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Sample records for acute health endpoints

  1. Clinical trial endpoints in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Billings, Frederic T; Shaw, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The development and use of consensus criteria for acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and the inclusion of recently identified markers of renal parenchymal damage as endpoints in clinical trials have improved the ability of physicians to compare the incidence and severity of AKI across patient populations, provided targets for testing new treatments, and may increase insight into the mechanisms of AKI. To date, these markers have not consistently translated into important clinical outcomes. Is that because these markers of renal injury/dysfunction are measurements of process of care (and not indicative of persistently impaired renal function), or is it because patients do actually recover from AKI? Physicians currently have limited ability to measure renal function reserve, and the ultimate consequence of a case of AKI on long-term morbidity remains unclear. There is little doubt that groups of patients who develop AKI have worse outcomes than groups of patients who do not, but investigators are now realizing the value of measuring clinically meaningful renal endpoints in all subjects enrolled in AKI clinical trials. Important examples of these outcomes include persistently impaired renal function, new hemodialysis, and death. We propose that these major adverse kidney events (MAKE) be included in all effectiveness clinical trials. Adaptation of the MAKE composite assessed 30, 60, or 90 days following AKI (i.e., MAKE30 or MAKE90) will improve our capacity to understand and treat AKI and may also provide a consensus composite to allow comparison of different interventions. Primary endpoints for phase I and II clinical trials, on the other hand, should continue to use continuous markers of renal injury/dysfunction as well as 'hard' clinical outcomes in order to generate meaningful data with limited subject exposure to untested treatments. By doing so, investigators may assess safety without requiring large sample sizes, demonstrate treatment effect of an unknown

  2. Probabilistic neural networks modeling of the 48-h LC50 acute toxicity endpoint to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, S P; Lewis, M A; Tigner, J

    2008-01-01

    Two modeling experiments based on the maximum likelihood estimation paradigm and targeting prediction of the Daphnia magna 48-h LC50 acute toxicity endpoint for both organic and inorganic compounds are reported. The resulting models computational algorithms are implemented as basic probabilistic neural networks with Gaussian kernel (statistical corrections included). The first experiment uses strictly D. magna information for 971 structures as training/learning data and the resulting model targets practical applications. The second experiment uses the same training/learning information plus additional data on another 29 compounds whose endpoint information is originating from D. pulex and Ceriodaphnia dubia. It only targets investigation of the effect of mixing strictly D. magna 48-h LC50 modeling information with small amounts of similar information estimated from related species, and this is done as part of the validation process. A complementary 81 compounds dataset (involving only strictly D. magna information) is used to perform external testing. On this external test set, the Gaussian character of the distribution of the residuals is confirmed for both models. This allows the use of traditional statistical methodology to implement computation of confidence intervals for the unknown measured values based on the models predictions. Examples are provided for the model targeting practical applications. For the same model, a comparison with other existing models targeting the same endpoint is performed.

  3. COMPARISON OF ILLNESS ENDPOINTS IN SWIMMERS' HEALTH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective epidemiological studies on swimmers¿ health that were conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) between 1973 and 1980 defined highly credible gastrointestinal illness (HCGI) as the occurrence of one or more of the following set of symptoms: (1) ...

  4. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP (QSAR) MODELS TO PREDICT CHEMICAL TOXICITY FOR VARIOUS HEALTH ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although ranking schemes based on exposure and toxicity have been developed to aid in the prioritization of research funds for identifying chemicals of regulatory concern, there are significant gaps in the availability of experimental toxicity data for most health endpoints. Pred...

  5. Developing Outcomes Assessments as Endpoints for Registrational Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Drugs: 2015 Update From the Biomarkers Consortium of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Talbot, George H; Powers, John H; Hoffmann, Steven C

    2016-03-01

    One important component in determining the benefits and harms of medical interventions is the use of well-defined and reliable outcome assessments as endpoints in clinical trials. Improving endpoints can better define patient benefits, allowing more accurate assessment of drug efficacy and more informed benefit-vs-risk decisions; another potential plus is facilitating efficient trial design. Since our first report in 2012, 2 Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Biomarkers Consortium Project Teams have continued to develop outcome assessments for potential uses as endpoints in registrational clinical trials of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. In addition, the teams have initiated similar work in the indications of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia. This report provides an update on progress to date in these 4 diseases.

  6. How Can Viral Dynamics Models Inform Endpoint Measures in Clinical Trials of Therapies for Acute Viral Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Cori, Anne; de Wolf, Frank; Anderson, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute viral infections pose many practical challenges for the accurate assessment of the impact of novel therapies on viral growth and decay. Using the example of influenza A, we illustrate how the measurement of infection-related quantities that determine the dynamics of viral load within the human host, can inform investigators on the course and severity of infection and the efficacy of a novel treatment. We estimated the values of key infection-related quantities that determine the course of natural infection from viral load data, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The data were placebo group viral load measurements collected during volunteer challenge studies, conducted by Roche, as part of the oseltamivir trials. We calculated the values of the quantities for each patient and the correlations between the quantities, symptom severity and body temperature. The greatest variation among individuals occurred in the viral load peak and area under the viral load curve. Total symptom severity correlated positively with the basic reproductive number. The most sensitive endpoint for therapeutic trials with the goal to cure patients is the duration of infection. We suggest laboratory experiments to obtain more precise estimates of virological quantities that can supplement clinical endpoint measurements. PMID:27367230

  7. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane), genotoxicity (oxidative DNA damage, DNA strand breakage, alterations in nuclear morphology), and cell cycle disturbances (subG1-nuclei, decrease of 4N population) in paraquat-treated cells. Overall, the genotoxicity results indicate that the production of ROS caused by exposure to paraquat induces oxidative DNA damage followed by DNA single- and double-strand breaks and cell cycle alterations, possibly leading to apoptosis

  8. Hazardous waste transportation risk assessment for the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement -- human health endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Lazaro, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    In this presentation, a quantitative methodology for assessing the risk associated with the transportation of hazardous waste (HW) is proposed. The focus is on identifying air concentrations of HW that correspond to specific human health endpoints.

  9. Summary of a workshop on regulatory acceptance of (Q)SARs for human health and environmental endpoints.

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Comber, M; Auer, C; Van Leeuwen, C J

    2003-01-01

    The "Workshop on Regulatory Use of (Q)SARs for Human Health and Environmental Endpoints," organized by the European Chemical Industry Council and the International Council of Chemical Associations, gathered more than 60 human health and environmental experts from industry, academia, and regulatory agencies from around the world. They agreed, especially industry and regulatory authorities, that the workshop initiated great potential for the further development and use of predictive models, that is, quantitative structure-activity relationships [(Q)SARs], for chemicals management in a much broader scope than is currently the case. To increase confidence in (Q)SAR predictions and minimization of their misuse, the workshop aimed to develop proposals for guidance and acceptability criteria. The workshop also described the broad outline of a system that would apply that guidance and acceptability criteria to a (Q)SAR when used for chemical management purposes, including priority setting, risk assessment, and classification and labeling. PMID:12896859

  10. OSIRIS, a quest for proof of principle for integrated testing strategies of chemicals for four human health endpoints.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Theo; Aldenberg, Tom; Buist, Harrie; Escher, Sylvia; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Pauné, Eduard; Rorije, Emiel; Kroese, Dinant

    2013-11-01

    Chemical substances policies in Europe are aiming towards chemical safety and at the same time a reduction in animal testing. These goals are alleged to be reachable by mining as many relevant data as possible, evaluate these data with regard to validity, reliability and relevance, and use of these data in so-called Integrated Testing Strategies (ITS). This paper offers an overview of four human health endpoints that were part of the EU-funded OSIRIS project, aiming to develop ITS fit for the EU chemicals legislation REACH. The endpoints considered cover their categorical as well as continuous characteristics: skin sensitisation, repeated dose toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Detailed papers are published elsewhere in this volume. The stepwise ITS approach developed takes advantage of existing information, groups information about similar substances and integrates exposure considerations. The different and possibly contradictory information is weighted and the respective uncertainties taken into account in a weight of evidence (WoE) approach. In case of data gaps, the ITS proposes the most appropriate method to acquire the missing information. Each building block for the ITS, i.e. each in vivo test, in vitro test, (Q)SAR model or human evidence, is evaluated with regard to quality.

  11. Erythritol Is More Effective Than Xylitol and Sorbitol in Managing Oral Health Endpoints.

    PubMed

    de Cock, Peter; Mäkinen, Kauko; Honkala, Eino; Saag, Mare; Kennepohl, Elke; Eapen, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To provide a comprehensive overview of published evidence on the impact of erythritol, a noncaloric polyol bulk sweetener, on oral health. Methods. A literature review was conducted regarding the potential effects of erythritol on dental plaque (biofilm), dental caries, and periodontal therapy. The efficacy of erythritol on oral health was compared with xylitol and sorbitol. Results. Erythritol effectively decreased weight of dental plaque and adherence of common streptococcal oral bacteria to tooth surfaces, inhibited growth and activity of associated bacteria like S. mutans, decreased expression of bacterial genes involved in sucrose metabolism, reduced the overall number of dental caries, and served as a suitable matrix for subgingival air-polishing to replace traditional root scaling. Conclusions. Important differences were reported in the effect of individual polyols on oral health. The current review provides evidence demonstrating better efficacy of erythritol compared to sorbitol and xylitol to maintain and improve oral health. PMID:27635141

  12. Erythritol Is More Effective Than Xylitol and Sorbitol in Managing Oral Health Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, Kauko; Honkala, Eino; Saag, Mare; Kennepohl, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To provide a comprehensive overview of published evidence on the impact of erythritol, a noncaloric polyol bulk sweetener, on oral health. Methods. A literature review was conducted regarding the potential effects of erythritol on dental plaque (biofilm), dental caries, and periodontal therapy. The efficacy of erythritol on oral health was compared with xylitol and sorbitol. Results. Erythritol effectively decreased weight of dental plaque and adherence of common streptococcal oral bacteria to tooth surfaces, inhibited growth and activity of associated bacteria like S. mutans, decreased expression of bacterial genes involved in sucrose metabolism, reduced the overall number of dental caries, and served as a suitable matrix for subgingival air-polishing to replace traditional root scaling. Conclusions. Important differences were reported in the effect of individual polyols on oral health. The current review provides evidence demonstrating better efficacy of erythritol compared to sorbitol and xylitol to maintain and improve oral health. PMID:27635141

  13. Erythritol Is More Effective Than Xylitol and Sorbitol in Managing Oral Health Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, Kauko; Honkala, Eino; Saag, Mare; Kennepohl, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To provide a comprehensive overview of published evidence on the impact of erythritol, a noncaloric polyol bulk sweetener, on oral health. Methods. A literature review was conducted regarding the potential effects of erythritol on dental plaque (biofilm), dental caries, and periodontal therapy. The efficacy of erythritol on oral health was compared with xylitol and sorbitol. Results. Erythritol effectively decreased weight of dental plaque and adherence of common streptococcal oral bacteria to tooth surfaces, inhibited growth and activity of associated bacteria like S. mutans, decreased expression of bacterial genes involved in sucrose metabolism, reduced the overall number of dental caries, and served as a suitable matrix for subgingival air-polishing to replace traditional root scaling. Conclusions. Important differences were reported in the effect of individual polyols on oral health. The current review provides evidence demonstrating better efficacy of erythritol compared to sorbitol and xylitol to maintain and improve oral health.

  14. A global initiative to refine acute inhalation studies through the use of 'evident toxicity' as an endpoint: Towards adoption of the fixed concentration procedure.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Fiona; Ragan, Ian; Marczylo, Tim; Anderson, Brian; Braun, Anne; Casey, Warren; Dennison, Ngaire; Griffiths, David; Guest, Robert; Holmes, Tom; van Huygevoort, Ton; Indans, Ian; Kenny, Terry; Kojima, Hajime; Lee, Kyuhong; Prieto, Pilar; Smith, Paul; Smedley, Jason; Stokes, William S; Wnorowski, Gary; Horgan, Graham

    2015-12-01

    Acute inhalation studies are conducted in animals as part of chemical hazard identification and characterisation, including for classification and labelling purposes. Current accepted methods use death as an endpoint (OECD TG403 and TG436), whereas the fixed concentration procedure (FCP) (draft OECD TG433) uses fewer animals and replaces lethality as an endpoint with 'evident toxicity.' Evident toxicity is defined as clear signs of toxicity that predict exposure to the next highest concentration will cause severe toxicity or death in most animals. A global initiative including 20 organisations, led by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) has shared data on the clinical signs recorded during acute inhalation studies for 172 substances (primarily dusts or mists) with the aim of making evident toxicity more objective and transferable between laboratories. Pairs of studies (5 male or 5 female rats) with at least a two-fold change in concentration were analysed to determine if there are any signs at the lower dose that could have predicted severe toxicity or death at the higher concentration. The results show that signs such as body weight loss (>10% pre-dosing weight), irregular respiration, tremors and hypoactivity, seen at least once in at least one animal after the day of dosing are highly predictive (positive predictive value > 90%) of severe toxicity or death at the next highest concentration. The working group has used these data to propose changes to TG433 that incorporate a clear indication of the clinical signs that define evident toxicity.

  15. Neurofunctional endpoints assessed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells for estimation of acute systemic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Helena; Runesson, Johan; Lundqvist, Jessica; Lindegren, Helene; Axelsson, Viktoria; Forsby, Anna

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the EU-funded integrated project ACuteTox is to develop a strategy in which general cytotoxicity, together with organ-specific toxicity and biokinetic features, are used for the estimation of human acute systemic toxicity. Our role in the project is to characterise the effect of reference chemicals with regard to neurotoxicity. We studied cell membrane potential (CMP), noradrenalin (NA) uptake, acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, acetylcholine receptor (AChR) signalling and voltage-operated calcium channel (VOCC) function in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after exposure to 23 pharmaceuticals, pesticides or industrial chemicals. Neurotoxic alert chemicals were identified by comparing the obtained data with cytotoxicity data from the neutral red uptake assay in 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Furthermore, neurotoxic concentrations were correlated with estimated human lethal blood concentrations (LC50). The CMP assay was the most sensitive assay, identifying eight chemicals as neurotoxic alerts and improving the LC50 correlation for nicotine, lindane, atropine and methadone. The NA uptake assay identified five neurotoxic alert chemicals and improved the LC50 correlation for atropine, diazepam, verapamil and methadone. The AChE, AChR and VOCC assays showed limited potential for detection of acute toxicity. The CMP assay was further evaluated by testing 36 additional reference chemicals. Five neurotoxic alert chemicals were generated and orphendrine and amitriptyline showed improved LC50 correlation. Due to the high sensitivity and the simplicity of the test protocol, the CMP assay constitutes a good candidate assay to be included in an in vitro test strategy for prediction of acute systemic toxicity.

  16. Comparison of Acute Health Effects From Exposures to Diesel and Biodiesel Fuel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Mehus, Aaron A.; Reed, Rustin J.; Lee, Vivien S. T.; Littau, Sally R.; Hu, Chengcheng; Lutz, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the comparative acute health effects associated with exposures to diesel and 75% biodiesel/25% diesel (B75) blend fuel emissions. Methods: We analyzed multiple health endpoints in 48 healthy adults before and after exposures to diesel and B75 emissions in an underground mine setting—lung function, lung and systemic inflammation, novel biomarkers of exposure, and oxidative stress were assessed. Results: B75 reduced respirable diesel particulate matter by 20%. Lung function declined significantly more after exposure to diesel emissions. Lung inflammatory cells along with sputum and plasma inflammatory mediators increased significantly to similar levels with both exposures. Urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative stress, was not significantly changed after either exposure. Conclusions: Use of B75 lowered respirable diesel particulate matter exposure and some associated acute health effects, although lung and systemic inflammation were not reduced compared with diesel use. PMID:26147538

  17. Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Measurement endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbrother, A.; Berg, M. van den

    1995-12-31

    Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to ail organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazard to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which are the appropriate measurement endpoints. Should only mortality, growth, or reproductive endpoints be used? Since toxicity threshold values may be used to make management decisions, should values related to each measurement endpoint be presented to allow the risk assessor to choose the measurement endpoint most relevant to the assessment questions being asked, or is a standard approach that uses the lowest value that causes a toxicologic response in any system of the animal a more appropriate, conservative estimate?

  18. Assessment of the Acute and Chronic Health Hazards of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids.

    PubMed

    Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Suchomel, Ashley E; Sweet, Jessica T; Vold, Elizabeth M; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2015-01-01

    There is growing concern about how hydraulic fracturing affects public health because this activity involves handling large volumes of fluids that contain toxic and carcinogenic constituents, which are injected under high pressure through wells into the subsurface to release oil and gas from tight shale formations. The constituents of hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFFs) present occupational health risks because workers may be directly exposed to them, and general public health risks because of potential air and water contamination. Hazard identification, which focuses on the types of toxicity that substances may cause, is an important step in the complex health risk assessment of hydraulic fracturing. This article presents a practical and adaptable tool for the hazard identification of HFF constituents, and its use in the analysis of HFF constituents reported to be used in 2,850 wells in North Dakota between December 2009 and November 2013. Of the 569 reported constituents, 347 could be identified by a Chemical Abstract Service Registration Number (CASRN) and matching constituent name. The remainder could not be identified either because of trade secret labeling (210) or because of an invalid CASRN (12). Eleven public databases were searched for health hazard information on thirteen health hazard endpoints for 168 identifiable constituents that had at least 25 reports of use. Health hazard counts were generated for chronic and acute endpoints, including those associated with oral, inhalation, ocular, and dermal exposure. Eleven of the constituents listed in the top 30 by total health hazard count were also listed in the top 30 by reports of use. This includes naphthalene, which along with benzyl chloride, has the highest health hazard count. The top 25 constituents reportedly used in North Dakota largely overlap with those reported for Texas and Pennsylvania, despite different geologic formations, target resources (oil vs. gas), and disclosure requirements

  19. Assessment of the Acute and Chronic Health Hazards of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids.

    PubMed

    Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Suchomel, Ashley E; Sweet, Jessica T; Vold, Elizabeth M; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2015-01-01

    There is growing concern about how hydraulic fracturing affects public health because this activity involves handling large volumes of fluids that contain toxic and carcinogenic constituents, which are injected under high pressure through wells into the subsurface to release oil and gas from tight shale formations. The constituents of hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFFs) present occupational health risks because workers may be directly exposed to them, and general public health risks because of potential air and water contamination. Hazard identification, which focuses on the types of toxicity that substances may cause, is an important step in the complex health risk assessment of hydraulic fracturing. This article presents a practical and adaptable tool for the hazard identification of HFF constituents, and its use in the analysis of HFF constituents reported to be used in 2,850 wells in North Dakota between December 2009 and November 2013. Of the 569 reported constituents, 347 could be identified by a Chemical Abstract Service Registration Number (CASRN) and matching constituent name. The remainder could not be identified either because of trade secret labeling (210) or because of an invalid CASRN (12). Eleven public databases were searched for health hazard information on thirteen health hazard endpoints for 168 identifiable constituents that had at least 25 reports of use. Health hazard counts were generated for chronic and acute endpoints, including those associated with oral, inhalation, ocular, and dermal exposure. Eleven of the constituents listed in the top 30 by total health hazard count were also listed in the top 30 by reports of use. This includes naphthalene, which along with benzyl chloride, has the highest health hazard count. The top 25 constituents reportedly used in North Dakota largely overlap with those reported for Texas and Pennsylvania, despite different geologic formations, target resources (oil vs. gas), and disclosure requirements

  20. EndPoints 2000

    2009-08-13

    The application leads the user through a logical framework to determine the minimum effort and cost necessary to reach the desired end state for each space, system, and facility. Endpoints are used to plan the project work, track and manage the determination, management, verification, and closure of D&D endpoints, consistent with DOE End Point guidance documents.

  1. A structured approach to Exposure Based Waiving of human health endpoints under REACH developed in the OSIRIS project.

    PubMed

    Marquart, Hans; Meijster, Tim; Van de Bovenkamp, Marja; Ter Burg, Wouter; Spaan, Suzanne; Van Engelen, Jacqueline

    2012-03-01

    Exposure Based Waiving (EBW) is one of the options in REACH when there is insufficient hazard data on a specific endpoint. Rules for adaptation of test requirements are specified and a general option for EBW is given via Appendix XI of REACH, allowing waiving of repeated dose toxicity studies, reproductive toxicity studies and carcinogenicity studies under a number of conditions if exposure is very low. A decision tree is described that was developed in the European project OSIRIS (Optimised Strategies for Risk Assessment of Industrial Chemicals through Integration of Non-Test and Test Information) to help decide in what cases EBW can be justified. The decision tree uses specific criteria as well as more general questions. For the latter, guidance on interpretation and resulting conclusions is provided. Criteria and guidance are partly based on an expert elicitation process. Among the specific criteria a number of proposed Thresholds of Toxicological Concern are used. The decision tree, expanded with specific parts on absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion that are not described in this paper, is implemented in the OSIRIS webtool on integrated testing strategies.

  2. [Immunological surrogate endpoints to evaluate vaccine efficacy].

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengfei; Li, Jingxin; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Fengcai

    2015-12-01

    An immunological surrogate endpoints is a vaccine-induced immune response (either humoral or cellular immune) that predicts protection against clinical endpoints (infection or disease), and can be used to evaluate vaccine efficacy in clinical vaccine trials. Compared with field efficacy trials observing clinical endpoints, immunological vaccine trials could reduce the sample size or shorten the duration of a trial, which promote the license and development of new candidate vaccines. For these reasons, establishing immunological surrogate endpoints is one of 14 Grand Challenges of Global Health of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. From two parts of definition and statistical methods for evaluation of surrogate endpoints, this review provides a more comprehensive description. PMID:26887309

  3. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  4. Examination of Inter-relationships among Atmospheric Transport Patterns, Ozone Concentrations, and Human Health Endpoints in New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Valerie Cover

    In its mission to protect human health and the environment, the United States (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) implemented the NOx Budget Trading Program (NBP) to reduce the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the Eastern U.S., with the intent of reducing ambient concentrations of both NOx and the secondarily-formed ozone chemicals. These pollutants and their precursors can be transported downwind, contributing to pollutant levels at locations much farther from the emission sources, potentially impacting human health in downwind areas. This study investigates the health risks in New York State (NYS) from exposure to polluted air parcels transported from the Midwest. Back-trajectories are performed from several sites within NYS for ten summers (June, July and August from 1997 to 2006) to identify days that the air parcel passed through the Ohio River Valley (ORV) region within 48 hours back in time. The ORV zone is defined as a boundary encompassing relatively high-emitting power plants in the Midwest and is used as an indicator variable to represent the transport of ozone from this area into NYS in an epidemiology analysis. The ORV zone variable and the daily maximum 8-hr average ozone concentrations are then used as the main health effects in a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) to investigate potential associations between these two variables and respiratory-related hospital admissions. The results of the analysis indicate that the risk of being admitted to the hospital for a respiratory-related illness on days that air parcels are transported from the Midwest is elevated in NYS sub-regions 2, 3 and 6. In addition, the risk of respiratory-related hospital admission from exposure to ozone is elevated in Regions 2 and 4. Two time periods before the implementation of the NBP and after the implementation of the NBP (summers of 1997 -- 2000 and 2004 -- 2006, respectively) were also examined, but an analysis of the number of summers needed to conduct the

  5. In vitro sensitivity of granulo-monocytic progenitors as a new toxicological cell system and endpoint in the ACuteTox Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrato, Laura; Valeri, Antonio; Bueren, Juan A.; Albella, Beatriz

    2009-07-15

    The ACuteTox Project (part of the EU 6th Framework Programme) was started up in January 2005. The aim of this project is to develop a simple and robust in vitro strategy for prediction of human acute systemic toxicity, which could replace animal tests used for regulatory purposes. Our group is responsible for the characterization of the effect of the reference chemicals on the hematopoietic tissue. CFU-GM assay based on the culture of human mononuclear cord blood cells has been used to characterize the effects of the selected compounds on the myeloid progenitors. Previous results have shown the relevance of the CFU-GM assay for the prediction of human acute neutropenia after treatment of antitumoral compounds, and this assay has been recently approved by the ECVAM's Scientific Advisory Committee. Among the compounds included in the study there were pharmaceuticals, environmental pollutants and industrial chemicals. Eleven out of 55 chemicals did not show any cytotoxic effect at the maximum concentration tested. The correlation coefficients of CFU-GM IC50, IC70 and IC90 values with human LC50 values (50% lethal concentration calculated from time-related sublethal and lethal human blood concentrations) were 0.4965, 0.5106 and 0.5142 respectively. Although this correlation is not improve respect to classical in vitro basal cytotoxicity tests such as 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake, chemicals which deviate substantially in the correlation with these assays (colchicine, digoxin, 5-Fluorouracil and thallium sulfate) fitted very well in the linear regression analysis of the CFU-GM progenitors. The results shown in the present study indicate that the sensitivity of CFU-GM progenitors correlates better than the sensitivity of HL-60 cells with human LC50 values and could help to refine the predictability for human acute systemic toxicity when a given chemical may affect to the hematopoietic myeloid system.

  6. The language of compassion in acute mental health care.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Paul; Gilbert, Paul; Gilbert, Jean; Gale, Corinne; Harvey, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    In this article we examine the language of compassion in acute mental health care in the United Kingdom. Compassion is commonly defined as being sensitive to the suffering of others and showing a commitment to relieve it, yet we know little about how this is demonstrated in health professional language and how it is situated in the context of acute mental health care services. We report on a corpus-assisted discourse analysis of 20 acute mental health practitioner interview narratives about compassion and find a striking depletion in the use of "compassionate mentality" words, despite the topic focus. The language used by these practitioners placed more emphasis on time pressures, care processes, and organizational tensions in a way that might compromise best practice and point to the emergence of a "production-line mentality."

  7. Older adults experiences of rehabilitation in acute health care.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Anita; Tattersall, Kirsty; Murphy, Susana; Davenport, Neil; Craik, Christine; Caldwell, Kay; McIntyre, Anne

    2007-09-01

    Rehabilitation is a key component of nursing and allied healthcare professionals' roles in most health and social care settings. This paper reports on stage 2 of an action research project to ascertain older adult's experience of rehabilitation. Twenty postdischarge interviews were conducted and the interview transcripts were analysed using thematic content analysis. All older adults discharged from an acute older acute rehabilitation ward to their own homes in the community were eligible to participate. The only exclusion criterion was older adults who were thought to be unable to give consent to participate by the nurse in charge and the researcher. Whilst 92 older adults were eligible to participate in this research study, only 20 were interviewed. The findings from this study suggest that older adults valued communication with health professionals but were aware of their time constraints that hindered communication. This study suggests that both nurses and allied health professionals are not actively providing rehabilitative services to promote health and well-being, which contradicts the focus of active ageing. Furthermore, there was evidence of unmet needs on discharge, and older adults unable to recall the professions that were involved in their interventions and the rationale for therapy input. It is suggested that further research is needed to explore the effectiveness of allied health rehabilitation in the acute setting. This study highlights the need for further research into older adults' perceptions of the rehabilitation process in the acute setting.

  8. Acute Health Delivery, Energy Impact, and Rural Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Lonna; And Others

    To examine what changes occurred in the acute health care delivery systems of rural Texas energy impact communities from 1978 to 1983, a retrospective survey was used to acquire data from which a database could be generated that could provide information for community and state policy decisions. From a pool of communities chosen by a panel of…

  9. Formaldehyde exposure and acute health effects study

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.; Michaud, J.P.; Bronnimann, D. )

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effects of formaldehyde exposures on health, exposure groups were defined using baseline exposure and health questionnaires. Formaldehyde concentrations were poorly correlated with these exposure classifications, perhaps due to the time delay between classification and monitoring. The 151 households reported here had a mean HCHO concentration of 35 (S.E. 1.5 and median 30) {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Passive samplers prepared in our lab were calibrated in a chamber to derive an estimated sampling rate of 0.311 {mu}g/(mg {center dot} m{sup {minus}3} {center dot} hr). They were also compared to commercially available samplers inside of the homes, with a correlation coefficient of 0.896 and mean difference of 2.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. In this report of initial findings from an ongoing study, daily symptoms and peak expiratory flow measurements were compared with an HCHO exposure classification based on the median measured concentrations. None of the symptoms groups were related to HCHO exposure when controlling for age and sex. There was a significant relationship between HCHO exposure and variability in peak expiratory flows that was dependent on age group. It may be especially important to assess the variability in reactive individuals and children to determine the short-term effects of HCHO exposures and possible long-term consequences.

  10. Acute Health Impact of Air Pollution in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, T.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, M.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution not only has long term health impact, but can affect health through acute exposure. This paper, using air pollution index (API) as overall evaluation of air quality, blood pressure and vital capacity as health outcomes, focuses on the acute health impact of air pollution in China. Current result suggests that after controlling smoking history, occupational exposure, income and education, API is positively associated with blood pressure and negatively associated with vital capacity. The associations became stronger for people with hypertension or pulmonary functional diseases, which indicates that these people are more sensitive to air pollution. Among three pollutants which API measures, that is inhalable particles (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), PM10 is most statistically associated with blood pressure increase and vital capacity decrease. Further study will focusing on the following two questions. The first question is how various time lags affect the associations among API, blood pressure and vital capacity. The second question is how differently people in various cohorts reacts to acute exposure to air pollution. The differences in reactions of blood pressure and vital capacity between people in urban and rural areas, genders, various age cohorts, distinct income and education groups will be further studied.

  11. Worrying About Terrorism and Other Acute Environmental Health Hazard Events

    PubMed Central

    Babcock-Dunning, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To better understand why some people worry more about terrorism compared with others, we measured how much US residents worried about a terrorist event in their area and examined the association of their fears with their concerns about acute and chronic hazards and other correlates. Methods. In 2008 (n = 600) and 2010 (n = 651), we performed a random-digit dialing national landline telephone survey. We asked about worries about terrorism and 5 other environmental health hazard issues. We also collected demographic and socioeconomic data. Results. Only 15% worried “a great deal” about a terrorist event in their area and 18% to 33% were greatly concerned about other environmental issues. Fear about acute hazard events was a stronger predictor of a great deal of concern about terrorism than were age, race/ethnicity, gender, educational achievement, and other correlates. Conclusions. Those who worried most about acute environmental health hazard events were most likely to worry about terrorism. Also, those who were older, poorer, Blacks, or Latinos, or who lived in populous urban areas felt they were most vulnerable to terrorist attacks. We recommend methods to involve US citizens as part of disaster planning. PMID:22397346

  12. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis'', December 1987.

  13. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-09-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their ``Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis``, December 1987.

  14. Improved Endpoints for Cancer Immunotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; Janetzki, Sylvia; Hodi, F. Stephen; Ibrahim, Ramy; Anderson, Aparna; Humphrey, Rachel; Blumenstein, Brent; Wolchok, Jedd

    2010-01-01

    Unlike chemotherapy, which acts directly on the tumor, cancer immunotherapies exert their effects on the immune system and demonstrate new kinetics that involve building a cellular immune response, followed by changes in tumor burden or patient survival. Thus, adequate design and evaluation of some immunotherapy clinical trials require a new development paradigm that includes reconsideration of established endpoints. Between 2004 and 2009, several initiatives facilitated by the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute and partner organizations systematically evaluated an immunotherapy-focused clinical development paradigm and created the principles for redefining trial endpoints. On this basis, a body of clinical and laboratory data was generated that supports three novel endpoint recommendations. First, cellular immune response assays generate highly variable results. Assay harmonization in multicenter trials may minimize variability and help to establish cellular immune response as a reproducible biomarker, thus allowing investigation of its relationship with clinical outcomes. Second, immunotherapy may induce novel patterns of antitumor response not captured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors or World Health Organization criteria. New immune-related response criteria were defined to more comprehensively capture all response patterns. Third, delayed separation of Kaplan–Meier curves in randomized immunotherapy trials can affect results. Altered statistical models describing hazard ratios as a function of time and recognizing differences before and after separation of curves may allow improved planning of phase III trials. These recommendations may improve our tools for cancer immunotherapy trials and may offer a more realistic and useful model for clinical investigation. PMID:20826737

  15. Surrogate Endpoints in Suicide Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortzel, Hal S.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Breshears, Ryan E.; Harwood, Jeri E.

    2010-01-01

    Surrogate endpoints frequently substitute for rare outcomes in research. The ability to learn about completed suicides by investigating more readily available and proximate outcomes, such as suicide attempts, has obvious appeal. However, concerns with surrogates from the statistical science perspective exist, and mounting evidence from…

  16. Spatial and temporal dynamics of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) health indicators: linking individual-based indicators to a management-relevant endpoint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Tyler; Jones, Michael L.; Ebener, Mark P.; Arts, Michael T.; Brenden, Travis O.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Wright, Gregory M.; Faisal, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    We examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of health indicators in four lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) stocks located in northern lakes Michigan and Huron from 2003 to 2006. The specific objectives were to (1) quantify spatial and temporal variability in health indicators; (2) examine relationships among nutritional indicators and stock-specific spatial and temporal dynamics of pathogen prevalence and intensity of infection; and (3) examine relationships between indicators measured on individual fish and stock-specific estimates of natural mortality. The percent of the total variation attributed to spatial and temporal sources varied greatly depending on the health indicator examined. The most notable pattern was a downward trend in the concentration of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), observed in all stocks, in the polar lipid fraction of lake whitefish dorsal muscle tissue over the three study years. Variation among stocks and years for some indicators were correlated with the prevalence and intensity of the swimbladder nematode Cystidicola farionis, suggesting that our measures of fish health were related, at some level, with disease dynamics. We did not find relationships between spatial patterns in fish health indicators and estimates of natural mortality rates for the stocks. Our research highlights the complexity of the interactions between fish nutritional status, disease dynamics, and natural mortality in wild fish populations. Additional research that identifies thresholds of health indicators, below (or above) which survival may be reduced, will greatly help in understanding the relationship between indicators measured on individual fish and potential population-level effects.

  17. Profile of acute poisoning in three health districts of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Kasule, Mary

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background This study sought to characterise acute poisoning cases seen in three health districts of Botswana. Method A retrospective review of patients’ records was conducted and included patients treated from January 2004 to December 2005. Data on the demographic status of the patients, information about the poisonous agent(s) involved, and the circumstances and outcomes of the poisoning incidents were recorded on a pre-tested data collection form. Results A total of 590 cases of acute poisoning were included in the analysis. The most affected age category was that of children aged less than six years, who constituted 33.4% of the cases. Most incidents were recorded in the urban district of Gaborone. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of the incidents were accidental, with the remainder being intentional. The poisonous agents involved were pharmaceuticals (26.6%), natural toxins (25.6%), household products (14.6%), foods (14.4%), alcohol (6.9%), traditional medicines (4.7%), unspecified agents (3.2%), and agrochemicals (2.7%). The most common route of poison exposure was by oral (82.2%), followed by dermal contact (16.5%), while the inhalation of gases occurred in 1.2% of cases. An incidence rate of 4.7/1000, a case fatality rate of 3.8/100, and 1.5% of deaths were recorded over the two-year period. Conclusion In conclusion, it can be stated that acute poisoning involved mainly young children and resulted in an incidence rate of 4.7/1000, a case fatality rate of 3.8/100, and 1.5% of deaths over the two-year period. There were differences based on age category, gender and residence of the victims, the types of toxic agents involved, as well as the circumstances and the outcomes of the poisoning incidents. Given the fact that pharmaceuticals, natural toxins, household products and foods were the agents most commonly involved, targeted interventions should take these differences into account in addressing the problem of acute poisoning.

  18. Establishing a group of endpoints to support collective operations without specifying unique identifiers for any endpoints

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksom, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.; Xue, Hanghon

    2016-02-02

    A parallel computer executes a number of tasks, each task includes a number of endpoints and the endpoints are configured to support collective operations. In such a parallel computer, establishing a group of endpoints receiving a user specification of a set of endpoints included in a global collection of endpoints, where the user specification defines the set in accordance with a predefined virtual representation of the endpoints, the predefined virtual representation is a data structure setting forth an organization of tasks and endpoints included in the global collection of endpoints and the user specification defines the set of endpoints without a user specification of a particular endpoint; and defining a group of endpoints in dependence upon the predefined virtual representation of the endpoints and the user specification.

  19. New drugs and patient-centred end-points in old age: setting the wheels in motion.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Arduino A; Pilotto, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Older patients with various degrees of frailty and disability, a key population target of pharmacological interventions in acute and chronic disease states, are virtually neglected in pre-marketing studies assessing the efficacy and safety of investigational drugs. Moreover, aggressively pursuing established therapeutic targets in old age, e.g. blood pressure, serum glucose or cholesterol concentrations, is not necessarily associated with the beneficial effects, and the acceptable safety, reported in younger patient cohorts. Measures of self-reported health and functional status might represent additional, more meaningful, therapeutic end-points in the older population, particularly in patients with significant frailty and relatively short life expectancy, e.g. in the presence of cancer and/or neurodegenerative disease conditions. Strategies enhancing early knowledge about key pharmacological characteristics of investigational drugs targeting older adults are discussed, together with the rationale for incorporating non-traditional, patient-centred, end-points in this ever-increasing group. PMID:26455964

  20. Acute health effects of accidental chlorine gas exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to report the course of an accidental release of chlorine gas that occurred in a factory in Gumi-si, South Korea, on March 5, 2013. We describe the analysis results of 2 patients hospitalized because of chlorine-induced acute health problems, as well as the clinical features of 209 non-hospitalized patients. Methods We analyzed the medical records of the 2 hospitalized patients admitted to the hospital, as well as the medical records and self-report questionnaires of 209 non-hospitalized patients completed during outpatient treatment. Results Immediately after the exposure, the 2 hospitalized patients developed acute asthma-like symptoms such as cough and dyspnea, and showed restrictive and combined pattern ventilatory defects on the pulmonary function test. The case 1 showed asthma-like symptoms over six months and diurnal variability in peak expiratory flow rate was 56.7%. In case 2, his FEV1 after treatment (93%) increased by 25% compared to initial FEV1 (68%). Both cases were diagnosed as chlorine-induced reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) on the basis of these clinical features. The most frequent chief complaints of the 209 non-hospitalized patients were headache (22.7%), followed by eye irritation (18.2%), nausea (11.2%), and sore throat (10.8%), with asymptomatic patients accounting for 36.5%. The multiple-response analysis of individual symptom revealed headache (42.4%) to be the most frequent symptom, followed by eye irritation (30.5%), sore throat (30.0%), cough (29.6%), nausea (27.6%), and dizziness (27.3%). Conclusions The 2 patients hospitalized after exposure to chlorine gas at the leakage site showed a clinical course corresponding to RADS. All of the 209 non-hospitalized patients only complained of symptoms of the upper airways and mucous membrane irritation. PMID:25852940

  1. Health utility indexes in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Baris; Rodondi, Nicolas; Auer, Reto; Nanchen, David; Räber, Lorenz; Klingenberg, Roland; Pletscher, Mark; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Perneger, Thomas V; Girardin, François R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have been associated with lower health utilities (HUs) compared with the general population. Given the prognostic improvements after ACS with the implementation of coronary angiography (eg, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), contemporary HU values derived from patient-reported outcomes are needed. Methods We analysed data of 1882 patients with ACS 1 year after coronary angiography in a Swiss prospective cohort. We used the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and visual analogue scale (VAS) to derive HU indexes. We estimated the effects of clinical factors on HU using a linear regression model and compared the observed HU with the average values of individuals of the same sex and age in the general population. Results Mean EQ-5D HU 1-year after coronary angiography for ACS was 0.82 (±0.16) and mean VAS was 0.77 (±0.18); 40.9% of participants exhibited the highest utility values. Compared with population controls, the mean EQ-5D HU was similar (expected mean 0.82, p=0.58) in patients with ACS, but the mean VAS was slightly lower (expected mean 0.79, p<0.001). Patients with ACS who are younger than 60 years had lower HU than the general population (<0.001). In patients with ACS, significant differences were found according to the gender, education and employment status, diabetes, obesity, heart failure, recurrent ischaemic or incident bleeding event and participation in cardiac rehabilitation (p<0.01). Conclusions At 1 year, patients with ACS with coronary angiography had HU indexes similar to a control population. Subgroup analyses based on patients' characteristics and further disease-specific instruments could provide better sensitivity for detecting smaller variations in health-related quality of life. PMID:27252878

  2. Self-reported acute health symptoms and exposure to companion animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: In order to understand the etiological burden of disease associated with acute health symptoms (e.g. gastrointestinal [GI], respiratory, dermatological), it is important to understand how common exposures influence these symptoms. Exposures to familiar and unfamiliar ...

  3. Behavioral endpoints for radiation injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Hunt, W. A.; Dalton, T. B.; Kandasamy, S. B.; Harris, A. H.; Ludewig, B.

    1994-10-01

    The relative behavioral effectiveness of heavy particles was evaluated. Using the taste aversion paradigm in rats, the behavioral toxicity of most types of radiation (including 20Ne and 40Ar) was similar to that of 60Co photons. Only 56Fe and 93Nb particles and fission neutrons were significantly more effective. Using emesis in ferrets as the behavioral endpoint, 56Fe particles and neutrons were again the most effective; however, 60Co photons were significantly more effective than 18 MeV electrons. These results suggest that LET does not completely predict behavioral effectiveness. Additionally, exposing rats to 10 cGy of 56Fe particles attenuated amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning. This behavior is one of a broad class of behaviors which depends on the integrity of the dopaminergic system and suggests the possibility of alterations in these behaviors following exposure to heavy particles in a space radiation environment.

  4. Defining response in migraine: which endpoints are important?

    PubMed

    Edmeads, John

    2005-01-01

    The primary endpoint traditionally measured in clinical trials of triptans for acute migraine therapy has been 2-hour pain relief, a decrease in pain intensity from moderate/severe to mild/none. Although harder to achieve, endpoints such as 2-hour pain free and the composite measure sustained pain free are now preferred as they better reflect what patients desire from medication, namely rapid onset of action, and complete and lasting relief of pain. A comprehensive meta-analysis has shown that oral triptans differ in their ability to achieve these endpoints, with almotriptan 12.5 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and rizatriptan 10 mg providing the highest likelihood of success. Although all triptans have simple and consistent pharmacokinetic features, they also have specific differences that may play a part in their differing clinical attributes. Incorporating tolerability to generate a more stringent endpoint, sustained pain free with no adverse events (SNAE), may provide an even better representation of patients' expectations. Comparison of SNAE rates using data from the meta-analysis of oral triptans indicates that almotriptan 12.5 mg has the best balance of high efficacy and good tolerability. PMID:15920334

  5. Endpoint matrix: a conceptual tool to promote consideration of the multiple dimensions of humane endpoints.

    PubMed

    Ashall, Vanessa; Millar, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework to support appropriate application of endpoints in animal experiments. It is recommended that unpredicted endpoints should be explicitly considered alongside scientific endpoints and justifiable endpoints as the three types of endpoint which comprise the "humane." We suggest there is a need for clear identification of each type of endpoint and an understanding of the interactions between these types. The use of an "endpoint matrix" during study planning is proposed to promote methodically sound and consistent definition, determination, and detection of unpredicted, scientific, and justifiable endpoints in animal experiments. It is claimed that the further development and use of this tool will support a more effective and harmonized practical application of humane endpoints for all animal use in line with best practice recommendations.

  6. Exact relativistic {beta} decay endpoint spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, S. S.; Nasri, S.; Schechter, J.; Tortola, M. A.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2007-10-15

    The exact relativistic form for the {beta} decay endpoint spectrum is derived and presented in a simple factorized form. We show that our exact formula can be well approximated to yield the endpoint form used in the fit method of the KATRIN Collaboration. We also discuss the three-neutrino case and how information from neutrino oscillation experiments may be useful in analyzing future {beta} decay endpoint experiments.

  7. Self-reported acute health symptoms and exposure to companion animals#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Self-reported acute health symptoms and exposure to companion animalsWhitney S. Krueger1,2, Elizabeth D. Hilborn2, Timothy J. Wade21Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA2Environmental Public Health Division, Office of Research and Development, U...

  8. Cognitive influences on health symptoms from acute chemical exposure.

    PubMed

    Dalton, P

    1999-11-01

    Symptom reports, perceived adverse health effects, and public health concerns are increasingly precipitated by the perception of chemical odors. This study examined the interaction between health cognitions, odor perception, and symptom reports. A group of 180 healthy men and women were exposed to 1 of 3 ambient odors, normatively rated as healthful (methyl salicylate, or wintergreen), harmful (butanol or alcohol), and ambiguous (isobomyl acetate, or balsam), after receiving 1 of 3 odorant characterizations (harmful, healthful, and neutral). Individuals given a harmful bias reported significantly more health symptoms following exposure and more intense odor and irritation during exposure than did those given a neutral or healthful bias. The overall pattern of results suggests that many of the health-related effects of exposure to odorants are mediated not by a direct agency of odors but by cognitive variables, such as mental models of the relationship between environmental odors and health.

  9. Endpoints for Mouse Abdominal Tumor Models: Refinement of Current Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eden V; Villines, Kimberly A; Hickman, Debra L

    2009-01-01

    Accurate, rapid, and noninvasive health assessments are required to establish more appropriate endpoints in mouse cancer models where tumor size is not easily measured. We evaluated potential endpoints in mice with experimentally induced peritoneal lymphoma, an abdominal tumor model, by comparing body weight, body condition, and behavior with those of a control group of mice not developing lymphoma. Our hypothesis was that body weight would increase or plateau, whereas body condition and behavioral scores would decrease, as disease progressed. Results indicated that body weight did not differ significantly between the control and experimental groups, but the experimental group experienced significant decreases in both body condition and behavioral scores. Our results support the use of body condition and behavioral scoring as adjunctive assessment methods for mice involved in abdominal lymphoma tumor studies in which health may decline despite an increase or plateau in body weight. PMID:19619413

  10. Public health response systems in-action: learning from local health departments' experiences with acute and emergency incidents.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jennifer C; Yang, Jane E; Crawley, Adam W; Biesiadecki, Laura; Aragón, Tomás J

    2013-01-01

    As part of their core mission, public health agencies attend to a wide range of disease and health threats, including those that require routine, acute, and emergency responses. While each incident is unique, the number and type of response activities are finite; therefore, through comparative analysis, we can learn about commonalities in the response patterns that could improve predictions and expectations regarding the resources and capabilities required to respond to future acute events. In this study, we interviewed representatives from more than 120 local health departments regarding their recent experiences with real-world acute public health incidents, such as infectious disease outbreaks, severe weather events, chemical spills, and bioterrorism threats. We collected highly structured data on key aspects of the incident and the public health response, particularly focusing on the public health activities initiated and community partners engaged in the response efforts. As a result, we are able to make comparisons across event types, create response profiles, and identify functional and structural response patterns that have import for future public health preparedness and response. Our study contributes to clarifying the complexity of public health response systems and our analysis reveals the ways in which these systems are adaptive to the character of the threat, resulting in differential activation of functions and partners based on the type of incident. Continued and rigorous examination of the experiences of health departments throughout the nation will refine our very understanding of what the public health response system is, will enable the identification of organizational and event inputs to performance, and will allow for the construction of rich, relevant, and practical models of response operations that can be employed to strengthen public health systems. PMID:24236137

  11. Public Health Response Systems In-Action: Learning from Local Health Departments’ Experiences with Acute and Emergency Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jennifer C.; Yang, Jane E.; Crawley, Adam W.; Biesiadecki, Laura; Aragón, Tomás J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of their core mission, public health agencies attend to a wide range of disease and health threats, including those that require routine, acute, and emergency responses. While each incident is unique, the number and type of response activities are finite; therefore, through comparative analysis, we can learn about commonalities in the response patterns that could improve predictions and expectations regarding the resources and capabilities required to respond to future acute events. In this study, we interviewed representatives from more than 120 local health departments regarding their recent experiences with real-world acute public health incidents, such as infectious disease outbreaks, severe weather events, chemical spills, and bioterrorism threats. We collected highly structured data on key aspects of the incident and the public health response, particularly focusing on the public health activities initiated and community partners engaged in the response efforts. As a result, we are able to make comparisons across event types, create response profiles, and identify functional and structural response patterns that have import for future public health preparedness and response. Our study contributes to clarifying the complexity of public health response systems and our analysis reveals the ways in which these systems are adaptive to the character of the threat, resulting in differential activation of functions and partners based on the type of incident. Continued and rigorous examination of the experiences of health departments throughout the nation will refine our very understanding of what the public health response system is, will enable the identification of organizational and event inputs to performance, and will allow for the construction of rich, relevant, and practical models of response operations that can be employed to strengthen public health systems. PMID:24236137

  12. [Telemedicine in acute stroke care--a health economics view].

    PubMed

    Günzel, F; Theiss, S; Knüppel, P; Halberstadt, S; Rose, G; Raith, M

    2010-05-01

    Specialized stroke units offer optimal treatment of patients with an acute stroke. Unfortunately, their installation is limited by an acute lack of experienced neurologists and the small number of stroke patients in sparsely populated rural areas. This problem is increasingly being solved by the use of telemedicine, so that neurological expertise is made available to basic and regular care. It has been demonstrated by national and international pilot studies that solidly based and rapid decisions can be made by telemedicine regrading the use of thrombolysis, as the most important acute treatment, but also of other interventions. So far studies have only evaluated improvement in the quality of care achieved by networking, but not of any lasting effect on any economic benefit. Complementary to a medical evaluation, the qualitative economic assessment presented here of German and American concepts of telemetric care indicate no difference in efficacy between various ways of networking. Most noteworthy, when comparing two large American and German studies, is the difference in their priorities. While the American networks achieved targeted improvements in efficacy of care that go beyond the immediate wishes of the doctors involved, this was of only secondary importance in the German studies. Also, in contrast to several American networks, the German telemetry networks have not tended to be organized for future growth. In terms of economic benefits, decentralized organized networks offer a greater potential of efficacy than purely local ones. Furthermore, the integration of inducements into the design of business models is a fundamental factor for achieving successful and lasting existence, especially within a highly competitive market.

  13. Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission. Methods Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days. Results ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±6.2), abusive behaviours (12 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±10.7), and stroke (7 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles. Conclusions A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this

  14. Multi-Toxic Endpoints of the Foodborne Mycotoxins in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhendong; Xue, Kathy S; Sun, Xiulan; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2015-12-02

    Aflatoxins B₁ (AFB₁), deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisin B₁ (FB₁), T-2 toxin (T-2), and zearalenone (ZEA) are the major foodborne mycotoxins of public health concerns. In the present study, the multiple toxic endpoints of these naturally-occurring mycotoxins were evaluated in Caenorhabditis elegans model for their lethality, toxic effects on growth and reproduction, as well as influence on lifespan. We found that the lethality endpoint was more sensitive for T-2 toxicity with the EC50 at 1.38 mg/L, the growth endpoint was relatively sensitive for AFB₁ toxic effects, and the reproduction endpoint was more sensitive for toxicities of AFB₁, FB₁, and ZEA. Moreover, the lifespan endpoint was sensitive to toxic effects of all five tested mycotoxins. Data obtained from this study may serve as an important contribution to knowledge on assessment of mycotoxin toxic effects, especially for assessing developmental and reproductive toxic effects, using the C. elegans model.

  15. Multi-Toxic Endpoints of the Foodborne Mycotoxins in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhendong; Xue, Kathy S.; Sun, Xiulan; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins B1 (AFB1), deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisin B1 (FB1), T-2 toxin (T-2), and zearalenone (ZEA) are the major foodborne mycotoxins of public health concerns. In the present study, the multiple toxic endpoints of these naturally-occurring mycotoxins were evaluated in Caenorhabditis elegans model for their lethality, toxic effects on growth and reproduction, as well as influence on lifespan. We found that the lethality endpoint was more sensitive for T-2 toxicity with the EC50 at 1.38 mg/L, the growth endpoint was relatively sensitive for AFB1 toxic effects, and the reproduction endpoint was more sensitive for toxicities of AFB1, FB1, and ZEA. Moreover, the lifespan endpoint was sensitive to toxic effects of all five tested mycotoxins. Data obtained from this study may serve as an important contribution to knowledge on assessment of mycotoxin toxic effects, especially for assessing developmental and reproductive toxic effects, using the C. elegans model. PMID:26633509

  16. Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zummo, S.M.; Karol, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Increased awareness of the poor quality of indoor air compared with outdoor air has resulted in a significant amount of research on the adverse health effects and mechanisms of action of indoor air pollutants. Common indoor air agents are identified, along with resultant adverse health effects, mechanisms of action, and likely susceptible populations. Indoor air pollutants range from biological agents (such as dust mites) to chemical irritants (such as nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, and isocyanates). These agents may exert their effects through allergic as well as nonallergic mechanisms. While the public does not generally perceive poor indoor air quality as a significant health risk, increasing reports of illness related to indoor air and an expanding base of knowledge on the health effects of indoor air pollution are likely to continue pushing the issue to the forefront.

  17. A safe electric medical bed for an acute inpatient behavioral health care setting.

    PubMed

    Wagner, John J; Ingram, Todd N

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process of developing a safe electric bed for a traditional acute care adult behavioral health inpatient unit. Many articles and studies exist related to creating a safe environment on acute care psychiatric units, but very few address the use of electric hospital beds. The process of adapting a traditional electric bed for inpatient use by the nursing management team of the Behavioral Health Service at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics is described, including specific safety features in the prototype bed. Policy changes during implementation and safety data after 12 months of bed use on the units are also presented. Results indicate that traditional electric hospital beds can be safely adapted for use on traditional acute care psychiatric units.

  18. Establishing a group of endpoints in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.; Xue, Hanhong

    2016-02-02

    A parallel computer executes a number of tasks, each task includes a number of endpoints and the endpoints are configured to support collective operations. In such a parallel computer, establishing a group of endpoints receiving a user specification of a set of endpoints included in a global collection of endpoints, where the user specification defines the set in accordance with a predefined virtual representation of the endpoints, the predefined virtual representation is a data structure setting forth an organization of tasks and endpoints included in the global collection of endpoints and the user specification defines the set of endpoints without a user specification of a particular endpoint; and defining a group of endpoints in dependence upon the predefined virtual representation of the endpoints and the user specification.

  19. Health Literacy and Mortality: A Cohort Study of Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio for death among patients with low health literacy was 1.34 (95% CI 1.04, 1.73, P=0.02) compared to Brief Health Literacy Screen >9. Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Conclusions Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. PMID:25926328

  20. Fear of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Kwong-Lo, Rosalie S. Y.; Mak, Christine W. Y.; Wong, Joe S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined fear related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among 2 samples of hospital staff in Hong Kong. Sample 1 included health care workers (n = 82) and was assessed during the peak of the SARS epidemic. Sample 2 included hospital staff who recovered from SARS (n = 97). The results show that participants in…

  1. Mental and social health during and after acute emergencies: emerging consensus?

    PubMed Central

    van Ommeren, Mark; Saxena, Shekhar; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2005-01-01

    Mental health care programmes during and after acute emergencies in resource-poor countries have been considered controversial. There is no agreement on the public health value of the post-traumatic stress disorder concept and no agreement on the appropriateness of vertical (separate) trauma-focused services. A range of social and mental health intervention strategies and principles seem, however, to have the broad support of expert opinion. Despite continuing debate, there is emerging agreement on what entails good public health practice in respect of mental health. In terms of early interventions, this agreement is exemplified by the recent inclusion of a "mental and social aspects of health" standard in the Sphere handbook's revision on minimal standards in disaster response. This affirmation of emerging agreement is important and should give clear messages to health planners. PMID:15682252

  2. Public Health Consequences on Vulnerable Populations from Acute Chemical Releases

    PubMed Central

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Orr, Maureen F.

    2008-01-01

    Data from a large, multi-state surveillance system on acute chemical releases were analyzed to describe the type of events that are potentially affecting vulnerable populations (children, elderly and hospitalized patients) in order to better prevent and plan for these types of incidents in the future. During 2003–2005, there were 231 events where vulnerable populations were within ¼ mile of the event and the area of impact was greater than 200 feet from the facility/point of release. Most events occurred on a weekday during times when day care centers or schools were likely to be in session. Equipment failure and human error caused a majority of the releases. Agencies involved in preparing for and responding to chemical emergencies should work with hospitals, nursing homes, day care centers, and schools to develop policies and procedures for initiating appropriate protective measures and managing the medical needs of patients. Chemical emergency response drills should involve the entire community to protect those that may be more susceptible to harm. PMID:21572842

  3. Management of acute respiratory infections by community health volunteers: experience of Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC).

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Abdullahel

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of management practices for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in improving the competency of community health volunteers in diagnosing and treating acute respiratory infections among children. METHODS: Data were collected by a group of research physicians who observed the performance of a sample of 120 health volunteers in 10 sub-districts in Bangladesh in which Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) had run a community-based ARI control programme since mid-1992. Standardized tests were conducted until the 95% interphysician reliability on the observation of clinical examination was achieved. FINDINGS:The sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates in diagnosing and treating ARIs were significantly higher among the health volunteers who had basic training and were supervised routinely than among those who had not. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis and treatment of ARIs at the household level in developing countries are possible if intensive basic training and the close supervision of service providers are ensured. PMID:12764514

  4. Acute health effects after exposure to chlorine gas released after a train derailment⋆

    PubMed Central

    Van Sickle, David; Wenck, Mary Anne; Belflower, Amy; Drociuk, Dan; Ferdinands, Jill; Holguin, Fernando; Svendsen, Erik; Bretous, Lena; Jankelevich, Shirley; Gibson, James J.; Garbe, Paul; Moolenaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2005, a train derailment on the premises of a textile mill in South Carolina released 42 to 60 tons of chlorine gas in the middle of a small town. Medical records and autopsy reports were reviewed to describe the clinical presentation, hospital course, and pathology observed in persons hospitalized or deceased as a result of chlorine gas exposure. Eight persons died before reaching medical care; of the 71 persons hospitalized for acute health effects as a result of chlorine exposure, 1 died in the hospital. The mean age of the hospitalized persons was 40 years (range, 4 months-76 years); 87% were male. The median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1-29 days). Twenty-five (35%) persons were admitted to the intensive care unit; the median length of stay was 3 days. Many surviving victims developed significant pulmonary signs and severe airway inflammation; 41 (58%) hospitalized persons met Po2/Fio2 criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury. During their hospitalization, 40 (57%) developed abnormal x-ray findings, 74% of those within the first day. Hypoxia on room air and Po2/Fio2 ratio predicted severity of outcome as assessed by the duration of hospitalization and the need for intensive care support. This community release of chlorine gas caused widespread exposure and resulted in significant acute health effects and substantial health care requirements. Pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis provided early indications of outcome severity. PMID:19041527

  5. Practical legal and ethical considerations for the provision of acute disaster mental health services.

    PubMed

    Call, John A; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Jenuwine, Michael J; Flynn, Brian W

    2012-01-01

    Mental health professionals who provide emergency psychosocial assistance in the immediate aftermath of disasters do so in the midst of crisis and chaos. Common roles undertaken by disaster mental health professionals include treating existing conditions of disaster survivors and providing psychosocial support to front line responders and those acutely affected. Other roles include participating in multidisciplinary health care teams as well as monitoring and supporting team members' mental health. When, in the immediate aftermath of a disaster, mental health professionals provide such assistance, they may take on legal and ethical responsibilities that they are not fully aware of or do not fully comprehend. Unfortunately, not much has been written about these obligations, and professional organizations have provided little guidance. Thus, the purpose of the present article is to outline and discuss an analysis framework and suggest recommendations that mental health professionals can use to help guide their actions during the chaos immediate post disaster.

  6. Enabling communication concurrency through flexible MPI endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Dinan, James; Grant, Ryan E.; Balaji, Pavan; Goodell, David; Miller, Douglas; Snir, Marc; Thakur, Rajeev

    2014-09-23

    MPI defines a one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. This model captures many use cases effectively; however, it also limits communication concurrency and interoperability between MPI and programming models that utilize threads. Our paper describes the MPI endpoints extension, which relaxes the longstanding one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. Using endpoints, an MPI implementation can map separate communication contexts to threads, allowing them to drive communication independently. Also, endpoints enable threads to be addressable in MPI operations, enhancing interoperability between MPI and other programming models. Furthermore, these characteristics are illustrated through several examples and an empirical study that contrasts current multithreaded communication performance with the need for high degrees of communication concurrency to achieve peak communication performance.

  7. Enabling communication concurrency through flexible MPI endpoints

    DOE PAGES

    Dinan, James; Grant, Ryan E.; Balaji, Pavan; Goodell, David; Miller, Douglas; Snir, Marc; Thakur, Rajeev

    2014-09-23

    MPI defines a one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. This model captures many use cases effectively; however, it also limits communication concurrency and interoperability between MPI and programming models that utilize threads. Our paper describes the MPI endpoints extension, which relaxes the longstanding one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. Using endpoints, an MPI implementation can map separate communication contexts to threads, allowing them to drive communication independently. Also, endpoints enable threads to be addressable in MPI operations, enhancing interoperability between MPI and other programming models. Furthermore, these characteristics are illustrated through several examples and an empirical study thatmore » contrasts current multithreaded communication performance with the need for high degrees of communication concurrency to achieve peak communication performance.« less

  8. Physiological and lavage fluid cytological and biochemical endpoints of toxicity in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of the respiratory tract to toxic materials can result in a variety of physiologic disturbances that can serve as endpoints of toxicity. In addition to a brief review of commonly assessed physiologic endpoints, attention is given in the first component of this report to the use of both nose breathing and mouth'' breathing rats in toxicity studies that involve measurements of ventilatory functional changes in response to test atmospheres. Additionally, the usefulness of maximum oxygen consumption, or VO[sub 2max], as a physiologic endpoint of toxicity that uses exercising rats after exposure to test atmospheres is described, along with an introduction to post-exposure exercise as an important behavioral activity that can markedly impact on the severity of acute lung injury caused by pneumoedematogenic materials. The second component of this report focuses on bronchoalveolar lavage and cytological and biochemical endpoints that can be assessed in investigations of the toxicities of test materials. As will be shown herein, some of the biochemical endpoints of toxicity, especially, can sensitively detect subtle injury to the lower respiratory tract that may escape detection by changes in some other conventional endpoints of toxicity, including lung gravimetric increases and histopathological alterations.

  9. Physiological and lavage fluid cytological and biochemical endpoints of toxicity in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.

    1992-12-31

    Exposure of the respiratory tract to toxic materials can result in a variety of physiologic disturbances that can serve as endpoints of toxicity. In addition to a brief review of commonly assessed physiologic endpoints, attention is given in the first component of this report to the use of both nose breathing and ``mouth`` breathing rats in toxicity studies that involve measurements of ventilatory functional changes in response to test atmospheres. Additionally, the usefulness of maximum oxygen consumption, or VO{sub 2max}, as a physiologic endpoint of toxicity that uses exercising rats after exposure to test atmospheres is described, along with an introduction to post-exposure exercise as an important behavioral activity that can markedly impact on the severity of acute lung injury caused by pneumoedematogenic materials. The second component of this report focuses on bronchoalveolar lavage and cytological and biochemical endpoints that can be assessed in investigations of the toxicities of test materials. As will be shown herein, some of the biochemical endpoints of toxicity, especially, can sensitively detect subtle injury to the lower respiratory tract that may escape detection by changes in some other conventional endpoints of toxicity, including lung gravimetric increases and histopathological alterations.

  10. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Classification of Studies Employing Psychological Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Stephanie A.; Litvak, Margarita; Robbins, Natashia M.; Sandberg, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Psychological outcomes in persons with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have received substantial attention. The objectives of this paper were to (1) catalog psychological endpoints assessed in CAH outcome studies and (2) classify the conceptual/theoretical model shaping the research design and interpretation of CAH-related psychological effects. A total of 98 original research studies, published between 1955 and 2009, were categorized based on psychological endpoints examined as well as the research design and conceptual model guiding analysis and interpretation of data. The majority of studies (68%) investigated endpoints related to psychosexual differentiation. The preponderance of studies (76%) examined a direct relationship (i.e., inferring causality) between prenatal androgen exposure and psychological outcomes. Findings are discussed in relation to the observed imbalance between theoretical interest in the role of prenatal androgens in shaping psychosexual differentiation and a broader conceptual model that examines the role of other potential factors in mediating or moderating the influence of CAH pathophysiology on psychological outcomes in both affected females and males. The latter approach offers to identify factors amenable to clinical intervention that enhance both health and quality of life outcomes in CAH as well as other disorders of sex development. PMID:20976294

  11. Colonisation endpoints in Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccine trials.

    PubMed

    Auranen, Kari; Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Goldblatt, David; Nohynek, Hanna; O'Brien, Katherine L; Satzke, Catherine; Simell, Birgit; Tanskanen, Antti; Käyhty, Helena

    2013-12-17

    Evaluating vaccine efficacy for protection against colonisation (VEcol) with bacterial pathogens is an area of growing interest. In this article, we consider estimation of VEcol for colonisation with Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). Colonisation is a common, recurrent and multi-type endpoint that requires both careful definition of the vaccine efficacy parameter and the corresponding method of estimation. We review recent developments in the area and provide practical guidelines for choosing the estimand and the estimation method in trials with a colonisation endpoint. We concentrate on methods that are based on a cross-sectional study design, in which only one nasopharyngeal sample is obtained per study subject.

  12. Estimation of endpoints in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Ozanne, G

    1984-01-01

    A program, written in BASIC, has been developed to estimate rapidly endpoints from a small number of experimental data. The computational method is based on the work of Reed and Muench (Am. J. Hyg. 27, 493 1938). Several endpoints may be estimated in the same run. A subroutine allows the saving of experimental data in disk file and a printout subroutine permits different types of printout (tabular or graphical). Estimation of several infectious doses (ID) of a guinea-pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) Chlamydia psittaci strain is given as sample run.

  13. Acute low back problems in adults: assessment and treatment. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research.

    PubMed

    1994-12-01

    This Quick Reference Guide for Clinicians contains highlights from the Clinical Practice Guideline version of Acute Low Back Problems in Adults, which was developed by a private-sector panel of health care providers and consumers. The Quick Reference Guide is an example of how a clinician might implement the panel's findings and recommendations on the management of acute low back problems in working-age adults. Topics covered include the initial assessment of patients presenting with acute low back problems, identification of red flags that may indicate the presence of a serious underlying medical condition, initial management, special studies and diagnostic considerations, and further management considerations. Instructions for clinical testing for sciatic tension, recommendations for sitting and unassisted lifting, tests for identification of clinical pathology, and algorithms for patient management are included.

  14. Correlation of oral health of children with acute leukemia during the induction phase

    PubMed Central

    Dholam, Kanchan P.; Gurav, Sandeep; Dugad, Jinesh; Banavli, Shripad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of acute leukemia's- a common childhood malignancy, involves intensive and powerful multi-drug chemotherapeutic regime. Oral lesions are a common complication in these patients affecting oral health status. Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate and assess the oral health status of newly diagnosed leukemic pediatric patients during induction phase and its correlation to outcome of induction therapy. Material Methods: Oral examinations was done in 33 children between the age group of 5-15 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myloblastic leukemia (AML), who were undergoing chemotherapy. Oral Hygiene Index- Simplified, (OHI-S) decayed missing filled teeth index (def/DMFT), Loe and Sillness index for gingiva, and complete blood count at first and fourth week of induction phase were recorded for each patient. The changes in the oral health status were analyzed with Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: During an induction phase it was observed that level of OHI-S (P = 0.002), Loe and Sillness index (P = 0.003), def/DMFT index (P = 0.076), platelet count (P = 0.00) increased significantly and no significant difference was noted in hemoglobin (P = 0.4) and total leucocytes count (P = 0.11). Conclusion: It was observed that, although oral health status had significantly worsened, the induction outcome was not affected. PMID:25006282

  15. Acute effects of aerobic stretching, health and happiness improving movement exercise on cortical activity of children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyungsoo; Park, Sangjun; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Lee, Kwanghee; Rhyu, Hyun-Seung

    2016-08-01

    Acute high-intensity physical exercise is known to improve cognitive performance of children, including those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this work, we investigated the acute effect of an aerobic stretching and moderate-intensity, health and happiness improving movement (HHIM) exercise on the cortical activity of children with and without ADHD using electroencephalography (EEG). Children aged 12 to 14 yr with combined-type ADHD and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study, performing two individual movements (n=79, 35 controls) and a single exercise bout (n=45, 18 controls). electroencephalographic signals were recorded before and immediately after each movement, and before and after acute exercise under resting conditions, to obtain absolute and relative power estimates for the theta (3.5-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), sensory motor rhythm (12-16 Hz), and beta (16-25 Hz) bands. After acute HHIM exercise, all children showed significant changes in their relative EEG, mainly in the theta and alpha bands. Individual movements were found to influence relative theta, alpha and beta, and theta-to-beta ratios. He presents aerobic stretching HHIM exercise has demonstrated acute effect on the cortical activity of children.

  16. Acute effects of aerobic stretching, health and happiness improving movement exercise on cortical activity of children

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungsoo; Park, Sangjun; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Lee, Kwanghee; Rhyu, Hyun-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Acute high-intensity physical exercise is known to improve cognitive performance of children, including those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this work, we investigated the acute effect of an aerobic stretching and moderate-intensity, health and happiness improving movement (HHIM) exercise on the cortical activity of children with and without ADHD using electroencephalography (EEG). Children aged 12 to 14 yr with combined-type ADHD and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study, performing two individual movements (n=79, 35 controls) and a single exercise bout (n=45, 18 controls). electroencephalographic signals were recorded before and immediately after each movement, and before and after acute exercise under resting conditions, to obtain absolute and relative power estimates for the theta (3.5–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), sensory motor rhythm (12–16 Hz), and beta (16–25 Hz) bands. After acute HHIM exercise, all children showed significant changes in their relative EEG, mainly in the theta and alpha bands. Individual movements were found to influence relative theta, alpha and beta, and theta-to-beta ratios. He presents aerobic stretching HHIM exercise has demonstrated acute effect on the cortical activity of children. PMID:27656629

  17. Acute effects of aerobic stretching, health and happiness improving movement exercise on cortical activity of children

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungsoo; Park, Sangjun; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Lee, Kwanghee; Rhyu, Hyun-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Acute high-intensity physical exercise is known to improve cognitive performance of children, including those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this work, we investigated the acute effect of an aerobic stretching and moderate-intensity, health and happiness improving movement (HHIM) exercise on the cortical activity of children with and without ADHD using electroencephalography (EEG). Children aged 12 to 14 yr with combined-type ADHD and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study, performing two individual movements (n=79, 35 controls) and a single exercise bout (n=45, 18 controls). electroencephalographic signals were recorded before and immediately after each movement, and before and after acute exercise under resting conditions, to obtain absolute and relative power estimates for the theta (3.5–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), sensory motor rhythm (12–16 Hz), and beta (16–25 Hz) bands. After acute HHIM exercise, all children showed significant changes in their relative EEG, mainly in the theta and alpha bands. Individual movements were found to influence relative theta, alpha and beta, and theta-to-beta ratios. He presents aerobic stretching HHIM exercise has demonstrated acute effect on the cortical activity of children.

  18. Acute effects of aerobic stretching, health and happiness improving movement exercise on cortical activity of children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyungsoo; Park, Sangjun; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Lee, Kwanghee; Rhyu, Hyun-Seung

    2016-08-01

    Acute high-intensity physical exercise is known to improve cognitive performance of children, including those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this work, we investigated the acute effect of an aerobic stretching and moderate-intensity, health and happiness improving movement (HHIM) exercise on the cortical activity of children with and without ADHD using electroencephalography (EEG). Children aged 12 to 14 yr with combined-type ADHD and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study, performing two individual movements (n=79, 35 controls) and a single exercise bout (n=45, 18 controls). electroencephalographic signals were recorded before and immediately after each movement, and before and after acute exercise under resting conditions, to obtain absolute and relative power estimates for the theta (3.5-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), sensory motor rhythm (12-16 Hz), and beta (16-25 Hz) bands. After acute HHIM exercise, all children showed significant changes in their relative EEG, mainly in the theta and alpha bands. Individual movements were found to influence relative theta, alpha and beta, and theta-to-beta ratios. He presents aerobic stretching HHIM exercise has demonstrated acute effect on the cortical activity of children. PMID:27656629

  19. Acute mental health service delivery to Indigenous women: What is known?

    PubMed

    Bradley, Pat; Dunn, Sandra; Lowell, Anne; Nagel, Tricia

    2015-12-01

    The Australian College of Mental Health Nurses directs that mental health nurses must 'enable cultural safety in practice, taking into account age, gender, spirituality, ethnicity and health values'. The present study is a review of the existing literature undertaken in order to identify current knowledge and knowledge gaps regarding the experience of Indigenous women in acute mental health inpatient facilities. In particular, studies that identified environments and practices promoting the development of culturally-safe healing spaces for Indigenous women, and studies that identified women's experience of seclusion, were sought. The results showed that there is little literature directly relevant to Indigenous women's experiences of inpatient mental health units in Australia. The present study consolidates existing knowledge and knowledge gaps, and advances the argument for gender-disaggregated future research. Implications for professional practice and service development are also noted.

  20. Enhancing adult therapeutic interpersonal relationships in the acute health care setting: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Kornhaber, Rachel; Walsh, Kenneth; Duff, Jed; Walker, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic interpersonal relationships are the primary component of all health care interactions that facilitate the development of positive clinician–patient experiences. Therapeutic interpersonal relationships have the capacity to transform and enrich the patients’ experiences. Consequently, with an increasing necessity to focus on patient-centered care, it is imperative for health care professionals to therapeutically engage with patients to improve health-related outcomes. Studies were identified through an electronic search, using the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO databases of peer-reviewed research, limited to the English language with search terms developed to reflect therapeutic interpersonal relationships between health care professionals and patients in the acute care setting. This study found that therapeutic listening, responding to patient emotions and unmet needs, and patient centeredness were key characteristics of strategies for improving therapeutic interpersonal relationships. PMID:27789958

  1. Increased systolic blood pressure reactivity to acute stress is related with better self-reported health

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Bradley J.; O'Brien, Shaun; Hazi, Agnes; Kent, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The stress reactivity hypothesis posits that the magnitude of cardiovascular reactions to acute stress tasks is related with future blood pressure status, heart hypertrophy, and atherosclerosis. We assessed the stress reactivity hypothesis and aimed to identify which physiological indices (blood pressure, heart-rate, cortisol, salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA)) related to self-reported mental and physical health. We also assessed if physiological reactions elicited by an acute stressor were more related than basal assessments. Participants provided physiological samples, self-reported stress and health-data before and after an assessed 5–7 minute academic oral presentation. In hierarchical regression models, increased systolic and reduced sIgA reactivity was associated with better perceptions of mental health. Reactivity data were more related to self-reported data than basal data. In line with the only 2 studies to assess the reactivity hypothesis with self-perceived health, increased systolic reactivity was best associated with better perceived physical and mental health. The findings suggest that increased SBP reactivity may also be associated with positive health outcomes. Further research is required to determine if increased or decreased sIgA reactivity is most predictive of future morbidity. PMID:25391460

  2. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT ASSESSMENT - MIDPOINTS VS. ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The question of whether to use midpoints or endpoints or both in an LCIA framework is often dependent upon the goal and scope and the decision that is being supported by the LCIA. LCIAs for Enlightenment may not require an aggregation of impact categories and may be most useful ...

  3. IPF clinical trial design and endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Steven D.; Meyer, Keith C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review There remains a dire need for therapies that impact the clinical course of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Indeed, there is a surge of interest in IPF therapeutics, with many candidate agents in various stages of development. Optimal design and implementation of the appropriate prospective clinical trials are essential to demonstrate clinical efficacy of promising drugs for the treatment of IPF. A key element in the success of such clinical trials is the choice of the best endpoint(s) to match the design of the study. Recent findings Although the results of many IPF clinical trials have been disappointing, these trials have provided valuable insights into the epidemiology and natural history of the disease and have sparked debate into the best clinical trial designs and endpoints. Summary This review will discuss the various clinical trial endpoints that have been used or proposed with a focus on their potential utility, as well as possible pitfalls that investigators should consider in the design of such studies. Video abstract http://links.lww.com/COPM/A13 PMID:25022315

  4. Infectious Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illness among Patients Seeking Health Care in South-Central Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Matthew R.; Blair, Patrick J.; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L.; Burgess, Timothy H.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Putnam, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations. PMID:22302857

  5. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  6. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: a challenge for public health practice in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A; Abdullah, A

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is now a global challenge affecting more than 8000 patients in different continents. The dictum of public health practice especially for infectious disease is "prevention better than cure". It is especially true for SARS as the treatment strategies remain diverse and experimental. Maintaining a healthy and hygienic environment can be one of the effective public health measures to combat infectious disease. The major challenge is that some of the most important public health measures are to be taken outside the health sector. The community also needs to be strengthened and equipped with the health skills to promote better health and hygiene. There is also the need to create a supportive environment conducive to health for long term sustainability. The WHO approach of promoting health through setting approach would be one possible solution to face the challenge. This paper will describe some of the public health initiatives in Hong Kong through "setting approach" and "community development model" in helping the society fight against SARS. With the emergence of SARS, this might be the time to globalise public health medicine as an important component of medical practice. PMID:12933766

  7. Shift endpoint trace selection algorithm and wavelet analysis to detect the endpoint using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Zakour, Sihem; Taleb, Hassen

    2016-06-01

    Endpoint detection (EPD) is very important undertaking on the side of getting a good understanding and figuring out if a plasma etching process is done on the right way. It is truly a crucial part of supplying repeatable effects in every single wafer. When the film to be etched has been completely erased, the endpoint is reached. In order to ensure the desired device performance on the produced integrated circuit, many sensors are used to detect the endpoint, such as the optical, electrical, acoustical/vibrational, thermal, and frictional. But, except the optical sensor, the other ones show their weaknesses due to the environmental conditions which affect the exactness of reaching endpoint. Unfortunately, some exposed area to the film to be etched is very low (<0.5%), reflecting low signal and showing the incapacity of the traditional endpoint detection method to determine the wind-up of the etch process. This work has provided a means to improve the endpoint detection sensitivity by collecting a huge numbers of full spectral data containing 1201 spectra for each run, then a new unsophisticated algorithm is proposed to select the important endpoint traces named shift endpoint trace selection (SETS). Then, a sensitivity analysis of linear methods named principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA), and the nonlinear method called wavelet analysis (WA) for both approximation and details will be studied to compare performances of the methods mentioned above. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) is not only computed based on the main etch (ME) period but also the over etch (OE) period. Moreover, a new unused statistic for EPD, coefficient of variation (CV), is proposed to reach the endpoint in plasma etches process.

  8. Managing patients with behavioral health problems in acute care: balancing safety and financial viability.

    PubMed

    Rape, Cyndy; Mann, Tammy; Schooley, John; Ramey, Jana

    2015-01-01

    With a recent decrease in community resources for the mental health population, acute care facilities must seek creative, cost-effective ways to protect and care for these vulnerable individuals. This article describes 1 facility's journey to maintaining patient and staff safety while reducing cost. Success factors of this program include staff engagement, environmental modifications, and a nurse-driven, sitter-reduction process. PMID:25479169

  9. Self-Reported Acute Health Effects and Exposure to Companion Animals.

    PubMed

    Krueger, W S; Hilborn, E D; Dufour, A P; Sams, E A; Wade, T J

    2016-06-01

    To understand the etiological burden of disease associated with acute health symptoms [e.g. gastrointestinal (GI), respiratory, dermatological], it is important to understand how common exposures influence these symptoms. Exposures to familiar and unfamiliar animals can result in a variety of health symptoms related to infection, irritation and allergy; however, few studies have examined this association in a large-scale cohort setting. Cross-sectional data collected from 50 507 participants in the United States enrolled from 2003 to 2009 were used to examine associations between animal contact and acute health symptoms during a 10-12 day period. Fixed-effects multivariable logistic regression estimated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confident intervals (CI) for associations between animal exposures and outcomes of GI illness, respiratory illness and skin/eye symptoms. Two-thirds of the study population (63.2%) reported direct contact with animals, of which 7.7% had contact with at least one unfamiliar animal. Participants exposed to unfamiliar animals had significantly higher odds of self-reporting all three acute health symptoms, when compared to non-animal-exposed participants (GI: AOR = 1.4, CI = 1.2-1.7; respiratory: AOR = 1.5, CI = 1.2-1.8; and skin/eye: AOR = 1.9, CI = 1.6-2.3), as well as when compared to participants who only had contact with familiar animals. Specific contact with dogs, cats or pet birds was also significantly associated with at least one acute health symptom; AORs ranged from 1.1 to 1.5, when compared to participants not exposed to each animal. These results indicate that contact with animals, especially unfamiliar animals, was significantly associated with GI, respiratory and skin/eye symptoms. Such associations could be attributable to zoonotic infections and allergic reactions. Etiological models for acute health symptoms should consider contact with companion animals, particularly exposure to unfamiliar animals

  10. Using Personal Sensors to Assess the Exposome and Acute Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Foraster, Maria; Martinez, David; Cisneros, Andres

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The exposome encompasses the totality of human environmental exposures. Recent developments in sensor technology have made it possible to better measure personal exposure to environmental pollutants and other factors. We aimed to discuss and demonstrate the recent developments in personal sensors to measure multiple exposures and possible acute health responses, and discuss the main challenges ahead. Methods: We searched for a range of sensors to measure air pollution, noise, temperature, UV, physical activity, location, blood pressure, heart rate and lung function and to obtain information on green space and emotional status/mood and put it on a person. Results and Conclusions: We discussed the recent developments and main challenges for personal sensors to measure multiple exposures. We found and put together a personal sensor set that measures a comprehensive set of personal exposures continuously over 24 h to assess part of the current exposome and acute health responses. We obtained data for a whole range of exposures and some acute health responses, but many challenges remain to apply the methodology for extended time periods and larger populations including improving the ease of wear, e.g., through miniaturization and extending battery life, and the reduction of costs. However, the technology is moving fast and opportunities will come closer for further wide spread use to assess, at least part of the exposome. PMID:25101766

  11. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  12. School-Based Mental Health Program Evaluation: Children's School Outcomes and Acute Mental Health Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang-Yi, Christina D.; Mandell, David S.; Hadley, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examined the impact of school-based mental health programs on children's school outcomes and the utilization of acute mental health services. Methods: The study sample included 468 Medicaid-enrolled children aged 6 to 17 years who were enrolled 1 of 2 school-based mental health programs (SBMHs) in a metropolitan area…

  13. Mental health nurses' perceptions of good work in an acute setting.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

    2012-10-01

    Frequently, research and conference papers explore difficult or problematic areas of practice that can inadvertently render daily nursing accomplishments invisible and create the perception of a discipline in crisis. In this qualitative study, we explore the views of registered nurses about achievements in the workplace and good nursing work in an acute inpatient mental health setting in Sydney, Australia. Mental health nurses were asked a series of questions about their experiences and understanding of what constitutes good nursing work as well as their sense of optimism about their work. A total of 40 structured face-to-face interviews were completed. Among the responses to questions about achievements and good nursing practice, five broad themes were identified: i) teamwork; (ii) interpersonal interactions with patients; (iii) providing practical and holistic support to patients; (iv) patients' mental health improvements; and (v) optimism-pessimism continuum. Findings contribute to a discussion of good nursing work in acute mental health settings, as well as self-perceptions of optimism and hopefulness, which are important contributors to positive, supportive health-care settings and patient recovery.

  14. Cervical spinal cord injury: tailoring clinical trial endpoints to reflect meaningful functional improvements

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M.; McKerracher, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) results in partial to full paralysis of the upper and lower extremities. Traditional primary endpoints for acute SCI clinical trials are too broad to assess functional recovery in cervical subjects, raising the possibility of false positive outcomes in trials for cervical SCI. Endpoints focused on the recovery of hand and arm control (e.g., upper extremity motor score, motor level change) show the most potential for use as primary outcomes in upcoming trials of cervical SCI. As the field moves forward, the most reliable way to ensure meaningful clinical testing in cervical subjects may be the development of a composite primary endpoint that measures both neurological recovery and functional improvement. PMID:25317162

  15. Population growth rate determinants for Arbacia: Evaluating ecological relevance of toxicity test endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Nacci, D.; Gleason, T.; Munns, W.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    A population dynamics model for the sea urchin, Arbacia punctulata, was recently developed incorporating life stage endpoints frequently measured in acute and chronic toxicity studies. Model elasticity analysis was used to demonstrate that population growth rate was influenced most by adult survival and least by early life stage success, calling into question the ecological relevance of results from standardized Arbacia fertilization and larval development toxicity tests. Two approaches were used to continue this evaluation. Actual and hypothetical dose-response curves for toxicant exposures over multiple life stages were used to evaluate contributions to population growth rate of stage-specific toxicant effects. Additionally, relationships between critical life stages were developed from laboratory data for Arbacia. The results of this analysis underscore the importance of understanding both endpoint sensitivity to toxicants and sensitivity of population growth rate to test endpoints in determining the ecological relevance of toxicity tests results.

  16. Pathways to catastrophic health expenditure for acute coronary syndrome in Kerala: ‘Good health at low cost’?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Universal health coverage through the removal of financial and other barriers to access, particularly for people who are poor, is a global priority. This viewpoint describes the many pathways to catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) for patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) based on two case studies and the thematic analysis of field notes regarding 210 patients and their households from a study based in Kerala, India. Discussion There is evidence of the severe financial impact of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), which is in contradiction to the widely acclaimed Kerala model: Good health at low cost. However, it is important to look beyond the out-of-pocket expenditure (OOPE) and CHE to the possible pathways and identify the triggers that make families vulnerable to CHE. The identified pathways include a primary and secondary loop. The primary pathway describes the direct path by which families experience CHE. These include: 1) factors related to the pre-event period that increase the likelihood of experiencing CHE, such as being from the lower socio-economic strata (SES), past financial losses or loans that leave families with no financial shock absorber at the time of illness; 2) factors related to the acute event, diagnosis, treatment and hospitalization and expenditures incurred for the same and; 3) factors related to the post-event period such as loss of gainful employment and means of financing both the acute period and the long-term management particularly through distress financing. The secondary pathway arises from the primary and includes: 1) the impact of distress financing and; 2) the long- and short- term consequences of CHE. These factors ultimately result in a vicious cycle of debt and poverty through non-compliance and repeat acute events. Summary This paper outlines the direct and indirect pathways by which patients with ACS and their families are trapped in a vicious cycle of debt and poverty. It also contradicts the prevailing

  17. A specific endpoint assay for ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, I A; Warms, J V

    1987-01-01

    Simple endpoint assays for free ubiquitin (Ub) and for the Ub-activating enzyme are described. The method for measuring Ub makes use of the reaction of iodoacetamide-treated Ub-activating enzyme (E): [3H]ATP + Ub + E----E X [3H]AMP-Ub + PPi and PPi----2Pi (in the presence of pyrophosphatase). The Ub is then measured by determining the acid-insoluble radioactivity. The reaction is accompanied by a slow enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of the complex to AMP plus Ub. The presence of ubiquitin-activating enzyme in excess of Ub by approximately equal to 0.1 microM assures that the steady state will be close to the endpoint for total Ub. A preparation of the activating enzyme from human erythrocytes that does not depend on affinity chromatography is described. Several applications of the assay are presented. PMID:3031643

  18. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  19. Protein patterns as endpoints in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.; Brown, D.

    1995-12-31

    Biological endpoints can complement chemical analyses in monitoring environmental remediation. In some cases the levels of chemical detection are so low that the costs of clean-up to no detection would be prohibitive. And chemical tests do not indicate the availability of the contaminants to the biota. On the other hand many if not most biological tests lack specificity. The authors have investigated a protein expression assay to establish an endpoint for clean-up of sulfur mustard and breakdown products. Earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were exposed to sulfur mustard (SM), a breakdown product thiodiethanol (TDE), and ethylene glycol, the solvent for the two chemicals. Tissue from the lining of the coelomic cavity was taken from each of 6 worms in each treatment class. Soluble proteins were extracted and separated on one and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) gels. The 1 D gels showed no difference by eye but the patterns from control and solvent control worms on 2D gels differed from those of worms exposed to TDE and SM. The 1D gel data were digitized and analyzed by pattern recognition using artificial neural networks. The protein patterns under the two treatments and the two controls were learned in one set of data and successfully recognized in a second. This indicated that what was learned was useful in recognizing patterns induced by SM and TDE. Thus a possible endpoint for remediation would be the protein pattern at no effect levels of chemicals of interest.

  20. Influence of age, previous health status, and severity of acute illness on outcome from intensive care.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, J R; Brun-Buisson, C; Trunet, P; Latournerie, J; Chantereau, S; Rapin, M

    1982-09-01

    Age, previous health status (HS), and severity of acute illness were assessed prospectively on 228 unselected patients admitted over 1 yr to the multidisciplinary ICU, to determine their influence on outcome. One hundred and fifty patients (66%) were discharged from the ICU, but the survival rate fell to 50% at 6 months, and was similar after 1 yr (49%). Over a 6-month period, there was improved HS in survivors which gradually leveled off. Compared to prior HS, the final HS was worsened in 37% of survivors. Three factors were important predictors of late survival: age under 50, good previous HS, and less than two visceral failures. We conclude that evaluation of ICU outcome should provide information on 6-month survival and HS and include important variables as age, previous HS, and severity of acute illness. PMID:7105766

  1. Continuous quality improvement in acute health care: creating a holistic and integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Sewell, N

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the range of quality activity in a National Health Service hospital trust, using a staff questionnaire survey, self-assessment against the Baldrige Quality Award criteria, and the application of the SERVQUAL approach to service quality assessment. Reviews the acute health care quality programme literature. Finds that there are needs for greater integration of quality effort, to engage with patients in a more meaningful manner, and to achieve greater commitment and involvement from clinicians and managers. Identifies lack of time and resources as a major barrier to greater application of quality programmes. Explores ways of developing a more holistic and integrated programme of quality improvement. Describes the creation and implementation of a model for continuous improvement in health care quality.

  2. Ecosystem Services as Assessment Endpoints in Ecological Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of ecological risk assessment (ERA) is on assessment endpoints, explicit expressions of environmental values to be protected. Traditionally, the ecological entities identified in assessment endpoints have been components of ecosystems deemed by risk assessors to be impo...

  3. Some Endpoint Results for β-Generalized Weak Contractive Multifunctions

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani, H.; Gopal, D.; Miandaragh, M. A.; Rezapour, Sh.; Shahzad, N.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce β-generalized weak contractive multifunctions and give some results about endpoints of the multifunctions. Also, we give some results about role of a point in the existence of endpoints. PMID:24348197

  4. Ready, aim fire! Mental health nurses under siege in acute inpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Ward, Louise

    2013-04-01

    It has been clearly acknowledged and well-documented that physical, emotional, and psychological violence is a central theme and an expected workplace hazard for registered nurses working in acute inpatient mental health care facilities. Limited research, however, has focused on how registered nurses have been able to cope within this environment and adequately protect themselves from harm. A critical feminist research project recently explored the lived experience of 13 Australian, female, registered nurses working in a busy metropolitan acute inpatient mental health care facility. "Fear" was exposed as the precursor to violence and aggression, both "fear as experienced by the nurse" and "fear as experienced by the patient." The participants reported experiencing a sense of fear when they could not accurately or confidently anticipate a patient response or reaction. They identified this relationship with fear as being "part of the job" and part of the unpredictable nature of caring for people experiencing complex distortions in thinking and behavior. The participants believed, however, that additional workplace pressures complicated the therapeutic environment, resulting in a distraction from patient care and observation. This distraction could lead to nurse-patient miscommunication and the potential for violence. This article discusses a major theme to emerge from this study, "Better the devil you know!" The theme highlights how mental health nurses cope with violence and why they choose to continue working in this complex care environment. PMID:23566191

  5. Cumulative Adversity Sensitizes Neural Response to Acute Stress: Association with Health Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dongju; Tsou, Kristen A; Ansell, Emily B; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative adversity (CA) increases stress sensitivity and risk of adverse health outcomes. However, neural mechanisms underlying these associations in humans remain unclear. To understand neural responses underlying the link between CA and adverse health symptoms, the current study assessed brain activity during stress and neutral-relaxing states in 75 demographically matched, healthy individuals with high, mid, and low CA (25 in each group), and their health symptoms using the Cornell Medical Index. CA was significantly associated with greater adverse health symptoms (P=0.01) in all participants. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results indicated significant associations between CA scores and increased stress-induced activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, insula, striatum, right amygdala, hippocampus, and temporal regions in all 75 participants (p<0.05, whole-brain corrected). In addition to these regions, the high vs low CA group comparison revealed decreased stress-induced activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the high CA group (p<0.01, whole-brain corrected). Specifically, hypoactive medial OFC and hyperactive right hippocampus responses to stress were each significantly associated with greater adverse health symptoms (p<0.01). Furthermore, an inverse correlation was found between activity in the medial OFC and right hippocampus (p=0.01). These results indicate that high CA sensitizes limbic–striatal responses to acute stress and also identifies an important role for stress-related medial OFC and hippocampus responses in the effects of CA on increasing vulnerability to adverse health consequences. PMID:24051900

  6. Serum and salivary cardiac analytes in acute myocardial infarction related to oral health status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Campbell, Charles; Kinane, Denis F.; McDevitt, John T.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Floriano, Pierre N.; Miller, Craig S.

    2014-06-01

    With the advent of an increased emphasis on the potential to utilize biomarkers in saliva for systemic diseases, the issue of existing oral disease is an important consideration that could adversely affect the interpretation of diagnostic results obtained from saliva. We addressed the question does a patient's oral inflammation status confound biomarker levels used in diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The results demonstrated that multiple serum biomarkers and a few salivary biomarkers reflected the cardiac event. Importantly, oral health of the individual had minimal impact on the validity of the serum or salivary biomarker effectiveness.

  7. The Role of Ecological Endpoints in Watershed Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landscape change and pollution in watersheds affect ecological endpoints in receiving water bodies. Therefore, these endpoints are useful in watershed management. Fish and benthic macro invertebrates are often used as endpoints, since they are easily measured in the field and int...

  8. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  9. A service user-initiated project investigating the attitudes of mental health staff towards clients and services in an acute mental health unit.

    PubMed

    Tyson, P J

    2013-04-01

    Mental Health Service Users (MHSU) are becoming increasingly recognized as very valuable contributors to the research process. The current study originated from the idea of a group of MHSU within a service user and carer research group. They wanted to investigate the attitudes of mental health staff towards clients in an acute mental health setting, as well as their attitudes towards certain aspects of service. An amended version of the 'Attitudes Towards Acute Mental Health Scale' was sent to nursing and allied staff at an acute psychiatric unit within the Gloucestershire 2gether NHS Foundation Trust. Fifty-seven of the 200 anonymous questionnaires were returned. Generally positive opinions of MHSU were obtained, but there were divided opinions on questions regarding the aetiology of mental health problems (e.g. social vs. genetic determinants). Opinions on aspects of the admissions process, therapeutic aspects of care, the use of medication and the use of control and restraint techniques were also obtained. Demographic variables of staff age, status and years of experience in mental health were found to be associated with attitudes and opinions. This MHSU-initiated study has extended the literature on mental health staff attitudes towards clients and services in an acute mental health setting. This study is split into two parts, Part A is focused on the process of involving MHSU in this project, Part B is concerned with the empirical investigation.

  10. Assessing strategic behaviour within the acute sector of the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Chaston, I

    1994-01-01

    The creation of the internal market has merely been the latest progression in the change processes confronting the NHS over recent years as the UK Government searches for new ways of expanding patient output while concurrently restricting provision of additional financial resources. To assist in the implementation of change, acute sector providers have introduced managerial concepts from the private sector such as strategic planning. It is not clear, however, whether these techniques are appropriate or effective in the management of health-care services. A survey was undertaken to gain the perspectives of middle managers in acute units on the degree to which senior management involves them in determining performance goals and strategic plans. Results indicate that in most units, the orientation of senior management is to retain control over key issues associated with strategic planning and to minimize the degree to which the workforce is involved in any decision-making processes. Reviewing these results relative to the service-sector management theories concerning the options of industrializing or employee empowerment strategies indicates that senior management in the acute sector is operating a production-line service output philosophy. Although this orientation may meet the immediate needs of the UK Government, a review of how this strategic philosophy has severely weakened Western firms' position in world markets provides a basis for examining whether greater economic advantages might accrue to Britain by redirecting the management of change in the NHS towards a strategic philosophy based on employee empowerment.

  11. Acute effects of summer air pollution on respiratory health of asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Gielen, M H; van der Zee, S C; van Wijnen, J H; van Steen, C J; Brunekreef, B

    1997-06-01

    In the early summer of 1995, the acute respiratory effects of ambient air pollution were studied in a panel of 61 children, ages 7 to 13 yr, of whom 77% were taking asthma medication. Peak flow was measured twice daily with MiniWright meters at home and the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms and medication use was registered daily by the parents in a diary. Exposure to air pollution was characterized by the ambient concentrations of ozone, PM10, and black smoke. During the study period, maximal 1-h ozone concentrations never exceeded 130 microg/m3, and 24-h black smoke and PM10 concentrations were never higher than 41 and 60 microg/m3 respectively. Associations of air pollution and health outcomes were evaluated using time series analysis. After adjusting for pollen, time trend, and day of the week, black smoke in particular was associated with acute respiratory symptoms and with medication use. Less strong associations were found for PM10 and ozone. These results suggest that in this panel of children, most of whom had asthma, relatively low levels of particulate matter and ozone in ambient air are able to increase symptoms and medication use.

  12. Choice of study endpoint significantly impacts the results of breast cancer trials evaluating chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry; Mazzarello, Sasha; Wang, Zhou; Hutton, Brian; Dranitsaris, George; Vandermeer, Lisa; Smith, Stephanie; Clemons, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endpoints can be used to evaluate chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These endpoints reflect the various combinations of vomiting, nausea and rescue antiemetic use in the acute (0-24 h), delayed (>24-120 h) and overall (0-120 h) periods after chemotherapy. As the choice of outcome measure could potentially change the interpretation of clinical trial results, we evaluated CINV rates using different endpoints on a single dataset from a prospective cohort. Data from 177 breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy was used to calculate CINV control rates using the 15 most commonly reported CINV endpoints. As nausea remains such a significant symptom, we explored the frequency at which pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical company-funded studies included measures of nausea in their primary study endpoint. CINV control rates ranged from 12.5 %, 95 % (CI 7.6-17.4 %) for total control (no vomiting, no nausea and no rescue medication) in the overall period to 77.4 %, 95 % (CI 71.2-83.6 %) for no vomiting in the overall period. Similar differences were found in the acute and delayed periods. Non-pharmaceutical company-funded trials were more likely to include a measure of nausea in the primary study outcome (9/18, 50 %) than pharmaceutical-funded trials (1/12, 8.3 %). The choice of trial endpoint has an important impact on reported CINV control rates and could significantly impact on interpretation of the results. Primary endpoints of studies, including those mandated by regulatory bodies, should account for nausea to reflect patient experience. Reporting of endpoints should be more comprehensive to allow for cross-trial comparisons.

  13. Modeling Acute Health Effects of Astronauts from Exposure to Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    In space exploration outside the Earth s geomagnetic field, radiation exposure from solar particle events (SPE) presents a health concern for astronauts, that could impair their performance and result in possible failure of the mission. Acute risks are of special concern during extra-vehicular activities because of the rapid onset of SPE. However, most SPEs will not lead to acute risks but can lead to mission disruption if accurate projection methods are not available. Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS) is a group of clinical syndromes developing acutely (within several seconds to 3 days) after high dose whole-body or significant partial-body ionizing radiation exposures. The manifestation of these syndromes reflects the disturbance of physiological processes of various cellular groups damaged by radiation. Hematopoietic cells, skin, epithelium, intestine, and vascular endothelium are among the most sensitive tissues of human body to ionizing radiation. Most ARS symptoms are directly related to these tissues and other systems (nervous, endocrine, and cardiovascular, etc.) with coupled regulations. Here we report the progress in bio-mathematical models to describe the dose and time-dependent early human responses to ionizing radiation. The responses include lymphocyte depression, granulocyte modulation, fatigue and weakness syndrome, and upper gastrointestinal distress. The modest dose and dose-rates of SPEs are predicted to lead to large sparing of ARS, however detailed experimental data on a range of proton dose-rates for organ doses from 0.5 to 2 Gy is needed to validate the models. We also report on the ARRBOD code that integrates the BRYNTRN and SUMDOSE codes, which are used to estimate the SPE organ doses for astronauts under various space travel scenarios, with our models of ARS. The more recent effort is to provide easy web access to space radiation risk assessment using the ARRBOD code.

  14. Outpatient mental health service use by older adults after acute psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Proctor, Enola; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    This study described outpatient mental health service used by elderly patients discharged from acute inpatient psychiatric treatment for depression, assessed services barriers, and identified factors related to the use of outpatient mental health services. The sample consisted of 199 elderly patients discharged home from a geropsychiatric unit of an urban midwestern hospital. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with use of various mental health services. Almost three quarters of the elderly patients saw a psychiatrist within 6 weeks postdischarge, but few used other outpatient mental health services. The most frequently reported barriers to use included (1) cost of services, (2) personal belief that depression would improve on its own, and (3) lack of awareness of available services. The use of various outpatient services was differentially related to predisposing, need, and enabling factors. Female patients, those residing in rural areas, and those who wanted to solve their problems on their own were less likely to use outpatient mental health services. Patients who reported greater levels of functional impairment, resided in rural areas, and perceived that getting services required too much time were less likely to see a psychiatrist in the postacute period. African American patients were more likely than whites to use day treatment programs. This may be related to the fact that most day treatment centers were located in areas where the majority of residents were African Americans.

  15. [Access to medicines prescribed for acute health conditions in adults in South and Northeast Brazil].

    PubMed

    Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Cechin, Isabel Carolina Coelho Flores; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; Silveira, Denise Silva da; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2016-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study within Brazil's Project for the Expansion and Consolidation of Family Health, 2005, with the objective of universal and free access to the medication prescribed in the last medical appointment for acute health problems and to estimate the degree to which access may have improved with inclusion of the medicines in prevailing policies and programs. The sample included 4,060 adults living in the area of primary health care units in 41 municipalities in South and Northeast Brazil. Access was greater in the South (83.2%) than in the Northeast (71%), and free access was similar (37%), with a greater share by the Family Health Program (FHP) when compared to the traditional model, especially in the Northeast. Some 60% of prescribed medicines and 50% of those on the National List of Essential Medicines (RENAME) were paid for. No variation was observed in the proportion of medicines present on the prevailing RENAME list and access. However, 40% of the medicines that were paid for can currently be obtained through the Popular Pharmacy Program. The latter program appears to emerge as a new way to guarantee access to medicines prescribed in the health system.

  16. Strategies and Endpoints of Antifibrotic Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie; Dranoff, Jonathan A.; Schuppan, Detlef; Friedman, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop antifibrotic therapies for chronic liver disease, and to clarify which endpoints in antifibrotic trials will be acceptable to regulatory agencies. AASLD sponsored an endpoints conference to help accelerate the efficient testing of antifibrotic agents and to develop recommendations on clinical trial design for liver fibrosis. In this review we summarize the salient and novel elements of this conference and provide directions for future clinical trial design. The paper follows the structure of the conference and is organized into five areas: I) Antifibrotic trial design; II) Preclinical proof of concept studies; III) Pharmacologic targets: rationale and lessons to learn; IV) Rational drug design and development; V) Consensus and recommendations on design of clinical trials in liver fibrosis. Expert overviews and collaborative discussions helped to summarize the key unmet needs and directions for the future, including: 1) Greater clarification of at-risk populations and study groups; 2) Standardization of all elements of drug discovery and testing; 3) Standardization of clinical trial approaches; 4) Accelerated development of improved non-invasive markers; 5) Need for exploration of potential off-target toxicities of future antifibrotic drugs. PMID:25626988

  17. Reengineering acute episodic and chronic care delivery: the Geisinger Health System experience.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Jonathan R; Casale, Alfred S; Steele, Glenn D; Toms, Steven A

    2012-07-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) represents an evolution in clinical decision-making research that allows for the study of heterogeneous groups of patients with complex diseases processes. It has foundations in decision science, reliability science, and health care policy research. Health care finance will increasingly rely on CER for guidance in the coming years. There is increasing awareness of the importance of decreasing unwarranted variation in health care delivery. In the past 7 years, Geisinger Health System has performed broad reengineering of its acute episodic and chronic care delivery models utilizing macrosystem-level application of CER principles. These provider-driven process initiatives have resulted in significant improvement across all segments of care delivery, improved patient outcomes, and notable cost containment. These programs have led to the creation of novel pricing models, and when "hardwired" throughout a care delivery system, they can lead to correct medical decision making by 100% of providers in all patient encounters. Neurosurgery as a specialty faces unique challenges and opportunities with respect to broad adoption and application of CER techniques. PMID:22746233

  18. Reengineering acute episodic and chronic care delivery: the Geisinger Health System experience.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Jonathan R; Casale, Alfred S; Steele, Glenn D; Toms, Steven A

    2012-07-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) represents an evolution in clinical decision-making research that allows for the study of heterogeneous groups of patients with complex diseases processes. It has foundations in decision science, reliability science, and health care policy research. Health care finance will increasingly rely on CER for guidance in the coming years. There is increasing awareness of the importance of decreasing unwarranted variation in health care delivery. In the past 7 years, Geisinger Health System has performed broad reengineering of its acute episodic and chronic care delivery models utilizing macrosystem-level application of CER principles. These provider-driven process initiatives have resulted in significant improvement across all segments of care delivery, improved patient outcomes, and notable cost containment. These programs have led to the creation of novel pricing models, and when "hardwired" throughout a care delivery system, they can lead to correct medical decision making by 100% of providers in all patient encounters. Neurosurgery as a specialty faces unique challenges and opportunities with respect to broad adoption and application of CER techniques.

  19. Acute health impacts of airborne particles estimated from satellite remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Liu, Yang; Hu, Mu; Pan, Xiaochuan; Shi, Jing; Chen, Feng; He, Kebin; Koutrakis, Petros; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing provides a unique opportunity to monitor air quality from space at global, continental, national and regional scales. Most current research focused on developing empirical models using ground measurements of the ambient particulate. However, the application of satellite-based exposure assessment in environmental health is still limited, especially for acute effects, because the development of satellite PM(2.5) model depends on the availability of ground measurements. We tested the hypothesis that MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) exposure estimates, obtained from NASA satellites, are directly associated with daily health outcomes. Three independent healthcare databases were used: unscheduled outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and mortality collected in Beijing metropolitan area, China during 2006. We use generalized linear models to compare the short-term effects of air pollution assessed by ground monitoring (PM(10)) with adjustment of absolute humidity (AH) and AH-calibrated AOD. Across all databases we found that both AH-calibrated AOD and PM(10) (adjusted by AH) were consistently associated with elevated daily events on the current day and/or lag days for cardiovascular diseases, ischemic heart diseases, and COPD. The relative risks estimated by AH-calibrated AOD and PM(10) (adjusted by AH) were similar. Additionally, compared to ground PM(10), we found that AH-calibrated AOD had narrower confidence intervals for all models and was more robust in estimating the current day and lag day effects. Our preliminary findings suggested that, with proper adjustment of meteorological factors, satellite AOD can be used directly to estimate the acute health impacts of ambient particles without prior calibrating to the sparse ground monitoring networks. PMID:23220016

  20. Acute health impacts of airborne particles estimated from satellite remote sensing✩

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Liu, Yang; Hu, Mu; Pan, Xiaochuan; Shi, Jing; Chen, Feng; He, Kebin; Koutrakis, Petros; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing provides a unique opportunity to monitor air quality from space at global, continental, national and regional scales. Most current research focused on developing empirical models using ground measurements of the ambient particulate. However, the application of satellite-based exposure assessment in environmental health is still limited, especially for acute effects, because the development of satellite PM2.5 model depends on the availability of ground measurements. We tested the hypothesis that MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) exposure estimates, obtained from NASA satellites, are directly associated with daily health outcomes. Three independent healthcare databases were used: unscheduled outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and mortality collected in Beijing metropolitan area, China during 2006. We use generalized linear models to compare the short-term effects of air pollution assessed by ground monitoring (PM10) with adjustment of absolute humidity (AH) and AH-calibrated AOD. Across all databases we found that both AH-calibrated AOD and PM10 (adjusted by AH) were consistently associated with elevated daily events on the current day and/or lag days for cardiovascular diseases, ischemic heart diseases, and COPD. The relative risks estimated by AH-calibrated AOD and PM10 (adjusted by AH) were similar. Additionally, compared to ground PM10, we found that AH-calibrated AOD had narrower confidence intervals for all models and was more robust in estimating the current day and lag day effects. Our preliminary findings suggested that, with proper adjustment of meteorological factors, satellite AOD can be used directly to estimate the acute health impacts of ambient particles without prior calibrating to the sparse ground monitoring networks. PMID:23220016

  1. Acute health impacts of airborne particles estimated from satellite remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Liu, Yang; Hu, Mu; Pan, Xiaochuan; Shi, Jing; Chen, Feng; He, Kebin; Koutrakis, Petros; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing provides a unique opportunity to monitor air quality from space at global, continental, national and regional scales. Most current research focused on developing empirical models using ground measurements of the ambient particulate. However, the application of satellite-based exposure assessment in environmental health is still limited, especially for acute effects, because the development of satellite PM(2.5) model depends on the availability of ground measurements. We tested the hypothesis that MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) exposure estimates, obtained from NASA satellites, are directly associated with daily health outcomes. Three independent healthcare databases were used: unscheduled outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and mortality collected in Beijing metropolitan area, China during 2006. We use generalized linear models to compare the short-term effects of air pollution assessed by ground monitoring (PM(10)) with adjustment of absolute humidity (AH) and AH-calibrated AOD. Across all databases we found that both AH-calibrated AOD and PM(10) (adjusted by AH) were consistently associated with elevated daily events on the current day and/or lag days for cardiovascular diseases, ischemic heart diseases, and COPD. The relative risks estimated by AH-calibrated AOD and PM(10) (adjusted by AH) were similar. Additionally, compared to ground PM(10), we found that AH-calibrated AOD had narrower confidence intervals for all models and was more robust in estimating the current day and lag day effects. Our preliminary findings suggested that, with proper adjustment of meteorological factors, satellite AOD can be used directly to estimate the acute health impacts of ambient particles without prior calibrating to the sparse ground monitoring networks.

  2. A comparison of Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scoring system in predicting mortality and length of stay at surgical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Gilani, Mahryar Taghavi; Razavi, Majid; Azad, Azadeh Mokhtari

    2014-01-01

    Background: In critically ill patients, several scoring systems have been developed over the last three decades. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) and the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) are the most widely used scoring systems in the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic accuracy of SAPS II and APACHE II and APACHE III scoring systems in predicting short-term hospital mortality of surgical ICU patients. Materials and Methods: Prospectively collected data from 202 patients admitted to Mashhad University Hospital postoperative ICU were analyzed. Calibration was estimated using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test. Discrimination was evaluated by using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under a ROC curve (AUC). Result: Two hundred and two patients admitted on post-surgical ICU were evaluated. The mean SAPS II, APACHE II, and APACHE III scores for survivors were found to be significantly lower than of non-survivors. The calibration was best for APACHE II score. Discrimination was excellent for APACHE II (AUC: 0.828) score and acceptable for APACHE III (AUC: 0.782) and SAPS II (AUC: 0.778) scores. Conclusion: APACHE II provided better discrimination than APACHE III and SAPS II calibration was good at APACHE II and poor at APACHE III and SAPS II. Use of APACHE II was excellent in this post-surgical ICU. PMID:24791049

  3. Acute health effects associated with exposure to volcanic air pollution (vog) from increased activity at Kilauea Volcano in 2008.

    PubMed

    Longo, Bernadette M; Yang, Wei; Green, Joshua B; Crosby, Frederick L; Crosby, Vickie L

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the Kilauea Volcano on the island of Hawai'i increased eruption activity and emissions of sulfurous volcanic air pollution called vog. The purpose of this study was to promptly assess for a relative increase in cases of medically diagnosed acute illnesses in an exposed Hawaiian community. Using a within-clinic retrospective cohort design, comparisons were made for visits of acute illnesses during the 14 wk prior to the increased volcanic emissions (low exposure) to 14 wk of high vog exposure when ambient sulfur dioxide was threefold higher and averaged 75 parts per billion volume per day. Logistic regression analysis estimated effect measures between the low- and high-exposure cohorts for age, gender, race, and smoking status. There were statistically significant positive associations between high vog exposure and visits for medically diagnosed cough, headache, acute pharyngitis, and acute airway problems. More than a sixfold increase in odds was estimated for visits with acute airway problems, primarily experienced by young Pacific Islanders. These findings suggest that the elevated volcanic emissions in 2008 were associated with increased morbidity of acute illnesses in age and racial subgroups of the general Hawaiian population. Continued investigation is crucial to fully assess the health impact of this natural source of sulfurous air pollution. Culturally appropriate primary- and secondary-level health prevention initiatives are recommended for populations in Hawai'i and volcanically active areas worldwide. PMID:20818536

  4. Forward and inverse electroencephalographic modeling in health and in acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Goh, S.Y. Matthew; Torgerson, Carinna M.; Chambers, Micah C.; Kikinis, Ron; Van Horn, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective EEG source localization is demonstrated in three cases of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) with progressive lesion loads using anatomically faithful models of the head which account for pathology. Methods Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes were used to generate head models via the finite element method (FEM). A total of 25 tissue types—including 6 types accounting for pathology— were included. To determine the effects of TBI upon source localization accuracy, a minimum-norm operator was used to perform inverse localization and to determine the accuracy of the latter. Results The importance of using a more comprehensive number of tissue types is confirmed in both health and in TBI. Pathology omission is found to cause substantial inaccuracies in EEG forward matrix calculations, with lead field sensitivity being underestimated by as much as ~200% in (peri-) contusional regions when TBI-related changes are ignored. Failing to account for such conductivity changes is found to misestimate substantial localization error by up to 35 mm. Conclusions Changes in head conductivity profiles should be accounted for when performing EEG modeling in acute TBI. Significance Given the challenges of inverse localization in TBI, this framework can benefit neurotrauma patients by providing useful insights on pathophysiology. PMID:23746499

  5. Effects of acute and chronic hypohydration on kidney health and function.

    PubMed

    Feehally, John; Khosravi, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the homeostasis of body fluid tonicity and effective circulating volume. Renal homeostatic mechanisms are frequently challenged in acutely ill people. Fluid depletion causing hypovolemia may result in renal hypoperfusion that, if left untreated, may lead to acute kidney failure. Some populations, notably older people and neonates, are less tolerant of extremes in fluid loading and deprivation, similar to those with established chronic kidney disease. Risk of kidney injury during fluid depletion is increased by medications including diuretics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and renin-angiotensin system blockers. There is no consistent evidence indicating that lower-than-average fluid intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Increasing consumption of sugar-containing beverages is, however, a major concern for kidney health as a precursor of obesity and diabetes. There is no evidence that high dietary protein intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Idiosyncratic, adverse renal responses have been described with creatine supplements. There are only a few clinical conditions for which high fluid intake should be considered. These include recurrent kidney stones or urinary tract infections and, possibly, polycystic kidney disease. PMID:26290296

  6. Effects of acute and chronic hypohydration on kidney health and function.

    PubMed

    Feehally, John; Khosravi, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the homeostasis of body fluid tonicity and effective circulating volume. Renal homeostatic mechanisms are frequently challenged in acutely ill people. Fluid depletion causing hypovolemia may result in renal hypoperfusion that, if left untreated, may lead to acute kidney failure. Some populations, notably older people and neonates, are less tolerant of extremes in fluid loading and deprivation, similar to those with established chronic kidney disease. Risk of kidney injury during fluid depletion is increased by medications including diuretics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and renin-angiotensin system blockers. There is no consistent evidence indicating that lower-than-average fluid intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Increasing consumption of sugar-containing beverages is, however, a major concern for kidney health as a precursor of obesity and diabetes. There is no evidence that high dietary protein intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Idiosyncratic, adverse renal responses have been described with creatine supplements. There are only a few clinical conditions for which high fluid intake should be considered. These include recurrent kidney stones or urinary tract infections and, possibly, polycystic kidney disease.

  7. Life in acute mental health settings: experiences and perceptions of service users and nurses.

    PubMed

    Rose, D; Evans, J; Laker, C; Wykes, T

    2015-02-01

    Background. Acute psychiatric provision in the UK today as well as globally has many critics including service users and nurses. Method. Four focus groups, each meeting twice, were held separately for service users and nurses. The analysis was not purely inductive but driven by concerns with the social position of marginalised groups - both patients and staff. Results. The main themes were nurse/patient interaction and coercion. Service users and nurses conceptualised these differently. Service users found nurses inaccessible and uncaring, whereas nurses also felt powerless because their working life was dominated by administration. Nurses saw coercive situations as a reasonable response to factors 'internal' to the patient whereas for service users they were driven to extreme behaviour by the environment of the ward and coercive interventions were unnecessary and heavy handed. Conclusion. This study sheds new light on living and working in acute mental health settings today by comparing the perceptions of service users and nurses and deploying service user and nurse researchers. The intention is to promote better practice by providing a window on the perceptions of both groups. PMID:24330951

  8. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arber, Daniel A; Orazi, Attilio; Hasserjian, Robert; Thiele, Jürgen; Borowitz, Michael J; Le Beau, Michelle M; Bloomfield, Clara D; Cazzola, Mario; Vardiman, James W

    2016-05-19

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues was last updated in 2008. Since then, there have been numerous advances in the identification of unique biomarkers associated with some myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemias, largely derived from gene expression analysis and next-generation sequencing that can significantly improve the diagnostic criteria as well as the prognostic relevance of entities currently included in the WHO classification and that also suggest new entities that should be added. Therefore, there is a clear need for a revision to the current classification. The revisions to the categories of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia will be published in a monograph in 2016 and reflect a consensus of opinion of hematopathologists, hematologists, oncologists, and geneticists. The 2016 edition represents a revision of the prior classification rather than an entirely new classification and attempts to incorporate new clinical, prognostic, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic data that have emerged since the last edition. The major changes in the classification and their rationale are presented here.

  9. Comparison of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation IV to predict intensive care unit mortality

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Bashu Dev; Shrestha, Gentle S.; Pradhan, Bishwas; Amatya, Roshana

    2015-01-01

    Context: Clinical assessment of severity of illness is an essential component of medical practice to predict the outcome of critically ill-patient. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) model is one of the widely used scoring systems. Aims: This study was designed to evaluate the Performance of APACHE II and IV scoring systems in our Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Settings and Design: A prospective study in 6 bedded ICU, including 76 patients all above 15 years. Subjects and Methods: APACHE II and APACHE IV scores were calculated based on the worst values in the first 24 h of admission. All enrolled patients were followed, and outcome was recorded as survivors or nonsurvivors. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 17. Results: The mean APACHE score was significantly higher among nonsurvivors than survivors (P < 0.005). Discrimination for APACHE II and APACHE IV was fair with area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73 and 0.79 respectively. The cut-off point with best Youden index for APACHE II was 17 and for APACHE IV was 85. Above cut-off point, mortality was higher for both models (P < 0.005). Hosmer–Lemeshow Chi-square coefficient test showed better calibration for APACHE II than APACHE IV. A positive correlation was seen between the models with Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.748 (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Discrimination was better for APACHE IV than APACHE II model however Calibration was better for APACHE II than APACHE IV model in our study. There was good correlation between the two models observed in our study. PMID:25722550

  10. Toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in soils posing environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Asensio, V; Zaldibar, B; Soto, M; Marigómez, I

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity profiles of two soils (a brownfield in Legazpi and an abandoned iron mine in Zugaztieta; Basque Country) contaminated with several metals (As, Zn, Pb and Cu in Legazpi; Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in Zugaztieta) and petroleum hydrocarbons (in Legazpi) were determined using a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Investigated soils exceeded screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe). Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with a selected set of test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates, as well as with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. The sensitivity of the test species and the toxicity endpoints varied depending on the soil. It was concluded that whilst Zugaztieta soil showed very little or no toxicity, Legazpi soil was toxic according to almost all the toxicity tests (solid phase Microtox, D. discoideum inhibition of fruiting body formation and developmental cycle solid phase assays, lettuce seed germination and root elongation test, earthworm acute toxicity and reproduction tests, D. discoideum cell viability and replication elutriate assays). Thus, albeit both soils had similar SVs, their ecotoxicological risk, and therefore the need for intervening, was different for each soil as unveiled after toxicity profiling based on multiple endpoint bioassays. Such a toxicity profiling approach is suitable to be applied for scenario-targeted soil risk assessment in those cases where applicable national/regional soil legislation based on SVs demands further toxicity assessment. PMID:24819436

  11. Toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in soils posing environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Asensio, V; Zaldibar, B; Soto, M; Marigómez, I

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity profiles of two soils (a brownfield in Legazpi and an abandoned iron mine in Zugaztieta; Basque Country) contaminated with several metals (As, Zn, Pb and Cu in Legazpi; Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in Zugaztieta) and petroleum hydrocarbons (in Legazpi) were determined using a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Investigated soils exceeded screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe). Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with a selected set of test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates, as well as with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. The sensitivity of the test species and the toxicity endpoints varied depending on the soil. It was concluded that whilst Zugaztieta soil showed very little or no toxicity, Legazpi soil was toxic according to almost all the toxicity tests (solid phase Microtox, D. discoideum inhibition of fruiting body formation and developmental cycle solid phase assays, lettuce seed germination and root elongation test, earthworm acute toxicity and reproduction tests, D. discoideum cell viability and replication elutriate assays). Thus, albeit both soils had similar SVs, their ecotoxicological risk, and therefore the need for intervening, was different for each soil as unveiled after toxicity profiling based on multiple endpoint bioassays. Such a toxicity profiling approach is suitable to be applied for scenario-targeted soil risk assessment in those cases where applicable national/regional soil legislation based on SVs demands further toxicity assessment.

  12. Knowledge, attitude and practice factors in childhood acute respiratory infections in a peninsular Malaysia health district.

    PubMed

    Vasanthamala, A; Arokiasamy, J T

    1989-01-01

    This study compares the knowledge, attitudes and practice of mothers in two ethnic groups with regard to acute respiratory infections (ARI) in their child. Most had traditional beliefs as to the cause of ARI with only a minority knowing the causes. Most mothers were aware of the effect of frequent attacks of ARI on the health status of their child and of the importance of early treatment. Reasons for their becoming worried during an episode of ARI in their child indicated that problems of distance, transportation and arrangements for care of their other children predominate. A large proportion of the respondents felt that their present knowledge of ARI was inadequate and were thus interested in obtaining more information. PMID:2620023

  13. Knowledge, attitude and practice factors in childhood acute respiratory infections in a peninsular Malaysia health district.

    PubMed

    Vasanthamala, A; Arokiasamy, J T

    1989-01-01

    This study compares the knowledge, attitudes and practice of mothers in two ethnic groups with regard to acute respiratory infections (ARI) in their child. Most had traditional beliefs as to the cause of ARI with only a minority knowing the causes. Most mothers were aware of the effect of frequent attacks of ARI on the health status of their child and of the importance of early treatment. Reasons for their becoming worried during an episode of ARI in their child indicated that problems of distance, transportation and arrangements for care of their other children predominate. A large proportion of the respondents felt that their present knowledge of ARI was inadequate and were thus interested in obtaining more information.

  14. Ecosystem services as assessment endpoints for ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Munns, Wayne R; Rea, Anne W; Suter, Glenn W; Martin, Lawrence; Blake-Hedges, Lynne; Crk, Tanja; Davis, Christine; Ferreira, Gina; Jordan, Steve; Mahoney, Michele; Barron, Mace G

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem services are defined as the outputs of ecological processes that contribute to human welfare or have the potential to do so in the future. Those outputs include food and drinking water, clean air and water, and pollinated crops. The need to protect the services provided by natural systems has been recognized previously, but ecosystem services have not been formally incorporated into ecological risk assessment practice in a general way in the United States. Endpoints used conventionally in ecological risk assessment, derived directly from the state of the ecosystem (e.g., biophysical structure and processes), and endpoints based on ecosystem services serve different purposes. Conventional endpoints are ecologically important and susceptible entities and attributes that are protected under US laws and regulations. Ecosystem service endpoints are a conceptual and analytical step beyond conventional endpoints and are intended to complement conventional endpoints by linking and extending endpoints to goods and services with more obvious benefit to humans. Conventional endpoints can be related to ecosystem services even when the latter are not considered explicitly during problem formulation. To advance the use of ecosystem service endpoints in ecological risk assessment, the US Environmental Protection Agency's Risk Assessment Forum has added generic endpoints based on ecosystem services (ES-GEAE) to the original 2003 set of generic ecological assessment endpoints (GEAEs). Like conventional GEAEs, ES-GEAEs are defined by an entity and an attribute. Also like conventional GEAEs, ES-GEAEs are broadly described and will need to be made specific when applied to individual assessments. Adoption of ecosystem services as a type of assessment endpoint is intended to improve the value of risk assessment to environmental decision making, linking ecological risk to human well-being, and providing an improved means of communicating those risks. Integr Environ Assess Manag

  15. Ecosystem services as assessment endpoints for ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Munns, Wayne R; Rea, Anne W; Suter, Glenn W; Martin, Lawrence; Blake-Hedges, Lynne; Crk, Tanja; Davis, Christine; Ferreira, Gina; Jordan, Steve; Mahoney, Michele; Barron, Mace G

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem services are defined as the outputs of ecological processes that contribute to human welfare or have the potential to do so in the future. Those outputs include food and drinking water, clean air and water, and pollinated crops. The need to protect the services provided by natural systems has been recognized previously, but ecosystem services have not been formally incorporated into ecological risk assessment practice in a general way in the United States. Endpoints used conventionally in ecological risk assessment, derived directly from the state of the ecosystem (e.g., biophysical structure and processes), and endpoints based on ecosystem services serve different purposes. Conventional endpoints are ecologically important and susceptible entities and attributes that are protected under US laws and regulations. Ecosystem service endpoints are a conceptual and analytical step beyond conventional endpoints and are intended to complement conventional endpoints by linking and extending endpoints to goods and services with more obvious benefit to humans. Conventional endpoints can be related to ecosystem services even when the latter are not considered explicitly during problem formulation. To advance the use of ecosystem service endpoints in ecological risk assessment, the US Environmental Protection Agency's Risk Assessment Forum has added generic endpoints based on ecosystem services (ES-GEAE) to the original 2003 set of generic ecological assessment endpoints (GEAEs). Like conventional GEAEs, ES-GEAEs are defined by an entity and an attribute. Also like conventional GEAEs, ES-GEAEs are broadly described and will need to be made specific when applied to individual assessments. Adoption of ecosystem services as a type of assessment endpoint is intended to improve the value of risk assessment to environmental decision making, linking ecological risk to human well-being, and providing an improved means of communicating those risks. Integr Environ Assess Manag

  16. Health Care Insurance, Financial Concerns, and Delays to Hospital Presentation in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Smolderen, Kim G.; Spertus, John A.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Tang, Fengming; Ross, Joseph S.; Ting, Henry H.; Alexander, Karen P.; Rathore, Saif S.; Chan, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Context Little is known about how health insurance status affects decisions to seek care during emergency medical conditions like acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Objective To examine the association between lack of health insurance and financial concerns about accessing care among those with health insurance, and the time from symptom onset to hospital presentation (prehospital delays) during AMI. Design, Setting and Patients Multicenter, prospective registry of 3721 AMI patients enrolled between April, 2005 and December, 2008 from 24 U.S. hospitals. Health insurance status was categorized as uninsured, insured with financial concerns about accessing care, and insured without financial concerns. Insurance information was determined from medical records while financial concerns among those with health insurance were determined from structured interviews. Main Outcome Measure Prehospital delay times (≤2 hours, >2 to 6 hours, >6 hours), adjusted for demographic, clinical, social and psychological factors using hierarchical ordinal regression models. Results Of 3,721 patients, 738 (19.8%) were uninsured, and 689 (18.5%) were insured with financial concerns, and 2294 (61.7%) were insured without financial concerns. Uninsured and insured patients with financial concerns were more likely to delay seeking care during AMI, with prehospital delays >6 hours among 48.6% of uninsured patients, 44.6% of insured patients with financial concerns, and 39.3% of insured patients without financial concerns, as compared with prehospital delays of <2 hours among 27.5%, 33.5%, and 36.6% of those who were uninsured, insured with financial concerns, and insured without financial concerns, respectively (P <.001). After adjusting for potential confounders, both insurance with financial concerns and lack of insurance were associated with prehospital delays: insurance without financial concerns (reference); insurance with financial concerns, adjusted odds ratio [OR)], 1.21; 95% confidence

  17. Acute health effects in a community after a release of hydrofluoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, J.S.; Brender, J.D.; Sanderson, L.M.; Perrotta, D.M.; Beauchamp, R.A. )

    1991-05-01

    {approximately} 3,000 persons were evacuated from a Texas community after 24,036 kg (53,000 lb) of caustic hydrofluoric acid (HF) were released from a nearby petrochemical plant. Emergency room and hospital records of 939 persons who were seen at two area hospitals were reviewed. Most persons who presented at the emergency rooms were female (56%) or black (60%), and their mean age was 33.9 y. The most frequently reported symptoms were eye irritation (41.5%), burning throat (21%), headache (20.6%), and shortness of breath (19.4%). Physical examination results were normal for 49% of the cases; however, irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, skin, and lungs were noted on other exams. Decreased pulmonary function was demonstrated by pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in the first second, less than 80% of predicted value, 42.3%); hypoxemia (pO2 less than 80 mm Hg, 17.4%) and hypocalcemia (less than 8.5 mg/dl, 16.3%) were also noted. Ninety-four (10%) of the cases were hospitalized, and more than 83% of all cases were discharged with a primary diagnosis of HF exposure. There are several reports of individuals who are acutely and chronically exposed to HF; however, we are unaware of other published reports that describe exposure of a community to HF. This incident represented a unique opportunity to study the immediate health impact on a community of residents who were exposed to a hazardous materials release. Results of this analysis suggest that (a) initial health problems should be followed up, (b) any long-term health effects of HF exposure must be assessed, and (c) the health impact on the population at risk should be determined.

  18. Endpoint distinctiveness facilitates analogical mapping in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Cook, Robert G

    2015-03-01

    Analogical thinking necessitates mapping shared relations across two separate domains. We investigated whether pigeons could learn faster with ordinal mapping of relations across two physical dimensions (circle size & choice spatial position) relative to random mapping of these relations. Pigeons were trained to relate six circular samples of different sizes to horizontally positioned choice locations in a six alternative matching-to-sample task. Three pigeons were trained in a mapped condition in which circle size mapped directly onto choice spatial position. Three other pigeons were trained in a random condition in which the relations between size and choice position were arbitrarily assigned. The mapped group showed an advantage over the random group in acquiring this task. In a subsequent second phase, relations between the dimensions were ordinally reversed for the mapped group and re-randomized for the random group. There was no difference in how quickly matching accuracy re-emerged in the two groups, although the mapped group eventually performed more accurately. Analyses suggested this mapped advantage was likely due to endpoint distinctiveness and the benefits of proximity errors during choice responding rather than a conceptual or relational advantage attributable to the common or ordinal mapping of the two dimensions. This potential difficulty in mapping relations across dimensions may limit the pigeons' capacity for more advanced types of analogical reasoning. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall.

  19. Holographic endpoint of spatially modulated phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2010-12-15

    In a previous paper [S. Nakamura, H. Ooguri, and C. S. Park, Phys. Rev. D 81, 044018 (2010)], we showed that the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole in the five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space coupled to the Maxwell theory with the Chern-Simons term is unstable when the Chern-Simons coupling is sufficiently large. In the dual conformal field theory, the instability suggests a spatially modulated phase transition. In this paper, we construct and analyze nonlinear solutions which describe the endpoint of this phase transition. In the limit where the Chern-Simons coupling is large, we find that the phase transition is of the second order with the mean field critical exponent. However, the dispersion relation with the Van Hove singularity enhances quantum corrections in the bulk, and we argue that this changes the order of the phase transition from the second to the first. We compute linear response functions in the nonlinear solution and find an infinite off-diagonal DC conductivity in the new phase.

  20. Building on a national health information technology strategic plan for long-term and post-acute care: comments by the Long Term Post Acute Care Health Information Technology Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Alwan, Majd; Batshon, Lynne; Bloom, Shawn M; Brennan, Richard D; Derr, John F; Dougherty, Michelle; Gruhn, Peter; Kirby, Annessa; Manard, Barbara; Raiford, Robin; Serio, Ingrid Johnson

    2011-07-01

    The LTPAC (Long Term Post Acute Care) Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative consists of an alliance of long-term services and post-acute care stakeholders. Members of the collaborative are actively promoting HIT innovations in long-term care settings because IT adoption for health care institutions in the United States has become a high priority. One method used to actively promote HIT is providing expert comments on important documents addressing HIT adoption. Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT released a draft of the Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan 2011-2015 for public comment. The following brief is intended to inform about recommendations and comments made by the Collaborative on the strategic plan. PMID:21667892

  1. Building on a national health information technology strategic plan for long-term and post-acute care: comments by the Long Term Post Acute Care Health Information Technology Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Alwan, Majd; Batshon, Lynne; Bloom, Shawn M; Brennan, Richard D; Derr, John F; Dougherty, Michelle; Gruhn, Peter; Kirby, Annessa; Manard, Barbara; Raiford, Robin; Serio, Ingrid Johnson

    2011-07-01

    The LTPAC (Long Term Post Acute Care) Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative consists of an alliance of long-term services and post-acute care stakeholders. Members of the collaborative are actively promoting HIT innovations in long-term care settings because IT adoption for health care institutions in the United States has become a high priority. One method used to actively promote HIT is providing expert comments on important documents addressing HIT adoption. Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT released a draft of the Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan 2011-2015 for public comment. The following brief is intended to inform about recommendations and comments made by the Collaborative on the strategic plan.

  2. Alternate Endpoints for Deep Vadose Zone Environments: Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Michelle H.

    2013-02-24

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical to achieve. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provide a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable establishing a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches.

  3. Alternate Endpoints for Deep Vadose Zone Environments: Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress - 13036

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, M. Hope

    2013-07-01

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical to achieve. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provide a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable establishing a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches. (authors)

  4. Deep Vadose Zone Remediation: Technical and Policy Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress in Achieving Cleanup Endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Michelle H.

    2013-02-24

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provides a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable the establishment of a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches.

  5. Health-related QOL in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doll, Helen; Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-01-01

    There is a lack of emphasis on health-related QOL (HR-QOL) changes associated with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (CB) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this review is to examine the use of HR-QOL instruments to evaluate acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, so as to form recommendations for future research.A literature search of papers published between 1966 and July 2003 identified more than 300 articles that used acute exacerbation of CB or COPD as the search term. However, only 21 of these studies employed HR-QOL measures as predictors of outcome or in the assessment of the impact, evolution or treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD or CB. A variety of HR-QOL measures were used, both generic and disease specific. The disease-specific St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), devised for patients with stable CB and with a recall period of 1-12 months, was the most widely used measure, with the Chronic Respiratory disease Questionnaire (CRQ) and the Baseline and Transitional Dyspnoea Index (BDI, TDI) being the only other disease-specific measures used. Most measures, both generic and disease specific, performed adequately when used during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD and indicated poor HR-QOL during acute exacerbation, which improved on resolution of the exacerbation. Relationships were evident between HR-QOL during an acute exacerbation and various outcomes, including post-exacerbation functional status, hospital re- admission for acute exacerbation or COPD, and mortality. There is a need for studies of treatments for acute exacerbation of CB or COPD to include an appropriate HR-QOL instrument to aid in the stratification of patients so as to target the right treatment to the right patient group. While a new instrument could be developed to measure HR-QOL during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, currently available disease-specific measures such as the CRQ and the SGRQ appear to be acceptable to patients during acute

  6. Developing a market orientation in the Health Service: a survey of acute NHS Trusts in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Laing, A W; Galbraith, A

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the introduction of the quasi market mechanism into the Health Service has required that managers within NHS trusts acquire new managerial skills relating to market operations and, more importantly, reorientate their organizations towards the marketplace. Examines the pattern of development which has occurred within acute trusts across Scotland in the past three years, and argues that managers in the majority of trusts have developed a remarkably robust and relevant conceptualization of the nature and application of marketing within the NHS, reflecting the difficulties managers have faced in selling the concept of marketing to a generally sceptical body of clinicians. Notes, in part owing to such professional scepticism, that the development of marketing as an implementable approach to operations has lagged significantly behind the managerial conceptualization, although this cannot be attributed solely to resistance from clinicians and other health care professionals. Rather, suggests that such limited progress in implementing a market orientation reflects a range of "structural" barriers, both within individual trusts and the specific market environment faced by trusts.

  7. Untargeted LC-MS Metabolomics of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Differentiates Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome from Health

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Charles R.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kovach, Melissa A.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Burant, Charles F.; Stringer, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a significant hazard to human health and is clinically challenging because there are no prognostic biomarkers and no effective pharmacotherapy. The lung compartment metabolome may detail the status of the local environment that could be useful in ARDS biomarker discovery and the identification of drug target opportunities. However, neither the utility of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as a biofluid for metabolomics nor the optimal analytical platform for metabolite identification are established. To address this, we undertook a study to compare metabolites in BALF samples from patients with ARDS and healthy controls using a newly developed liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectroscopy (MS) platform for untargeted metabolomics. Following initial testing of three different high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns, we determined that reversed phase (RP)-LC and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), were the most informative chromatographic methods because they yielded the most and highest quality data. Following confirmation of metabolite identification, statistical analysis resulted in 37 differentiating metabolites in the BALF of ARDS compared with health across both analytical platforms. Pathway analysis revealed networks associated with amino acid metabolism, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, phospholipids and purine metabolism in the ARDS BALF. The complementary analytical platforms of RPLC and HILIC-LC generated informative, insightful metabolomics data of the ARDS lung environment. PMID:24289193

  8. Computer Model for Prediction of PCB Dechlorination and Biodegradation Endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Just, E.M.; Klasson, T.

    1999-04-19

    Mathematical modeling of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) transformation served as a means of predicting possible endpoints of bioremediation, thus allowing evaluation of several of the most common transformation patterns. Correlation between laboratory-observed and predicted endpoint data was, in some cases, as good as 0.98 (perfect correlation = 1.0).

  9. Facilitators and barriers to doing workplace mental health research: Case study of acute psychological trauma in a public transit system.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Bender, Ash; Eynan, Rahel; O'Grady, John; Shah, Ravi

    2016-03-10

    The Acute Psychological Trauma (APT) Study was a collaboration between an acute care hospital, a specialized multidisciplinary program designed to meet the mental health needs of injured workers, and a large urban public transit system. The overall purpose was to evaluate a Best Practices Intervention (BPI) for employees affected by acute psychological trauma compared to a Treatment as Usual (TAU) group. The specific purpose is to discuss facilitators and barriers that were recognized in implementing and carrying out mental health research in a workplace setting. Over the course of the APT study, a joint implementation committee was responsible for day-to-day study operations and made regular observations on the facilitators and barriers that arose throughout the study. The facilitators to this study included the longstanding relationships among the partners, increased recognition for the need of mental health research in the workplace, and the existence of a community advisory committee. The significant barriers to doing this study of mental health research in the workplace included differences in organizational culture, inconsistent union support, co-interventions, and stigma. Researchers and funding agencies need to be flexible and provide additional resources in order to overcome the barriers that can exist doing workplace mental health research.

  10. Facilitators and barriers to doing workplace mental health research: Case study of acute psychological trauma in a public transit system.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Bender, Ash; Eynan, Rahel; O'Grady, John; Shah, Ravi

    2016-03-10

    The Acute Psychological Trauma (APT) Study was a collaboration between an acute care hospital, a specialized multidisciplinary program designed to meet the mental health needs of injured workers, and a large urban public transit system. The overall purpose was to evaluate a Best Practices Intervention (BPI) for employees affected by acute psychological trauma compared to a Treatment as Usual (TAU) group. The specific purpose is to discuss facilitators and barriers that were recognized in implementing and carrying out mental health research in a workplace setting. Over the course of the APT study, a joint implementation committee was responsible for day-to-day study operations and made regular observations on the facilitators and barriers that arose throughout the study. The facilitators to this study included the longstanding relationships among the partners, increased recognition for the need of mental health research in the workplace, and the existence of a community advisory committee. The significant barriers to doing this study of mental health research in the workplace included differences in organizational culture, inconsistent union support, co-interventions, and stigma. Researchers and funding agencies need to be flexible and provide additional resources in order to overcome the barriers that can exist doing workplace mental health research. PMID:26967029

  11. A multinational health professional perspective of the prevalence of mood disorders in patients with acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Upton, Dominic; Solowiej, Kazia; Woo, Kevin Y

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has started to identify mood disorders and problems associated with acute and chronic wounds, which have been shown to contribute to delayed healing, poor patient well-being and a reduced quality of life. Furthermore, mood disorders have been shown to have a negative impact on financial costs for service providers and the wider society in terms of treatment and sickness absence. This study aimed to survey a multinational sample of health professionals to explore their perspective and awareness of mood disorders amongst acute and chronic wound patients. Responses were received from n = 908 health professionals working in Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, North America and South America. A strong awareness of the prevalence of mood disorders appeared to be widespread among the health professionals across the world, in addition to a view on the potential factors contributing to these problems with mood. Despite this, it was thought that few patients were actually receiving treatment for their mood disorders. Implications for clinical practice include the need for health professionals to engage actively with their patients to enable them to learn from their experiences. Studies that explore the benefits of treatments and techniques appropriate for minimising mood disorders in patients with wounds would provide empirical evidence for health professionals to make recommendations for patients with acute and chronic wounds.

  12. Human health screening level risk assessments of tertiary-butyl acetate (TBAC): calculated acute and chronic reference concentration (RfC) and Hazard Quotient (HQ) values based on toxicity and exposure scenario evaluations.

    PubMed

    Bus, James S; Banton, Marcy I; Faber, Willem D; Kirman, Christopher R; McGregor, Douglas B; Pourreau, Daniel B

    2015-02-01

    A screening level risk assessment has been performed for tertiary-butyl acetate (TBAC) examining its primary uses as a solvent in industrial and consumer products. Hazard quotients (HQ) were developed by merging TBAC animal toxicity and dose-response data with population-level, occupational and consumer exposure scenarios. TBAC has a low order of toxicity following subchronic inhalation exposure, and neurobehavioral changes (hyperactivity) in mice observed immediately after termination of exposure were used as conservative endpoints for derivation of acute and chronic reference concentration (RfC) values. TBAC is not genotoxic but has not been tested for carcinogenicity. However, TBAC is unlikely to be a human carcinogen in that its non-genotoxic metabolic surrogates tertiary-butanol (TBA) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) produce only male rat α-2u-globulin-mediated kidney cancer and high-dose specific mouse thyroid tumors, both of which have little qualitative or quantitative relevance to humans. Benchmark dose (BMD)-modeling of the neurobehavioral responses yielded acute and chronic RfC values of 1.5 ppm and 0.3 ppm, respectively. After conservative modeling of general population and near-source occupational and consumer product exposure scenarios, almost all HQs were substantially less than 1. HQs exceeding 1 were limited to consumer use of automotive products and paints in a poorly ventilated garage-sized room (HQ = 313) and occupational exposures in small and large brake shops using no personal protective equipment or ventilation controls (HQs = 3.4-126.6). The screening level risk assessments confirm low human health concerns with most uses of TBAC and indicate that further data-informed refinements can address problematic health/exposure scenarios. The assessments also illustrate how tier-based risk assessments using read-across toxicity information to metabolic surrogates reduce the need for comprehensive animal testing.

  13. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In Ontario, current treatment for eligible patients who have an acute ischemic stroke is intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). However, there are some limitations and contraindications to IVT, and outcomes may not be favourable for patients with stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. An alternative is mechanical thrombectomy with newer devices, and a number of recent studies have suggested that this treatment is more effective for improving functional independence and clinical outcomes. The objective of this health technology assessment was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices (with or without IVT) compared to IVT alone (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature, limited to randomized controlled trials that examined the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy using stent retrievers and thromboaspiration devices for patients with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy (with or without IVT) versus IVT alone (if eligible), calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios using a 5-year time horizon, and conducted sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of the estimates. Results There was a substantial, statistically significant difference in rate of functional independence (GRADE: high quality) between those who received mechanical thrombectomy (with or without IVT) and IVT alone (odds ratio [OR] 2.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.88–3.04). We did not observe a difference in mortality (GRADE: moderate quality) (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.60–1.07) or symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (GRADE: moderate quality) (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.66–1.87). In the base-case cost-utility analysis, which had a 5 year time horizon, the costs and effectiveness for

  14. Ecological risk assessment of bisphenol A in surface waters of China based on both traditional and reproductive endpoints.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Li, Zhengyan; Gao, Pei; Hu, Hong; Gibson, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) occurs widely in natural waters with both traditional and reproductive toxicity to various aquatic species. The water quality criteria (WQC), however, have not been established in China, which hinders the ecological risk assessment for the pollutant. This study therefore aims to derive the water quality criteria for BPA based on both acute and chronic toxicity endpoints and to assess the ecological risk in surface waters of China. A total of 15 acute toxicity values tested with aquatic species resident in China were found in published literature, which were simulated with the species sensitivity distribution (SSD) model for the derivation of criterion maximum concentration (CMC). 18 chronic toxicity values with traditional endpoints were simulated for the derivation of traditional criterion continuous concentration (CCC) and 12 chronic toxicity values with reproductive endpoints were for reproductive CCC. Based on the derived WQC, the ecological risk of BPA in surface waters of China was assessed with risk quotient (RQ) method. The results showed that the CMC, traditional CCC and reproductive CCC were 1518μgL(-1), 2.19μgL(-1) and 0.86μgL(-1), respectively. The acute risk of BPA was negligible with RQ values much lower than 0.1. The chronic risk was however much higher with RQ values of between 0.01-3.76 and 0.03-9.57 based on traditional and reproductive CCC, respectively. The chronic RQ values on reproductive endpoints were about threefold as high as those on traditional endpoints, indicating that ecological risk assessment based on traditional effects may not guarantee the safety of aquatic biota. PMID:26081577

  15. Current state of clinical end-points assessment in transplant: Key points.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Domingo; Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Víctor

    2016-04-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage organ disease. However, organ transplantation can stress the cardiovascular system and decrease immune surveillance, leading to early mortality and graft loss due to multiple underlying comorbidities. Clinical end-points in transplant include death and graft failure. Thus, generating accurate predictive models through regression models is crucial to test for definitive clinical post-transplantation end-points. Survival predictive models should assemble efficient surrogate markers or prognostic factors to generate a minimal set of variables derived from a proper modeling strategy through regression models. However, a few critical points should be considered when reporting survival analyses and regression models to achieve proper discrimination and calibration of the predictive models. Additionally, population-based risk scores may underestimate risk prediction in transplant. The application of predictive models in these patients should therefore incorporate both classical and non-classical risk factors, as well as community-based health indicators and transplant-specific factors to quantify the outcomes in terms of survival properly. This review focuses on assessment of clinical end-points in transplant through regression models by combining predictive and surrogate variables, and considering key points in these analyses to accurately predict definitive end-points, which could aid clinicians in decision making. PMID:26948088

  16. Modeling the acute health effects of astronauts from exposure to large solar particle events.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; McClellan, Gene E; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-04-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events (SPE) presents a significant health concern for astronauts for exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field, which could impair their performance and result in the possibility of failure of the mission. Assessing the potential for early radiation effects under such adverse conditions is of prime importance. Here we apply a biologically based mathematical model that describes the dose- and time-dependent early human responses that constitute the prodromal syndromes to consider acute risks from SPEs. We examine the possible early effects on crews from exposure to some historically large solar events on lunar and/or Mars missions. The doses and dose rates of specific organs were calculated using the Baryon radiation transport (BRYNTRN) code and a computerized anatomical man model, while the hazard of the early radiation effects and performance reduction were calculated using the Radiation-Induced Performance Decrement (RIPD) code. Based on model assumptions we show that exposure to these historical events would cause moderate early health effects to crew members inside a typical spacecraft or during extra-vehicular activities, if effective shielding and medical countermeasure tactics were not provided. We also calculate possible even worse cases (double intensity, multiple occurrences in a short period of time, etc.) to estimate the severity, onset and duration of various types of early illness. Uncertainties in the calculation due to limited data on relative biological effectiveness and dose-rate modifying factors for protons and secondary radiation, and the identification of sensitive sites in critical organs are discussed.

  17. Modeling the acute health effects of astronauts from exposure to large solar particle events.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; McClellan, Gene E; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-04-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events (SPE) presents a significant health concern for astronauts for exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field, which could impair their performance and result in the possibility of failure of the mission. Assessing the potential for early radiation effects under such adverse conditions is of prime importance. Here we apply a biologically based mathematical model that describes the dose- and time-dependent early human responses that constitute the prodromal syndromes to consider acute risks from SPEs. We examine the possible early effects on crews from exposure to some historically large solar events on lunar and/or Mars missions. The doses and dose rates of specific organs were calculated using the Baryon radiation transport (BRYNTRN) code and a computerized anatomical man model, while the hazard of the early radiation effects and performance reduction were calculated using the Radiation-Induced Performance Decrement (RIPD) code. Based on model assumptions we show that exposure to these historical events would cause moderate early health effects to crew members inside a typical spacecraft or during extra-vehicular activities, if effective shielding and medical countermeasure tactics were not provided. We also calculate possible even worse cases (double intensity, multiple occurrences in a short period of time, etc.) to estimate the severity, onset and duration of various types of early illness. Uncertainties in the calculation due to limited data on relative biological effectiveness and dose-rate modifying factors for protons and secondary radiation, and the identification of sensitive sites in critical organs are discussed. PMID:19276707

  18. Acute health impact of the gas release at Lake Nyos, Cameroon, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Peter J.; Kapila, Mukesh

    1989-11-01

    Available medical evidence on the acute health impact of the gas release at Lake Nyos is summarised, including the results of a survey of medical records of 845 survivors treated at Wum and Nkambe hospitals. The main clinical features were compatible with exposure to an asphyxiant gas such as CO 2 but confirmation of the identity of the gas or gases involved was not possible. Exposure to CO 2 over such a large inhabited area and reversible coma lasting for hours after CO 2 gassing do not appear to have been reported before. In some victims, blistering or ulceration of the skin was present which could not be readily explained by local injury from pressure, or burns from acid, or falling near fires. Further epidemiological studies on survivors are unlikely to be feasible, but the possibility of long-term anoxic brain damage among adults and children who had been rendered comatose by the gas should be considered, though overt evidence of major neurological or respiratory disability was not apparent in survivors in the weeks following the disaster. The inadequacy of the toxicological and forensic evidence obtained points to the need for the rapid mobilisation of medical scientists in future disasters of this kind.

  19. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused. PMID:24779763

  20. Development of Inpatient Risk Stratification Models of Acute Kidney Injury for Use in Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Miller, Randolph A.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Waitman, Lemuel R.; Denny, Joshua C.; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Dittus, Robert S.; Peterson, Josh F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased mortality and further medical complications. Evaluating these patients with a prediction tool easily implemented within an electronic health record (EHR) would identify high risk patients prior to the development of AKI, and could prevent iatrogenically induced episodes of AKI and improve clinical management. Methods We used structured clinical data acquired from an EHR to identify patients with normal kidney function for admissions from August 1st, 1999 to July 31st, 2003. Using administrative, computerized provider order entry, and laboratory test data, we developed a 3-level risk stratification model to predict each of two severity levels of in-hospital AKI as defined by RIFLE criteria. The severity levels were defined as 150% or 200% of baseline serum creatinine. Model discrimination and calibration was evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation. Results Cross-validation of the models resulted in area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) curves of 0.75 (150% elevation) and 0.78 (200% elevation). Both models were adequately calibrated as measured by the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test chi-squared values of 9.7 (p = 0.29) and 12.7 (p = 0.12), respectively. Conclusions We generated risk prediction models for hospital-acquired AKI using only commonly available electronic data. The models identify patients at high risk for AKI who might benefit from early intervention or increased monitoring. PMID:20354229

  1. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused.

  2. Acute health effects of ambient air pollution: the ultrafine particle hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Utell, M J; Frampton, M W

    2000-01-01

    A strong and consistent association has been observed between adjusted mortality rates and ambient particle concentration. The strongest associations are seen for respiratory and cardiac deaths, particularly among the elderly. Particulate air pollution is also associated with asthma exacerbations, increased respiratory symptoms, decreased lung function, increased medication use, and increased hospital admissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently promulgated a new national ambient air quality standard for fine particles, and yet the mechanisms for health effects at such low particle mass concentrations remain unclear. Hypotheses to identify the responsible particles have focused on particle acidity, particle content of transition metals, bioaerosols, and ultrafine particles. Because ultrafine particles are efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract and may be important in initiating airway inflammation, we have initiated clinical studies with ultrafine carbon particles in healthy subjects. These studies examine the role of ultrafines in: (1) the induction of airway inflammation; (2) expression of leukocyte and endothelial adhesion molecules in blood; (3) the alteration of blood coagulability; and (4) alteration in cardiac electrical activity. These events could lead to exacerbation of underlying cardiorespiratory disease. For example, airway inflammation may activate endothelium and circulating leukocytes, and induce a systemic acute phase response with transient hypercoagulability; this could explain the epidemiologic linkages between pollutant exposures and cardiovascular events. These approaches should be useful in identifying mechanisms for pollutant-induced respiratory and systemic effects, and in providing data for determining appropriate air quality standards.

  3. Exactly solvable model for the QCD tricritical endpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, K. A.

    2008-09-15

    An inclusion of temperature and chemical-potential-dependent surface-tension in the gas of quark-gluon bags model resolves a long-standing problem of a unified description of the first-and second-order phase transition with the crossover. The suggested model has an exact analytical solution and allows one to rigorously study the vicinity of the critical endpoint of the deconfinement phase transition. It is found that, at the curve of a zero surface-tension coefficient, there must exist the surface-induced phase transition of the seond or higher order. The present model predicts that the critical endpoint of quantum chromodynamics is the tricritical endpoint.

  4. Acute health problems related to the operation mounted to clean the Hebei Spirit oil spill in Taean, Korea.

    PubMed

    Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Hyoung Gon

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated acute health problems in people engaged in the operation mounted to clear the Hebei Spirit oil spill which occurred in December 2007 in Taean County, South Korea, and identified the risk factors associated with the development of symptoms. Eight hundred forty-six people engaged in the clean up operation for periods between 7 and 14 days were examined. Demographic information and risk factors were obtained using a questionnaire. Symptoms were classified into six categories: back pain, skin lesions, headache, and eye, neurovestibular, and respiratory symptoms. Residents and volunteers engaged in the Hebei Spirit oil spill clean up operation experienced acute health problems. Risk analyses revealed that more frequent and greater exposure was strongly associated with a higher occurrence of symptoms.

  5. Do pollution time-series studies contain uncontrolled or residual confounding by risk factors for acute health events?

    PubMed

    Bukowski, John

    2008-07-01

    Acute health effects from air pollution are based largely on weak associations identified in time-series studies comparing daily air pollution levels to daily mortality. Much of this mortality is due to cardiovascular disease. Time-series studies have many potential limitations, but are not thought to be confounded by traditional cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., smoking status or hypertension) because these chronic risk factors are not obviously associated with daily pollution levels. However, acute psychobehavioral variants of these risk factors (e.g., smoking patterns and episodes of stress on any given day) are plausible confounders for the associations observed in time-series studies, given that time-series studies attempt to predict acute rather than chronic health outcomes. There is a fairly compelling literature on the strong link between cardiovascular events and daily "triggers" such as stress. Stress-related triggers are plausibly associated with daily pollution levels through surrogate stressors such as ambient temperature, daily workload, local traffic congestion, or other correlates of air pollution. For example, variables such as traffic congestion and industrial activity increase both stress-related health events and air pollution, suggesting the potential for classical confounding. Support for this argument is illustrated through examples of the well-demonstrated relationship between emotional stress and heart attack/stroke.

  6. Endpoint behavior of high-energy scattering cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2010-11-01

    In high-energy processes near the endpoint, there emerge new contributions associated with spectator interactions. Away from the endpoint region, these new contributions are suppressed compared to the leading contribution, but the leading contribution becomes suppressed as we approach the endpoint and the new contributions become comparable. We present how the new contributions scale as we reach the endpoint and show that they are comparable to the suppressed leading contributions in deep inelastic scattering by employing a power-counting analysis. The hadronic tensor in deep inelastic scattering is shown to factorize including the spectator interactions, and it can be expressed in terms of the light cone distribution amplitudes of initial hadrons. We also consider the contribution of the spectator contributions in Drell-Yan processes. Here the spectator interactions are suppressed compared to double parton annihilation according to the power counting.

  7. Alternative Endpoints and Approaches Selected for the Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater at Complex Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, R. A.; Hawley, E.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation will focus on findings, statistics, and case studies from a recently-completed report for the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) (Project ER-0832) on alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies for groundwater remediation under a variety of Federal and state cleanup programs, including technical impracticability (TI) and other Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirement (ARAR) waivers, state and local designations such as groundwater management zones, Alternate Concentration Limits (ACLs), use of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) over long timeframes, and more. The primary objective of the project was to provide environmental managers and regulators with tools, metrics, and information needed to evaluate alternative endpoints for groundwater remediation at complex sites. A statistical analysis of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites receiving TI waivers will be presented as well as case studies of other types of alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies to illustrate the variety of approaches used at complex sites and the technical analyses used to predict and document cost, timeframe, and potential remedial effectiveness. Case studies provide examples of the flexible, site-specific, application of alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies that have been used in the past to manage and remediate groundwater contamination at complex sites. For example, at least 13 states consider some designation for groundwater containment in their corrective action policies, such as groundwater management zones, containment zones, and groundwater classification exemption areas. These designations typically indicate that groundwater contamination is present above permissible levels. Soil and groundwater within these zones are managed to protect human health and the environment. Lesson learned for the analyses

  8. Location of end-points in high-precision coulometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, W F; Poe, D P; Diehl, H

    1975-07-01

    A computer has been used to fit a cubic equation to experimental data obtained in the region of the end-point in high-precision coulometric titrations of 4-aminopyridine and tris(hydroxy-methyl) aminomethane. For these weak bases, the two end-points (points of inflexion calculated by setting the second derivative equal to zero) obtained by choosing first time, and secondly pH, as the independent variable, are in good agreement.

  9. Accurate measurement method for tube's endpoints based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoli; Jin, Peng; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Tubes are used widely in aerospace vehicles, and their accurate assembly can directly affect the assembling reliability and the quality of products. It is important to measure the processed tube's endpoints and then fix any geometric errors correspondingly. However, the traditional tube inspection method is time-consuming and complex operations. Therefore, a new measurement method for a tube's endpoints based on machine vision is proposed. First, reflected light on tube's surface can be removed by using photometric linearization. Then, based on the optimization model for the tube's endpoint measurements and the principle of stereo matching, the global coordinates and the relative distance of the tube's endpoint are obtained. To confirm the feasibility, 11 tubes are processed to remove the reflected light and then the endpoint's positions of tubes are measured. The experiment results show that the measurement repeatability accuracy is 0.167 mm, and the absolute accuracy is 0.328 mm. The measurement takes less than 1 min. The proposed method based on machine vision can measure the tube's endpoints without any surface treatment or any tools and can realize on line measurement.

  10. Association of serum interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score with clinical outcome in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swaroopa, Deme; Bhaskar, Kakarla; Mahathi, T.; Katkam, Shivakrishna; Raju, Y. Satyanarayana; Chandra, Naval; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Studies on potential biomarkers in experimental models of acute lung injury (ALI) and clinical samples from patients with ALI have provided evidence to the pathophysiology of the mechanisms of lung injury and predictor of clinical outcome. Because of the high mortality and substantial variability in outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), identification of biomarkers such as cytokines is important to determine prognosis and guide clinical decision-making. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have included thirty patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit diagnosed with ARDS, and serum samples were collected on day 1 and 7 and were analyzed for serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 by ELISA method, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring was done on day 1. Results: The mortality in the patients observed with ARDS was 34%. APACHE II score was significantly higher in nonsurvivors as compared to survivors. There were no significant differences in gender and biochemical and hematological parameters among the survivors and nonsurvivors. Serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels on day 1 were significantly higher in all the ARDS patients as compared to healthy controls and these levels were returned to near-normal basal levels on day 7. The serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels measured on day 7 were of survivors. As compared to survivors, the IL-6 and IL-8 levels were significantly higher in nonsurvivors measured on day 1. Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive correlation of APACHE II with IL-8. By using APACHE II score, IL-6, and IL-8, the receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted and the provided predictable accuracy of mortality (outcome) was 94%. Conclusion: The present study highlighted the importance of measuring the cytokines such as IL-6 and IL-8 in patients with ARDS in predicting the clinical outcome. PMID:27688627

  11. Association of serum interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score with clinical outcome in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swaroopa, Deme; Bhaskar, Kakarla; Mahathi, T.; Katkam, Shivakrishna; Raju, Y. Satyanarayana; Chandra, Naval; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Studies on potential biomarkers in experimental models of acute lung injury (ALI) and clinical samples from patients with ALI have provided evidence to the pathophysiology of the mechanisms of lung injury and predictor of clinical outcome. Because of the high mortality and substantial variability in outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), identification of biomarkers such as cytokines is important to determine prognosis and guide clinical decision-making. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have included thirty patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit diagnosed with ARDS, and serum samples were collected on day 1 and 7 and were analyzed for serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 by ELISA method, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring was done on day 1. Results: The mortality in the patients observed with ARDS was 34%. APACHE II score was significantly higher in nonsurvivors as compared to survivors. There were no significant differences in gender and biochemical and hematological parameters among the survivors and nonsurvivors. Serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels on day 1 were significantly higher in all the ARDS patients as compared to healthy controls and these levels were returned to near-normal basal levels on day 7. The serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels measured on day 7 were of survivors. As compared to survivors, the IL-6 and IL-8 levels were significantly higher in nonsurvivors measured on day 1. Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive correlation of APACHE II with IL-8. By using APACHE II score, IL-6, and IL-8, the receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted and the provided predictable accuracy of mortality (outcome) was 94%. Conclusion: The present study highlighted the importance of measuring the cytokines such as IL-6 and IL-8 in patients with ARDS in predicting the clinical outcome.

  12. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  13. The dopaminergic response to acute stress in health and psychopathology: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vaessen, Thomas; Hernaus, Dennis; Myin-Germeys, Inez; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse

    2015-09-01

    Previous work in animals has shown that dopamine (DA) in cortex and striatum plays an essential role in stress processing. For the first time, we systematically reviewed the in vivo evidence for DAergic stress processing in health and psychopathology in humans. All studies included (n studies=25, n observations=324) utilized DA D2/3 positron emission tomography and measured DAergic activity during an acute stress challenge. The evidence in healthy volunteers (HV) suggests that physiological, but not psychological, stress consistently increases striatal DA release. Instead, increased medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) DAergic activity in HV was observed during psychological stress. Across brain regions, stress-related DAergic activity was correlated with the physiological and psychological intensity of the stressor. The magnitude of stress-induced DA release was dependent on rearing conditions, personality traits and genetic variations in several SNPs. In psychopathology, preliminary evidence was found for stress-related dorsal striatal DAergic hyperactivity in psychosis spectrum and a blunted response in chronic cannabis use and pain-related disorders, but results were inconsistent. Physiological stress-induced DAergic activity in striatum in HV may reflect somatosensory properties of the stressor and readiness for active fight-or-flight behavior. DAergic activity in HV in the ventral striatum and mPFC may be more related to expectations about the stressor and threat evaluation, respectively. Future studies with increased sample size in HV and psychopathology assessing the functional relevance of stress-induced DAergic activity, the association between cortical and subcortical DAergic activity and the direct comparison of different stressors are necessary to conclusively elucidate the role of the DA system in the stress response.

  14. Endpoint Refinement for Total Body Irradiation of C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Artwohl, James E; Anderson, Robert J; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome is a life-threatening condition that has the potential to affect large populations of humans. Although several animal models of this syndrome are available, the total-body–irradiated mouse has emerged as an important tool to evaluate the efficacy of prospective prophylaxis, mitigation, and treatment compounds. Despite the widespread use of this model, humane endpoints have not been clearly identified. To address this issue, we developed a cageside observation-based scoring system specifically for total-body–irradiated mice to assess the progression of clinical signs associated with acute radiation syndrome. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 175; age, 8 to 9 wk) received an anticipated LD50 dose of radiation and were observed for progression of clinical signs of acute radiation syndrome for 30 d. All mice were scored individually through cageside observation of their body posture (score, 0 to 3), eye appearance (0 to 3), and activity level (0 to 3). Retrospective analysis of the score data indicated that death could be predicted accurately by using increasing cumulative scores (0 to 9). Total scores of 6, 7, 8, and 9 were associated with mortality rates of 78.6%, 86.4%, 93.3%, and 100%, respectively. Furthermore, scores of 6, 7, and 8 predicted death within 3, 1.5, and 0.5 d, respectively. The use of this scoring system provides investigators and IACUCs with predictive humane, surrogate endpoints for total-body–irradiated mice. This system allows preemptive euthanasia of mice before they become moribund, thereby minimizing pain and distress associated with acute radiation syndrome and improving animal welfare. PMID:23561934

  15. Preliminary remediation goals for ecological endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, R.A.; Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.

    1996-07-01

    Preliminary remediation goals (PRGs) are useful for risk assessment and decision making at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites. PRGs are upper concentration limits for specific chemicals in specific environmental media that are anticipated to protect human health or the environment. They can be used for multiple remedial investigations at multiple facilities. In addition to media and chemicals of potential concern, the development of PRGs generally requires some knowledge or anticipation of future land use. In Preliminary Remediation Goals for Use at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (Energy Systems 1995), PRGs intended to protect human health were developed with guidance from Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual, Part B (RAGS) (EPA 1991). However, no guidance was given for PRGs based on ecological risk. The numbers that appear in this volume have, for the most part, been extracted from toxicological benchmarks documents for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and have previously been developed by ORNL. The sources of the quantities, and many of the uncertainties associated with their derivation, are described in this technical memorandum.

  16. Efficient estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint when some endpoints are only partially observed.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Rhian M; Tsiatis, Anastasios A

    2013-10-01

    Two common features of clinical trials, and other longitudinal studies, are (1) a primary interest in composite endpoints, and (2) the problem of subjects withdrawing prematurely from the study. In some settings, withdrawal may only affect observation of some components of the composite endpoint, for example when another component is death, information on which may be available from a national registry. In this paper, we use the theory of augmented inverse probability weighted estimating equations to show how such partial information on the composite endpoint for subjects who withdraw from the study can be incorporated in a principled way into the estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint, typically leading to increased efficiency without relying on additional assumptions above those that would be made by standard approaches. We describe our proposed approach theoretically, and demonstrate its properties in a simulation study. PMID:23722304

  17. Efficient estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint when some endpoints are only partially observed

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Rhian M.; Tsiatis, Anastasios A.

    2014-01-01

    Two common features of clinical trials, and other longitudinal studies, are (1) a primary interest in composite endpoints, and (2) the problem of subjects withdrawing prematurely from the study. In some settings, withdrawal may only affect observation of some components of the composite endpoint, for example when another component is death, information on which may be available from a national registry. In this paper, we use the theory of augmented inverse probability weighted estimating equations to show how such partial information on the composite endpoint for subjects who withdraw from the study can be incorporated in a principled way into the estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint, typically leading to increased efficiency without relying on additional assumptions above those that would be made by standard approaches. We describe our proposed approach theoretically, and demonstrate its properties in a simulation study. PMID:23722304

  18. Challenges with using chronic disease endpoints in setting dietary reference intakes.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Paula R

    2008-08-01

    Since 1941, the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) in the United States have been based on the goal of maintaining health in the country's population. There has been a growing body of evidence to support the role of diet in reducing the risk of chronic diseases. For this reason, there has been recent emphasis on considering data on chronic disease endpoints for setting dietary reference intakes (DRIs). Despite this emphasis, none of the RDAs set during the DRI review were based on chronic disease risk. However, chronic disease risk was considered for determining adequate intakes and even some acceptable macronutrient distribution ranges. This article discusses the application of and challenges associated with using chronic disease endpoints in setting DRIs.

  19. Recovery-oriented care in older-adult acute inpatient mental health settings in Australia: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian; Furness, Trentham; Dhital, Deepa; Ireland, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Recovery-oriented care acknowledges the unique journey that consumers lead with the aim of regaining control of their lives in order to live a good life. Recovery has become a dominant policy-directed model of many mental health care organizations, but in older-adult acute mental health inpatient settings, nurses do not have a clear description of how to be recovery-oriented. The aims of this study were to determine the extent to which elements of existing nursing practice resemble the domains of recovery-oriented care and provide a baseline understanding of practice in preparation for transformation to recovery-oriented mental health care provision. An exploratory, qualitative research design was used to meet the research aims. A purposive sample of mental health nurses (N = 12) participated in focus groups in three older-adult inpatient settings in Australia. A general inductive approach was used to analyze the qualitative data. The mental health nurses in this study readily discussed aspects of their current practice within the recovery domains. They described pragmatic ways to promote a culture of hope, collaborative partnerships, meaningful engagement, autonomy and self-determination, and community participation and citizenship. Nurses also discussed challenges and barriers to recovery-oriented care in older-adult acute mental health settings. This study identified a reasonable baseline understanding of practice in preparation for transformation to recovery-oriented older-adult mental healthcare provision. A concerted drive focused on recovery education is required to effectively embed a recovery-orientated paradigm into older-adult mental health settings.

  20. Disability, Health Insurance Coverage, and Utilization of Acute Health Services in the United States. Disability Statistics Report 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPlante, Mitchell P.

    This report uses data from the 1989 National Health Interview Survey to estimate health insurance coverage of children and nonelderly adults with disabilities and their utilization of physician and hospital care as a function of health insurance status. In part 1, national statistics on disability and insurance status are provided for different…

  1. Early Benefit Assessments in Oncology in Germany: How Can a Clinically Relevant Endpoint Not Be Relevant to Patients?

    PubMed

    Ruof, Jörg; Flückiger, Olivier; Andre, Niko

    2015-09-01

    After 4 years of early benefit assessment (EBA) in Germany, it is becoming evident that the Federal Joint Committee (FJC) frequently considers well-established clinical endpoints as not being relevant to patients. Focusing on assessments of oncology medicines, we analysed the FJC's view on primary endpoints and compared it with the approach used by regulatory authorities. Mortality data were accepted by both stakeholders. Whereas regulatory authorities accepted primary morbidity endpoints such as progression-free survival and response rates, the FJC mostly excluded these from its assessments. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data have been poorly reflected in the approval process; for EBAs, those data have rarely impacted on benefit ratings. We argue that agreement between regulatory authorities and the FJC is required regarding primary study endpoints that are relevant to patients, and that clarification of acceptable endpoints by the FJC, especially in the morbidity domain, has to be provided. Moreover, in order to fully acknowledge the benefit of a new medicinal product, mortality, morbidity and HRQoL should be weighted differentially, according to the condition. PMID:26286202

  2. Traditional and new composite endpoints in heart failure clinical trials: facilitating comprehensive efficacy assessments and improving trial efficiency.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Schroeder, Stefan; Atar, Dan; Bax, Jeroen J; Ceconi, Claudio; Cowie, Martin R; Crisp, Adam; Dominjon, Fabienne; Ford, Ian; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Gropper, Savion; Hindricks, Gerhard; Hlatky, Mark A; Holcomb, Richard; Honarpour, Narimon; Jukema, J Wouter; Kim, Albert M; Kunz, Michael; Lefkowitz, Martin; Le Floch, Chantal; Landmesser, Ulf; McDonagh, Theresa A; McMurray, John J; Merkely, Bela; Packer, Milton; Prasad, Krishna; Revkin, James; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Somaratne, Ransi; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Voors, Adriaan A; Ruschitzka, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Composite endpoints are commonly used as the primary measure of efficacy in heart failure clinical trials to assess the overall treatment effect and to increase the efficiency of trials. Clinical trials still must enrol large numbers of patients to accrue a sufficient number of outcome events and have adequate power to draw conclusions about the efficacy and safety of new treatments for heart failure. Additionally, the societal and health system perspectives on heart failure have raised interest in ascertaining the effects of therapy on outcomes such as repeat hospitalization and the patient's burden of disease. Thus, novel methods for using composite endpoints in clinical trials (e.g. clinical status composite endpoints, recurrent event analyses) are being applied in current and planned trials. Endpoints that measure functional status or reflect the patient experience are important but used cautiously because heart failure treatments may improve function yet have adverse effects on mortality. This paper discusses the use of traditional and new composite endpoints, identifies qualities of robust composites, and outlines opportunities for future research. PMID:27071916

  3. The habitus of 'rescue' and its significance for implementation of rapid response systems in acute health care.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

    2014-11-01

    The need to focus on patient safety and improve the quality and consistency of medical care in acute hospital settings has been highlighted in a number of UK and international reports. When patients on a hospital ward become acutely unwell there is often a window of opportunity for staff, patients and relatives to contribute to the 'rescue' process by intervening in the trajectory of clinical deterioration. This paper explores the social and institutional processes associated with the practice of rescue, and implications for the implementation and effectiveness of rapid response systems (RRSs) within acute health care. An ethnographic case study was conducted in 2009 in two UK hospitals (focussing on the medical directorates in each organisation). Data collection involved 180 h of observation, 35 staff interviews (doctors, nurses, health care assistants and managers) and documentary review. Analysis was informed by Bourdieu's logic of practice and his relational concept of the 'field' of the general medical ward. Three themes illustrated the nature of rescue work within the field and collective rules which guided associated occupational distinction practices: (1) the 'dirty work' of vital sign recording and its distinction from diagnostic (higher order) interpretive work; (2) the moral order of legitimacy claims for additional help; and (3) professional deference and the selective managerial control of rescue work. The discourse of rescue provided a means of exercising greater control over clinical uncertainty. The acquisition of 'rescue capital' enabled the social positioning of health care assistants, nurses and doctors, and shaped use of the RRS on the wards. Boundary work, professional legitimation and jurisdictional claims defined the social practice of rescue, as clinical staff had to balance safety, professional and organisational concerns within the field. This paper offers a nuanced understanding of patient safety on the front-line, challenging notions of

  4. The habitus of 'rescue' and its significance for implementation of rapid response systems in acute health care.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

    2014-11-01

    The need to focus on patient safety and improve the quality and consistency of medical care in acute hospital settings has been highlighted in a number of UK and international reports. When patients on a hospital ward become acutely unwell there is often a window of opportunity for staff, patients and relatives to contribute to the 'rescue' process by intervening in the trajectory of clinical deterioration. This paper explores the social and institutional processes associated with the practice of rescue, and implications for the implementation and effectiveness of rapid response systems (RRSs) within acute health care. An ethnographic case study was conducted in 2009 in two UK hospitals (focussing on the medical directorates in each organisation). Data collection involved 180 h of observation, 35 staff interviews (doctors, nurses, health care assistants and managers) and documentary review. Analysis was informed by Bourdieu's logic of practice and his relational concept of the 'field' of the general medical ward. Three themes illustrated the nature of rescue work within the field and collective rules which guided associated occupational distinction practices: (1) the 'dirty work' of vital sign recording and its distinction from diagnostic (higher order) interpretive work; (2) the moral order of legitimacy claims for additional help; and (3) professional deference and the selective managerial control of rescue work. The discourse of rescue provided a means of exercising greater control over clinical uncertainty. The acquisition of 'rescue capital' enabled the social positioning of health care assistants, nurses and doctors, and shaped use of the RRS on the wards. Boundary work, professional legitimation and jurisdictional claims defined the social practice of rescue, as clinical staff had to balance safety, professional and organisational concerns within the field. This paper offers a nuanced understanding of patient safety on the front-line, challenging notions of

  5. Educating Mental Health Clinicians About Sensory Modulation to Enhance Clinical Practice in a Youth Acute Inpatient Mental Health Unit: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Julie; McKenna, Brian; Jackson, Brian; Hitch, Danielle; Benitez, Jessica; McLennan, Cathy; Furness, Trentham

    2016-07-01

    There is an emergence of literature describing effective sensory modulation (SM) interventions to de-escalate violence and aggression among mental health inpatients. However, the evidence is limited to adult settings, with the effect of SM in youth acute settings unknown. Yet, before SM may be used as a de-escalation intervention in youth acute settings, multidisciplinary staff need to be educated about and supported in the clinical application of SM. In the current study, an online SM education package was developed to assist mental health staff understand SM. This was blended with action learning sets (ALS), small group experiential opportunities consisting staff and consumers to learn about SM resources, and the support of SM trained nurses. The aims of the study were to evaluate the effectiveness of this SM education intervention in (a) transferring knowledge of SM to staff, and (b) translating this knowledge into practice in a youth acute inpatient mental health unit. A mixed methods research design with an 11-item pre- and post-education questionnaire was used along with three-month follow-up focus groups. The SM education improved understanding about SM (all 11-items p ≤ 0.004, r ≥ 0.47). Three-months after SM education, four themes evident in the focus group data emerged about the practice and process of SM; (1) translating of learning into practice, (2) SM in practice, (3) perceptions of SM benefits, and (4) limitations of SM. A blended SM education process enhanced clinical practice in the unit, yet participants were mindful of limitations of SM in situations of distress or escalating agitation. PMID:27253182

  6. Origin of electrical signals for plasma etching endpoint detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolewski, Mark A.

    2011-11-14

    Electrical signals are used for endpoint detection in plasma etching, but the origin of the electrical changes observed at endpoint is not known. They may be caused by changes in the gas-phase densities of etch products and reactants or by changes in substrate surface properties such as photoemitted or ion-induced electron yield. To investigate these effects, experiments were performed in an inductively coupled, rf-biased reactor, during CF{sub 4}/Ar etches of SiO{sub 2} films on Si wafers. The rf bias impedance was measured vs. time during etching, simultaneous with Langmuir probe measurements. At endpoint, a decrease in impedance coincided with increases in ion current and electron energy. The data, analyzed by a numerical model of the discharge, indicate that changes in electron emission yield were relatively insignificant or entirely absent. Thus the impedance change is not a surface effect but is, instead, predominantly or entirely a gas-phase phenomenon.

  7. Pleuritic Chest Pain in a Young Female: A Reminder for Acute Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alaa M.; Stroncek, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common reasons for emergency department visits. Emergency medicine doctors should focus their initial assessment on patients' stability. History, physical examination, and ancillary testing should exclude serious causes such as acute coronary syndrome, acute aortic syndromes, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax, esophageal perforation, and rupture as well as pericardial tamponade. Young age should not be used alone as a predictor of a benign condition. Below we present a case of a 24-year-old female who was found to have ascending aortic dissection and was sent for emergent surgery. PMID:25247097

  8. Accuracy of the endpoint assay for virus titration.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, L K; Smyth, G K; Greenfield, P F

    1992-01-01

    The statistics of estimators used with the endpoint assay for virus titration were investigated. For a standard assay with 10 wells/dilution, the graphical estimator traditionally used was found to produce estimates with significant positive bias and a relatively low accuracy. Furthermore, the graphical estimator was found to be inconsistent. A superior estimator based on the maximum likelihood principle was developed. The results are discussed in relation to the choice between the endpoint titration assay and the plaque assay, and an alternative two-stage assay is presented.

  9. Identifying and designing chemicals with minimal acute aquatic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kostal, Jakub; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina; Anastas, Paul T.; Zimmerman, Julie Beth

    2015-01-01

    Industrial ecology has revolutionized our understanding of material stocks and flows in our economy and society. For this important discipline to have even deeper impact, we must understand the inherent nature of these materials in terms of human health and the environment. This paper focuses on methods to design synthetic chemicals to reduce their intrinsic ability to cause adverse consequence to the biosphere. Advances in the fields of computational chemistry and molecular toxicology in recent decades allow the development of predictive models that inform the design of molecules with reduced potential to be toxic to humans or the environment. The approach presented herein builds on the important work in quantitative structure–activity relationships by linking toxicological and chemical mechanistic insights to the identification of critical physical–chemical properties needed to be modified. This in silico approach yields design guidelines using boundary values for physiochemical properties. Acute aquatic toxicity serves as a model endpoint in this study. Defining value ranges for properties related to bioavailability and reactivity eliminates 99% of the chemicals in the highest concern for acute aquatic toxicity category. This approach and its future implementations are expected to yield very powerful tools for life cycle assessment practitioners and molecular designers that allow rapid assessment of multiple environmental and human health endpoints and inform modifications to minimize hazard. PMID:24639521

  10. Identifying and designing chemicals with minimal acute aquatic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kostal, Jakub; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina; Anastas, Paul T; Zimmerman, Julie Beth

    2015-05-19

    Industrial ecology has revolutionized our understanding of material stocks and flows in our economy and society. For this important discipline to have even deeper impact, we must understand the inherent nature of these materials in terms of human health and the environment. This paper focuses on methods to design synthetic chemicals to reduce their intrinsic ability to cause adverse consequence to the biosphere. Advances in the fields of computational chemistry and molecular toxicology in recent decades allow the development of predictive models that inform the design of molecules with reduced potential to be toxic to humans or the environment. The approach presented herein builds on the important work in quantitative structure-activity relationships by linking toxicological and chemical mechanistic insights to the identification of critical physical-chemical properties needed to be modified. This in silico approach yields design guidelines using boundary values for physiochemical properties. Acute aquatic toxicity serves as a model endpoint in this study. Defining value ranges for properties related to bioavailability and reactivity eliminates 99% of the chemicals in the highest concern for acute aquatic toxicity category. This approach and its future implementations are expected to yield very powerful tools for life cycle assessment practitioners and molecular designers that allow rapid assessment of multiple environmental and human health endpoints and inform modifications to minimize hazard.

  11. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Epidemic and Change of People's Health Behavior in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Xiaodong; Li, Shiyue; Wang, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Xiaomin

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) has become a new worldwide epidemic whose origin was until recently unknown. It is the unpredictable nature of this epidemic that makes people want answers to some important questions about what they can do to protect themselves. This study presents an inquiry into peoples knowledge and self-reported…

  12. The prevalence, management and outcome for acute wounds identified in a wound care survey within one English health care district.

    PubMed

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2009-02-01

    This paper reports the characteristics and local management of 826 acute wounds identified during an audit across all health care providers serving the population of Bradford, UK. Of the wounds encountered 303 were traumatic wounds and 237 primary closures with smaller numbers of other acute wound types. Of the 303 traumatic wounds 174 occurred in women (57.4%). Men predominated in the under 45s (65M:26F), this being largely accounted for by hand and finger trauma (n = 62) particularly in patients of working age (M32:F12). Women predominated in the over 65s (50M:130F), this being largely accounted for by lower limb traumatic wounds (M24:F91), the majority of these being in patients 65 and over (M14:F82). In this sub-group of 96 patients 25 had wounds of 6 weeks or longer duration, only 3 had undergone Doppler assessment and only 2 received compression bandaging. Typically these wounds were of recent origin and small in size (under 1 week and less than 5 cm2 in surface area) however exceptions occurred where 10 people had wounds over 25 cm2 in area while 3 wounds had been present for over 5 years. 101 (12.2%) of the encountered wounds were considered to be infected although the practice of wound swabbing in the presence of presumed infection seemed inadequate with 37.6% of all infected acute wounds not being swabbed while 97 non-infected wounds were swabbed. Where wounds were swabbed 4.5% were found to be MRSA positive. Across all acute wound types (with the sole exception of primary closures) antimicrobial wound dressings were the most prevalent form of dressing and covered 56 (55.4%) of all infected wounds.

  13. Reasons and circumstances for the late notification of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) cases in health facilities in Luanda

    PubMed Central

    Macama, Arciolanda; Okeibunor, Joseph; Grando, Silvia; Djibaoui, Karim; Yameogo, Robert Koudounoaga; Morais, Alda; Gasasira, Alex Ntale; Mbaye, Salla; Mihigo, Richard; Nshimirimana, Deo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As the polio eradication effort enters the end game stage, surveillance for Acute Flaccid Paralysis in children becomes a pivotal tool. Thus given the gaps in AFP surveillance as identified in the cases of late notification, this study was designed to explore the reasons and circumstances responsible for late notification of AFP and collection of inadequate stools (more than 14 days of onset of paralysis until collection of the 2nd stool specimen) of AFP cases in health facilities equipped to manage AFP cases. Methods Eleven AFP cases with inadequate stools were reported from January 2 to July 8, 2012 - Epidemiological Weeks 1-27. The families of these cases were interviewed with an in-depth interview guide. The staff of the seven health units, where they later reported, was also enlisted for the study which used in-depth interview guide in eliciting information from them. Results Ignorance and wrong perception of the etiology of the cases as well as dissatisfaction with the health units as the major reasons for late reporting of AFP cases. The first port of call is usually alternative health care system such as traditional healers and spiritualists because the people hold the belief that the problem is spiritually induced. The few, who make it to health units, are faced with ill equipped rural health workers who wait for the arrival of more qualified staff, who may take days to do so. Conclusion An understanding of the health seeking behavior of the population is germane to effective AFP surveillance. There is thus a need to tailor AFP surveillance to the health seeking behavior of the populations and expand it to community structures. PMID:25426197

  14. Coral reef health response to chronic and acute changes in water quality in St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Rosmin S; Brandt, Marilyn E; Wilson Grimes, Kristin R; Smith, Tyler B

    2016-10-15

    It is suspected that land cover alteration on the southern coast of St. Thomas, USVI has increased runoff, degrading nearshore water quality and coral reef health. Chronic and acute changes in water quality, sediment deposition, and coral health metrics were assessed in three zones based upon perceived degree of human influence. Chlorophyll (p<0.0001) and turbidity (p=0.0113) were significantly higher in nearshore zones and in the high impact zone during heavy precipitation. Net sediment deposition and terrigenous content increased in nearshore zones during periods of greater precipitation and port activity. Macroalgae overgrowth significantly increased along a gradient of decreasing water quality (p<0.0001). Coral bleaching in all zones peaked in November with a regional thermal stress event (p<0.0001). However, mean bleaching prevalence was significantly greater in the most impacted zone compared to the offshore zone (p=0.0396), suggesting a link between declining water quality and bleaching severity. PMID:27499526

  15. Coral reef health response to chronic and acute changes in water quality in St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Rosmin S; Brandt, Marilyn E; Wilson Grimes, Kristin R; Smith, Tyler B

    2016-10-15

    It is suspected that land cover alteration on the southern coast of St. Thomas, USVI has increased runoff, degrading nearshore water quality and coral reef health. Chronic and acute changes in water quality, sediment deposition, and coral health metrics were assessed in three zones based upon perceived degree of human influence. Chlorophyll (p<0.0001) and turbidity (p=0.0113) were significantly higher in nearshore zones and in the high impact zone during heavy precipitation. Net sediment deposition and terrigenous content increased in nearshore zones during periods of greater precipitation and port activity. Macroalgae overgrowth significantly increased along a gradient of decreasing water quality (p<0.0001). Coral bleaching in all zones peaked in November with a regional thermal stress event (p<0.0001). However, mean bleaching prevalence was significantly greater in the most impacted zone compared to the offshore zone (p=0.0396), suggesting a link between declining water quality and bleaching severity.

  16. Interprofessional care co-ordinators: the benefits and tensions associated with a new role in UK acute health care.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jackie; Meyer, Julienne; Glynn, Michael; Bentley, Jane; Reeves, Scott

    2003-08-01

    While more flexible models of service delivery are being introduced in UK health and social care, little is known about the impact of new roles, particularly support worker roles, on the work of existing practitioners. This action research study aimed to explore the impact of one such new role, that of interprofessional care co-ordinators (IPCCs). The general (internal) medical service of a UK hospital uses IPCCs to provide support to the interprofessional team and, in doing so, promote efficiency of acute bed use. Using a range of methods, mainly qualitative, this action research study sought to explore the characteristics and impact of the role on interprofessional team working. While the role's flexibility, autonomy and informality contributed to success in meeting its intended objectives, these characteristics also caused some tensions with interprofessional colleagues. These benefits and tensions mirror wider issues associated with the current modernisation agenda in UK health care. PMID:12834925

  17. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 314.510 Section 314.510 Food... a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval... an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under...

  18. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 314.510 Section 314.510 Food... a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval... an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under...

  19. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 314.510 Section 314.510 Food... a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval... an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under...

  20. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 314.510 Section 314.510 Food... a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval... an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under...

  1. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care.

  2. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care. PMID:25847647

  3. Five Years of Acute Stroke Unit Care: Comparing ASU and Non-ASU Admissions and Allied Health Involvement.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Isobel J; Evans, Malcolm; McMullen-Roach, Sarah; Marquez, Jodie; Parsons, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU) provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter Hospital, Australia, admits 500 stroke patients each year and has a 4-bed ASU. Aims. This study investigated hospital admissions over a 5-year period of all strokes patients and of all patients admitted to the 4-bed ASU and the involvement of allied health professionals. Methods. The study retrospectively audited 5-year data from all stroke patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital (n = 2525) and from nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU (n = 826). The study's primary outcomes were admission rates, length of stay (days), and allied health involvement. Results. Over 5 years, 47% of stroke patients were admitted to the ASU. More male stroke patients were admitted to the ASU (chi(2) = 5.81; P = 0.016). There was a trend over time towards parity between the number of stroke and nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU. When compared to those admitted elsewhere, ASU stroke patients had a longer length of stay (z = -8.233; P = 0.0000) and were more likely to receive allied healthcare. Conclusion. This is the first study to report 5 years of ASU admissions. Acute Stroke Units may benefit from a review of the healthcare provided to all stroke patients. The trends over time with respect to the utilisation of the John Hunter Hospitall's ASU have resulted in a review of the hospitall's Stroke Unit and allied healthcare.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of the community-based management of severe acute malnutrition by community health workers in southern Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Puett, Chloe; Sadler, Kate; Alderman, Harold; Coates, Jennifer; Fiedler, John L; Myatt, Mark

    2013-07-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of adding the community-based management of severe acute malnutrition (CMAM) to a community-based health and nutrition programme delivered by community health workers (CHWs) in southern Bangladesh. The cost-effectiveness of this model of treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) was compared with the cost-effectiveness of the 'standard of care' for SAM (i.e. inpatient treatment), augmented with community surveillance by CHWs to detect cases, in a neighbouring area. An activity-based cost model was used, and a societal perspective taken, to include all costs incurred in the programme by providers and participants for the management of SAM in both areas. Cost data were coupled with programme effectiveness data. The community-based strategy cost US$26 per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted, compared with US$1344 per DALY averted for inpatient treatment. The average cost to participant households for their child to recover from SAM in community treatment was one-sixth that of inpatient treatment. These results suggest that this model of treatment for SAM is highly cost-effective and that CHWs, given adequate supervision and training, can be employed effectively to expand access to treatment for SAM in Bangladesh. PMID:22879522

  5. Comparison and Evaluation of Laboratory and Field Measured Bioaccumulation Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of bioaccumulation endpoints on a fugacity basis allows provides a framework to assess the biomagnification potential of a chemical and assess data deficiencies, i.e., uncertainties and lack of data. In addition, it is suggested that additional guidance is needed in o...

  6. Digit mechanics in relation to endpoint compliance during precision pinch.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-02-26

    This study investigates the mechanics of the thumb and index finger in relation to compliant endpoint forces during precision pinch. The objective was to gain insight into how individuals modulate motor output at the digit endpoints and joints according to compliance-related sensory feedback across the digits. Thirteen able-bodied subjects performed precision pinch upon elastic resistance bands of a customized apparatus instrumented with six degree-of-freedom load-cells. Compliance levels were discretely adjusted according to the number of bands connected. Subjects were provided visual feedback to control the rate of force application. Fifteen repetitions of low-to-moderate force (<20N) pinches were analyzed at each of five compliance levels, during which force and motion data were collected. Joint angles and moments normalized by pinch force magnitude were computed. Second-order polynomials were used to characterize joint mechanics as a function of compliance. The joint degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) at the finger showed greater dependence on compliance for angular position while the thumb joint DOFs demonstrated greater dependence for normalized joint moment. The digits also adjusted coordination of their endpoint forces according to compliance. Overall, the finger may be altering its position to increase load to the joints of the thumb with changing compliance. These findings describe naturally emergent changes in digit mechanics for compliant precision pinch, which involves motor execution in response to endpoint sensory feedback. Identifying and understanding these motor patterns may provide theoretical basis for restoring and rehabilitating sensorimotor pathologies of the hand.

  7. ECOLOGICAL ENDPOINT MODELING: EFFECTS OF SEDIMENT ON FISH POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment is one of the main stressors of concern for TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads) for streams, and often it is a concern because of its impact on biological endpoints. The National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that the EPA promote the development of models that ca...

  8. Is Suicide Ideation a Surrogate Endpoint for Geriatric Suicide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Links, Paul S.; Heisel, Marnin J.; Quastel, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The present study explored the validity of treating suicide ideation as a surrogate endpoint that can serve as a proxy for suicide in clinical intervention research with suicidal seniors. Two criteria; that suicide ideation is modulated by the proposed intervention and that modulation of suicide ideation leads to a quantitative reduction in…

  9. Gender differences in pre-event health status of young patients with acute myocardial infarction: A VIRGO study analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Rachel P; Smolderen, Kim G; Strait, Kelly M; Beltrame, John F; Lichtman, Judith H; Lorenze, Nancy P; D’Onofrio, Gail; Bueno, Héctor; Krumholz, Harlan M; Spertus, John A

    2015-01-01

    Aims We assessed gender differences in pre-event health status (symptoms, functioning, quality of life) in young patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and whether or not this association persists following sequential adjustment for important covariates. We also evaluated the interaction between gender and prior coronary artery disease (CAD), given that aggressive symptom control is a cornerstone of care in those with known coronary disease. Methods and Results A total of 3,501 AMI patients (2,349 women) aged 18–55 years were enrolled from 103 United States/24 Spanish hospitals (2008–2012). Clinical/health status information was obtained by medical record abstraction and patient interviews. Pre-event health status was measured by generic [Short Form-12 (SF-12), EuroQoL [EQ-5D)] and disease-specific [Seattle angina questionnaire (SAQ)] measures. T-test/chi-square and multivariable linear/logistic regression analysis was utilized, sequentially adjusting for covariates. Women had more co-morbidities and significantly lower generic mean health scores than men [SF-12 physical health =43±12 vs. 46±11 and mental health= 44±13 vs. 48±11]; EQ-5D utility index=0.7±0.2 vs. 0.8±0.2, and visual analog scale=63±22 vs. 67±20, P<0.0001 for all. Their disease-specific health status was also worse, with more angina [SAQ angina frequency=83±22 vs. 87±18], worse physical function [physical limitation=78±27 vs. 87±21] and poorer quality of life [55±25 vs. 60±22, P<0.0001 for all]. In multivariable analysis, the association between female gender and worse generic physical/mental health persisted, as well as worse disease-specific physical limitation and quality of life. The interaction between gender and prior CAD was not significant in any of the health status outcomes. Conclusion Young women have worse pre-event health status as compared with men, regardless of their CAD history. While future studies of gender differences should adjust for baseline health

  10. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  11. Automatic endpoint detection to support the systematic review process.

    PubMed

    Blake, Catherine; Lucic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Preparing a systematic review can take hundreds of hours to complete, but the process of reconciling different results from multiple studies is the bedrock of evidence-based medicine. We introduce a two-step approach to automatically extract three facets - two entities (the agent and object) and the way in which the entities are compared (the endpoint) - from direct comparative sentences in full-text articles. The system does not require a user to predefine entities in advance and thus can be used in domains where entity recognition is difficult or unavailable. As with a systematic review, the tabular summary produced using the automatically extracted facets shows how experimental results differ between studies. Experiments were conducted using a collection of more than 2million sentences from three journals Diabetes, Carcinogenesis and Endocrinology and two machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM) and a general linear model (GLM). F1 and accuracy measures for the SVM and GLM differed by only 0.01 across all three comparison facets in a randomly selected set of test sentences. The system achieved the best performance of 92% for objects, whereas the accuracy for both agent and endpoints was 73%. F1 scores were higher for objects (0.77) than for endpoints (0.51) or agents (0.47). A situated evaluation of Metformin, a drug to treat diabetes, showed system accuracy of 95%, 83% and 79% for the object, endpoint and agent respectively. The situated evaluation had higher F1 scores of 0.88, 0.64 and 0.62 for object, endpoint, and agent respectively. On average, only 5.31% of the sentences in a full-text article are direct comparisons, but the tabular summaries suggest that these sentences provide a rich source of currently underutilized information that can be used to accelerate the systematic review process and identify gaps where future research should be focused.

  12. Automatic endpoint detection to support the systematic review process.

    PubMed

    Blake, Catherine; Lucic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Preparing a systematic review can take hundreds of hours to complete, but the process of reconciling different results from multiple studies is the bedrock of evidence-based medicine. We introduce a two-step approach to automatically extract three facets - two entities (the agent and object) and the way in which the entities are compared (the endpoint) - from direct comparative sentences in full-text articles. The system does not require a user to predefine entities in advance and thus can be used in domains where entity recognition is difficult or unavailable. As with a systematic review, the tabular summary produced using the automatically extracted facets shows how experimental results differ between studies. Experiments were conducted using a collection of more than 2million sentences from three journals Diabetes, Carcinogenesis and Endocrinology and two machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM) and a general linear model (GLM). F1 and accuracy measures for the SVM and GLM differed by only 0.01 across all three comparison facets in a randomly selected set of test sentences. The system achieved the best performance of 92% for objects, whereas the accuracy for both agent and endpoints was 73%. F1 scores were higher for objects (0.77) than for endpoints (0.51) or agents (0.47). A situated evaluation of Metformin, a drug to treat diabetes, showed system accuracy of 95%, 83% and 79% for the object, endpoint and agent respectively. The situated evaluation had higher F1 scores of 0.88, 0.64 and 0.62 for object, endpoint, and agent respectively. On average, only 5.31% of the sentences in a full-text article are direct comparisons, but the tabular summaries suggest that these sentences provide a rich source of currently underutilized information that can be used to accelerate the systematic review process and identify gaps where future research should be focused. PMID:26003938

  13. Impact of integrated health system changes, accelerated due to an earthquake, on emergency department attendances and acute admissions: a Bayesian change-point analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Philip J; Hamilton, Greg J; Deely, Joanne M; Ardagh, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Objective To chart emergency department (ED) attendance and acute admission following a devastating earthquake in 2011 which lead to Canterbury's rapidly accelerated integrated health system transformations. Design Interrupted time series analysis, modelling using Bayesian change-point methods, of ED attendance and acute admission rates over the 2008–2014 period. Setting ED department within the Canterbury District Health Board; with comparison to two other district health boards unaffected by the earthquake within New Zealand. Participants Canterbury's health system services ∼500 000 people, with around 85 000 ED attendances and 37 000 acute admissions per annum. Main outcome measures De-seasoned standardised population ED attendance and acute admission rates overall, and stratified by age and sex, compared before and after the earthquake. Results Analyses revealed five global patterns: (1) postearthquake, there was a sudden and persisting decrease in the proportion of the population attending the ED; (2) the growth rate of ED attendances per head of population did not change between the pre-earthquake and postearthquake periods; (3) postearthquake, there was a sudden and persisting decrease in the proportion of the population admitted to hospital; (4) the growth rate of hospital admissions per head of the population declined between pre-earthquake and postearthquake periods and (5) the most dramatic reduction in hospital admissions growth after the earthquake occurred among those aged 65+ years. Extrapolating from the projected and fitted deseasoned rates for December 2014, ∼676 (16.8%) of 4035 projected hospital admissions were avoided. Conclusions While both necessarily and opportunistically accelerated, Canterbury's integrated health systems transformations have resulted in a dramatic and sustained reduction in ED attendances and acute hospital admissions. This natural intervention experiment, triggered by an earthquake, demonstrated that

  14. Genetic evaluation of beef carcass data using different endpoint adjustments.

    PubMed

    Rumph, J M; Shafer, W R; Crews, D H; Enns, R M; Lipsey, R J; Quaas, R L; Pollak, E J

    2007-05-01

    Carcass data from 6,795 Simmental-sired animals born from 1992 to 2001 were used to determine whether adjustment to a constant age, back-fat, HCW, or marbling score would result in differences in heritability of the carcass traits and, correspondingly, if EPD calculated using those variance components and adjustments would result in sire reranking. The endpoints were age (EPA), backfat (EPF), HCW (EPC), or marbling (EPM). The traits analyzed were 12th-rib backfat (FAT), HCW, marbling (MRB), LM area (LMA), and percentage retail cuts (PRC). The data were analyzed using an animal model, where contemporary group was included as a fixed effect and was composed of slaughter date, sex, and herd. Random effects included in the model were direct genetic and residual. Estimates of heritability ranged from 0.12 to 0.14, 0.32 to 0.34, and 0.26 to 0.27 for FAT, HCW, and LMA, respectively, for the corresponding endpoints. Heritability for MRB was estimated to be 0.27 at all endpoints. For PRC, estimates of heritability were more variable, with estimates of 0.23 +/- 0.05, 0.32 +/- 0.05, 0.21 +/- 0.05, and 0.20 +/- 0.04 for EPA, EPF, EPC, and EPM, respectively. However, because the EPF and EPC adjustments adjust for a component trait of PRC (FAT and HCW, respectively), they may be altering the trait to one different from PRC. Spearman rank correlations between EPD within a trait using EPA compared with the other endpoints were >0.90 (P < 0.01) for FAT, HCW, MRB, and LMA. For PRC, Spearman rank correlations with EPA EPD were 0.73 (P < 0.01), 0.93 (P < 0.01), and 0.95 (P < 0.01) for EPF, EPC, and EPM, respectively. For most traits and endpoints, there was little reranking among sires when alternative endpoints were used. However, adjusting PRC to EPF appears to result in a greater heritability and substantial re-ranking of sires, potentially due to the adjustment changing the trait to one other than PRC. PMID:17224467

  15. Arsenic Exposure and Subclinical Endpoints of Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fen; Molinaro, Peter; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic evidence suggests that arsenic exposure from drinking water increases the production of reactive oxygen species and influences inflammatory responses and endothelial nitric oxide homeostasis. These arsenic-induced events may lead to endothelial dysfunction that increases the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We reviewed accumulating epidemiologic evidence that evaluated the association between arsenic exposure and intermediate markers and subclinical measures that predict future cardiovascular risk. Cross-sectional studies have indicated positive associations between high or low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure with indices of subclinical atherosclerosis, QT interval prolongation, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction. The evidence is limited for other intermediate endpoints such as markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, QT dispersion, and lipid profiles. Prospective studies are needed to enhance the causal inferences of arsenic's effects on subclinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease, especially at lower arsenic exposure levels. PMID:25013752

  16. Acute physiology, age, and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score is an alternative efficient predictor of mortality in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yohei; Shimizu, Mikio; Hirabayashi, Hidemitsu

    2007-05-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the prognostic value of the acute physiology, age, chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score in burn patients. We hypothesised that APACHE III score efficiently predicts mortality of burn patients as it reflects the physiological changes in the acute phase and the severity of the underlying illness. Data such as age, gender, inhalation injury, total burn surface area (TBSA), burn index (BI), prognostic burn index (PBI), APACHE III score and outcome of 105 hospitalised patients were analysed retrospectively. TBSA, BI, PBI, and APACHE III score in the mortality group were significantly higher than those of surviving group. The mean scores of surviving versus mortality groups were as follows: TBSA, 19.2+/-17.8% versus 69.1+/-28.4%, p<0.0001; BI, 12.8+/-13.1% versus 66.8+/-28.6%, p<0.0001; PBI, 68.8+/-26.0% versus 124.4+/-33.6%, p<0.0001; APACHE III score, 28.4+/-22.2% versus 71.3+/-32.1%, p<0.0001. PBI and APACHE III score showed marked associations between higher scores and higher mortality. APACHE III score showed a significant correlation with PBI (p<0.0001). The present study suggested that APACHE III score could be used as an alternative efficient predictor of mortality in burn patients.

  17. Health and Risk Behaviors in Survivors of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Report From the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Kris Ann P.; Chen, Lu; Chen, Zhengjia; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.; Nicholson, H. Stacy; Neglia, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) face increased risks of chronic disease and secondary malignancies. Substance exposure may compound these risks. Procedures Participants were diagnosed with AML at <21 years of age and survived ≥5 years following diagnosis. All underwent chemotherapy alone or followed by autologous BMT (chemo ± autoBMT) or underwent allogeneic BMT (alloBMT) if an HLA-matched related donor was available. Survivors completed a health questionnaire and a Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). Results Of eligible survivors, 117 were ≥18 years of age and completed a YRBS. Survivors were a mean age of 10 years at diagnosis and 24 years at interview. Of the substance exposures assessed by YRBS, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana were most common. Twenty-two percent (22%) had smoked cigarettes in the last 30 days. One-quarter (25%) reported binge drinking in the last month. None of these exposures varied by treatment group. Less than 10% of survivors reported cocaine, heroin, or methamphetamine use. Men were more likely to report high substance exposure (P = 0.004). Sadness/suicidality score was associated with cancer-related anxiety (P = 0.006) and multiple health conditions (P = 0.006). Conclusions This analysis reveals exposure to tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana in young adults with few differences based on treatment received. Survivors with cancer-related anxiety or multiple health conditions were more likely to report sadness/hopelessness. PMID:20232426

  18. Resistance to changing practice from pro re nata prescriptions to patient group directions in acute mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Price, O; Baker, J A

    2013-09-01

    Poor practice associated with pro re nata (PRN) prescriptions in mental health is known to be common and can increase the risk of serious and potentially fatal side effects. A contributing factor to poor practice is the lack of a clear chain of accountability between the decision to prescribe and administer PRN prescriptions. To address this problem, a patient group direction (PGD) for acute behavioural disturbance (lorazepam 0.5-2 mg) and staff training materials were developed. The intention was to replace PRN prescriptions with the PGD in two mental health trusts. One of the potential benefits of this would be the removal of the contribution of PRN to high and combined dose antipsychotic prescriptions. This proposal, however, was met with significant resistance in both trusts and did not replace PRN as a result. A series of interviews and focus groups were conducted with 16 RMNs working in the two trusts, to explore the reasons why the PGD was met with resistance. Senior nurses perceived resistance to be associated with anxieties over increased responsibility for decision making. Junior nurses reported concerns regarding the medicalization of the nursing role, the paperwork associated with the PGD and the training approach used. Future efforts to implement PGDs in mental health settings must carefully consider the methods for engaging effectively with participating organizations, in terms of managing change and completing the necessary groundwork for successful implementation. PMID:22957970

  19. Perspectives for integration into the local health system of community-based management of acute malnutrition in children under 5 years: a qualitative study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute malnutrition is a major cause of death among under-five children in low- and middle-income countries. United Nations agencies recommend the integration of community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) into the local health systems for sustainability. The objective of the study was to assess the preparedness of the health system to implement CMAM targeting children under-five years in two sub-districts of Bangladesh. Methods The assessment was performed through direct observation of 44 health centres, individual interviews of seven policy makers, three donors, four health and nutrition implementing partners, 29 health workers, and review of secondary data. Assessment themes, derived from the WHO six Building Blocks, were nutrition governance, nutrition financing, health service delivery, human resources, equipment and supply, referral, monitoring and supervision mechanism. They were subdivided into 16 criteria. Findings were compared with CMAM operational recommendations according to WHO, Valid International and Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance guidelines. Results The government of Bangladesh has developed inpatient and outpatient CMAM guidelines, and a policy offering free-of-charge health care for under-five children. Nutrition coordination was not under full government leadership. Most of funds (74%) dedicated to CMAM were provided by donors, for short-term interventions. Of the total 44 health centres assessed, 39 (88.6%) were active, among which 4 (10.2%) delivered inpatient services, 35 (89.8%) outpatient services, and 24 (61.5%) outreach services. These were regarded as opportunities to include CMAM activities. There were 48.9% vacant positions and the health workers were not trained for management of acute malnutrition. Equipment and supplies did not meet the operational recommendations for management of acute malnutrition. Conclusion Implementing CMAM through the health centres of both sub-districts would warrant

  20. Comparative toxicity based on similar asymptotic endpoints (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, M.A.; Lowrie, L.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the laboratory tests are used in assessing the environmental risk of exposure to industrial chemicals. The combined effects of dose-level exposure and time-duration exposure are tested in the laboratory, but only a single endpoint reflecting the dose-level exposure at the end of the test period is routinely reported and used. At times, this might be sufficient, or the data otherwise inappropriate for calculation of more than a single endpoint. Nevertheless, an approach that makes a more complete use of existing sufficient test information is needed. One method is presented in this paper, the focus of which is the evaluation of an LC50 endpoint at a calculated exposure time. This calculation determines a condition for the toxicity curve to become established along the time axis. The authors refer to this condition of the dose-response curve as an asymptotic state and the LC50 calculated from it as the asymptotic LC50. An analysis of 152 toxicity tests using fathead minnows show that the 96-hr LC50 is 25% more conservative than the asymptotic LC50. The calculation of LC50 under asymptotic conditions better enables comparing toxicities of different chemicals on the basis of comparable dose-level and time-duration exposures.

  1. Challenges assessing clinical endpoints in early Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Jane S.; Wang, Chiachi; Duff, Kevin; Barker, Roger; Nance, Martha; Beglinger, Leigh; Moser, David; Williams, Janet K.; Simpson, Sheila; Langbehn, Douglas; van Kammen, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the current accepted standard clinical endpoint for the earliest-studied HD participants likely to be recruited into clinical trials. Since the advent of genetic testing for HD, it is possible to identify gene carriers prior to the diagnosis of disease, which opens up the possibility of clinical trials of disease-modifying treatments in clinically asymptomatic persons. Current accepted standard clinical endpoints were examined as part of a multi-national, 32-site, longitudinal, observational study of 786 research participants currently in the HD prodrome (gene-positive but not clinically diagnosed). Clinical signs and symptoms were used to prospectively predict functional loss as assessed by current accepted standard endpoints over 8 years of follow up. Functional capacity measures were not sensitive for HD in the prodrome; over 88% scored at ceiling. Prospective evaluation revealed that the first functional loss was in their accustomed work. In a survival analysis, motor, cognitive, and psychiatric measures were all predictors of job change. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study ever conducted on the emergence of functional loss secondary to brain disease. We conclude that future clinical trials designed for very early disease will require the development of new and more sensitive measures of real-life function. PMID:20623772

  2. Visual information throughout a reach determines endpoint precision.

    PubMed

    Ma-Wyatt, Anna; McKee, Suzanne P

    2007-05-01

    People make rapid, goal-directed movements to interact with their environment. Because these movements have consequences, it is important to be able to control them with a high level of precision and accuracy. Our hypothesis is that vision guides rapid hand movements, thereby enhancing their accuracy and precision. To test this idea, we asked observers to point to a briefly presented target (110 ms). We measured the impact of visual information on endpoint precision by using a shutter to close off view of the hand 50, 110 and 250 ms into the reach. We found that precision was degraded if the view of the hand was restricted at any time during the reach, despite the fact that the target disappeared long before the reach was completed. We therefore conclude that vision keeps the hand on the planned trajectory. We then investigated the effects of a perturbation of target position during the reach. For these experiments, the target remained visible until the reach was completed. The target position was shifted at 110, 180 or 250 ms into the reach. Early shifts in target position were easily compensated for, but late shifts led to a shift in the mean position of the endpoints; observers pointed to the center of the two locations, as a kind of best bet on the position of the target. Visual information is used to guide the hand throughout a reach and has a significant impact on endpoint precision.

  3. Impact of the Department of Health initiative to equip and train acute trusts to manage chemically contaminated casualties

    PubMed Central

    Al-Damouk, M; Bleetman, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Before 1999, there was no national model or standard doctrine for managing casualties from chemical incidents in the UK. A Department of Health (DoH) initiative to prepare the National Health Service (NHS) for chemical incidents was launched in the same year. This led to the distribution of an NHS standard chemical personal protective equipment suit (CPPE) together with a new single half day training package (Structured Approach to Chemical Casualties (SACC)) in 2001. Objectives: To assess the impact of the DoH initiative on acute hospital and ambulance trusts. To identify deficiencies in the design and operational deployment of the new CPPE, training initiative, and decontamination procedures at hospital level. Method: A survey to assess progress in specific areas of chemical incident preparedness and two simulated incidents with "live" chemically contaminated casualties conducted in two acute trusts. Umpires evaluated the operational performance against DoH SACC standards. Results: There has been marked improvement in many aspects of preparedness for chemical incidents since the original National Focus survey. Some deficiencies remain and this study identified areas for further work. In the live casualty exercises, hospital staff complied well with SACC protocols. Some practical difficulties were encountered with the deployment of the CPPE and in some aspects of the operational response, leading to some delays in the delivery of care to the casualties and to the integrity of the uncontaminated (clean) zones within the hospitals. Conclusion: Problems with the design and deployment of the CPPE, together with training difficulties have been fed back into the planning and development process. PMID:15843703

  4. Reactive nitrogen and human health: acute and long-term implications.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Amir H; Patz, Jonathan A

    2002-03-01

    Reactive-nitrogen (Nr) has a wide variety of beneficial and detrimental effects on human health. The most important of the beneficial effects are increasing global and regional food supplies and increased nutritional quality of available foods. However, lack of adequate dietary intake of amino acids and proteins is a serious cause of malnutrition when food supplies are inadequate because of poverty, drought, floods, wars, and displacements of people as refugees. There is sufficient, though limited, quantitative data indicating that increased circulation of Nr in the environment is responsible for significant human health effects via other exposure pathways. Nr can lead to harmful health effects from airborne occupational exposures and population-wide indoor and outdoor air pollution exposures to nitrogen dioxide and ozone. Nr can also affect health via water pollution problems, including methemoglobinemia from contaminated ground water, eutrophication causing fish kills and algal blooms that can be toxic to humans, and via global warming. The environmental pollutants stemming from reactive nitrogen are ubiquitous, making it difficult to identify the extent to which Nr exerts a specific health effect. As all populations are susceptible, continued interdisciplinary investigations are needed to determine the extent and nature of the beneficial and harmful effects on human health of nitrogen-related pollutants and their derivatives. PMID:12078000

  5. Reactive nitrogen and human health: acute and long-term implications.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Amir H; Patz, Jonathan A

    2002-03-01

    Reactive-nitrogen (Nr) has a wide variety of beneficial and detrimental effects on human health. The most important of the beneficial effects are increasing global and regional food supplies and increased nutritional quality of available foods. However, lack of adequate dietary intake of amino acids and proteins is a serious cause of malnutrition when food supplies are inadequate because of poverty, drought, floods, wars, and displacements of people as refugees. There is sufficient, though limited, quantitative data indicating that increased circulation of Nr in the environment is responsible for significant human health effects via other exposure pathways. Nr can lead to harmful health effects from airborne occupational exposures and population-wide indoor and outdoor air pollution exposures to nitrogen dioxide and ozone. Nr can also affect health via water pollution problems, including methemoglobinemia from contaminated ground water, eutrophication causing fish kills and algal blooms that can be toxic to humans, and via global warming. The environmental pollutants stemming from reactive nitrogen are ubiquitous, making it difficult to identify the extent to which Nr exerts a specific health effect. As all populations are susceptible, continued interdisciplinary investigations are needed to determine the extent and nature of the beneficial and harmful effects on human health of nitrogen-related pollutants and their derivatives.

  6. Designing quantitative structure activity relationships to predict specific toxic endpoints for polybrominated diphenyl ethers in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Rawat, S; Bruce, E D

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are known as effective flame retardants and have vast industrial application in products like plastics, building materials and textiles. They are found to be structurally similar to thyroid hormones that are responsible for regulating metabolism in the body. Structural similarity with the hormones poses a threat to human health because, once in the system, PBDEs have the potential to affect thyroid hormone transport and metabolism. This study was aimed at designing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting toxic endpoints, namely cell viability and apoptosis, elicited by PBDEs in mammalian cells. Cell viability was evaluated quantitatively using a general cytotoxicity bioassay using Janus Green dye and apoptosis was evaluated using a caspase assay. This study has thus modelled the overall cytotoxic influence of PBDEs at an early and a late endpoint by the Genetic Function Approximation method. This research was a twofold process including running in vitro bioassays to collect data on the toxic endpoints and modeling the evaluated endpoints using QSARs. Cell viability and apoptosis responses for Hep G2 cells exposed to PBDEs were successfully modelled with an r(2) of 0.97 and 0.94, respectively. PMID:24738916

  7. Loss of quality adjusted days as a trial endpoint: effect of early thrombolytic treatment in suspected myocardial infarction. Grampion Region Early Anistreplase Trial (GREAT).

    PubMed Central

    Rawles, J; Light, J

    1993-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES--(1) To measure the quality of life and the loss of quality adjusted days (QADS) after suspected acute myocardial infarction in patients who received thrombolytic treatment either at home or in hospital. (2) To compare the loss of QADS as a trial endpoint with the conventional endpoints of mortality and Q-wave infarction. DESIGN--Randomised double blind parallel group trial of anistreplase (30 U given intravenously) and placebo given either at home or in hospital. SETTING--Rural practices in Grampian admitting patients to teaching hospitals in Aberdeen. PATIENTS--A total of 311 patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction and no contraindications to thrombolytic treatment seen at home within four hours of the onset of symptoms. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Loss of quality adjusted days (QADS) in the first 100 days after suspected myocardial infarction (365 QADS = 1 QALY) was the main outcome measure. Compared with later administration in hospital, anistreplase at home resulted in a relative reduction of mortality of 49% (95% confidence interval 3.95%, 2p = 0.04), and a relative reduction of 26% in the proportion of survivors with infarction who had Q-waves (95% CI 7.44%, 2p = 0.007). During the 100 day follow up, the median loss of QADS was 25 for all patients. This loss was significantly greater in those who died than in survivors (65 v 18, 2p < 0.001), and in survivors with infarction than in survivors without infarction (26 v 13, 2p < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in loss of QADS in those with infarction with or without Q-waves (29 v 21, NS), and the median loss of QADS was not significantly different in those who had thrombolytic treatment at home or in hospital (median difference 0, 95% CI -5, +4 QADS). CONCLUSIONS--Loss of QADS had two serious limitations as an outcome measure: it was less sensitive than mortality and it failed to reflect physiological benefit. Palliative treatment with no physiological effect

  8. The relationship between depressive symptoms, health service consumption, and prognosis after acute myocardial infarction: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kurdyak, Paul A; Gnam, William H; Goering, Paula; Chong, Alice; Alter, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of cardiovascular health services is greater among patients with depressive symptoms than among patients without. However, the extent to which such associations between depressive symptoms and health service utilization are attributable to variations in comorbidity and prognostic disease severity is unknown. This paper explores the relationship between depressive symptoms, health service cardiovascular consumption, and prognosis following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods The study design was a prospective cohort study with follow-up telephone interviews of 1,941 patients 30 days following AMI discharged from 53 hospitals across Ontario, Canada between December 1999 and February, 2003. Outcome measures were post discharge use of cardiac and non-cardiac health care services. The service utilization outcomes were adjusted for age, sex, income, comorbidity, two validated measures of prognosis (cardiac functional capacity and risk adjustment severity index), cardiac procedures (CABG or PTCA) and drugs prescribed at discharge. Results Depressive symptoms were associated with a 24% (Adjusted RR:1.24; 95% CI:1.19–1.30, P < 0.001), 9% (Adjusted RR:1.09; 95% CI:1.02–1.16, P = 0.007) and 43% (Adjusted RR: 1.43; 95% CI:1.34–1.52, P < 0.001) increase in total, cardiac, and non-cardiac hospitalization days post-AMI respectively, after adjusting for baseline patient and hospital characteristics. Depressive-associated increases in cardiac health service consumption were significantly more pronounced among patients of lower than higher cardiac risk severity. Depressive symptoms were not associated with increased mortality after adjusting for baseline patient characteristics. Conclusion Depressive symptoms are associated with significantly higher cardiac and non-cardiac health service consumption following AMI despite adjustments for comorbidity and prognostic severity. The disproportionately higher cardiac health service consumption among lower

  9. Quantification of Norwalk virus inocula: Comparison of endpoint titration and real-time reverse transcription-PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengbo; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Moe, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Human noroviruses (NoV) are the leading cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis. In order to fully characterize features such as persistence and infectious dose, precise quantification of virus concentration is necessary. The purpose of this study was to compare two methods [endpoint titration RT-PCR and quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR)] with respect to quantification of Norwalk virus (NV) in inocula made from purified stock suspensions of human fecal specimens. A full-length NV RNA transcript was developed to facilitate quantification using RT-qPCR and provided log linear detection in the range of 49-4.9 x 10(4) genome equivalent copies (GEC) per reaction. Endpoint titration RT-PCR was used to estimate PCR detection units, and RT-qPCR was used to estimate genome copies in two NV inocula (8fIIa and 8fIIb) used in previous human challenge studies. Overall, RT-qPCR was 1.1-1.6 log(10) more sensitive (lower detection limit) than endpoint titration RT-PCR when the same RNA release method, PCR primers and thermocycle program were used. These findings have important implications for many experimental interpretations, not the least of which is estimating the median infectious dose in human challenge studies.

  10. World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of New-Onset Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and WTC-Related Acute Traumatic Injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program conducted a review of published, peer-reviewed epidemiologic studies regarding potential evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute traumatic injury among individuals who were responders to or survivors of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) found that these studies provide substantial evidence to support a causal association between each of these health conditions and 9/11 exposures. As a result, the Administrator is publishing a final rule to add both new-onset COPD and WTC-related acute traumatic injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions eligible for treatment coverage in the WTC Health Program.

  11. World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of New-Onset Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and WTC-Related Acute Traumatic Injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program conducted a review of published, peer-reviewed epidemiologic studies regarding potential evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute traumatic injury among individuals who were responders to or survivors of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) found that these studies provide substantial evidence to support a causal association between each of these health conditions and 9/11 exposures. As a result, the Administrator is publishing a final rule to add both new-onset COPD and WTC-related acute traumatic injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions eligible for treatment coverage in the WTC Health Program. PMID:27382662

  12. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2014-08-12

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective operation through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  13. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-02-11

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface ('PAMI') of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective opeartion through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  14. Clinical research and methodology: What usage and what hierarchical order for secondary endpoints?

    PubMed

    Laporte, Silvy; Diviné, Marine; Girault, Danièle

    2016-02-01

    In a randomised clinical trial, when the result of the primary endpoint shows a significant benefit, the secondary endpoints are scrutinised to identify additional effects of the treatment. However, this approach entails a risk of concluding that there is a benefit for one of these endpoints when such benefit does not exist (inflation of type I error risk). There are mainly two methods used to control the risk of drawing erroneous conclusions for secondary endpoints. The first method consists of distributing the risk over several co-primary endpoints, so as to maintain an overall risk of 5%. The second is the hierarchical test procedure, which consists of first establishing a hierarchy of the endpoints, then evaluating each endpoint in succession according to this hierarchy while the endpoints continue to show statistical significance. This simple method makes it possible to show the additional advantages of treatments and to identify the factors that differentiate them.

  15. The Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) Trial: Rationale, Ethics, Design, and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Antic, Nick A.; Heeley, Emma; Anderson, Craig S.; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jiguang; Neal, Bruce; Grunstein, Ron; Barbe, Ferran; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Huang, Shaoguang; Redline, Susan; Zhong, Nanshan; McEvoy, R. Doug

    2015-01-01

    The Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) study is an ongoing investigator-initiated and conducted, international, multicenter, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial that was designed to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) can reduce the risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with established CV disease (clinical trial registration NCT00738179). The results of this study will have important implications for the provision of health care to patients with sleep apnea around the world. The SAVE study has brought together respiratory, sleep, CV and stroke clinicians-scientists in an interdisciplinary collaboration with industry and government sponsorship to conduct an ambitious clinical trial. Following its launch in Australia and China in late 2008, the recruitment network expanded across 89 sites that included New Zealand, India, Spain, USA, and Brazil for a total of 2,717 patients randomized by December 2013. These patients are being followed until December 2015 so that the average length of follow-up of the cohort will be over 4 y. This article describes the rationale for the SAVE study, considerations given to the design including how various cultural and ethical challenges were addressed, and progress in establishing and maintaining the recruitment network, patient follow-up, and adherence to CPAP and procedures. The assumptions underlying the original trial sample size calculation and why this was revised downward in 2012 are also discussed. Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT00738179. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12608000409370. Citation: Antic NA, Heeley E, Anderson CS, Luo Y, Wang J, Neal B, Grunstein R, Barbe F, Lorenzi-Filho G, Huang S, Redline S, Zhong N, McEvoy RD. The sleep apnea cardiovascular endpoints (SAVE) trial: rationale, ethics, design, and progress. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1247–1257. PMID:25669180

  16. Injury to the lung from cancer therapy: Clinical syndromes, measurable endpoints, and potential scoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.; Rubin, P.; Phillips, T.L.

    1995-03-30

    Toxicity of the respiratory system is a common side effect and complication of anticancer therapy that can result in significant morbidity. The range of respiratory compromise can extend from acute lethal events to degrees of chronic pulmonary decompensation, manifesting years after the initial cancer therapy. This review examines the anatomic-histologic background of the lung and the normal functional anatomic unit. The pathophysiology of radiation and chemotherapy induced lung injury is discussed as well as the associated clinical syndromes. Radiation tolerance doses and volumes are assessed in addition to chemotherapy tolerance and risk factors and radiation-chemotherapy interactions. There are a variety of measurable endpoints for detection and screening. Because of the wide range of available quantitative tests, it would seem that the measurement of impaired lung function is possible. The development of staging systems for acute and late toxicity is discussed an a new staging system for Late Effects in Normal Tissues :(LENT) is proposed. 115 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was…

  18. Refocusing acute psychiatry, performance management, standards and accountability, a new context for mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Harnett, P J; Bowles, N; Coughlan, A

    2009-06-01

    The term 'performance management' has an aversive 'managerial' aspect, is unappealing to many public sector staff and has an 'image problem'. Perhaps as a consequence, it has failed to make a significant impact on Irish public sector workers, notably mental health nurses. In this paper, performance management is introduced and examined within an Irish healthcare context and with reference to its use in other countries. Some of the challenges faced by Irish mental health nurses and the potential benefits of working within a performance managed workplace are discussed. The paper concludes that performance management is likely to increasingly affect nurses, either as active agents or as passive recipients of a change that is thrust on them. The authors anticipate that the performance management 'image problem' will give way to recognition that this is a fundamental change which has the potential to enable health services to change. This change will bring high standards of transparency, worker involvement in decision making, an explicit value base for health services and individual teams. It provides the potential for clear practice standards and high standards of transparency as well as worker welfare in all aspects, including supporting employment and career progression. PMID:19538599

  19. Treatment and Prevention of Acute Diarrhoea. Guidelines for the Trainers of Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This booklet, intended primarily for the trainers of middle-level community health workers in underdeveloped countries, is designed to help such workers present the topic of diarrhea treatment and prevention in training courses. Divided into five sections, the booklet gives guidelines on treatment and prevention, with particular emphasis on the…

  20. Refocusing acute psychiatry, performance management, standards and accountability, a new context for mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Harnett, P J; Bowles, N; Coughlan, A

    2009-06-01

    The term 'performance management' has an aversive 'managerial' aspect, is unappealing to many public sector staff and has an 'image problem'. Perhaps as a consequence, it has failed to make a significant impact on Irish public sector workers, notably mental health nurses. In this paper, performance management is introduced and examined within an Irish healthcare context and with reference to its use in other countries. Some of the challenges faced by Irish mental health nurses and the potential benefits of working within a performance managed workplace are discussed. The paper concludes that performance management is likely to increasingly affect nurses, either as active agents or as passive recipients of a change that is thrust on them. The authors anticipate that the performance management 'image problem' will give way to recognition that this is a fundamental change which has the potential to enable health services to change. This change will bring high standards of transparency, worker involvement in decision making, an explicit value base for health services and individual teams. It provides the potential for clear practice standards and high standards of transparency as well as worker welfare in all aspects, including supporting employment and career progression.

  1. Overview of Systematic Reviews: Yoga as a Therapeutic Intervention for Adults with Acute and Chronic Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Marcy C.; Ward, Alison; Roberts, Nia W.; Heneghan, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Overview the quality, direction, and characteristics of yoga interventions for treatment of acute and chronic health conditions in adult populations. Methods. We searched for systematic reviews in 10 online databases, bibliographic references, and hand-searches in yoga-related journals. Included reviews satisfy Oxman criteria and specify yoga as a primary intervention in one or more randomized controlled trials for treatment in adults. The AMSTAR tool and GRADE approach evaluated the methodological quality of reviews and quality of evidence. Results. We identified 2202 titles, of which 41 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility and 26 systematic reviews satisfied inclusion criteria. Thirteen systematic reviews include quantitative data and six papers include meta-analysis. The quality of evidence is generally low. Sixteen different types of health conditions are included. Eleven reviews show tendency towards positive effects of yoga intervention, 15 reviews report unclear results, and no, reviews report adverse effects of yoga. Yoga appears most effective for reducing symptoms in anxiety, depression, and pain. Conclusion. Although the quality of systematic reviews is high, the quality of supporting evidence is low. Significant heterogeneity and variability in reporting interventions by type of yoga, settings, and population characteristics limit the generalizability of results. PMID:23762174

  2. Challenges in translating endpoints from trials to observational cohort studies in oncology.

    PubMed

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Ehrenstein, Vera; Lash, Timothy L; Acquavella, John; Rørth, Mikael; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are considered the gold standard for examining drug efficacy and for approval of new drugs. Medical databases and population surveillance registries are valuable resources for post-approval observational research, which are increasingly used in studies of benefits and risk of new cancer drugs. Here, we address the challenges in translating endpoints from oncology trials to observational studies. Registry-based cohort studies can investigate real-world safety issues - including previously unrecognized concerns - by examining rare endpoints or multiple endpoints at once. In contrast to clinical trials, observational cohort studies typically do not exclude real-world patients from clinical practice, such as old and frail patients with comorbidity. The observational cohort study complements the clinical trial by examining the effectiveness of interventions applied in clinical practice and by providing evidence on long-term clinical outcomes, which are often not feasible to study in a clinical trial. Various endpoints can be included in clinical trials, such as hard endpoints, soft endpoints, surrogate endpoints, and patient-reported endpoints. Each endpoint has it strengths and limitations for use in research studies. Endpoints used in oncology trials are often not applicable in observational cohort studies which are limited by the setting of standard clinical practice and by non-standardized endpoint determination. Observational studies can be more helpful moving research forward if they restrict focus to appropriate and valid endpoints. PMID:27354827

  3. Challenges in translating endpoints from trials to observational cohort studies in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Ehrenstein, Vera; Lash, Timothy L; Acquavella, John; Rørth, Mikael; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are considered the gold standard for examining drug efficacy and for approval of new drugs. Medical databases and population surveillance registries are valuable resources for post-approval observational research, which are increasingly used in studies of benefits and risk of new cancer drugs. Here, we address the challenges in translating endpoints from oncology trials to observational studies. Registry-based cohort studies can investigate real-world safety issues – including previously unrecognized concerns – by examining rare endpoints or multiple endpoints at once. In contrast to clinical trials, observational cohort studies typically do not exclude real-world patients from clinical practice, such as old and frail patients with comorbidity. The observational cohort study complements the clinical trial by examining the effectiveness of interventions applied in clinical practice and by providing evidence on long-term clinical outcomes, which are often not feasible to study in a clinical trial. Various endpoints can be included in clinical trials, such as hard endpoints, soft endpoints, surrogate endpoints, and patient-reported endpoints. Each endpoint has it strengths and limitations for use in research studies. Endpoints used in oncology trials are often not applicable in observational cohort studies which are limited by the setting of standard clinical practice and by non-standardized endpoint determination. Observational studies can be more helpful moving research forward if they restrict focus to appropriate and valid endpoints. PMID:27354827

  4. Israeli acute paralysis virus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and implications for honey bee health.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L; Teixeira, Erica W; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D

    2014-07-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV-host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide. PMID:25079600

  5. Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Implications for Honey Bee Health

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P. Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W. Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C.; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L.; Teixeira, Erica W.; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV–host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide. PMID:25079600

  6. Community-acquired acute kidney injury: A challenge and opportunity for primary care in kidney health.

    PubMed

    Mesropian, Paul Der; Othersen, Jennifer; Mason, Darius; Wang, Jeffrey; Asif, Arif; Mathew, Roy O

    2016-09-01

    Community-acquired acute kidney injury (CA-AKI) has been found to be a common event in the population. Current incidence estimates are not available, but evaluations of severe elevations in serum creatinine indicate that incidence can be as high as 989 cases per million population in those older than 80 years. Data on risk factors are limited, but older age and higher comorbid illness burden, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease, seem to be more common in patients who suffer CA-AKI. In addition to being more common than hospital-acquired AKI, the long-term sequelae of CA-AKI seem to be just as severe, including renal disease progression and mortality. Efforts to better understand the aetiology of CA-AKI and how ultimately to prevent the development of this condition will need to be taken. In the meantime, a concerted effort by general internists and nephrologists will be needed to prevent CA-AKI in the highest risk patients and thus limit the poor outcomes associated with this entity. PMID:26890822

  7. Israeli acute paralysis virus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and implications for honey bee health.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L; Teixeira, Erica W; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D

    2014-07-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV-host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide.

  8. Directional constraint of endpoint force emerges from hindlimb anatomy.

    PubMed

    Bunderson, Nathan E; McKay, J Lucas; Ting, Lena H; Burkholder, Thomas J

    2010-06-15

    Postural control requires the coordination of force production at the limb endpoints to apply an appropriate force to the body. Subjected to horizontal plane perturbations, quadruped limbs stereotypically produce force constrained along a line that passes near the center of mass. This phenomenon, referred to as the force constraint strategy, may reflect mechanical constraints on the limb or body, a specific neural control strategy or an interaction among neural controls and mechanical constraints. We used a neuromuscular model of the cat hindlimb to test the hypothesis that the anatomical constraints restrict the mechanical action of individual muscles during stance and constrain the response to perturbations to a line independent of perturbation direction. In a linearized neuromuscular model of the cat hindlimb, muscle lengthening directions were highly conserved across 10,000 different muscle activation patterns, each of which produced an identical, stance-like endpoint force. These lengthening directions were closely aligned with the sagittal plane and reveal an anatomical structure for directionally constrained force responses. Each of the 10,000 activation patterns was predicted to produce stable stance based on Lyapunov stability analysis. In forward simulations of the nonlinear, seven degree of freedom model under the action of 200 random muscle activation patterns, displacement of the endpoint from its equilibrium position produced restoring forces, which were also biased toward the sagittal plane. The single exception was an activation pattern based on minimum muscle stress optimization, which produced destabilizing force responses in some perturbation directions. The sagittal force constraint increased during simulations as the system shifted from an inertial response during the acceleration phase to a viscoelastic response as peak velocity was obtained. These results qualitatively match similar experimental observations and suggest that the force

  9. Adverse effect of agroecosystem pond water on biological endpoints of common toad (Rhinella arenarum) tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Babini, María Selene; Bionda, Clarisa de Lourdes; Salas, Nancy Edith; Martino, Adolfo Ludovico

    2016-08-01

    Chemical prroducts used in farming and wastes from livestock can contaminate pond water in agroecosystems due to runoff. Amphibians using these ponds for breeding are probably exposed to pollutants, and serious consequences might be observed afterward at the population level. Assessment biological endpoints of anuran to water quality give a realistic estimate of the probability of occurrence of adverse effects and provide an early warning signal. In this study, the ecotoxicity of agroecosystem ponds from the south of Córdoba province, Argentina, was investigated. Ponds in four sites with different degrees of human disturbance were selected: three agroecosystems (A1, A2, A3) and a site without crops or livestock (SM). The effect of pond water quality on the biological endpoint of Rhinella arenarum tadpoles was examined using microcosms with pond water from sites. Biological endpoints assessed were as follows: mortality, growth, development, morphological abnormalities (in body shape, gut, and labial tooth row formula), behavior, and blood cell parameters (micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities). Results indicated that water from agroecosystems has adverse effect on early life stage of R. arenarum. High mortality and fewer metamorphs were recorded in the A1 and A3 treatments. Tadpoles and metamorphs from A1 and A2 treatments had lower body condition. Tadpoles from A1 and A3 showed the highest prevalence of morphological abnormalities. The lowest amount of tadpoles feeding and the highest percentage of tadpoles swimming on the surface were observed in treatments with agroecosystem pond water. The higher frequencies of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities were recorded in tadpoles from A1, A2, and A3 treatments. We check the sensitivity of the biological endpoints of R. arenarum tadpoles like early warning indicators of water quality. We found that the poor water quality of agroecosystem ponds has impact on the health of the tadpoles, and this could affect the

  10. Adverse effect of agroecosystem pond water on biological endpoints of common toad (Rhinella arenarum) tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Babini, María Selene; Bionda, Clarisa de Lourdes; Salas, Nancy Edith; Martino, Adolfo Ludovico

    2016-08-01

    Chemical prroducts used in farming and wastes from livestock can contaminate pond water in agroecosystems due to runoff. Amphibians using these ponds for breeding are probably exposed to pollutants, and serious consequences might be observed afterward at the population level. Assessment biological endpoints of anuran to water quality give a realistic estimate of the probability of occurrence of adverse effects and provide an early warning signal. In this study, the ecotoxicity of agroecosystem ponds from the south of Córdoba province, Argentina, was investigated. Ponds in four sites with different degrees of human disturbance were selected: three agroecosystems (A1, A2, A3) and a site without crops or livestock (SM). The effect of pond water quality on the biological endpoint of Rhinella arenarum tadpoles was examined using microcosms with pond water from sites. Biological endpoints assessed were as follows: mortality, growth, development, morphological abnormalities (in body shape, gut, and labial tooth row formula), behavior, and blood cell parameters (micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities). Results indicated that water from agroecosystems has adverse effect on early life stage of R. arenarum. High mortality and fewer metamorphs were recorded in the A1 and A3 treatments. Tadpoles and metamorphs from A1 and A2 treatments had lower body condition. Tadpoles from A1 and A3 showed the highest prevalence of morphological abnormalities. The lowest amount of tadpoles feeding and the highest percentage of tadpoles swimming on the surface were observed in treatments with agroecosystem pond water. The higher frequencies of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities were recorded in tadpoles from A1, A2, and A3 treatments. We check the sensitivity of the biological endpoints of R. arenarum tadpoles like early warning indicators of water quality. We found that the poor water quality of agroecosystem ponds has impact on the health of the tadpoles, and this could affect the

  11. Understanding Nurses' Perceptions of Electronic Health Record Use in an Acute Care Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Gillian; McGillis Hall, Linda; Nagle, Lynn; Trbovich, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are being implemented in health care environments in an effort to improve the safety, quality and efficiency of care. However, not all of these potential benefits have been demonstrated in empirical research. One of the reasons for this may be a number of barriers that prevent nurses from being able to incorporate EHRs into their professional practice. A review of the literature revealed a number of barriers to, and facilitators of EHR use by nurses. Among these, EHR usability, organizational context, and individual nurse characteristics were found to be concepts that influence use. It is currently unknown how these concepts together might influence nurses' perceptions of their ability to use the technology to support the nursing process. In this poster, the authors will describe a study aimed at achieving a better understanding of nurses' perceptions of their EHR use by investigating the concepts of EHR usability, organizational context and select individual nurse characteristics. PMID:27332345

  12. Peak exposures to nitrogen dioxide and study design to detect their acute health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, I.F.; Andrews, L.R.

    1986-04-01

    Findings on continuous exposure to nitrogen dioxide by persons cooking a meal on a gas stove are presented. In addition, peak levels of NO/sub 2/ at different heights above the floor and at various distances from the stove while the range and oven are in operation are reported for 24 homes. A study design to detect the health effects of short-term exposures to high levels of nitrogen dioxide ranging from 0.20 ppm to over 1.5 ppm on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in asthmatic and non-asthmatic subjects is described. The continuous exposure to nitrogen dioxide of the study subjects before, during and after cooking a dinner on a gas stove is determined using a continuous nitrogen dioxide monitoring instrument. Lung-function tests are performed and symptom questionnaires are administered throughout the study period to assess both health effects and changes in pulmonary function associated with the above exposures.

  13. Alternative Endpoints and Approaches for the Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater at Complex Sites - 13426

    SciTech Connect

    Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elisabeth L.

    2013-07-01

    alternative endpoints for groundwater remediation at complex sites. A statistical analysis of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites receiving TI waivers will be presented as well as case studies of other types of alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies that illustrate the variety of approaches used at complex sites and the technical analyses used to predict and document cost, time frame, and potential remedial effectiveness. This presentation is intended to inform DOE program managers, state regulators, practitioners and other stakeholders who are evaluating technical cleanup challenges within their own programs, and establishing programmatic approaches to evaluating and implementing long-term management approaches. Case studies provide examples of long-term management designations and strategies to manage and remediate groundwater at complex sites. At least 13 states consider some designation for groundwater containment in their corrective action policies, such as groundwater management zones, containment zones, and groundwater classification exemption areas. Long-term management designations are not a way to 'do nothing' or walk away from a site. Instead, soil and groundwater within the zone is managed to be protective of human health and the environment. Understanding when and how to adopt a long-term management approach can lead to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across DOE and at numerous other industrial and military sites across the U.S. This presentation provides context for assessing the use and appropriate role of alternative endpoints and supporting long-term management designations in final remedies. (authors)

  14. Development of an Acute Care Plastic Surgery Service in the Saskatoon Health Region: Effects on flexor tendon management

    PubMed Central

    Wilgenbusch, Chelsea S; Dust, Peter W; Sunderland, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acute care surgery model has gained favour in general surgery, but has yet to be widely adopted in other specialties. An Acute Care Plastic Surgery (ACS) Service was recently implemented in the Saskatoon Health Region in an effort to improve trauma care. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of ACS on the management of flexor tendon lacerations. The authors hypothesize that ACS has resulted in more timely intervention, improved outcomes and decreased ‘after hours’ surgery. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients treated for flexor tendon lacerations from 2007 to 2013 was performed. Patients were stratified into two groups based on whether they received treatment before (group A) or after (group B) ACS implementation. Variables included dates and times of patient referral, consultation and tendon repair; postoperative complications; and admissions. A surgeon survey was administered on the perceived impact of ACS. RESULTS: Group A was more likely to have surgery performed after hours (P=0.0019) and be admitted to hospital (P=0.0211) compared with group B. Time from referral to consultation and injury-to-surgery interval were slightly increased post-ACS (Group B). Surgeons were highly satisfied with the new system, citing benefits to patients and surgeons. CONCLUSION: ACS was designed to improve trauma care, while favourably impacting surgeon workload. Surprisingly, the injury-to-surgery interval was slightly increased. However, this was not clinically significant and did not lead to increased postoperative complications. This finding was likely due to a favourable change in practice patterns observed after ACS implementation. ACS has resulted in fewer hospital admissions, decreased after-hours surgeries and improved surgeon satisfaction. PMID:26361628

  15. Assessing chronic fish health: An application to a case of an acute exposure to chemically treated crude oil.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, F; Domenici, P; Farrell, A P; Lacroix, C; Le Floch, S; Lemaire, P; Nicolas-Kopec, A; Whittington, M; Zambonino-Infante, J L; Claireaux, G

    2016-09-01

    Human alteration of marine ecosystems is substantial and growing. Yet, no adequate methodology exists that provides reliable predictions of how environmental degradation will affect these ecosystems at a relevant level of biological organization. The primary objective of this study was to develop a methodology to evaluate a fish's capacity to face a well-established environmental challenge, an exposure to chemically dispersed oil, and characterize the long-term consequences. Therefore, we applied high-throughput, non-lethal challenge tests to assess hypoxia tolerance, temperature susceptibility and maximal swimming speed as proxies for a fish's functional integrity. These whole animal challenge tests were implemented before (1 month) and after (1 month) juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) had been acutely exposed (48h) to a mixture containing 0.08gL(-1) of weathered Arabian light crude oil plus 4% dispersant (Corexit© EC9500A), a realistic exposure concentration during an oil spill. In addition, experimental populations were then transferred into semi-natural tidal mesocosm ponds and correlates of Darwinian fitness (growth and survival) were monitored over a period of 4 months. Our results revealed that fish acutely exposed to chemically dispersed oil remained impaired in terms of their hypoxia tolerance and swimming performance, but not in temperature susceptibility for 1 month post-exposure. Nevertheless, these functional impairments had no subsequent ecological consequences under mildly selective environmental conditions since growth and survival were not impacted during the mesocosm pond study. Furthermore, the earlier effects on fish performance were presumably temporary because re-testing the fish 10 months post-exposure revealed no significant residual effects on hypoxia tolerance, temperature susceptibility and maximal swimming speed. We propose that the functional proxies and correlates of Darwinian fitness used here provide a useful

  16. Assessing chronic fish health: An application to a case of an acute exposure to chemically treated crude oil.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, F; Domenici, P; Farrell, A P; Lacroix, C; Le Floch, S; Lemaire, P; Nicolas-Kopec, A; Whittington, M; Zambonino-Infante, J L; Claireaux, G

    2016-09-01

    Human alteration of marine ecosystems is substantial and growing. Yet, no adequate methodology exists that provides reliable predictions of how environmental degradation will affect these ecosystems at a relevant level of biological organization. The primary objective of this study was to develop a methodology to evaluate a fish's capacity to face a well-established environmental challenge, an exposure to chemically dispersed oil, and characterize the long-term consequences. Therefore, we applied high-throughput, non-lethal challenge tests to assess hypoxia tolerance, temperature susceptibility and maximal swimming speed as proxies for a fish's functional integrity. These whole animal challenge tests were implemented before (1 month) and after (1 month) juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) had been acutely exposed (48h) to a mixture containing 0.08gL(-1) of weathered Arabian light crude oil plus 4% dispersant (Corexit© EC9500A), a realistic exposure concentration during an oil spill. In addition, experimental populations were then transferred into semi-natural tidal mesocosm ponds and correlates of Darwinian fitness (growth and survival) were monitored over a period of 4 months. Our results revealed that fish acutely exposed to chemically dispersed oil remained impaired in terms of their hypoxia tolerance and swimming performance, but not in temperature susceptibility for 1 month post-exposure. Nevertheless, these functional impairments had no subsequent ecological consequences under mildly selective environmental conditions since growth and survival were not impacted during the mesocosm pond study. Furthermore, the earlier effects on fish performance were presumably temporary because re-testing the fish 10 months post-exposure revealed no significant residual effects on hypoxia tolerance, temperature susceptibility and maximal swimming speed. We propose that the functional proxies and correlates of Darwinian fitness used here provide a useful

  17. ASPREE Cancer Endpoints Study | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The ASPREE Cancer Endpoint Study (ACES), an ancillary study of the ASPirin in the Prevention of Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) Study, will allow for the examination of the effect of daily low-dose aspirin (100 mg) compared to placebo, on specific DNA biomarkers and selected specific incident and recurrent cancer and metastases. The establishment of this ACES biobank will allow for the exploration of DNA-related molecular mechanisms of aspirin's protective effect against cancer, cancer associated mortality and metastases, using blood or saliva DNA specimens, urine, and tumor tissue. |

  18. Exploring a possible origin of the QCD critical endpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, K. A. Petrov, V. K. Zinovjev, G. M.

    2013-03-15

    We develop a new model of the QCD critical endpoint by matching the deconfinement phase transition line of quark-gluon bags with the similar line at which the bag surface tension coefficient vanishes. Unlike all previous studies of such models the deconfined phase in our approach is defined not by an essential singularity of the isobaric partition function but its simple pole. As an unexpected result we find out that the first-order phase transition which is usually defined by a discontinuity of the first derivative of the bag system pressure results from a discontinuity of the derivative of surface tension coefficient of quark-gluon bags.

  19. Establishment of Early Endpoints in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Koch, Amory; Gulani, Jatinder; King, Gregory; Hieber, Kevin; Chappell, Mark; Ossetrova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) following exposure to ionizing irradiation is characterized by radiation-induced multiorgan dysfunction/failure that refers to progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems, the etiological agent being radiation damage to cells and tissues over time. Radiation sensitivity data on humans and animals has made it possible to describe the signs associated with ARS. A mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) has previously been developed that represents the likely scenario of exposure in the human population. Herein, we present the Mouse Intervention Scoring System (MISS) developed at the Veterinary Sciences Department (VSD) of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) to identify moribund mice and decrease the numbers of mice found dead, which is therefore a more humane refinement to death as the endpoint. Survival rates were compared to changes in body weights and temperatures in the mouse (CD2F1 male) TBI model (6-14 Gy, 60Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min-1), which informed improvements to the Scoring System. Individual tracking of animals via implanted microchips allowed for assessment of criteria based on individuals rather than by group averages. From a total of 132 mice (92 irradiated), 51 mice were euthanized versus only four mice that were found dead (7% of non-survivors). In this case, all four mice were found dead after overnight periods between observations. Weight loss alone was indicative of imminent succumbing to radiation injury, however mice did not always become moribund within 24 hours while having weight loss >30%. Only one survivor had a weight loss of greater than 30%. Temperature significantly dropped only 2-4 days before death/euthanasia in 10 and 14 Gy animals. The score system demonstrates a significant refinement as compared to using subjective assessment of morbidity or death as the endpoint for these survival studies. PMID:27579862

  20. Establishment of Early Endpoints in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Koch, Amory; Gulani, Jatinder; King, Gregory; Hieber, Kevin; Chappell, Mark; Ossetrova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) following exposure to ionizing irradiation is characterized by radiation-induced multiorgan dysfunction/failure that refers to progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems, the etiological agent being radiation damage to cells and tissues over time. Radiation sensitivity data on humans and animals has made it possible to describe the signs associated with ARS. A mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) has previously been developed that represents the likely scenario of exposure in the human population. Herein, we present the Mouse Intervention Scoring System (MISS) developed at the Veterinary Sciences Department (VSD) of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) to identify moribund mice and decrease the numbers of mice found dead, which is therefore a more humane refinement to death as the endpoint. Survival rates were compared to changes in body weights and temperatures in the mouse (CD2F1 male) TBI model (6-14 Gy, 60Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min-1), which informed improvements to the Scoring System. Individual tracking of animals via implanted microchips allowed for assessment of criteria based on individuals rather than by group averages. From a total of 132 mice (92 irradiated), 51 mice were euthanized versus only four mice that were found dead (7% of non-survivors). In this case, all four mice were found dead after overnight periods between observations. Weight loss alone was indicative of imminent succumbing to radiation injury, however mice did not always become moribund within 24 hours while having weight loss >30%. Only one survivor had a weight loss of greater than 30%. Temperature significantly dropped only 2-4 days before death/euthanasia in 10 and 14 Gy animals. The score system demonstrates a significant refinement as compared to using subjective assessment of morbidity or death as the endpoint for these survival studies.

  1. Establishment of Early Endpoints in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model

    PubMed Central

    Gulani, Jatinder; King, Gregory; Hieber, Kevin; Chappell, Mark; Ossetrova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) following exposure to ionizing irradiation is characterized by radiation-induced multiorgan dysfunction/failure that refers to progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems, the etiological agent being radiation damage to cells and tissues over time. Radiation sensitivity data on humans and animals has made it possible to describe the signs associated with ARS. A mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) has previously been developed that represents the likely scenario of exposure in the human population. Herein, we present the Mouse Intervention Scoring System (MISS) developed at the Veterinary Sciences Department (VSD) of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) to identify moribund mice and decrease the numbers of mice found dead, which is therefore a more humane refinement to death as the endpoint. Survival rates were compared to changes in body weights and temperatures in the mouse (CD2F1 male) TBI model (6–14 Gy, 60Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min-1), which informed improvements to the Scoring System. Individual tracking of animals via implanted microchips allowed for assessment of criteria based on individuals rather than by group averages. From a total of 132 mice (92 irradiated), 51 mice were euthanized versus only four mice that were found dead (7% of non-survivors). In this case, all four mice were found dead after overnight periods between observations. Weight loss alone was indicative of imminent succumbing to radiation injury, however mice did not always become moribund within 24 hours while having weight loss >30%. Only one survivor had a weight loss of greater than 30%. Temperature significantly dropped only 2–4 days before death/euthanasia in 10 and 14 Gy animals. The score system demonstrates a significant refinement as compared to using subjective assessment of morbidity or death as the endpoint for these survival studies. PMID:27579862

  2. Predicting Levels of Policy Advocacy Engagement Among Acute-Care Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Bird, Melissa; Ward, Cathy Rogers; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to describe the factors that predict health professionals' engagement in policy advocacy. The researchers used a cross-sectional research design with a sample of 97 nurses, 94 social workers, and 104 medical residents from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven predictor scales were associated with health professionals' policy advocacy engagement and revealed that five of the eight factors were significantly associated with it (p < .05). The factors include patient advocacy engagement, eagerness, skills, tangible support, and organizational receptivity. Regression analysis examined whether the seven scales, when controlling for sociodemographic variables and hospital site, predicted levels of policy advocacy engagement. Results revealed that patient advocacy engagement (p < .001), eagerness (p < .001), skills (p < .01), tangible support (p < .01), perceived effectiveness (p < .05), and organizational receptivity (p < .05) all predicted health professional's policy advocacy engagement. Ethical commitment did not predict policy advocacy engagement. The model explained 36% of the variance in policy advocacy engagement. Limitations of the study and its implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed.

  3. Predicting Levels of Policy Advocacy Engagement Among Acute-Care Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Bird, Melissa; Ward, Cathy Rogers; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to describe the factors that predict health professionals' engagement in policy advocacy. The researchers used a cross-sectional research design with a sample of 97 nurses, 94 social workers, and 104 medical residents from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven predictor scales were associated with health professionals' policy advocacy engagement and revealed that five of the eight factors were significantly associated with it (p < .05). The factors include patient advocacy engagement, eagerness, skills, tangible support, and organizational receptivity. Regression analysis examined whether the seven scales, when controlling for sociodemographic variables and hospital site, predicted levels of policy advocacy engagement. Results revealed that patient advocacy engagement (p < .001), eagerness (p < .001), skills (p < .01), tangible support (p < .01), perceived effectiveness (p < .05), and organizational receptivity (p < .05) all predicted health professional's policy advocacy engagement. Ethical commitment did not predict policy advocacy engagement. The model explained 36% of the variance in policy advocacy engagement. Limitations of the study and its implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed. PMID:27151835

  4. Modeling acute health risks associated with accidental releases of toxic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Haskin, F.E.; Ding, C.; Summa, K.J.; Young, M.

    1996-09-01

    CHEM{_}MACCS has been developed from the radiological accident consequence code, MACCS, to perform probabilistic calculations of potential off-site consequences of the accidental atmospheric release of hazardous chemicals. The principal phenomena considered in CHEM{_}MACCS are atmospheric transport, mitigative actions based on dose projection, dose accumulation by a number of pathways, and early and latent health effects. CHEM{_}MACCS provides the following capabilities: (1) statistical weather sampling data (8,760 hourly data points per year), (2) population dose and health effect risk calculations based on site-specific population data, (3) health effects calculations including the consideration of potential site specific mitigative actions (evacuation and shielding), and (4) modeling of multiple release segments. Three different sample problems are contained in this report to show how to use CHEM{_}MACCS. Three test problems are run to compare CHEM{_}MACCS and D2PC. The doses versus the downwind centerline distances from the source for the given doses are in very close agreement.

  5. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  6. Health status, renal function, and quality of life after multiorgan failure and acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Faulhaber-Walter, Robert; Scholz, Sebastian; Haller, Herrmann; Kielstein, Jan T; Hafer, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in need of renal replacement therapy (RRT) may have a protracted and often incomplete rehabilitation. Their long-term outcome has rarely been investigated. Study design Survivors of the HANnover Dialysis OUTcome (HANDOUT) study were evaluated after 5 years for survival, health status, renal function, and quality of life (QoL). The HANDOUT study had examinded mortality and renal recovery of patients with AKI receiving either standard extendend or intensified dialysis after multi organ failure. Results One hundred fifty-six former HANDOUT participants were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 56.4%. Five-year survival after AKI/RRT was 40.1% (86.5% if discharged from hospital). Main causes of death were cardiovascular complications and sepsis. A total of 19 survivors presented to the outpatient department of our clinic and had good renal recovery (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 72.5±30 mL/min/1.73 m2; mean proteinuria 89±84 mg/d). One person required maintenance dialysis. Seventy-nine percent of the patients had a pathological kidney sonomorphology. The Charlson comorbidity score was 2.2±1.4 and adjusted for age 3.3±2.1 years. Numbers of comorbid conditions averaged 2.38±1.72 per patient (heart failure [52%] > chronic kidney disease/myocardial infarction [each 29%]). Median 36-item short form health survey (SF-36™) index was 0.657 (0.69 physical health/0.66 mental health). Quality-adjusted life-years after 5 years were 3.365. Conclusion Mortality after severe AKI is higher than short-term prospective studies show, and morbidity is significant. Kidney recovery as well as general health remains incomplete. Reduction of QoL is minor, and social rehabilitation is very good. Affectivity is heterogeneous, but most patients experience emotional well-being. In summary, AKI in critically ill patients leads to incomplete rehabilitation but acceptable QoL after 5 years. PMID:27284261

  7. Immediate skin responses to laser and light treatments: Warning endpoints: How to avoid side effects.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Avram, Mathew M; Anderson, R Rox

    2016-05-01

    Lasers are versatile, commonly used treatment tools in dermatology. While it is tempting to follow manufacturer's guidelines or other "recipes" for laser treatment, this approach alone can be a recipe for disaster. Specific and immediate skin responses or endpoints exist and are clinically useful because they correlate with underlying mechanisms that are either desirable (ie, therapeutic), undesirable (ie, warning signs of injury or side effects), or incidental. The observation of clinical endpoints is a safe and reliable guide for appropriate treatment. This article presents the warning endpoints during specific dermatologic laser treatments, and the accompanying article presents the therapeutic endpoints, their underlying mechanisms, and the utility of these endpoints. PMID:27085227

  8. Acute health effects of the Tasman Spirit oil spill on residents of Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Janjua, Naveed Zafar; Kasi, Pashtoon Murtaza; Nawaz, Haq; Farooqui, Sadia Zohra; Khuwaja, Urooj Bakht; Najam-ul-Hassan; Jafri, Syed Nadim; Lutfi, Shahid Ali; Kadir, Muhammad Masood; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2006-01-01

    Background On July 27 2003, a ship carrying crude oil run aground near Karachi and after two weeks released 37,000 tons of its cargo into the sea. Oil on the coastal areas and fumes in air raised health concerns among people. We assessed the immediate health impact of oil spill from the tanker Tasman Spirit on residents of the affected coastline in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods We conducted a study consisting of an exposed group including adults living in houses on the affected shoreline and two control groups (A and B) who lived at the distance of 2 km and 20 km away from the sea, respectively. We selected households through systematic sampling and interviewed an adult male and female in each household about symptoms relating to eyes, respiratory tract, skin and nervous system, smoking, allergies, beliefs about the effect on their health and anxiety about the health effects. We used logistic regression procedures to model each symptom as an outcome and the exposure status as an independent variable while adjusting for confounders. We also used linear regression procedure to assess the relationship exposure status with symptoms score; calculated by summation of all symptoms. Results Overall 400 subjects were interviewed (exposed, n = 216; group A, n = 83; and group B, n = 101). The exposed group reported a higher occurrence of one or more symptoms compared to either of the control groups (exposed, 96% vs. group A, 70%, group B 85%; P < 0.001). Mean summary symptom scores were higher among the exposed group (14.5) than control group A (4.5) and control group B (3.8, P < 0.001). Logistic regression models indicated that there were statistically significant, moderate-to-strong associations (Prevalence ORs (POR) ranging from 2.3 to 37.0) between the exposed group and the symptoms. There was a trend of decreasing symptom-specific PORs with increase in distance from the spill site. Multiple linear regression model revealed strong relationship of exposure status with the

  9. Medical informatics: an essential tool for health sciences research in acute care.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Pickering, Brian W; Smith, Vernon D; Hadzikadic, Mirsad; Gajic, Ognjen; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2009-10-01

    Medical Informatics has become an important tool in modern health care practice and research. In the present article we outline the challenges and opportunities associated with the implementation of electronic medical records (EMR) in complex environments such as intensive care units (ICU). We share our initial experience in the design, maintenance and application of a customized critical care, Microsoft SQL based, research warehouse, ICU DataMart. ICU DataMart integrates clinical and administrative data from heterogeneous sources within the EMR to support research and practice improvement in the ICUs. Examples of intelligent alarms -- "sniffers", administrative reports, decision support and clinical research applications are presented.

  10. Emergency Care of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Integrated Health System

    PubMed Central

    Sauser-Zachrison, Kori; Shen, Ernest; Ajani, Zahra; Neil, William P; Sangha, Navdeep; Gould, Michael K; Sharp, Adam L

    2016-01-01

    Context: Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is underutilized for treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Objective: To determine whether the probability of tPA administration for patients with ischemic stroke in an integrated health care system improved from 2009 to 2013, and to identify predictors of tPA administration. Design: Retrospective analysis of all ischemic stroke presentations to 14 Emergency Departments between 2009 and 2013. A generalized linear mixed-effects model identified patient and hospital predictors of tPA. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome was tPA administration; secondary outcomes were door-to-imaging and door-to-needle times and tPA-related bleeding complications. Results: Of the 11,630 patients, 3.9% received tPA. The likelihood of tPA administration increased with presentation in 2012 and 2013 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26–2.43; and OR = 2.58; 95% CI = 1.90–3.51), female sex (OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.04–1.54), and ambulance arrival (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.76–2.67), and decreased with prior stroke (OR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.25–0.89) and increased age (OR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.97–0.99). Likelihood varied by Medical Center (pseudo-intraclass correlation coefficient 13.5%). Among tPA-treated patients, median door-to-imaging time was 15 minutes (interquartile range, 9–23 minutes), and door-to-needle time was 73 minutes (interquartile range, 55–103 minutes). The rate of intracranial hemorrhage was 4.2% and 0.9% among tPA- and non-tPA treated patients (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Acute ischemic stroke care improved over time in this integrated health system. Better understanding of differences in hospital performance will have important quality-improvement and policy implications. PMID:27043833

  11. Local lymph node assay with non-radioisotope alternative endpoints.

    PubMed

    Suda, Akiko; Yamashita, Masahiro; Tabei, Mitsuyuki; Taguchi, Kazuhiko; Vohr, Hans-Werner; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suzuki, Ritsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Katsuaki; Sakaguchi, Keisuke; Mochizuki, Kouki; Nakamura, Kazuichi

    2002-08-01

    The local lymph node assay has recently been accepted by regulatory agencies as a stand-alone alternate method for predicting allergic contact dermatitis. To compare the sensitivity of non-radioisotope methods with that of the standard assay, we determined if these modified methods would affect evaluation of sensitization potency. For this reason, we used 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and benzocaine for different sensitizing criteria. Female CBA mice were treated for 3 days with a test compound or vehicle applied to each side of both ears. Bilateral auricular lymph node proliferative activity was assessed by the following endpoints with incorporation of 3H-methyl thymidine (3H-TdR), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in vivo, and BrdU ex vivo, IL-2 production, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression. Ear thickness was also tested. The strong sensitizer DNCB was detectable by any of the non-radioisotope endpoints as well as by radioisotope-dependent standard assay. On the other hand, when evaluating the weak sensitizer benzocaine, significant changes were evident in BrdU incorporation ex vivo and in vivo, and IL-2 production. We believe that these non-radioisotope methods can assess allergic contact dermatitis caused by chemicals even in the laboratory, where it can be difficult to handle radioisotopes.

  12. Health information technology adoption in U.S. acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Seblega, Binyam; Wan, Thomas; Unruh, Lynn; Agiro, Abiy; Miao, Li

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies show that the healthcare industry lags behind many other economic sectors in the adoption of information technology. The purpose of this study is to understand differences in structural characteristics between providers that do and that do not adopt Health Information Technology (HIT) applications. Publicly available secondary data were used from three sources: American Hospital Association (AHA) annual survey, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) analytics annual survey, and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Fifty-two information technologies were grouped into three clusters: clinical, administrative, and strategic decision making ITs. Negative binomial regression was applied with adoption of technology as the dependent variables and eight organizational and contextual factors as the independent variables. Hospitals adopt a relatively larger proportion of administrative information technology as compared to clinical and strategic IT. Large size, urban location and HMO penetration were found to be the most influential hospital characteristics that positively affect information technology adoption. There are still considerable variations in the adoption of information technology across hospitals and in the type of technology adopted. Organizational factors appear to be more influential than market factors when it comes to information technology adoption. The future research may examine whether the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program in 2011 would increase the information technology uses in hospitals as it provides financial incentives for HER adoptions and uses among providers.

  13. Spatial variable selection methods for investigating acute health effects of fine particulate matter components.

    PubMed

    Boehm Vock, Laura F; Reich, Brian J; Fuentes, Montserrat; Dominici, Francesca

    2015-03-01

    Multi-site time series studies have reported evidence of an association between short term exposure to particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects, but the effect size varies across the United States. Variability in the effect may partially be due to differing community level exposure and health characteristics, but also due to the chemical composition of PM which is known to vary greatly by location and time. The objective of this article is to identify particularly harmful components of this chemical mixture. Because of the large number of highly-correlated components, we must incorporate some regularization into a statistical model. We assume that, at each spatial location, the regression coefficients come from a mixture model with the flavor of stochastic search variable selection, but utilize a copula to share information about variable inclusion and effect magnitude across locations. The model differs from current spatial variable selection techniques by accommodating both local and global variable selection. The model is used to study the association between fine PM (PM <2.5μm) components, measured at 115 counties nationally over the period 2000-2008, and cardiovascular emergency room admissions among Medicare patients.

  14. Population-scale assessment endpoints in ecological risk assessment. Part 1: Reflections of stakeholder values.

    PubMed

    Landis, Wayne G

    2006-01-01

    The selection of appropriate assessment endpoints is a basic element of an ecological risk assessment, especially at regional or watershed scales. Because ecological services often are tied to specific species, the risk to populations is a critical endpoint and feature of ecological risk assessments. The first item is a discussion of the replacement of population-level risk assessment with the construct of a population-scale assessment endpoint. Next, the criteria that are currently used for assessment endpoints are reviewed and evaluated for utility in an ecological risk assessment. Following this examination, assessment endpoints from a number of regional-scale ecological risk assessments are compared. The outcome of this evaluation is that population-scale assessment endpoints are important expressions of the valued components of ecological structures. Finally, a few recommendations for the selection of assessment endpoints at a population scale are listed. PMID:16640323

  15. Nutrient reference value: non-communicable disease endpoints--a conference report.

    PubMed

    Lupton, J R; Blumberg, J B; L'Abbe, M; LeDoux, M; Rice, H B; von Schacky, C; Yaktine, A; Griffiths, J C

    2016-03-01

    scientific evidence does exist to confirm a relationship between the intake of a specific bioactive constituent and enhanced health conditions or reduced risk of a chronic disease. Further, research on the putative mechanisms of action of various classes of bioactives is supported by national and pan-national government agencies, and academic institutions, as well as functional food and dietary supplement manufacturers. Consumers are becoming educated and are seeking to purchase products containing bioactives, yet there is no evaluative process in place to let the public know how strong the science is behind the benefits or the quantitative amounts needed to achieve these beneficial health effects or to avoid exceeding the upper level (UL). When one lacks an essential nutrient, overt deficiency with concomitant physiological determents and eventually death are expected. The absence of bioactive substances from the diet results in suboptimal health, e.g., poor cellular and/or physiological function, which is relative and not absolute. Regrettably at this time, there is no DRI process to evaluate bioactives, although a recent workshop convened by the National Institutes of Health (Options for Consideration of Chronic Disease Endpoints for Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs); March 10-11, 2015; http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dri/ ) did explore the process to develop DVs for nutrients, the lack of which result in increased risk of chronic disease (non-communicable disease) endpoints. A final report is expected soon. This conference (CRN-International Scientific Symposium; "Nutrient Reference Value-Non-Communicable Disease (NRV-NCD) Endpoints," 20 November in Kronberg, Germany; http://www.crn-i.ch/2015symposium/ ) explores concepts related to the Codex NRV process, the public health opportunities in setting NRVs for bioactive constituents, and further research and details on the specific class of bioactives, n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (also termed omega-3 fatty

  16. Nutrient reference value: non-communicable disease endpoints--a conference report.

    PubMed

    Lupton, J R; Blumberg, J B; L'Abbe, M; LeDoux, M; Rice, H B; von Schacky, C; Yaktine, A; Griffiths, J C

    2016-03-01

    scientific evidence does exist to confirm a relationship between the intake of a specific bioactive constituent and enhanced health conditions or reduced risk of a chronic disease. Further, research on the putative mechanisms of action of various classes of bioactives is supported by national and pan-national government agencies, and academic institutions, as well as functional food and dietary supplement manufacturers. Consumers are becoming educated and are seeking to purchase products containing bioactives, yet there is no evaluative process in place to let the public know how strong the science is behind the benefits or the quantitative amounts needed to achieve these beneficial health effects or to avoid exceeding the upper level (UL). When one lacks an essential nutrient, overt deficiency with concomitant physiological determents and eventually death are expected. The absence of bioactive substances from the diet results in suboptimal health, e.g., poor cellular and/or physiological function, which is relative and not absolute. Regrettably at this time, there is no DRI process to evaluate bioactives, although a recent workshop convened by the National Institutes of Health (Options for Consideration of Chronic Disease Endpoints for Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs); March 10-11, 2015; http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dri/ ) did explore the process to develop DVs for nutrients, the lack of which result in increased risk of chronic disease (non-communicable disease) endpoints. A final report is expected soon. This conference (CRN-International Scientific Symposium; "Nutrient Reference Value-Non-Communicable Disease (NRV-NCD) Endpoints," 20 November in Kronberg, Germany; http://www.crn-i.ch/2015symposium/ ) explores concepts related to the Codex NRV process, the public health opportunities in setting NRVs for bioactive constituents, and further research and details on the specific class of bioactives, n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (also termed omega-3 fatty

  17. Trends in Utilization of Surrogate Endpoints in Contemporary Cardiovascular Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi B; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Samman-Tahhan, Ayman; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Fonarow, Gregg C; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-06-01

    Surrogate endpoints facilitate trial efficiency but are variably linked to clinical outcomes, and limited data are available exploring their utilization in cardiovascular clinical trials over time. We abstracted data regarding primary clinical, intermediate, and surrogate endpoints from all phase II to IV cardiovascular clinical trials from 2001 to 2012 published in the 8 highest Web of Science impact factor journals. Two investigators independently classified the type of primary endpoint. Of the 1,224 trials evaluated, 677 (55.3%) primary endpoints were clinical, 165 (13.5%) intermediate, and 382 (31.2%) surrogate. The relative proportions of these endpoints remained constant over time (p = 0.98). Trials using surrogate endpoints were smaller (187 vs 1,028 patients) and enrolled patients more expeditiously (1.4 vs 0.9 patients per site per month) compared with trials using clinical endpoints (p <0.001 for both comparisons). Surrogate endpoint trials were independently more likely to meet their primary endpoint compared to trials with clinical endpoints (adjusted odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.34; p = 0.03). Rates of positive results in clinical endpoint trials have decreased over time from 66.1% in 2001 to 2003 to 47.2% in 2010 to 2012 (p = 0.001), whereas these rates have remained stable over the same period for surrogate (72.0% to 69.3%, p = 0.27) and intermediate endpoints (74.4% to 71.4%, p = 0.98). In conclusion, approximately a third of contemporary cardiovascular trials use surrogate endpoints. These trials are completed more expeditiously and are more likely to meet their primary outcomes. The overall scientific contribution of these surrogate endpoint trials requires further attention given their variable association with definitive outcomes. PMID:27085935

  18. [Acute head injuries in primary health care--internet survey conducted with general practitioners].

    PubMed

    Luoto, Teemu M; Artsola, Minna; Helminen, Mika; Liimatainen, Suvi; Kosunen, Elise; Ohman, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Patients with head injury constitute a large population treated in primary health care. It is essential to recognize patients with traumatic brain injury among this notable population to determine the need for more specific evaluation. General practitioners (n=331) in Pirkanmaa hospital district in Finland received an email link to answer the survey. The response rate was 54.1% (n=179). Mean survey score was 20.5 points (max. 25). Only acquaintance with the national traumatic brain injury practice guidelines was associated with greater survey scores. The general practitioners' level of knowledge in managing head injuries was good. Deficiencies were found in the questions dealt with post-traumatic amnesia and the definition of traumatic brain injury. PMID:23786110

  19. A change in culture: violence prevention in an acute behavioral health setting.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Suzanne Barnum; Taylor-Trujillo, Ann

    2012-01-01

    A multilayered implementation of safety measures in an inpatient psychiatric facility created a sustained change in culture related to patient and staff safety. The model was developed over a 5-year period in a freestanding 80-bed behavioral health facility that is part of a Level II trauma center in the Midwest. The model has nine components that the nursing leadership team saw as integral to maintaining a safe environment. The nine elements include trauma-informed care principles, aggression management, code event review, leadership involvement, quality feedback, recovery orientation, patient assessment, education, and collaboration. The metrics collected to determine the effectiveness of the model included patient violence events and staff injuries. This article describes the development of this model and its impact on the reduction of patient violence events and staff injuries at this facility. The recommendations include considerations for the replication of this model at other facilities.

  20. Health Information Technology, Patient Safety, and Professional Nursing Care Documentation in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Mary Ann; Harper, Ellen; Barr, Nancy

    2015-04-14

    The electronic health record (EHR) is a documentation tool that yields data useful in enhancing patient safety, evaluating care quality, maximizing efficiency, and measuring staffing needs. Although nurses applaud the EHR, they also indicate dissatisfaction with its design and cumbersome electronic processes. This article describes the views of nurses shared by members of the Nursing Practice Committee of the Missouri Nurses Association; it encourages nurses to share their EHR concerns with Information Technology (IT) staff and vendors and to take their place at the table when nursing-related IT decisions are made. In this article, we describe the experiential-reflective reasoning and action model used to understand staff nurses' perspectives, share committee reflections and recommendations for improving both documentation and documentation technology, and conclude by encouraging nurses to develop their documentation and informatics skills. Nursing issues include medication safety, documentation and standards of practice, and EHR efficiency. IT concerns include interoperability, vendors, innovation, nursing voice, education, and collaboration.

  1. Health Information Technology, Patient Safety, and Professional Nursing Care Documentation in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Mary Ann; Harper, Ellen; Barr, Nancy

    2015-05-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) is a documentation tool that yields data useful in enhancing patient safety, evaluating care quality, maximizing efficiency, and measuring staffing needs. Although nurses applaud the EHR, they also indicate dissatisfaction with its design and cumbersome electronic processes. This article describes the views of nurses shared by members of the Nursing Practice Committee of the Missouri Nurses Association; it encourages nurses to share their EHR concerns with Information Technology (IT) staff and vendors and to take their place at the table when nursing-related IT decisions are made. In this article, we describe the experiential-reflective reasoning and action model used to understand staff nurses' perspectives, share committee reflections and recommendations for improving both documentation and documentation technology, and conclude by encouraging nurses to develop their documentation and informatics skills. Nursing issues include medication safety, documentation and standards of practice, and EHR efficiency. IT concerns include interoperability, vendors, innovation, nursing voice, education, and collaboration. PMID:26882425

  2. Intraoperative hypotension - a neglected causative factor in hospital-acquired acute kidney injury; a Mayo Clinic Health System experience revisited.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a relatively common complication of cardiothoracic surgery and has both short- and long-term survival implications, even when AKI does not progress to severe renal failure. Given that currently, there are no active effective treatments for AKI, other than renal replacement therapy when indicated, the focus of clinicians ought to be on prevention and risk factor management. In the AKI-surgery literature, there exists this general consensus that intraoperative hypotension (IH) following hypotensive anesthesia (HA) or controlled hypotension (CH) in the operating room has no significant short-term and long-term impacts on renal function. In this review, we examine the basis for this consensus, exposing some of the flaws of the clinical study data upon which this prevailing consensus is based. We then describe our experiences in the last decade at the Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, in Northwestern Wisconsin, USA, with two selected case presentations to highlight the contribution of IH as a potent yet preventable cause of post-operative AKI. We further highlight the causative although neglected role of IH in precipitating postoperative AKI in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We show additional risk factors associated with this syndrome and further make a strong case for the elimination of IH as an achievable mechanism to reduce overall, the incidence of hospital acquired AKI. We finally posit that as the old saying goes, prevention is indeed better than cure. PMID:26468476

  3. Intraoperative hypotension - a neglected causative factor in hospital-acquired acute kidney injury; a Mayo Clinic Health System experience revisited

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a relatively common complication of cardiothoracic surgery and has both short- and long-term survival implications, even when AKI does not progress to severe renal failure. Given that currently, there are no active effective treatments for AKI, other than renal replacement therapy when indicated, the focus of clinicians ought to be on prevention and risk factor management. In the AKI-surgery literature, there exists this general consensus that intraoperative hypotension (IH) following hypotensive anesthesia (HA) or controlled hypotension (CH) in the operating room has no significant short-term and long-term impacts on renal function. In this review, we examine the basis for this consensus, exposing some of the flaws of the clinical study data upon which this prevailing consensus is based. We then describe our experiences in the last decade at the Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, in Northwestern Wisconsin, USA, with two selected case presentations to highlight the contribution of IH as a potent yet preventable cause of post-operative AKI. We further highlight the causative although neglected role of IH in precipitating postoperative AKI in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We show additional risk factors associated with this syndrome and further make a strong case for the elimination of IH as an achievable mechanism to reduce overall, the incidence of hospital acquired AKI. We finally posit that as the old saying goes, prevention is indeed better than cure. PMID:26468476

  4. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed. PMID:26317762

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescents at the time of Diagnosis with Osteosarcoma or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Pamela S.; Billups, Catherine A.; Cao, Xueyuan; Gattuso, Jami S.; Burghen, Elizabeth; West, Nancy; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Daw, Najat C.

    2014-01-01

    Although measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adolescents with cancer helps clinicians to personalize care for their patients, no previous studies have included HRQoL measurement at the time of diagnosis of osteosarcoma (OS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of measuring adolescents' HRQoL at the time of their diagnosis of OS or AML, and to compare their ratings with those of their parents and of similarly diagnosed but younger patients aged 8- to 12- years. Participants included 126 patients (79 adolescents) and 130 parents (78 parents of adolescents); most completed the HRQoL instrument/s within 48 hours of the first chemotherapy cycle. Ninety-three percent of adolescents diagnosed with OS and 93% of those diagnosed with AML completed the HRQoL instruments. Agreement between the adolescents and their parents ranged from 0.29 to 0.71 (OS) and 0.44 to 0.62 (AML). In all domains, OS adolescents had significantly lower PedsQL v.4.0 scores than adolescents with AML. Our findings demonstrates the feasibility of measuring HRQoL in adolescents with OS or AML (and their parents) at the time of diagnosis, and thus their HRQoL ratings can be used to inform their cancer care from diagnosis forward. PMID:18926773

  6. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed.

  7. Tennis for physical health: acute age- and gender-based physiological responses to cardio tennis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Alistair P; Duffield, Rob; Reid, Machar

    2014-11-01

    This study described physiological and perceptual responses to Cardio tennis for "younger" and "older" adult populations of both sexes for health-related outcomes. Thirty-one active participants, each with prior recreational tennis experience (∼2 years) (8 younger and 8 older males, and 7 younger and 8 older females) performed preliminary testing and a 50-minute instructor-led Cardio tennis session. Cardio tennis is a conditioning-based tennis program comprised of warm-up movements, drill-based exercises (set movement and hitting games), and competitive play scenarios. Participants performed the 20-m shuttle run test to determine maximal heart rate (HR) during preliminary testing. Before, after, and 30-minute post Cardio tennis session, HR, blood pressure (BP), rate pressure product (RPP), and capillary blood lactate and glucose were determined. Furthermore, HR and pedometer-derived step counts were measured throughout, while the session was filmed and coded for technical skill. After the session, ratings of perceived exertion, enjoyment, and challenge were obtained. Heart rate, systolic BP, and RPP were significantly increased by Cardio tennis (p ≤ 0.05), though returned to pre-exercise levels after 30 minutes (p > 0.05). Heart rate and BP did not differ between groups pre- or 30-minute postexercise (p > 0.05); however, these were lower in younger males during and higher in younger females postsession (p ≤ 0.05). Lactate and glucose concentrations were increased in all groups (p ≤ 0.05), with lactate being highest in male groups (p ≤ 0.05), without differences in glucose between groups (p > 0.05). Stroke and step counts were not different between groups (p > 0.05). Ratings of perceived exertion and perceived challenge were lowest in the younger male group compared with all other groups (p ≤ 0.05). Cardio tennis presents as an effective stimulus to invoke sufficient cardiovascular and metabolic load to benefit health and fitness, though age- and sex

  8. Are Routinely Collected NHS Administrative Records Suitable for Endpoint Identification in Clinical Trials? Evidence from the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Sarah J. E.; Dinnett, Eleanor; Kean, Sharon; Gaw, Allan; Ford, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Background Routinely collected electronic patient records are already widely used in epidemiological research. In this work we investigated the potential for using them to identify endpoints in clinical trials. Methods The events recorded in the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS), a large clinical trial of pravastatin in middle-aged hypercholesterolaemic men in the 1990s, were compared with those in the record-linked deaths and hospitalisations records routinely collected in Scotland. Results We matched 99% of fatal study events by date. We showed excellent matching (97%) of the causes of fatal endpoint events and good matching (>80% for first events) of the causes of nonfatal endpoint events with a slightly lower rate of mismatching of record linkage than study events (19% of first study myocardial infarctions (MI) and 4% of first record linkage MIs not matched as MI). We also investigated the matching of non-endpoint events and showed a good level of matching, with >78% of first stroke/TIA events being matched as stroke/TIA. The primary reasons for mismatches were record linkage data recording readmissions for procedures or previous events, differences between the diagnoses in the routinely collected data and the conclusions of the clinical trial expert adjudication committee, events occurring outside Scotland and therefore being missed by record linkage data, miscoding of cardiac events in hospitalisations data as ‘unspecified chest pain’, some general miscoding in the record linkage data and some record linkage errors. Conclusions We conclude that routinely collected data could be used for recording cardiovascular endpoints in clinical trials and would give very similar results to rigorously collected clinical trial data, in countries with unified health systems such as Scotland. The endpoint types would need to be carefully thought through and an expert endpoint adjudication committee should be involved. PMID:24058681

  9. [Treatment of children with acute diarrheal disease. Knowledge and attitudes of the health personnel].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Zamora-Escudero, G

    1992-10-01

    Diarrheal diseases are still one of the most frequent causes of death due to dehydration in children; lack of information regarding the adequate treatment of diarrhea is the main cause. The results of an inquire sent to 620 physicians and nurses were analyzed to determine the knowledge and attitudes of the health care workers that reside in different diarrheal mortality areas in Mexico. The less professional experience time was correlated with more knowledge in etiology of diarrhea. More physicians than nurses had correct answers regarding the place of diarrheal diseases in child mortality and the correct use of antimicrobial, and other drugs and liquids to prevent and treat dehydration. Most workers did not know the inconvenience of hypertonic solutions to prevent dehydration and the importance of the oral solution flavor. This results suggest that nurses will, be included in clinical training by means of seminars in oral hydration therapy. Furthermore it seems convenient to increase the access to oral hydration solutions as well as the diffusion of its advantages.

  10. Quantitative Structure--Activity Relationship Modeling of Rat Acute Toxicity by Oral Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Few Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies have successfully modeled large, diverse rodent toxicity endpoints. Objective: In this study, a combinatorial QSAR approach has been employed for the creation of robust and predictive models of acute toxi...

  11. Semi-inclusive hadronic B decays in the endpoint region

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul; Leibovich, Adam K.; Zupan, Jure

    2006-10-01

    We consider in the soft-collinear effective theory semi-inclusive hadronic B decays, B{yields}XM, in which an energetic light meson M near the endpoint recoils against an inclusive jet X. We focus on a subset of decays where the spectator quark from the B meson ends up in the jet. The branching ratios and direct CP asymmetries are computed to next-to-leading order accuracy in {alpha}{sub s} and to leading order in 1/m{sub b}. The contribution of charming penguins is extensively discussed, and a method to extract it in semi-inclusive decays is suggested. Subleading 1/m{sub b} corrections and SU(3) breaking effects are discussed.

  12. [Endpoints in clinical trials and their relevance for patients].

    PubMed

    Faber, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Patient participation, which has been established since 2004, has brought more attention to patients' concerns in healthcare. More and more endpoints in clinical trials are defined with respect to their relevance for patients. But this development has still been found wanting. For important drugs, no evidence-based benefit has been demonstrated in the benefit assessment, which also has become possible since 2004. Furthermore, this assessment has arrived too late for patients who have been medicated for a long time. Healthcare policies, applicants and stakeholders have contributed a lot to the patients' scepticism towards benefit assessments, though, in principle, patients are interested in high evidence levels and reasonable pricing. New drugs are often licensed under less ambitious conditions. Whether this is in the patients' interest needs to be put up for a large-scale, and societal, discussion. PMID:20608257

  13. Acute health effects after accidental exposure to styrene from drinking water in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Arnedo-Pena, Alberto; Bellido-Blasco, Juan; Villamarin-Vazquez, Jose-Luis; Aranda-Mares, Jose-Luis; Font-Cardona, Nuria; Gobba, Fabriziomaria; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2003-01-01

    Objectives We studied subjective health symptoms in a population accidentally exposed to high styrene concentrations in drinking tap water. The contamination occurred during the reparation of a water tank. Methods Residents of 27 apartments in two buildings using the contaminated water were contacted. A questionnaire on subjective symptoms was administered to 84 out of 93 persons living in the apartments at the time of the accident. Styrene concentration was measured in samples of water collected two days after the accident. The means of exposure associated with appearance of symptoms were examined through case-control analyses. Results Styrene in water reached concentrations up to 900 μg/L. Symptoms were reported by 46 persons (attack rate 55 %). The most frequent symptoms were irritation of the throat (26%), nose (19%), eyes (18%) and the skin (14%). General gastrointestinal symptoms were observed with 11% reporting abdominal pain and 7% diarrhea. The factors most strongly associated with symptoms were drinking tap water (OR = 7.8, 95% CI 1.3–48), exposure to vapors from the basement (OR = 10.4, 2.3–47) and eating foods prepared with tap water (OR = 8.6, 1.9–40). All residents in the ground floor reported symptoms. Conclusions This accidental contamination led to very high styrene concentrations in water and was related to a high prevalence of subjective symptoms of the eyes, respiratory tract and skin. Similar exposures have been described in workers but not in subjects exposed at their residence. Various gastrointestinal symptoms were also observed in this population probably due to a local irritative effect. PMID:12777181

  14. Interactive toxicity of major ion salts: Comparisons among species and between acute and chronic endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased concentrations of major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) in freshwater systems can result from a variety of anthropogenic activities, and can adversely affect aquatic organisms if the increase is sufficiently severe. Laboratory tests have indicated that the toxicity...

  15. Evaluating the impact of depression, anxiety & autonomic function on health related quality of life, vocational functioning and health care utilisation in acute coronary syndrome patients: the ADVENT study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent and co-morbid in acute coronary syndrome patients. Somatic and cognitive subtypes of depression and anxiety in acute coronary syndrome have been shown to be associated with mortality although their association with patient outcomes is unknown, as are the mechanisms that underpin these associations. We are conducting a prospective cohort study which aims to examine in acute coronary syndrome patients: (1) the role of somatic subtypes of depression and anxiety as predictors of health related quality of life outcomes; (2) how somatic subtypes of depression and anxiety relate to long term vocational functioning and healthcare utilisation; and (3) the role of the autonomic nervous system assessed by heart rate variability as a moderator of these associations. Methods Patients are being screened after index admission for acute coronary syndrome at a single, high volume centre, MonashHeart, Monash Health, Victoria, Australia. The inclusion criterion is all patients aged > 21 years old and fluent in English admitted to MonashHeart, Monash Health with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The primary outcome is mean health related quality of life (Short Form-36) Physical and Mental Health Summary scores at 12 and 24 months in subtypes with somatic symptoms of depression and anxiety. Depressive domains are assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory II and the Cardiac Depression Scale. Anxiety is measured using the Speilberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Crown Crisp Phobic Anxiety questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include clinical variables, healthcare service utilisation and vocational functioning. Discussion This manuscript presents the protocol for a prospective cohort study which will investigate the role of somatic subtypes of depression and anxiety as predictors of health related quality of life, long-term vocational functioning and health service use, and the role of the autonomic nervous system in

  16. A retrospective study on acute health effects due to volcanic ash exposure during the eruption of Mount Etna (Sicily) in 2002

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mount Etna, located in the eastern part of Sicily (Italy), is the highest and most active volcano in Europe. During the sustained eruption that occurred in October-November 2002 huge amounts of volcanic ash fell on a densely populated area south-east of Mount Etna in Catania province. The volcanic ash fall caused extensive damage to infrastructure utilities and distress in the exposed population. This retrospective study evaluates whether or not there was an association between ash fall and acute health effects in exposed local communities. Methods We collected the number and type of visits to the emergency department (ED) for diseases that could be related to volcanic ash exposure in public hospitals of the Province of Catania between October 20 and November 7, 2002. We compared the magnitude of differences in ED visits between the ash exposure period in 2002 and the same period of the previous year 2001. Results We observed a significant increase of ED visits for acute respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, and ocular disturbances during the ash exposure time period. Conclusions There was a positive association between exposure to volcanic ash from the 2002 eruption of Mount Etna and acute health effects in the Catania residents. This study documents the need for public health preparedness and response initiatives to protect nearby populations from exposure to ash fall from future eruptions of Mount Etna. PMID:23924394

  17. Long-term care and health information technology: opportunities and responsibilities for long-term and post-acute care providers.

    PubMed

    MacTaggart, Patricia; Thorpe, Jane Hyatt

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and post-acute care providers (LTPAC) need to understand the multiple aspects of health information technology (HIT) in the context of health systems transformation in order to be a viable participant. The issues with moving to HIT are not just technical and funding, but include legal and policy, technical and business operations, and very significantly, governance. There are many unanswered questions. However, changes in payment methodologies, service delivery models, consumer expectations, and regulatory requirements necessitate that LTPAC providers begin their journey. PMID:24159273

  18. Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE Particles for Chromosomal Exchanges and Other Surrogate Cancer Risk Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Premkumar B.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of high charge and energy (HZE) particle exposures are of interest in space radiation protection of astronauts and cosmonauts, and estimating secondary cancer risks for patients undergoing Hadron therapy for primary cancers. The large number of particles types and energies that makeup primary or secondary radiation in HZE particle exposures precludes tumor induction studies in animal models for all but a few particle types and energies, thus leading to the use of surrogate endpoints to investigate the details of the radiation quality dependence of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors. In this report we make detailed RBE predictions of the charge number and energy dependence of RBE’s using a parametric track structure model to represent experimental results for the low dose response for chromosomal exchanges in normal human lymphocyte and fibroblast cells with comparison to published data for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation. RBE’s are evaluated against acute doses of γ-rays for doses near 1 Gy. Models that assume linear or non-targeted effects at low dose are considered. Modest values of RBE (<10) are found for simple exchanges using a linear dose response model, however in the non-targeted effects model for fibroblast cells large RBE values (>10) are predicted at low doses <0.1 Gy. The radiation quality dependence of RBE’s against the effects of acute doses γ-rays found for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation studies are similar to those found for simple exchanges if a linear response is assumed at low HZE particle doses. Comparisons of the resulting model parameters to those used in the NASA radiation quality factor function are discussed. PMID:27111667

  19. Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE Particles for Chromosomal Exchanges and Other Surrogate Cancer Risk Endpoints.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Premkumar B; George, Kerry A; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of high charge and energy (HZE) particle exposures are of interest in space radiation protection of astronauts and cosmonauts, and estimating secondary cancer risks for patients undergoing Hadron therapy for primary cancers. The large number of particles types and energies that makeup primary or secondary radiation in HZE particle exposures precludes tumor induction studies in animal models for all but a few particle types and energies, thus leading to the use of surrogate endpoints to investigate the details of the radiation quality dependence of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors. In this report we make detailed RBE predictions of the charge number and energy dependence of RBE's using a parametric track structure model to represent experimental results for the low dose response for chromosomal exchanges in normal human lymphocyte and fibroblast cells with comparison to published data for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation. RBE's are evaluated against acute doses of γ-rays for doses near 1 Gy. Models that assume linear or non-targeted effects at low dose are considered. Modest values of RBE (<10) are found for simple exchanges using a linear dose response model, however in the non-targeted effects model for fibroblast cells large RBE values (>10) are predicted at low doses <0.1 Gy. The radiation quality dependence of RBE's against the effects of acute doses γ-rays found for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation studies are similar to those found for simple exchanges if a linear response is assumed at low HZE particle doses. Comparisons of the resulting model parameters to those used in the NASA radiation quality factor function are discussed. PMID:27111667

  20. Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE Particles for Chromosomal Exchanges and Other Surrogate Cancer Risk Endpoints

    DOE PAGES

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Premkumar B.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2016-04-25

    The biological effects of high charge and energy (HZE) particle exposures are of interest in space radiation protection of astronauts and cosmonauts, and estimating secondary cancer risks for patients undergoing Hadron therapy for primary cancers. The large number of particles types and energies that makeup primary or secondary radiation in HZE particle exposures precludes tumor induction studies in animal models for all but a few particle types and energies, thus leading to the use of surrogate endpoints to investigate the details of the radiation quality dependence of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors. In this report we make detailed RBE predictionsmore » of the charge number and energy dependence of RBE’s using a parametric track structure model to represent experimental results for the low dose response for chromosomal exchanges in normal human lymphocyte and fibroblast cells with comparison to published data for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation. RBE’s are evaluated against acute doses of γ-rays for doses near 1 Gy. Models that assume linear or non-targeted effects at low dose are considered. Modest values of RBE (<10) are found for simple exchanges using a linear dose response model, however in the non-targeted effects model for fibroblast cells large RBE values (>10) are predicted at low doses <0.1 Gy. The radiation quality dependence of RBE’s against the effects of acute doses γ-rays found for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation studies are similar to those found for simple exchanges if a linear response is assumed at low HZE particle doses. Finally, we discuss comparisons of the resulting model parameters to those used in the NASA radiation quality factor function.« less

  1. End-point Region of the Electron Spectrum in Inclusive Semileptonic Heavy Quark Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Isgur, Nathan

    1992-01-01

    I examine the relationship between the inclusive and sum-over-exclusive-resonances pictures for the electron spectrum of semileptonic heavy quark decay. The analysis shown to that obtained from a free-quark-decay-type model with an endpoint adjusted to the physical endpoint. This conclusion removes the need for nonresonant contributions in the endpoint region and is consistent with arguments that free-quark-decay-type models are, in principle,

  2. Anatomy of an experimental two-link flexible manipulator under end-point control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, Celia M.; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The design and experimental implementation of an end-point controller for two-link flexible manipulators are presented. The end-point controller is based on linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory and is shown to exhibit significant improvements in trajectory tracking over a conventional controller design. To understand the behavior of the manipulator structure under end-point control, a strobe sequence illustrating the link deflections during a typical slew maneuver is included.

  3. Impact of weighted composite compared to traditional composite endpoints for the design of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bakal, Jeffrey A; Westerhout, Cynthia M; Armstrong, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    Composite endpoints are commonly used in cardiovascular clinical trials. When using a composite endpoint a subject is considered to have an event when the first component endpoint has occurred. The use of composite endpoints offers the ability to incorporate several clinically important endpoint events thereby augmenting the event rate and increasing statistical power for a given sample size. One assumption of the composite is that all component events are of equal clinical importance. This assumption is rarely achieved given the diversity of component endpoints included. One means of adjusting for this diversity is to adjust the outcomes using severity weights determined a priori. The use of a weighted endpoint also allows for the incorporation of multiple endpoints per patient. Although weighting the outcomes lowers the effective number of events, it offers additional information that reduces the variance of the estimate. We created a series of simulation studies to examine the effect on power as the individual components of a typical composite were changed. In one study, we noted that the weighted composite was able to offer discriminative power when the component outcomes were altered, while the traditional method was not. In the other study, we noted that the weighted composite offered a similar level of power to the traditional composite when the change was driven by the more severe endpoints.

  4. 78 FR 49530 - Gastroenterology Regulatory Endpoints and the Advancement of Therapeutics; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Inc., the North American Society for Pediatric... endpoints and clinical trial design for ulcerative colitis registration trials. Strategies and methods...

  5. Nonparametric Discrete Survival Function Estimation with Uncertain Endpoints Using an Internal Validation Subsample

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Jarcy; Xie, Sharon X.

    2015-01-01

    Summary When a true survival endpoint cannot be assessed for some subjects, an alternative endpoint that measures the true endpoint with error may be collected, which often occurs when obtaining the true endpoint is too invasive or costly. We develop an estimated likelihood function for the situation where we have both uncertain endpoints for all participants and true endpoints for only a subset of participants. We propose a nonparametric maximum estimated likelihood estimator of the discrete survival function of time to the true endpoint. We show that the proposed estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal. We demonstrate through extensive simulations that the proposed estimator has little bias compared to the naïve Kaplan-Meier survival function estimator, which uses only uncertain endpoints, and more efficient with moderate missingness compared to the complete-case Kaplan-Meier survival function estimator, which uses only available true endpoints. Finally, we apply the proposed method to a dataset for estimating the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. PMID:25916510

  6. Improving the care for people with acute low-back pain by allied health professionals (the ALIGN trial): A cluster randomised trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Variability between clinical practice guideline recommendations and actual clinical practice exists in many areas of health care. A 2004 systematic review examining the effectiveness of guideline implementation interventions concluded there was a lack of evidence to support decisions about effective interventions to promote the uptake of guidelines. Further, the review recommended the use of theory in the development of implementation interventions. A clinical practice guideline for the management of acute low-back pain has been developed in Australia (2003). Acute low-back pain is a common condition, has a high burden, and there is some indication of an evidence-practice gap in the allied health setting. This provides an opportunity to develop and test a theory-based implementation intervention which, if effective, may provide benefits for patients with this condition. Aims This study aims to estimate the effectiveness of a theory-based intervention to increase allied health practitioners' (physiotherapists and chiropractors in Victoria, Australia) compliance with a clinical practice guideline for acute non-specific low back pain (LBP), compared with providing practitioners with a printed copy of the guideline. Specifically, our primary objectives are to establish if the intervention is effective in reducing the percentage of acute non-specific LBP patients who are either referred for or receive an x-ray, and improving mean level of disability for patients three months post-onset of acute LBP. Methods The design of the study is a cluster randomised trial. Restricted randomisation was used to randomise 210 practices (clusters) to an intervention or control group. Practitioners in the control group received a printed copy of the guideline. Practitioners in the intervention group received a theory-based intervention developed to address prospectively identified barriers to practitioner compliance with the guideline. The intervention primarily consisted of

  7. Predictors of Long‐term Clinical Endpoints in Patients With Refractory Angina

    PubMed Central

    Povsic, Thomas J.; Broderick, Samuel; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Shaw, Linda K.; Ohman, E. Magnus; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Smith, Peter K.; Alexander, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical outcomes in patients with refractory angina (RA) are poorly characterized and variably described. Using the Duke Database for Cardiovascular Disease (DDCD), we explored characteristics that drive clinical endpoints in patients with class II to IV angina stabilized on medical therapy. Methods and Results We explored clinical endpoints and associated costs of patients who underwent catheterization at Duke University Medical Center from 1997 to 2010 for evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and were found to have advanced CAD ineligible for additional revascularization, and were clinically stable for a minimum of 60 days. Of 77 257 cardiac catheterizations performed, 1908 patients met entry criteria. The 3‐year incidence of death; cardiac rehospitalization; and a composite of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac rehospitalization, and revascularization were 13.0%, 43.5%, and 52.2%, respectively. Predictors of mortality included age, ejection fraction (EF), low body mass index, multivessel CAD, low heart rate, diabetes, diastolic blood pressure, history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery, cigarette smoking, history of congestive heart failure (CHF), and race. Multivessel CAD, EF<45%, and history of CHF increased risk of mortality; angina class and prior revascularization did not. Total rehospitalization costs over a 3‐year period per patient were $10 185 (95% CI 8458, 11912) in 2012 US dollars. Conclusions Clinically stable patients with RA who are medically managed have a modest mortality, but a high incidence of hospitalization and resource use over 3 years. These findings point to the need for novel therapies aimed at symptom mitigation in this population and their potential impact on health care utilization and costs. PMID:25637344

  8. Suitability of cytotoxicity endpoints and test microalgal species to disclose the toxic effect of common aquatic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Prado, Raquel; García, Rosa; Rioboo, Carmen; Herrero, Concepción; Cid, Ángeles

    2015-04-01

    Pulse discharges of chemicals to aquatic environments may lead to high concentrations of them in surface waters for short periods of time, but enough to induce toxic effects on aquatic organisms; however, no many methods allow an early warning of toxicity of these agents. Acute effects of one representative chemical from each of three of the main groups of aquatic pollutants (pesticides, metals and pharmaceuticals) are studied on two green microalgal species (Chlamydomonas moewusii and Chlorella vulgaris). Flow cytometry protocols were used to detect the potential application of chlorophyll a fluorescent emission, cell viability, metabolic activity and membrane potential as cytotoxicity endpoints, besides an epifluorescence microscopy protocol for comet assay to detect genotoxicity level of cells. Obtained results confirm the suitability of them for the prospective assessment of the potential cytotoxicity of these aquatic pollutants. The two microalgal species analysed could be used as indicators in toxicity bioassays, being C. moewusii more sensitive than C. vulgaris. Among cell parameters assayed, the metabolic activity and the primary DNA damage stood out as sensitive cytotoxicity endpoints. PMID:25637746

  9. Organizational and command aspects for coordinating the public health response to an outbreak of acute renal failure, Republic of Panama, 2006.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Miguel A; Keim, Mark E; Schier, Joshua G; Gonzalez, Raul; Valencia, Angel; Telfer, Jana L

    2011-06-01

    The Ministry of Health of Panama (MINSA) received several reports of ill persons who had clinical presentations of acute renal insufficiency or failure during September and October 2006. On 01 October 2006, the MINSA formally asked the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to assist with the investigation. Additional agencies involved in the response included the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Gorgas Institute for Health Studies (GIHS), and the Social Security Health System (SSHS) of Panama. Through a joint effort, the MINSA, CDC, FDA, GIHS, SSHS, and PAHO were able to characterize the illness, identify the etiological agent, identify the population-at-risk, and launch an unprecedented media and social mobilization effort to prevent additional cases.International outbreak responses may require familiarity with basic emergency management principles beyond technical or scientific considerations. The management, logistical capabilities, team interaction, and efficiency of outbreak investigations can be enhanced substantially by having staff already familiar with common operational frameworks for incident responses. This report describes the inter-agency coordination and organizational structure implemented during an international response to identify the cause of an outbreak of acute renal failure in Panama. PMID:22107775

  10. Is the tobacco control movement misrepresenting the acute cardiovascular health effects of secondhand smoke exposure? An analysis of the scientific evidence and commentary on the implications for tobacco control and public health practice

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Michael

    2007-01-01

    While chronic exposure to secondhand smoke has been well recognized as a cause of heart disease in nonsmokers, there has been recent speculation about the potential acute cardiovascular effects of transient exposure to secondhand smoke among nonsmokers; in particular, the possibility that such exposure could increase the risk of acute myocardial infarction even in an otherwise healthy nonsmoker. This paper reviews the claims being made by a number of anti-smoking and public health groups regarding the acute cardiovascular effects of secondhand smoke exposure among otherwise healthy adults, analyzes the validity of these claims based on a review of the scientific evidence, and discusses the implications of the findings for tobacco control and public health practice. Based on the analysis, it appears that a large number of anti-smoking organizations are making inaccurate claims that a single, acute, transient exposure to secondhand smoke can cause severe and even fatal cardiovascular events in healthy nonsmokers. The dissemination of inaccurate information by anti-smoking groups to the public in support of smoking bans is unfortunate because it may harm the tobacco control movement by undermining its credibility, reputation, and effectiveness. Disseminating inaccurate information also represents a violation of basic ethical principles that are a core value of public health practice that cannot and should not be sacrificed, even for a noble end such as protecting nonsmokers from secondhand smoke exposure. How the tobacco control movement responds to this crisis of credibility will go a long way towards determining the future effectiveness of the movement and its ability to continue to save lives and protect the public's health. PMID:17927828

  11. A probabilistic assessment of health risks associated with short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G; Biller, W.F.; Jusko, M.J.; Keisler, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    The work described in this report is part of a larger risk assessment sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Earlier efforts developed exposure-response relationships for acute health effects among populations engaged in heavy exertion. Those efforts also developed a probabilistic national ambient air quality standards exposure model and a general methodology for integrating probabilistic exposure-response relation- ships and exposure estimates to calculate overall risk results. Recently published data make it possible to model additional health endpoints (for exposure at moderate exertion), including hospital admissions. New air quality and exposure estimates for alternative national ambient air quality standards for ozone are combined with exposure-response models to produce the risk results for hospital admissions and acute health effects. Sample results explain the methodology and introduce risk output formats.

  12. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  13. Acute Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nika; Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Acute vision loss can be transient (lasting <24 hours) or persistent (lasting >24 hours). When patients present with acute vision loss, it is important to ascertain the duration of vision loss and whether it is a unilateral process affecting one eye or a bilateral process affecting both eyes. This article focuses on causes of acute vision loss in the nontraumatic setting and provides management pearls to help health care providers better triage these patients.

  14. Acute Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nika; Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Acute vision loss can be transient (lasting <24 hours) or persistent (lasting >24 hours). When patients present with acute vision loss, it is important to ascertain the duration of vision loss and whether it is a unilateral process affecting one eye or a bilateral process affecting both eyes. This article focuses on causes of acute vision loss in the nontraumatic setting and provides management pearls to help health care providers better triage these patients. PMID:26319342

  15. Utilizing electronic health records to predict acute kidney injury risk and outcomes: workgroup statements from the 15(th) ADQI Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Scott M; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Hsu, Raymond K; Kramer, Andrew A; Goldstein, Stuart L; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    The data contained within the electronic health record (EHR) is "big" from the standpoint of volume, velocity, and variety. These circumstances and the pervasive trend towards EHR adoption have sparked interest in applying big data predictive analytic techniques to EHR data. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a condition well suited to prediction and risk forecasting; not only does the consensus definition for AKI allow temporal anchoring of events, but no treatments exist once AKI develops, underscoring the importance of early identification and prevention. The Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) convened a group of key opinion leaders and stakeholders to consider how best to approach AKI research and care in the "Big Data" era. This manuscript addresses the core elements of AKI risk prediction and outlines potential pathways and processes. We describe AKI prediction targets, feature selection, model development, and data display.

  16. Choosing relevant endpoints for older breast cancer patients in clinical trials: an overview of all current clinical trials on breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    de Glas, N A; Hamaker, M E; Kiderlen, M; de Craen, A J M; Mooijaart, S P; van de Velde, C J H; van Munster, B C; Portielje, J E A; Liefers, G J; Bastiaannet, E

    2014-08-01

    With the ongoing ageing of western societies, the proportion of older breast cancer patients will increase. For several years, clinicians and researchers in geriatric oncology have urged for new clinical trials that address patient-related endpoints such as functional decline after treatment of older patients. The aim of this study was to present an overview of trial characteristics and endpoints of all currently running clinical trials in breast cancer, particularly in older patients. The clinical trial register of the United States National Institutes of Health Differences was searched for all current clinical trials on breast cancer treatment. Trial characteristics and endpoints were retrieved from the register and differences in characteristics between studies in older patients specifically (defined as a lower age-limit of 60 years or older) and trials in all patients were assessed using χ(2) tests. We included 463 clinical trials. Nine trials (2 %) specifically investigated breast cancer treatment in older patients. Ninety-one breast cancer trials included any patient-related endpoint (20 %), while five trials specifically addressing older patients included any patient-related endpoint (56 %, P = 0.02). Five of the trials in older patients incorporated a geriatric assessment (56 %). Clinical trials still rarely incorporate patient-related endpoints, even in trials that specifically address older patients. Trials that are specifically designed for older patients do not often incorporate a geriatric assessment in their design. This implicates that current clinical studies are not expected to fill the gap in knowledge concerning treatment of older breast cancer patients in the next decade.

  17. A novel study design for antibiotic trials in acute exacerbations of COPD: MAESTRAL methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert; Anzueto, Antonio; Miravitlles, Marc; Arvis, Pierre; Faragó, Geneviève; Haverstock, Daniel; Trajanovic, Mila; Sethi, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics, along with oral corticosteroids, are standard treatments for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). The ultimate aims of treatment are to minimize the impact of the current exacerbation, and by ensuring complete resolution, reduce the risk of relapse. In the absence of superiority studies of antibiotics in AECOPD, evidence of the relative efficacy of different drugs is lacking, and so it is difficult for physicians to select the most effective antibiotic. This paper describes the protocol and rationale for MAESTRAL (moxifloxacin in AECBs [acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis] trial; www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00656747), one of the first antibiotic comparator trials designed to show superiority of one antibiotic over another in AECOPD. It is a prospective, multinational, multicenter, randomized, double-blind controlled study of moxifloxacin (400 mg PO [ per os] once daily for 5 days) vs amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (875/125 mg PO twice daily for 7 days) in outpatients with COPD and chronic bronchitis suffering from an exacerbation. MAESTRAL uses an innovative primary endpoint of clinical failure: the requirement for additional or alternate treatment for the exacerbation at 8 weeks after the end of antibiotic therapy, powered for superiority. Patients enrolled are those at high-risk of treatment failure, and all are experiencing an Anthonisen type I exacerbation. Patients are stratified according to oral corticosteroid use to control their effect across antibiotic treatment arms. Secondary endpoints include quality of life, symptom assessments and health care resource use. PMID:21760724

  18. Lower cardiovascular reactivity to acute stress in informal caregivers of people with autism spectrum disorder than in non-caregivers: Implications for health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Robledillo, N; Bellosta-Batalla, M; Moya-Albiol, L

    2015-10-01

    Caring for offspring with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with chronic stress. Such a situation could alter body homeostasis, and in turn, physiological systems associated with the stress response and health, such as the autonomic nervous system. The primary aim of the present study was to compare the cardiovascular response with a set of mental tasks in parents of people with (n=34) and without (n=36) ASD. The secondary aim was to explore a potential relationship between cardiovascular response and self-reported health. Caregivers had lower sympathetic activity than non-caregivers, especially during the acute stress period. Higher sympathetic activity was related to more self-reported somatic symptoms in caregivers. Further, caregivers were found to have lower sympathetic reactivity to the stressor, probably due to an adaptation mechanism. Such adaptation could be extremely important for protecting the health of caregivers. PMID:26226113

  19. Ecotoxicological evaluation of the additive butylated hydroxyanisole using a battery with six model systems and eighteen endpoints.

    PubMed

    Jos, Angeles; Repetto, Guillermo; Ríos, Juan Carlos; del Peso, Ana; Salguero, Manuel; Hazen, María José; Molero, María Luisa; Fernández-Freire, Paloma; Pérez-Martín, Jose Manuel; Labrador, Verónica; Cameán, Ana

    2005-01-26

    The occurrence and fate of additives in the aquatic environment is an emerging issue in environmental chemistry. This paper describes the ecotoxicological effects of the commonly used additive butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) using a test battery, comprising of several different organisms and in vitro test systems, representing a proportion of the different trophic levels. The most sensitive system to BHA was the inhibition of bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri bacteria, which resulted in an acute low observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC) of 0.28 microM. The next most sensitive system was the immobilization of the cladoceran Daphnia magna followed by: the inhibition of the growth of the unicellular alga Chlorella vulgaris; the endpoints evaluated in Vero (mammalian) cells (total protein content, LDH activity, neutral red uptake and MTT metabolization), mitotic index and root growth inhibition in the terrestrial plant Allium cepa, and finally, the endpoints used on the RTG-2 salmonid fish cell line (neutral red uptake, total protein content, MTS metabolization, lactate dehydrogenase leakage and activity, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity). Morphological alterations in RTG-2 cells were also assessed and these included loss of cells, induction of cellular pleomorphism, hydropic degeneration and induction of apoptosis at high concentrations. The results from this study also indicated that micronuclei were not induced in A.cepa exposed to BHA. The differences in sensitivity for the diverse systems that were used (EC50 ranged from 1.2 to >500 microM) suggest the importance for a test battery approach in the evaluation of the ecological consequences of chemicals. According to the results, the levels of BHA reported in industrial wastewater would elicit adverse effects in the environment. This, coupled with its potential to bioaccumulate, makes BHA a pollutant of concern not only for acute exposures, but also for the long-term. PMID:15642642

  20. Use of sublethal endpoints in sediment toxicity testing with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    SciTech Connect

    Kemble, N.E.; Brunson, E.B.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ehrhardt, E.A.; Hardesty, D.K.; Haverland, P.S.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    ASTM and EPA standard methods for sediment toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca typically recommend use of lethality as the endpoint in a 10-d exposure. However, data from 10- to 28-d exposures with amphipods indicate sublethal endpoints (i.e., growth, sexual maturation, or reproduction) identify additional samples as toxic. The authors compared the frequency that lethal and sublethal endpoints identified a sediment sample as toxic in 14- and 28-d amphipod exposures. In the 14-d amphipod exposures, lethality identified 20% of the samples as toxic, and sublethal endpoints identified an additional 16% of the samples as toxic using sublethal endpoints only. Similarly, in the 28-d exposures, lethality identified 14% of the samples as toxic and sublethal endpoints identified an additional 18% of the samples as toxic. The authors are also currently evaluating Sediment Effect Concentrations (SECs) relative to both lethal and sublethal endpoints in H. azteca exposures. These SECs will be used to evaluate reliability in estimating toxicity of samples. Potential factors which may confound interpretation of sublethal endpoints in sediment tests include: (1) changes in sediment chemistry resulting from long-term storage or feeding (2) the influence of physical characteristics of sediment (grain size), and (3) effects of ammonia or hydrogen sulfide.

  1. 76 FR 51993 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Standards for Clinical Trial Imaging Endpoints; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Standards for Clinical Trial... entitled ``Standards for Clinical Trial Imaging Endpoints.'' The purpose of this draft guidance is to assist sponsors in the use of imaging endpoints in clinical trials of therapeutic drugs and...

  2. 77 FR 49447 - Endpoints for Clinical Trials in Kidney Transplantation; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Endpoints for Clinical Trials in Kidney Transplantation... evaluate patient and allograft outcome in clinical trials of kidney transplantation. The meeting will... discussion and may serve to inform recommendations on potential endpoints in clinical trials of...

  3. Combining progression-free survival and overall survival as a novel composite endpoint for glioblastoma trials

    PubMed Central

    Trippa, Lorenzo; Wen, Patrick Y.; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Berry, Donald A.; Alexander, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of auxiliary endpoints may provide efficiencies for clinical trial design, but such endpoints may not have intrinsic clinical relevance or clear linkage to more meaningful endpoints. The purpose of this study was to generate a novel endpoint that considers both overall survival (OS) and earlier events such as progression-free survival (PFS) and determine whether such an endpoint could increase efficiency in the design of glioblastoma clinical trials. Methods Recognizing that the association between PFS and OS varies depending on therapy and tumor type, we developed a statistical model to predict OS based on PFS as the trial progresses. We then evaluated the efficiency of our model using simulations of adaptively randomized trials incorporating PFS and OS distributions from prior published trials in neuro-oncology. Results When treatment effects on PFS and OS are concordant, our proposed approach results in efficiency gains compared with randomization based on OS alone while sacrificing minimal efficiency compared with using PFS as the primary endpoint. When treatment effects are limited to PFS, our approach provides randomization probabilities that are close to those based on OS alone. Conclusion Use of OS as the primary endpoint, combined with statistical modeling of the relationship between OS and PFS during the course of the trial, results in more robust and efficient trial designs than using either endpoint alone. PMID:25568226

  4. 78 FR 46351 - Trial Designs and Endpoints for Liver Disease Secondary to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... discuss trial design, including endpoints for clinical trials in NAFLD, to promote efficient drug... forum to discuss the key issues in the design of clinical trials of drugs for the treatment of liver... selection of endpoints and assessment methodologies in clinical trials. Trial design strategies and...

  5. Attention to Endpoints: A Cross-Linguistic Constraint on Spatial Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regier, Terry; Zheng, Mingyu

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a possible universal constraint on spatial meaning. It has been proposed that people attend preferentially to the endpoints of spatial motion events, and that languages may therefore make finer semantic distinctions at event endpoints than at event beginnings. We test this proposal. In Experiment 1, we show that people discriminate…

  6. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Bojalil, R.; Guiscafré, H.; Espinosa, P.; Viniegra, L.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Gutiérrez, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  7. The interRAI Acute Care instrument incorporated in an eHealth system for standardized and web-based geriatric assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the acute hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The interRAI Acute Care instrument is a multidimensional geriatric assessment system intended to determine a hospitalized older persons’ medical, psychosocial and functional capacity and needs. Its objective is to develop an overall plan for treatment and long-term follow-up based on a common set of standardized items that can be used in various care settings. A Belgian web-based software system (BelRAI-software) was developed to enable clinicians to interpret the output and to communicate the patients’ data across wards and care organizations. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the (dis)advantages of the implementation of the interRAI Acute Care instrument as a comprehensive geriatric assessment instrument in an acute hospital context. Methods In a cross-sectional multicenter study on four geriatric wards in three acute hospitals, trained clinical staff (nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, and geriatricians) assessed 410 inpatients in routine clinical practice. The BelRAI-system was evaluated by focus groups, observations, and questionnaires. The Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats were mapped (SWOT-analysis) and validated by the participants. Results The primary strengths of the BelRAI-system were a structured overview of the patients’ condition early after admission and the promotion of multidisciplinary assessment. Our study was a first attempt to transfer standardized data between home care organizations, nursing homes and hospitals and a way to centralize medical, allied health professionals and nursing data. With the BelRAI-software, privacy of data is guaranteed. Weaknesses are the time-consuming character of the process and the overlap with other assessment instruments or (electronic) registration forms. There is room for improving the user-friendliness and the efficiency of the software, which needs hospital-specific adaptations. Opportunities are a timely and systematic problem detection and continuity of

  8. Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: defining endpoints that are important to patients.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish

    2004-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) seek treatment to obtain relief of their symptoms. Symptoms are important to patients because they interfere with activities of daily living and impair quality of life. Clinical trials in GERD have traditionally focused on the healing of erosive esophagitis, and symptom endpoints have been relegated to a secondary role. In primary care, however, patients typically are treated empirically without definition of the presence or absence of esophagitis. Patient-centered endpoints such as complete symptom resolution, patient satisfaction, and improvement in quality of life therefore provide more meaningful results in the broad population of patients with GERD, provided they are coupled with objective data on mucosal healing. This article reviews the importance of patient-centered endpoints in the assessment of the treatment of GERD and concludes that complete resolution of symptoms is the most rigorous endpoint in clinical trials and provides a meaningful endpoint for therapy in clinical practice.

  9. A Few Endpoint Geodesic Restriction Estimates for Eigenfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Sogge, Christopher D.

    2014-07-01

    We prove a couple of new endpoint geodesic restriction estimates for eigenfunctions. In the case of general 3-dimensional compact manifolds, after a TT* argument, simply by using the L 2-boundedness of the Hilbert transform on , we are able to improve the corresponding L 2-restriction bounds of Burq, Gérard and Tzvetkov (Duke Math J 138:445-486, 2007) and Hu (Forum Math 6:1021-1052, 2009). Also, in the case of 2-dimensional compact manifolds with nonpositive curvature, we obtain improved L 4-estimates for restrictions to geodesics, which, by Hölder's inequality and interpolation, implies improved L p -bounds for all exponents p ≥ 2. We do this by using oscillatory integral theorems of Hörmander (Ark Mat 11:1-11, 1973), Greenleaf and Seeger (J Reine Angew Math 455:35-56, 1994) and Phong and Stein (Int Math Res Notices 4:49-60, 1991), along with a simple geometric lemma (Lemma 3.2) about properties of the mixed-Hessian of the Riemannian distance function restricted to pairs of geodesics in Riemannian surfaces. We are also able to get further improvements beyond our new results in three dimensions under the assumption of constant nonpositive curvature by exploiting the fact that, in this case, there are many totally geodesic submanifolds.

  10. Responding to a "window of opportunity": the detection and management of aged abuse in an acute and subacute health care setting.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Lynette; Posenelli, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Aged abuse can manifest as physical harm, sexual assault, intimidation, blackmail, and social deprivation, misappropriation of funds or property, and neglect. The extent of the problem is difficult to assess in health settings due to underreporting and the fragility and reluctance of the elderly in being able to discuss the issue with health care providers. This appears to be related to the fact that perpetrators are frequently family members with resulting issues of aged dependency, family loyalty, and fear of the consequences of reporting. Of equal importance is a general lack of community understanding of aged abuse, including health professionals who frequently lack the confidence in screening and management to respond appropriately when aged abuse is suspected. Staff knowledge and skills emerge as a deficit in the detection of elder abuse and staff education has been identified as an effective means of improving the recognition of the abused elderly person in acute hospital settings. In addition, there remains a need for effective screening protocols. The aim of this study was to explore the recognition of aged abuse in an acute and subacute hospital setting. This has implications for effective management and community linkage as well as strengthening the knowledge base of issues related to this vulnerable group. The study included a survey and interview with hospital staff to explore their response to aged abuse over a retrospective twelve-month period. PMID:20182983

  11. Effects of Educational Music Therapy on State Hope for Recovery in Acute Care Mental Health Inpatients: A Cluster-Randomized Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been an increasing emphasis on recovery as the expectation for people with mental health disorders. Purpose: The purpose of this effectiveness study is to determine if group-based educational music therapy can immediately impact state hope for recovery in acute care mental health patients. Research questions included: will acute care mental health inpatients who participate in a single music therapy session have higher agency and pathway aspects of state hope for recovery than patients in a control condition? Will there be differences in state hope for recovery as a result of hope-oriented songwriting or lyric analysis interventions? Method: Participants (N = 169) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: lyric analysis, songwriting, or wait-list control. Results: There was no significant between-group difference. However, both music therapy conditions tended to have slightly higher mean pathway, agency, and total state hope scores than the control condition even within the temporal parameters of a single music therapy session. There was no between-group difference in the songwriting and lyric analysis interventions. Conclusion: Although not significant, results support that educational music therapy may impact state hope for recovery within the temporal parameters of a single session. The specific type of educational music therapy intervention did not affect results. Implications for practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:27774084

  12. University of Minnesota Duluth, gasifier health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, H.R.; O'Donnell, F.R.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; Etnier, E.L.

    1984-09-01

    This document describes an investigation of potential public and occupational health impacts associated with operation of the small, low Btu gasifier at the University of Minnesota, Duluth (UMD). The purpose of this study is to identify and quantify, within the uncertainty limits imposed by the available data, major contributors to such impacts. Consequently, we have estimated potential occupational health impacts and the gasifier's potential for producing certain health endpoints in the general public. Endpoints are specifically noncancer acute and chronic effects (threshold effects), and cancer and SO/sub x/-related mortalities (linear, nonthreshold effects) associated with atmospheric releases (no direct releases to aquatic systems occur at the facility) and subsequent inhalation exposure to representatives of three classes of released materials - metals, organics, and criteria pollutants. Other potential pathways to public exposure (atmospherically-contaminated drinking water, ingestion of locally produced foods, etc.) should not be responsible for a significant fraction of estimated risk, given the high dilution potential of the city's drinking water source (Lake Superior), and the fact that a relatively small quantity of food is grown locally. The report is organized to provide the reader with: (1) discussion and estimation, as feasible, of gasifier worker health risks, (2) source term (release rate) data, environmental transport and population exposure information, and (3) an assessment of the general population health risk based on these exposure estimates. 82 references, 1 figure, 9 tables.

  13. [Empirical therapeutic approach to infection by resistant gram positive (acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and health care pneumonia). Value of risk factors].

    PubMed

    González-DelCastillo, J; Núñez-Orantos, M J; Candel, F J; Martín-Sánchez, F J

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic treatment inadequacy is common in these sites of infection and may have implications for the patient's prognosis. In acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, the document states that for the establishment of an adequate treatment it must be assessed the severity, the patient comorbidity and the risk factors for multidrug-resistant microorganism. The concept of health care-associated pneumonia is discussed and leads to errors in the etiologic diagnosis and therefore in the selection of antibiotic treatment. This paper discusses how to perform this approach to the possible etiology to guide empirical treatment. PMID:27608306

  14. Rare alleles within the CYP2E1 (MEOS system) could be associated with better short-term health outcome after acute methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Pelclova, Daniela; Seidl, Zdenek; Vaneckova, Manuela; Klempir, Jiri; Ruzicka, Evzen; Ridzon, Petr; Urban, Pavel; Fenclova, Zdenka; Petrik, Vit; Diblik, Pavel; Kuthan, Pavel; Miovsky, Michal; Janikova, Barbara; Adamkova, Vera; Zakharov, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    Genetic polymorphisms influence the metabolism of ethanol and methanol, but the potential effects of genetic predisposition on the clinical course, outcome and short-term health sequelae of acute methanol poisoning are unknown. To evaluate the role of the MEOS system in methanol poisoning, we analysed the effect of three polymorphisms (RsaI - rs2031920; PstI - rs3813867; insertion/deletion I/D) within the CYP2E1 enzyme (MEOS system) in 50 adult survivors of methanol poisoning and compared their genotype frequencies with 460 controls. The minor allele frequencies of all three polymorphisms were below 5% in both groups. We did not detect significant differences in the genotype frequencies between survivors of methanol poisoning and controls (p = 0.34 for the RsaI variant; p = 0.59 for the PstI variant and p = 0.21 for the I/D polymorphism). The carriers of at least one minor allele in the CYP2E1 gene had less severe clinical symptoms and better short-term outcome after acute poisoning. Variants within the CYP2E1 gene are likely not significant genetic determinants of acute methanol poisoning (if survivors are analysed), but they may influence the severity of methanol poisoning and its visual/central nervous system (CNS) outcome.

  15. Acute Alcohol Consumption and Secondary Psychopathic Traits Increase Ratings of the Attractiveness and Health of Ethnic Ingroup Faces but Not Outgroup Faces

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ian J.; Gillespie, Steven M.; Leverton, Monica; Llewellyn, Victoria; Neale, Emily; Stevenson, Isobel

    2015-01-01

    Studies have consistently shown that both consumption of acute amounts of alcohol and elevated antisocial psychopathic traits are associated with an impaired ability for prepotent response inhibition. This may manifest as a reduced ability to inhibit prepotent race biased responses. Here, we tested the effects of acute alcohol consumption, and elevated antisocial psychopathic traits, on judgments of the attractiveness and health of ethnic ingroup and outgroup faces. In the first study, we show that following acute alcohol consumption, at a dose that is sufficient to result in impaired performance on tests of executive function, Caucasian participants judged White faces to be more attractive and healthier compared to when sober. However, this effect did not extend to Black faces. A similar effect was found in a second study involving sober Caucasian participants where secondary psychopathic traits were related to an intergroup bias in the ratings of attractiveness for White versus Black faces. These results are discussed in terms of a model which postulates that poor prefrontal functioning leads to increases in ingroup liking as a result of impaired abilities for prepotent response inhibition. PMID:25745403

  16. Neuroimaging as a Selection Tool and Endpoint in Clinical and Pre-clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Muir, Keith W; Macrae, I Mhairi

    2016-10-01

    Standard imaging in acute stroke enables the exclusion of non-stroke structural CNS lesions and cerebral haemorrhage from clinical and pre-clinical ischaemic stroke trials. In this review, the potential benefit of imaging (e.g., angiography and penumbral imaging) as a translational tool for trial recruitment and the use of imaging endpoints are discussed for both clinical and pre-clinical stroke research. The addition of advanced imaging to identify a "responder" population leads to reduced sample size for any given effect size in phase 2 trials and is a potentially cost-efficient means of testing interventions. In pre-clinical studies, technical failures (failed or incomplete vessel occlusion, cerebral haemorrhage) can be excluded early and continuous multimodal imaging of the animal from stroke onset is feasible. Pre- and post-intervention repeat scans provide real time assessment of the intervention over the first 4-6 h. Negative aspects of advanced imaging in animal studies include increased time under general anaesthesia, and, as in clinical studies, a delay in starting the intervention. In clinical phase 3 trial designs, the negative aspects of advanced imaging in patient selection include higher exclusion rates, slower recruitment, overestimated effect size and longer acquisition times. Imaging may identify biological effects with smaller sample size and at earlier time points, compared to standard clinical assessments, and can be adjusted for baseline parameters. Mechanistic insights can be obtained. Pre-clinically, multimodal imaging can non-invasively generate data on a range of parameters, allowing the animal to be recovered for subsequent behavioural testing and/or the brain taken for further molecular or histological analysis. PMID:27543177

  17. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  18. Israeli acute paralysis virus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and implications for honey bee health and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus that was linked with honey bee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), the sudden and massive die-off of honey bee colonies in the U.S. in 2006-2007. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence and genetic diversity of IAPV, host transcripti...

  19. Health-related quality of life dynamics of HIV-positive South African women up to ART initiation: evidence from the CAPRISA 002 acute infection cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Andrew; Garrett, Nigel; Werner, Lise; Burns, Jonathan K; Mpanza, Lindiwe; Mlisana, Koleka; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2014-06-01

    Few studies have investigated the long-term dynamics in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among HIV-positive persons from acute infection. From 2004, 160 women were enrolled into the CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection study at two sites in the province of KwaZulu-Natal and underwent 3-6 monthly HRQoL assessments using the functional assessment of HIV infection (FAHI) instrument. Overall and 5 sub-scale FAHI scores [physical well-being (PWB), emotional well-being (EWB), functional and global well-being (FGWB), social well-being (SWB) and cognitive functioning (CF)] were calculated up to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and scores at enrollment were compared to the acute, early and established infection phases. Mixed-effects regression models adjusting for behavioral and clinical factors were applied to assess HRQoL trends and the proportion of women meeting minimally important differences was calculated. Our analyses revealed that overall/sub-scale scores improved over time, except from PWB and CF. A higher educational status, contraceptive use and a higher BMI were the strongest predictors of higher overall/sub-scale FAHI scores. CD4 count and HIV viral load were strongly associated with PWB and CF, but not overall FAHI and other sub-scales. Women newly diagnosed with acute HIV infection face profound HRQoL challenges. While early ART delivery may be important for PWB and CF, factors such as education, contraception provision and good nutritional status should be promoted to maximize HRQoL in HIV positive individuals.

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life Dynamics of HIV-positive South African Women up to ART Initiation: Evidence from the CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Andrew; Garrett, Nigel; Werner, Lise; Burns, Jonathan K.; Mpanza, Lindiwe; Mlisana, Koleka; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Karim, Salim S. Abdool

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the long-term dynamics in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among HIV-positive persons from acute infection. From 2004, 160 women were enrolled into the CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection study at two sites in the province of KwaZulu-Natal and underwent 3–6 monthly HRQoL assessments using the functional assessment of HIV infection (FAHI) instrument. Overall and 5 sub-scale FAHI scores [physical well-being (PWB), emotional well-being (EWB), functional and global well-being (FGWB), social well-being (SWB) and cognitive functioning (CF)] were calculated up to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and scores at enrollment were compared to the acute, early and established infection phases. Mixed-effects regression models adjusting for behavioral and clinical factors were applied to assess HRQoL trends and the proportion of women meeting minimally important differences was calculated. Our analyses revealed that overall/sub-scale scores improved over time, except from PWB and CF. A higher educational status, contraceptive use and a higher BMI were the strongest predictors of higher overall/sub-scale FAHI scores. CD4 count and HIV viral load were strongly associated with PWB and CF, but not overall FAHI and other sub-scales. Women newly diagnosed with acute HIV infection face profound HRQoL challenges. While early ART delivery may be important for PWB and CF, factors such as education, contraception provision and good nutritional status should be promoted to maximize HRQoL in HIV positive individuals. PMID:24368630

  1. Acute cocaine-related health problems in patients presenting to an urban emergency department in Switzerland: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency departments may be a useful information source to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with acute cocaine-related medical problems. We therefore conducted a retrospective analysis of 165 acute, laboratory-confirmed cocaine intoxications admitted to an urban emergency department in Switzerland between January 2007 and March 2011. Results A total of 165 patients with a mean age of 32 years were included. Most patients were male (73%) and unemployed (65%). Only a minority (16%) had abused cocaine alone while 84% of the patients had used at least one additional substance, most commonly ethanol (41%), opioids (38%), or cannabis (36%) as confirmed by their detection in blood samples. The most frequently reported symptoms were chest pain (21%), palpitations (19%), anxiety (36%) and restlessness (36%). Psychiatric symptoms were present in 64%. Hypertension and tachycardia were observed in 53% and 44% of the patients, respectively. Severe poisonings only occurred in patients with multiple substance intoxication (15%). Severe intoxications were non-significantly more frequent with injected drug use compared to nasal, oral, or inhalational drug use. Severe complications included acute myocardial infarction (2 cases), stroke (one case), and seizures (3 cases). Most patients (75%) were discharged home within 24 h after admission. A psychiatric evaluation in the ED was performed in 24% of the patients and 19% were referred to a psychiatric clinic. Conclusions Patients with acute cocaine intoxication often used cocaine together with ethanol and opioids and presented with sympathomimetic toxicity and/or psychiatric disorders. Severe acute toxicity was more frequent with multiple substance use. Toxicity was typically short-lasting but psychiatric evaluation and referral was often needed. PMID:24666782

  2. Relevance weighting of tier 1 endocrine screening endpoints by rank order.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Stuchal, Leah D; Mihaich, Ellen M; Becker, Richard A; Bentley, Karin S; Brausch, John M; Coady, Katie; Geter, David R; Gordon, Elliot; Guiney, Patrick D; Hess, Frederick; Holmes, Catherine M; LeBaron, Matthew J; Levine, Steve; Marty, Sue; Mukhi, Sandeep; Neal, Barbara H; Ortego, Lisa S; Saltmiras, David A; Snajdr, Suzanne; Staveley, Jane; Tobia, Abraham

    2014-02-01

    Weight of evidence (WoE) approaches are recommended for interpreting various toxicological data, but few systematic and transparent procedures exist. A hypothesis-based WoE framework was recently published focusing on the U.S. EPA's Tier 1 Endocrine Screening Battery (ESB) as an example. The framework recommends weighting each experimental endpoint according to its relevance for deciding eight hypotheses addressed by the ESB. Here we present detailed rationale for weighting the ESB endpoints according to three rank ordered categories and an interpretive process for using the rankings to reach WoE determinations. Rank 1 was assigned to in vivo endpoints that characterize the fundamental physiological actions for androgen, estrogen, and thyroid activities. Rank 1 endpoints are specific and sensitive for the hypothesis, interpretable without ancillary data, and rarely confounded by artifacts or nonspecific activity. Rank 2 endpoints are specific and interpretable for the hypothesis but less informative than Rank 1, often due to oversensitivity, inclusion of narrowly context-dependent components of the hormonal system (e.g., in vitro endpoints), or confounding by nonspecific activity. Rank 3 endpoints are relevant for the hypothesis but only corroborative of Ranks 1 and 2 endpoints. Rank 3 includes many apical in vivo endpoints that can be affected by systemic toxicity and nonhormonal activity. Although these relevance weight rankings (WREL ) necessarily involve professional judgment, their a priori derivation enhances transparency and renders WoE determinations amenable to methodological scrutiny according to basic scientific premises, characteristics that cannot be assured by processes in which the rationale for decisions is provided post hoc. PMID:24510745

  3. Reliability of a Manual Procedure for Marking the EZ Endpoint Location in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rithambara; X. Cai, Cindy; Lee, Dongwon; C. Epstein, Benjamin; Locke, Kirsten G.; G. Birch, David; C. Hood, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We developed and evaluated a training procedure for marking the endpoints of the ellipsoid zone (EZ), also known as the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) border, on frequency domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT) scans from patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods A manual for marking EZ endpoints was developed and used to train 2 inexperienced graders. After training, an experienced grader and the 2 trained graders marked the endpoints on fdOCT horizontal line scans through the macula from 45 patients with RP. They marked the endpoints on these same scans again 1 month later. Results Intragrader agreement was excellent. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.99, the average difference of endpoint locations (19.6 μm) was close to 0 μm, and the 95% limits were between −284 and 323 μm, approximately ±1.1°. Intergrader agreement also was excellent. The ICC values were 0.98 (time 1) and 0.97 (time 2), the average difference among graders was close to zero, and the 95% limits of these differences was less than 350 μm, approximately 1.2°, for both test times. Conclusions While automated algorithms are becoming increasingly accurate, EZ endpoints still have to be verified manually and corrected when necessary. With training, the inter- and intragrader agreement of manually marked endpoints is excellent. Translational Relevance For clinical studies, the EZ endpoints can be marked by hand if a training procedure, including a manual, is used. The endpoint confidence intervals, well under ±2.0°, are considerably smaller than the 6° spacing for the typically used static visual field. PMID:27226930

  4. Sublethal Toxicity Endpoints of Heavy Metals to the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Wang, Qiang; Li, Huixin

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living nematode, is commonly used as a model organism in ecotoxicological studies. The current literatures have provided useful insight into the relative sensitivity of several endpoints, but few direct comparisons of multiple endpoints under a common set of experimental conditions. The objective of this study was to determine appropriate sublethal endpoints to develop an ecotoxicity screening and monitoring system. C. elegans was applied to explore the sublethal toxicity of four heavy metals (copper, zinc, cadmium and chromium). Two physiological endpoints (growth and reproduction), three behavioral endpoints (head thrash frequency, body bend frequency and feeding) and two enzymatic endpoints (acetylcholine esterase [AChE] and superoxide dismutase [SOD]) were selected for the assessment of heavy metal toxicity. The squared correlation coefficients (R2) between the responses observed and fitted by Logit function were higher than 0.90 and the RMSE were lower than 0.10, indicating a good significance statistically. There was no significant difference among the half effect concentration (EC50) endpoints in physiological and behavioral effects of the four heavy metals, indicating similar sensitivity of physiological and behavioral effects. AChE enzyme was more sensitive to copper, zinc, and cadmium than to other physiological and behavioral effects, and SOD enzyme was most sensitive to chromium. The EC50 of copper, zinc, and cadmium, to the AChE enzyme in the nematodes were 0.68 mg/L, 2.76 mg/L, and 0.92 mg/L respectively and the EC50 of chromium to the SOD enzyme in the nematode was 1.58 mg/L. The results of this study showed that there was a good concentration-response relationship between all four heavy metals and the sublethal toxicity effects to C. elegans. Considering these sublethal endpoints in terms of simplicity, accuracy, repeatability and costs of the experiments, feeding is the relatively ideal sublethal toxicity endpoint of

  5. Sublethal Toxicity Endpoints of Heavy Metals to the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Chen, Jiandong; Wu, Yue; Wang, Qiang; Li, Huixin

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living nematode, is commonly used as a model organism in ecotoxicological studies. The current literatures have provided useful insight into the relative sensitivity of several endpoints, but few direct comparisons of multiple endpoints under a common set of experimental conditions. The objective of this study was to determine appropriate sublethal endpoints to develop an ecotoxicity screening and monitoring system. C. elegans was applied to explore the sublethal toxicity of four heavy metals (copper, zinc, cadmium and chromium). Two physiological endpoints (growth and reproduction), three behavioral endpoints (head thrash frequency, body bend frequency and feeding) and two enzymatic endpoints (acetylcholine esterase [AChE] and superoxide dismutase [SOD]) were selected for the assessment of heavy metal toxicity. The squared correlation coefficients (R2) between the responses observed and fitted by Logit function were higher than 0.90 and the RMSE were lower than 0.10, indicating a good significance statistically. There was no significant difference among the half effect concentration (EC50) endpoints in physiological and behavioral effects of the four heavy metals, indicating similar sensitivity of physiological and behavioral effects. AChE enzyme was more sensitive to copper, zinc, and cadmium than to other physiological and behavioral effects, and SOD enzyme was most sensitive to chromium. The EC50 of copper, zinc, and cadmium, to the AChE enzyme in the nematodes were 0.68 mg/L, 2.76 mg/L, and 0.92 mg/L respectively and the EC50 of chromium to the SOD enzyme in the nematode was 1.58 mg/L. The results of this study showed that there was a good concentration-response relationship between all four heavy metals and the sublethal toxicity effects to C. elegans. Considering these sublethal endpoints in terms of simplicity, accuracy, repeatability and costs of the experiments, feeding is the relatively ideal sublethal toxicity endpoint of

  6. Effectiveness of N95 respirators versus surgical masks in protecting health care workers from acute respiratory infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeffrey D.; MacDougall, Colin C.; Johnstone, Jennie; Copes, Ray A.; Schwartz, Brian; Garber, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conflicting recommendations exist related to which facial protection should be used by health care workers to prevent transmission of acute respiratory infections, including pandemic influenza. We performed a systematic review of both clinical and surrogate exposure data comparing N95 respirators and surgical masks for the prevention of transmissible acute respiratory infections. Methods: We searched various electronic databases and the grey literature for relevant studies published from January 1990 to December 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies and case–control studies that included data on health care workers wearing N95 respirators and surgical masks to prevent acute respiratory infections were included in the meta-analysis. Surrogate exposure studies comparing N95 respirators and surgical masks using manikins or adult volunteers under simulated conditions were summarized separately. Outcomes from clinical studies were laboratory-confirmed respiratory infection, influenza-like illness and workplace absenteeism. Outcomes from surrogate exposure studies were filter penetration, face-seal leakage and total inward leakage. Results: We identified 6 clinical studies (3 RCTs, 1 cohort study and 2 case–control studies) and 23 surrogate exposure studies. In the meta-analysis of the clinical studies, we found no significant difference between N95 respirators and surgical masks in associated risk of (a) laboratory-confirmed respiratory infection (RCTs: odds ratio [OR] 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64–1.24; cohort study: OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.03–6.41; case–control studies: OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.25–3.36); (b) influenza-like illness (RCTs: OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.19–1.41); or (c) reported workplace absenteeism (RCT: OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.57–1.50). In the surrogate exposure studies, N95 respirators were associated with less filter penetration, less face-seal leakage and less total inward leakage under laboratory experimental conditions

  7. An analysis of National Health Service Trust websites on the occupational backgrounds of ‘Non-Executive Directors’ on England’s Acute Trusts

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Andrew JE

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To explore the occupational backgrounds of English Non-Executive Directors (NED) on Acute National Health Service (NHS) Trusts. Design Data extrapolated from Trust websites of NED’ occupational backgrounds by gender and occupations, and inter-rater reliability test undertaken. Setting Data were available on all but 24 of the 166 Acute Trusts’ from all regions. Participants Trust Chairs and NED were categorised by their dominant occupation. Main outcome measure Differentiating NED with and without health or social care leadership experience. Results The ratings of NED’ occupations positively correlated (p < 0.001). Occupational categories were Commerce and Finance from private and public sectors or with Medical or Community leadership experience. Only 4% of Chairs were Medical, 2% from Community – the majority (61%) from Commerce and Finance. Of the 1001 NED, 8% and 6% respectively had Medical or Community leadership experience; most (86%) were Commerce, Finance and non-clinical Managerial backgrounds. Females made up 27% of NED. Conclusions With a predominance of Chairs and NED without health or social care leadership experience, are current Boards equipped to avoid inadvertently ‘doing the system's business’ (Francis, 2013) rather than developing a more patient-centred, clinically led and integrated NHS? It is suggested that Boards need more NED with health and social care leadership experience and methods to identify the ‘patient’s agenda’ to create ‘a common culture’ that places ‘patients at the centre of everything we do’ (Hunt, 2012). A key context for Trust Boards operations is funding, which Francis’ terms of reference excluded, an issue that is briefly discussed. PMID:25057396

  8. Systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary hypertension: why disease-specific composite endpoints are needed

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc). In clinical trials PAH-SSc has been grouped with other forms, including idiopathic PAH. The primary endpoint for most pivotal studies was improvement in exercise capacity. However, composite clinical endpoints that better reflect long-term outcome may be more meaningful. We discuss potential endpoints and consider why the same measures may not be appropriate for both idiopathic PAH and PAH-SSc due to inherent differences in clinical outcome and management strategies of these two forms of PAH. Failure to take this into account may compromise progress in managing PAH in SSc. PMID:21699746

  9. Determination of infectious bursal disease virus titration and neutralization endpoints using fluorogenic staining.

    PubMed

    Bayyari, G R; Skeeles, J K; Story, J D; Slavik, M F

    1991-01-01

    An automated method for determining infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) titration and neutralization endpoints is described. The method employs the fluorogenic ester carboxyfluorescein-diacetate (CFDA) to stain cell monolayers in 96-well plates and a fluorescence-concentration analyzer. Titration results are compared with immunofluorescence and plaque assay titers. Virus-neutralization endpoint determination is objective, and the endpoints of replicate tests were equivalent or within one dilution of variability. Tests can be automatically screened as any percentage of a positive control or any standard deviation from a negative control.

  10. Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) – a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with acute leukemia experience a substantial symptom burden and are at risk of developing infections throughout the course of repeated cycles of intensive chemotherapy. Physical activity in recent years has been a strategy for rehabilitation in cancer patients to remedy disease and treatment related symptoms and side effects. To date, there are no clinical practice exercise guidelines for patients with acute leukemia undergoing induction and consolidation chemotherapy. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine if patients with acute leukemia can benefit by a structured and supervised counseling and exercise program. Methods/design This paper presents the study protocol: Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) trial, a two center, randomized controlled trial of 70 patients with acute leukemia (35 patients/study arm) following induction chemotherapy in the outpatient setting. Eligible patients will be randomized to usual care or to the 12 week exercise and counseling program. The intervention includes 3 hours + 30 minutes per week of supervised and structured aerobic training (moderate to high intensity 70 - 80%) on an ergometer cycle, strength exercises using hand weights and relaxation exercise. Individual health counseling sessions include a self directed home walk program with a step counter. The primary endpoint is functional performance/exercise capacity (6 minute walk distance). The secondary endpoints are submaximal VO2 max test, sit to stand and bicep curl test, physical activity levels, patient reported outcomes (quality of life, anxiety and depression, symptom prevalence, intensity and interference). Evaluation of clinical outcomes will be explored including incidence of infection, hospitalization days, body mass index, time to recurrence and survival. Qualitative exploration of patients’ health behavior and experiences. Discussion PACE-AL will provide evidence of the effect of

  11. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, D.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, F.W.

    1997-11-01

    'This report summarizes the first year''s progress of research funded under the Department of Energy''s Environmental Management Science Program. The research was initiated to better determine ecological risks from toxic and radioactive contaminants. More precisely, the research is designed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and to identify characteristics of non-human populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, as is typically found on many DOE sites. The authors propose to establish a protocol to assess risks to non-human species at higher levels of biological organization by relating molecular damage to more relevant responses that reflect population health. They think that they can achieve this by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables, and by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization.'

  12. Using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) for oilfield produced water treatment with environmentally acceptable endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zaib, Qammer; Aina, Oluwajinmi Daniel; Ahmad, Farrukh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were employed to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from low and high salinity water pre-equilibrated with crude oil. The treatment endpoint of crude oil-contaminated water is often controlled by BTEX compounds owing to their higher aqueous solubility and human-health toxicity compared to other hydrocarbons. The MWNT sorbent was extensively characterized and the depletion of the organic sorbate from the produced water was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses. The equilibrium sorptive removal of BTEX followed the order: ethylbenzene/o-xylene > m-xylene > toluene > benzene in the presence of other competing organics in produced water. Sorption mechanisms were explored through the application of a variety of kinetics and equilibrium models. Pseudo 2(nd) order kinetics and Freundlich equilibrium models were the best at describing BTEX removal from produced water. Hydrophobic interactions between the MWNTs and BTEX, as well as the physical characteristics of the sorbate molecules, were regarded as primary factors responsible for regulating competitive adsorption. Salinity played a critical role in limiting sorptive removal, with BTEX and total organic carbon (TOC) removal falling by 27% and 25%, respectively, upon the introduction of saline conditions. Results suggest that MWNTs are effective in removing risk-driving BTEX compounds from low-salinity oilfield produced water.

  13. Phagocytosis in earthworms: An environmentally acceptable endpoint to assess immunotoxic potential of contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Giggleman, M.A.; Fitzpatrick, L.C.; Goven, A.J.; Venables, B.J.; Callahan, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Phagocytosis, a host-defense mechanism phylogenetically conserved throughout the animal kingdom, by earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomocytes has potential as a surrogate for vertebrates to be used as an environmentally acceptable endpoint to assess sublethal immunotoxic risks of contaminated soils to environmental (eg. higher wildlife) and public health. Coelomocytes can be exposed in vivo to complex contaminated parent soils by placing earthworms in situ at hazardous waste sites (HWS) or into soil samples and their dilutions with artificial soil (AS) in the laboratory, or in vitro to soil extracts and their fractionations. Here the authors report on phagocytosis by coelomocytes in earthworms exposed to pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils from a wood treatment HWS, PCP-spiked AS and PCP treated filter paper (FP). HWS soil was diluted to 25% with AS to a sublethal concentration (ca. 125 mg kg{sup {minus}1}) and earthworms exposed for 14d at 10 C under light conditions. AS was spiked at ca. 125 mg kg{sup {minus}1} PCP and earthworms were similarly exposed. Controls for both consisted of earthworms exposed to 100% AS. Earthworms were exposed to FP treated with a sublethal PCP concentration (15 {micro}g cm{sup {minus}2}) at 10 C under dark conditions for 96H. Controls were similarly exposed without PCP. Phagocytosis by coelomocytes in earthworms exposed to HWS soil, spiked AS and treated FP was suppressed 37, 41 and 29%, respectively. Results are discussed in terms of PCP body burdens and exposure protocols.

  14. Using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) for oilfield produced water treatment with environmentally acceptable endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zaib, Qammer; Aina, Oluwajinmi Daniel; Ahmad, Farrukh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were employed to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from low and high salinity water pre-equilibrated with crude oil. The treatment endpoint of crude oil-contaminated water is often controlled by BTEX compounds owing to their higher aqueous solubility and human-health toxicity compared to other hydrocarbons. The MWNT sorbent was extensively characterized and the depletion of the organic sorbate from the produced water was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses. The equilibrium sorptive removal of BTEX followed the order: ethylbenzene/o-xylene > m-xylene > toluene > benzene in the presence of other competing organics in produced water. Sorption mechanisms were explored through the application of a variety of kinetics and equilibrium models. Pseudo 2(nd) order kinetics and Freundlich equilibrium models were the best at describing BTEX removal from produced water. Hydrophobic interactions between the MWNTs and BTEX, as well as the physical characteristics of the sorbate molecules, were regarded as primary factors responsible for regulating competitive adsorption. Salinity played a critical role in limiting sorptive removal, with BTEX and total organic carbon (TOC) removal falling by 27% and 25%, respectively, upon the introduction of saline conditions. Results suggest that MWNTs are effective in removing risk-driving BTEX compounds from low-salinity oilfield produced water. PMID:24975808

  15. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  16. A U.S. Partnership with India and Poland to Track Acute Chemical Releases to Serve Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Orr, Maureen; Pałaszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Dewan, Aruna; Kapil, Vikas

    2009-01-01

    We describe a collaborative effort between the U.S., India, and Poland to track acute chemical releases during 2005–2007. In all three countries, fixed facility events were more common than transportation-related events; manufacturing and transportation/warehousing were the most frequently involved industries; and equipment failure and human error were the primary contributing factors. The most commonly released nonpetroleum substances were ammonia (India), carbon monoxide (U.S.) and mercury (Poland). More events in India (54%) resulted in victims compared with Poland (15%) and the U.S. (9%). The pilot program showed it is possible to successfully conduct international surveillance of acute hazardous substances releases with careful interpretation of the findings. PMID:19826549

  17. PREDICTING TOXICOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS OF CHEMICALS USING QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (QSARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are being developed to predict the toxicological endpoints for untested chemicals similar in structure to chemicals that have known experimental toxicological data. Based on a very large number of predetermined descriptors, a...

  18. Developing osteoblasts as an endpoint for the mouse embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinrong; Hansen, Deborah K; Merry, Gwenn; DeJarnette, Christian; Nolen, Greg; Sloper, Daniel; Fisher, J Edward; Harrouk, Wafa; Tassinari, Melissa S; Inselman, Amy L

    2015-06-01

    The mouse Embryonic Stem cell Test (EST) using cardiomyocyte differentiation is a promising in vitro assay for detecting potential embryotoxicity; however, the addition of another differentiation endpoint, such as osteoblasts, may improve the predictive value of the test. A number of variables such as culture conditions and starting cell number were investigated. A 14 day direct plating method of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) was used to test the predictivity of osteoblast differentiation as an endpoint in the EST. Twelve compounds were tested using the prediction model developed in the ECVAM validation study. Eight of the compounds selected from the EST validation study served as model compounds; four additional compounds known to produce skeletal defects were also tested. Our results indicate comparable chemical classification between the validated cardiomyocyte endpoint and the osteoblast endpoint. These results suggest that differentiation to osteoblasts may provide confirmatory information in predicting embryotoxicity.

  19. Endpoint behavior of the pion distribution amplitude in QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, S. V.; Pimikov, A. V.; Stefanis, N. G.

    2010-09-01

    Starting from the QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates for the pion distribution amplitude, we derive another sum rule for its derivative and its ''integral derivatives''--defined in this work. We use this new sum rule to analyze the fine details of the pion distribution amplitude in the endpoint region x{approx}0. The results for endpoint-suppressed and flattop (or flatlike) pion distribution amplitudes are compared with those we obtained with differential sum rules by employing two different models for the distribution of vacuum-quark virtualities. We determine the range of values of the derivatives of the pion distribution amplitude and show that endpoint-suppressed distribution amplitudes lie within this range, while those with endpoint enhancement--flat-type or Chernyak-Zhitnitsky like--yield values outside this range.

  20. Acute suicidal ideation in middle-aged adults from Brazil. Results from the baseline data of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Brunoni, André R; Nunes, Maria A; Lotufo, Paulo A; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2015-02-28

    Suicidal ideation represents an important burden worldwide. However, little is known about it in low-/middle-income countries. We investigated this issue in a large cross-sectional of Brazilian civil servants (ELSA-Brasil, the Brazilian Health Longitudinal Study, n=15,105). Logistic univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the strength of association (odds ratio, OR) between clinical and sociodemographic variables with acute life-weariness (tiredness of life) and suicidal thoughts. The presence of major depressive disorder (MDD), common mental disorders (CMDs), stressful life-events (SLEs) and poor self-perceived physical health was also collected. MDD and CMDs were strongly associated with suicidal ideation in univariate and multivariate analyses. For life-weariness thoughts, a modest, consistent association was found for female gender, being single, non-White ethnicity and poor education. SLEs and poor self-perceived physical health were also associated with suicidal ideation. Espiritism-Kardecism, but not other religions or Atheism/Agnosticism, was associated with lower rates of life-weariness and suicidal thoughts. To conclude, suicidal ideation does not differ in Brazil compared to developed countries, being primarily associated with psychiatric disorders and, to a lesser but significant extent, to social disadvantage, SLEs, poor self-perceived health and being single.

  1. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  2. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Accelerated Approval of New Drugs for... for a new drug product on the basis of adequate and well-controlled clinical trials establishing that... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on...

  3. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  4. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  5. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  6. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  7. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  8. Evaluation of three soil toxicity tests used to monitor acceptable endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann, M.; Stroo, H.; Leuschner, A.; Leuteritz, D.; Stromberg, M.; Brourman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Three terrestrial toxicity tests were used to evaluate the efficacy of biological treatment of creosote and pentachlorophenol impacted soils at a Superfund site. Microtox, 5-day lettuce seed, and 14-day earthworm toxicity tests were performed on 10 soil samples at the beginning and end of 3 months of land treatment. Secondary endpoints of root length and earthworm weight loss were also evaluated. EC50 and LC50 values were calculated using a Trimmed Logit Statistical Program and compared to toxicity of 10 background samples collected from the site. Results for initial soils demonstrated toxicity with three of the five endpoints. End treatment results showed no measurable toxicity using all endpoints. Toxicity testing results are critical for obtaining regulatory approval for the full-scale treatment system. Post treatment closure requirements for the site will be based on bioassay results. Evaluation of the three tests used showed the Microtox test to be the most sensitive to this type of toxicity. Lettuce seed germination results were the least sensitive of the three primary endpoints chosen. Of the secondary endpoint criteria, root length demonstrated reliable EC50 values and showed toxicity trends similar to Microtox and earthworm tests. The earthworm weight loss endpoint was not a useful toxicity measurement at 14 days.

  9. 2013 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel Status Review for: The Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure, The Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events (SPEs), The Risk Of Degenerative Tissue Or Other Health Effects From Radiation Exposure, and The Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) was impressed with the strong research program presented by the scientists and staff associated with NASA's Space Radiation Program Element and National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). The presentations given on-site and the reports of ongoing research that were provided in advance indicated the potential Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure (CNS) and were extensively discussed by the SRP. This new data leads the SRP to recommend that a higher priority should be placed on research designed to identify and understand these risks at the mechanistic level. To support this effort the SRP feels that a shift of emphasis from Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) and carcinogenesis to CNS-related endpoints is justified at this point. However, these research efforts need to focus on mechanisms, should follow pace with advances in the field of CNS in general and should consider the specific comments and suggestions made by the SRP as outlined below. The SRP further recommends that the Space Radiation Program Element continue with its efforts to fill the vacant positions (Element Scientist, CNS Risk Discipline Lead) as soon as possible. The SRP also strongly recommends that NASA should continue the NASA Space Radiation Summer School. In addition to these broad recommendations, there are specific comments/recommendations noted for each risk, described in detail below.

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapeutics for total diabetes management: assessment of composite end-points.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Daisuke; Kuwata, Hitoshi; Usui, Ryota; Kurose, Takeshi; Seino, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the benefits of anti-diabetic drugs for type 2 diabetes requires analysis of composite end-points, taking HbA1c, bodyweight, hypoglycemia and other metabolic parameters into consideration; continuous, optimal glycemic control as well as bodyweight, blood pressure and lipid levels are critical to prevent micro- and macro-vascular complications. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are now established as an important total treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes, exerting glucose-lowering effects with little hypoglycemia risk and also ameliorating bodyweight, blood pressure and lipid levels, which are therapeutic targets for prevention of complications of the disease. The available data strongly suggest only beneficial effects of GLP-1RAs; however, long-term evaluation of the relevant composite end-points including health-related quality of life and cost-effectiveness remain to be investigated in adequately powered, prospective, controlled clinical trials. In the meantime, healthcare professionals need to be scrupulously attentive for potential, rare adverse events in patients using GLP-1RAs. PMID:25916903

  11. Gender Differences in the Trajectory of Recovery in Health Status Among Young Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results From the VIRGO Study

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Rachel P.; Wang, Yongfei; Strait, Kelly M.; Lorenze, Nancy P.; D’Onofrio, Gail; Bueno, Héctor; Lichtman, Judith H.; Spertus, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the excess risk of mortality in young women (≤55 years) following acute myocardial infarction (AMI), little is known about young women’s health status (symptoms, functioning, quality of life) during the first year of recovery after an AMI. We examined gender differences in health status over time from baseline to 12-months post AMI. Methods and Results A total of 3,501 AMI patients (67% women) aged 18-55 years were enrolled from 103 United States/24 Spanish hospitals. Data were obtained by medical record abstraction/patient interviews at baseline hospitalization, 1- and 12-months post AMI. Health status was measured by generic [Short Form-12 (SF-12), and disease specific [Seattle angina questionnaire (SAQ)] measures. We compared health status scores at all three time points, and utilized longitudinal linear mixed effects analyses to examine the independent effect of gender, adjusting for time and selected covariates. Women had significantly lower health status scores than men at each assessment (all P-values <0.0001). Following adjustment for time and all covariates, women had SF-12 physical/mental summary scores that were −0.96 (95% CI: −1.59, −0.32) and −2.36 points lower (95% CI: −2.99, −1.72) than men, as well as worse SAQ physical limitations (−2.44 points lower; 95% CI: −3.53, −1.34), more angina (−1.03 points lower; 95% CI: −1.98, −0.07), and poorer quality of life (−3.51 points lower; 95% CI: −4.80, −2.22) than men. Conclusions Although both genders recover similarly following AMI, women have poorer scores than men on all health status measures; a difference that persisted throughout the entire year after discharge. PMID:25862743

  12. [Mental health care systems and provisions in the immediate and acute phase of the Great East Japan Earthquake: situational and support activities in Miyagi Prefecture].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, which measured 9.0 on the Richter scale, was followed by a huge tsunami that caused catastrophic damage to the area extending from the Tohoku to Kanto regions. It was also accompanied by the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Mental health service provisions were hit equally hard by the disaster, with a wide range of support and relief activities being implemented. This article reviews damage that was inflicted and support activities that were carried out in the mental health field in Miyagi Prefecture in the immediate aftermath and acute phase of the disaster, and also examines future challenges. Almost all mental health institutions in Miyagi Prefecture were affected by the disaster, and experienced difficulties such as feeding inpatients and securing necessary medication. Mental health institutions in the coastal area, in particular, were severely hit. Three hospitals-were seriously damaged by the tsunami, which forced them to make arrangements for the transfer of 300 inpatients. In the aftermath of the earthquake, it became difficult to access medical institutions, and confusion ensued regarding the provision of mental health services. Many municipalities in Miyagi Prefecture were seriously affected by the disaster, and information-gathering was crippled due to the disruption of communication and transport networks. Consequently, the administrative function regarding mental health service provisions was significantly impaired. Through official, private, and academic channels, volunteers in the field of mental health were sent to the affected areas in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. It was very difficult to coordinate these volunteers because of the confusion in gathering-information and in the chain of command for support activities. The number of support teams working in the affected areas peaked one to two months after the earthquake, but it became clear that continuous and long

  13. [Mental health care systems and provisions in the immediate and acute phase of the Great East Japan Earthquake: situational and support activities in Miyagi Prefecture].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, which measured 9.0 on the Richter scale, was followed by a huge tsunami that caused catastrophic damage to the area extending from the Tohoku to Kanto regions. It was also accompanied by the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Mental health service provisions were hit equally hard by the disaster, with a wide range of support and relief activities being implemented. This article reviews damage that was inflicted and support activities that were carried out in the mental health field in Miyagi Prefecture in the immediate aftermath and acute phase of the disaster, and also examines future challenges. Almost all mental health institutions in Miyagi Prefecture were affected by the disaster, and experienced difficulties such as feeding inpatients and securing necessary medication. Mental health institutions in the coastal area, in particular, were severely hit. Three hospitals-were seriously damaged by the tsunami, which forced them to make arrangements for the transfer of 300 inpatients. In the aftermath of the earthquake, it became difficult to access medical institutions, and confusion ensued regarding the provision of mental health services. Many municipalities in Miyagi Prefecture were seriously affected by the disaster, and information-gathering was crippled due to the disruption of communication and transport networks. Consequently, the administrative function regarding mental health service provisions was significantly impaired. Through official, private, and academic channels, volunteers in the field of mental health were sent to the affected areas in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. It was very difficult to coordinate these volunteers because of the confusion in gathering-information and in the chain of command for support activities. The number of support teams working in the affected areas peaked one to two months after the earthquake, but it became clear that continuous and long

  14. Niacin and statin combination therapy for atherosclerosis regression and prevention of cardiovascular disease events: reconciling the AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial with previous surrogate endpoint trials.

    PubMed

    Michos, Erin D; Sibley, Christopher T; Baer, Jefferson T; Blaha, Michael J; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2012-06-01

    Despite substantial risk reductions targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statins, there remains significant residual risk as evidenced by incident and recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among statin-treated patients. Observational studies have shown that low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with increased CVD risk. It remains unclear whether strategies aimed at increasing HDL-C in addition to background statin therapy will further reduce risk. The AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial, which compared combined niacin/simvastatin with simvastatin alone, failed to demonstrate an incremental benefit of niacin among patients with atherosclerotic CVD and on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values <70 mg/dl, but this study had some limitations. Previously, small randomized, clinical trials of niacin plus statins showed that modest regression of carotid atherosclerosis is possible in individuals with CVD, CVD risk equivalents, or atherosclerosis. This viewpoint summarizes these imaging trials studying niacin and places them in the context of the failure of AIM-HIGH to support the HDL-C-increasing hypothesis.

  15. Knowledge and Awareness of Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Among Mobile App-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Missed Public Health Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, Aaron J.; Sanchez, Travis; Sineath, R. Craig; Grey, Jeremy; Kahle, Erin; Sullivan, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    In a national online survey, we assessed awareness and knowledge of acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection manifestation among 1748 men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 39% of respondents were aware that acute HIV infection may be accompanied by symptoms. Education and increased access to acute HIV testing may facilitate MSM to appropriately seek acute HIV testing. PMID:26034766

  16. The acute and sub-chronic effects of cocoa flavanols on mood, cognitive and cardiovascular health in young healthy adults: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Massee, Laura A.; Ried, Karin; Pase, Matthew; Travica, Nikolaj; Yoganathan, Jaesshanth; Scholey, Andrew; Macpherson, Helen; Kennedy, Greg; Sali, Avni; Pipingas, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cocoa supplementation has been associated with benefits to cardiovascular health. However, cocoa's effects on cognition are less clear. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial (n = 40, age M = 24.13 years, SD = 4.47 years) was conducted to investigate the effects of both acute (same-day) and sub-chronic (daily for four-weeks) 250 mg cocoa supplementation on mood and mental fatigue, cognitive performance and cardiovascular functioning in young, healthy adults. Assessment involved repeated 10-min cycles of the Cognitive Demand Battery (CDB) encompassing two serial subtraction tasks (Serial Threes and Sevens), a Rapid Visual Information Processing task, and a mental fatigue scale over the course of half an hour. The Swinburne University Computerized Cognitive Assessment Battery (SUCCAB) was also completed to evaluate cognition. Cardiovascular function included measuring both peripheral and central blood pressure and cerebral blood flow. At the acute time point, consumption of cocoa significantly improved self-reported mental fatigue and performance on the Serial Sevens task in cycle one of the CDB. No other significant effects were found. This trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (Trial ID: ACTRN12613000626763). Accessible via http://www.anzctr.org.au/TrialSearch.aspx?searchTxt=ACTRN12613000626763&ddlSearch=Registered. PMID:26042037

  17. Applications of equine models of acute inflammation. The Ciba-Geigy Prize for Research in Animal Health.

    PubMed

    Lees, P; Higgins, A J; Sedgwick, A D; May, S A

    1987-05-30

    The development of reproducible models of acute inflammation in which inflammatory heat is easily quantified and from which inflammatory exudate is readily harvested has facilitated studies in the horse of the actions of steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). Blockade of the synthesis of eicosanoids and suppression of inflammatory heat by clinical dose rates of NSAIDS suggests a causal link between the two events and provides further evidence for a role of these compounds in acute equine inflammation. The tendency for enolic and carboxylic acids NSAIDS to accumulate in inflammatory exudate may account for the duration of action of these compounds in inhibiting exudate eicosanoid synthesis and the data confirm clinical experiences with these drugs. A novel NSAID which inhibits both cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, BW540C, and two anti-inflammatory steroids, betamethasone and dexamethasone, have been evaluated in the models of equine inflammation with some interesting and unexpected findings. This paper emphasises the interrelationships between the inflammatory process and the actions and fate of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  18. Optimising health and safety of people who inject drugs during transition from acute to outpatient care: narrative review with clinical checklist.

    PubMed

    Thakarar, Kinna; Weinstein, Zoe M; Walley, Alexander Y

    2016-06-01

    The opioid epidemic in the USA continues to worsen. Medical providers are faced with the challenge of addressing complications from opioid use disorders and associated injection drug use. Unsafe injection practices among people who inject drugs (PWID) can lead to several complications requiring acute care encounters in the emergency department and inpatient hospital. Our objective is to provide a narrative review to help medical providers recognise and address key health issues in PWID, who are being released from the emergency department and inpatient hospital. In the midst of rises in overdose deaths and infections such as hepatitis C, we highlight several health issues for PWID, including overdose and infection prevention. We provide a clinical checklist of actions to help guide providers in the care of these complex patients. The clinical checklist includes strategies also applicable to low-resource settings, which may lack addiction treatment options. Our review and clinical checklist highlight key aspects of optimising the health and safety of PWID. PMID:27004476

  19. Acute effects of particulate matter on respiratory diseases, symptoms and functions:. epidemiological results of the Austrian Project on Health Effects of Particulate Matter (AUPHEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, Manfred; Schimek, Michael G.; Horak, Friedrich; Moshammer, Hanns; Kundi, Michael; Frischer, Thomas; Gomiscek, Bostjan; Puxbaum, Hans; Hauck, Helger; Auphep-Team

    To examine hypotheses regarding health effects of particulate matter, we conducted time series studies in Austrian urban and rural areas. Of the pollutants measured, ambient PM 2.5 was most consistently associated with parameters of respiratory health. Time series studies applying semiparametric generalized additive models showed significant increases of respiratory hospital admissions (ICD 490-496) at age 65 and older. The early increase of 5.5% in Vienna at a lag of 2 days in males and of 5.6% per 10 μg/m 3 at a lag of 3 days in females was not observed in a nearby rural area. Another increase of respiratory admissions (mainly COPD) was observed after a lag of 10-11 days. A time series on a panel of 56 healthy preschool children showed a significant impact of the carbonaceous fraction of PM 2.5 on tidal breathing pattern assessed by inductive plethysmography. In repeated oscillometric measurements of respiratory resistance in 164 healthy elementary school children not only immediate responses to fine particulates were found but also latent ones, possibly indicating inflammatory changes in airways. It may be speculated that the improvements of urban air quality prevented measurable effects on respiratory mortality. More sensitive indicators, however, still show acute impairments of respiratory function and health in elderly and children which are associated with fine particulates and subfractions related to motor traffic.

  20. Post-acute integration strategies in an era of accountability

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, John P; Trivedi, Amal N; Zinn, Jacqueline S; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine, in its 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report, recommended greater integration and coordination as a component of a transformed health care system, yet relationships between acute and post-acute providers have remained weak. With payment reforms that hold hospitals and health systems accountable for the total costs of care and readmissions, the dynamic between acute and post-acute providers is changing. In this article, we outline the internal and market factors that will drive health systems’ decisions about whether and how they integrate with post-acute providers. Enhanced integration between acute and post-acute providers should reduce variation in post-acute spending. PMID:27148428

  1. Comparing three novel endpoints for developmental osteotoxicity in the embryonic stem cell test

    SciTech Connect

    Nieden, Nicole I. zur; Davis, Lesley A.; Rancourt, Derrick E.

    2010-09-01

    Birth defects belong to the most serious side effects of pharmaceutical compounds or environmental chemicals. In vivo, teratogens most often affect the normal development of bones, causing growth retardation, limb defects or craniofacial malformations. The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is one of the most promising models that allow the in vitro prediction of embryotoxicity, with one of its endpoints being bone tissue development. The present study was designed to describe three novel inexpensive endpoints to assess developmental osteotoxicity using the model compounds penicillin G (non-teratogenic), 5-fluorouracil (strong teratogen) and all-trans retinoic acid (bone teratogen). These three endpoints were: quantification of matrix incorporated calcium by (1) morphometric analysis and (2) measurement of calcium levels as well as (3) activity of alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme involved in matrix calcification. To evaluate our data, we have compared the concentration curves and resulting ID{sub 50}s of the new endpoints with mRNA expression for osteocalcin. Osteocalcin is an exclusive marker found only in mineralized tissues, is regulated upon compound treatment and reliably predicts the potential of a chemical entity acting as a bone teratogen. By comparing the new endpoints to quantitative expression of osteocalcin, which we previously identified as suitable to detect developmental osteotoxicity, we were ultimately able to illustrate IMAGE analysis and Ca{sup 2+} deposition assays as two reliable novel endpoints for the EST. This is of particular importance for routine industrial assessment of novel compounds as these two new endpoints may substitute previously used molecular read-out methods, which are often costly and time-consuming.

  2. FINE PARTICLES ARE MORE STRONGLY ASSOCIATED THAN COARSE PARTICLES WITH ACUTE REPIRATORY HEALTH EFFECTS IN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have reported associations between airborne particles and a range of respiratory outcomes from symptoms to mortality. Current attention has been focused on the characteristics of these particles responsible for the adverse health effects. We have reanalyzed three...

  3. Capitals diminished, denied, mustered and deployed. A qualitative longitudinal study of women's four year trajectories after acute health crisis, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Susan F.; Akoum, Mélanie S.; Storeng, Katerini T.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that health crises can play a key role in precipitating or exacerbating poverty. For women of reproductive age in low-income countries, the complications of pregnancy are a common cause of acute health crisis, yet investigation of longer-term dynamics set in motion by such events, and their interactions with other aspects of social life, is rare. This article presents findings from longitudinal qualitative research conducted in Burkina Faso over 2004–2010. Guided by an analytic focus on patterns of continuity and change, and drawing on recent discussions on the notion of ‘resilience’, and the concepts of ‘social capital’ and ‘bodily capital’, we explore the trajectories of 16 women in the aftermath of costly acute healthcare episodes. The synthesis of case studies shows that, in conditions of structural inequity and great insecurity, an individual's social capital ebbs and flow over time, resulting in a trajectory of multiple adaptations. Women's capacity to harness or exploit bodily capital in its various forms (beauty, youthfulness, physical strength, fertility) to some extent determines their ability to confront and overcome adversities. With this, they are able to further mobilise social capital without incurring excessive debt, or to access and accumulate significant new social capital. Temporary self-displacement, often to the parental home, is also used as a weapon of negotiation in intra-household conflict and to remind others of the value of one's productive and domestic labour. Conversely, diminished bodily capital due to the physiological impact of an obstetric event or its complications can lead to reduced opportunities, and to further disadvantage. PMID:23063215

  4. Capitals diminished, denied, mustered and deployed. A qualitative longitudinal study of women's four year trajectories after acute health crisis, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan F; Akoum, Mélanie S; Storeng, Katerini T

    2012-12-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that health crises can play a key role in precipitating or exacerbating poverty. For women of reproductive age in low-income countries, the complications of pregnancy are a common cause of acute health crisis, yet investigation of longer-term dynamics set in motion by such events, and their interactions with other aspects of social life, is rare. This article presents findings from longitudinal qualitative research conducted in Burkina Faso over 2004-2010. Guided by an analytic focus on patterns of continuity and change, and drawing on recent discussions on the notion of 'resilience', and the concepts of 'social capital' and 'bodily capital', we explore the trajectories of 16 women in the aftermath of costly acute healthcare episodes. The synthesis of case studies shows that, in conditions of structural inequity and great insecurity, an individual's social capital ebbs and flow over time, resulting in a trajectory of multiple adaptations. Women's capacity to harness or exploit bodily capital in its various forms (beauty, youthfulness, physical strength, fertility) to some extent determines their ability to confront and overcome adversities. With this, they are able to further mobilise social capital without incurring excessive debt, or to access and accumulate significant new social capital. Temporary self-displacement, often to the parental home, is also used as a weapon of negotiation in intra-household conflict and to remind others of the value of one's productive and domestic labour. Conversely, diminished bodily capital due to the physiological impact of an obstetric event or its complications can lead to reduced opportunities, and to further disadvantage. PMID:23063215

  5. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  9. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Health care utilization for acute illnesses in an urban setting with a refugee population in Nairobi, Kenya: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Estimates place the number of refugees in Nairobi over 100,000. The constant movement of refugees between countries of origin, refugee camps, and Nairobi poses risk of introduction and transmission of communicable diseases into Kenya. We assessed the care-seeking behavior of residents of Eastleigh, a neighborhood in Nairobi with urban refugees. Methods During July and August 2010, we conducted a Health Utilization Survey in Section II of Eastleigh. We used a multistage random cluster sampling design to identify households for interview. A standard questionnaire on the household demographics, water and sanitation was administered to household caretakers. Separate questionnaires were administered to household members who had one or more of the illnesses of interest. Results Of 785 households targeted for interview, data were obtained from 673 (85.7%) households with 3,005 residents. Of the surveyed respondents, 290 (9.7%) individuals reported acute respiratory illness (ARI) in the previous 12 months, 222 (7.4%) reported fever in the preceding 2 weeks, and 54 (1.8%) reported having diarrhea in the 30 days prior to the survey. Children <5 years old had the highest frequency of all the illnesses surveyed: 17.1% (95% CI 12.2-21.9) reported ARI, 10.0% (95% CI 6.2-13.8) reported fever, and 6.9% (3.8-10.0) reported diarrhea during the time periods specified for each syndrome. Twenty-nine [7.5% (95% CI 4.3-10.7)] hospitalizations were reported among all age groups of those who sought care. Among participants who reported ≥1 illness, 330 (77.0%) sought some form of health care; most (174 [59.8%]) sought health care services from private health care providers. Fifty-five (18.9%) participants seeking healthcare services visited a pharmacy. Few residents of Eastleigh (38 [13.1%]) sought care at government-run facilities, and 24 (8.2%) sought care from a relative, a religious leader, or a health volunteer. Of those who did not seek any health care services (99 [23

  12. Stressful life events preceding the acute onset of schizophrenia: a cross-national study from the World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Day, R; Nielsen, J A; Korten, A; Ernberg, G; Dube, K C; Gebhart, J; Jablensky, A; Leon, C; Marsella, A; Olatawura, M

    1987-06-01

    This study reports on the findings from a WHO sponsored cross-national investigation of life events and schizophrenia. Data are presented from a series of 386 acutely ill schizophrenic patients selected from nine field research centers located in developing and developed countries (Aarhus, Denmark; Agra, India; Cali, Colombia; Chandigarh, India; Honolulu, USA; Ibadan, Nigeria; Nagasaki, Japan; Prague, Czechoslovakia; Rochester, USA). On a methodological level, the study demonstrates that life event methodologies originating in the developed countries can be adapted for international studies and may be used to collect reasonably reliable and comparable cross-cultural data on psychosocial factors affecting the course of schizophrenic disorders. Substantive findings replicate the results of prior studies which conclude that socioenvironmental stressors may precipitate schizophrenic attacks and such events tend to cluster in the two to three week period immediately preceding illness onset.

  13. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  14. Arsenate (As V) in water: quantitative sensitivity relationships among biomarker, ecotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Silva, Valéria C; Almeida, Sônia M; Resgalla, Charrid; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Cotelle, Sylvie; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-06-01

    It is useful to test ecotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints in the environmental impact assessment. Here, we compare and discuss ecotoxicity and genotoxicity effects in organisms in response to exposure to arsenate (As V) in solution. Eco(geno)toxicity responses in Aliivibrio fischeri, Lytechinus variegatus, Daphnia magna, Skeletonema costatum and Vicia faba were analyzed by assessing different endpoints: biomass growth, peroxidase activity, mitotic index, micronucleus frequency, and lethality in accordance with the international protocols. Quantitative sensitivity relationships (QSR) between these endpoints were established in order to rank endpoint sensitivity. The results for the QSR values based on the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) ratios varied from 2 (for ratio of root peroxidase activity to leaf peroxidase activity) to 2286 (for ratio of higher plant biomass growth to root peroxidase activity). The QSR values allowed the following sensitivity ranking to be established: higher plant enzymatic activity>daphnids≈echinoderms>bacteria≈algae>higher plant biomass growth. The LOEC values for the mitotic index and micronucleus frequency (LOEC=0.25mgAsL(-1)) were similar to the lowest LOEC values observed in aquatic organisms. This approach to the QSR of different endpoints could form the basis for monitoring and predicting early effects of pollutants before they give rise to significant changes in natural community structures. PMID:23597676

  15. The Dirac form factor predicts the Pauli form factor in the Endpoint Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagaonkar, Sumeet K.; Jain, Pankaj; Ralston, John P.

    2016-07-01

    We compute the momentum-transfer dependence of the proton Pauli form factor F2 in the Endpoint overlap Model. We find the model correctly reproduces the scaling of the ratio of F2 with the Dirac form factor F1 observed at the Jefferson Laboratory. The calculation uses the leading-power, leading-twist Dirac structure of the quark light-cone wave function and the same endpoint dependence previously determined from the Dirac form factor F1. There are no parameters and no adjustable functions in the Endpoint Model's prediction for the scaling behavior of F2. The model's predicted momentum dependence of the ratio F2(Q2)/F1(Q2) is quite insensitive to the endpoint wave function, which explains why the observed ratio scales like 1 / Q down to rather low momentum transfers. We also fit the magnitude of this ratio by adjusting the parameters of the wave function. The Endpoint Model appears to be the only comprehensive model consistent with all form factor information as well as reproducing fixed-angle proton-proton scattering at large momentum transfer. Any one of the processes is capable of predicting the others.

  16. The contribution of physicochemical properties to multiple in vitro cytotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuyan; Jessen, Bart; Strock, Christopher; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Attrition due to safety reasons remains a serious problem for the pharmaceutical industry. This has prompted efforts to develop early predictive in vitro screens that can assist in selecting compounds with a more desirable safety profile early on in the drug discovery process. Here we examined the relationship between physicochemical properties, such as partition coefficient (clogP), topological polar surface area (TPSA), acid dissociation constant (pK(a)), and in vitro mechanistic endpoints generated using a high content imaging approach. We demonstrate in our initial analysis that compounds with clogP>2 and pK(a)>5.5 flagged more endpoints than compounds with clogP ≤ 2 and pK(a) ≤ 5.5. In contrast, TPSA did not stand on its own in predicting cytotoxicity. When this knowledge was applied to eight different mechanistic cytotoxicity endpoints (cell loss, apoptosis, ER stress, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial potential, nuclear size, neutral lipids/steatosis and lysosomal mass), we found that compounds with such properties preferentially flagged in the lysosomal endpoint. We also saw a slight enrichment of such compounds in the endpoints cell loss, DNA fragmentation and nuclear size. We demonstrate that lysosomal compound accumulation is a potential contributor to cell death and possibly organ toxicity.

  17. Pollutant threshold concentration determination in marine ecosystems using an ecological interaction endpoint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changyou; Liang, Shengkang; Guo, Wenting; Yu, Hua; Xing, Wenhui

    2015-09-01

    The threshold concentrations of pollutants are determined by extrapolating single-species effect data to community-level effects. This assumes the most sensitive endpoint of the life cycle of individuals and the species sensitivity distribution from single-species toxic effect tests, thus, ignoring the ecological interactions. The uncertainties due to this extrapolation can be partially overcome using the equilibrium point of a customized ecosystem. This method incorporates ecological interactions and integrates the effects on growth, survival, and ingestion into a single effect measure, the equilibrium point excursion in the customized ecosystem, in order to describe the toxic effects on plankton. A case study showed that the threshold concentration of copper calculated with the endpoint of the equilibrium point was 10 μg L(-1), which is significantly different from the threshold calculated with a single-species endpoint. The endpoint calculated using this method provides a more relevant measure of the ecological impact than any single individual-level endpoint. PMID:25982547

  18. A new proportion measure of the treatment effect captured by candidate surrogate endpoints.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Kuroki, Manabu

    2014-08-30

    The use of surrogate endpoints is expected to play an important role in the development of new drugs, as they can be used to reduce the sample size and/or duration of randomized clinical trials. Biostatistical researchers and practitioners have proposed various surrogacy measures; however, (i) most of these surrogacy measures often fall outside the range [0,1] without any assumptions, (ii) these surrogacy measures do not provide a cut-off value for judging a surrogacy level of candidate surrogate endpoints, and (iii) most surrogacy measures are highly variable; thus, the confidence intervals are often unacceptably wide. In order to solve problems (i) and (ii), we propose a new surrogacy measure, a proportion of the treatment effect captured by candidate surrogate endpoints (PCS), on the basis of the decomposition of the treatment effect into parts captured and non-captured by the candidate surrogate endpoints. In order to solve problem (iii), we propose an estimation method based on the half-range mode method with the bootstrap distribution of the estimated surrogacy measures. Finally, through numerical experiments and two empirical examples, we show that the PCS with the proposed estimation method overcomes these difficulties. The results of this paper contribute to the reliable evaluation of how much of the treatment effect is captured by candidate surrogate endpoints. PMID:24782344

  19. Body composition and bone health in long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and adolescence: the protocol for a cross-sectional cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Ronald; Nayiager, Trishana; Gordon, Christopher; Marriott, Christopher; Athale, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Success in the treatment of young people with cancer, as measured conventionally by survival rates, is mitigated by late effects of therapy that impose a burden of morbidity and limit life expectancy. Among these adverse sequelae are altered body composition, especially obesity, and compromised bone health in the form of osteoporosis and increased fragility. These outcomes are potentially reversible and even preventable. This study will examine measures of body composition and bone health in long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in childhood and adolescence. These measures will be complemented by measures of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Methods and analysis Survivors of ALL who are at least 10 years from diagnosis, following treatment on uniform protocols, will undergo measurements of body mass index; triceps skin fold thickness and mid-upper arm circumference; fat mass, lean body mass, skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; trabecular and cortical bone indices and muscle density by peripheral quantitative CT; physical activity by the Habitual Activity Estimation Scale; and HRQL by Health Utilities Index instruments. Descriptive measures will be used for continuous variables and number (percent) for categorical variables. Associations between variables will be assessed using Fisher's exact t test and the χ2 test; correlations will be tested by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the institutional research ethics board and is supported by a competitive funding award. Dissemination of the results will occur by presentations to scientific meetings and publications in peer-reviewed journals, and by posting summaries of the results on websites accessed by adolescent and young adult survivors of cancer. PMID:25603918

  20. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe. PMID:15649529

  1. Review of the health effects of wildland fire smoke on wildland firefighters and the public.

    PubMed

    Adetona, Olorunfemi; Reinhardt, Timothy E; Domitrovich, Joe; Broyles, George; Adetona, Anna M; Kleinman, Michael T; Ottmar, Roger D; Naeher, Luke P

    2016-01-01

    Each year, the general public and wildland firefighters in the US are exposed to smoke from wildland fires. As part of an effort to characterize health risks of breathing this smoke, a review of the literature was conducted using five major databases, including PubMed and MEDLINE Web of Knowledge, to identify smoke components that present the highest hazard potential, the mechanisms of toxicity, review epidemiological studies for health effects and identify the current gap in knowledge on the health impacts of wildland fire smoke exposure. Respiratory events measured in time series studies as incidences of disease-caused mortality, hospital admissions, emergency room visits and symptoms in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients are the health effects that are most commonly associated with community level exposure to wildland fire smoke. A few recent studies have also determined associations between acute wildland fire smoke exposure and cardiovascular health end-points. These cardiopulmonary effects were mostly observed in association with ambient air concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5). However, research on the health effects of this mixture is currently limited. The health effects of acute exposures beyond susceptible populations and the effects of chronic exposures experienced by the wildland firefighter are largely unknown. Longitudinal studies of wildland firefighters during and/or after the firefighting career could help elucidate some of the unknown health impacts of cumulative exposure to wildland fire smoke, establish occupational exposure limits and help determine the types of exposure controls that may be applicable to the occupation.

  2. Swimming speed alteration in the early developmental stages of Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin as ecotoxicological endpoint.

    PubMed

    Morgana, Silvia; Gambardella, Chiara; Falugi, Carla; Pronzato, Roberto; Garaventa, Francesca; Faimali, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Behavioral endpoints have been used for decades to assess chemical impacts at concentrations unlikely to cause mortality. With recently developed techniques, it is possible to investigate the swimming behavior of several organisms under laboratory conditions. The aims of this study were: i) assessing for the first time the feasibility of swimming speed analysis of the early developmental stage sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus by an automatic recording system ii) investigating any Swimming Speed Alteration (SSA) on P. lividus early stages exposed to a chemical reference; iii) identifying the most suitable stage for SSA test. Results show that the swimming speed of all the developmental stages was easily recorded. The swimming speed was inhibited as a function of toxicant concentration. Pluteus were the most appropriate stage for evaluating SSA in P. lividus as ecotoxicological endpoint. Finally, swimming of sea urchin early stages represents a sensitive endpoint to be considered in ecotoxicological investigations.

  3. The Feynman trajectories: determining the path of a protein using fixed-endpoint assays.

    PubMed

    Ketteler, Robin

    2010-03-01

    Richard Feynman postulated in 1948 that the path of an electron can be best described by the sum or functional integral of all possible trajectories rather than by the notion of a single, unique trajectory. As a consequence, the position of an electron does not harbor any information about the paths that contributed to this position. This observation constitutes a classical endpoint observation. The endpoint assay is the desired type of experiment for high-throughput screening applications, mainly because of limitations in data acquisition and handling. Quite contrary to electrons, it is possible to extract information about the path of a protein using endpoint assays, and these types of applications are reviewed in this article.

  4. Automatic end-point detection of spray etching in application to mask making

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, F.; Kato, M.; Koizumi, T.; Mori, K.; Sagawara, K.; Takehana, Y.

    1985-06-01

    The development of high performance LSI's has increased the requirement for precise control of mask making in addition to that of wafer processing. One method for obtaining precise control is ''in-process'' end-point detection. End-point detection methods have previously been devised for thin film formation, such as thickness control of SOS (silicon-on-sapphire) epitaxial layers (1), homoepitaxial layers (2), and for plasma etching (3). In mask making, ''wet etching'' has been used due to thin Cr film deposited on mask blanks and to flat surface in comparison with the wafer fabrication. In this note, a novel method of the end-point detection used for the mask making will be reported; it is quite different from that used for the ''dry etching.''

  5. Amplification of endpoint structure for new particle mass measurement at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Won Sang; Kim, Jihn E.; Kim, Ji-Hun

    2010-05-01

    We introduce a new collider variable, M{sub CT2}, named as constransverse mass. It is a mixture of 'stransverse mass (M{sub T2})' and 'contransverse mass (M{sub CT})' variables, where the usual endpoint structure of M{sub T2} distribution can be amplified in the M{sub CT2} basis by a large Jacobian factor which is controlled by a trial missing particle mass. Thus, the M{sub CT2} projection of events increases our observability to measure several important endpoints from new particle decays, which are usually expected to be buried by irreducible backgrounds with various systematic uncertainties at the LHC. In this paper we explain the phenomenology of endpoint amplification in M{sub CT2} projection, and describe how one may employ this variable to measure several meaningful mass constraints of new particles.

  6. Deep inelastic scattering near the endpoint in soft-collinear effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2007-01-01

    We apply the soft-collinear effective theory to deep inelastic scattering near the endpoint region. The forward scattering amplitude and the structure functions are shown to factorize as a convolution of the Wilson coefficients, the jet functions, and the parton distribution functions. The behavior of the parton distribution functions near the endpoint region is considered. It turns out that it evolves with the Altarelli-Parisi kernel even in the endpoint region, and the parton distribution function can be factorized further into a collinear part and the soft Wilson line. The factorized form for the structure functions is obtained by the two-step matching, and the radiative corrections or the evolution for each factorized part can be computed in perturbation theory. We present the radiative corrections of each factorized part to leading order in {alpha}{sub s}, including the zero-bin subtraction for the collinear part.

  7. Update of OECD DART guidelines with endocrine disruptor relevant endpoints: Practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Beekhuijzen, Manon; van Otterdijk, Francois; Wieland, Willemien; van Tuyl, Miranda; Rijcken, Robert Pels; Peter, Birgit; Emmen, Harry

    2016-09-01

    In 1998, the OECD initiated a high-priority project aimed at revising existing test guidelines and developing new test guidelines for screening of potential endocrine disruptors. In 2011, OECD 443 was adopted, and in 2015 OECD 421 and OECD 422 were updated with endocrine disruptor relevant endpoints. A feasibility study for the enhancement of OECD 414 with endocrine disruptor relevant endpoints is currently ongoing. The addition of these endpoints is considered crucial for gaining more information on endocrine disruptor potency of tested chemicals, however it should be noted that these additions have a major impact on the study designs and give rise to several practical challenges. The aim of this review is to discuss important aspects of these challenging study designs and to share our knowledge on their implementation in our laboratory. Together, this review can be used as guidance for other laboratories, study monitors and registration officers. PMID:27063183

  8. [Good practice in occupational health services--Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events].

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Andrzej; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances). During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer's post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors. PMID:26536976

  9. [Good practice in occupational health services--Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events].

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Andrzej; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances). During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer's post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors.

  10. Effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints for environmental research.

    PubMed

    Spörndly-Nees, Ellinor; Ekstedt, Elisabeth; Magnusson, Ulf; Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Holm, Lena

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in using wild animals to monitor the real-life cocktail effect of environmental chemicals on male reproduction. However, practical difficulties, such as long distances to the laboratory, generally prolong the time between euthanisation and specimen handling. For instance, tissue fixation is often performed on frozen material or on material where deterioration has started, which may affect tissue morphology. This study examined the effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints in order to determine robust endpoints in suboptimally handled specimens. Sexually mature farmed mink (n=30) selected at culling were divided into six groups and subjected to different time intervals between euthanisation and fixation or freezing: 0 hours (fixed immediately post mortem), 6 hours, 18 hours, 30 hours, 42 hours, or frozen 6 hours post mortem and thawed overnight. Unaffected endpoints when pre-fixation storage was extended to 30 hours included: area and diameter of the seminiferous tubules, length and weight of the testes, and acrosomes marked with Gata-4. Epithelial height, Sertoli cells marked with Gata-4 and cell morphology were affected endpoints after 6 hours of storage. Freezing the tissue prior to fixation severely altered cell morphology and reduced testicular weight, tubular diameter and area. Morphological changes seen after 6 hours included shredded germ cells and excess cytoplasm in seminiferous tubular lumen, chromatin rearrangements and increased germ cell death. Extended delay before fixation and freezing affected many endpoints in the mink testicular tissue. Some of these endpoints may mimic chemically induced effects, which is important to consider when evaluating specimens from wild animals for environmental toxicity. PMID:25933113

  11. Effect of Pre-Fixation Delay and Freezing on Mink Testicular Endpoints for Environmental Research

    PubMed Central

    Spörndly-Nees, Ellinor; Ekstedt, Elisabeth; Magnusson, Ulf; Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Holm, Lena

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in using wild animals to monitor the real-life cocktail effect of environmental chemicals on male reproduction. However, practical difficulties, such as long distances to the laboratory, generally prolong the time between euthanisation and specimen handling. For instance, tissue fixation is often performed on frozen material or on material where deterioration has started, which may affect tissue morphology. This study examined the effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints in order to determine robust endpoints in suboptimally handled specimens. Sexually mature farmed mink (n=30) selected at culling were divided into six groups and subjected to different time intervals between euthanisation and fixation or freezing: 0 hours (fixed immediately post mortem), 6 hours, 18 hours, 30 hours, 42 hours, or frozen 6 hours post mortem and thawed overnight. Unaffected endpoints when pre-fixation storage was extended to 30 hours included: area and diameter of the seminiferous tubules, length and weight of the testes, and acrosomes marked with Gata-4. Epithelial height, Sertoli cells marked with Gata-4 and cell morphology were affected endpoints after 6 hours of storage. Freezing the tissue prior to fixation severely altered cell morphology and reduced testicular weight, tubular diameter and area. Morphological changes seen after 6 hours included shredded germ cells and excess cytoplasm in seminiferous tubular lumen, chromatin rearrangements and increased germ cell death. Extended delay before fixation and freezing affected many endpoints in the mink testicular tissue. Some of these endpoints may mimic chemically induced effects, which is important to consider when evaluating specimens from wild animals for environmental toxicity. PMID:25933113

  12. Evaluation of suitable endpoints for assessing the impacts of toxicants at the community level.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bayo, Francisco; Goka, Kouchi

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of ecological impacts of toxicants relies currently on extrapolation of effects observed at organismal or population levels. The uncertainty inherent to such extrapolations, together with the impossibility of predicting ecological effects of chemical mixtures, can only be resolved by adopting approaches that consider toxicological endpoints at a community or ecological level. Experimental data from micro- and mesocosms provide estimates of community effect levels, which can then be used to confirm or correct the extrapolations from theoretical methods such as species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) or others. When assessing impacts, the choice of sensitive community endpoints is important. Four community endpoints (species richness, abundance, diversity and similarity indices) were evaluated in their ability to assess impacts of two insecticides, imidacloprid and etofenprox, and their mixture on aquatic and benthic communities from artificial rice paddies. Proportional changes of each community endpoint were expressed by ratios between their values in the treatment and control paddies. Regression lines fitted to the endpoint ratios against the time series of chemical concentrations were used to predict percentile impacts in the communities. The abundance endpoint appears to be the most sensitive indicator of the communities' response, but the Czekanowski similarity index described best the structural changes that occur in all communities. Aquatic arthropods were more sensitive to the mixture of both insecticides than zooplankton and benthic communities. Estimated protective levels for 95% of aquatic species exposed to imidacloprid (<0.01-1.0 μg l(-1)) were slightly lower than predicted by SSD, whereas for etofenprox the protective concentrations in water (<0.01-0.58 μg l(-1)) were an order of magnitude lower than SSD's predictions. PMID:22120543

  13. The Developing Brain: A Largely Overlooked Health Endpoint in Risk Assessments for Synthetic Chemical Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElgunn, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    A large body of experimental animal research on the neurotoxic effects of certain environmental chemicals provides evidence of a cascade of neurobehavioural effects including learning deficits, hyperactivity, anxiety, depression, lack of motivation, increased aggressiveness, altered maternal care and bonding, and an over-reaction to small…

  14. Equivalency of risk for a modified health endpoint: a case from recreational water epidemiology studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and its predecessors have conducted three distinct series of epidemiological studies beginning in 1948 on the relationship between bathing water quality and swimmers' illnesses. Keeping pace with advances in microbial tec...

  15. Comparison of methods for accurate end-point detection of potentiometric titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villela, R. L. A.; Borges, P. P.; Vyskočil, L.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the end point in potentiometric titrations has wide application on experiments that demand very low measurement uncertainties mainly for certifying reference materials. Simulations of experimental coulometric titration data and consequential error analysis of the end-point values were conducted using a programming code. These simulations revealed that the Levenberg-Marquardt method is in general more accurate than the traditional second derivative technique used currently as end-point detection for potentiometric titrations. Performance of the methods will be compared and presented in this paper.

  16. A numerical method of finding potentiometric titration end-points by use of approximative spline functions.

    PubMed

    Ren, K

    1990-07-01

    A new numerical method of determining potentiometric titration end-points is presented. It consists in calculating the coefficients of approximative spline functions describing the experimental data (e.m.f., volume of titrant added). The end-point (the inflection point of the curve) is determined by calculating zero points of the second derivative of the approximative spline function. This spline function, unlike rational spline functions, is free from oscillations and its course is largely independent of random errors in e.m.f. measurements. The proposed method is useful for direct analysis of titration data and especially as a basis for construction of microcomputer-controlled automatic titrators. PMID:18964999

  17. Verifying Elimination Programs with a Special Emphasis on Cysticercosis Endpoints and Postelimination Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Handali, Sukwan; Pawitan, Yudi

    2012-01-01

    Methods are needed for determining program endpoints or postprogram surveillance for any elimination program. Cysticercosis has the necessary effective strategies and diagnostic tools for establishing an elimination program; however, tools to verify program endpoints have not been determined. Using a statistical approach, the present study proposed that taeniasis and porcine cysticercosis antibody assays could be used to determine with a high statistical confidence whether an area is free of disease. Confidence would be improved by using secondary tests such as the taeniasis coproantigen assay and necropsy of the sentinel pigs. PMID:23213490

  18. Calculation of a velocity distribution from particle trajectory end-points.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Lowell A.

    1983-01-01

    The longitudinal component of the velocity of a particle at or near a glacier surface is considered, its position as a function of time being termed its trajectory. Functional relationships are derived for obtaining the trajectory from the spatial distribution of velocity and for obtaining the velocity distribution from the trajectory. It is established that the trajectory end-points impose only an integral condition on the velocity distribution and that no individual point on the velocity distribution can be determined if only the end-points are known.-from Author

  19. Order of the Roberge-Weiss endpoint (finite size transition) in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    We consider the endpoint of the Roberge-Weiss (RW) first order transition line present for imaginary baryon chemical potentials. We remark that it coincides with the finite size transition relevant in the context of large N{sub c} QCD and study its order in the theory with two degenerate flavors. The RW endpoint is first order in the limit of large and small quark masses, while it weakens for intermediate masses where it is likely in the Ising 3D universality class. Phenomenological implications and further speculations about the QCD phase diagram are discuss0008.

  20. Association between health information, use of protective devices and occurrence of acute health problems in the Prestige oil spill clean-up in Asturias and Cantabria (Spain): a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, José Miguel; Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Suárez, Berta; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Pollán, Marina

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper examines the association between use of protective devices, frequency of acute health problems and health-protection information received by participants engaged in the Prestige oil spill clean-up in Asturias and Cantabria, Spain. Methods We studied 133 seamen, 135 bird cleaners, 266 volunteers and 265 paid workers selected by random sampling, stratified by type of worker and number of working days. Information was collected by telephone interview conducted in June 2003. The association of interest was summarized, using odds ratios (OR) obtained from logistic regression. Results Health-protection briefing was associated with use of protective devices and clothing. Uninformed subjects registered a significant excess risk of itchy eyes (OR:2.89; 95%CI:1.21–6.90), nausea/vomiting/dizziness (OR:2.25; 95%CI:1.17–4.32) and throat and respiratory problems (OR:2.30; 95%CI:1.15–4.61). There was a noteworthy significant excess risk of headaches (OR:3.86: 95%CI:1.74–8.54) and respiratory problems (OR:2.43; 95%CI:1.02–5.79) among uninformed paid workers. Seamen, the group most exposed to the fuel-oil, were the worst informed and registered the highest frequency of toxicological problems. Conclusion Proper health-protection briefing was associated with greater use of protective devices and lower frequency of health problems. Among seamen, however, the results indicate poorer dissemination of information and the need of specific guidelines for removing fuel-oil at sea. PMID:16390547

  1. A health-care system perspective on implementing genomic medicine: pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia as a paradigm.

    PubMed

    Evans, W E; Crews, K R; Pui, C-H

    2013-08-01

    The promise of genomic medicine has received great attention over the past decade, projecting how genomics will soon guide the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases. However, this evolution has been slower than forecast, even where evidence is often strong (e.g., pharmacogenomics). Reasons include the requirement for institutional resources and the need for the will to push beyond barriers impeding health-care changes. Here, we illustrate how genomics has been deployed to advance the treatment of childhood leukemia.

  2. Comparison of health-related quality of life of children during maintenance therapy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia versus siblings and healthy children in India.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Minakshi; Sharma, Kamlesh K; Vatsa, Manju; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2013-05-01

    Data on quality of life (QOL) specifically in maintenance therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are minimal. This study was done to assess various items listed in domains of QOL (physical, emotional, social and school health domains) of children with ALL during maintenance therapy, and compare the same with those of their siblings and other healthy children. Forty children on maintenance therapy of ALL, 40 siblings and 40 healthy children were assessed for QOL by child self-report using PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core in the local language. Means were computed and compared for each domain with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), wherein higher values reflected better QOL. Overall QOL of children with ALL in maintenance therapy (77.16 ± 10.98) was significantly poorer than that of siblings (93.56 ± 4.41) and healthy children (93.02 ± 3.76) (p < 0.001), but their abilities of self-care, household work, exercise, attentiveness, memory and homework were unaffected. There was significantly higher absenteeism due to sickness and hospital visits, and increased emotional problems (fear, anger, sleeping problems) among children with ALL. In the social health domain, children with ALL reported difficulty in maintaining friendships and competing. QOL of siblings was as good as that of healthy children in physical, social and school health domains, but they had increased emotional problems such as anger and sadness. Healthy children reported significantly higher future worries and bullying than children with ALL and siblings. This study validated that the QOL of children with ALL during maintenance therapy was significantly poorer than that of siblings and healthy children. The study identified various items in each domain of QOL that were affected in these children, and thus would assist in guiding healthcare professionals to focus on these specific items so as to improve their overall QOL.

  3. Efficiency of automotive cabin air filters to reduce acute health effects of diesel exhaust in human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rudell, B.; Wass, U.; Horstedt, P.; Levin, J. O.; Lindahl, R.; Rannug, U.; Sunesson, A. L.; Ostberg, Y.; Sandstrom, T.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficiency of different automotive cabin air filters to prevent penetration of components of diesel exhaust and thereby reduce biomedical effects in human subjects. Filtered air and unfiltered diluted diesel exhaust (DDE) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively, and were compared with exposure to DDE filtered with four different filter systems. METHODS: 32 Healthy non- smoking subjects (age 21-53) participated in the study. Each subject was exposed six times for 1 hour in a specially designed exposure chamber: once to air, once to unfiltered DDE, and once to DDE filtered with the four different cabin air filters. Particle concentrations during exposure to unfiltered DDE were kept at 300 micrograms/m3. Two of the filters were particle filters. The other two were particle filters combined with active charcoal filters that might reduce certain gaseous components. Subjective symptoms were recorded and nasal airway lavage (NAL), acoustic rhinometry, and lung function measurements were performed. RESULTS: The two particle filters decreased the concentrations of diesel exhaust particles by about half, but did not reduce the intensity of symptoms induced by exhaust. The combination of active charcoal filters and a particle filter significantly reduced the symptoms and discomfort caused by the diesel exhaust. The most noticable differences in efficacy between the filters were found in the reduction of detection of an unpleasant smell from the diesel exhaust. In this respect even the two charcoal filter combinations differed significantly. The efficacy to reduce symptoms may depend on the abilities of the filters investigated to reduce certain hydrocarbons. No acute effects on NAL, rhinometry, and lung function variables were found. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown that the use of active charcoal filters, and a particle filter, clearly reduced the intensity of symptoms induced by diesel exhaust. Complementary studies on vehicle

  4. Improvement in latent variable indirect response joint modeling of a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuanpu; Zhou, Honghui

    2016-02-01

    Improving the quality of exposure-response modeling is important in clinical drug development. The general joint modeling of multiple endpoints is made possible in part by recent progress on the latent variable indirect response (IDR) modeling for ordered categorical endpoints. This manuscript aims to investigate, when modeling a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint, the level of improvement achievable by joint modeling in the latent variable IDR modeling framework through the sharing of model parameters for the individual endpoints, guided by the appropriate representation of drug and placebo mechanism. This was illustrated with data from two phase III clinical trials of intravenously administered mAb X for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, with the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and 20, 50, and 70% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70) disease severity criteria were used as efficacy endpoints. The joint modeling framework led to a parsimonious final model with reasonable performance, evaluated by visual predictive check. The results showed that, compared with the more common approach of separately modeling the endpoints, it is possible for the joint model to be more parsimonious and yet better describe the individual endpoints. In particular, the joint model may better describe one endpoint through subject-specific random effects that would not have been estimable from data of this endpoint alone.

  5. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a CMP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xu; Dongming, Guo; Zhuji, Jin; Renke, Kang

    2010-12-01

    A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process is presented. The signal process method uses the wavelet threshold denoising method to reduce the noise contained in the measured original signal, extracts the Kalman filter innovation from the denoised signal as the feature signal, and judges the CMP endpoint based on the feature of the Kalman filter innovation sequence during the CMP process. Applying the signal processing method, the endpoint detection experiments of the Cu CMP process were carried out. The results show that the signal processing method can judge the endpoint of the Cu CMP process.

  6. Personal Exposures to Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Acute Respiratory Health among Bronx Schoolchildren with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Spira-Cohen, Ariel; Chen, Lung Chi; Kendall, Michaela; Lall, Ramona; Thurston, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported relationships between adverse respiratory health outcomes and residential proximity to traffic pollution, but have not shown this at a personal exposure level. Objective We compared, among inner-city children with asthma, the associations of adverse asthma outcome incidences with increased personal exposure to particulate matter mass ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) air pollution versus the diesel-related carbonaceous fraction of PM2.5. Methods Daily 24-hr personal samples of PM2.5, including the elemental carbon (EC) fraction, were collected for 40 fifth-grade children with asthma at four South Bronx schools (10 children per school) during approximately 1 month each. Spirometry and symptom scores were recorded several times daily during weekdays. Results We found elevated same-day relative risks of wheeze [1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03–2.04)], shortness of breath (1.41; 95% CI, 1.01–1.99), and total symptoms (1.30; 95% CI, 1.04–1.62) with an increase in personal EC, but not with personal PM2.5 mass. We found increased risk of cough, wheeze, and total symptoms with increased 1-day lag and 2-day average personal and school-site EC. We found no significant associations with school-site PM2.5 mass or sulfur. The EC effect estimate was robust to addition of gaseous pollutants. Conclusion Adverse health associations were strongest with personal measures of EC exposure, suggesting that the diesel “soot” fraction of PM2.5 is most responsible for pollution-related asthma exacerbations among children living near roadways. Studies that rely on exposure to PM mass may underestimate PM health impacts. PMID:21216722

  7. Impact of extended-spectrum β-lactamase production on treatment outcomes of acute pyelonephritis caused by escherichia coli in patients without health care-associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Lee, Dong-Gun; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Choi, Jae-Ki; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2015-04-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is increasingly identified as a cause of acute pyelonephritis (APN) among patients without recent health care contact, i.e., community-associated APN. This case-control study compared 75 cases of community-associated ESBL-EC APN (CA-ESBL) to 225 controls of community-associated non-ESBL-EC APN (CA-non-ESBL) to identify the risk factors for ESBL-EC acquisition and investigate the impact of ESBL on the treatment outcomes of community-associated APN (CA-APN) caused by E. coli at a Korean hospital during 2007 to 2013. The baseline characteristics were similar between the cases and controls; the risk factors for ESBL-EC were age (>55 years), antibiotic use within the previous year, and diabetes with recurrent APN. The severity of illness did not differ between CA-ESBL and CA-non-ESBL (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II scores [mean ± standard deviation], 7.7 ± 5.9 versus 6.4 ± 5.3; P = 0.071). The proportions of clinical (odds ratio [OR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57 to 5.38; P = 0.323) and microbiological (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.51 to 2.65; P = 0.730) cures were similar, although the CA-ESBL APN patients were less likely to receive appropriate antibiotics within 48 h. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis of the prognostic factors for CA-APN caused by E. coli showed that ESBL production was not a significant factor for clinical (hazard ratio [HR], 0.39; 95% CI, 0.12 to 1.30; P = 0.126) or microbiological (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.21 to 1.12; P = 0.091) failure. The estimates did not change after incorporating weights calculated using propensity scores for acquiring ESBL-EC. Therefore, ESBL production did not negatively affect treatment outcomes among patients with community-associated E. coli APN.

  8. Selecting surrogate endpoints for estimating pesticide effects on avian reproductive success

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Markov chain nest productivity model (MCnest) has been developed for projecting the effects of a specific pesticide-use scenario on the annual reproductive success of avian species of concern. A critical element in MCnest is the use of surrogate endpoints, defined as measured ...

  9. Shape and Steepness of Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships of Continuous Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints indicates that an exponential or a Hill model with four parameters both adequately describe toxicological dose-responses. The four parameters relate to the background response, the potency o...

  10. Recent Developments in Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations: Innovations in Manipulations and Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) methods were developed primarily in the late 1990s and early 2000s in research programs dedicated to developing manipulations and endpoints to characterize and identify causes of toxicity to benthic freshwater and marine org...

  11. Developing ecosystem services-based assessment endpoints for determining ecological risks to estuarine environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current U.S. EPA ecological risk assessment (ERA) guidance defines an assessment endpoint (AE) as an explicit expression of the environmental value that is to be protected, and recommends that AEs are selected based on ecological relevance, susceptibility to known or potential st...

  12. Coulometric Titration of Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) with Spectrophotometric Endpoint Detection: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.; Killian, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is commonly used as an anticoagulant in blood-collection procedures. In this experiment for the instrumental analysis laboratory, students determine the quantity of EDTA in commercial collection tubes by coulometric titration with electrolytically generated Cu[superscript 2+]. The endpoint is detected…

  13. Correlates of protection for rotavirus vaccines: Possible alternative trial endpoints, opportunities, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Juana; Steele, A Duncan; Franco, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a major vaccine-preventable killer of young children worldwide. Two RV vaccines are globally commercially available and other vaccines are in different stages of development. Due to the absence of a suitable correlate of protection (CoP), all RV vaccine efficacy trials have had clinical endpoints. These trials represent an important challenge since RV vaccines have to be introduced in many different settings, placebo-controlled studies are unethical due to the availability of licensed vaccines, and comparator assessments for new vaccines with clinical endpoints are very large, complex, and expensive to conduct. A CoP as a surrogate endpoint would allow predictions of vaccine efficacy for new RV vaccines and enable a regulatory pathway, contributing to the more rapid development of new RV vaccines. The goal of this review is to summarize experiences from RV natural infection and vaccine studies to evaluate potential CoP for use as surrogate endpoints for assessment of new RV vaccines, and to explore challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25483685

  14. Automatic detection of exogenous respiration end-point using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Bisschops, I; Spanjers, H; Keesman, K

    2006-01-01

    When aerobic bacteria receive a biodegradable material such as wastewater, then respiration changes from endogenous to exogenous. The reverse occurs when biodegradation is complete. When using respirometry a respirogram is recorded showing those changes in respiration, and for an expert it is not difficult to point the moments at which they occur. The area corresponding to the exogenous respiration phase is a measure of the easily biodegradable fraction of material, also called the short-term BOD or BOD(ST). That value, in combination with a value for COD, can be used to determine the treatability of wastewater. Respirometry can also be applied on-line, e.g. for on-line monitoring of wastewater. However, automatic detection of the end-point of exogenous respiration is difficult. The first step towards on-line monitoring of wastewater treatability is to make automatic detection of this end-point possible. In this study the use of a neural network for detection of this end-point was investigated. Results are promising; after training the neural network is able to detect the correct end-point in the majority of the studied cases.

  15. 78 FR 73199 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted Under an Abbreviated New Drug Application; Availability AGENCY: Food... applicants planning to include bioequivalence (BE) information in abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs... Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002....

  16. EFFECTS OF COPPER ON COMMUNITY, FUNCTIONAL, AND BEHAVIORAL ENDPOINTS IN AN ARTIFICIAL STREAM STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the effects of copper on biota and behavioral endpoints was carried out at the U.S. EPA's Experimental Stream Facility (ESF), Milford OH. The objective of the study was to identify relationships between structural (macrobenthos and periphyton indices), functional (inte...

  17. Rational study endpoints in anti-neoplastic agent regulatory approval trials in the gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Markman, Maurie

    2016-07-01

    A discussion of rational endpoints in clinical trials seeking regulatory approval for new anti-neoplastic agents involving the three major gynecologic malignancies, cancers of the ovary, cervix, and endometrial, is particularly interesting as (in the opinion of this commentator) the conclusion will be different in the individual cancers. PMID:27638892

  18. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP SUMMARY - MIDPOINTS VERSUS ENDPOINTS: THE SACRIFICES AND BENEFITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On 5/25-26/2000 in Brighton, England, the third international workshop was held under the umbrella of UNEP addressing issues in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). The workshop provided a forum for experts to discuss midpoint vs. endpoint modeling. Midpoints are considered to be...

  19. Detecting Blending End-Point Using Mean Squares Successive Difference Test and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Milad; Amigo, José M; Bertelsen, Poul; Van Den Berg, Frans; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-08-01

    An algorithm based on mean squares successive difference test applied to near-infrared and principal component analysis scores was developed to monitor and determine the blending profile and to assess the end-point in the statistical stabile phase. Model formulations consisting of an active compound (acetylsalicylic acid), together with microcrystalline cellulose and two grades of calcium carbonate with dramatically different particle shapes, were prepared. The formulation comprising angular-shaped calcium carbonate reached blending end-point slower when compared with the formulation comprising equant-shaped calcium carbonate. Utilizing the ring shear test, this distinction in end-point could be related to the difference in flowability of the formulations. On the basis of the two model formulations, a design of experiments was conducted to characterize the blending process by studying the effect of CaCO3 grades and fill level of the bin on blending end-point. Calcium carbonate grades, fill level, and their interaction were shown to have a significant impact on the blending process. PMID:26094601

  20. Predictive Signatures from ToxCast Data for Chronic, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast program is using in vitro assay data and chemical descriptors to build predictive models for in vivo toxicity endpoints. In vitro assays measure activity of chemicals against molecular targets such as enzymes and receptors (measured in cell-free and cell-based sys...

  1. Public health consequences from hazardous substances acutely released during rail transit--South Carolina, 2005; selected States, 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    2005-01-28

    On January 6, 2005, two freight trains collided in Graniteville, South Carolina (approximately 10 miles northeast of Augusta, Georgia), releasing an estimated 11,500 gallons of chlorine gas, which caused nine deaths and sent at least 529 persons seeking medical treatment for possible chlorine exposure. The incident prompted the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to review data from its Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system and update an analysis of 1993-1998 railroad events. The HSEES system is used to collect and analyze data concerning the public health consequences (e.g., morbidity, mortality, and evacuations) associated with hazardous-substance--release events that occur in facilities or during transportation. This report describes the event in South Carolina, which is not part of the HSEES system, and two others from HSEES, and summarizes all rail events reported to HSEES from 16 state health departments during 1999-2004. Local government agencies, employers, and first responders can help reduce morbidity and mortality from transit-associated hazardous-substance releases by examining historical spill data for planning purposes, developing emergency response plans, undergoing proper hazardous materials (HazMat) training, and reviewing epidemiologic investigation data.

  2. Public health consequences from hazardous substances acutely released during rail transit--South Carolina, 2005; selected States, 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    2005-01-28

    On January 6, 2005, two freight trains collided in Graniteville, South Carolina (approximately 10 miles northeast of Augusta, Georgia), releasing an estimated 11,500 gallons of chlorine gas, which caused nine deaths and sent at least 529 persons seeking medical treatment for possible chlorine exposure. The incident prompted the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to review data from its Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system and update an analysis of 1993-1998 railroad events. The HSEES system is used to collect and analyze data concerning the public health consequences (e.g., morbidity, mortality, and evacuations) associated with hazardous-substance--release events that occur in facilities or during transportation. This report describes the event in South Carolina, which is not part of the HSEES system, and two others from HSEES, and summarizes all rail events reported to HSEES from 16 state health departments during 1999-2004. Local government agencies, employers, and first responders can help reduce morbidity and mortality from transit-associated hazardous-substance releases by examining historical spill data for planning purposes, developing emergency response plans, undergoing proper hazardous materials (HazMat) training, and reviewing epidemiologic investigation data. PMID:15674184

  3. Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, Kate

    1980-01-01

    Indians have the lowest life expectancy of any group in the US; the general state of Indian health lags 25 years behind the rest of the population. Article discusses problems of health delivery systems, alternative approaches to health care, and some of the most pressing health problems. (DS)

  4. Population modelling to compare chronic external radiotoxicity between individual and population endpoints in four taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, Frédéric; Hertel-Aas, Turid; Real, Almudena; Lance, Emilie; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Bradshaw, Clare; Vives I Batlle, Jordi; Oughton, Deborah H; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we modelled population responses to chronic external gamma radiation in 12 laboratory species (including aquatic and soil invertebrates, fish and terrestrial mammals). Our aim was to compare radiosensitivity between individual and population endpoints and to examine how internationally proposed benchmarks for environmental radioprotection protected species against various risks at the population level. To do so, we used population matrix models, combining life history and chronic radiotoxicity data (derived from laboratory experiments and described in the literature and the FREDERICA database) to simulate changes in population endpoints (net reproductive rate R0, asymptotic population growth rate λ, equilibrium population size Neq) for a range of dose rates. Elasticity analyses of models showed that population responses differed depending on the affected individual endpoint (juvenile or adult survival, delay in maturity or reduction in fecundity), the considered population endpoint (R0, λ or Neq) and the life history of the studied species. Among population endpoints, net reproductive rate R0 showed the lowest EDR10 (effective dose rate inducing 10% effect) in all species, with values ranging from 26 μGy h(-1) in the mouse Mus musculus to 38,000 μGy h(-1) in the fish Oryzias latipes. For several species, EDR10 for population endpoints were lower than the lowest EDR10 for individual endpoints. Various population level risks, differing in severity for the population, were investigated. Population extinction (predicted when radiation effects caused population growth rate λ to decrease below 1, indicating that no population growth in the long term) was predicted for dose rates ranging from 2700 μGy h(-1) in fish to 12,000 μGy h(-1) in soil invertebrates. A milder risk, that population growth rate λ will be reduced by 10% of the reduction causing extinction, was predicted for dose rates ranging from 24 μGy h(-1) in mammals to 1800 μGy h(-1) in

  5. Population modelling to compare chronic external radiotoxicity between individual and population endpoints in four taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, Frédéric; Hertel-Aas, Turid; Real, Almudena; Lance, Emilie; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Bradshaw, Clare; Vives I Batlle, Jordi; Oughton, Deborah H; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we modelled population responses to chronic external gamma radiation in 12 laboratory species (including aquatic and soil invertebrates, fish and terrestrial mammals). Our aim was to compare radiosensitivity between individual and population endpoints and to examine how internationally proposed benchmarks for environmental radioprotection protected species against various risks at the population level. To do so, we used population matrix models, combining life history and chronic radiotoxicity data (derived from laboratory experiments and described in the literature and the FREDERICA database) to simulate changes in population endpoints (net reproductive rate R0, asymptotic population growth rate λ, equilibrium population size Neq) for a range of dose rates. Elasticity analyses of models showed that population responses differed depending on the affected individual endpoint (juvenile or adult survival, delay in maturity or reduction in fecundity), the considered population endpoint (R0, λ or Neq) and the life history of the studied species. Among population endpoints, net reproductive rate R0 showed the lowest EDR10 (effective dose rate inducing 10% effect) in all species, with values ranging from 26 μGy h(-1) in the mouse Mus musculus to 38,000 μGy h(-1) in the fish Oryzias latipes. For several species, EDR10 for population endpoints were lower than the lowest EDR10 for individual endpoints. Various population level risks, differing in severity for the population, were investigated. Population extinction (predicted when radiation effects caused population growth rate λ to decrease below 1, indicating that no population growth in the long term) was predicted for dose rates ranging from 2700 μGy h(-1) in fish to 12,000 μGy h(-1) in soil invertebrates. A milder risk, that population growth rate λ will be reduced by 10% of the reduction causing extinction, was predicted for dose rates ranging from 24 μGy h(-1) in mammals to 1800 μGy h(-1) in

  6. A randomized trial of a mental health consumer-managed alternative to civil commitment for acute psychiatric crisis.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Thomas K; Stoneking, Beth C; Humphreys, Keith; Sundby, Evan; Bond, Jason

    2008-09-01

    This experiment compared the effectiveness of an unlocked, mental health consumer-managed, crisis residential program (CRP) to a locked, inpatient psychiatric facility (LIPF) for adults civilly committed for severe psychiatric problems. Following screening and informed consent, participants (n = 393) were randomized to the CRP or the LIPF and interviewed at baseline and at 30-day, 6-month, and 1-year post admission. Outcomes were costs, level of functioning, psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, enrichment, and service satisfaction. Treatment outcomes were compared using hierarchical linear models. Participants in the CRP experienced significantly greater improvement on interviewer-rated and self-reported psychopathology than did participants in the LIPF condition; service satisfaction was dramatically higher in the CRP condition. CRP-style facilities are a viable alternative to psychiatric hospitalization for many individuals facing civil commitment. PMID:18626766

  7. Sex Differences in the Treatment and Outcome of Korean Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Using the Korean National Health Insurance Claims Database

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae-Seok; Kang, Hee-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Evidence showing higher acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates among female compared with male inpatients has stimulated interest in whether this disparity is the result of biological factors or differences in the provision of healthcare services. We investigated the impact of sex on in-hospital mortality rates due to AMI, and evaluated the contribution of differences in the delivery of optimal medical services for AMI. We retrospectively constructed a dataset of 85,329 new patients admitted to Korean hospitals with AMI between 2003 and 2007 from the Korea National Health Insurance Claims Database. We used the claims database to provide information about treatment after admission or death for each patient. Proportionally more female than male patients aged 65 years or older had complications; however, proportionally fewer female patients underwent invasive procedures. Female patients had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than males (21.2% vs 14.6%, odds ratio [OR] 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52–1.64). The probability of death within 30 days after admission remained higher for females than males after adjusting for demographic characteristics and severity (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04–1.13). After additionally adjusting for invasive and medical management, the probability of death within 30 days did not differ between males and females (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.99–1.08). A similar trend was revealed by an additional analysis of patients according to younger (<65 years) and older (≥65 years) age groups. The higher in-hospital mortality rates after AMI in Korean female patients was associated with a lower procedure rate. Evidence indicating that AMI symptoms differ according to sex highlights the need for health policies and public education programs that raise awareness of sex-related differences in early AMI symptoms to increase the incidence of appropriate early treatment in females. PMID:26334894

  8. Development and implementation of a participative intervention to improve the psychosocial work environment and mental health in an acute care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bourbonnais, R; Brisson, C; Vinet, A; Vézina, M; Lower, A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To describe the development and implementation phases of a participative intervention aimed at reducing four theory grounded and empirically supported adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support, and low reward), and their mental health effects. Methods The intervention was realised among 500 care providers in an acute care hospital. A prior risk evaluation was performed, using a quantitative approach, to determine the prevalence of adverse psychosocial work factors and of psychological distress in the hospital compared to an appropriate reference population. In addition, a qualitative approach included observation in the care units, interviews with key informants, and collaborative work with an intervention team (IT) including all stakeholders. Results The prior risk evaluation showed a high prevalence of adverse psychosocial factors and psychological distress among care providers compared to a representative sample of workers from the general population. Psychosocial variables at work associated with psychological distress in the prior risk evaluation were high psychological demands (prevalence ratio (PR) = 2.27), low social support from supervisors and co‐workers (PR = 1.35), low reward (PR = 2.92), and effort‐reward imbalance (PR = 2.65). These results showed the empirical relevance of an intervention on the four selected adverse psychosocial factors among care providers. Qualitative methods permitted the identification of 56 adverse conditions and of their solutions. Targets of intervention were related to team work and team spirit, staffing processes, work organisation, training, communication, and ergonomy. Conclusion This study adds to the scarce literature describing the development and implementation of preventive intervention aimed at reducing psychosocial factors at work and their health effects. Even if adverse conditions in the psychosocial environment and

  9. [Pelargonium sidoides in acute bronchitis - Health-related quality of life and patient-reported outcome in adults receiving EPs 7630 treatment].

    PubMed

    Matthys, Heinrich; Lizogub, Victor G; Funk, Petra; Malek, Fathi A

    2010-12-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) and patient-reported outcome (PRO) have become important outcome parameters for the evaluation of medical treatment within clinical trials and, furthermore, to evaluate efficiency in clinical practice. We therefore report further exploratory results of an already reported dose-finding study with EPs 7630 tablets, now focussing on HRQL and PRO. A total of 406 adults with acute bronchitis were randomly assigned to one of four parallel treatment groups (placebo, 30 mg, 60 mg or 90 mg EPs 7630 daily). HRQL and PRO were assessed by questionnaires as secondary outcome measures at each study visit or daily in the patient's diary. At day 7, the patient-reported outcome measures were significantly more improved in all the three EPs 7630 groups compared to placebo (EQ-5D and EQ VAS, SF-12: physical score, impact of patient's sickness, duration of activity limitation, patient-reported treatment outcome, satisfaction with treatment). In conclusion, a statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement of HRQL/PRO compared to placebo was shown in all the three EPs 7630 groups.

  10. Impact of Antiretroviral Therapy on Health-Related Quality of Life among South African Women in the CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Andrew; Garrett, Nigel; Werner, Lise; Burns, Jonathan K.; Ngcobo, Nelisiwe; Zuma, Nomthandazo; Mlisana, Koleka; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Abdool Karim, Salim S.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns are often raised regarding potentially adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but there is limited longitudinal data to prove this. Building on our prior investigation, we examined the impact of ART on HRQoL among HIV-infected South African women with extensive follow-up in the CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection Cohort Study. Overall HRQoL and five sub-domains [physical well-being (PWB), emotional well-being (EWB), functional and global well-being (FGWB), social well-being (SWB) and cognitive functioning (CF)] were assessed using the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection (FAHI) instrument. Our analyses comparing FAHI scores between pre-ART (established infection) and ART phases using paired Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and adjusted mixed-effects regression models revealed improvements on ART in overall HRQoL, and in PWB, EWB, and SWB, but not in FGWB and CF. No long-term adverse impact of ART on HRQoL was detected, providing additional non-biomedical support to early treatment strategies. PMID:24849623

  11. Are doctors still failing to assess and treat asthma attacks? An audit of the management of acute attacks in a health district.

    PubMed

    Pinnock, H; Johnson, A; Young, P; Martin, N

    1999-06-01

    This audit aimed to observe the management of acute asthma by primary and secondary care within a Health District. Asthma attacks occurring during the first 6 weeks of 1996 to patients between the ages of 3 and 74 years in Canterbury and Thanet District were notified by general practitioners, out-of-hours co-operatives and hospitals. Data were obtained retrospectively from the patient records. A total of 378 episodes was registered: 342 (90%) to primary care. Of these 234 (76% of patients aged 6 years or over) had a peak flow recorded; 114 (30%) were given emergency bronchodilation: oxygen was not used in primary care; 204 (54%) were given systemic steroids; and 43 (11%) were referred for hospital care of whom 36 were admitted. Of the attacks, 212 (69% of the patients aged 6 years or over) could be classified by percentage predicted peak flow and management compared to the Guidelines published by the British Thoracic Society. Twenty-eight patients presented with 'life-threatening' asthma: 20 (71%) were given emergency bronchodilation; oxygen was used in only two; 24 (86%) were given systemic steroids; and six (21%) were referred for admission. In their confidential enquiry into the asthma deaths the British Thoracic Society identified a failure to appreciate the severity of the attack, resulting in inadequate emergency treatment and delay in referring to hospital. These data suggest that, 15 years later, these problems may still exist.

  12. Optimisation of infection prevention and control in acute health care by use of behaviour change: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Rachel; Charani, Esmita; Sevdalis, Nick; Alexandrou, Banos; Sibley, Eleanor; Mullett, David; Loveday, Heather P; Drumright, Lydia N; Holmes, Alison

    2012-04-01

    Changes in the behaviour of health-care workers (HCWs) are required to improve adherence to infection prevention and control (IPC) guidelines. Despite heavy investment in strategies to change behaviour, effectiveness has not been adequately assessed. We did a systematic review to assess the effectiveness and sustainability of interventions to change IPC behaviour and assessed exploratory literature for barriers to and facilitators of behaviour change. 21 studies published from 1999 to 2011 met our inclusion criteria: seven intervention studies and 14 exploratory studies. Of the intervention studies none explicitly incorporated psychological theory and only two contained elements of social marketing in the design, although five addressed sustainability. All elicited behaviour change, reduction in infection risk, or both. The exploratory studies identified social and cultural factors that affect the IPC behaviour of HCWs. To improve the standard of research and broaden the evidence base, we recommend that quality criteria are added to existing systematic review guidelines to enable the inclusion of qualitative research and to ensure robust design, implementation, and reporting of interventions. PMID:22342325

  13. The duration of acute health problems in people involved with the cleanup operation of the Hebei Spirit oil spill.

    PubMed

    Na, Ji Ung; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Hyoung Gon

    2012-06-01

    The authors investigated the duration of health problems of people involved with cleanup efforts for the Hebei Spirit oil spill, which occurred in December 2007 in Taean County, South Korea. The study identified risk factors correlated with the continuation of symptoms. Approximately one year after the accident, 442 people who had participated in the cleanup operation were examined. Data regarding demographic information, risk factors, and the continuation and duration of any symptoms were obtained. Eye symptoms (9.7 months), headaches (8.4 months), skin symptoms (8.3 months), and neurovestibular symptoms (6.9 months) had a relatively longer duration than did back pain (1.8 months) or respiratory symptoms (2.1 months). In particular, the remission of headaches had a negative correlation with female gender (HR 0.57, 0.34-0.95, 95% CI), and remission of eye symptoms had a negative correlation with the total hours of daily participation in the cleanup operation (HR 0.24, 0.06-0.95, 95% CI).

  14. Medical treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M

    2004-12-01

    Eighty percent of all cases of acute pancreatitis are linked etiologically to gallstone disease or caused by immoderate alcohol consumption. No specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Early prognostic factors that indicate severe disease are three or more signs on organ failure scores according to Ranson, Imrie, or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) 11, extrapancreatic complications of the disease, or the detection of pancreatic necrosis on CT scans. Elevated CRP levels above 130 mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Moreover, relief of often severe visceral pain is a high priority. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis, or other infectious complications. Enteral nutrition has no adverse effect compared with parenteral nutrition during the course of acute pancreatitis, and is probably beneficial in regard to outcome.

  15. Health effects of acute exposure to air pollution. Part I: Healthy and asthmatic subjects exposed to diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Holgate, Stephen T; Sandström, Thomas; Frew, Anthony J; Stenfors, Nikolai; Nördenhall, Charlotta; Salvi, Sundeep; Blomberg, Anders; Helleday, Ragnberth; Söderberg, Margaretha

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of short-term exposure to diluted diesel exhaust on inflammatory parameters in human airways. We previously exposed control subjects for 1 hour to a high ambient concentration of diesel exhaust (particle concentration 300 pg/m3--a level comparable with that found in North Sea ferries, highway underpasses, etc). Although these exposures did not have any measurable effect on standard indices of lung function, there was a marked neutrophilic inflammatory response in the airways accompanied by increases in blood neutrophil and platelet counts. Endothelial adhesion molecules were upregulated, and the expression of interleukin 8 messenger RNA (IL-8 mRNA*) was increased in a pattern consistent with neutrophilia. Individuals with asthma have inflamed airways and are clinically more sensitive to air pollutants than are control subjects. The present study was designed to assess whether this clinical sensitivity can be explained by acute neutrophilic inflammation or an increase in allergic airway inflammation resulting from diesel exhaust exposure. For this study, we used a lower concentration of diesel exhaust (100 microg/m3 PM10) for a 2-hour exposure. At this concentration, both the control subjects and those with asthma demonstrated a modest but statistically significant increase in airway resistance following exposure to diesel exhaust. This increase in airway resistance was associated with an increased number of neutrophils in the bronchial wash (BW) fluid obtained from control subjects (median after diesel exhaust 22.0 vs median after air 17.2; P = 0.015), as well as an increase in lymphocytes obtained through bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) (15.0% after diesel exhaust vs 12.3% after air; P = 0.017). Upregulation of the endothelial adhesion molecule P-selectin was noted in bronchial biopsy tissues from control subjects (65.4% of vessels after diesel exhaust vs 52.5% after air). There was also a significant increase in IL

  16. In Emergency Department Patients with Acute Chest Pain, Stress Cardiac MRI Observation Unit Care Reduces 1- year Cardiac-Related Health Care Expenditures: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Case, Doug; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct cost of medical care and clinical events during the first year after patients with intermediate risk acute chest pain were randomized to stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) observation unit (OU) testing, versus inpatient care. Background In a recent study, randomization to OU-CMR reduced median index hospitalization cost compared to inpatient care in patients presenting to the emergency department with intermediate risk acute chest pain. Methods Emergency department patients with intermediate risk chest pain were randomized to OU-CMR (OU care, cardiac markers, stress CMR) or inpatient care (admission, care per admitting provider). This analysis reports the direct cost of cardiac-related care and clinical outcomes (MI, revascularization, cardiovascular death) during the first year of follow-up subsequent to discharge. Consistent with health economics literature, provider cost was calculated from work-related relative value units using the Medicare conversion factor; facility charges were converted to cost using departmental specific cost-to-charge ratios. Linear models were used to compare cost accumulation among study groups. Results One-hundred nine (109) randomized subjects were included in this analysis (52 OU-CMR, 57 inpatient care). The median age was 56 years; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. At 1 year, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72) with 1 patient in each group experiencing a cardiac event after discharge. First-year cardiac-related costs were significantly lower for participants randomized to OU-CMR compared to participants receiving inpatient care (geometric mean = $3101 vs $4742 including the index visit (p = .004) and $29 vs $152 following discharge (p = .012)). During the year following randomization, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72). Conclusions An OU-CMR strategy

  17. Acute Exposure to Particulate Matter (PM) Alters Physiologic and Toxicologic Endpoints in a Rat Model of Heart Failure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient PM from fossil-fuel emissions is linked to cardiovascular disease and death. This association strengthens in people with preexisting cardiopulmonary diseases—especially heart failure (HF). We previously examined the effects of PM on HF by exposing Sponta...

  18. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  19. The calorimetric spectrum of the electron-capture decay of 163Ho. The spectral endpoint region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rújula, A.; Lusignoli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The electron-neutrino mass (or masses and mixing angles) may be directly measurable in weak electron-capture decays. The favoured experimental technique is "calorimetric". The optimal nuclide is 163Ho, and several experiments (ECHo, HOLMES and NuMECS) are currently studying its decay. The most relevant range of the calorimetric-energy spectrum extends for the last few hundred eV below its endpoint. It has not yet been well measured. We explore the theory, mainly in the cited range, of electron capture in 163Ho decay. A so far neglected process turns out to be most relevant: electron-capture accompanied by the shake-off of a second electron. Our two main conclusions are very encouraging: the counting rate close to the endpoint may be more than an order of magnitude larger than previously expected; the "pile-up" problem may be significantly reduced.

  20. Roberge-Weiss endpoint in N{sub f}=2 QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bonati, Claudio; Cossu, Guido; D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    We present the results of extensive simulations regarding the critical behavior at the endpoint of the Roberge-Weiss transition for N{sub f}=2 QCD. We confirm early evidence, presented in Ref. [M. D'Elia and F. Sanfilippo, Phys. Rev. D 80, 111501(R) (2009).], according to which the Roberge-Weiss endpoint is first order in the limit of large or small quark masses, and second order for intermediate masses. A systematic study of the transition strength as a function of the quark mass in the first order regions, permits us to estimate the tricritical values of the quark mass separating the second order region from the first order ones.

  1. The effect of endpoint congruency on bimanual transport and rotation tasks

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Andrea H.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    The completion of many goal oriented skills requires the tight coordination of the right and left hands to achieve the task objective. Although the coordination of wrist transport and orientation of the hand before object contact has been studied in detail for discrete bimanual tasks, as yet, very few studies have examined bimanual coordination when the target is already in hand. It has been shown that congruency of the goal facilitates the production of discrete bimanual responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of goal congruency on precision bimanual transport and rotate tasks. In the current investigation, participants transported two cubic objects while rotating them laterally to place them into tight-fitting targets. The magnitude of the rotation could be the same for both hands (i.e., both 45 or 90∘) or different (i.e., one 45 and 90∘) and the endpoint orientations (i.e., goal) could either be congruent or incongruent. Results indicated that when the endpoint orientation was congruent for the two hands, movement times were similar regardless of hand (left or right), rotation magnitude (45, 90∘) and whether the rotation magnitude for the two hands was the same or different. These results suggest that congruency of the endpoint goal facilitates the temporal synchronization of the transport component for two limbs. In contrast, a different pattern of results was obtained when considering the rotation component. Specifically, regardless of whether the hands were rotating the same magnitude or ending in congruent endpoint positions, the coordination of the rotation component between the hands was asynchronous. We hypothesize that the greater requirement to shift visual fixation from one hand/target to the other to ascertain the separate goal orientations may explain these differences. These results provide further evidence that multiple constraints act to influence the performance of skilled bimanual tasks. PMID:25713546

  2. Muscle Synergies Heavily Influence the Neural Control of Arm Endpoint Stiffness and Energy Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Much debate has arisen from research on muscle synergies with respect to both limb impedance control and energy consumption. Studies of limb impedance control in the context of reaching movements and postural tasks have produced divergent findings, and this study explores whether the use of synergies by the central nervous system (CNS) can resolve these findings and also provide insights on mechanisms of energy consumption. In this study, we phrase these debates at the conceptual level of interactions between neural degrees of freedom and tasks constraints. This allows us to examine the ability of experimentally-observed synergies—correlated muscle activations—to control both energy consumption and the stiffness component of limb endpoint impedance. In our nominal 6-muscle planar arm model, muscle synergies and the desired size, shape, and orientation of endpoint stiffness ellipses, are expressed as linear constraints that define the set of feasible muscle activation patterns. Quadratic programming allows us to predict whether and how energy consumption can be minimized throughout the workspace of the limb given those linear constraints. We show that the presence of synergies drastically decreases the ability of the CNS to vary the properties of the endpoint stiffness and can even preclude the ability to minimize energy. Furthermore, the capacity to minimize energy consumption—when available—can be greatly affected by arm posture. Our computational approach helps reconcile divergent findings and conclusions about task-specific regulation of endpoint stiffness and energy consumption in the context of synergies. But more generally, these results provide further evidence that the benefits and disadvantages of muscle synergies go hand-in-hand with the structure of feasible muscle activation patterns afforded by the mechanics of the limb and task constraints. These insights will help design experiments to elucidate the interplay between synergies and the

  3. Muscle Synergies Heavily Influence the Neural Control of Arm Endpoint Stiffness and Energy Consumption.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Joshua M; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Much debate has arisen from research on muscle synergies with respect to both limb impedance control and energy consumption. Studies of limb impedance control in the context of reaching movements and postural tasks have produced divergent findings, and this study explores whether the use of synergies by the central nervous system (CNS) can resolve these findings and also provide insights on mechanisms of energy consumption. In this study, we phrase these debates at the conceptual level of interactions between neural degrees of freedom and tasks constraints. This allows us to examine the ability of experimentally-observed synergies--correlated muscle activations--to control both energy consumption and the stiffness component of limb endpoint impedance. In our nominal 6-muscle planar arm model, muscle synergies and the desired size, shape, and orientation of endpoint stiffness ellipses, are expressed as linear constraints that define the set of feasible muscle activation patterns. Quadratic programming allows us to predict whether and how energy consumption can be minimized throughout the workspace of the limb given those linear constraints. We show that the presence of synergies drastically decreases the ability of the CNS to vary the properties of the endpoint stiffness and can even preclude the ability to minimize energy. Furthermore, the capacity to minimize energy consumption--when available--can be greatly affected by arm posture. Our computational approach helps reconcile divergent findings and conclusions about task-specific regulation of endpoint stiffness and energy consumption in the context of synergies. But more generally, these results provide further evidence that the benefits and disadvantages of muscle synergies go hand-in-hand with the structure of feasible muscle activation patterns afforded by the mechanics of the limb and task constraints. These insights will help design experiments to elucidate the interplay between synergies and the mechanisms

  4. Differential effects of copper and cadmium exposure on toxicity endpoints and gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, Tasha L; Shafer, Martin M; Armstrong, David E

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of cadmium to aquatic organisms is well known, but the mechanisms of toxicity are not as clearly understood. In the present study, Cd bioassay experiments incorporating both traditional endpoints and novel thiol-based endpoints were conducted with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results were compared with results from previous bioassay experiments to probe the apparent contrasting biochemical mechanisms of toxicity of copper and cadmium as expressed in cellular glutathione and the glutathione cycle. Total glutathione and reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) measurements were remarkably different in Cd- compared with Cu-exposed cells. Whereas total glutathione in cells decreased with increasing Cu concentration, Cd caused dramatic increases. Total glutathione increased by 4.5-fold with 80 nM Cd treatment over concentrations in Cd-free controls. Glutathione reductase (GR) enzyme activity was positively correlated (r(2) (Cu) = 0.96, r(2) (Cd) = 0.85) with glutathione concentrations for both metals. Measurements of mRNA for GR were increased 2-fold in response to Cd exposure (80 nM) and correlated well with GR enzyme activity. Glutathione concentrations and GR enzyme activity are useful endpoints for both Cu and Cd toxicity in algae, even though the metals elicit opposing responses. We conclude that Cu decreases glutathione concentrations by inhibiting GR enzyme activity. In contrast, Cd stimulates GR enzyme activity and increases glutathione concentrations as cells respond to Cd-induced stress by producing increased antioxidant capacity. The present study demonstrates that determining the glutathione response in cells is important for understanding the metal-specific mechanisms of toxicity and that these associated novel endpoints may be useful metrics for accurately predicting toxicity.

  5. Kinetic titration with differential thermometric determination of the end-point.

    PubMed

    Sajó, I

    1968-06-01

    A method has been described for the determination of concentrations below 10(-4)M by applying catalytic reactions and using thermometric end-point determination. A reference solution, identical with the sample solution except for catalyst, is titrated with catalyst solution until the rates of reaction become the same, as shown by a null deflection on a galvanometer connected via bridge circuits to two opposed thermistors placed in the solutions. PMID:18960338

  6. Energy metabolism and biotransformation as endpoints to pre-screen hepatotoxicity using a liver spheroid model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Jinsheng . E-mail: jinsheng.xu@uwe.ac.uk; Purcell, Wendy M.

    2006-10-15

    The current study investigated liver spheroid culture as an in vitro model to evaluate the endpoints relevant to the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation after exposure to test toxicants. Mature rat liver spheroids were exposed to diclofenac, galactosamine, isoniazid, paracetamol, m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB) and 3-nitroaniline (3-NA) for 24 h. Pyruvate uptake, galactose biotransformation, lactate release and glucose secretion were evaluated after exposure. The results showed that pyruvate uptake and lactate release by mature liver spheroids in culture were maintained at a relatively stable level. These endpoints, together with glucose secretion and galactose biotransformation, were related to and could reflect the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation in hepatocytes. After exposure, all of the test agents significantly reduced glucose secretion, which was shown to be the most sensitive endpoint of those evaluated. Diclofenac, isoniazid, paracetamol and galactosamine reduced lactate release (P < 0.01), but m-DNB increased lactate release (P < 0.01). Diclofenac, isoniazid and paracetamol also reduced pyruvate uptake (P < 0.01), while galactosamine had little discernible effect. Diclofenac, galactosamine, paracetamol and m-DNB also reduced galactose biotransformation (P < 0.01), by contrast, isoniazid did not. The metabolite of m-DNB, 3-NA, which served as a negative control, did not cause significant changes in lactate release, pyruvate uptake or galactose biotransformation. It is concluded that pyruvate uptake, galactose biotransformation, lactate release and glucose secretion can be used as endpoints for evaluating the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation after exposure to test agents using the liver spheroid model to pre-screen hepatotoxicity.

  7. Feasibility of Using Distal Endpoints for In-room PET Range Verification of Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, Kira; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Winey, Brian; Bortfeld, Thomas; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to verify the dose delivery in proton therapy, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans have been employed to measure the distribution of β+ radioactivity produced from nuclear reactions of the protons with native nuclei. Because the dose and PET distributions are difficult to compare directly, the range verification is currently carried out by comparing measured and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation predicted PET distributions. In order to reduce the reliance on MC, simulated PET (simPET) and dose distal endpoints were compared to explore the feasibility of using distal endpoints for in-room PET range verification. MC simulations were generated for six head and neck patients with corrections for radiological decay, biological washout, and PET resolution. One-dimensional profiles of the dose and simPET were examined along the direction of the beam and covering the cross section of the beam. The chosen endpoints of the simPET (x-intercept of the linear fit to the distal falloff) and planned dose (20–50% of maximum dose) correspond to where most of the protons are below the threshold energy for the nuclear reactions. The difference in endpoint range between the distal surfaces of the dose and MC-PET were compared and the spread of range differences were assessed. Among the six patients, the mean difference between MC-PET and dose depth was found to be −1.6 mm to +0.5 mm between patients, with a standard deviation of 1.1 to 4.0 mm across the individual beams. In clinical practice, regions with deviations beyond the safety margin need to be examined more closely and can potentially lead to adjustments to the treatment plan. PMID:24464031

  8. Clinical usefulness and relevance of intermediate endpoints for cytotoxic neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Caterina; Loibl, Sibylle; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate endpoints are surrogate markers of treatment efficacy assessed earlier than the true outcome of interest. Tumor response after systemic neoadjuvant therapy is considered a suitable intermediate endpoint, especially for specific breast cancer subtypes. Response can be evaluated either after only 1 cycle of treatment by clinical evaluation or at the end of the planned neoadjuvant treatment by histomorphologic examination of all surgically removed tissues from the breast and regional nodes. Although several meta-analyses showed a lower risk of death among patients who attain a pathologic complete response (pCR) compared with patients with residual tumor in breast and/or lymph nodes after neoadjuvant therapy, a statistically significant linkage between increased pCR rate by a specific treatment and improvement of survival by the same treatment has not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, formal surrogacy of pCR is not established. Moreover, the better definition of pCR is still an open issue: a large pooled analysis demonstrated that patients who attained ypT0 ypN0 (no invasive or non-invasive residual cancer in breast and nodes) experienced longer DFS (p < 0.001) compared with patients who attained ypTis ypN0 (no invasive residual in breast and nodes irrespective of residual non-invasive disease). Nevertheless, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently allowed using pCR as a surrogate endpoint for accelerated approval process. Several meta-analyses demonstrated the greatest prognostic value of pCR in more aggressive breast cancer subtypes (i.e. triple-negative, HER2-positive, or high grade breast cancer). Usefulness of an earlier intermediate endpoints was prospectively demonstrated in the GeparTrio trial in which patients showing an early response achieved 4-times more frequently a pCR than those without early response. PMID:26279131

  9. EXPOSURE DOMAINS: ROLE OF TIMING, PATTERN AND MAGNITUDE OF EXPOSURE ON HEALTH RISKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental health risk assessment may be broadly separated into assessment of risks from exposures to agents affecting health endpoints for which it may be presumed there is no dose threshold, and to agents affecting endpoints that more likely have a dose threshold. For hea...

  10. Implementation of cellulomonas cholesterol oxidase for total serum cholesterol determination by the endpoint method.

    PubMed

    Srisawasdi, Pornpen; Chaichanajarernkul, Upsorn; Teerakranjana, Narumon; Kroll, Martin H

    2008-01-01

    Cellulomonas has been shown to be a good source of cholesterol oxidase in addition to Streptomyces for serum cholesterol determination by the endpoint method, inexpensive in cost, and showing excellent performance. For clinical use, we have assessed the reliability of Cellulomonas reagent for cholesterol determination. We constructed the user-defined endpoint methods on three automated analyzers. The analytical performances (linearity, precision, recovery, interference, stability, and comparison with the standardized method) of Cellulomonas cholesterol reagents were evaluated and compared to those of Streptomyces reagents. Linearity (18.1-23.3 mmol/L) and stability of reagents (6-11 weeks) depended on the analyzers being used. The average within-run and between-day % coefficients of variation (CVs) ranged from 1.44 to 2.45 and 1.98 to 2.99, respectively, and were within National Cholesterol Education Program analytical criteria (endpoint method. Its analytical performance is equivalent to Streptomyces enzymes and meets the analytical goals. It has an advantage over the other enzymes in that it does not ship in the frozen state.

  11. End-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands and robotic assistance with directional damping.

    PubMed

    Erden, Mustafa Suphi; Billard, Aude

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to perform end-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands while doing airbrush painting and to use the results for developing a robotic assistance scheme. We study airbrush painting because it resembles in many ways manual welding, a standard industrial task. The experiments are performed with the 7 degrees of freedom KUKA lightweight robot arm. The robot is controlled in admittance using a force sensor attached at the end-point, so as to act as a free-mass and be passively guided by the human. For impedance measurements, a set of nine subjects perform 12 repetitions of airbrush painting, drawing a straight-line on a cartoon horizontally placed on a table, while passively moving the airbrush mounted on the robot's end-point. We measure hand impedance during the painting task by generating sudden and brief external forces with the robot. The results show that on average the dominant hand displays larger impedance than the nondominant in the directions perpendicular to the painting line. We find the most significant difference in the damping values in these directions. Based on this observation, we develop a "directional damping" scheme for robotic assistance and conduct a pilot study with 12 subjects to contrast airbrush painting with and without robotic assistance. Results show significant improvement in precision with both dominant and nondominant hands when using robotic assistance. PMID:25148680

  12. Resummation of Large Endpoint Corrections to Color-Octet J/psi Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Fleming; Adam K. Leibovich; Thomas Mehen

    2006-07-27

    An unresolved problem in J/{psi} phenomenology is a systematic understanding of the differential photoproduction cross section, d{sigma}/dz [{gamma} + p {yields} J/{psi} + X], where z = E{sub {psi}}/E{sub {gamma}} in the proton rest frame. In the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism, fixed-order perturbative calculations of color-octet mechanisms suffer from large perturbative and nonperturbative corrections that grow rapidly in the endpoint region, z {yields} 1. In this paper, NRQCD and soft collinear effective theory are combined to resum these large corrections to the color-octet photoproduction cross section. We derive a factorization theorem for the endpoint differential cross section involving the parton distribution function and the color-octet J/{psi} shape functions. A one loop matching calculation explicitly confirms our factorization theorem at next-to-leading order. Large perturbative corrections are resummed using the renormalization group. The calculation of the color-octet contribution to d{sigma}/dz is in qualitative agreement with data. Quantitative tests of the universality of color-octet matrix elements require improved knowledge of shape functions entering these calculations as well as resummation of the color-singlet contribution which accounts for much of the total cross section and also peaks near the endpoint.

  13. Effects of the polycyclic musk HHCB on individual- and population-level endpoints in Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Signe; Selck, Henriette; Salvito, Daniel; Forbes, Valery

    2009-05-01

    Although the polycyclic musk 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta[gamma]-2-benzopyran (HHCB) is frequently detected in aquatic sediments, very little is known about its effects on sediment-feeding organisms. Effects of sediment-associated HHCB on growth, feeding rate, survival and reproduction in the gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum were measured in the laboratory. Snails were exposed to six nominal HHCB concentrations: 0, 0.1, 1, 10, 30 and 100microg g(-1) dry weight (dw) sediment. Adult survival and growth were not affected by HHCB. However, juvenile growth and survival, reproduction, time to first reproduction and adult feeding rate were more sensitive endpoints and declined with increasing HHCB concentration. Individual-level endpoints for P. antipodarum were integrated into a population model to investigate the effects of HHCB on population growth rate. Under otherwise favorable laboratory conditions, population growth rate was slightly (by ca. 2%), but not significantly, reduced with increasing HHCB exposure concentration. Model simulations were performed to explore the consequences of HHCB exposure under more ecologically realistic conditions (i.e., survival and reproduction of unexposed snails were markedly reduced relative to the laboratory). The results suggest that despite detectable effects of HHCB on individual-level endpoints measured in the laboratory, impacts on population dynamics of this deposit feeder are not likely to occur at environmentally relevant exposure concentrations.

  14. End-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands and robotic assistance with directional damping.

    PubMed

    Erden, Mustafa Suphi; Billard, Aude

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to perform end-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands while doing airbrush painting and to use the results for developing a robotic assistance scheme. We study airbrush painting because it resembles in many ways manual welding, a standard industrial task. The experiments are performed with the 7 degrees of freedom KUKA lightweight robot arm. The robot is controlled in admittance using a force sensor attached at the end-point, so as to act as a free-mass and be passively guided by the human. For impedance measurements, a set of nine subjects perform 12 repetitions of airbrush painting, drawing a straight-line on a cartoon horizontally placed on a table, while passively moving the airbrush mounted on the robot's end-point. We measure hand impedance during the painting task by generating sudden and brief external forces with the robot. The results show that on average the dominant hand displays larger impedance than the nondominant in the directions perpendicular to the painting line. We find the most significant difference in the damping values in these directions. Based on this observation, we develop a "directional damping" scheme for robotic assistance and conduct a pilot study with 12 subjects to contrast airbrush painting with and without robotic assistance. Results show significant improvement in precision with both dominant and nondominant hands when using robotic assistance.

  15. Resummation of large endpoint corrections to color-octet J/{psi} photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Sean; Leibovich, Adam K.; Mehen, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    An unresolved problem in J/{psi} phenomenology is a systematic understanding of the differential photoproduction cross section, d{sigma}/dz[{gamma}+p{yields}J/{psi}+X], where z=E{sub {psi}}/E{sub {gamma}} in the proton rest frame. In the nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism, fixed-order perturbative calculations of color-octet mechanisms suffer from large perturbative and nonperturbative corrections that grow rapidly in the endpoint region, z{yields}1. In this paper, NRQCD and soft collinear effective theory are combined to resum these large corrections to the color-octet photoproduction cross section. We derive a factorization theorem for the endpoint differential cross section involving the parton distribution function and the color-octet J/{psi} shape functions. A one-loop matching calculation explicitly confirms our factorization theorem at next-to-leading order. Large perturbative corrections are resummed using the renormalization group. The calculation of the color-octet contribution to d{sigma}/dz is in qualitative agreement with data. Quantitative tests of the universality of color-octet matrix elements require improved knowledge of shape functions entering these calculations as well as resummation of the color-singlet contribution which accounts for much of the total cross section and also peaks near the endpoint.

  16. mRNA profiling for body fluid identification by reverse transcription endpoint PCR and realtime PCR.

    PubMed

    Haas, C; Klesser, B; Maake, C; Bär, W; Kratzer, A

    2009-03-01

    mRNA profiling is a promising new method for the identification of body fluids from biological stains. Major advantages of mRNA profiling are the possibility of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction and of simultaneously isolating DNA without loss of material. A reverse transcription endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and a realtime PCR assay were established for the identification of blood, saliva, semen, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood, and were compared to conventional enzymatic and immunologic tests. The results for specificity, sensitivity and suitability to biological stains were satisfying and mRNA stability was demonstrated for up to 2-year-old stains. Two novel multiplex assays were created with the endpoint PCR primers: multiplex 1 amplifies two markers for each of the above mentioned body fluids and is suited for screening; multiplex 2 was designed for the detection of blood, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood. The results demonstrate that both endpoint PCR and realtime PCR are suitable for the identification of body fluids in forensic stains and represent an effective alternative to conventional enzymatic and immunologic tests.

  17. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character. PMID:26069577

  18. Association of Vitamin D Status and Acute Rhinosinusitis: Results From the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2006.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Ayesha N; Ladha, Karim S; Luong, Amber U; Quraishi, Sadeq A

    2015-10-01

    Although vitamin D status may be a modifiable risk factor for various respiratory ailments, limited data exists regarding its role in sinonasal infections. Our goal was to investigate the association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels with acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) in a large, nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized individuals from the United States. In this cross-sectional study of individuals ≥ 17 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2006, we used multivariable regression analysis to investigate the association of 25OHD levels with ARS, while adjusting for season, demographics (age, sex, race, and poverty-to-income ratio), and clinical data (smoking, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, and neutropenia). A total of 3921 individuals were included in our analyses. Median 25OHD level was 22 (interquartile range 16-28) ng/mL. Overall, 15.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.4-17.7) of participants reported ARS within the 24 hours leading up to their survey participation. After adjusting for season, demographics, and clinical data, 25OHD levels were associated with ARS (odds ratio 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-0.99 per 10 ng/mL). When vitamin D status was dichotomized, 25OHD levels < 20 ng/mL were associated with 33% higher odds of ARS (odds ratio 1.33, 95% CI 1.03-1.72) compared with levels ≥ 20 ng/mL. Our analyses suggest that 25OHD levels are inversely associated with ARS. Randomized, controlled trials are warranted to determine the effect of optimizing vitamin D status on the risk of sinonasal infections. PMID:26447998

  19. Association of Vitamin D Status and Acute Rhinosinusitis: Results From the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2006.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Ayesha N; Ladha, Karim S; Luong, Amber U; Quraishi, Sadeq A

    2015-10-01

    Although vitamin D status may be a modifiable risk factor for various respiratory ailments, limited data exists regarding its role in sinonasal infections. Our goal was to investigate the association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels with acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) in a large, nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized individuals from the United States. In this cross-sectional study of individuals ≥ 17 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2006, we used multivariable regression analysis to investigate the association of 25OHD levels with ARS, while adjusting for season, demographics (age, sex, race, and poverty-to-income ratio), and clinical data (smoking, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, and neutropenia). A total of 3921 individuals were included in our analyses. Median 25OHD level was 22 (interquartile range 16-28) ng/mL. Overall, 15.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.4-17.7) of participants reported ARS within the 24 hours leading up to their survey participation. After adjusting for season, demographics, and clinical data, 25OHD levels were associated with ARS (odds ratio 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-0.99 per 10 ng/mL). When vitamin D status was dichotomized, 25OHD levels < 20 ng/mL were associated with 33% higher odds of ARS (odds ratio 1.33, 95% CI 1.03-1.72) compared with levels ≥ 20 ng/mL. Our analyses suggest that 25OHD levels are inversely associated with ARS. Randomized, controlled trials are warranted to determine the effect of optimizing vitamin D status on the risk of sinonasal infections.

  20. Clinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 2: endpoint definitions: A consensus document from the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-08-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of trans- catheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives.

  1. Clinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 2: endpoint definitions: A consensus document from the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-08-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of trans- catheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26170468

  2. Role of patient-reported outcomes and other efficacy endpoints in the drug approval process in Europe (2008-2012).

    PubMed

    Bansal, Dipika; Bhagat, Anil; Schifano, Fabrizio; Gudala, Kapil

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed at systematically reviewing the role and extent of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) usage within the package of scientific evidence considered for marketing authorization (MA). All regulatory information published by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for products authorized between January 2008 and December 2012 and appearing in the European Public Assessment Report (EPAR) database was examined for efficacy endpoints. The endpoints here considered included: PROs, clinician reported outcomes (CROs), and laboratory reported outcomes (LROs). LROs were the most frequently reported endpoints. Out of the 180 products here selected, 99 (55%), 67 (37%), and 30 (17%), respectively, used LROs, CROs and PROs as primary endpoints (PEs). PROs as any endpoints were used in 82 (46%) products. Out of these, PROs were documented as PE in 30 (37%), with 27 (33%) products having used PROs both as primary and non-PEs. PRO usage was most frequently identified with nervous system and antineoplastic agents. During the study period, the use of all the three types of endpoints appeared to be static. Both the regulatory bodies and the industry should ensure complete and clear reporting of all endpoints used, including PROs, to improve transparency. PMID:26031612

  3. Acute asthma during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Stenius-Aarniala, B. S.; Hedman, J.; Teramo, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute asthma during pregnancy is potentially dangerous to the fetus. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute attack of asthma during pregnancy on the course of pregnancy or delivery, or the health of the newborn infant, and to identify undertreatment as a possible cause of the exacerbations. METHODS: Five hundred and four pregnant asthmatic subjects were prospectively followed and treated. The data on 47 patients with an attack of asthma during pregnancy were compared with those of 457 asthmatics with no recorded acute exacerbation and with 237 healthy parturients. RESULTS: Of 504 asthmatics, 177 patients were not initially treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Of these, 17% had an acute attack compared with only 4% of the 257 patients who had been on inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment from the start of pregnancy. There were no differences between the groups as to length of gestation, length of the third stage of labour, or amount of haemorrhage after delivery. No differences were observed between pregnancies with and without an exacerbation with regard to relative birth weight, incidence of malformations, hypoglycaemia, or need for phototherapy for jaundice during the neonatal period. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inadequate inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment during pregnancy run a higher risk of suffering an acute attack of asthma than those treated with an anti-inflammatory agent. However, if the acute attack of asthma is relatively mild and promptly treated, it does not have a serious effect on the pregnancy, delivery, or the health of the newborn infant. PMID:8733495

  4. Evaluation of multiple mechanism-based toxicity endpoints in primary cultured human hepatocytes for the identification of drugs with clinical hepatotoxicity: Results from 152 marketed drugs with known liver injury profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Doshi, Utkarsh; Suzuki, Ayako; Chang, Ching-Wei; Borlak, Jürgen; Li, Albert P; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-01

    We report here the results of a collaborative research program to develop a robust and reliable in vitro system to allow an accurate definition of the drug-induced liver injury (DILI) potential of new drug entities during drug development. The in vitro hepatotoxic potential of 152 drugs with known DILI profiles were evaluated in primary cultured human hepatocytes with four mechanistically-relevant endpoints: cellular ATP depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) depletion, and caspase activation for apoptosis. The drugs, 80 in the testing set and 72 in the validation set, were classified based on serious clinical/regulatory outcomes as defined by reported acute liver failure, black-box warning, and/or withdrawal. The drugs were further sub-categorized for dominant types of liver injury. Logistic regression models were performed to calculate the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) and to evaluate the prediction potential of the selected endpoints for serious clinical/regulatory outcomes. The ROS/ATP ratio was found to yield an excellent AUROC in both the testing (0.8989, P < 0.0001) and validation set (0.8545, P < 0.0001), and was found to distinguish drugs associated with severe from non-severe DILI cases (p < 0.0001). The results suggest that evaluation of drugs in primary human hepatocytes using the ROS/ATP ratio endpoint may aid the definition of their potential to cause severe DILI. PMID:26581450

  5. Deliberations and evaluations of the approaches, endpoints and paradigms for magnesium dietary recommendations.

    PubMed

    Shils, M E; Rude, R K

    1996-09-01

    The working group on magnesium considered a number of issues relevant to establishing allowances and to providing other pertinent information on this ion for the next edition of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA). An accurate and specific marker for assessing the importance of magnesium nutriture in health and disease remains to be identified. Thus, it is unknown whether marginal magnesium depletion results in a disease. Although it is apparent that abnormal serum concentrations are unusual and obvious signs of acute depletion of magnesium are absent in the U.S. populace, one cannot assume that the associated cellular and intracellular pool sizes are optimal for health. There is a need for systematic studies of these and other parameters in healthy individuals with controlled intakes and during depletion. To address the question of how magnesium allowances should be set, previous editions of the RDA that included magnesium were reviewed; this review indicated the need for the adoption of objective criteria for acceptance of published balance studies and the inclusion in the discussion of an analysis of the balance studies and the specific calculations used in establishing the RDA. Such criteria and evaluations should be placed in a technical addendum to allow readers to evaluate the data. It is recommended that future RDA Committees consider expressing metabolic balance data on a basis other than weight, e.g., energy expenditure, lean body mass or body cell mass. Claims that magnesium nutriture has a role in preventing or ameliorating chronic disease such as heart disease and hypertension need to be critically evaluated if they are to be used to set the next RDA. The pharmacologic effects of magnesium are significant and need to be recognized. Because excess oral magnesium can be toxic to persons with advanced renal disease, more attention should be given to this topic by future RDA Committees.

  6. 40 CFR 799.9135 - TSCA acute inhalation toxicity with histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exposure and to characterize toxicologic response following acute high exposures. The latter is of... pulmonary toxicity by examining biochemical and cytologic endpoints of material from the lungs of animals... additional functional and morphological evaluations may be necessary to assess completely the...

  7. 40 CFR 799.9135 - TSCA acute inhalation toxicity with histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exposure and to characterize toxicologic response following acute high exposures. The latter is of... pulmonary toxicity by examining biochemical and cytologic endpoints of material from the lungs of animals... additional functional and morphological evaluations may be necessary to assess completely the...

  8. Design of clinical trials in acute kidney injury: report from an NIDDK workshop on trial methodology.

    PubMed

    Palevsky, Paul M; Molitoris, Bruce A; Okusa, Mark D; Levin, Adeera; Waikar, Sushrut S; Wald, Ron; Chertow, Glenn M; Murray, Patrick T; Parikh, Chirag R; Shaw, Andrew D; Go, Alan S; Faubel, Sarah G; Kellum, John A; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Liu, Kathleen D; Cheung, Alfred K; Weisbord, Steven D; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kaufman, James S; Devarajan, Prasad; Toto, Robert M; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Greene, Tom; Mehta, Ravindra L; Stokes, John B; Thompson, Aliza M; Thompson, B Taylor; Westenfelder, Christof S; Tumlin, James A; Warnock, David G; Shah, Sudhir V; Xie, Yining; Duggan, Emily G; Kimmel, Paul L; Star, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a complex clinical problem associated with significant short-term morbidity and mortality and lacking effective pharmacologic interventions. Patients with AKI experience longer-term risks for progressive chronic ESRD, which diminish patients' health-related quality of life and create a larger burden on the healthcare system. Although experimental models have yielded numerous promising agents, translation into clinical practice has been unsuccessful, possibly because of issues in clinical trial design, such as delayed drug administration, masking of therapeutic benefit by adverse events, and inadequate sample size. To address issues of clinical trial design, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases sponsored a workshop titled "Clinical Trials in Acute Kidney Injury: Current Opportunities and Barriers" in December 2010. Workshop participants included representatives from academia, industry, and government agencies whose areas of expertise spanned basic science, clinical nephrology, critical care medicine, biostatistics, pharmacology, and drug development. This document summarizes the discussions of collaborative workgroups that addressed issues related to patient selection, study endpoints, the role of novel biomarkers, sample size and power calculations, and adverse events and pilot/feasibility studies in prevention and treatment of AKI. Companion articles outline the discussions of workgroups for model trials related to prevention or treatment of established AKI in different clinical settings, such as in patients with sepsis.

  9. Acute kidney injury: short-term and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Doyle, James F; Forni, Lui G

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most common cause of organ dysfunction in critically ill adults, with a single episode of AKI, regardless of stage, carrying a significant morbidity and mortality risk. Since the consensus on AKI nomenclature has been reached, data reflecting outcomes have become more apparent allowing investigation of both short- and long-term outcomes.Classically the short-term effects of AKI can be thought of as those reflecting an acute deterioration in renal function per se. However, the effects of AKI, especially with regard to distant organ function ("organ cross-talk"), are being elucidated as is the increased susceptibility to other conditions. With regards to the long-term effects, the consideration that outcome is a simple binary endpoint of dialysis or not, or survival or not, is overly simplistic, with the reality being much more complex.Also discussed are currently available treatment strategies to mitigate these adverse effects, as they have the potential to improve patient outcome and provide considerable economic health savings. Moving forward, an agreement for defining renal recovery is warranted if we are to assess and extrapolate the efficacy of novel therapies. Future research should focus on targeted therapies assessed by measure of long-term outcomes. PMID:27373891

  10. Eletriptan: a review of its use in the acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L; Keating, Gillian M

    2006-01-01

    Eletriptan (Relpax) is an orally administered, lipophilic, highly selective serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist ('triptan') that is effective in the acute treatment of moderate to severe migraine attacks in adults. It has a rapid onset of action and demonstrates superiority over placebo as early as 30 minutes after the administration of a single 40 or 80 mg oral dose. The efficacy of eletriptan 20 mg was similar to that of sumatriptan 100 mg, while eletriptan 40 and 80 mg displayed greater efficacy than sumatriptan 50 or 100 mg for most endpoints. Eletriptan 40 mg was generally superior to naratriptan 2.5 mg and equivalent to almotriptan 12.5 mg, rizatriptan 10 mg and zolmitriptan 2.5 mg, while eletriptan 80 mg was superior to zolmitriptan 2.5 mg for most efficacy parameters. Eletriptan 40 and 80 mg were consistently superior to ergotamine/caffeine. Eletriptan is generally well tolerated, reduces time lost from normal activities, improves patients' health-related quality of life and appears to be at least as, if not more, cost effective than sumatriptan. Eletriptan is therefore a useful addition to the triptan family and a first-line treatment option in the acute management of migraine attacks. PMID:16789799

  11. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  12. Communication and care in an acute cancer center: the effects of patients' willingness to communicate about health, health-care environment perceptions, and health status on information seeking, participation in care practices, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kevin B; Frey, Lawrence R

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the role of willingness to communicate about health (WTCH) among older patients in a state-of-the-art cancer center. Specifically, relationships were examined between patients' WTCH and their information seeking, perceptions of coping activities the center offered, and satisfaction with the center. The study also explored how those relationships may be mediated by patients' perceptions of the health-care environment and their health status. The results indicated that WTCH may play an important role in predicting information-seeking behaviors, perceived helpfulness of center-sponsored activities, and overall satisfaction with care received at the center. Evidence also was found that perceptions of the health-care environment mediated cancer patients' WTCH. The implications of these findings for communication theory and application, as well as limitations and future directions for research, are discussed.

  13. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  14. Heart failure therapeutics on the basis of a biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor. Rationale and design of the BLAST-AHF study (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure).

    PubMed

    Felker, G Michael; Butler, Javed; Collins, Sean P; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Levy, Phillip D; Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Soergel, David G; Teerlink, John R; Violin, Jonathan D; Voors, Adriaan A; Pang, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    The BLAST-AHF (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure) study is designed to test the efficacy and safety of TRV027, a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor, in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). AHF remains a major public health problem, and no currently-available therapies have been shown to favorably affect outcomes. TRV027 is a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor that antagonizes angiotensin-stimulated G-protein activation while stimulating β-arrestin. In animal models, these effects reduce afterload while increasing cardiac performance and maintaining stroke volume. In initial human studies, TRV027 appears to be hemodynamically active primarily in patients with activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, a potentially attractive profile for an AHF therapeutic. BLAST-AHF is an international prospective, randomized, phase IIb, dose-ranging study that will randomize up to 500 AHF patients with systolic blood pressure ≥120 mm Hg and ≤200 mm Hg within 24 h of initial presentation to 1 of 3 doses of intravenous TRV027 (1, 5, or 25 mg/h) or matching placebo (1:1:1:1) for at least 48 h and up to 96 h. The primary endpoint is a composite of 5 clinical endpoints (dyspnea, worsening heart failure, length of hospital stay, 30-day rehospitalization, and 30-day mortality) combined using an average z-score. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of dyspnea and change in amino-terminal pro-