Science.gov

Sample records for acute hemodynamic response

  1. Acute hemodynamic responses to weightlessness in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Elton, K. F.; Holt, T. A.; Mukai, C.; Bennett, B. S.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    As NASA designs space flights requiring prolonged periods of weightlessness for a broader segment of the population, it will be important to know the acute and sustained effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular system since this information will contribute to understanding of the clinical pharmacology of drugs administered in space. Due to operational constraints on space flights, earliest effects of weightlessness have not been documented. We examined hemodynamic responses of humans to transitions from acceleration to weightlessness during parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Impedance cardiography data were collected over four sets of 8-10 parabolas, with a brief rest period between sets. Each parabola included a period of 1.8 Gz, then approximately 20 seconds of weightlessness, and finally a period of 1.6 Gz; the cycle repeated almost immediately for the remainder of the set. Subjects were semi-supine (Shuttle launch posture) for the first set, then randomly supine, sitting and standing for each subsequent set. Transition to weightlessness while standing produced decreased heart rate, increased thoracic fluid content, and increased stroke index. Surprisingly, the onset of weightlessness in the semi-supine posture produced little evidence of a headward fluid shift. Heart rate, stroke index, and cardiac index are virtually unchanged after 20 seconds of weightlessness, and thoracic fluid content is slightly decreased. Semi-supine responses run counter to Shuttle crewmember reports of noticeable fluid shift after minutes to hours in orbit. Apparently, the headward fluid shift commences in the semi-supine posture before launch. is augmented by launch acceleration, but briefly interrupted immediately in orbit, then resumes and is completed over the next hours.

  2. Creatine supplementation attenuates hemodynamic and arterial stiffness responses following an acute bout of isokinetic exercise.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A; Wieder, Ralph; Kim, Jeong-Su; Vicil, Florence; Figueroa, Arturo

    2011-09-01

    Arterial stiffness and hemodynamics may be increased following a bout of resistance exercise. Oral creatine supplementation (Cr) may attenuate cardiovascular responses after exercise via improved anaerobic metabolism. This study was aimed to determine the effect of Cr on hemodynamic and arterial stiffness responses after acute isokinetic exercise. Sixteen healthy males (22.6 ± 0.6 year) were randomly assigned to either placebo (Pl, n = 8) or Cr (n = 8) (2 × 5 g/day) for 3 weeks. Brachial systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and leg PWV were measured in the supine position at rest before and after the interventions. After the supplementation period, parameters were also measured 5 min (PE5) and 15 min (PE15) after two sets of leg isokinetic exercise. There was no difference between the groups in resting measurements before and after the supplementation. Compared with the Pl group, the Cr group had attenuated (P < 0.05) increases in SBP at PE5 (Pl 14.0 ± 2.5, Cr 5.6 ± 2.3 mmHg), HR at both P5 (Pl 28 ± 4 vs. Cr 16 ± 2 beats/min) and PE15 (Pl 21 ± 3, Cr 11 ± 2 beats/min) and rate pressure product at P5 (Pl 45.8 ± 6.4, Cr 24.8 ± 2.2) and P15 (Pl 34.2 ± 5.0, Cr 15.9 ± 6.0). Compared with the Pl group, the Cr group had suppressed increases in baPWV at PE5 (Pl 1.5 ± 0.4, Cr -0.1 ± 0.4 m/s) and PE15 (Pl 1.1 ± 0.2, Cr -0.3 ± 0.3 m/s) and returned SBP to pre-exercise values at PE15 (Pl 10.6 ± 2.8, Cr 2.1 ± 2.6 mmHg). PWV in the exercised leg decreased at PE5 in both groups. These findings suggest that Cr supplementation attenuates the hemodynamic and baPWV responses after acute isokinetic exercise.

  3. Hemodynamic responses to acute aortic coarctation in conscious sinoaortic denervated rats.

    PubMed

    Fazan Júnior, R; Machado, B H; Salgado, H C

    1997-10-01

    The hemodynamic responses to acute (45 min) partial aortic constriction were studied in conscious intact (N = 7) or sinoaortic denervated (SAD) adult male Wistar rats (280-350 g, N = 7) implanted with carotid and femoral arterial catheters, a pneumatic cuff around the abdominal aorta and a pulsed Doppler flow probe to measure changes in aortic resistance. In addition, the hypertensive response and the reflex bradycardia elicited by total (N = 8) vs partial (N = 7) aortic constriction (monitored by maintenance of the pressure distal to the cuff at 50 mmHg) were compared in two other groups of intact rats. Intact rats presented a smaller hypertensive response (26 to 40% above basal level) to partial aortic constriction than SAD rats (38 to 58%). The calculated change in aortic resistance imposed by constriction of the aorta increased progressively only in intact rats, but was significantly smaller (193 to 306%) than that observed (501 to 591%) in SAD rats. Intact rats showed a significant bradycardia (23 to 26% change in basal heart rate) throughout coarctation, whereas the SAD rats did not (1 to 3%). Partial or total occlusion of the aorta induced similar hypertensive responses (37-38% vs 24-30% for total constriction) as well as reflex bradycardia (-15 to -17% vs -22 to -33%) despite a greater gradient in pressure (97-98 vs 129-140 mmHg) caused by total constriction. The present data indicate that the integrity of the baroreflex in intact rats can cause the hypertensive response to level off at a lower value than in SAD rats despite a progressive increase in aortic resistance. In addition, they also indicate that the degree of partial aortic constriction by maintenance of the pressure distal to the cuff at 50 mmHg already elicits a maximal stimulation of the arterial baroreflex.

  4. Acute Cardiovascular and Hemodynamic Responses to Low Intensity Eccentric Resistance Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bazgir, Behzad; Rezazadeh Valojerdi, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid; Fathi, Rouhollah; Ojaghi, Seyed Mojtaba; Emami Meybodi, Mohammad Kazem; Neto, Gabriel R.; Rahimi, Mostafa; Asgari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently it has been suggested that low intensity (LI) resistance exercise (RE) alone or in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR) can be applied for cardiovascular function improvement or rehabilitation. Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of LI eccentric RE with and without BFR on heart rate (HR), rate pressure product (RPP), blood pressure (BP) parameters [systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure (MAP)], oxygen saturation (SpO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE). Methods In a semi-experimental study 16 young adults (26.18 ± 3.67 years) volunteered and performed LI (30% maximum voluntary contraction) eccentric RE alone or combined with BFR. Results The results indicated that HR, RPP, and RPE increased significantly within both groups (P < 0.05); SBP and DBP increased significantly only with BFR (P < 0.05); MAP increased significantly during exercise without BFR (P < 0.05); and no change was observed in SpO2 in either groups (P > 0.05). Furthermore, studied parameters did not vary amongst different groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions It is concluded that LI eccentric RE with BFR positively regulated the hemodynamic and cardiovascular responses. Therefore, the eccentric RE combined with BFR seems to be a good option for future studies with the aim of time efficacy, since it alters these parameters within normal values. PMID:28144415

  5. Central hemodynamic responses during acute high-intensity interval exercise and moderate continuous exercise in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Mathieu; Normandin, Eve; Meyer, Philippe; Juneau, Martin; Haykowsky, Mark; Nigam, Anil

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the acute hemodynamic responses during high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) session compared with moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE) session in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). Thirteen patients with HFREF (age, 59 ± 6 years; left ventricular ejection fraction, 27% ± 6%; New York Heart Association class I to III) were randomly assigned to a single session of HIIE (2 × 8 min) corresponding to 30 s at 100% of peak power output (PPO) and 30 s passive recovery intervals or to a MICE (22 min) at 60% of PPO. Gas exchange and central hemodynamic parameters (cardiac bioimpedance) were measured continuously during exercise. Oxygen uptake, stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and arterio-venous difference (C(a-v)O(2)) were compared. Mean oxygen uptake and ventilation were lower during HIIE vs. MICE. CO, SV, and C(a-v)O(2)) were not different between MICE and HIIE. Optimized HIIE was well tolerated (similar perceived exertion) and no significant ventricular arrhythmias and (or) abnormal blood pressure responses occurred during HIEE session. Compared with MICE, optimized HIIE elicited similar central hemodynamic and C(a-v)O(2) responses in HFREF patients with lower oxygen uptake and ventilation. HIIE may be an efficient exercise training modality in patients with HFREF.

  6. Variability of hemodynamic responses to acute digitalization in chronic cardiac failure due to cardiomyopathy and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Cohn, K; Selzer, A; Kersh, E S; Karpman, L S; Goldschlager, N

    1975-04-01

    Eight patients with chronic congestive heart failure (four with cardiomyopathy and four with ischemic heart disease) underwent hemodynamic studies during acute administration of digoxin, given intravenously in two 0-5 mg doses 2 hours apart. Observations were made before administration of digitalis (control period) and serially therafter for 4 hours after the first dose. Resting mean cardiac index and pulmonary arterial wedge pressure were as follows: 2.0 liters/min per m2 and 23 mm Hg (control period); 2.1 and 24 (at 1 hour); 2.0 and 23 (at 2 hours); 2.7 and 19 (at 3 hours); and 2.3 and 20 (at 4 hours). Exercise responses of mean cardiac index and pulmonary arterial wedge pressure in five patients were: 3.1 liters/min per m2 and 36 mm Hg (control period); 3.2 and 33 (at 1 hour); 3.2 and 28 (at 2 hours); 3.1 and 27 (at.3 hours); and 3.4 and 31 (at 4 hours). The pulmonary arterial wedge pressure remained elevated during exercise in all cases. Arrhythmias were seen in five patients after administration of 0.5 mg of digoxin. Hemodynamic improvement at 4 hours involving both reduced filling pressure and increased blood flow was observed in only two patients at rest and in one additional patient during exercise. Acute deterioration of cardiac function (elevated pulmonary arterial wedge pressure of decreased cardiac index) occurred 30 minutes after administration of digoxin in four patients, concomitantly with increased systemic resistance. In six patients, a peak hemodynamic effect appeared 1 to 1 1/2 hours after administration of digoxin, with partial or total loss of initial benefit by 2 and 4 hours. In previously performed studies observations have seldom exceeded 1 hour; the results of this 4 hour study suggest that, in patients with cardiomyopathy or coronary artery disease and chronic congestive heart failure, acute digitalization does not necessarily lead to consistent, marked or lasting hemodynamic improvement. Thus, current concepts of the use of digitalis is

  7. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  8. Review: hemodynamic response to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    Historically, and at present, carbon monoxide is a major gaseous poison responsible for widespread morbidity and mortality. From threshold to maximal nonlethal levels, a variety of cardiovascular changes occur, both immediately and in the long term, whose homeostatic function it is to renormalize tissue oxygen delivery. However, notwithstanding numerous studies over the past century, the literature remains equivocal regarding the hemodynamic responses in animals and humans, although CO hypoxia is clearly different in several respects from hypoxic hypoxia. Factors complicating interpretation of experimental findings include species, CO dose level and rate, route of CO delivery, duration, level of exertion, state of consciousness, and anesthetic agent used. Augmented cardiac output usually observed with moderate COHb may be compromised in more sever poisoning for the same reasons, such that regional or global ischemia result. The hypotension usually seen in most animal studies is thought to be a primary cause of CNS damage resulting from acute CO poisoning, yet the exact mechanism(s) remains unproven in both animals and humans, as does the way in which CO produces hypotension. This review briefly summarizes the literature relevant to the short- and long-term hemodynamic responses reported in animals and humans. It concludes by presenting an overview using data from a single species in which the most complete work has been done to date.

  9. Lower-limb hot-water immersion acutely induces beneficial hemodynamic and cardiovascular responses in peripheral arterial disease and healthy, elderly controls.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kate N; van Rij, André M; Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D

    2017-03-01

    Passive heat induces beneficial perfusion profiles, provides substantive cardiovascular strain, and reduces blood pressure, thereby holding potential for healthy and cardiovascular disease populations. The aim of this study was to assess acute responses to passive heat via lower-limb, hot-water immersion in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and healthy, elderly controls. Eleven patients with PAD (age 71 ± 6 yr, 7 male, 4 female) and 10 controls (age 72 ± 7 yr, 8 male, 2 female) underwent hot-water immersion (30-min waist-level immersion in 42.1 ± 0.6°C water). Before, during, and following immersion, brachial and popliteal artery diameter, blood flow, and shear stress were assessed using duplex ultrasound. Lower-limb perfusion was measured also using venous occlusion plethysmography and near-infrared spectroscopy. During immersion, shear rate increased (P < 0.0001) comparably between groups in the popliteal artery (controls: +183 ± 26%; PAD: +258 ± 54%) and brachial artery (controls: +117 ± 24%; PAD: +107 ± 32%). Lower-limb blood flow increased significantly in both groups, as measured from duplex ultrasound (>200%), plethysmography (>100%), and spectroscopy, while central and peripheral pulse-wave velocity decreased in both groups. Mean arterial blood pressure was reduced by 22 ± 9 mmHg (main effect P < 0.0001, interaction P = 0.60) during immersion, and remained 7 ± 7 mmHg lower 3 h afterward. In PAD, popliteal shear profiles and claudication both compared favorably with those measured immediately following symptom-limited walking. A 30-min hot-water immersion is a practical means of delivering heat therapy to PAD patients and healthy, elderly individuals to induce appreciable systemic (chronotropic and blood pressure lowering) and hemodynamic (upper and lower-limb perfusion and shear rate increases) responses.

  10. Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose on the pharmacokinetics of fructose and acute metabolic and hemodynamic responses in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Le, Myphuong T; Frye, Reginald F; Rivard, Christopher J; Cheng, Jing; McFann, Kim K; Segal, Mark S; Johnson, Richard J; Johnson, Julie A

    2012-05-01

    It is unclear whether high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which contains a higher amount of fructose and provides an immediate source of free fructose, induces greater systemic concentrations of fructose as compared with sucrose. It is also unclear whether exposure to higher levels of fructose leads to increased fructose-induced adverse effects. The objective was to prospectively compare the effects of HFCS- vs sucrose-sweetened soft drinks on acute metabolic and hemodynamic effects. Forty men and women consumed 24 oz of HFCS- or sucrose-sweetened beverages in a randomized crossover design study. Blood and urine samples were collected over 6 hours. Blood pressure, heart rate, fructose, and a variety of other metabolic biomarkers were measured. Fructose area under the curve and maximum concentration, dose-normalized glucose area under the curve and maximum concentration, relative bioavailability of glucose, changes in postprandial concentrations of serum uric acid, and systolic blood pressure maximum levels were higher when HFCS-sweetened beverages were consumed as compared with sucrose-sweetened beverages. Compared with sucrose, HFCS leads to greater fructose systemic exposure and significantly different acute metabolic effects.

  11. Hemodynamic response to the upright posture.

    PubMed

    Smith, J J; Porth, C M; Erickson, M

    1994-05-01

    The authors' objective was to review previous studies of immediate (first 30 seconds) and stabilized (30 seconds to 20 minutes) hemodynamic responses of healthy adults to the head-up posture, with particular reference to alteration of such responses in the elderly and the usefulness of such data in the diagnosis of orthostatic hypotension. The immediate response in healthy young adults is characterized by a prompt rise in heart rate, which peaks at about 8 to 15 seconds and then tapers; the arterial pressure and total vascular resistance decrease sharply at 5 to 10 seconds, followed by a rapid rebound and overshoot. Over the first 30 seconds there is a steady parallel decline of thoracic blood volume and stroke volume; there is also an initial surge of cardiac output followed by a steady decrease. During the stabilized response (30 seconds to 20 minutes), the hemodynamic variables are relatively steady, showing average increases in heart rate of about 15 to 30%, in diastolic pressure of 10 to 15%, and in total vascular resistance of 30 to 40%; during the 5th to 20th minutes there are also decreases in thoracic blood volume averaging about 25 to 30%, in cardiac output 15 to 30%, and in pulse pressure about 5 to 10%. It is evident that in normal human subjects, assumption of the upright posture results in profound hemodynamic changes, most of them occurring during the first 30 seconds. In elderly subjects (aged 60-69 years), there are, in the upright posture, lesser increments of heart rate and diastolic pressure, but no significant differences from younger age groups in the response of thoracic blood volume, cardiac output or total vascular resistance. However, beginning at about age 75, there is an increasing incidence of orthostatic hypotension, which averages about 14 to 20% at age 75 and older. The tendency toward orthostatic hypotension in the elderly is due (1) to the structural and functional changes in the circulation itself, (2) to a decline in autonomic

  12. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  13. Acute hypercalcemia and cardiac autotransplantation in dogs: long-term hemodynamic adaptability.

    PubMed

    Dumont, L; Stanley, P; Chartrand, C

    1986-11-01

    Cardiac autotransplantation (excision and reimplantation) is a unique model that isolates totally the cardiac afferent and efferent neural pathways and results in hemodynamic misadaptability to many provocative tests. Since the cardiovascular response to acute hypercalcemia is modulated by numerous factors among which the autonomic innervation plays a major role, the hemodynamic response to bolus administration of calcium gluconate was compared in normal and cardiac autotransplanted dogs. Twenty-two animals underwent an autotransplantation while a sham procedure was performed in 18 animals. Each dog was equipped with an electromagnetic flow probe positioned around the ascending aorta and with central venous and aortic catheters. Hemodynamic data were collected daily during 1 month, before and during rapid intravenous administration of calcium gluconate (0.90 mEq). Baseline hemodynamic studies indicate that for both groups myocardial failure is evident in the immediate postoperative period; despite progressive recovery, the autotransplants always show lower cardiovascular performance. Calcium administration elicits transient positive inotropism, which is more important in presence of myocardial failure; this is true for both control and autotransplanted dogs. In the early postoperative period, hemodynamic adaptability to this stress is impaired in the autotransplants. However, long-term results indicate that minimal differences subsist over time in response to calcium administration, and when they are observed, they result from interferences in baroreceptor regulation and reflexes.

  14. In Heart Failure Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block Single Lead MultiSpot Left Ventricular Pacing Does Not Improve Acute Hemodynamic Response To Conventional Biventricular Pacing. A Multicenter Prospective, Interventional, Non-Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterliński, Maciej; Sokal, Adam; Lenarczyk, Radosław; Van Heuverswyn, Frederic; Rinaldi, C. Aldo; Vanderheyden, Marc; Khalameizer, Vladimir; Francis, Darrel; Heynens, Joeri; Stegemann, Berthold; Cornelussen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent efforts to increase CRT response by multiSPOT pacing (MSP) from multiple bipols on the same left ventricular lead are still inconclusive. Aim The Left Ventricular (LV) MultiSPOTpacing for CRT (iSPOT) study compared the acute hemodynamic response of MSP pacing by using 3 electrodes on a quadripolar lead compared with conventional biventricular pacing (BiV). Methods Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent an acute hemodynamic study to determine the %change in LV+dP/dtmax from baseline atrial pacing compared to the following configurations: BiV pacing with the LV lead in a one of lateral veins, while pacing from the distal, mid, or proximal electrode and all 3 electrodes together (i.e. MSP). All measurements were repeated 4 times at 5 different atrioventricular delays. We also measured QRS-width and individual Q-LV durations. Results Protocol was completed in 24 patients, all with LBBB (QRS width 171±20 ms) and 58% ischemic aetiology. The percentage change in LV+dP/dtmax for MSP pacing was 31.0±3.3% (Mean±SE), which was not significantly superior to any BiV pacing configuration: 28.9±3.2% (LV-distal), 28.3±2.7% (LV-mid), and 29.5±3.0% (LV-prox), respectively. Correlation between LV+dP/dtmax and either QRS-width or Q-LV ratio was poor. Conclusions In patients with LBBB MultiSPOT LV pacing demonstrated comparable improvement in contractility to best conventional BiV pacing. Optimization of atrioventricular delay is important for the best performance for both BiV and MultiSPOT pacing configurations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01883141 PMID:27124724

  15. Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    A review is presented of the physical principles governing the distribution of blood flow and blood pressure in the vascular system. The main factors involved are the pulsatile driving pressure generated by the heart, the flow characteristics of blood, and the geometric structure and mechanical properties of the vessels. The relationship between driving pressure and flow in a given vessel can be understood by considering the viscous and inertial forces acting on the blood. Depending on the vessel diameter and other physical parameters, a wide variety of flow phenomena can occur. In large arteries, the propagation of the pressure pulse depends on the elastic properties of the artery walls. In the microcirculation, the fact that blood is a suspension of cells strongly influences its flow properties and leads to a non-uniform distribution of hematocrit among microvessels. The forces acting on vessel walls include shear stress resulting from blood flow and circumferential stress resulting from blood pressure. Biological responses to these forces are important in the control of blood flow and the structural remodeling of vessels, and also play a role in major disease processes including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Consideration of hemodynamics is essential for a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of the circulatory system. PMID:27065172

  16. Acute effects of ingesting Java Fit™ energy extreme functional coffee on resting energy expenditure and hemodynamic responses in male and female coffee drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lemuel W; Wilborn, Colin D; Harvey, Travis; Wismann, Jennifer; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2007-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a functional coffee beverage containing additional caffeine, green tea extracts, niacin and garcinia cambogia to regular coffee to determine the effects on resting energy expenditure (REE) and hemodynamic variables. Methods Subjects included five male (26 ± 2.1 y, 97.16 ± 10.05 kg, 183.89 ± 6.60 cm) and five female (28.8 ± 5.3 y, 142.2 ± 12.6 lbs) regular coffee drinkers. Subjects fasted for 10 hours and were assessed for 1 hour prior (PRE) and 3 hours following 1.5 cups of coffee ingestion [JavaFit™ Energy Extreme (JF) ~400 mg total caffeine; Folgers (F) ~200 mg total caffeine] in a double-blind, crossover design. REE, resting heart rate (RHR), and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure was assessed at PRE and 1, 2, and 3-hours post coffee ingestion. Data were analyzed by three-factor repeated measures ANOVA (p < 0.05). Results JF trial resulted in a significant main effect for REE (p < 0.01), SBP (p < 0.01), RER (p < 0.01), and VO2 (p < 0.01) compared to F, with no difference between trials on the RHR and DBP variables. A significant interaction for trial and time point (p < 0.05) was observed for the variable REE. The JF trial resulted in a significant overall mean increase in REE of 14.4% (males = 12.1%, females = 17.9%) over the observation period (p < 0.05), while the F trial produced an overall decrease in REE of 5.7%. SBP was significantly higher in the JF trial; however, there was no significant increase from PRE to 3-hours post. Conclusion Results from this study suggest that JavaFit™ Energy Extreme coffee is more effective than Folgers regular caffeinated coffee at increasing REE in regular coffee drinkers for up to 3 hours following ingestion without any adverse hemodynamic effects. PMID:17919327

  17. Hemodynamic and symptomatic effects of acute interventions on tilt in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, V. M.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Novak, V.; Low, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to alleviate symptoms in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Drugs reported to be of benefit include midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, and phenobarbital. Other measures used include volume expansion and physical countermaneuvers. These treatments may influence pathophysiologic mechanisms of POTS such as alpha-receptor dysfunction, beta-receptor supersensitivity, venous pooling, and brainstem center dysfunction. The authors prospectively studied hemodynamic indices and symptom scores in patients with POTS who were acutely treated with a variety of interventions. Twenty-one subjects who met the criteria for POTS were studied (20 women, 1 man; mean age, 28.7 +/- 6.8 y; age range, 14-39 y). Patients were studied with a 5-minute head-up tilt protocol, ECG monitoring, and noninvasive beat-to-beat blood pressure monitoring, all before and after the administration of an intervention (intravenous saline, midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, or phenobarbital). The hemodynamic indices studied were heart rate (ECG) and systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressure. Patients used a balanced verbal scale to record any change in their symptoms between the tilts. Symptom scores improved significantly after the patients received midodrine and saline. Midodrine and propranolol reduced the resting heart rate response to tilt (p <0.005) and the immediate and 5-minute heart rate responses to tilt (p <0.002). Clonidine accentuated the immediate decrease in blood pressure on tilt up (p <0.05). It was concluded that midodrine and intravenous saline are effective in decreasing symptoms on tilt in patients with POTS when given acutely. Effects of treatments on heart rate and blood pressure responses generally reflected the known pharmacologic mechanisms of the agents.

  18. Theoretical Analysis of the Relative Impact of Obesity on Hemodynamic Stability During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Jones, Alan E.; Coleman, Thomas G.; Summers, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that morbid obesity may be an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries. Objectives: In this study, a theoretic analysis using a derivation of the Guyton model of cardiovascular physiology examines the expected impact of obesity on hemodynamic changes in Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) and Cardiac Output (CO) during Hemorrhagic Shock (HS). Patients and Methods: Computer simulation studies were used to predict the relative impact of increasing Body Mass Index (BMI) on global hemodynamic parameters during HS. The analytic procedure involved recreating physiologic conditions associated with changing BMI for a virtual subject in an In Silico environment. The model was validated for the known effect of a BMI of 30 on iliofemoral venous pressures. Then, the relative effect of changing BMI on the outcome of target cardiovascular parameters was examined during simulated acute loss of blood volume in class II hemorrhage. The percent changes in these parameters were compared between the virtual nonobese and obese subjects. Model parameter values are derived from known population distributions, producing simulation outputs that can be used in a deductive systems analysis assessment rather than traditional frequentist statistical methodologies. Results: In hemorrhage simulation, moderate increases in BMI were found to produce greater decreases in MAP and CO compared to the normal subject. During HS, the virtual obese subject had 42% and 44% greater falls in CO and MAP, respectively, compared to the nonobese subject. Systems analysis of the model revealed that an increase in resistance to venous return due to changes in intra-abdominal pressure resulting from obesity was the critical mechanism responsible for the differences. Conclusions: This study suggests that obese patients in HS may have a higher risk of hemodynamic instability compared to their nonobese counterparts primarily due to obesity

  19. Neural correlates of single vessel hemodynamic responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    O'Herron, Philip; Chhatbar, Pratik Y; Levy, Manuel; Shen, Zhiming; Schramm, Adrien E; Lu, Zhongyang; Kara, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Neural activation increases blood flow locally. This vascular signal is used by functional imaging techniques to infer the location and strength of neural activity1,2. However, the precise spatial scale over which neural and vascular signals are correlated is unknown. Furthermore, the relative role of synaptic and spiking activity in driving hemodynamic signals is controversial3-9. Prior studies recorded local field potentials (LFPs) as a measure of synaptic activity together with spiking activity and low-resolution hemodynamic imaging. Here we used two-photon microscopy to measure sensory-evoked responses of individual blood vessels (dilation, blood velocity) while imaging synaptic and spiking activity in the surrounding tissue using fluorescent glutamate and calcium sensors. In cat primary visual cortex, where neurons are clustered by their preference for stimulus orientation, we discovered new maps for excitatory synaptic activity, which were organized similar to spiking activity but were less selective for stimulus orientation and direction. We generated tuning curves for individual vessel responses for the first time and found that parenchymal vessels in cortical layer 2/3 were orientation selective. Neighboring penetrating arterioles had different orientation preferences. Pial surface arteries in cats, as well as surface arteries and penetrating arterioles in rat visual cortex (where orientation maps do not exist10), responded to visual stimuli but had no orientation selectivity. We integrated synaptic or spiking responses around individual parenchymal vessels in cats and established that the vascular and neural responses had the same orientation preference. However, synaptic and spiking responses were more selective than vascular responses—vessels frequently responded robustly to stimuli that evoked little to no neural activity in the surrounding tissue. Thus, local neural and hemodynamic signals were partly decoupled. Together, these results indicate that

  20. [Ibopamine--acute hemodynamic, renal and neurohumoral effects].

    PubMed

    Wehling, M; Theisen, K

    1991-01-01

    Ibopamine (IP) is a novel dopamine analogue for which beneficial effects have been shown in chronic heart failure. Hemodynamic effects of the substance include an increase in cardiac output and a decrease in the peripheral resistance. Aside from these hemodynamic effects, changes in renal (increased diuresis) and neurohumoral parameters (decreased plasma renin activity, aldosterone, norepinephrine, increased ANF and cGMP) have been found. The renal effects may originate from three independent mechanisms: 1) direct impact of improved hemodynamic parameters on the renal perfusion; 2) the improved cardiac performance results in a reduction of compensatory hormonal adaptations, such as the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-axis or the sympathetic system; 3) direct effects on the intrarenal hemodynamic and glomerular/tubular functions induced by stimulation of renal dopaminergic receptors. The continued decrease of the plasma renin activity by 35% results in a reduction of the plasma levels of angiotensin II and aldosterone. Additionally, an increase in plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and its second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) was observed after ibopamine, which could contribute to the diuretic action of the drug. These findings underline the importance of extrarenal effects of a drug in the treatment of heart failure, this may essentially contribute to the improvement of cardiac performance, independent of positive inotropy.

  1. Immediate hemodynamic response to furosemide in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, R E; Messerli, F H; deCarvalho, J G; Husserl, F E

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of furosemide on cardiovascular hemodynamics in patients with end-stage renal failure, we studied ten patients undergoing hemodialysis three times a week. Arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output (indocyanine green dye) were measured in triplicate; total peripheral resistance and central blood volume were calculated by standard formulas. Hemodynamics were determined at baseline and 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes after intravenous (IV) bolus injection of furosemide 60 mg. Furosemide produced a decrease in central blood volume of -13% +/- 2.2% from pretreatment values (P less than .01) that was most pronounced five minutes after injection, together with a fall in cardiac output (from 6.76 +/- 0.59 to 6.17 +/- 0.52 L/min, P less than .10). Stroke volume decreased with a maximum fall occurring after 15 minutes (from 84 +/- 7 to 79 +/- 7 mL/min, P less than .05), and total peripheral resistance increased (from 15.8 +/- 2.1 to 17.8 +/- 2.3 units, P less than .05) after furosemide. Arterial pressure and heart rate did not change. The decrease in central blood volume reflects a shift of the total blood volume from the cardiopulmonary circulation to the periphery, suggesting dilation of the peripheral venous bed. Thus, even in patients undergoing hemodialysis, furosemide acutely decreases left ventricular preload by venous dilation and should therefore prove to be beneficial in acute volume overload.

  2. Coronary hemodynamic responses during local hemodilution in canine hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, G.J. )

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemodilution per se on coronary hemodynamics, experiments were performed in 36 anesthetized, open-chest dogs whose left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was perfused selectively with either normal arterial blood or arterial blood diluted with lactated Ringer solution. LAD blood flow (CBF) was measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter and its transmural distribution assessed with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. With perfusion pressure normal, graded hemodilution caused progressive, transmurally uniform increases in CBF that showed an nonlinear relationship to inflow hematocrit. Increased peak reactive hyperemic flow and decreased dilator reserve ratio indicated that both reduced viscosity and vasodilation contributed to increased CBF during hemodilution. Hypotension alone reduced CBF, with greater effect in the subendocardium. Additional hemodilution returned CBF to normotensive value, but relative subendocardial hypoperfusion persisted. The present study provides fundamental information on effects of hemodilution on coronary hemodynamics without the systemic responses that complicated previous studies utilizing whole body exchange transfusions.

  3. Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

  4. Functional Imaging of the Hemodynamic Sensory Gating Response in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Andrew R.; Ruhl, David; Merideth, Flannery; Ling, Josef; Hanlon, Faith; Bustillo, Juan; Cañive, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The cortical (auditory and prefrontal) and/or subcortical (thalamic and hippocampal) generators of abnormal electrophysiological responses during sensory gating remain actively debated in the schizophrenia literature. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the spatial resolution for disambiguating deep or simultaneous sources but has been relatively under-utilized to investigate generators of the gating response. Thirty patients with chronic schizophrenia (SP) and 30 matched controls participated in the current experiment. Hemodynamic response functions (HRF) for single (S1) and pairs (S1 + S2) of identical (IT; “gating-out” redundant information) or non-identical (NT; “gating-in” novel information) tones were generated through deconvolution. Increased or prolonged activation for patients in conjunction with deactivation for controls was observed within auditory cortex, prefrontal cortex and thalamus in response to single tones during the late hemodynamic response, and these group differences were not associated with clinical or cognitive symptomatology. Although patient hyper-activation to paired-tones conditions was present in several ROI, the effects were not statistically significant for either the gating-out or gating-in conditions. Finally, abnormalities in the post-undershoot of the auditory HRF were also observed for both single and paired tones conditions in patients. In conclusion, the amalgamation of the entire electrophysiological response to both S1 and S2 stimuli may limit hemodynamic sensitivity to paired tones during sensory gating, which may be more readily overcome by paradigms that utilize multiple stimuli rather than pairs. Patient hyperactivation following single tones is suggestive of deficits in basic inhibition, neurovascular abnormalities or a combination of both factors. PMID:22461278

  5. The Acute Impact of Smoking One Cigarette on Cardiac Hemodynamic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Khalid Abou; AbouFarha, Ramy; Bolt, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Background The acute impact of tobacco smoking on the cardiac hemodynamic parameters and its pathological implication in the process of arterial atherosclerosis need further exploration. This investigation was purposed to assess the acute impact of tobacco smoke on blood pressure and cardiac hemodynamic parameters. Methods Using an Ultrasonic Cardiac Output Monitor, and DINAMAP Pro 400 Series V2 blood pressure monitor, several cardiac hemodynamic parameters and the blood pressure were assessed in 14 smokers, 11 females and 3 males, at 2 time points, before and after smoking of one cigarette. Data, in terms of ratio of the means and 95% confidence interval were analyzed using ANOVA. Results Single-subject design in which the subject has served as his/her own control has been used. Tobacco smoking led to statistically significant acute increase in the means of all hemodynamic parameters, except for heart rate in female subjects, as compared to the means obtained before smoking. Conclusions Cigarette smoking induces acute non-physiologic alteration in cardiac outflow forces, exposing the aortic valve and arch to mechanical injury that might be implicated in initiating and promoting the process of aortic arch atherosclerosis and associated pathological lesions.

  6. Biochemical and hemodynamic changes in normal subjects during acute and rigorous bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Afonin, Victor B.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Rigorous bed rest (RBR) induces significant biochemical and circulatory changes. However, little is known about acute rigorous bed rest (ARBR). Measuring biochemical and circulatory variables during ARBR and RBR the aim of this study was to establish the significance of ARBR effect. Studies were done during 3 days of a pre-bed rest (BR) period and during 7 days of ARBR and RBR period. Thirty normal male individuals aged, 24.1±6.3 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided equally into three groups: 10 subjects placed under active control conditions served as unrestricted ambulatory control subjects (UACS), 10 subjects submitted to an acute rigorous bed rest served as acute rigorous bed rested subjects (ARBRS) and 10 subjects submitted to a rigorous bed rest served as rigorous bed rested subjects (RBRS). The UACS were maintained under an average running distance of 9.7 km day -1. For the ARBR effect simulation, ARBRS were submitted abruptly to BR for 7 days. They did not have any prior knowledge of the exact date and time when they would be asked to confine to RBR. For the RBR effect simulation, RBRS were subjected to BR for 7 days on a predetermined date and time known to them right away from the start of the study. Plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma cortisol (PC), plasma aldosterone (PA), plasma and urinary sodium (Na) and potassium (K) levels, heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and arterial blood pressure (ABP) increased significantly, and urinary aldosterone (UA), stroke volume (SV) and plasma volume (PV) decreased significantly ( p<0.05) in ARBRS and RBRS as compared with their pre-BR values and the values in UACS. Electrolyte, hormonal and hemodynamic responses were significantly ( p<0.05) greater and occurred significantly faster ( p<0.05) during ARBR than RBR. Parameters change insignificantly ( p>0.05) in UACS compared with pre-BR control values. It was concluded that, the more abruptly muscular activity is restricted in experimental subjects

  7. Estimating Hemodynamic Responses to the Wingate Test Using Thoracic Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Bovee, Curtis; DeBoe, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Techniques including direct Fick and Doppler echocardiography are frequently used to assess hemodynamic responses to exercise. Thoracic impedance has been shown to be a noninvasive alternative to these methods for assessing these responses during graded exercise to exhaustion, yet its feasibility during supramaximal bouts of exercise is relatively unknown. We used thoracic impedance to estimate stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) during the Wingate test (WAnT) and compared these values to those from graded exercise testing (GXT). Active men (n = 9) and women (n = 7) (mean age = 24.8 ± 5.9 yr) completed two Wingate tests and two graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. During exercise, heart rate (HR), SV, and CO were continuously estimated using thoracic impedance. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to identify potential differences in hemodynamic responses across protocols. Results: Maximal SV (138.6 ± 37.4 mL vs. 135.6 ± 26.9 mL) and CO (24.5 ± 6.1 L·min-1 vs. 23.7 ± 5.1 L·min-1) were similar (p > 0.05) between repeated Wingate tests. Mean maximal HR was higher (p < 0.01) for GXT (185 ± 7 b·min-1) versus WAnT (177 ± 11 b·min-1), and mean SV was higher in response to WAnT (137.1 ± 32.1 mL) versus GXT (123.0 ± 32.0 mL), leading to similar maximal cardiac output between WAnT and GXT (23.9 ± 5.6 L·min-1 vs. 22.5 ± 6.0 L·min-1). Our data show no difference in hemodynamic responses in response to repeated administrations of the Wingate test. In addition, the Wingate test elicits similar cardiac output compared to progressive cycling to VO2max. Key points Measurement of cardiac output (CO), the rate of oxygen transport delivered by the heart to skeletal muscle, is not widely-employed in Exercise Physiology due to the level of difficulty and invasiveness characteristic of most techniques used to measure this variable. Nevertheless, thoracic impedance has been shown to provide a noninvasive and simpler approach to continuously

  8. Optimal design for nonlinear estimation of the hemodynamic response function.

    PubMed

    Maus, Bärbel; van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Goebel, Rainer; Berger, Martijn P F

    2012-06-01

    Subject-specific hemodynamic response functions (HRFs) have been recommended to capture variation in the form of the hemodynamic response between subjects (Aguirre et al., [ 1998]: Neuroimage 8:360-369). The purpose of this article is to find optimal designs for estimation of subject-specific parameters for the double gamma HRF. As the double gamma function is a nonlinear function of its parameters, optimal design theory for nonlinear models is employed in this article. The double gamma function is linearized by a Taylor approximation and the maximin criterion is used to handle dependency of the D-optimal design on the expansion point of the Taylor approximation. A realistic range of double gamma HRF parameters is used for the expansion point of the Taylor approximation. Furthermore, a genetic algorithm (GA) (Kao et al., [ 2009]: Neuroimage 44:849-856) is applied to find locally optimal designs for the different expansion points and the maximin design chosen from the locally optimal designs is compared to maximin designs obtained by m-sequences, blocked designs, designs with constant interstimulus interval (ISI) and random event-related designs. The maximin design obtained by the GA is most efficient. Random event-related designs chosen from several generated designs and m-sequences have a high efficiency, while blocked designs and designs with a constant ISI have a low efficiency compared to the maximin GA design.

  9. Phonocardiographic Assessment of Hemodynamic Response to Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Howard S.; Ferguson, James J.

    1990-01-01

    The time to systolic murmur peak is a clinical index that is useful in assessing the severity of valvular aortic stenosis. To determine whether phonocardiography could be used to detect a change in the timing of the murmur and thus to measure hemodynamic improvements in elderly balloon aortic valvuloplasty patients, we retrospectively reviewed phonocardiographic tracings of 18 patients taken before and after the procedure. Ten men and 8 women were included in the study; the mean age was 80.7 ± 11.2 years (range, 64 to 90). Phonocardiographic signals were digitized, and the R-wave to murmur peak interval (R-MP) was measured. In 11 patients, the R-MP decreased (mean decrease, 16% ± 11%): of these, 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in mean gradient; 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in peak-to-peak gradient; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 38%. Seven patients had an increase in R-MP (mean increase, 10% ± 9%): of these, 6 had a decrease in mean gradient of less than 25%; 6 had a decrease in peak-to-peak gradient of less than 25%; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 21%. Pre- and post-balloon aortic valvuloplasty heart rates were not significantly different (71 ± 8 beats/min versus 73 ± 5 beats/min). In this study, hemodynamic improvements after valvuloplasty were manifested by a reduction in the R-MP interval. We conclude that phonocardiography may be a practical, noninvasive method of assessing the hemodynamic response to balloon aortic valvuloplasty. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:42-7) PMID:15227188

  10. Different hemodynamic actions of trinitroglycerin and isosorbide dinitrate in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rezakovic, D; Rutishauser, W; Pavicic, L; Popadic, M; Bloch, A; Imhoff, E W

    1983-10-01

    The hemodynamic effects of intravenously administered trinitroglycerin (TNT) and isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) in stechiometric equivalent doses were studied in 30 patients with acute myocardial infarction. Both drugs were given over 30 min in every patient, and the stability of the condition of the patient was checked by administering the initial drug again. Measurements were made by right heart catheterization using a balloon tip thermodilution catheter and a catheter in the radial artery. TNT and ISDN have different hemodynamic effects. By multivariate analysis it could be shown that TNT is a venous dilator, lowering mainly pulmonary capillary pressure, while ISDN acts more as a mixed vasodilator, diminishing mainly peripheral vascular resistance and increasing cardiac output. These drugs have, therefore, a different spectrum of indications in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  11. The Effects of a Multiflavonoid Supplement on Vascular and Hemodynamic Parameters following Acute Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kappus, Rebecca M.; Curry, Chelsea D.; McAnulty, Steve; Welsh, Janice; Morris, David; Nieman, David C.; Soukup, Jeffrey; Collier, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidants can decrease oxidative stress and combined with acute exercise they may lead to further decreases in blood pressure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 weeks of antioxidant supplementation on vascular distensibility and cardiovascular hemodynamics during postexercise hypotension. Methods. Twenty young subjects were randomized to placebo (n = 10) or antioxidant supplementation (n = 10) for two weeks. Antioxidant status, vascular distensibility, and hemodynamics were obtained before, immediately, and 30 minutes after an acute bout of aerobic exercise both before and after supplementation. Results. Two weeks of antioxidant supplementation resulted in a greater systolic blood pressure (SBP) decrease during postexercise hypotension (PEH) and significant decreases in augmentation index versus placebo (12.5% versus 3.5%, resp.). Also ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) increased significantly (interaction P = 0.024) after supplementation. Conclusion. Supplementation showed an additive effect on PEH associated with increased FRAP values and decreases in systolic blood pressure and augmentation index. PMID:22191012

  12. Optimal hemodynamic response model for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Muhammad A.; Jeong, Myung Yung; Mannan, Malik M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging non-invasive brain imaging technique and measures brain activities by means of near-infrared light of 650–950 nm wavelengths. The cortical hemodynamic response (HR) differs in attributes at different brain regions and on repetition of trials, even if the experimental paradigm is kept exactly the same. Therefore, an HR model that can estimate such variations in the response is the objective of this research. The canonical hemodynamic response function (cHRF) is modeled by two Gamma functions with six unknown parameters (four of them to model the shape and other two to scale and baseline respectively). The HRF model is supposed to be a linear combination of HRF, baseline, and physiological noises (amplitudes and frequencies of physiological noises are supposed to be unknown). An objective function is developed as a square of the residuals with constraints on 12 free parameters. The formulated problem is solved by using an iterative optimization algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters in the model. Inter-subject variations in HRF and physiological noises have been estimated for better cortical functional maps. The accuracy of the algorithm has been verified using 10 real and 15 simulated data sets. Ten healthy subjects participated in the experiment and their HRF for finger-tapping tasks have been estimated and analyzed. The statistical significance of the estimated activity strength parameters has been verified by employing statistical analysis (i.e., t-value > tcritical and p-value < 0.05). PMID:26136668

  13. Hemodynamic responses during and after multiple sets of stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Tainah P.; Farinatti, Paulo T.V.; Rubini, Ercole C.; Silva, Elirez B.; Monteiro, Walace D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the acute hemodynamic responses to multiple sets of passive stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. METHODS: Fifteen healthy men aged 21 to 29 years with poor flexibility performed stretching protocols comprising 10 sets of maximal passive unilateral hip flexion, sustained for 30 seconds with equal intervals between sets. Protocols without and with the Valsalva maneuver were applied in a random counterbalanced order, separated by 48-hour intervals. Hemodynamic responses were measured by photoplethysmography pre-exercise, during the stretching sets, and post-exercise. RESULTS: The effects of stretching sets on systolic and diastolic blood pressure were cumulative until the fourth set in protocols performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. The heart rate and rate pressure product increased in both protocols, but no additive effect was observed due to the number of sets. Hemodynamic responses were always higher when stretching was performed with the Valsalva maneuver, causing an additional elevation in the rate pressure product. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sets of unilateral hip flexion stretching significantly increased blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product values. A cumulative effect of the number of sets occurred only for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, at least in the initial sets of the stretching protocols. The performance of the Valsalva maneuver intensified all hemodynamic responses, which resulted in significant increases in cardiac work during stretching exercises. PMID:26039949

  14. Characterization of the spectrum of hemodynamic profiles in trauma patients with acute neurogenic shock☆

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Richard L.; Baker, Stephen D.; Sterling, Sarah A.; Porter, John M; Jones, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neurogenic shock considered a distributive type of shock secondary to loss of sympathetic outflow to the peripheral vasculature. In this study, we examine the hemodynamic profiles of a series of trauma patients with a diagnosis of neurogenic shock. Methods Hemodynamic data were collected on a series of trauma patients determined to have spinal cord injuries with neurogenic shock. A well-established integrated computer model of human physiology was used to analyze and categorize the hemodynamic profiles from a system analysis perspective. A differentiation between these categories was presented as the percent of total patients. Results Of the 9 patients with traumatic neurogenic shock, the etiology of shock was decrease in peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) in 3 (33%; 95% confidence interval, 12%–65%), loss of vascular capacitance in 2 (22%; 6%–55%) and mixed peripheral resistance and capacitance responsible in 3 (33%; 12%–65%), and purely cardiac in 1 (11%; 3%–48%). The markers of sympathetic outflow had no correlation to any of the elements in the patients' hemodynamic profiles. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that hypotension of neurogenic shock can have multiple mechanistic etiologies and represents a spectrum of hemodynamic profiles. This understanding is important for the treatment decisions in managing these patients. PMID:23566731

  15. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, U.; Burke, E. J.; Butler, B. D.; Davis, K. L.; Katz, J.; Melamed, E.; Morris, W. P.; Allen, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 yr ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 degrees down (LLR-10 degrees; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  16. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, Uwe; Burke, Edward J.; Butler, Bruce D.; Davis, Karen L.; Katz, Jeffrey; Melamed, Evan; Morris, William P.; Allen, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 years ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 deg down (LLR-10 deg; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  17. Use of Bioimpedance to Assess Changes in Hemodynamics During Acute Administration of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Digby, Genevieve C.; Driver, Helen S.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Ropchan, Glorianne; Parker, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Attempts to investigate the mechanisms by which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy improves heart function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been limited by the lack of non-invasive methods to assess cardiac performance. We used transthoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) to assess acute hemodynamic changes including heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index (CI) during PAP titration in (1) post-operative cardiac surgery patients, (2) patients with severe OSA, and (3) normal healthy volunteers. Methods Post-operative cardiac surgery patients were studied via TEB and pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) during acute titration of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) while mechanically ventilated. Patients with severe OSA were studied non-invasively by TEB during acute CPAP titration in supine stage 2 sleep, and normal subjects while awake and recumbent. Results In post-operative cardiac surgery patients (n = 3), increasing PEEP to 18 cmH2O significantly reduced SV and CI relative to baseline. There was no difference between TEB and PAC in terms of ability to assess variations in hemodynamic parameters. In patients with severe OSA (n = 3), CPAP titration to optimal pressure to alleviate obstructive apneas reduced HR, SV, CO and CI significantly compared to without CPAP. In three healthy subjects, maximal tolerated CPAP reduced SV and CO significantly compared to baseline. Conclusions Acute administration of CPAP causes a decrease in CO and CI, apparently a consequence of a reduction in SV. TEB appears to be an accurate and reproducible non-invasive method of detecting changes in hemodynamics.

  18. Gender affects sympathetic and hemodynamic response to postural stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Khan, M.; Kimmerly, D. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in sympathetic reflex responses to head-up tilt (HUT) between males (n = 9) and females (n = 8) were associated with decrements in postural vasomotor responses in women. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography), heart rate, stroke volume (SV; Doppler), and blood pressure (Finapres) were measured during a progressive HUT protocol (5 min at each of supine, 20 degrees, 40 degrees, and 60 degrees ). MSNA and hemodynamic responses were also measured during the cold pressor test (CPT) to examine nonbaroreflex neurovascular control. SV was normalized to body surface area (SV(i)) to calculate the index of cardiac output (Q(i)), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). During HUT, heart rate increased more in females versus males (P < 0.001) and SV(i) and Q(i) decreased similarly in both groups. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased to a lesser extent in females versus males in the HUT (P < 0.01) but increases in TPR during HUT were similar. MSNA burst frequency was lower in females versus males in supine (P < 0.03) but increased similarly during HUT. Average amplitude/burst increased in 60 degrees HUT for males but not females. Both males and females demonstrated an increase in MAP as well as MSNA burst frequency, mean burst amplitude, and total MSNA during the CPT. However, compared with females, males demonstrated a greater neural response (DeltaTotal MSNA) due to a larger increase in mean burst amplitude (P < 0.05). Therefore, these data point to gender-specific autonomic responses to cardiovascular stress. The different MSNA response to postural stress between genders may contribute importantly to decrements in blood pressure control during HUT in females.

  19. Entrainment of spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic oscillations to behavioral responses.

    PubMed

    Pfurtscheller, Gert; Walther, Mario; Bauernfeind, Günther; Barry, Robert J; Witte, Herbert; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2014-04-30

    Entrainment in physiological systems can be manifest in cases where phase-coupling (synchronization) between slow intrinsic oscillations and periodic motor responses, or vice versa, takes place. To test whether voluntary movement has something in common with entrainment of slow hemodynamic oscillations to motor responses, we studied blood pressure (BP), heart rate beat-to-beat intervals (RRI) and prefrontal (de)oxyhemoglobin (Hb/HbO2) during 5min of rest, 10min of self-paced, voluntary movements and 10min of stimulus-paced movements at 10s intervals in 9 subjects. Subjects were divided into 2 groups according to the timing of voluntary finger movements. It appeared that these movements occurred at relatively regular intervals of approximately 10s in 5 subjects (group A); while 4 subjects showed random or very short inter-movement intervals (group B). Two remarkable results were obtained: first, the phase coupling (COH(2)) between BP and RRI showed a significant (p=0.0061) interaction between activity (rest vs. movement) and group (A vs. B), with an increased (p=0.0003) coupling in group A. Second, the COH(2) between BP and Hb oscillations showed a significant (p=0.034) interaction between activity and group, with a decreased (p=0.079) coupling in group B. These results suggest that subjects able to initiate self-paced, voluntary movements at relatively regular intervals of ∼10s show an entrainment potential between physiological oscillations and motor responses. This also provides the first evidence that not only physiological oscillations can be entrained to motor responses, but also motor responses (voluntary movements) can be entrained to slow intrinsic oscillations.

  20. Correlation between electrical and hemodynamic responses during visual stimulation with graded contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Juanning; Zhang, Xin; Li, Yuejun; Zhang, Yujin; Zuo, Nianming; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-09-01

    Brain functional activity involves complex cellular, metabolic, and vascular chain reactions, making it difficult to comprehend. Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) have been combined into a multimodal neuroimaging method that captures both electrophysiological and hemodynamic information to explore the spatiotemporal characteristics of brain activity. Because of the significance of visually evoked functional activity in clinical applications, numerous studies have explored the amplitude of the visual evoked potential (VEP) to clarify its relationship with the hemodynamic response. However, relatively few studies have investigated the influence of latency, which has been frequently used to diagnose visual diseases, on the hemodynamic response. Moreover, because the latency and the amplitude of VEPs have different roles in coding visual information, investigating the relationship between latency and the hemodynamic response should be helpful. In this study, checkerboard reversal tasks with graded contrasts were used to evoke visual functional activity. Both EEG and fNIRS were employed to investigate the relationship between neuronal electrophysiological activities and the hemodynamic responses. The VEP amplitudes were linearly correlated with the hemodynamic response, but the VEP latency showed a negative linear correlation with the hemodynamic response.

  1. Glomerular hemodynamic alterations during acute hyperinsulinemia in normal and diabetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, B. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Thies, R. S.; Collins, R. C.; Blantz, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of insulin dependent diabetes invariably requires exogenous insulin to control blood glucose. Insulin treatment, independent of other factors associated with insulin dependent diabetes, may induce changes that affect glomerular function. Due to exogenous delivery of insulin in insulin dependent diabetes entering systemic circulation prior to the portal vein, plasma levels of insulin are often in excess of that observed in non-diabetics. The specific effects of hyperinsulinemia on glomerular hemodynamics have not been previously examined. Micropuncture studies were performed in control (non-diabetic), untreated diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats 7 to 10 days after administration of 65 mg/kg body weight streptozotocin. After the first period micropuncture measurements were obtained, 5 U of regular insulin (Humulin-R) was infused i.v., and glucose clamped at euglycemic values (80 to 120 mg/dl). Blood glucose concentration in non-diabetic controls was 99 +/- 6 mg/dl. In control rats, insulin infusion and glucose clamp increased nephron filtration rate due to decreases in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance (afferent greater than efferent) resulting in increased plasma flow and increased glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient. However, insulin infusion and glucose clamp produced the opposite effect in both untreated and insulin-treated diabetic rats with afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction resulting in decreases in plasma flow, glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient and nephron filtration rate. Thromboxane A2 (TX) synthetase inhibition partially decreased the vasoconstrictive response due to acute insulin infusion in diabetic rats preventing the decrease in nephron filtration rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Neural and Hemodynamic Responses Elicited by Forelimb- and Photo-stimulation in Channelrhodopsin-2 Mice: Insights into the Hemodynamic Point Spread Function

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alberto L.; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Crowley, Justin C.; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses are commonly used to map brain activity; however, their spatial limits have remained unclear because of the lack of a well-defined and malleable spatial stimulus. To examine the properties of neural activity and hemodynamic responses, multiunit activity, local field potential, cerebral blood volume (CBV)-sensitive optical imaging, and laser Doppler flowmetry were measured from the somatosensory cortex of transgenic mice expressing Channelrhodopsin-2 in cortex Layer 5 pyramidal neurons. The magnitude and extent of neural and hemodynamic responses were modulated using different photo-stimulation parameters and compared with those induced by somatosensory stimulation. Photo-stimulation-evoked spiking activity across cortical layers was similar to forelimb stimulation, although their activity originated in different layers. Hemodynamic responses induced by forelimb- and photo-stimulation were similar in magnitude and shape, although the former were slightly larger in amplitude and wider in extent. Altogether, the neurovascular relationship differed between these 2 stimulation pathways, but photo-stimulation-evoked changes in neural and hemodynamic activities were linearly correlated. Hemodynamic point spread functions were estimated from the photo-stimulation data and its full-width at half-maximum ranged between 103 and 175 µm. Therefore, submillimeter functional structures separated by a few hundred micrometers may be resolved using hemodynamic methods, such as optical imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23761666

  3. Saturation thresholds of evoked neural and hemodynamic responses in awake and asleep rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schei, Jennifer L.; Van Nortwick, Amy S.; Meighan, Peter C.; Rector, David M.

    2011-03-01

    Neural activation generates a hemodynamic response to the localized region replenishing nutrients to the area. Changes in vigilance state have been shown to alter the vascular response where the vascular response is muted during wake compared to quiet sleep. We tested the saturation thresholds of the neurovascular response in the auditory cortex during wake and sleep by chronically implanting rats with an EEG electrode, a light emitting diode (LED, 600 nm), and photodiode to simultaneously measure evoked response potentials (ERPs) and evoked hemodynamic responses. We stimulated the cortex with a single speaker click delivered at random intervals 2-13 s at varied stimulus intensities ranging from 45-80 dB. To further test the potential for activity related saturation, we sleep deprived animals for 2, 4, or 6 hours and recorded evoked responses during the first hour recovery period. With increasing stimulus intensity, integrated ERPs and evoked hemodynamic responses increased; however the hemodynamic response approached saturation limits at a lower stimulus intensity than the ERP. With longer periods of sleep deprivation, the integrated ERPs did not change but evoked hemodynamic responses decreased. There may be physical limits in cortical blood delivery and vascular compliance, and with extended periods of neural activity during wake, vessels may approach these limits.

  4. Repeated restraint stress produces acute and chronic changes in hemodynamic parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Mariusz; Konopelski, Piotr; Pham, Kinga; Wyczalkowska-Tomasik, Aleksandra; Ufnal, Marcin

    2016-11-01

    Noninvasive hemodynamic measurements in rats require placing animals in restrainers. To minimize restraint stress-induced artifacts several habituation protocols have been proposed, however, the results are inconclusive. Here, we evaluated if a four-week habituation is superior to a shorter habituation, or no habituation. This is the first study comparing different habituation protocols with the use of four-week continuous telemetry measurements. We did the experiments on male, 16-week old, Sprague-Dawley rats. Continuous recordings of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate (HR) were made before and during habituation protocols. Rats were subjected either to control (four weeks of restraint-free recordings, n = 5) or two-week (seven restraints, n = 6) or four-week (14 restraints, n = 6) restraint sessions. The restraint protocols included placement of rats in the middle of the dark phase into plastic restrainers as used for tail-cuff measurements. Restraint lasted for 60 min, and was repeated every second day. Each restraint significantly increased MABP (by 15-25 mmHg) and HR (by 40-120 beats/min). Exposure to the restraint protocols decreased diurnal variation in MABP. There was no hemodynamic adaptation to repeated restraint, and no significant difference in hemodynamic response to restraint among controls, the two-week and the four-week groups. In conclusion, our study indicates that measurements in restrained rats are not likely being made without stress-induced changes in MABP. Moreover, in hemodynamic studies in repeatedly restrained rats longer habituation is not superior to shorter habituation.

  5. Low-dose intravenous nitrite improves hemodynamics in a canine model of acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Dias-Junior, Carlos A C; Gladwin, Mark T; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2006-12-15

    Acute pulmonary thomboembolism (APT)-induced pulmonary hypertension can be counteracted by activating the nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway. Recent studies have demonstrated that the naturally occurring anion nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is a bioactive storage reservoir for NO, and is reduced to NO under conditions of hypoxia and acidosis. We hypothesized that nitrite infused intravenously could attenuate the hemodynamic changes associated with APT. APT was induced with autologous blood clots injected into the right atrium in mongrel dogs. After APT (or saline), the dogs received an intravenous nitrite (or saline) infusion (6.75 micromol/kg over 15 min and then 0.28 micromol/kg/min) and hemodynamic evaluations were carried out for 2 h. Plasma nitrite concentrations were measured using ozone-based reductive chemiluminescence methodologies. APT decreased cardiac index (CI) and increased pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI); these effects were improved during infusions of sodium nitrite. Accordingly, nitrite infusion increased cardiac index by 28%, reduced the PVRI by 48%, and the systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) by 21% in embolized dogs, suggesting a greater effect on the ischemic embolized vascular system than the systemic circulation following embolization. Interestingly, in nonembolized control dogs the same nitrite infusion decreased MAP and CI (all P<0.05). The nitrite infusion increased plasma nitrite concentrations by approximately 2 microM, and produced dose-dependent effects on PVRI, MAP, and SVRI. Remarkably, blood levels of nitrite as low as 500 nM decreased PVRI and SVRI in this model, suggesting a potential role of nitrite in physiological blood flow regulation. These results suggest that a low-dose nitrite infusion produces beneficial hemodynamic effects in a dog model of APT. These findings suggest a new therapeutic application for nitrite and support emerging evidence for a surprisingly potent and potentially physiological vasoactivity of nitrite.

  6. Acute dark chocolate ingestion is beneficial for hemodynamics via enhancement of erythrocyte deformability in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Radosinska, Jana; Horvathova, Martina; Frimmel, Karel; Muchova, Jana; Vidosovicova, Maria; Vazan, Rastislav; Bernatova, Iveta

    2017-03-01

    Erythrocyte deformability is an important property of erythrocytes that considerably affects blood flow and hemodynamics. The high content of polyphenols present in dark chocolate has been reported to play a protective role in functionality of erythrocytes. We hypothesized that chocolate might influence erythrocytes not only after repeated chronic intake, but also immediately after its ingestion. Thus, we determined the acute effect of dark chocolate and milk (with lower content of biologically active substances) chocolate intake on erythrocyte deformability. We also focused on selected factors that may affect erythrocyte deformability, specifically nitric oxide production in erythrocytes and total antioxidant capacity of plasma. We determined posttreatment changes in the mentioned parameters 2hours after consumption of chocolate compared with their levels before consumption of chocolate. In contrast to milk chocolate intake, the dark chocolate led to a significantly higher increase in erythrocyte deformability. Nitric oxide production in erythrocytes was not changed after dark chocolate intake, but significantly decreased after milk chocolate. The plasma total antioxidant capacity remained unaffected after ingestion of both chocolates. We conclude that our hypothesis was confirmed. Single ingestion of dark chocolate improved erythrocyte deformability despite unchanged nitric oxide production and antioxidant capacity of plasma. Increased deformability of erythrocytes may considerably improve rheological properties of blood and thus hemodynamics in humans, resulting in better tissue oxygenation.

  7. The Acute Effect of Resistance Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction with Hemodynamic Variables on Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Joamira P.; Silva, Eliney D.; Silva, Julio C. G.; Souza, Thiago S. P.; Lima, Eloíse O.; Guerra, Ialuska; Sousa, Maria S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the heart rate (HR) before, during and after training at moderate intensity (MI, 50%-1RM) and at low intensity with blood flow restriction (LIBFR). In a randomized controlled trial study, 14 subjects (average age 45±9,9 years) performed one of the exercise protocols during two separate visits to the laboratory. SBP, DBP and HR measurements were collected prior to the start of the set and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after knee extension exercises. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to identify significant variables (2 × 5; group × time). The results demonstrated a significant reduction in SBP in the LIBFR group. These results provide evidence that strength training performed acutely alters hemodynamic variables. However, training with blood flow restriction is more efficient in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive individuals than training with moderate intensity. PMID:25713647

  8. The acute effect of resistance exercise with blood flow restriction with hemodynamic variables on hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Joamira P; Silva, Eliney D; Silva, Julio C G; Souza, Thiago S P; Lima, Eloíse O; Guerra, Ialuska; Sousa, Maria S C

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this study was to analyze systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the heart rate (HR) before, during and after training at moderate intensity (MI, 50%-1RM) and at low intensity with blood flow restriction (LIBFR). In a randomized controlled trial study, 14 subjects (average age 45±9,9 years) performed one of the exercise protocols during two separate visits to the laboratory. SBP, DBP and HR measurements were collected prior to the start of the set and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after knee extension exercises. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to identify significant variables (2 × 5; group × time). The results demonstrated a significant reduction in SBP in the LIBFR group. These results provide evidence that strength training performed acutely alters hemodynamic variables. However, training with blood flow restriction is more efficient in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive individuals than training with moderate intensity.

  9. Wet BNP, fluid and hemodynamic status at discharge in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Parrinello, Gaspare; Torres, Daniele; Paterna, Salvatore; Di Pasquale, Pietro; Licata, Giuseppe

    2010-11-19

    We comment the noteworthy results of Pimenta et al. concerning the significance of discharge BNP levels in acute HF patients. The innovation of Pimento's study is the systematic research of the potential relationship between BNP and clinical and hemodynamic parameters. We focused the attention on the importance of wet "BNP" in managing HF and its ability to reflect congestion and multiple underlying patho-physiological disturbances. The first observation, regarding the statistical order, underlines the importance of renal insufficiency at discharge in genesis of higher BNP levels. Secondly, we note that the relationship between natriuretic peptides and the non-invasive measurement of the fluid status assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis was already demonstrated. Thirdly, we comment on the potential therapeutical implication of the verified relationship between BNP and albumin levels and we argue on the clinical utility of the albumin supplementation or hypertonic solutions in unstable HF management due to their oncotic power. Fourthly, we wish to further examine the role of central volemia. We underline that some studies had demonstrated that systemic congestion may be a mirror of central congestion and may also influence these levels alone in acute and also chronic HF patients. We believe that a concealed or poorly-assessed accumulation of systemic fluid is of crucial importance in managing HF, which frequently remains undiagnosed or inappropriately treated, thus requiring recurrent hospital readmission and disease progression. Furthermore not only BNP at discharge but also bioimpedance detection may be helpful to discover misdiagnosed congestion. We are of the opinion that, in cases of hospitalized HF and thereafter in ambulatory setting, the achievement and, then, maintenance of dry-wet tailoring diuretics, fluid and sodium intake is the key approach leading to a euvolemic status, a lowering of the NYHA class and an improvement in cardiac hemodynamics

  10. Fast Hemodynamic Responses in the Visual Cortex of the Awake Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pisauro, M. Andrea; Dhruv, Neel T.; Benucci, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses in mice and other species are typically measured under anesthesia. However, anesthesia could influence their relationship to neural activity. To investigate this relationship, we used optical imaging in mouse primary visual cortex (V1). Hemodynamic responses yielded clear maps of retinotopy in both anesthetized and awake mice. However, during wakefulness, responses were four times larger and twice as fast. These differences held whether we induced anesthesia with urethane or isoflurane and whether awake mice were stationary or running on a treadmill. With electrode recordings, we established that the effects of wakefulness reflect changes in neurovascular coupling, not in neural activity. By activating V1 directly via optogenetics, we replicated the effects of wakefulness in terms of timing but not of amplitude. We conclude that neurovascular coupling depends critically on anesthesia and wakefulness: during wakefulness, neural activity is followed by much stronger and quicker hemodynamic responses. PMID:24227743

  11. Changes in hemodynamic response to mental stress with heart rate feedback training.

    PubMed

    Goodie, J L; Larkin, K T

    2001-12-01

    This study was designed to examine underlying hemodynamic changes that accompany observed reductions in heart rate (HR) response to mental stress following HR feedback training. Twenty-five college males, assigned to either a HR feedback training group (FB+) or a control group (FB-), were presented with a videogame and mental arithmetic challenge, as HR, blood pressure, and impedance cardiography-derived measures of hemodynamic functioning were recorded. During training, the FB+ group received HR feedback and the FB- group was not provided with HR feedback while playing a videogame. At posttraining, results revealed that the FB+ group exhibited significantly lower HR, systolic blood pressure, stroke volume, and total peripheral resistance responses to the videogame compared to that at pretraining. There was no evidence that the acquired skills generalized to a mental arithmetic task. These results suggest that HR feedback training is an effective method for reducing cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses to a mental stressor; however, the generalizability of this effect remains questionable.

  12. Hemodynamic effects of acute digitalization several months after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ressl, J; Jandová, R; Jebavý, P; Kasalický, J; Widimský, J

    1975-01-01

    Left ventricular function was investigated at rest and during exercise by heart catheterization in 15 patients 3-5 months after acute myocardial infarction. The effect of 1 mg digoxin i.v. in ten patients was correlated to placebo (saline solution) in five patients. A significant decrease of the left ventricular enddiastolic pressure, increase of left ventricular systolic ejection fraction and a shift of the left ventricular function curve to left upwards was found after digoxin with no changes in the placebo group. This beneficial effect of acute digitalization in patients convalescing from uncomplicated myocardial infarction without clinical signs of manifest heart failure could have therapeutic implication.

  13. Effect of Magnesium Sulfate and Clonidine in Attenuating Hemodynamic Response to Pneumoperitoneum in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Shruthi P.; Bevinaguddaiah, Yatish; Nagaraja, Dinesh Chillkunda; Pujar, Vinayak S.; Anandaswamy, Tejesh C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pneumoperitoneum in laparoscopic procedures is associated with hemodynamic response, due to the release of catecholamines and vasopressin. Magnesium and clonidine have been used to attenuate such hemodynamic responses by inhibiting release of these mediators. We conducted this randomized, double-blinded study to assess which of the two attenuates hemodynamic response better. Materials and Methods: Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists health status Classes I and II patients posted for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into three groups of thirty patients each. Group C received injection clonidine 1 μg/kg diluted in 10 mL normal saline over 10 min, prior to pneumoperitoneum. Group M received injection magnesium sulfate 50 mg/kg diluted in 10 mL normal saline over 10 min, prior to pneumoperitoneum. Group NS received 10 mL normal saline intravenously over 10 min, prior to pneumoperitoneum. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded before induction (baseline values), at the end of magnesium sulfate/clonidine/saline administration and before pneumoperitoneum (P0), 5 min (P5), 10 min (P10), 20 min (P20), 30 min (P30), and 40 min (P40) after pneumoperitoneum. Results: Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were all significantly higher in the normal saline group compared to magnesium and clonidine. On comparing patients in Group M and Group C, DBP, MAP, and HR were significantly lower in the magnesium group. Mean extubation time and time to response to verbal commands were significantly longer in the magnesium group. Conclusions: Both magnesium and clonidine attenuated the hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum. However, magnesium 50 mg/kg, attenuated hemodynamic response better than clonidine 1 μg/kg. PMID:28298759

  14. Hemodynamic and ADH responses to central blood volume shifts in cardiac-denervated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Thompson, C. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Savin, W. M.; Gordon, E. P.; Haskell, W. L.; Schroeder, J. S.; Sandler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes designed to induce blood volume shifts in ten cardiac transplant recipients to assess the contribution of cardiac and vascular volume receptors in the control of ADH secretion. Each subject underwent 15 min of a control period in the seated posture, then assumed a lying posture for 30 min at 6 deg head down tilt (HDT) followed by 20 min of seated recovery. Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions (echocardiography) were taken at 0 and 15 min before HDT, 5, 15, and 30 min of HDT, and 5, 15, and 30 min of seated recovery. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Resting plasma volume (PV) was measured by Evans blue dye and percent changes in PV during posture changes were calculated from changes in hematocrit. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded every 2 min. Results indicate that cardiac volume receptors are not the only mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute blood volume shifts in man.

  15. Intraoperative brain hemodynamic response assessment with real-time hyperspectral optical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurence, Audrey; Pichette, Julien; Angulo-Rodríguez, Leticia M.; Saint Pierre, Catherine; Lesage, Frédéric; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Leblond, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Following normal neuronal activity, there is an increase in cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume to provide oxygenated hemoglobin to active neurons. For abnormal activity such as epileptiform discharges, this hemodynamic response may be inadequate to meet the high metabolic demands. To verify this hypothesis, we developed a novel hyperspectral imaging system able to monitor real-time cortical hemodynamic changes during brain surgery. The imaging system is directly integrated into a surgical microscope, using the white-light source for illumination. A snapshot hyperspectral camera is used for detection (4x4 mosaic filter array detecting 16 wavelengths simultaneously). We present calibration experiments where phantoms made of intralipid and food dyes were imaged. Relative concentrations of three dyes were recovered at a video rate of 30 frames per second. We also present hyperspectral recordings during brain surgery of epileptic patients with concurrent electrocorticography recordings. Relative concentration maps of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin were extracted from the data, allowing real-time studies of hemodynamic changes with a good spatial resolution. Finally, we present preliminary results on phantoms obtained with an integrated spatial frequency domain imaging system to recover tissue optical properties. This additional module, used together with the hyperspectral imaging system, will allow quantification of hemoglobin concentrations maps. Our hyperspectral imaging system offers a new tool to analyze hemodynamic changes, especially in the case of epileptiform discharges. It also offers an opportunity to study brain connectivity by analyzing correlations between hemodynamic responses of different tissue regions.

  16. Catheter-Directed Therapy in Acute Pulmonary Embolism with Right Ventricular Dysfunction: A Promising Modality to Provide Early Hemodynamic Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Dilektasli, Asli Gorek; Cetinoglu, Ezgi Demirdogen; Acet, Nilufer Aylin; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Ursavas, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Guven; Coskun, Funda; Karadag, Mehmet; Ege, Ercument

    2016-01-01

    Background Catheter-directed therapy (CDT) for pulmonary embolism (PE) is considered as an alternative to systemic thrombolysis (ST) in patients with hemodynamically unstable acute PE who are considered at high bleeding risk for ST. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CDT in the management of acute PE with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD). The primary outcomes were mortality, clinical success, and complications. Secondary outcomes were change in hemodynamic parameters in the first 24 hours following the procedure. Material/Methods Medical records of consecutive patients diagnosed as having acute massive or submassive PE with accompanying RVD treated by immediate CDT at our institution from January 2007 to January 2014 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, mortality, achievement of clinical success, and minor and major bleeding complications were analyzed in the overall study group, as well as massive vs. submassive PE subgroups. Change in hemodynamic parameters in the second, eighth, and 24th hours after the CDT procedure were also analyzed. Results The study included 15 consecutive patients (M/F=10/5) with a mean age of 54.2±16.6 years who underwent immediate CDT. Nine of the patients had submassive PE, and 6 had massive PE. In-hospital mortality rate was 13.3% (95% CI, 0.04–0.38). One major, but not life-threatening, bleeding episode was evident in the whole group. Hemodynamic parameters were stabilized and clinical success was achieved in 14/15 (93.3%; 95% CI, 70.2–98.8) of the patients in the first 24 hours. Notably, the hemodynamic recovery was significantly evident in the first 8 hours after the procedure. Conclusions CDT is a promising treatment option for patients with acute PE with RVD with no fatal bleeding complication. In experienced centers, CDT should be considered as a first-line treatment for patients with acute PE and RVD and contraindications for ST, with the advantage of providing early hemodynamic recovery. PMID:27081754

  17. Comprehensive physiological cardiovascular model enables automatic correction of hemodynamics in patients with acute life-threatening heart failure.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazunori; Kamiya, Atsunori; Shimizu, Shuji; Shishido, Toshiaki; Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    Saving life of patients with acute life-threatening heart failure is a major challenge. One has to correct several fatal hemodynamic abnormalities at the same time within a limited time frame. The formulation of such complicated treatments enables the development of a system that can be used to save automatically lives of patients with acute heart failure, an autopilot system. To accomplish this, we established a comprehensive physiological cardiovascular model, on which we based the design of the autopilot system. By translating hemodynamics into cardiovascular parameters (pumping ability, vascular resistance, blood volume), and by controlling each of these with individual drugs, we were able to correct blood pressure, cardiac output, and left atrial pressure to the target values rapidly (5.2 +/- 6.6, 6.8 +/- 4.6, and 11.7 +/- 9.8 minutes), stably, and simultaneously.

  18. Hemodynamic responses are reduced with aerobic compared with resistance blood flow restriction exercise.

    PubMed

    May, Anthony K; Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-02-01

    The hemodynamics of light-load exercise with an applied blood-flow restriction (BFR) have not been extensively compared between light-intensity, BFR, and high-intensity forms of both resistance and aerobic exercise in the same participant population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use a randomized crossover design to examine the hemodynamic responses to resistance and aerobic BFR exercise in comparison with a common high-intensity and light-intensity non-BFR exercise. On separate occasions participants completed a leg-press (resistance) or treadmill (aerobic) trial. Each trial comprised a light-intensity bout (LI) followed by a light-intensity bout with BFR (80% resting systolic blood pressure (LI+BFR)), then a high-intensity bout (HI). To characterize the hemodynamic response, measures of cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate and blood pressure were taken at baseline and exercise for each bout. Exercising hemodynamics for leg-press LI+BFR most often resembled those for HI and were greater than LI (e.g. for systolic blood pressure LI+BFR = 152 ± 3 mmHg; HI = 153 ± 3; LI = 143 ± 3 P < 0.05). However, exercising hemodynamics for treadmill LI+BFR most often resembled those for LI and were lower than HI (e.g. for systolic pressure LI+BFR = 124 ± 2 mmHg; LI = 123 ± 2; HI = 140 ± 3 P < 0.05). In conclusion, the hemodynamic response for light aerobic (walking) BFR exercise suggests this mode of BFR exercise may be preferential for chronic use to develop muscle size and strength, and other health benefits in certain clinical populations that are contraindicated to heavy-load resistance exercise.

  19. Depth-resolved optical imaging of hemodynamic response in mouse brain with microcirculatory beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Nettleton, Rosemary; Rosenberg, Mara; Boudreau, Eilis; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    Optical hemodynamic imaging employed in pre-clinical studies with high spatial and temporal resolution is significant to unveil the functional activities of brain and the mechanism of internal or external stimulus effects in diverse pathological conditions and treatments. Most current optical systems only resolve hemodynamic changes within superficial macrocirculatory beds, such as laser speckle contrast imaging; or only provide vascular structural information within microcirculatory beds, such as multi-photon microscopy. In this study, we introduce a hemodynamic imaging system based on Optical Micro-angiography (OMAG) which is capable of resolving and quantifying 3D dynamic blood perfusion down to microcirculatory level. This system can measure the optical phase shifts caused by moving blood cells in microcirculation. Here, the utility of OMAG was demonstrated by monitoring the hemodynamic response to alcohol administration in mouse prefrontal cortex. Our preliminary results suggest that the spatiotemporal tracking of cerebral micro-hemodynamic using OMAG can be successfully applied to the mouse brain and reliably distinguish between vehicle and alcohol stimulation experiment.

  20. [Influence of iron nanoparticles on cardiac performance and hemodynamics in rabbits after intravenous administration in acute experiment].

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, A M

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles are possessed by high potential in the creation of effective and safe antianemic drugs due to the enhanced biological activity of metal nanoparticles. As a step of intravenous dosage form development the study of short-term effects of iron nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system is important. Dose-dependent changes of systemic hemodynamics' parameters were established in acute experiment on rabbits after several intravenous injections of zero-valent iron nanoparticles solution.

  1. Flexibly combined optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle system for comprehensive imaging of hemodynamic and metabolic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Qin, Jia; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    We have proposed and developed a multi-modal non-invasive biomedical optical imager. It was combined from the subsystems of optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging. The system was designed to maintain the performances of both subsystems. It was capable of simultaneously imaging the hemodynamic and metabolic responses in tissue environment in vivo. To achieve such requirements, we utilized unique optical setup, such as paired dichroic mirrors to compensate dispersion, additional relay lens to increase working distance and translational sample probe to freely select imaging area and focal plane. The multi-functionality of the system was demonstrated in an investigation of hemodynamic and metabolic responses on an acute wound healing model in mouse pinna in vivo. The microvasculature, blood flow and hemoglobin concentration from millimeter down to capillary level were comprehensively visualized. The captured instantaneous responses to wound onset differed greatly between localized areas; after that blood flow had a rebalance tendency, and hemoglobin concentration dynamically recovered to baseline situation.

  2. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-shan; Li, Su-zhi; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (−17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution. PMID:27503416

  3. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (‑17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution.

  4. Association between social functioning and prefrontal hemodynamic responses in elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Katsutoshi; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Mitani, Hideaki; Adachi, Akiko; Kaneko, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Social functioning has received widespread attention as one of the most important outcomes in psychiatric disorders and has been related to cognitive functioning and the underlying brain activity. Cognitive decline, however, appears not only in the psychiatric population but also in aged individuals. In our previous study, we demonstrated a significant relationship between social functioning and prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity in patients with depression. However, it has not been shown whether the above relationship could be extended to healthy populations. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a possible association between social functioning and prefrontal hemodynamic responses in healthy elderly adults by using a non-invasive and low-constraint functional neuroimaging technique, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Study subjects included 55 healthy, elderly volunteers. We measured hemodynamic responses over prefrontal cortical (PFC) areas during the verbal fluency task by using multi-channel NIRS and analyzed the relationship between task-associated hemodynamic responses and social functioning as measured by the social adaptation self-evaluation scale (SASS). A significant positive relationship was observed between the SASS total score and PFC activation. Our findings suggest that PFC activation is associated with social functioning in healthy elderly adults. Furthermore, hemodynamic responses assessed using non-invasive NIRS could be a useful biological marker of these characteristics.

  5. Hemodynamic Responses Associated with Post-exercise Hypotension in Normotensive Black Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headley, Samuel A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the hemodynamic responses during recovery from moderate intensity exercise in young Black normotensive males. Nineteen normotensive men (age 24-26 years) walked continuously on a treadmill for 40 minutes at 50-60 percent heart rate reserve. Following exercise, blood pressure (by auscultation) and…

  6. Self-reported social functioning and prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a cognitive task in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Itakura, Masashi; Yamanashi, Takehiko; Sugie, Takuya; Miura, Akehiko; Satake, Takahiro; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Kaneko, Koichi

    2015-10-30

    Impaired social functioning is a characteristic of schizophrenia that affects patients' quality of life. The aim of the study was to assess prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a cognitive task and establish its influence on psychiatric symptoms, cognitive function, global functioning, and self-reported social functioning in patients with schizophrenia. Thirty-three patients with schizophrenia and 30 age-and sex-matched healthy controls participated in the study. We measured hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal and superior temporal cortical surface areas with 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during a verbal fluency task (VFT). Self-reported social functioning was assessed using the Social Functioning Scale (SFS). Regional hemodynamic responses were significantly smaller in the prefrontal and temporal regions in subjects with schizophrenia than in the controls, and prefrontal hemodynamic responses during the VFT showed a strong correlation with SFS total scores. These results suggest an association between self-reported social functioning and prefrontal activation in subjects with schizophrenia. The present study provides evidence that NIRS imaging could be helpful in understanding the neural basis of social functioning.

  7. Low Dose Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Hemodynamic Response to Skull Pin Holder Application

    PubMed Central

    Kondavagilu, Shwethashri Ramaprasannakumar; Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Chadalawada, Mohan V. R.; Bevinguddaiah, Yatish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The application of skull pin holder elicits an adverse hemodynamic response that can be deleterious; there are many drugs that have been used to attenuate this response. We have conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (i.v.) dexmedetomidine on attenuation of hemodynamic responses to skull pin head holder application and to compare the effectiveness of two doses of i.v. dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg and 0.5 μg/kg bolus). Materials and Methods: Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I–III patients undergoing craniotomy were randomized into three groups of thirty each. After intubation, patients in Group A received 1 μg/kg of i.v. dexmedetomidine, Group B received 0.5 μg/kg of i.v. dexmedetomidine, whereas Group C received an equivalent quantity of normal saline. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored regularly after skull pin insertion. Results: There was no significant difference in the monitored hemodynamic parameters among the three groups from baseline until intubation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased significantly at skull pin insertion and subsequent points in Group C, whereas the values decreased in Groups A and B (P < 0.05). Patients in Group A showed a higher and sustained attenuation of MAP. Patients in Group C had a higher incidence of tachycardia and hypertension requiring additional measures to attenuate the response. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine in either dosage (1 μg/kg or 0.5 μg/kg) was effective in attenuating hemodynamic response to skull pin insertion. Dexmedetomidine in doses of 0.5 μg/kg was as effective in attenuating the HR and MAP response to skull pin insertion as compared to a dose of 1 μg/kg. PMID:28298757

  8. Acute effect of calcium blocker on renal hemodynamics in diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Kaizu, K; Ling, Q Y; Uriu, K; Ikeda, M; Eto, S

    1995-01-01

    This study was done to examine the acute effect of a calcium channel blocker on renal hemodynamics in the diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes, and barnidipine (B) was used as a calcium blocker. Renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured by a clearance method with paraaminohypurate (PAH) and inulin, respectively. Rats were divided into two groups: nondiabetic SHR, N-SHR; diabetic SHR, DM-SHR. B increased RBF in N-SHR (7.44 +/- 1.99 versus 8.50 +/- 1.97 mL/min/g.kw) while there was no change in DM-SHR. B reduced renovascular resistance (RVR) in DM-SHR and N-SHR. B increased GFR in N-SHR (1.15 +/- 0.24 versus 1.34 +/- 0.25 mL/min/g.kw), in spite of no changes in DM-SHR. B did not modify filtration fraction (FF) in both groups. These results indicate (1) in SHR, B exerts beneficial effects on hypertensive renal damage by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), RVR, RBF, and GFR; (2) in diabetic SHR, B is less effective in restoring renal hyperfiltration in spite of reducing RVR.

  9. Acute effects of intravenous dronedarone on electrocardiograms, hemodynamics and cardiac functions in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Saengklub, Nakkawee; Limprasutr, Vudhiporn; Sawangkoon, Suwanakiet; Buranakarl, Chollada; Hamlin, Robert L; Kijtawornrat, Anusak

    2016-02-01

    Dronedarone is a class III antiarrhythmic that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but limited information was found in dogs. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of escalating concentrations of dronedarone on electrocardiograms (ECG), hemodynamics and cardiac mechanics in healthy dogs. A total of 7 beagle dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and instrumented to obtain lead II ECG, pressures at ascending aorta, right atrium, pulmonary artery and left ventricle, and left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Five dogs were given vehicle and followed by escalating doses of dronedarone (0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg, 15 min for each dose), and two dogs were used as a vehicle-treated control. All parameters were measured at 15 min after the end of each dose. The results showed that all parameters in vehicle-treated dogs were unaltered. Dronedarone at 2.5 mg/kg significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.01), reduced cardiac output (P<0.01) and increased systemic vascular resistance (P<0.01). Dronedarone produced negative inotropy assessed by significantly lowered end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, contractility index and dP/dtmax. It also impaired diastolic function by significantly increased end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship, tau and dP/dtmin. These results suggested that acute effects of dronedarone produced negative dromotropy, inotropy and lusitropy in anesthetized dogs. Care should be taken when given dronedarone to dogs, especially when the patients have impaired cardiac function.

  10. Mechano-Sensitive PPAP2B Regulates Endothelial Responses to Athero-Relevant Hemodynamic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Kumar, Sandeep; Kim, Chan Woo; Lin, Yen-Chen; Chen, Yen-Ju; Birukova, Anna; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Dulin, Nickolai O.; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J.; Loyer, Xavier; Tedgui, Alain; Dai, Guohao; Jo, Hanjoong; Fang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Rationale PhosPhatidic-Acid-Phosphatase-type-2B (PPAP2B), an integral membrane protein that inactivates lysophosphatidic acid, was implicated in coronary artery disease (CAD) by genome-wide-association-studies (GWAS). However, it is unclear whether GWAS-identified CAD genes including PPAP2B participate in mechanotransduction mechanisms by which vascular endothelia respond to local athero-relevant hemodynamics that contribute to the regional nature of atherosclerosis. Objective To establish the critical role of PPAP2B in endothelial responses to hemodynamics. Methods and Results Reduced PPAP2B was detected in vivo in mouse and swine aortic arch endothelia exposed to chronic disturbed flow, and in mouse carotid artery endothelia subjected to surgically-induced acute disturbed flow. In humans, PPAP2B was reduced in the downstream part of carotid plaques where low shear stress prevails. In culture, reduced PPAP2B was measured in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) under athero-susceptible waveform mimicking flow in human carotid sinus. Flow-sensitive microRNA-92a and transcription factor KLF2 were identified as upstream inhibitor and activator of endothelial PPAP2B, respectively. PPAP2B suppression abrogated athero-protection of unidirectional flow; Inhibition of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPAR1) restored the flow-dependent, anti-inflammatory phenotype in PPAP2B-deficient cells. PPAP2B inhibition resulted in myosin-light-chain phosphorylation and intercellular gaps, which were abolished by LPAR1/2 inhibition. Expression-quantitative-trait-locus-mapping demonstrated PPAP2B CAD risk allele is not linked to PPAP2B expression in various human tissues but significantly associated with reduced PPAP2B in HAEC. Conclusions Athero-relevant flows dynamically modulate endothelial PPAP2B expression through miR-92a and KLF2. Mechano-sensitive PPAP2B plays a critical role in promoting anti-inflammatory phenotype and maintaining vascular integrity of endothelial monolayer

  11. Hemodynamic response of children with attention-deficit and hyperactive disorder (ADHD) to emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroko; Nakato, Emi; Kanazawa, So; Shimamura, Keiichi; Sakuta, Yuiko; Sakuta, Ryoichi; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2014-10-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have difficulty recognizing facial expressions. They identify angry expressions less accurately than typically developing (TD) children, yet little is known about their atypical neural basis for the recognition of facial expressions. Here, we used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to examine the distinctive cerebral hemodynamics of ADHD and TD children while they viewed happy and angry expressions. We measured the hemodynamic responses of 13 ADHD boys and 13 TD boys to happy and angry expressions at their bilateral temporal areas, which are sensitive to face processing. The ADHD children showed an increased concentration of oxy-Hb for happy faces but not for angry faces, while TD children showed increased oxy-Hb for both faces. Moreover, the individual peak latency of hemodynamic response in the right temporal area showed significantly greater variance in the ADHD group than in the TD group. Such atypical brain activity observed in ADHD boys may relate to their preserved ability to recognize a happy expression and their difficulty recognizing an angry expression. We firstly demonstrated that NIRS can be used to detect atypical hemodynamic response to facial expressions in ADHD children.

  12. Physiological responses to environmental factors related to space flight. [hemodynamic and metabolic responses to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    Physiological base line data are established, and physiological procedures and instrumentation necessary for the automatic measurement of hemodynamic and metabolic parameters during prolonged periods of weightlessness are developed.

  13. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on pulmonary hemodynamics after acute lung injury in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Romand, J.A.; Pinsky, M.R.; Firestone, L.; Zar, H.A.; Lancaster, J.R. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mismatch in ventilation-to-perfusion ratio characterize acute lung injury (ALI). Pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) decreases when nitric oxide (NO) is inhaled during hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV); thus NO inhalation may reduce PVR and improve gas exchange in ALI. The authors studied the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of NO inhalation during HPV and then ALI in eight anesthetized open-chest mechanically ventilated dogs. Right atrial pressure, Ppa, and left ventricular and arterial pressures were measured, and cardiac output was estimated by an aortic flow probe. Shunt and dead space were also estimated. The effect of 5-min exposures to 0, 17, 28, 47, and 0 ppm inhaled NO was recorded during hyperoxia, hypoxia, and oleic acid-induced ALI. During ALI, partial [beta]-adrenergic blockage (propanolol, 0.15 mg/kg iv) was induced and 74 ppm NO was inhaled. Nitrosylhemoglobin (NO-Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) levels were measured. During hyperoxia, NO inhalation had no measurable effects. Hypoxia increased Ppa and calculated PVR, both of which decreased with 17 ppm NO. ALI decreased arterial Po[sub 2] and increased airway pressure, shunt, and dead space ventilation. Ppa and PVR were greater during ALI than during hyperoxia. NO inhalation had no measurable effect during ALI before or after [beta]-adrenergic blockage. MetHb remained low, and NO-Hb was unmeasurable. Bolus infusion of nitroglycerin (15 [mu]g) induced an immediate decrease in Ppa and PVR during ALI. Short-term NO inhalation does not affect PVR or gas exchange in dogs with oleic acid-induced ALI, nor does it increase NO-Hb or MetHb. In contrast, NO can diminish hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary vascular tone. These data suggest that NO inhalation selectively dilates the pulmonary circulation and specifically reduces HPV but not oleic acid-induced increases in pulmonary vasomotor tone. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Spatial Relationship between Flavoprotein Fluorescence and the Hemodynamic Response in the Primary Visual Cortex of Alert Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Sirotin, Yevgeniy B.; Das, Aniruddha

    2010-01-01

    Flavoprotein fluorescence imaging (FFI) is a novel intrinsic optical signal that is steadily gaining ground as a valuable imaging tool in neuroscience research due to its closer relationship with local metabolism relative to the more commonly used hemodynamic signals. We have developed a technique for FFI imaging in the primary visual cortex (V1) of alert monkeys. Due to the nature of neurovascular coupling, hemodynamic signals are known to spread beyond the locus of metabolic activity. To determine whether FFI signals could provide a more focal measure of cortical activity in alert animals, we compared FFI and hemodynamic point spreads (i.e. responses to a minimal visual stimulus) and functional mapping signals over V1 in macaques performing simple fixation tasks. FFI responses were biphasic, with an early and focal fluorescence increase followed by a delayed and spatially broader fluorescence decrease. As expected, the early fluorescence increase, indicating increased local oxidative metabolism, was somewhat narrower than the simultaneously observed hemodynamic response. However, the later FFI decrease was broader than the hemodynamic response and started prior to the cessation of visual stimulation suggesting different mechanisms underlying the two phases of the fluorescence signal. FFI mapping signals were free of vascular artifacts and comparable in amplitude to hemodynamic mapping signals. These results indicate that the FFI response may be a more local and direct indicator of cortical metabolism than the hemodynamic response in alert animals. PMID:20577638

  15. Abnormal hemodynamic response to forepaw stimulation in rat brain after cocaine injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Park, Kicheon; Choi, Jeonghun; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous measurement of hemodynamics is of great importance to evaluate the brain functional changes induced by brain diseases such as drug addiction. Previously, we developed a multimodal-imaging platform (OFI) which combined laser speckle contrast imaging with multi-wavelength imaging to simultaneously characterize the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygenated- and deoxygenated- hemoglobin (HbO and HbR) from animal brain. Recently, we upgraded our OFI system that enables detection of hemodynamic changes in response to forepaw electrical stimulation to study potential brain activity changes elicited by cocaine. The improvement includes 1) high sensitivity to detect the cortical response to single forepaw electrical stimulation; 2) high temporal resolution (i.e., 16Hz/channel) to resolve dynamic variations in drug-delivery study; 3) high spatial resolution to separate the stimulation-evoked hemodynamic changes in vascular compartments from those in tissue. The system was validated by imaging the hemodynamic responses to the forepaw-stimulations in the somatosensory cortex of cocaine-treated rats. The stimulations and acquisitions were conducted every 2min over 40min, i.e., from 10min before (baseline) to 30min after cocaine challenge. Our results show that the HbO response decreased first (at ~4min) followed by the decrease of HbR response (at ~6min) after cocaine, and both did not fully recovered for over 30min. Interestingly, while CBF decreased at 4min, it partially recovered at 18min after cocaine administration. The results indicate the heterogeneity of cocaine's effects on vasculature and tissue metabolism, demonstrating the unique capability of optical imaging for brain functional studies.

  16. Negative hemodynamic response without neuronal inhibition investigated by combining optical imaging and electrophysiological recording.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zengguang; Cao, Pengjia; Sun, Pengcheng; Lu, Zhuofan; Li, Liming; Chen, Yao; Chai, Xinyu

    2017-01-10

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying negative hemodynamic responses is critical for the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Negative imaging signals have been found in the visual, somatosensory and motor cortices in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI) studies. However, the origin of negative imaging signals is still controversial. The present study investigated the visual cortical responses to peripheral grating stimuli using multi-wavelength ISOI and electrophysiological recording. We found an increased cerebral blood volume (CBV) in the stimulus-induced regions and a decreased CBV in the adjacent regions in the visual cortex. Nevertheless, there was no significant change in blood oxygenation in the negative CBV regions. Furthermore, by combining the planar and laminar electrophysiological recordings, we did not observe significantly decreased neuronal activity in the negative CBV regions. Our results suggest that the negative hemodynamic response does not necessarily originate in decreased neuronal activity. Therefore, caution should be taken when interpreting a negative hemodynamic response as neuronal inhibition.

  17. Renal hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to urapidil in hypertensive man

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, P.W.; van Es, P.N.; de Bruyn, H.A.; Birkenhaeger, W.H.D.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the acute effects of urapidil on renal vascular tone and on pressor systems we performed a randomized placebo-controlled crossover study in 8 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension. Each subject received, on two separate days one week apart, an intravenous injection of either placebo or urapidil (25 mg, to be increased to 50 mg if blood pressure did not fall within 5 minutes). Before and following this injection we measured blood pressure and heart rate (Dinamap), renal plasma flow (/sup 125/I-hippuran), renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and catecholamines. The results show that urapidil, when compared to placebo, significantly reduced blood pressure, while increasing heart rate, renal blood flow, noradrenaline and adrenaline. Dopamine levels, on the other hand, were suppressed. While renin and angiotensin II were only mildly stimulated, aldosterone levels increased markedly. It is concluded that urapidil, given intravenously, has an immediate blood pressure lowering effect associated with a fall in renal vascular tone and an increase in renal perfusion. As a consequence both the sympathetic system and the renin-angiotensin system are stimulated, although the latter only to a mild degree. The rise in aldosterone may be related to withdrawal of dopaminergic tone.

  18. Imaging hemodynamic response after ischemic stroke in mouse cortex using visible-light optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siyu; Liu, Qi; Shu, Xiao; Soetikno, Brian; Tong, Shanbao; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Visible-light optical coherence tomography (Vis-OCT) is an emerging technology that can image hemodynamic response in microvasculature. Vis-OCT can retrieve blood oxygen saturation (sO2) mapping using intrinsic optical absorption contrast while providing high-resolution anatomical vascular structures at the same time. To improve the accuracy of Vis-OCT oximetry on vessels embedded in highly scattering medium, i.e., brain cortex, we developed and formulated a novel dual-depth sampling and normalization strategy that allowed us to minimize the detrimental effect of ubiquitous tissue scattering. We applied our newly developed approach to monitor the hemodynamic response in mouse cortex after focal photothrombosis. We observed vessel dilatation, which was negatively correlated with the original vessel diameter, in the penumbra region. The sO2 of vessels in the penumbra region also dropped below normal range after focal ischemia. PMID:27699105

  19. Hemodynamic responses to laboratory stressors in children and adolescents: the influences of age, race, and gender.

    PubMed

    Allen, M T; Matthews, K A

    1997-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were threefold: (a) to compare the patterns of hemodynamic responding of children and adolescents during behavioral challenges, (b) to examine whether previously reported cardiovascular reactivity differences between Black and White children are dependent on pubertal status, and (c) to assess whether gender differences in hemodynamic response reported for adults is similar in children. One hundred fifty-nine children (ages 8-10 years) and adolescents (ages 15-17 years), equally divided along gender and racial lines, participated in a laboratory protocol consisting of a reaction time task, a mirror tracing task, a cold forehead challenge, and a stress interview. Results indicated that adolescents responded with greater beta-adrenergic activation than did children and that gender differences in reactivity often reported for adults emerged more clearly in the adolescents than in the children. This study failed to replicate prior findings of greater vasoconstrictive responses in Black children as compared with White children.

  20. Reduced Prefrontal Cortex Hemodynamic Response in Adults with Methamphetamine Induced Psychosis: Relevance for Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Naoko; Nakanishi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shohei; Ota, Toyosaku; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with methamphetamine abuse/dependence often exhibit high levels of impulsivity, which may be associated with the structural abnormalities and functional hypoactivities observed in the frontal cortex of these subjects. Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a simple and non-invasive method for characterizing the clinical features of various psychiatric illnesses, few studies have used NIRS to directly investigate the association between prefrontal cortical activity and inhibitory control in patients with methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MAP). Using a 24-channel NIRS system, we compared hemodynamic responses during the Stroop color-word task in 14 patients with MAP and 21 healthy controls matched for age, sex and premorbid IQ. In addition, we used the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11) to assess impulsivity between subject groups. The MAP group exhibited significantly less activation in the anterior and frontopolar prefrontal cortex accompanied by lower Stroop color-word task performance, compared with controls. Moreover, BIS-11 scores were significantly higher in the MAP group, and were negatively correlated with the hemodynamic responses in prefrontal cortex. Our data suggest that reduced hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might reflect higher levels of impulsivity in patients with MAP, providing new insights into disrupted inhibitory control observed in MAP. PMID:27050450

  1. Optimal measurements of hemodynamic response latency in fNIRS using the jackknife approach.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Manon; Bisaillon-Sicotte, Étienne; Tabrizi, Shirin; Armony, Jorge L; Lina, Jean-Marc; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) permits measurements of changes in the concentration of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, typically with a higher sampling rate than with other imaging methods based on the hemodynamic response. We examined the potential of the fNIRS technique to estimate variations in the latency of hemodynamic responses to experimental events and sought optimal methods to maximize the reliability and reproducibility of latency effects. We used Monte Carlo simulations using subsamples of real fNIRS measures to estimate the statistical power of different approaches (such as fixed threshold, percent of peak, fractional-area latency, for both individual-subject estimates and estimates from jackknife averages) to detect a known simulated latency shift. The simulations used measures of hemodynamic responses in the temporal lobe from two groups of young adult participants who listened to auditory stimuli, one with a blocked presentation design and one with an event-related design. We estimated the relative sensitivity of different latency measures and approaches to the measurement of latency effects of different magnitudes using realistic noise and signal-to-noise characteristics. In general, the jackknife approach provided the greatest statistical power to detect a known latency shift, without inflation of Type I error.

  2. Exploring diazepam’s effect on hemodynamic responses of mouse brain tissue by optical spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a simple duel-optical spectroscopic imaging apparatus capable of simultaneously determining relative changes in brain oxy-and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations was used following administration of the anxiolytic compound diazepam in mice with strong dominant (Dom) and submissive (Sub) behavioral traits. Three month old mice (n = 30) were anesthetized and after 10 min of baseline imaging, diazepam (1.5 mg/kg) was administered and measurements were taken for 80 min. The mouse head was illuminated by white light based LED's and diffused reflected light passing through different channels, consisting of a bandpass filter and a CCD camera, respectively, was collected and analyzed to measure the hemodynamic response. This work’s major findings are threefold: first, Dom and Sub animals showed statistically significant differences in hemodynamic response to diazepam administration. Secondly, diazepam was found to more strongly affect the Sub group. Thirdly, different time-series profiles were observed post-injection, which can serve as a possible marker for the groups’ differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the effects of an anxiolytic drug on brain hemodynamic responses in mice using diffused light optical imaging. PMID:25071958

  3. Social cognition and prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a working memory task in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Itakura, Masashi; Yamanashi, Takehiko; Yamada, Sayaka; Masai, Mieko; Miura, Akihiko; Yamauchi, Takahira; Satake, Takahiro; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Roberts, David L; Kaneko, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    Social cognition is an important determinant of functional impairment in schizophrenia, but its relationship with the prefrontal functional abnormalities associated with the condition is still unclear. The present study aimed to explore the relationship between social cognition and prefrontal function in patients with schizophrenia using 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty-six patients with schizophrenia and 26 age-, gender-, and intelligence quotient-matched healthy controls (HCs) participated in the study. Hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal and superior temporal cortical regions were assessed during a working memory task using NIRS. Social cognition was assessed using the Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire (SCSQ). The observed hemodynamic responses were significantly reduced in the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), the frontopolar cortex, and temporal regions in subjects with schizophrenia compared to HCs. Additionally, lateral PFC hemodynamic responses assessed during the working memory task demonstrated a strong positive correlation with the SCSQ theory of mind (ToM) subscale score even after controlling for working memory performance. These results suggest that ToM integrity is closely related to lateral PFC functional abnormalities found in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, this study provides evidence to suggest that NIRS could be used to identify biomarkers of social cognition function in subjects with schizophrenia.

  4. Acute hemodynamic effects of inhaled sodium nitrite in pulmonary hypertension associated with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marc A.; Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Nouraie, Mehdi; Bachman, Timothy N.; White, Pamela M.; Sugahara, Masataka; Gorcsan, John; Parsley, Ed L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with poor outcomes, yet specific treatments only exist for a small subset of patients. The most common form of PH is that associated with left heart disease (Group 2), for which there is no approved therapy. Nitrite has shown efficacy in preclinical animal models of Group 1 and 2 PH, as well as in patients with left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a potentially novel inhaled formulation of nitrite in PH-HFpEF patients as compared with Group 1 and 3 PH. METHODS. Cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were recorded after acute administration of inhaled nitrite at 2 doses, 45 and 90 mg. Safety endpoints included change in systemic blood pressure and methemoglobin levels. Responses were also compared with those administered inhaled nitric oxide. RESULTS. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (10 PH-HFpEF, 20 Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension patients on background PH-specific therapy, and 6 Group 3 PH). Drug administration was well tolerated. Nitrite inhalation significantly lowered pulmonary, right atrial, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. There was a modest decrease in cardiac output and systemic blood pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance decreased only in Group 3 PH patients. There was substantial increase in pulmonary artery compliance, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. CONCLUSIONS. Inhaled nitrite is safe in PH patients and may be efficacious in PH-HFpEF and Group 3 PH primarily via improvements in left and right ventricular filling pressures and pulmonary artery compliance. The lack of change in pulmonary vascular resistance likely may limit efficacy for Group 1 patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01431313 FUNDING. This work was supported in part by the NIH grants P01HL103455 (to MAS and MTG), R01HL098032 (to MTG), and R01HL096973 (to MTG), and Mast Therapeutics, Inc. PMID

  5. The Mechanoreflex and Hemodynamic Response to Passive Leg Movement in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ives, Stephen J.; Amann, Markus; Venturelli, Massimo; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Groot, H. Jonathan; Wray, D. Walter; Morgan, David E.; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sensitization of mechanosensitive afferents, which contribute to the exercise pressor reflex (EPR) has been recognized as a characteristic of patients with heart failure (HF), however, the hemodynamic implications of this hypersensitivity are unclear. Objectives The present study utilized passive leg movement (PLM) and intrathecal injection of fentanyl to blunt the afferent portion of this reflex arc to better understand the role of the mechanoreflex on central and peripheral hemodynamics in HF. Methods Femoral blood flow (FBF), mean arterial pressure (MAP), femoral vascular conductance (FVC), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), ventilation (VE), and muscle oxygenation of the vastus lateralis, were assessed in 10 NYHA class II HF patients at baseline and during 3-min of PLM both with fentanyl and without (control). Results Fentanyl had no effect on baseline measures, but increased (p<0.05, control vs. fentanyl) the peak PLM-induced change in FBF (493±155 vs. 804±198 ΔmL/min), and FVC (4.7±2 vs. 8.5±3 ΔmL/min/mmHg), while norepinephrine spillover (103±19 vs. 58±17 %Δ), and retrograde FBF (371±115 vs. 260±68 ΔmL/min) tended to be reduced (p<0.10). Additionally, fentanyl administration resulted in greater PLM-induced increases in muscle oxygenation, suggestive of increased microvascular perfusion. Fentanyl had no effect on the VE, MAP, HR, SV, or CO response to PLM. Conclusions Although movement-induced central hemodynamics were unchanged by afferent blockade, peripheral hemodynamic responses were significantly enhanced. Thus, in patients with HF a heightened mechanoreflex appears to augment peripheral sympathetic vasoconstriction in response to movement, a phenomenon that may contribute to exercise intolerance in this population. PMID:26418560

  6. Empirical Evaluation of Visual Fatigue from Display Alignment Errors Using Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wiyor, Hanniebey D.; Ntuen, Celestine A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of stereoscopic display alignment errors on visual fatigue and prefrontal cortical tissue hemodynamic responses. We collected hemodynamic data and perceptual ratings of visual fatigue while participants performed visual display tasks on 8 ft × 6 ft NEC LT silver screen with NEC LT 245 DLP projectors. There was statistical significant difference between subjective measures of visual fatigue before air traffic control task (BATC) and after air traffic control task (ATC 3), (P < 0.05). Statistical significance was observed between left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex oxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-HbO2), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-Hbb), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (r DLPFC-Hbb) on stereoscopic alignment errors (P < 0.05). Thus, cortical tissue oxygenation requirement in the left hemisphere indicates that the effect of visual fatigue is more pronounced in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:27006917

  7. Hemodynamic and neurohormonal responses to extreme orthostatic stress in physically fit young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, E. K.; Goswami, N.; Rössler, A.; Vrecko, K.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    2009-04-01

    Blood pressure stability may be jeopardized in astronauts experiencing orthostatic stress. There is disagreement about cardiovascular and endocrine stress responses that emerge when a critical (presyncopal) state is reached. We studied hemodynamic and neurohormonal changes as induced by an orthostatic stress paradigm (head-up tilt combined with lower body negative pressure) that leads to a syncopal endpoint. From supine control to presyncope, heart rate increased by 78% and thoracic impedance by 12%. There was a 49% fall in stroke volume index, 19% in mean arterial blood pressure, 14% in total peripheral resistance index and 11% in plasma volume. Plasma norepinephrine rose by 107, epinephrine by 491, plasma renin activity by 167, and cortisol by 25%. Hemodynamic and hormonal changes of clearly different magnitude emerge in presyncope as compared to supine rest. Additional studies are warranted to reveal the exact time course of orthostatic changes up to syncopal levels.

  8. Hemodynamic responses to seated and supine lower body negative pressure - Comparison with +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polese, Alvese; Sandler, Harold; Montgomery, Leslie D.

    1992-01-01

    The hemodynamic responses to LBNP in seated subjects and in subjects in supine body positions were compared and were correlated with hemodynamic changes which occurred during a simulated (by centrifugation) Shuttle reentry acceleration with a slow onset rate of 0.002 G/s and during gradual onset exposures to +3 Gz and +4 Gz. Results demonstrate that seated LBNP at a level of -40 mm Hg can serve as a static simulator for changes in the heart rate and in mean blood pressure induced by gradual onset acceleration stress occurring during Shuttle reentry. The findings also provide a rationale for using LBNP during weightlessness as a means of imposing G-loading on the circulation prior to reentry.

  9. Acute Hemodynamic Effects of the Braslet-M Device on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Barratt, Michael R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Ebert, Douglas; Martin, David; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Braslet-M occlusion device is prescribed for cosmonauts as a countermeasure for early phases of spaceflight to temporarily alleviate symptoms associated with the cephalad fluid shift. Using a multipurpose ultrasound (US) device onboard, we assessed the acute hemodynamic effects of the Bracelet-M device on a long duration International Space Station (ISS) crewmember. Methods A combination of just-in-time training and real-time remote expert assistance was used to conduct the imaging procedures. An HDI-5000 imager (Philips, Bothell, WA) was used, provided by the ISS Human Research Facility. Superficial femoral artery (SFA), femoral vein (FV) flow spectra were obtained at mid-thigh level. Left ventricle was imaged through the apical 4-chamber view, with Color M-Mode to measure propagation velocity (V (p)). After 10 minutes of Bracelet-M use, data collection was repeated. All data were transmitted in DICOM format to ground for analysis. Results With Braslet-M, cardiac V(p) slope decreased (56ms to 42ms). A stagnation signature in the FV was seen suggesting impeded flow (rouleaux formation, too-low-to-measure velocity, and increase in diameter). Quadri-phasic flow in SFA was seen both before and after Braslet-M application. Velocities in the SFA decreased with Braslet-M (65cm/sec to 52cm/sec) and so did the time velocity integrals (16.97 to 12.4); the flow pattern spoke of resistivity increase in the vascular bed. Conclusion In the long duration ISS crewmember we observed effects of lower extremity venous occlusion through both central and peripheral indicators. A part of circulating volume transferred to peripheral potential vascular space. Impediment to venous outflow was demonstrated objectively, with a commensurate change in the flow pattern of the main feeding artery. Central volume reduction caused lower V(p). Additional studies are warranted to determine the time course of the changes and the dynamics in interstitial fluid sequestration, as well as the safe

  10. Restructuring of the vascular bed in response to hemodynamic disturbances in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Garbuzenko, Dmitry Victorovich; Arefyev, Nikolay Olegovich; Belov, Dmitry Vladimirovich

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, defined progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of hemodynamic disturbances occurring in liver cirrhosis, which are based on portal hypertension. In addition to pathophysiological disorders related to endothelial dysfunction, it was revealed: There is the restructuring of the vasculature, which includes vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In spite of the fact that these changes are the compensatory-adaptive response to the deteriorating conditions of blood circulation, taken together, they contribute to the development and progression of portal hypertension causing severe complications such as bleeding from esophageal varices. Disruption of systemic and organ hemodynamics and the formation of portosystemic collaterals in portal hypertension commence with neovascularization and splanchnic vasodilation due to the hypoxia of the small intestine mucosa. In this regard, the goal of comprehensive treatment may be to influence on the chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, placental growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor and others) that lead to the development of these disorders. This review is to describe the mechanisms of restructuring of the vascular bed in response to hemodynamic disturbances in portal hypertension. Development of pathogenetic methods, which allow correcting portal hypertension, will improve the efficiency of conservative therapy aimed at prevention and treatment of its inherent complications. PMID:28083082

  11. fNIRS derived hemodynamic signals and electrodermal responses in a sequential risk-taking task.

    PubMed

    Holper, Lisa; ten Brincke, Robert H W; Wolf, Martin; Murphy, Ryan O

    2014-04-04

    The study measured cortical hemodynamic signals and peripheral correlates of decision makers during a dynamic risky task, the Just One More task (JOM), in which the risky decision entails choosing whether to incrementally increase accumulated earnings at the risk of ruin (going bust ending up with nothing). Twenty subjects participated in multiple instantiations of this task in which the probability of ruin and size of the stakes varied. Physiological correlates were simultaneously quantified by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and electrodermal activity (EDA). First, in the task decision phase (i.e., when subjects are contemplating options before making a choice) probability of ruin had a dissociating effect on fNIRS and EDA. fNIRS derived DLPFC hemodynamic signals reflected a subjective value signal, correlating positively with individual risk attitude. Contrary, EDA reflected the probability of ruin in terms of a common affective measure, irrespective of individuals׳ risk attitude. Second, during the task outcome phase (i.e., the time after subjects have made a choice and observed the outcomes) fNIRS and EDA revealed opposite patterns. While fNIRS derived DLPFC hemodynamic signals were larger in response to gains, EDA signals were larger in response to losses; both patterns were statistically independent of individual risk attitude. Lastly, fNIRS derived DLPFC hemodynamic signals in the decision phase correlated positively with the mean round earnings, providing a measure of the quality of the individual decision-making performance. Together with the positive correlation with individual risk attitude, our findings indicate that fNIRS signals, but not EDA, could be taken as a useful method for studying individual risk attitude and task performance in dynamic risky decision-making.

  12. Hemodynamic Response to Hemodialysis With Ultrafiltration Rate Profiles Either Gradually Decreasing or Gradually Increasing.

    PubMed

    Morales-Alvarez, Ricardo; Martínez-Memije, Raúl; Becerra-Luna, Brayans; García-Paz, Paola; Infante, Oscar; Palma-Ramírez, Alfredo; Caviedes-Aramburu, Amaya; Vargas-Barrón, Jesús; Lerma, Claudia; Pérez-Grovas, Héctor

    2016-07-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) is usually performed with the gradually decreasing ultrafiltration rate (UFR) profile (dUFR). The aim of the present study was to compare the hemodynamic response to HD with the dUFR to that of HD with the gradually increasing UFR profile (iUFR). The study population included 10 patients (three women, mean age: 28 ± 8 years) undergoing maintenance HD who had reached dry weight without taking antihypertensive medications. Each patient received (in random order) one HD session with the dUFR and another with the iUFR (both with 3 h total UFR = 2200 mL). Hemodynamic response was evaluated with a brachial blood pressure (BP) monitor, echocardiogram and Portapres to measure digital BP, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume, and peripheral resistance. Mean values were compared at each HD hour during the first 3 h of a 4-h HD session. The HD characteristics, including Kt/V, were similar for both UFR profiles. Relative blood volume decreased more gradually and linearly with the iUFR. Hemodynamic variables were not significantly different between the two profiles, but brachial BP was more stable with the iUFR. Digital diastolic BP increased with both profiles. Peripheral resistance increased with both profiles, and tended to increase more with the iUFR. Echocardiographic variables changed similarly during the HD session with both profiles. In conclusion, these two UFR profiles are similar in most hemodynamic variables. The statistical equivalence of both profiles suggests that either could be prescribed based on the clinical characteristics of the patient.

  13. Acute hemodynamic effects of right ventricular pacing site and pacing mode in patients with congestive heart failure secondary to either ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gold, M R; Brockman, R; Peters, R W; Olsovsky, M R; Shorofsky, S R

    2000-05-01

    The hemodynamic effects of pacing in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) remain controversial. Early studies reported that pacing from the right ventricular (RV) apex improved acute hemodynamic parameters in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, but these findings were not confirmed in subsequent controlled studies. More recently, it has been proposed that pacing from the RV side of the ventricular septum improves hemodynamic function compared with intrinsic conduction or apical pacing. Either dual-chamber or ventricular pacing have been evaluated, again with inconsistent findings. To assess the effects of pacing site and mode on acute hemodynamic function, we evaluated 21 subjects with CHF and intrinsic conduction disease. Hemodynamics were compared in AAI, VVI, and DDD modes with pacing from the RV apex or high septum. The pacing rate was constant in each patient and the order of testing was randomized. In the absence of ventricular pacing (AAI mode), the mean systemic arterial pressure was 85 +/- 11 mm Hg, the right atrial pressure was 11 +/- 4 mm Hg, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 18 +/- 8 mm Hg and the cardiac index was 2.4 +/- 0.7 L/min/m(2). Compared with AAI pacing, there were no improvements in any hemodynamic parameter with DDD pacing from either RV site. Hemodynamic function worsened with VVI pacing from both RV sites. Subgroup analyses of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, with prolonged PR interval, or with significant mitral regurgitation also failed to demonstrate an improvement with pacing. We conclude that pacing mode but not RV pacing site affects acute hemodynamic function. Pacing in the DDD mode prevents the deleterious effects of VVI pacing in this patient population.

  14. Effect of Lower Body Compression Garments on Hemodynamics in Response to Running Session

    PubMed Central

    Venckūnas, Tomas; Trinkūnas, Eugenijus; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Poderys, Jonas; Grūnovas, Albinas; Brazaitis, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Compression garments are often worn during exercise and allegedly have ergogenic and/or physiological effects. In this study, we compared hemodynamics and running performance while wearing compression and loose-fit breeches. We hypothesized that in neutral-warm environment compression breeches impair performance by diminishing body cooling via evaporative sweat loss and redistributing blood from active musculature to skin leading to a larger rise in body temperature and prolonging recovery of hemodynamics after exercise. Methods. Changes in hemodynamics (leg blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure during orthoclinostatic test), calf muscle tissue oxygenation, and skin and core temperatures were measured in response to 30 min running (simulation of aerobic training session) followed by maximal 400 m sprint (evaluation of running performance) in recreationally active females (25.1 ± 4.2 yrs; 63.0 ± 8.6 kg) wearing compression or loose-fit breeches in randomized fashion. Results. Wearing compression breeches resulted in larger skin temperature rise under the garment during exercise and recovery (by about 1°C, P < 0.05; statistical power > 85%), while core temperature dynamics and other measured parameters including circulation, running performance, and sensations were similar compared to wearing loose-fit breeches (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Compared with loose-fit breeches, compression breeches have neither positive nor negative physiological and performance effects for females running in thermoneutral environment. PMID:25202721

  15. Acute effects of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cantow, Kathleen; Pohlmann, Andreas; Flemming, Bert; Ferrara, Fabienne; Waiczies, Sonia; Grosenick, Dirk; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol is increasingly used as intravascular contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study details the impact of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. In 10 anesthetized rats, a single intravenous injection of isotonic saline (used as volume control) was followed by three consecutive injections of ferumoxytol to achieve cumulative doses of 6, 10, and 41 mg Fe/kg body mass. Arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygen tension were continuously measured. Regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was characterized by dedicated interventions: brief periods of suprarenal aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. None of the three doses of ferumoxytol resulted in significant changes in any of the measured parameters as compared to saline. Ferumoxytol did not significantly alter regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation as studied by aortic occlusion and hypoxia. The only significant effect of ferumoxytol at the highest dose was a blunting of the hyperoxia-induced increase in arterial pressure. Taken together, ferumoxytol has only marginal effects on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. This makes ferumoxytol a prime candidate as contrast agent for renal MRI including the assessment of renal blood volume fraction. PMID:27436132

  16. Feasibility of In-Vivo Simulation of Acute Hemodynamics in Human Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sramko, Marek; Wichterle, Dan; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated hemodynamic feasibility and reproducibility of a new method for in vivo simulation of human atrial fibrillation (AF). The method was tested during sinus rhythm in 10 patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF. A simple electronic device was assembled that allowed triggering a cardiac stimulator by predefined series of RR intervals. Irregular RR interval sequences with a mean heart rate of 90/min and 130/min were obtained from ECG recordings of another patients with AF. Simultaneous atrioventricular pacing was delivered by catheters placed inside the coronary sinus and at the His bundle region. Hemodynamic effect of the simulated AF was assessed by invasive measurement of the left ventricular (LV) pressure, dP/dt, and Tau. Compared to regular pacing at the same mean heart rate, the simulated AF significantly impaired the LV both systolic and diastolic function. Repeated AF pacing in the same patients generated similar LV hemodynamics. The proposed method provides a realistic and reproducible in-vivo model of AF. It can be exploited for investigation of the hemodynamic consequences of AF in various patient populations. PMID:27764240

  17. Remodeling of blood vessels: responses of diameter and wall thickness to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pries, Axel R; Reglin, Bettina; Secomb, Timothy W

    2005-10-01

    Vascular functions, including tissue perfusion and peripheral resistance, reflect continuous structural adaptation (remodeling) of blood vessels in response to several stimuli. Here, a theoretical model is presented that relates the structural and functional properties of microvascular networks to the adaptive responses of individual segments to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli. All vessels are assumed to respond, according to a common set of adaptation rules, to changes in wall shear stress, circumferential wall stress, and tissue metabolic status (indicated by partial pressure of oxygen). An increase in vessel diameter with increasing wall shear stress and an increase in wall mass with increased circumferential stress are needed to ensure stable vascular adaptation. The model allows quantitative predictions of the effects of changes in systemic hemodynamic conditions or local adaptation characteristics on vessel structure and on peripheral resistance. Predicted effects of driving pressure on the ratio of wall thickness to vessel diameter are consistent with experimental observations. In addition, peripheral resistance increases by approximately 65% for an increase in driving pressure from 50 to 150 mm Hg. Peripheral resistance is predicted to be markedly increased in response to a decrease in vascular sensitivity to wall shear stress, and to be decreased in response to increased tissue metabolic demand. This theoretical approach provides a framework for integrating available information on structural remodeling in the vascular system and predicting responses to changing conditions or altered vascular reactivity, as may occur in hypertension.

  18. Hemodynamic responses to Lachesis muta (South American bushmaster) snake venom in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Dias, Lourdes; Rodrigues, Mariana A P; Rennó, André L; Stroka, Alessandra; Inoue, Bruna R; Panunto, Patrícia C; Melgarejo, Anibal R; Hyslop, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we examined the hemodynamic responses to Lachesis muta (South American bushmaster) venom in anesthetized male Wistar rats. Venom (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) caused immediate hypotension that was followed by a gradual return towards baseline over 60 min; there were no significant changes in heart rate, ECG parameters and respiratory rate. A higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.v.) caused sustained hypotension, variable bradycardia, respiratory depression and fluctuations in ECG; death occurred within 10-60 min. Venom injected intramuscularly (15 mg/kg) produced a smaller decrease in blood pressure that was more persistent than with 1.5 mg/kg (i.v.). Pre-treatment with atenolol (selective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist) potentiated the response to venom (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and resulted in a hemodynamic profile similar to that seen with 3 mg/kg (i.v.). Macroscopically, systemic hemorrhage was seen only in the ileum, whereas histological analysis revealed extensive pulmonary hemorrhage; the heart, liver and kidney were generally unaffected. Intravascular pulmonary thrombosis occurred with venom given i.v. and i.m., but was less marked with the latter route. In rat isolated perfused hearts, venom caused a persistent decrease in left ventricular developed pressure but no change in heart rate, coronary flow or ECG; there was tissue necrosis and release of CK-MB that were abolished by pre-treating venom with the PLA2 inhibitor p-bromophenacyl bromide. These results show that in rats L. muta venom causes hypotension, bradycardia and respiratory depression, depending on the dose and route of administration. The hemodynamic responses apparently do not involve direct cardiotoxicity and are modulated by the adrenergic system.

  19. Hemodynamic response to treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pulmonary arterial hypertension: longitudinal insights from an implantable hemodynamic monitor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite new therapeutic options, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a progressive disease associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. As such, additional strategies for monitoring and adjunctive management of this disease are important. A 59-year-old woman with scleroderma-associated PAH received an implantable hemodynamic monitor (IHM) as part of a research protocol at our institution. Pulmonary artery pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output (sensor-based algorithm) were measured on a daily basis, and parameters of right ventricular (RV) performance and afterload were calculated. At the time of IHM implant, the patient had functional class III symptoms, was receiving triple-drug therapy, and had normal hemoglobin levels. Four months after implant, and with further optimization of prostacyclin therapy, she had improvement in her symptoms. However, shortly thereafter, while the patient was receiving stable drug therapy, her case regressed with worsening symptoms, and the patient received a new diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia. Oral iron supplementation resulted in normalization of hemoglobin levels and improvement in the patient’s iron profile. A gradual and sustained reduction in pulmonary pressures was noted after initiation of oral iron accompanied by increased RV performance and favorable reduction in RV afterload. The patient had significant symptomatic improvement. Iron deficiency is an underappreciated yet easily treatable risk factor in PAH. Use of IHM in this case longitudinally illustrates the optimization of pulmonary hemodynamics and RV afterload in tandem with clinical improvement achieved by a simple therapy. PMID:28090307

  20. Hemodynamic response to treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pulmonary arterial hypertension: longitudinal insights from an implantable hemodynamic monitor.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Muddassir; Agarwal, Richa; Raina, Amresh; Correa-Jaque, Priscilla; Benza, Raymond L

    2016-12-01

    Despite new therapeutic options, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a progressive disease associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. As such, additional strategies for monitoring and adjunctive management of this disease are important. A 59-year-old woman with scleroderma-associated PAH received an implantable hemodynamic monitor (IHM) as part of a research protocol at our institution. Pulmonary artery pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output (sensor-based algorithm) were measured on a daily basis, and parameters of right ventricular (RV) performance and afterload were calculated. At the time of IHM implant, the patient had functional class III symptoms, was receiving triple-drug therapy, and had normal hemoglobin levels. Four months after implant, and with further optimization of prostacyclin therapy, she had improvement in her symptoms. However, shortly thereafter, while the patient was receiving stable drug therapy, her case regressed with worsening symptoms, and the patient received a new diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia. Oral iron supplementation resulted in normalization of hemoglobin levels and improvement in the patient's iron profile. A gradual and sustained reduction in pulmonary pressures was noted after initiation of oral iron accompanied by increased RV performance and favorable reduction in RV afterload. The patient had significant symptomatic improvement. Iron deficiency is an underappreciated yet easily treatable risk factor in PAH. Use of IHM in this case longitudinally illustrates the optimization of pulmonary hemodynamics and RV afterload in tandem with clinical improvement achieved by a simple therapy.

  1. Dried-bonito aroma components enhance salivary hemodynamic responses to broth tastes detected by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomona; Saito, Kana; Nakamura, Akio; Saito, Tsukasa; Nammoku, Takashi; Ishikawa, Masashi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-01-25

    To elucidate the effects of aroma from dried bonito (katsuo-bushi) on broth tastes caused by the central integration of flavor, optical imaging of salivary hemodynamic responses was conducted using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A reconstituted dried bonito flavored broth produced a significantly larger hemodynamic response than the odorless broth taste solutions for 5 of the 10 panelists, who felt that the combination of the aroma with the tastes was congruent. In the remaining 5 panelists who felt the combination incongruent, the flavored broth did not cause the enhancement of response. Moreover, when the odor-active smoky parts were removed from the flavoring, the reconstituted flavoring did not enhance the response in the former five panelists. These results indicate that NIRS offers a sensitive method to detect the effect of specific congruent aroma components from dried-bonito broth on the taste-related salivary hemodynamic responses, dependent on the perceptual experience of the combination of aromas and tastes.

  2. Hypertrophic response to hemodynamic overload: role of load vs. renin-angiotensin system activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Carabello, B. A.; Conrad, C. C.; Buckley, J. M.; DeFreyte, G.; Barnes, M.; Tomanek, R. J.; Wei, C. C.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is one of the basic mechanisms by which the heart compensates for hemodynamic overload. The mechanisms by which hemodynamic overload is transduced by the cardiac muscle cell and translated into cardiac hypertrophy are not completely understood. Candidates include activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin II receptor (AT1) stimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that load, independent of the RAS, is sufficient to stimulate cardiac growth. Four groups of cats were studied: 14 normal controls, 20 pulmonary artery-banded (PAB) cats, 7 PAB cats in whom the AT1 was concomitantly and continuously blocked with losartan, and 8 PAB cats in whom the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was concomitantly and continuously blocked with captopril. Losartan cats had at least a one-log order increase in the ED50 of the blood pressure response to angiotensin II infusion. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy was assessed using the RV mass-to-body weight ratio and ventricular cardiocyte size. RV hemodynamic overload was assessed by measuring RV systolic and diastolic pressures. Neither the extent of RV pressure overload nor RV hypertrophy that resulted from PAB was affected by AT1 blockade with losartan or ACE inhibition with captopril. RV systolic pressure was increased from 21 +/- 3 mmHg in normals to 68 +/- 4 mmHg in PAB, 65 +/- 5 mmHg in PAB plus losartan and 62 +/- 3 mmHg in PAB plus captopril. RV-to-body weight ratio increased from 0.52 +/- 0.04 g/kg in normals to 1.11 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB, 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus losartan and 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus captopril. Thus 1) pharmacological modulation of the RAS with losartan and captopril did not change the extent of the hemodynamic overload or the hypertrophic response induced by PAB; 2) neither RAS activation nor angiotensin II receptor stimulation is an obligatory and necessary component of the signaling pathway that acts as an intermediary coupling load to the

  3. The effect of intra- and inter-subject variability of hemodynamic responses on group level Granger causality analyses.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Marleen B; Renken, Remco; Keysers, Christian

    2011-07-01

    Granger causality analyses aim to reveal the direction of influence between brain areas by analyzing temporal precedence: if a signal change in area A consistently precedes a signal change in area B, then A Granger-causes B. fMRI-based Granger causality inferences are mediated by the hemodynamic response function which can vary across brain regions. This variability might induce a bias in Granger causality analyses. Here we use simulations to investigate the effect of hemodynamic response variability on Granger causality analyses at the level of a group of twenty participants. We used a set of hemodynamic responses measured by Handwerker et al. (Neuroimage, 2004) and simulated 200 experiments in which time series with known directions of influence are convolved with these hemodynamic responses and submitted to Granger causality analysis. Results show that the average chance to find a significant Granger causality effect when no actual influence is present in the data stays well below the p-level imposed on the second level statistics. Most importantly, when the analyses reveal a significant directed influence, this direction was accurate in the vast majority of the cases. The sensitivity of the analyses however depended on the neuronal delay between the source and target regions and their relative hemodynamic delay. Influences flowing from regions to one with the same or a slower hemodynamic response function were detected in over 80% of the cases when the neuronal delay was at least 100 ms. Influences flowing to a region with a faster hemodynamic delay were detected in over 80% of the cases when delays are above 1s.

  4. Relationship between prefrontal hemodynamic responses and quality of life differs between melancholia and non-melancholic depression.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Noa; Mikawa, Wakako; Tsujimoto, Emi; Akashi, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Toru; Kirime, Eiji; Shirakawa, Osamu

    2016-07-30

    This study aimed to determine whether quality of life (QOL) reflects specific functional abnormalities of frontotemporal hemodynamic responses in melancholia. We recruited 30 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with melancholic features (MDD-MF), 52 with non-melancholic features (MDD-NMF), and 68 healthy control subjects who were matched for age, sex ratio, and years of education. QOL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and regional hemodynamic responses during a verbal fluency task were monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Patients with MDD-MF scored significantly lower than those with MDD-NMF on the role emotional domain of SF-36. Both MDD patient groups exhibited lower hemodynamic responses in the frontotemporal regions than the control group. Hemodynamic responses in the frontotemporal regions were significantly smaller in patients with MDD-MF than in those with MDD-NMF. The role emotional domain of patients with MDD-MF was significantly and positively correlated with hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal region, whereas that of patients with MDD-NMF revealed no significant correlation. In conclusion, our results indicate that patients with MDD-MF exhibit qualitatively distinct prefrontal dysfunction patterns associated with emotional role functioning compared with patients with MDD-NMF.

  5. Hemodynamic Responses to Blood Flow Restriction and Resistance Exercise to Muscular Failure.

    PubMed

    Libardi, Cleiton Augusto; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Miquelini, Maiara; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Minatel, Vinicius; Alvarez, Ieda Fernanda; Milan-Mattos, Juliana Cristina; Roschel, Hamilton; Tricoli, Valmor; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare hemodynamic responses between blood flow-restricted resistance exercise (BFR-RE), high-intensity resistance exercise (HI-RE) and low-intensity resistance exercise (LI-RE) performed to muscular failure. 12 men (age: 20±3 years; body mass: 73.5±9 kg; height: 174±6 cm) performed 4 sets of leg press exercises using BFR-RE (30% of 1-RM), HI-RE (80% of 1-RM) and LI-RE (30% of 1-RM) protocols. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR) were measured on a beat-to-beat continuous basis by a noninvasive photoplethysmographic arterial pressure device. The HI-RE and LI-RE showed higher values (P<0.05) in all of the sets than the BFR-RE for SBP, DBP, HR. Additionally, HI-RE showed higher SBP (4(th) set) and DBP (all sets) (P<0.05) values than the LI-RE. However, the SV, CO and TPR showed significantly greater values for LI-RE compared to HI-RE and BFR-RE (P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that the BFR-RE promotes a lower hemodynamic response compared to the HI-RE and LI-RE performed to muscular failure.

  6. CMOS Image Sensor and System for Imaging Hemodynamic Changes in Response to Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Noor, Muhammad S; McCracken, Clinton B; Kiss, Zelma H T; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Murari, Kartikeya

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic intervention used for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. It is known that DBS modulates neural activity which changes metabolic demands and thus the cerebral circulation state. However, it is unclear whether there are correlations between electrophysiological, hemodynamic and behavioral changes and whether they have any implications for clinical benefits. In order to investigate these questions, we present a miniaturized system for spectroscopic imaging of brain hemodynamics. The system consists of a 144 ×144, [Formula: see text] pixel pitch, high-sensitivity, analog-output CMOS imager fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, along with a miniaturized imaging system comprising illumination, focusing, analog-to-digital conversion and μSD card based data storage. This enables stand alone operation without a computer, nor electrical or fiberoptic tethers. To achieve high sensitivity, the pixel uses a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA). The nMOS transistors are in the pixel while pMOS transistors are column-parallel, resulting in a fill factor (FF) of 26%. Running at 60 fps and exposed to 470 nm light, the CMOS imager has a minimum detectable intensity of 2.3 nW/cm(2) , a maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 49 dB at 2.45 μW/cm(2) leading to a dynamic range (DR) of 61 dB while consuming 167 μA from a 3.3 V supply. In anesthetized rats, the system was able to detect temporal, spatial and spectral hemodynamic changes in response to DBS.

  7. Acute effect of hydralazine administration on pulmonary artery hemodynamics in dogs with chronic heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Atkins, C E; Keene, B W; McGuirk, S M; Sato, T

    1994-02-01

    In an effort to better understand the role of vasodilators in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic heartworm disease (HWD), pulmonary hemodynamic measurements were obtained from 7 experimentally infected, anesthetized dogs before and after hydralazine administration (mean dose, 1.96 mg/kg of body weight). Five dogs were maintained on room air, while 2 were maintained on 100% oxygen during the hydralazine study. The hemodynamic effect of hydralazine in dogs with HWD was evaluated, using heart rate, cardiac index, mean pulmonary artery pressure, mean arterial pressure, total pulmonary resistance, total systemic resistance, total systemic resistance/total pulmonary resistance, left ventricular dP/dtmax, left ventricular end diastolic pressure, and left and right ventricular double products ([mean arterial pressure x heart rate] and [mean pulmonary artery pressure x heart rate], respectively). Responders were defined as those in which total pulmonary resistance decreased > or = 20% without an increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and in which heart rate increase was < or = 10%. Comparison was also made between maximal hemodynamic effect of hydralazine with that after 100% oxygen administration for 15 minutes to previously normoxemic dogs (n = 5). Significance was determined if P < 0.05, using the paired t-test. Hydralazine induced significant reductions in mean pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and total pulmonary resistance, with no significant change in heart rate, cardiac index, total systemic resistance, left ventricular dP/dtmax, left ventricular end diastolic pressure, or right and left ventricular double products. Four (57%) of the 7 dogs studied were considered responders. Pretreatment cardiac index, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and total pulmonary resistance did not allow differentiation of responders from nonresponders.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of rat deep brain: hemodynamic responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Hosaka, Tomoya; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-03-01

    Hemodynamic responses of the brain to hypoxia or ischemia are one of the major interests in neurosurgery and neuroscience. In this study, we performed real-time transcutaneous PA imaging of the rat brain that was exposed to a hypoxic stress and investigated depth-resolved responses of the brain, including the hippocampus. A linear-array 8ch 10-MHz ultrasonic sensor (measurement length, 10 mm) was placed on the shaved scalp. Nanosecond, 570-nm and 595- nm light pulses were used to excite PA signals indicating cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood deoxygenation, respectively. Under spontaneous respiration, inhalation gas was switched from air to nitrogen, and then reswitched to oxygen, during which real-time PA imaging was performed continuously. High-contrast PA signals were observed from the depth regions corresponding to the scalp, skull, cortex and hippocampus. After starting hypoxia, PA signals at 595 nm increased immediately in both the cortex and hippocampus for about 1.5 min, showing hemoglobin deoxygenation. On the other hand, PA signals at 570 nm coming from these regions did not increase in the early phase but started to increase at about 1.5 min after starting hypoxia, indicating reactive hyperemia to hypoxia. During hypoxia, PA signals coming from the scalp decreased transiently, which is presumably due to compensatory response in the peripheral tissue to preserve blood perfusion in the brain. The reoxygenation caused a gradual recovery of these PA signals. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of PA imaging for real-time, depth-resolved observation of cerebral hemodynamics.

  9. Dynamic functional cerebral blood volume responses to normobaric hyperoxia in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ona; Lu, Jie; Mandeville, Joseph B; Murata, Yoshihiro; Egi, Yasu; Dai, Guangping; Marota, John J; Diwan, Izzuddin; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Kwong, Kenneth K; Lo, Eng H; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2012-01-01

    Studies suggest that neuroprotective effects of normobaric oxygen (NBO) therapy in acute stroke are partly mediated by hemodynamic alterations. We investigated cerebral hemodynamic effects of repeated NBO exposures. Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in Wistar rats subjected to focal ischemic stroke. Normobaric oxygen-induced functional cerebral blood volume (fCBV) responses were analyzed. All rats had diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) lesions within larger perfusion deficits, with DWI lesion expansion after 3 hours. Functional cerebral blood volume responses to NBO were spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Contralateral healthy tissue responded consistently with vasoconstriction that increased with time. No significant responses were evident in the acute DWI lesion. In hypoperfused regions surrounding the acute DWI lesion, tissue that remained viable until the end of the experiment showed relative preservation of mean fCBV at early time points, with some rats showing increased fCBV (vasodilation); however, these regions later exhibited significantly decreased fCBV (vasoconstriction). Tissue that became DWI abnormal by study-end initially showed marginal fCBV changes that later became moderate fCBV reductions. Our results suggest that a reverse-steal hemodynamic effect may occur in peripheral ischemic zones during NBO treatment of focal stroke. In addition, CBV responses to NBO challenge may have potential as an imaging marker to distinguish ischemic core from salvageable tissues. PMID:22739619

  10. Changes in glomerular hemodynamic response to angiotensin II after subacute renal denervation in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, B J; Mundy, C A; Maciejewski, A R; Printz, M P; Ziegler, M G; Pelayo, J C; Blantz, R C

    1986-01-01

    We examined the changes in glomerular hemodynamics produced by angiotensin II (AII) in both normal Munich-Wistar rats and rats which were unilaterally renal denervated (measured kidney) 4-6 d prior to the measurement periods. Measurements of glomerular dynamics were performed in a control period after plasma volume expansion and during infusion of 11 ng X 100 g body wt-1 X min-1 of AII. The glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient increased from 38 +/- 1 to 49 +/- 1 mmHg in denervated rats compared with a lesser response in controls (from 39 +/- 1 to 45 +/- 1 mmHg, P less than 0.05). Single nephron plasma flow decreased from 213 +/- 17 to 87 +/- 4 nl X min-1 X g kidney wt (KW)-1 in denervated kidneys versus a more modest decrease in control kidneys (from 161 +/- 9 to 102 +/- 5 nl X min X gKW-1). These changes were due to a greater increase in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance after AII infusion in denervated compared with control kidneys. Glomerular AII receptor maximum binding was 1,196 +/- 267 fmol/mg protein in denervated kidneys compared with 612 +/- 89 fmol/mg protein (P less than 0.01) in controls with no change in receptor affinity. We conclude the subacute unilateral renal denervation results in renal vasodilation, denervation magnifies the vasoconstrictive effect of AII infusion on glomerular hemodynamics, and the observed increased response to AII after denervation is associated with increases in glomerular AII receptors. PMID:3745432

  11. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42±36.69% and 130.58±31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17±14.65%, 24.52±20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62±18.56% and 59±18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52±22.42% and 54.24±11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  12. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42 ± 36.69% and 130.58 ± 31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17 ± 14.65%, 24.52 ± 20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62 ± 18.56% and 59 ± 18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52 ± 22.42% and 54.24 ± 11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  13. Converting enzyme inhibition and the glomerular hemodynamic response to glycine in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Slomowitz, L A; Peterson, O W; Thomson, S C

    1999-07-01

    GFR normally increases during glycine infusion. This response is absent in humans and rats with established diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) restores the effect of glycine on GFR. To ascertain the glomerular hemodynamic basis for this effect of ACEI, micropuncture studies were performed in male Wistar-Froemter rats after 5 to 6 wk of insulin-treated streptozotocin diabetes. The determinants of single-nephron GFR (SNGFR) were assessed in each rat before and during glycine infusion. Studies were performed in diabetics, diabetics after 5 d of ACEI (enalapril in the drinking water), and weight-matched controls. Diabetic rats manifest renal hypertrophy and glomerular hyperfiltration but not glomerular capillary hypertension. ACEI reduced glomerular capillary pressure, increased glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient, and did not mitigate hyperfiltration. In controls, glycine increased SNGFR by 30% due to increased nephron plasma flow. In diabetics, glycine had no effect on any determinant of SNGFR. In ACEI-treated diabetics, the SNGFR response to glycine was indistinguishable from nondiabetics, but the effect of glycine was mediated by greater ultrafiltration pressure rather than by greater plasma flow. These findings demonstrate that: (1) The absent response to glycine in established diabetes does not indicate that renal functional reserve is exhausted by hyperfiltration; and (2) ACEI restores the GFR response to glycine in established diabetes, but this response is mediated by increased ultrafiltration pressure rather than by increased nephron plasma flow.

  14. Impaired hemodynamic response to mental stress in subjects with prehypertension is improved after a single bout of maximal dynamic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Renata Frauches; Silva, Bruno Moreira; Neves, Fabricia Junqueira; Rocha, Natalia Galito; Sales, Allan Robson Kluser; Nobrega, Antonio Claudio

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: High blood pressure during mental stress in subjects with prehypertension is associated with blunted vasodilation in skeletal muscles, which might be improved by an acute bout of exercise. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hemodynamic responses to mental stress before and after a bout of exercise in subjects with prehypertension. METHOD: Eighteen subjects with prehypertension and 16 with normotension underwent a mental stress test before and after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill. Blood pressure was measured by auscultation, and forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography; from these measurements, the vascular conductance was calculated. RESULTS: Subjects with prehypertension had a higher mean blood pressure during mental stress (prehypertension 112±2 vs. normotension 101±3 mm Hg, p<0.05), and their vascular conductance did not increase (baseline 0.025±0.004 vs. mental stress 0.022±0.003 a.u., p>0.05). After the exercise bout, the mean blood pressure during mental stress was lower in subjects with prehypertension (before exercise 112±2 vs. after exercise 107±2 mm Hg, p<0.05), and vascular conductance increased (baseline 0.011±0.001 vs. mental stress 0.024±0.004 a.u., p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Subjects with prehypertension had elevated blood pressure and a blunted vasodilator response during mental stress, but their blood pressure was attenuated and their vasodilator response was normalized after a single bout of maximal dynamic exercise. PMID:22179153

  15. Hemodynamic effects of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock: the prospective, randomized IABP shock trial.

    PubMed

    Prondzinsky, Roland; Unverzagt, Susanne; Russ, Martin; Lemm, Henning; Swyter, Michael; Wegener, Nikolas; Buerke, Ute; Raaz, Uwe; Ebelt, Henning; Schlitt, Axel; Heinroth, Konstantin; Haerting, Johannes; Werdan, Karl; Buerke, Michael

    2012-04-01

    We conducted the IABP Cardiogenic Shock Trial (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00469248) as a prospective, randomized, monocentric clinical trial to determine the hemodynamic effects of additional intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) treatment and its effects on severity of disease in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock (CS). Intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation is recommended in patients with CS complicating myocardial infarction. However, there are only limited randomized controlled trial data available supporting the efficacy of IABP following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and its impact on hemodynamic parameters in patients with CS. Percutaneous coronary intervention of infarct-related artery was performed in 40 patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by CS, within 12 h of onset of hemodynamic instability. Serial hemodynamic parameters were determined over the next 4 days and compared in patients receiving medical treatment alone with those treated with additional intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation. There were no significant differences among severity of disease (i.e., Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score) initially and no differences among both groups for disease improvement. We observed significant temporal improvements of cardiac output (4.8 ± 0.5 to 6.0 ± 0.5 L/min), systemic vascular resistance (926 ± 73 to 769 ± 101 dyn · s(-1) · cm(-5)), and the prognosis-validated cardiac power output (0.78 ± 0.06 to 1.01 ± 0.2 W) within the IABP group. However, there were no significant differences between the IABP group and the medical-alone group. Additional IABP treatment did not result in a significant hemodynamic improvement compared with medical therapy alone in a randomized prospective trial in patients with CS following PCI. Therefore, the use and recommendation for IABP treatment in CS remain unclear.

  16. Prediction of Hemodynamic Response to Epinephrine via Model-Based System Identification.

    PubMed

    Bighamian, Ramin; Soleymani, Sadaf; Reisner, Andrew T; Seri, Istvan; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present a system identification approach to the mathematical modeling of hemodynamic responses to vasopressor-inotrope agents. We developed a hybrid model called the latency-dose-response-cardiovascular (LDC) model that incorporated 1) a low-order lumped latency model to reproduce the delay associated with the transport of vasopressor-inotrope agent and the onset of physiological effect, 2) phenomenological dose-response models to dictate the steady-state inotropic, chronotropic, and vasoactive responses as a function of vasopressor-inotrope dose, and 3) a physiological cardiovascular model to translate the agent's actions into the ultimate response of blood pressure. We assessed the validity of the LDC model to fit vasopressor-inotrope dose-response data using data collected from five piglet subjects during variable epinephrine infusion rates. The results suggested that the LDC model was viable in modeling the subjects' dynamic responses: After tuning the model to each subject, the r (2) values for measured versus model-predicted mean arterial pressure were consistently higher than 0.73. The results also suggested that intersubject variability in the dose-response models, rather than the latency models, had significantly more impact on the model's predictive capability: Fixing the latency model to population-averaged parameter values resulted in r(2) values higher than 0.57 between measured versus model-predicted mean arterial pressure, while fixing the dose-response model to population-averaged parameter values yielded nonphysiological predictions of mean arterial pressure. We conclude that the dose-response relationship must be individualized, whereas a population-averaged latency-model may be acceptable with minimal loss of model fidelity.

  17. Acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock: pharmacologic and mechanical hemodynamic support pathways.

    PubMed

    Graf, Tobias; Desch, Steffen; Eitel, Ingo; Thiele, Holger

    2015-09-01

    Cardiogenic shock (CS) is still the predominant cause of in-hospital death in patients with acute myocardial infarction, although mortality has been reduced in recent years. Early percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting are causal therapies implemented in CS, supported by catecholamines, fluids, intra-aortic balloon pumping, and also active percutaneous assist devices. There is only limited evidence from randomized studies of any of these treatments in CS, except for early revascularization and the relative ineffectiveness of intra-aortic balloon pumping. This review will present treatment pathways of CS complicating acute myocardial infarction, with a major focus on revascularization, intensive care unit treatment, and mechanical support devices.

  18. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic mismatch responses in rats listening to human speech syllables

    PubMed Central

    Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Wallois, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Speech is a complex auditory stimulus which is processed according to several time-scales. Whereas consonant discrimination is required to resolve rapid acoustic events, voice perception relies on slower cues. Humans, right from preterm ages, are particularly efficient to encode temporal cues. To compare the capacities of preterms to those observed in other mammals, we tested anesthetized adult rats by using exactly the same paradigm as that used in preterm neonates. We simultaneously recorded neural (using ECoG) and hemodynamic responses (using fNIRS) to series of human speech syllables and investigated the brain response to a change of consonant (ba vs. ga) and to a change of voice (male vs. female). Both methods revealed concordant results, although ECoG measures were more sensitive than fNIRS. Responses to syllables were bilateral, but with marked right-hemispheric lateralization. Responses to voice changes were observed with both methods, while only ECoG was sensitive to consonant changes. These results suggest that rats more effectively processed the speech envelope than fine temporal cues in contrast with human preterm neonates, in whom the opposite effects were observed. Cross-species comparisons constitute a very valuable tool to define the singularities of the human brain and species-specific bias that may help human infants to learn their native language. PMID:28291832

  19. Hemodynamic response during standing test after blood donation can predict the late phase vasovagal reaction.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masayoshi; Ando, Shin-Ichi; Eura, Emi; Hayashi, Atsumi; Kawamura, Natsumi; Narita, Sumito; Matsumoto, Mari; Momii, Hidetoshi; Kadokami, Toshiaki; Kiyokawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    A major complication of blood donation is vasovagal reaction (VVR) with or without syncope. VVR occurs not only in the early phase, but also in the late phase after blood donation. We previously reported the hemodynamic characteristics of blood donors susceptible to early phase VVR. In the present study, we investigated the hemodynamic characteristics of those who developed late VVR. Ninety-six healthy volunteers donating 400 ml of whole blood were studied. After asking about their physical condition or routine questions for blood donation, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded while the donors were kept standing up for 3 min before and after blood collection. Questionnaires were distributed to all donors for reporting late VVR symptoms within 24 h. Those with younger age and lower diastolic blood pressure were more susceptible to late VVR (both p < 0.05). Furthermore, we identified the increase in HR during the standing test after blood collection as a good predictor of late VVR (odds ratio 1.063, 95 % CI 1.005-1.124; p = 0.031). Also, analysis of questions asked before donation revealed that significantly more donors considered themselves as sensitive to pain in the late VVR group (Odds ratio 0.070, 95 % CI 0.008-0.586; p = 0.014). Excessive HR response to standing after blood collection and subjective sensitivity to pain as well as younger age and lower diastolic BP may be useful to detect donors at high risk for late VVR.

  20. Mephedrone, a new designer drug of abuse, produces acute hemodynamic effects in the rat.

    PubMed

    Meng, Harry; Cao, James; Kang, Jiesheng; Ying, Xiaoyou; Ji, Junzhi; Reynolds, William; Rampe, David

    2012-01-05

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a new and popular drug of abuse widely available on the Internet and still legal in some parts of the world. Clinical reports are now emerging suggesting that the drug displays sympathomimetic toxicity on the cardiovascular system but no studies have yet explored its cardiovascular effects. Therefore we examined the effects of mephedrone on the cardiovascular system using a combination of in vitro electrophysiology and in vivo hemodynamic and echocardiographic measurements. Patch clamp studies revealed that mephedrone, up to 30 μM, had little effect on the major voltage-dependent ion channels of the heart or on action potentials recorded in guinea pig myocytes. Subcutaneous administration of mephedrone (3 and 15 mg/kg) to conscious telemetry-implanted rats produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate and blood pressure which persisted after pre-treatment with reserpine. Echocardiographic analysis demonstrated that intravenous injection of mephedrone (0.3 and 1mg/kg) increased cardiac function, including cardiac output, ejection fraction, and stroke volume, similar to methamphetamine (0.3mg/kg). We conclude that mephedrone is not directly pro-arrhythmic, but induces substantial increases in heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac contractility and this activity contributes to the cardiovascular toxicity in people who abuse the drug.

  1. Acute effect of caffeine intake on hemodynamics after resistance exercise in young non-hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Souza, Diego; Casonatto, Juliano; Poton, Roberto; Willardson, Jeffrey; Polito, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of caffeine on hemodynamics after a resistance exercise session. Fifteen subjects completed two randomly ordered experimental resistance exercise sessions 45 min after the ingestion of either caffeine (4 mg.kg(-1)) or placebo. Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MAP) blood pressures were measured before consuming caffeine; SBP, DBP, MAP, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) were measured immediately before and after each of the sessions; SBP, DBP and MAP were measured for 9 hours after sessions. Caffeine increased (p < 0.05) pre-exercise DBP and MAP. In caffeine and placebo conditions significant decreases (p < 0.05) were noted in SBP, MAP, and PVR between the pre- and post-exercise time points. Notwithstanding, the mean values for SBP, DBP and MAP during the 9 h of post-exercise monitoring were increased (p < 0.05) for the caffeine. In conclusion, the cardiovascular effects of caffeine are different over the post-exercise period after resistance exercise in normotensive young adults.

  2. The association between cognitive deficits and prefrontal hemodynamic responses during performance of working memory task in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Itakura, Masashi; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Kaneko, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia-associated cognitive deficits are resistant to treatment and thus pose a lifelong burden. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) provides reliable and valid assessments across cognitive domains. However, because the prefrontal functional abnormalities specifically associated with the level of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia have not been examined, we explored this relationship. Patients with schizophrenia (N=87) and matched healthy controls (N=50) participated in the study. Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured the hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal and superior temporal cortical surface areas during a working memory task. Correlation analyses revealed a relationship between the hemodynamics and the BACS composite and domain scores. Hemodynamic responses of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and left frontopolar cortex (FPC) in the higher-level-of-cognitive-function schizophrenia group were weaker than the responses of the controls but similar to those of the lower-level-of-cognitive-function schizophrenia group. However, hemodynamic responses in the right DLPFC, bilateral ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC), and right temporal regions decreased with increasing cognitive deficits. In addition, the hemodynamic response correlated positively with the level of cognitive function (BACS composite scores) in the right DLPFC, bilateral VLPFC, right FPC, and bilateral temporal regions in schizophrenia. The correlation was driven by all BACS domains. Our results suggest that the linked functional deficits in the right DLPFC, bilateral VLPFC, right FPC, and bilateral temporal regions may be related to BACS-measured cognitive impairments in schizophrenia and show that linking the neurocognitive deficits and brain abnormalities can increase our understanding of schizophrenia pathophysiology.

  3. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  4. The role of venous capacitance, circulating catecholamines, and heart rate in the hemodynamic response to increased temperature and hypoxia in the dogfish.

    PubMed

    Sandblom, Erik; Cox, Georgina K; Perry, Steve F; Farrell, Anthony P

    2009-05-01

    Hypoxia and increased temperature alter venous blood pressures in teleosts through active changes in venous tone. Elasmobranchs possess a capacious venous system but have limited adrenergic vascular innervation and subambient central venous pressure (P(cv)). In this study, we explored venous hemodynamic responses to acute temperature increase and moderate (6.9 kPa) and severe (2.5 kPa) hypoxia in the dogfish (Squalus acanthias). Normoxic dogfish at 10 degrees C had a P(cv) between -0.08 and -0.04 kPa and a mean circulatory filling pressure (P(mcf)) of approximately 0.12 kPa. At 16 degrees C, heart rate (f(H)), cardiac output (Q), and P(mcf) increased but P(cv) and plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were unchanged. In contrast, moderate and severe hypoxia increased P(cv) and decreased Q and stroke volume (V(S)). f(H) decreased in severe hypoxia, whereas P(mcf) was unaffected despite elevated catecholamine levels. Atropine abolished hypoxic reductions in Q, V(S), and f(H), but P(cv) still increased. In contrast to the response in teleosts, this study on dogfish suggests that venous capacitance changes associated with warming and hypoxia are minimal and likely not mediated by circulating catecholamines. Thus hemodynamic status of the capacious elasmobranch venous circulation is potentially regulated by blood volume shifts from passive flow-mediated events and possibly through myogenic mechanisms.

  5. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Response to Skull Pin Head Holder Insertion: Intravenous Clonidine versus Intravenous Lignocaine Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundaswamy, Nethra H.; Marulasiddappa, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    Background: Insertion of skull pin induces a significant increase in heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and intracranial pressure. Alpha 2 agonist clonidine and intravenous (i.v.) lignocaine are effective in attenuating stress response. Local infiltration of pin site and scalp block with lignocaine are commonly used techniques for prevention of hemodynamic response to skull pin insertion. We compared the effectiveness of i.v. clonidine infusion and i.v. lignocaine infusion in suppressing the hemodynamic response to skull pin head holder insertion. Designs: Randomized double blind study conducted with sample size - sixty patients, divided into two groups: Group C (n = 30) - clonidine i.v. dose 2 μg/kg; Group L (n = 30) - lignocaine i.v. dose 1.5 mg/kg. Materials and Methods: All patients posted for elective craniotomy belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1 and 2, age group 18–70 were included in the study. ASA 3, 4; difficult airway; hypertensives; allergy to study drugs; ischemic heart disease; and arteriovenous malformations were excluded. Study drugs were administered 10 min prior to induction in 10 ml syringes with infusion pump over 10 min. Standard anesthesia protocol followed. HR, noninvasive BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and IBP were recorded at baseline (BL), after study drug (AD), 1 min after intubation (AI), 1 min prior to pin insertion -pre pin (PP), and 5 min after pin insertion (AP). Analysis: Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis – Student's t- and Chi-square/Fisher exact test were used (SAS 9.2, SPSS 15.0) P value described as *moderately significant (P value: 0.01 < P ≤ 0.05) **strongly significant (P value: P ≤ 0.01). Results: Groups were matched with respect to age (P = 0.7), gender distribution (P = 0.6), and weight (P = 0.67) There was no difference in BL HR in two groups. Significant difference in HR was noted after intubation P < 0.031 and pin insertion P < 0.001 stages with lower HR in Group C (76

  6. Cerebral hemodynamic responses to seizure in the mouse brain: simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy-electroencephalography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungduk; Lee, Mina; Koh, Dalkwon; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2010-05-01

    We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) simultaneously on the mouse brain and investigated the hemodynamic response to epileptic episodes under pharmacologically driven seizure. γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were applied to induce absence and tonic-clonic seizures, respectively. The epileptic episodes were identified from the single-channel EEG, and the corresponding hemodynamic changes in different regions of the brain were characterized by multichannel frequency-domain NIRS. Our results are the following: (i) the oxyhemoglobin level increases in the case of GBL-treated mice but not 4-AP-treated mice compared to the predrug state; (ii) the dominant response to each absence seizure is a decrease in deoxyhemolobin; (iii) the phase shift between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin reduces in GBL-treated mice but no 4-AP-treated mice; and (iv) the spatial correlation of hemodynamics increased significantly in 4-AP-treated mice but not in GBL-treated mice. Our results shows that spatiotemporal tracking of cerebral hemodynamics using NIRS can be successfully applied to the mouse brain in conjunction with electrophysiological recording, which will support the study of molecular, cellular, and network origin of neurovascular coupling in vivo.

  7. Hemodynamics of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Burkhoff, Daniel; Sayer, Gabriel; Doshi, Darshan; Uriel, Nir

    2015-12-15

    An increasing number of devices can provide mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to patients with acute hemodynamic compromise and chronic end-stage heart failure. These devices work by different pumping mechanisms, have various flow capacities, are inserted by different techniques, and have different sites from which blood is withdrawn and returned to the body. These factors result in different primary hemodynamic effects and secondary responses of the body. However, these are not generally taken into account when choosing a device for a particular patient or while managing a patient undergoing MCS. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of cardiac, vascular, and pump mechanics and illustrate how they provide a broad foundation for understanding the complex interactions between the heart, vasculature, and device, and how they may help guide future research to improve patient outcomes.

  8. The hemodynamic effects of acute aortic regurgitation into a stiffened left ventricle resulting from chronic aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Raghav, Vrishank; Midha, Prem; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) post-chronic aortic stenosis is a prevalent phenomenon occurring in patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of left ventricular diastolic stiffness (LVDS) and AR severity on LV performance. Three LVDS models were inserted into a physiological left heart simulator. AR severity was parametrically varied through four levels (ranging from trace to moderate) and compared with a competent aortic valve. Hemodynamic metrics such as average diastolic pressures (DP) and reduction in transmitral flow were measured. AR index was calculated as a function of AR severity and LVDS, and the work required to make up for lost volume due to AR was estimated. In the presence of trace AR, higher LVDS had up to a threefold reduction in transmitral flow (13% compared with 3.5%) and a significant increase in DP (2-fold). The AR index ranged from ∼42 to 16 (no AR to moderate AR), with stiffer LVs having lower values. To compensate for lost volume due to AR, the low, medium, and high LVDS models were found to require 5.1, 5.5, and 6.6 times more work, respectively. This work shows that the LVDS has a significant effect on the LV performance in the presence of AR. Therefore, the LVDS of potential TAVR patients should be assessed to gain an initial indication of their ability to tolerate post-procedural AR.

  9. Combined effect of low-dose nitric oxide gas inhalation with partial liquid ventilation on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange in acute lung injury of newborn piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won; Hwang, Jong Hee; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a randomized animal study to determine whether there is a cumulative effect on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange when low-dose nitric oxide (NO) is added to partial liquid ventilation (PLV) in acute lung injury. Eighteen newborn piglets were saline-lavaged repeatedly, and randomly divided into two groups: PLV with perfluorocarbon group (n=8) and lavage only (control) group (n=10). Perfluorodecalin (30 mL/kg) was instilled into the endotracheal tube for 30 min, followed by 5-10 mL/kg/hr. Fifteen minutes after the completion of perfluorodecalin dosing, NO (10 ppm) was added to the inspiratory gas in an "on/off" manner. Perfluorodecalin instillation produced a significant improvement in gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, shunt, and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). The addition of NO produced a further significant improvement in PaO2 and PAP. The "on/off" response to NO was seen apparently in PAP, PaO2, dynamic compliance, and shunt. All the variables in control group were remained at near the after-lavage levels without significant improvements until the end of the experiment. We concluded that NO might have a cumulative effect on gas exchange when combined with PLV, and this might be attributable to deceased PAP and V/Q mismatching. PMID:14676437

  10. Joint maximum likelihood estimation of activation and Hemodynamic Response Function for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Negar; Nosratinia, Aria

    2014-07-01

    Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the brain activity by measuring blood oxygenation level, which is related to brain activity via a temporal impulse response function known as the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF). The HRF varies from subject to subject and within areas of the brain, therefore a knowledge of HRF is necessary for accurately computing voxel activations. Conversely a knowledge of active voxels is highly beneficial for estimating the HRF. This work presents a joint maximum likelihood estimation of HRF and activation based on low-rank matrix approximations operating on regions of interest (ROI). Since each ROI has limited data, a smoothing constraint on the HRF is employed via Tikhonov regularization. The method is analyzed under both white noise and colored noise. Experiments with synthetic data show that accurate estimation of the HRF is possible with this method without prior assumptions on the exact shape of the HRF. Further experiments involving real fMRI experiments with auditory stimuli are used to validate the proposed method.

  11. Coagulation defects and altered hemodynamic responses in mice lacking receptors for thromboxane A2.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D W; Mannon, R B; Mannon, P J; Latour, A; Oliver, J A; Hoffman, M; Smithies, O; Koller, B H; Coffman, T M

    1998-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is a labile metabolite of arachidonic acid that has potent biological effects. Its actions are mediated by G protein-coupled thromboxane-prostanoid (TP) receptors. TP receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the physiological functions of TP receptors, we generated TP receptor-deficient mice by gene targeting. Tp-/- animals reproduce and survive in expected numbers, and their major organ systems are normal. Thromboxane agonist binding cannot be detected in tissues from Tp-/- mice. Bleeding times are prolonged in Tp-/- mice and their platelets do not aggregate after exposure to TXA2 agonists. Aggregation responses after collagen stimulation are also delayed, although ADP-stimulated aggregation is normal. Infusion of the TP receptor agonist U-46619 causes transient increases in blood pressure followed by cardiovascular collapse in wild-type mice, but U-46619 caused no hemodynamic effect in Tp-/- mice. Tp-/- mice are also resistant to arachidonic acid-induced shock, although arachidonic acid signifi-cantly reduced blood pressure in Tp-/- mice. In summary, Tp-/- mice have a mild bleeding disorder and altered vascular responses to TXA2 and arachidonic acid. Our studies suggest that most of the recognized functions of TXA2 are mediated by the single known Tp gene locus. PMID:9835625

  12. Locally Estimated Hemodynamic Response Function and Activation Detection Sensitivity in Heroin-Cue Reactivity Study

    PubMed Central

    Maleki-Balajoo, Somayeh; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A fixed hemodynamic response function (HRF) is commonly used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis. However, HRF may vary from region to region and subject to subject. We investigated the effect of locally estimated HRF (in functionally homogenous parcels) on activation detection sensitivity in a heroin cue reactivity study. Methods: We proposed a novel exploratory method for brain parcellation based on a probabilistic model to segregate the brain into spatially connected and functionally homogeneous components. Then, we estimated HRF and detected activated regions in response to an experimental task in each parcel using a joint detection estimation (JDE) method. We compared the proposed JDE method with the general linear model (GLM) that uses a fixed HRF and is implemented in FEAT (as a part of FMRIB Software Library, version 4.1). Results: 1) Regions detected by JDE are larger than those detected by fixed HRF, 2) In group analysis, JDE found areas of activation not detected by fixed HRF. It detected drug craving a priori “regions-of-interest” in the limbic lobe (anterior cingulate cortex [ACC], posterior cingulate cortex [PCC] and cingulate gyrus), basal ganglia, especially striatum (putamen and head of caudate), and cerebellum in addition to the areas detected by the fixed HRF method, 3) JDE obtained higher Z-values of local maxima compared to those obtained by fixed HRF. Conclusion: In our study of heroin cue reactivity, our proposed method (that estimates HRF locally) outperformed the conventional GLM that uses a fixed HRF. PMID:27872691

  13. Acute hemodynamic effects of angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibition after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider's solution.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Alexandro; Kempfert, Jörg; Pritzwald-Stegmann, Patrick; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Dhein, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Evidence as to how ACE inhibitors attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) after cardioplegic arrest remains scarce. Twenty-four rabbit hearts were perfused on a Langendorff apparatus. Control hearts (n = 6) were arrested with pure histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK)-Bretschneider. Treatment groups received added to the cardioplegic solution (n = 6) captopril (100 μmol/l) and losartan (100 μmol/l) for selective AT1-receptor antagonism or BQ123 (100 nmol/l) for selective ETA-receptor antagonism. Pre-ischemic equilibration of 45 min was followed by 90 min of cardioplegic arrest and 30 min of reperfusion. Indices of myocardial contractility (LVP, dp/dt max, dp/dt min), coronary flow, heart rate, and O2 consumption were recorded before and after ischemic arrest. Tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were measured to evaluate energy content and oxidative stress, respectively. After selective cardiac arrest with Bretschneider, captopril-treated hearts showed improved hemodynamics compared to control and the other treatment groups. Oxygen consumption was significantly decreased during early reperfusion in captopril-treated hearts (34 ± 3 μmol/min/g/mmHg) compared to controls and losartan- and BQ123-treated hearts (controls: 77 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.003; losartan: 54 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.015; BQ123: 64 ± 13 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.046). The ATP content of the reperfused tissue was significantly elevated after captopril treatment compared to control group (24 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2 μmol/g, p = 0.033), whereas the level of MDA was substantially decreased (0.58 ± 0.163 vs. 1.5 ± 0.28 μmol/g, p = 0.009). ACE inhibition leads to a significantly greater and faster recovery of myocardial contractility after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider solution. Due to decreased oxygen consumption, myocardial protection is enhanced. The association between ACE and ischemia cannot be clarified by selective blockade of

  14. Subfornical organ mediates sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to blood-borne proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2013-07-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in regulating autonomic and cardiovascular function in hypertension and heart failure. Peripherally administered proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), act on the brain to increase blood pressure, heart rate, and sympathetic nerve activity. These molecules are too large to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, and so the mechanisms by which they elicit these responses remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain circumventricular organ that lacks a blood-brain barrier, plays a major role in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to circulating proinflammatory cytokines. Intracarotid artery injection of TNF-α (200 ng) or IL-1β (200 ng) dramatically increased mean blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with sham lesions of the SFO (SFO-s). These excitatory responses to intracarotid artery TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly attenuated in SFO-lesioned (SFO-x) rats. Similarly, the increases in mean blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in response to intravenous injections of TNF-α (500 ng) or IL-1β (500 ng) in SFO-s rats were significantly reduced in the SFO-x rats. Immunofluorescent staining revealed a dense distribution of the p55 TNF-α receptor and the IL-1 receptor accessory protein, a subunit of the IL-1 receptor, in the SFO. These data suggest that SFO is a predominant site in the brain at which circulating proinflammatory cytokines act to elicit cardiovascular and sympathetic responses.

  15. Pharmacological analysis of hemodynamic responses to Lachesis muta (South American bushmaster) snake venom in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Dias, Lourdes; Rodrigues, Mariana A P; Inoue, Bruna R; Rodrigues, Renata L; Rennó, André L; de Souza, Valéria B; Torres-Huaco, Frank D; Sousa, Norma C; Stroka, Alessandra; Melgarejo, Anibal R; Hyslop, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we examined some mechanisms involved in the hypotension caused by Lachesis muta (South American bushmaster) venom in anesthetized rats. Venom (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) caused immediate hypotension that was maximal after 5 min and gradually returned to baseline over 60 min. Pretreatment of rats with the non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) did not attenuate the early phase of venom-induced hypotension, but abolished the recovery phase and resulted in rapid death; a similar effect was observed with the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ. In contrast, the hemodynamic responses to venom were not attenuated by the non-selective NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, the inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine, the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil, the adenylate cyclase (AC) inhibitor SQ-22.536, the non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine, the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist HOE-140 and the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. Preincubation of venom with the PLA2 inhibitor pBPB had no effect on the immediate hypotension but tended to improve the recovery phase. Neither AEBSF (a serine proteinase inhibitor) nor EDTA (a metalloproteinase inhibitor) prevented the venom-induced hypotension, but AEBSF and not EDTA protected against the lethality of a high dose (3.0 mg/kg, i.v.). There were no marked changes in the ECG parameters with the various treatments, except with L-NAME and ODQ that increased the RR interval. Pulmonary thrombus formation was markedly enhanced by L-NAME and ODQ, and to a lesser extent by pBPB, especially in small vessels, whereas AEBSF and EDTA inhibited thrombus formation. Venom relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted thoracic aorta and pulmonary artery in vitro, with the latter being more sensitive. The relaxation was endothelium-dependent and was inhibited by ODQ but not by H-89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Together, these

  16. Hemodynamic Nonlinearities Affect BOLD fMRI Response Timing and Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    de Zwart, Jacco A; van Gelderen, Peter; Jansma, J Martijn; Fukunaga, Masaki; Bianciardi, Marta; Duyn, Jeff H

    2009-01-01

    The interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies based on Blood Oxygen-Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast generally relies on the assumption of a linear relationship between evoked neuronal activity and fMRI response. While nonlinearities in this relationship have been suggested by a number of studies, it remains unclear to what extent they relate to the neurovascular response and are therefore inherent to BOLD-fMRI. Full characterization of potential vascular nonlinearities is required for accurate inferences about the neuronal system under study. To investigate the extent of vascular nonlinearities, evoked activity was studied in humans with BOLD-fMRI (n=28) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) (n=5). Brief (600-800 ms) rapidly repeated (1 Hz) visual stimuli were delivered using a stimulation paradigm that minimized neuronal nonlinearities. Nevertheless, BOLD-fMRI experiments showed substantial remaining nonlinearities. The smallest stimulus separation (200-400 ms) resulted in significant response broadening (15-20% amplitude decrease; 10-12% latency increase; 6-14% duration increase) with respect to a linear prediction. The substantial slowing and widening of the response in the presence of preceding stimuli suggests a vascular rather than neuronal origin to the observed non-linearity. This was confirmed by the MEG data, which showed no significant neuro-electric nonlinear interactions between stimuli as little as 200 ms apart. The presence of substantial vascular nonlinearities has important implications for rapid event-related studies by fMRI and other imaging modalities that infer neuronal activity from hemodynamic parameters. PMID:19520175

  17. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  18. Firefighting acutely increases airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C B; Barnhart, S; Miller, M F; Segal, M R; Aitken, M; Schoene, R; Daniell, W; Rosenstock, L

    1989-07-01

    The acute effects of the products of combustion and pyrolysis on airway responsiveness among firefighters are poorly documented. To study this relationship, spirometry and methacholine challenge testing (MCT) were performed on 18 active Seattle firefighters before and 5 to 24 h after firefighting. Body plethysmography was used to measure changes in specific airway conductance (SGaw), and results of MCT were analyzed using PD35-SGaw, the cumulative dose causing a 35% decrease in SGaw. Subjects who did not react by the end of the protocol were assigned a value of 640 inhalational units, the largest cumulative dose. Fire exposure was defined as the total time (hours) spent without a self-contained breathing apparatus at the firesite and was categorized as mild (less than 1 h, n = 7), moderate (1 to 2 h, n = 5), or severe (greater than 2 h, n = 6). Mean age of the 18 firefighters was 36.7 +/- 6.7 yr (range, 25 to 51), with a mean of 9.1 +/- 7.9 active years in the trade (range, zero to 22). None was known to be asthmatic. After firefighting, FEV1 % predicted (%pred) and FEF25-75 %pred significantly decreased by means of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and 5.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively. The mean decline in PD35-SGaw after firefighting was 184.5 +/- 53.2 units (p = 0.003). This observed decline in PD35-SGaw could not be explained by decrements in prechallenge SGaw, FEV1, or FVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses During Dynamic Posturography: Analysis with a Multichannel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Hiromasa; Nishijo, Hisao; Ishikawa, Akihiro; Shojaku, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate cortical roles in standing balance, cortical hemodynamic activity was recorded from the right hemisphere using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while subjects underwent the sensory organization test (SOT) protocol that systematically disrupts sensory integration processes (i.e., somatosensory or visual inputs or both). Eleven healthy men underwent the SOT during NIRS recording. Group statistical analyses were performed based on changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in 10 different cortical regions of interest and on a general linear analysis with NIRS statistical parametric mapping. The statistical analyses indicated significant activation in the right frontal operculum (f-Op), right parietal operculum (p-Op), and right superior temporal gyrus (STG), right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), right dorsal and ventral premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) under various conditions. The activation patterns in response to specific combinations of SOT conditions suggested that (1) f-Op, p-Op, and STG are essential for sensory integration when standing balance is perturbed; (2) the SMA is involved in the execution of volitional action and establishment of new motor programs to maintain postural balance; and (3) the PPC and PMC are involved in the updating and computation of spatial reference frames during instances of sensory conflict between vestibular and visual information. PMID:26635574

  20. A signal subspace approach for modeling the hemodynamic response function in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Ardekani, Babak A; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2003-10-01

    Many fMRI analysis methods use a model for the hemodynamic response function (HRF). Common models of the HRF, such as the Gaussian or Gamma functions, have parameters that are usually selected a priori by the data analyst. A new method is presented that characterizes the HRF over a wide range of parameters via three basis signals derived using principal component analysis (PCA). Covering the HRF variability, these three basis signals together with the stimulation pattern define signal subspaces which are applicable to both linear and nonlinear modeling and identification of the HRF and for various activation detection strategies. Analysis of simulated fMRI data using the proposed signal subspace showed increased detection sensitivity compared to the case of using a previously proposed trigonometric subspace. The methodology was also applied to activation detection in both event-related and block design experimental fMRI data using both linear and nonlinear modeling of the HRF. The activated regions were consistent with previous studies, indicating the ability of the proposed approach in detecting brain activation without a priori assumptions about the shape parameters of the HRF. The utility of the proposed basis functions in identifying the HRF is demonstrated by estimating the HRF in different activated regions.

  1. Interactive influences of ethnicity, gender and parental hypertension on hemodynamic responses to behavioral challenge.

    PubMed

    Terrell, D F; Manuck, S B

    1996-01-01

    To determine the independent and interactive influences of ethnicity, gender and parental hypertension on the magnitude and patterning of hemodynamic responses to standardized laboratory stressors, 112 normotensive, young adult African-American and Caucasian subjects (56 women, 56 men) completed a four-task protocol: three psychological stressors (the Stroop Color Word task, mental arithmetic and mirror tracing) and the forehead cold pressor test. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and impedance derived measures of cardiac pre-ejection period and stroke volume were measured at rest and during each task; calculated indices of cardiac output and total peripheral resistance were also computed. Women responded to the psychological stressors with significantly larger increases in HR and cardiac output, less change in total peripheral resistance and greater attenuation of cardiac pre-ejection period than did men; however, blood pressure responses did not vary by gender, ethnicity or parental history of hypertension. Across tasks, African Americans showed larger elevations in total peripheral resistance than did Caucasians; conversely Caucasian subjects showed a more pronounced cardiac responsivity to stress, as evidenced by an elevated cardiac output and concomitant decrease in cardiac pre-ejection period, compared to their African-American counterparts. The ethnic differences in reactivity to psychological stressors were more apparent among males, while the gender differences were generally more pronounced among African Americans. Finally, the cold pressor test elicited larger increases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) among Caucasian subjects with family history positive (FH+), relative to family history negative (FH-) subjects, and also caused a greater reduction in HR among males compared to females.

  2. Hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Lee, Joshua F; Berbert, Amanda; Witman, Melissa A H; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter

    2014-11-15

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for exercise intolerance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the present study sought to evaluate the hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in this cohort. In 25 HFrEF patients (64 ± 2 yr) and 17 healthy, age-matched control subjects (64 ± 2 yr), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and limb blood flow were examined during graded static-intermittent handgrip (HG) and dynamic single-leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise. During HG exercise, MAP increased similarly between groups. CO increased significantly (+1.3 ± 0.3 l/min) in the control group, but it remained unchanged across workloads in HFrEF patients. At 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), forearm blood flow was similar between groups, while HFrEF patients exhibited an attenuated increase at the two highest intensities compared with controls, with the greatest difference at the highest workload (352 ± 22 vs. 492 ± 48 ml/min, HFrEF vs. control, 45% MVC). During KE exercise, MAP and CO increased similarly across work rates between groups. However, HFrEF patients exhibited a diminished leg hyperemic response across all work rates, with the most substantial decrement at the highest intensity (1,842 ± 64 vs. 2,675 ± 81 ml/min; HFrEF vs. control, 15 W). Together, these findings indicate a marked attenuation in exercising limb perfusion attributable to impairments in peripheral vasodilatory capacity during both arm and leg exercise in patients with HFrEF, which likely plays a role in limiting exercise capacity in this patient population.

  3. Implantable self-reset CMOS image sensor and its application to hemodynamic response detection in living mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takehara, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A self-reset pixel of 15 × 15 µm2 with high signal-to-noise ratio (effective peak SNR ≃64 dB) for an implantable image sensor has been developed for intrinsic signal detection arising from hemodynamic responses in a living mouse brain. For detecting local conversion between oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) in brain tissues, an implantable imaging device was fabricated with our newly designed self-reset image sensor and orange light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ = 605 nm). We demonstrated imaging of hemodynamic responses in the sensory cortical area accompanied by forelimb stimulation of a living mouse. The implantable imaging device for intrinsic signal detection is expected to be a powerful tool to measure brain activities in living animals used in behavioral analysis.

  4. [Effects of hot water bath or sauna on patients with congestive heart failure: acute hemodynamic improvement by thermal vasodilation].

    PubMed

    Tei, C; Horikiri, Y; Park, J C; Jeong, J W; Chang, K S; Tanaka, N; Toyama, Y

    1994-01-01

    The acute hemodynamic effects of thermal vasodilation caused by exposure to hot water bath or sauna in chronic congestive heart failure were investigated in 32 patients (mean age 57 +/- 15 years old) with dilated cardiomyopathy (25 idiopathic and 7 ischemic). The clinical symptoms were New York Heart Association Class II in 2 patients, III in 17 and IV in 13, and the mean ejection fraction was 25 +/- 9% (9-44%). Exposure to hot water bath was for 10 minutes at 41 degrees C in a semi-sitting position, and to sauna for 15 minutes at 60 degrees C in a supine position using a special far infrared ray sauna chamber. Blood pressure, electrocardiogram, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiograms, expiration gas, and intracardiac pressure tracings were recorded before (control), during, and 30 minutes after hot water bath or sauna. 1. The increase in oxygen consumption was only 0.3 Mets during hot water bath or sauna, and returned to the control level 30 minutes later. 2. The deep temperature in the main pulmonary artery increased by 1.0-1.2 degrees C on average at the end of hot water bath or sauna. 3. Heart rate increased significantly (p < 0.01) by 20-25/min during bathing and still increased 30 min later. 4. Systolic blood pressure did not change significantly during and after hot water bath or sauna, while, diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly during (p < 0.05) and after sauna (p < 0.01), and after hot water bath (p < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Detecting the subtle shape differences in hemodynamic responses at the group level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Cox, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the hemodynamic response (HDR) is still not fully understood due to the multifaceted processes involved. Aside from the overall amplitude, the response may vary across cognitive states, tasks, brain regions, and subjects with respect to characteristics such as rise and fall speed, peak duration, undershoot shape, and overall duration. Here we demonstrate that the fixed-shape (FSM) or adjusted-shape (ASM) methods may fail to detect some shape subtleties (e.g., speed of rise or recovery, or undershoot). In contrast, the estimated-shape method (ESM) through multiple basis functions can provide the opportunity to identify some subtle shape differences and achieve higher statistical power at both individual and group levels. Previously, some dimension reduction approaches focused on the peak magnitude, or made inferences based on the area under the curve (AUC) or interaction, which can lead to potential misidentifications. By adopting a generic framework of multivariate modeling (MVM), we showcase a hybrid approach that is validated by simulations and real data. With the whole HDR shape integrity maintained as input at the group level, the approach allows the investigator to substantiate these more nuanced effects through the unique HDR shape features. Unlike the few analyses that were limited to main effect, two- or three-way interactions, we extend the modeling approach to an inclusive platform that is more adaptable than the conventional GLM. With multiple effect estimates from ESM for each condition, linear mixed-effects (LME) modeling should be used at the group level when there is only one group of subjects without any other explanatory variables. Under other situations, an approximate approach through dimension reduction within the MVM framework can be adopted to achieve a practical equipoise among representation, false positive control, statistical power, and modeling flexibility. The associated program 3dMVM is publicly available as part of the

  6. Hemodynamic Response to Interictal Epileptiform Discharges Addressed by Personalized EEG-fNIRS Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Giovanni; Machado, Alexis; von Ellenrieder, Nicolas; Watanabe, Satsuki; Hall, Jeffery A.; Lina, Jean-Marc; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed at studying the hemodynamic response (HR) to Interictal Epileptic Discharges (IEDs) using patient-specific and prolonged simultaneous ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) and functional Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (fNIRS) recordings. Methods: The epileptic generator was localized using Magnetoencephalography source imaging. fNIRS montage was tailored for each patient, using an algorithm to optimize the sensitivity to the epileptic generator. Optodes were glued using collodion to achieve prolonged acquisition with high quality signal. fNIRS data analysis was handled with no a priori constraint on HR time course, averaging fNIRS signals to similar IEDs. Cluster-permutation analysis was performed on 3D reconstructed fNIRS data to identify significant spatio-temporal HR clusters. Standard (GLM with fixed HRF) and cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analyses were performed for comparison purposes. Results: fNIRS detected HR to IEDs for 8/9 patients. It mainly consisted oxy-hemoglobin increases (seven patients), followed by oxy-hemoglobin decreases (six patients). HR was lateralized in six patients and lasted from 8.5 to 30 s. Standard EEG-fMRI analysis detected an HR in 4/9 patients (4/9 without enough IEDs, 1/9 unreliable result). The cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analysis restricted to the region investigated by fNIRS showed additional strong and non-canonical BOLD responses starting earlier than the IEDs and lasting up to 30 s. Conclusions: (i) EEG-fNIRS is suitable to detect the HR to IEDs and can outperform EEG-fMRI because of prolonged recordings and greater chance to detect IEDs; (ii) cluster-permutation analysis unveils additional HR features underestimated when imposing a canonical HR function (iii) the HR is often bilateral and lasts up to 30 s. PMID:27047325

  7. Optimizing Hemodynamic Support of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Based on Injury Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 sheds light on the dynamic changes that occur with oxygenation , blood flow, and metabolic responses in the penumbra of the traumatic spinal cord...critical reduction of substrate (glucose/ oxygen ) delivery. Following decompression only partially recovery was observed for blood flow, oxygen and glucose...and persisted for several hours. Distal to the injury we also observed a decrease in spinal cord oxygenation although more progressive over time

  8. Effects of Inspiratory Impedance on Hemodynamic Responses to a Squat-stand Test in Human Volunteers: Implications for Treatment of Orthostatic Hypotension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-28

    impedance on hemodynamic responses to a squat–stand test in human volunteers: implications for treatment of orthostatic hypotension Accepted: 14...Convertino et al. 1998; Fig. 3 ). In the present study, we used the beat-to-beat measurements of hemodynamic responses during the initial 10-s time interval of...to maintaining adequate cerebral blood perfusion as indicated by the significant amelio- ration of subjective symptoms. Clinical implications Breathing

  9. Hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation performed with video and direct laryngoscopy in patients scheduled for major cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sarkılar, Gamze; Sargın, Mehmet; Sarıtaş, Tuba Berra; Borazan, Hale; Gök, Funda; Kılıçaslan, Alper; Otelcioğlu, Şeref

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to compare the hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation performed with direct and video laryngoscope in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery and to assess the airway and laryngoscopic characteristics. One hundred ten patients were equally allocated to either direct Macintosh laryngoscope (n = 55) or indirect Macintosh C-MAC video laryngoscope (n = 55). Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded prior to induction anesthesia, and immediately and two minutes after intubation. Airway characteristics (modified Mallampati, thyromental distance, sternomental distance, mouth opening, upper lip bite test, Wilson risk sum score), mask ventilation, laryngoscopic characteristics (Cormack-Lehane, percentage of glottic opening), intubation time, number of attempts, external pressure application, use of stylet and predictors of difficult intubation (modified Mallampati grade 3-4, thyromental distance < 6 cm, upper lip bite test class 3, Wilson risk sum score ≥ 2, Cormack-Lehane grade 3-4) were recorded. Hemodynamic parameters were similar between the groups at all time points of measurement. Airway characteristics and mask ventilation were no significant between the groups. The C-MAC video laryngoscope group had better laryngoscopic view as assessed by Cormack-Lehane and percentage of glottic view, and a longer intubation time. Number of attempts, external pressure, use of stylet, and difficult intubation parameters were similar. Endotracheal intubation performed with direct Macintosh laryngoscope or indirect Macintosh C-MAC video laryngoscope causes similar and stable hemodynamic responses.

  10. Differences in the Pulsatile Component of the Skin Hemodynamic Response to Verbal Fluency Tasks in the Forehead and the Fingertip

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Takikawa, Yoriko; Kawagoe, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have claimed that hemodynamic signals measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the forehead exhibit different patterns during a verbal fluency task (VFT) in various psychiatric disorders, whereas many studies have noted that NIRS signals can reflect task-related changes in skin blood flow. If such a task-related skin hemodynamic response is also observed in the fingertip, a simpler biomarker may be developed. Furthermore, determining the difference in the response pattern may provide physiological insights into the condition. We found that the magnitude of the pulsatile component in skin hemodynamic signals increased on the forehead (p < 0.001 for N = 50, p = 0.073 for N = 8) but decreased on the fingertip (p < 0.001, N = 8) during the VFT, whereas the rate in both areas increased (p < 0.02, N = 8). We also did not find a repetition effect in both the rate and the magnitude on the fingertip, whereas the effect was present in the magnitude (p < 0.02, N = 8) but not in the rate on the forehead. These results suggest that the skin vasomotor system in the forehead could have a different vessel mechanism to psychological tasks compared to the fingertip. PMID:26905432

  11. Intramuscularly administered dexmedetomidine attenuates hemodynamic and stress hormone responses to gynecologic laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Aho, M; Scheinin, M; Lehtinen, A M; Erkola, O; Vuorinen, J; Korttila, K

    1992-12-01

    The hemodynamic and endocrine effects of three different doses of dexmedetomidine (0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 micrograms/kg), oxycodone (0.13 mg/kg), and saline solution, injected intramuscularly 45-60 min before induction of general anesthesia, were compared in a double-blind, randomized study involving 100 women undergoing gynecologic diagnostic laparoscopy. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental (4.5 mg/kg) and maintained with 0.3% end-tidal isoflurane and 70% nitrous oxide in oxygen. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate increased after endotracheal intubation and during laparoscopy in all groups, but the maximal mean arterial pressure after tracheal intubation was lower in the dexmedetomidine 2.4-micrograms/kg group (104 mm Hg [SD 19]) than in the saline solution group (130 mm Hg [SD 12]). Dexmedetomidine (2.4 and 1.2 micrograms/kg) attenuated the maximal heart rate after intubation (84 [SD 11] and 101 beats/min [SD 15], respectively) compared with saline solution (116 beats/min [SD 19]). On the other hand, 40% of the patients in the dexmedetomidine 2.4-micrograms/kg group received atropine in the postanesthesia care unit for bradycardia (heart rate < or = 40 beats/min). Preoperative anxiety and sedation before and after preanesthetic medication were evaluated by the patients with the aid of a profile of mood-state questionnaire; only dexmedetomidine 2.4 micrograms/kg produced significant anxiolysis and sedation. Plasma concentrations of norepinephrine, epinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol, cortisol, and beta-endorphin increased less in the dexmedetomidine 2.4-micrograms/kg group in response to tracheal intubation and surgery than in the saline solution group.

  12. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Hardik; Wiseman, Natalie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wentao; Welch, Robert D; O'Neil, Brian J; Zuk, Conor; Wang, Xiao; Mika, Valerie; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Haacke, E Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL). We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively). We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both). mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  13. Functional hemodynamic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R; Payen, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a cost-effective manner. PMID:16356240

  14. Central circulatory hemodynamics as a function of gravitational stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, Rick D.; White, C. D.; Fanton, J. W.; Owens, R. W.; Barber, J. F.; Lewkowski, B. E.; Goff, O. T.

    1991-01-01

    This study focuses on an evaluation of the central hemodynamics in a nonhuman primate model to variations in gravitational states. The baboon, phylogenectically close to man, was chosen as the human surrogate. The study environments selected are head-down and head-up tilt in the physiology laboratory, centrifugation to test hypergravic stress, and parabolic flights to test transient acute responses to microgravity.

  15. A comparative study of esmolol and dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic responses to carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Dhurjoti Prosad; Saha, Sauvik; Paul, Sanjib; Roychowdhary, Shibsankar; Mondal, Shirsendu; Paul, Suhrita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery increases arterial pressures, heart rate (HR), and systemic vascular resistance. In this randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, we investigated and compared the efficacy of esmolol and dexmedetomidine to provide perioperative hemodynamic stability in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Sixty patients, of either sex undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, were randomly allocated into three groups containing twenty patients each. Group E received bolus dose of 500 μg/kg intravenous (IV) esmolol before pneumoperitoneum followed by an infusion of 100 μg/kg/min. Group D received bolus dose of 1 μg/kg IV dexmedetomidine before pneumoperitoneum followed by infusion of 0.2 μg/kg/h. Group S (control) received saline 0.9%. Results: Mean arterial pressure and HR in Group E and D were significantly less throughout the period of pneumoperitoneum in comparison to Group S. IV nitroglycerine was required in 45% (9 out of 20) patients in Group S to control intraoperative hypertension, and it was clinically significant in comparison to Group E and D. Conclusion: Both esmolol and dexmedetomidine attenuate the adverse hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum and provide hemodynamic stability during laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27746555

  16. Variability in Prefrontal Hemodynamic Response during Exposure to Repeated Self-Selected Music Excerpts, a Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Saba; Schudlo, Larissa; Chau, Tom; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes. PMID:25837268

  17. Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Saba; Schudlo, Larissa; Chau, Tom; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes.

  18. Hemodynamic and hormonal responses to lower body negative pressure in men with varying profiles of strength and aerobic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Mathes, K. L.; Lasley, M. L.; Tomaselli, C. M.; Frey, M. A.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    Hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were examined in 24 healthy men to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of reflex control of blood pressure during orthostatic challenge is associated with interactions between strength and aerobic power. Subjects underwent treadmill tests to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2max) and isokinetic dynamometer tests to determine knee extensor strength. Based on predetermined criteria, subjects were classified into one of four fitness profiles of six subjects each, matched for age, height, and body mass: (a) low strength/average aerobic fitness, (b) low strength/high aerobic fitness, (c) high strength/average aerobic fitness, and (d) high strength/high aerobic fitness. Following 90 min of 0.11 rad (6 degrees) head-down tilt (HDT), each subject underwent graded LBNP to -6.7 kPa or presyncope, with maximal duration 15 min, while hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses were measured. All groups exhibited typical hemodynamic, hormonal, and fluid shift responses during LBNP, with no intergroup differences between high and low strength characteristics. Subjects with high aerobic power exhibited greater (P < 0.05) stroke volume and lower (P < 0.05) heart rate, vascular peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure during rest, HDT, and LBNP. Seven subjects, distributed among the four fitness profiles, became presyncopal. These subjects showed greatest reduction in mean arterial pressure during LBNP, had greater elevations in vasopressin, and lesser increases in heart rate and peripheral resistance. Neither VO2max nor leg strength were associated with fall in arterial pressure or with syncopal episodes. We conclude that interactions between aerobic and strength fitness characteristics do not influence responses to LBNP challenge.

  19. Influence of Spinal and General Anesthesia on the Metabolic, Hormonal, and Hemodynamic Response in Elective Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Snezana B.; Pavlovic, Aleksandar P.; Trpkovic, Sladjana V.; Ilić, Aleksandra N.; Sekulic, Ana D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the significance of spinal anesthesia in the suppression of the metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic response to surgical stress in elective surgical patients compared to general anesthesia. Material/Methods The study was clinical, prospective, and controlled and it involved 2 groups of patients (the spinal and the general anesthesia group) who underwent the same surgery. We monitored the metabolic and hormonal response to perioperative stress based on serum cortisol level and glycemia. We also examined how the different techniques of anesthesia affect these hemodynamic parameters: systolic arterial pressure (AP), diastolic AP, heart rate (HR), and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). These parameters were measured before induction on anesthesia (T1), 30 min after the surgical incisions (T2), 1 h postoperatively (T3) and 24 h after surgery (T4). Results Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in the general anesthesia group compared to the spinal anesthesia group (p<0.01). Glycemia was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.05). There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between serum cortisol levels and glycemia at all times observed (p<0.01). Systolic and diastolic AP did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.191, p=0.101). The HR was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.01). SpO2 values did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.081). Conclusions Based on metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses, spinal anesthesia proved more effective than general anesthesia in suppressing stress response in elective surgical patients. PMID:25284266

  20. Pros and Cons of Using the Informed Basis Set to Account for Hemodynamic Response Variability with Developmental Data.

    PubMed

    Cignetti, Fabien; Salvia, Emilie; Anton, Jean-Luc; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Assaiante, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Conventional analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using the general linear model (GLM) employs a neural model convolved with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF) peaking 5 s after stimulation. Incorporation of a further basis function, namely the canonical HRF temporal derivative, accounts for delays in the hemodynamic response to neural activity. A population that may benefit from this flexible approach is children whose hemodynamic response is not yet mature. Here, we examined the effects of using the set based on the canonical HRF plus its temporal derivative on both first- and second-level GLM analyses, through simulations and using developmental data (an fMRI dataset on proprioceptive mapping in children and adults). Simulations of delayed fMRI first-level data emphasized the benefit of carrying forward to the second-level a derivative boost that combines derivative and nonderivative beta estimates. In the experimental data, second-level analysis using a paired t-test showed increased mean amplitude estimate (i.e., increased group contrast mean) in several brain regions related to proprioceptive processing when using the derivative boost compared to using only the nonderivative term. This was true especially in children. However, carrying forward to the second-level the individual derivative boosts had adverse consequences on random-effects analysis that implemented one-sample t-test, yielding increased between-subject variance, thus affecting group-level statistic. Boosted data also presented a lower level of smoothness that had implication for the detection of group average activation. Imposing soft constraints on the derivative boost by limiting the time-to-peak range of the modeled response within a specified range (i.e., 4-6 s) mitigated these issues. These findings support the notion that there are pros and cons to using the informed basis set with developmental data.

  1. Pros and Cons of Using the Informed Basis Set to Account for Hemodynamic Response Variability with Developmental Data

    PubMed Central

    Cignetti, Fabien; Salvia, Emilie; Anton, Jean-Luc; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Assaiante, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Conventional analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using the general linear model (GLM) employs a neural model convolved with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF) peaking 5 s after stimulation. Incorporation of a further basis function, namely the canonical HRF temporal derivative, accounts for delays in the hemodynamic response to neural activity. A population that may benefit from this flexible approach is children whose hemodynamic response is not yet mature. Here, we examined the effects of using the set based on the canonical HRF plus its temporal derivative on both first- and second-level GLM analyses, through simulations and using developmental data (an fMRI dataset on proprioceptive mapping in children and adults). Simulations of delayed fMRI first-level data emphasized the benefit of carrying forward to the second-level a derivative boost that combines derivative and nonderivative beta estimates. In the experimental data, second-level analysis using a paired t-test showed increased mean amplitude estimate (i.e., increased group contrast mean) in several brain regions related to proprioceptive processing when using the derivative boost compared to using only the nonderivative term. This was true especially in children. However, carrying forward to the second-level the individual derivative boosts had adverse consequences on random-effects analysis that implemented one-sample t-test, yielding increased between-subject variance, thus affecting group-level statistic. Boosted data also presented a lower level of smoothness that had implication for the detection of group average activation. Imposing soft constraints on the derivative boost by limiting the time-to-peak range of the modeled response within a specified range (i.e., 4–6 s) mitigated these issues. These findings support the notion that there are pros and cons to using the informed basis set with developmental data. PMID:27471441

  2. Short separation regression improves statistical significance and better localizes the hemodynamic response obtained by near-infrared spectroscopy for tasks with differing autonomic responses

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M.; Petkov, Mike P.; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David; Boas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Autonomic nervous system response is known to be highly task-dependent. The sensitivity of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements to superficial layers, particularly to the scalp, makes it highly susceptible to systemic physiological changes. Thus, one critical step in NIRS data processing is to remove the contribution of superficial layers to the NIRS signal and to obtain the actual brain response. This can be achieved using short separation channels that are sensitive only to the hemodynamics in the scalp. We investigated the contribution of hemodynamic fluctuations due to autonomous nervous system activation during various tasks. Our results provide clear demonstrations of the critical role of using short separation channels in NIRS measurements to disentangle differing autonomic responses from the brain activation signal of interest. PMID:26835480

  3. [The changes of hemodynamic parameters, pathology and c-kit mRNA expression in myocardium after acute myocardial infarction in rats].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiqian; Long, Weifu; Wu, Wenchao; Jiang, Congxun; Liu, Xiaojing; Li, Liang

    2009-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the changes of hemodynamic parameters, pathology and c kit mRNA expression in myocardium after acute myocardial infarctionin (AMI) in rats, and to elucidate the relationship between these three kinds of changes. Sixty six adult male SD rats were randomly divided into normal group, Sham groups and ligation groups. The rat model of AMI was set up by ligating the left anterior descending artery. Hemodynamic parameters, pathological changes and c kit mRNA expression in myocardiam were examined. The results revealed that there were no statistically significant differences in hemodynamic parameters between normal group and Sham groups. Compared with the normal group, all ligation groups exhibited significantly decreased left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and +/-dp/dtmax (P<0.01), and increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP, P<0.01). In the other ligation groups, compared with 6th hour group after ligation, there appeared striking increase of LVSP, LVEDP and +/-dp/dtmax (P<0.05). HE staining in myocardiam showed that there are necrosis and derangement at 24th hour group after ligation ,and a great number of inflammatory cells infiltration around the infarct zone at 3rd day group after ligation, and granulation tissue infiltrated into the infarct zone at 14th day group after ligation. In all five time points groups after ligation, the levels of c-kit mRNA expression were 0.99 fold, 1.06 fold, 1.46 fold, 1.91 fold and 2.67 fold, respectively, compared with Sham groups. The results suggest that cardiac stem cells in myocardium might contribute to the role of regenerating myocardium via self proliferation after acute myocardial infarction, but further investigation is still needed.

  4. Effect of the Pulsatile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation on Hemodynamic Energy and Systemic Microcirculation in a Piglet Model of Acute Cardiac Failure.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hideshi; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito; Douguchi, Takuma; Obata, Hideaki; Inamori, Syuji; Iwasaki, Tatsuo; Kasahara, Shingo; Sano, Shunji; Ündar, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of pulsatile and nonpulsatile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on hemodynamic energy and systemic microcirculation in an acute cardiac failure model in piglets. Fourteen piglets with a mean body weight of 6.08 ± 0.86 kg were divided into pulsatile (N = 7) and nonpulsatile (N = 7) ECMO groups. The experimental ECMO circuit consisted of a centrifugal pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a pneumatic pulsatile flow generator system developed in-house. Nonpulsatile ECMO was initiated at a flow rate of 140 mL/kg/min for the first 30 min with normal heart beating, with rectal temperature maintained at 36°C. Ventricular fibrillation was then induced with a 3.5-V alternating current to generate a cardiac dysfunction model. Using this model, we collected the data on pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups. The piglets were weaned off ECMO at the end of the experiment (180 min after ECMO was initiated). The animals did not receive blood transfusions, inotropic drugs, or vasoactive drugs. Blood samples were collected to measure hemoglobin, methemoglobin, blood gases, electrolytes, and lactic acid levels. Hemodynamic energy was calculated using the Shepard's energy equivalent pressure. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor brain and kidney perfusion. The pulsatile ECMO group had a higher atrial pressure (systolic and mean), and significantly higher regional saturation at the brain level, than the nonpulsatile group (for both, P < 0.05). Additionally, the pulsatile ECMO group had higher methemoglobin levels within the normal range than the nonpulsatile group. Our study demonstrated that pulsatile ECMO produces significantly higher hemodynamic energy and improves systemic microcirculation, compared with nonpulsatile ECMO in acute cardiac failure.

  5. Differences in the hemodynamic response to event-related motor and visual paradigms as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasdzewski, G.; Strangman, G.; Wagner, J.; Kwong, K. K.; Poldrack, R. A.; Boas, D. A.; Sutton, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Several current brain imaging techniques rest on the assumption of a tight coupling between neural activity and hemodynamic response. The nature of this neurovascular coupling, however, is not completely understood. There is some evidence for a decoupling of these processes at the onset of neural activity, which manifests itself as a momentary increase in the relative concentration of deoxyhemoglobin (HbR). The existence of this early component of the hemodynamic response function, however, is controversial, as it is inconsistently found. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows quantification of levels of oxyhemoglobin (HbO(2)) and HbR during task performance in humans. We acquired NIRS data during performance of simple motor and visual tasks, using rapid-presentation event-related paradigms. Our results demonstrate that rapid, event-related NIRS can provide robust estimates of the hemodynamic response without artifacts due to low-frequency signal components, unlike data from blocked designs. In both the motor and visual data the onset of the increase in HbO(2) occurs before HbR decreases, and there is a poststimulus undershoot. Our results also show that total blood volume (HbT) drops before HbO(2) and undershoots baseline, raising a new issue for neurovascular models. We did not find early deoxygenation in the motor data using physiologically plausible values for the differential pathlength factor, but did find one in the visual data. We suggest that this difference, which is consistent with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, may be attributable to different capillary transit times in these cortices.

  6. Hemodynamic Responses of Unfit Healthy Women at a Training Session with Nintendo Wii: A Possible Impact on the General Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato S; Figueiredo, Luiz F; Conceição, Isabel; Carvalho, Carolina; Lattari, Eduardo; Mura, Gioia; Machado, Sérgio; da Silva, Elirez B

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was assess the effect of a training session with Nintendo Wii® on the hemodynamic responses of healthy women not involved in regular physical exercise. Method: Twenty-five healthy unfit women aged 28 ± 6 years played for 10 minutes the game Free Run (Wii Fit Plus). The resting heart rate (RHR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP), and double (rate-pressure) product (DP) were measured before and after activity. The HR during the activity (exercise heart rate, EHR) was measured every minute. Results: A statistically significant difference was observed between the RHR (75 ± 9 bpm) and the mean EHR (176 ± 15 bpm) (P < 0.001). The EHR remained in the target zone for aerobic exercise until the fifth minute of activity, which coincided with the upper limit of the aerobic zone (80% heart rate reserve (HRR) + RHR) from the sixth to tenth minute. The initial (110 ± 8 mmHg) and final (145 ± 17 mmHg) SBP (P < 0.01) were significantly different, as were the initial (71 ± 8 mmHg) and final (79 ± 9 mmHg) DBP (P < 0.01). A statistically significant difference was observed between the pre- (8.233 ± 1.141 bpm-mmHg) and post-activity (25.590 ± 4.117 bpm-mmHg) DP (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Physical exercise while playing Free Run sufficed to trigger acute hemodynamic changes in healthy women who were not engaged in regular physical exercise. PMID:25614754

  7. Hemodynamic responses in amygdala and hippocampus distinguish between aversive and neutral cues during Pavlovian fear conditioning in behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Stephen B; Marques-Smith, Andre; Li, Jennifer; Rawlins, J N P; Lowry, John; Conway, Michael; Gilmour, Gary; Tricklebank, Mark; Bannerman, David M

    2013-01-01

    Lesion and electrophysiological studies in rodents have identified the amygdala and hippocampus (HPC) as key structures for Pavlovian fear conditioning, but human functional neuroimaging studies have not consistently found activation of these structures. This could be because hemodynamic responses cannot detect the sparse neuronal activity proposed to underlie conditioned fear. Alternatively, differences in experimental design or fear levels could account for the discrepant findings between rodents and humans. To help distinguish between these alternatives, we used tissue oxygen amperometry to record hemodynamic responses from the basolateral amygdala (BLA), dorsal HPC (dHPC) and ventral HPC (vHPC) in freely-moving rats during the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear. To enable specific comparison with human studies we used a discriminative paradigm, with one auditory cue [conditioned stimulus (CS)+] that was always followed by footshock, and another auditory cue (CS−) that was never followed by footshock. BLA tissue oxygen signals were significantly higher during CS+ than CS− trials during training and early extinction. In contrast, they were lower during CS+ than CS− trials by the end of extinction. dHPC and vHPC tissue oxygen signals were significantly lower during CS+ than CS− trials throughout extinction. Thus, hemodynamic signals in the amygdala and HPC can detect the different patterns of neuronal activity evoked by threatening vs. neutral stimuli during fear conditioning. Discrepant neuroimaging findings may be due to differences in experimental design and/or fear levels evoked in participants. Our methodology offers a way to improve translation between rodent models and human neuroimaging. PMID:23173719

  8. Attenuation of the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation with fentanyl, lignocaine nebulization, and a combination of both: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhyuday; Seth, Anita; Prakash, Smita; Deganwa, Mangilal; Gogia, Anoop Raj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) fentanyl and lignocaine airway nebulization and a combination of both in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six patients of either sex aged between 18 and 65 years of age, belonging to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) health status Classes I and II, undergoing elective surgery requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were included in the study. Patients were randomly divided into three groups. Group F received IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg, Group L received nebulization with 3 mg/kg of 4% lignocaine, and Group FL received both nebulization with 3 mg/kg of 4% lignocaine and IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg before intubation. Hemodynamic parameters were noted before and immediately after induction, 1 min after intubation, and every minute after intubation for 10 min. Results: Hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation was not completely abolished in any of the groups. Nebulized lignocaine was least effective in attenuating hemodynamic response to intubation, and hemodynamic parameters were significantly high after intubation as compared to other groups. Fentanyl alone or in combination with nebulized lignocaine was most effective, and Group F and Group FL were comparable. The maximum increase in mean blood pressure after intubation from baseline in Groups F, L, and FL was 7.4%, 14.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: In our study, IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg administered 5 min before induction was found to be the most effective in attenuating the hemodynamic response. There was no advantage to the use of nebulized lignocaine in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. PMID:27746569

  9. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-06-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 +/- 81 to 350 +/- 77 ml and from 52 +/- 26 to 43 +/- 20 volume units, respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 +/- 10 to 17 +/- 9 mm Hg and 10 +/- 5 to 6 +/- 5 mm Hg. Although stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 +/- 6% to 22+/- 5% and from 25 +/- 9% to 29 +/- 11%, respectively. During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. This, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured.

  10. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-06-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 + 81 to 350 + 77 ml (p < 0.01) and from 52 + 26 to 43 + 20 volume units (p < 0.01), respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 + 10 to 17 + 9 mm Hg and 10 + 5 to and + 5 mm Hg (both p < 0.01). Altough stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 + 6% to 22 + 5% and from 25 + 9% to 29 + 11%, respectively (both p < 0.01). During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. Thus, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured.

  11. Pulmonary hemodynamic responses to inhaled NO in chronic heart failure depend on PDE5 G(-1142)T polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Damy, Thibaud; Lesault, Pierre-François; Guendouz, Soulef; Eddahibi, Saadia; Tu, Ly; Marcos, Elisabeth; Guellich, Aziz; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Teiger, Emmanuel; Hittinger, Luc; Adnot, Serge

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the vasoconstrictor component of PH in CHF by investigating the hemodynamic response to inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) and to determine whether this response was influenced by the phosphodiesterase 5 gene (PDE5) G(1142)T polymorphism. CHF patients underwent right heart catheterization at rest and after 20 ppm of iNO and plasma cGMP and PDE5 G(1142)T polymorphism determinations. Of the 72 included CHF patients (mean age, 53±1 years; mean left ventricular ejection fraction, 29±1%; and mean pulmonary artery pressure, 25.5±1.3 mmHg), 54% had ischemic heart disease. Proportions of patients with the TT, GT, and GG genotypes were 39%, 42% and 19% respectively. Baseline hemodynamic characteristics were not significantly different across PDE5 genotype groups, although pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) tended to be lower in the TT group (P=0.09). Baseline plasma cGMP levels were significantly lower in the TT than in the GG and GT patients. With iNO, PVR diminished in TT (-33%) but not GG (-1.6%) or GT (0%) patients (P=0.002); and PCWP increased more in TT than in GT (P<0.05) or GG (P<0.003) patients. The PDE5 G(-1142) polymorphism is therefore a major contributor to the iNO-induced PVR decrease in CHF.

  12. Hemodynamic and Respiratory Responses of Conscious Swine to E. coli Endotoxin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    E . coli endotoxin into conscious swine produced an early increase in pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and a decrease in left atrial pressure (LAP). This hemodynamic effect may be secondary to the pulmonary venous constriction seen in other species, or may relate to demonstrated multiple pulmonary microemboli. Hypoxemia developed in only 4 of 17 animals although all endotoxin-treated swine showed interstitial pulmonary edema and elevated wet/dry weight ratios with normal pulmonary surfactant. In addition, endotoxin-treated swine developed signs of disseminated

  13. Acute influence of different beta-blocking agents upon left heart hemodynamics at rest and during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Reale, A; Nigri, A; Gioffrè, P A; Motolese, M

    1979-02-01

    The study investigated the acute hemodynamic changes induced in patients with angiographically confirmed coronary artery disease by 3 beta-blockers: metoprolol, cardioselective without intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA), group I, 11 patients; bunitrolol, noncardioselective with ISA, group II, 11 patients; oxprenolol, noncardioselective with ISA, group III, 11 patients. Hemodynamic variables were obtained at rest and during exercise, before and 45 min after 10 mg i.v. of the drug. Changes in LVEDP and cardiac indexes were such as LV function was improved in 1 patient of group I, 7 patients of group II and 5 patients of group III; impaired in 4 patients of group I and in 1 patient of group III; unchanged in the others. Contractility indexes were less influenced by bunitrolol and oxprenolol. During exercise there was a significant difference between groups for LVEDP which was lower in group II (P less than 0.01). The data seem to indicate that the choice of the beta-blocker may be of importance when it is desirable that an already compromised cardiac function be not further impaired by pharmacological intervention.

  14. Fitter Women Did Not Have Attenuated Hemodynamic Responses to Psychological Stress Compared with Age-Matched Women with Lower Levels of Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Sisitha U.; Torres, Susan J.; Hussein, Mais; Fraser, Steve F.; Lambert, Gavin W.; Turner, Anne I.

    2017-01-01

    According to the ‘cross stressor adaptation hypothesis’, regular exercise acts as a buffer against the detrimental effects of stress. Nevertheless, evidence that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness moderate hemodynamic responses to acute psychological stress is inconclusive, especially in women. Women aged 30–50 years (in the mid-follicular phase of the menstrual cycle) with higher (n = 17) and lower (n = 17) levels of fitness were subjected to a Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Continuous, non-invasive measurements were made of beat-to-beat, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), left ventricular ejection time (LVET), maximum slope, pulse interval (PI) and total peripheral resistance (TPR). Maximal oxygen consumption was significantly (p<0.001) higher in the ‘higher fit’ women. Lower fit women had higher fasting glucose, resting heart rate, waist to hip ratios and elevated serum triglyceride and cholesterol/ HDL ratios compared with higher fit women (p<0.05 for all). While all measured parameters (for both groups)displayed significant (p<0.001) responses to the TSST, only HR, PI and LVET differed significantly between higher and lower fit women (p<0.001 for all) with the higher fit women having the larger response in each case. It was also found that higher fit women had significantly shorter time to recovery for maximum slope compared with the lower fit women. These findings provide little support for the notion that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness result in lower cardiovascular responsivity to psychological stress in women but may indicate that lower fit women have blunted responses to stress. PMID:28081200

  15. Adrenoceptor hyporeactivity is responsible for Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute vascular dysfunction in humans.

    PubMed

    Pleiner, Johannes; Heere-Ress, Elisabeth; Langenberger, Herbert; Sieder, Anna E; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Mittermayer, Fritz; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Böhm, Johannes; Jansen, Burkhard; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Impaired response to catecholamines contributes to the altered hemodynamics in sepsis, which has been attributed to excessive NO formation. We have studied the systemic hemodynamic and local forearm responses and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression during experimental endotoxemia in humans. Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) was administered at doses of 1 or 2 ng/kg to healthy volunteers. In 10 subjects, the systemic pressor effect of phenylephrine was assessed before and after the administration of LPS. In 9 further subjects, forearm blood flow responses to intra-arterial noradrenaline, acetylcholine, glyceryl trinitrate, and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) were studied at baseline and after LPS administration. Peripheral blood was collected and analyzed for iNOS mRNA and protein. Four hours after LPS, the response of systolic blood pressure (P<0.0005) and heart rate (P<0.05) to phenylephrine was significantly reduced. In the forearm, noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction was also reduced by approximately 50% (P<0.01), but L-NMMA responsiveness was unchanged. iNOS mRNA or protein was not increased. Marked vascular adrenoceptor hyporeactivity is detectable in the absence of increased NO activity or iNOS expression in endotoxemia, arguing against major involvement of vascular iNOS activity in the acute systemic vasodilation to LPS.

  16. Noninvasive monitoring hemodynamic responses in RIF tumors during and after PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Durduran, Turgut; Busch, Theresa M.; Wang, Hsing-Wen; Zhou, Chao; Saunders, H. Mark; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-06-01

    Changes in blood flow and oxygenation during and after PDT provide information about tumor vessel and cellular damage. The characterization of these changes may improve our understanding of PDT mechanisms and help predict treatment efficacy. We have designed a hybrid system that can non-invasively measure in vivo hemodynamic changes and provide independent information about tumor oxygenation and blood flow. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) monitors blood flow by measuring the optical phase shifts caused by moving blood cells, while diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) spectroscopy measures tissue absorption and scattering. When mounted on a camera, our unique probe allows non-contact measurements that avoid compressing the tumor and altering blood flow. An optical filter mounted in front of the camera lens cut off light below 650nm, which allowed monitoring of blood flow during PDT. The utility of the hybrid system was demonstrated by monitoring the hemodynamic changes during and after PDT in mice bearing the experimental radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF). For the first time, we non-invasively and continually monitored the in vivo flow changes during PDT. Relative oxygen consumption was calculated using flow values measured by DCS and oxygenation measured by a broadband absorption spectrometer. During PDT an initial rapid increase in blood flow was found, followed by a decrease and slow recovery. After PDT, substantial and continued reductions in blood saturation, blood flow and oxygen consumption were found after 3 hours, suggesting that permanent damage to tumor cells and blood vessels had occurred. The comparison of flow values after PDT as measured by DCS and by Power Doppler ultrasound (CWFA) demonstrated that both techniques non-invasively detected similar global changes in tumor blood flow or perfusion after PDT.

  17. Effects of Early Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration on E-Selectin, Hemodynamic Stability, and Ventilatory Function in Patients with Septic-Shock-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of 72-hour early-initiated continuous venovenous hemofiltration (ECVVH) treatment in patients with septic-shock-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (not acute kidney injury, AKI) with regard to serum E-selectin and measurements of lung function and hemodynamic stability. Methods. This prospective nonblinded single institutional randomized study involved 51 patients who were randomly assigned to receive or not receive ECVVH, an ECVVH group (n = 24) and a non-ECVVH group (n = 27). Besides standard therapies, patients in ECVVH group underwent CVVH for 72 h. Results. At 0 and 24 h after initiation of treatment, arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), and E-selectin level were not significantly different between groups (all P > 0.05). Compared to non-ECVVH group, PaO2/FiO2 is significantly higher and EVLWI and E-selectin level are significantly lower in ECVVH group (all P < 0.05) at 48 h and 72 h after initiation of treatment. The lengths of mechanical ventilation and stay in intensive care unit (ICU) were shorter in ECVVH group (all P < 0.05), but there was no difference in 28-day mortality between two groups. Conclusions. In patients with septic-shock-induced ARDS (not AKI), treatment with ECVVH in addition to standard therapies improves endothelial function, lung function, and hemodynamic stability and reduces the lengths of mechanical ventilation and stay in ICU. PMID:28044135

  18. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  19. Gender differences in response to acute and chronic angiotensin II infusion: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Toering, Tsjitske J; van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Visser, Folkert W; Buikema, Hendrik; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M; Lely, A Titia

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease progress at a slower rate to end stage renal disease than men. As angiotensin II has both hemodynamic and direct renal effects, we hypothesized that the female protection may result from gender differences in responses to angiotensin II. Therefore, we studied gender differences in response to angiotensin II, during acute (human) and chronic (rats) angiotensin II administration. In young healthy men (n = 18) and women (n = 18) we studied the responses of renal hemodynamics (125I-iothalamate and 131I-Hippuran) and blood pressure to graded angiotensin II infusion (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 ng/kg/min for 1 h). Men had increased responses of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05), and a more pronounced decrease in effective renal plasma flow (P = 0.009) than women. We measured the changes in proteinuria and blood pressure in response to chronic administration (200 ng/kg/min for 3 weeks) of angiotensin II in rats. Male rats had an increased response of proteinuria compared with females (GEE analysis, P = 0.001). Male, but not female, angiotensin II-treated rats had increased numbers of renal interstitial macrophages compared to sham-treated rats (P < 0.001). In conclusion, gender differences are present in the response to acute and chronic infusion of angiotensin II. Difference in angiotensin II sensitivity could play a role in gender differences in progression of renal disease. PMID:26149279

  20. Too little, too late or too much, too early? Differential hemodynamics of response inhibition in high and low sensation seekers.

    PubMed

    Collins, Heather R; Corbly, Christine R; Liu, Xun; Kelly, Thomas H; Lynam, Donald; Joseph, Jane E

    2012-10-24

    High sensation seeking is associated with strong approach behaviors and weak avoidance responses. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to further characterize the neurobiological underpinnings of this behavioral profile using a Go/No-go task. Analysis of brain activation associated with response inhibition (No-go) versus response initiation and execution (Go) revealed the commonly reported right lateral prefrontal, insula, cingulate, and supplementary motor area network. However, right lateral activation was associated with greater No-go than Go responses only in low sensation seekers. High sensation seekers showed no differential activation in these regions but a more pronounced Go compared to No-go response in several other regions that are involved in salience detection (insula), motor initiation (anterior cingulate) and attention (inferior parietal cortex). Temporal analysis of the hemodynamic response for Go and No-go conditions revealed that the stronger response to Go than No-go trials in high sensation seekers occurred in in the earliest time window in the right middle frontal gyrus, right mid-cingulate and right precuneus. In contrast, the greater No-go than Go response in low sensation seekers occurred in the later time window in these same regions. These findings indicate that high sensation seekers more strongly attend to or process Go trials and show delayed or minimal inhibitory responses on No-go trials in regions that low sensation seekers use for response inhibition. Failure to engage such regions for response inhibition may underlie some of the risky and impulsive behaviors observed in high sensation seekers.

  1. Trandolapril, but not verapamil nor their association, restores the physiological renal hemodynamic response to adrenergic activation in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Lorella; Di Serio, Claudia; Castellani, Sergio; Torrini, Monica; Lotti, Elena; Cristofari, Claudia; Masotti, Giulio; Marchionni, Niccolò; Ungar, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of antihypertensive drugs on renal hemodynamics in hypertensive patients during an adrenergic activation by mental stress (MS), which induces renal vasoconstriction in healthy subjects. Renal hemodynamics was assessed twice in 30 middle-aged essential hypertensive patients (57±6 years)-after 15 days of pharmacological wash-out and after 15 days of treatment with Trandolapril (T, 4 mg, n=10), Verapamil (V, 240 mg, n=10), or both (T 2 mg+V 180 mg, n=10). Each experiment consisted of 4 30-min periods (baseline, MS, recovery I and II). Renal hemodynamics was evaluated with effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from plasminogen activator inhibitor and inulin clearance, respectively. MS increased blood pressure (BP) to a similar extent before and after each treatment. Before treatment, the increasing BP was not associated with any modification of ERPF in the 3 groups. Renal vascular resistances (RVR) markedly increased during MS (+23% in the T group, +21.6% in the V group, and +32.9% in the T+V group); GFR remained constant during the whole experiment. After treatment, ERPF decreased significantly during MS in the T group (-15%, P<0.05) and in the V group (-11.7%, p<0.01); in the T+V group, ERPF modifications were not statistically significant (P=0.07). In the T group, ERPF reverted to baseline values at the end of the stimulus, whereas in the V group, renal vasoconstriction was more prolonged. Only in hypertensive patients treated with 4 mg of T, RVR reverted to baseline during the recovery I, whereas in the V group, RVR remained elevated for the whole experiment. No modifications of GFR were observed in all groups. The kidney of hypertensive patients cannot react to a sympathetic stimulus with the physiological vasoconstriction. A short-term antihypertensive treatment with 4 mg of T restores the physiological renal response to adrenergic activation.

  2. Two-photon microscopy of cortical NADH fluorescence intensity changes: correcting contamination from the hemodynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraghis, Edward; Devor, Anna; Fang, Qianqian; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Wu, Weicheng; Lesage, Frédéric; Ayata, Cenk; Kasischke, Karl A.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2011-10-01

    Quantification of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) changes during functional brain activation and pathological conditions provides critical insight into brain metabolism. Of the different imaging modalities, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) is becoming an important tool for cellular-resolution measurements of NADH changes associated with cellular metabolic changes. However, NADH fluorescence emission is strongly absorbed by hemoglobin. As a result, in vivo measurements are significantly affected by the hemodynamics associated with physiological and pathophysiological manipulations. We model NADH fluorescence excitation and emission in TPLSM imaging based on precise maps of cerebral microvasculature. The effects of hemoglobin optical absorption and optical scattering from red blood cells, changes in blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation, vessel size, and location with respect to imaging location are explored. A simple technique for correcting the measured NADH fluorescence intensity changes is provided, with the utilization of a parallel measurement of a physiologically inert fluorophore. The model is applied to TPLSM measurements of NADH fluorescence intensity changes in rat somatosensory cortex during mild hypoxia and hyperoxia. The general approach of the correction algorithm can be extended to other TPLSM measurements, where changes in the optical properties of the tissue confound physiological measurements, such as the detection of calcium dynamics.

  3. Two-photon microscopy of cortical NADH fluorescence intensity changes: correcting contamination from the hemodynamic response

    PubMed Central

    Baraghis, Edward; Devor, Anna; Fang, Qianqian; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Wu, Weicheng; Lesage, Frédéric; Ayata, Cenk; Kasischke, Karl A.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) changes during functional brain activation and pathological conditions provides critical insight into brain metabolism. Of the different imaging modalities, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) is becoming an important tool for cellular-resolution measurements of NADH changes associated with cellular metabolic changes. However, NADH fluorescence emission is strongly absorbed by hemoglobin. As a result, in vivo measurements are significantly affected by the hemodynamics associated with physiological and pathophysiological manipulations. We model NADH fluorescence excitation and emission in TPLSM imaging based on precise maps of cerebral microvasculature. The effects of hemoglobin optical absorption and optical scattering from red blood cells, changes in blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation, vessel size, and location with respect to imaging location are explored. A simple technique for correcting the measured NADH fluorescence intensity changes is provided, with the utilization of a parallel measurement of a physiologically inert fluorophore. The model is applied to TPLSM measurements of NADH fluorescence intensity changes in rat somatosensory cortex during mild hypoxia and hyperoxia. The general approach of the correction algorithm can be extended to other TPLSM measurements, where changes in the optical properties of the tissue confound physiological measurements, such as the detection of calcium dynamics. PMID:22029350

  4. Renal hemodynamic responses to increased renal venous pressure: role of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Kastner, P R; Hall, J E; Guyton, A C

    1982-09-01

    Studies were performed to quantitate the effects of progressive increases in renal venous pressure (RVP) on renin secretion (RS) and renal hemodynamics. RVP was raised in 10 mmHg increments to 50 mmHg. Renin secretion rate increased modestly as RVP was increased to 30 mmHg and then increased sharply after RVP exceeded 30 mmHg. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal blood flow (RBF), and filtration fraction (FF) did not change significantly when RVP was elevated to 50 mmHg. GFR and RBF were also measured after the renin-angiotension system (RAS) was blocked with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (CEI) SQ 14225. After a 60-min CEI infusion, RBF was elevated (32%), GFR was unchanged, FF was decreased, and total renal resistance (TRR) was decreased. As RVP was increased to 50 mmHg, GFR and FF decreased to 36.3 and 40.0% of control, respectively, RBF returned to a value not significantly different from control, and TRR decreased to 44.8% of control. The data indicate that the RAS plays an important role in preventing reductions in GFR during increased RVP because blockade of angiotensin II (ANG II) formation by the CEI results in marked decreases in GFR at high RVPs. The decreases in GFR after ANG II blockade and RVP elevation were not due to lack of renal vasodilation, since TRR was maintained below while RBF was maintained either above or at the pre-CEI levels.

  5. Two-photon microscopy of cortical NADH fluorescence intensity changes: correcting contamination from the hemodynamic response.

    PubMed

    Baraghis, Edward; Devor, Anna; Fang, Qianqian; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Wu, Weicheng; Lesage, Frédéric; Ayata, Cenk; Kasischke, Karl A; Boas, David A; Sakadzić, Sava

    2011-10-01

    Quantification of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) changes during functional brain activation and pathological conditions provides critical insight into brain metabolism. Of the different imaging modalities, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) is becoming an important tool for cellular-resolution measurements of NADH changes associated with cellular metabolic changes. However, NADH fluorescence emission is strongly absorbed by hemoglobin. As a result, in vivo measurements are significantly affected by the hemodynamics associated with physiological and pathophysiological manipulations. We model NADH fluorescence excitation and emission in TPLSM imaging based on precise maps of cerebral microvasculature. The effects of hemoglobin optical absorption and optical scattering from red blood cells, changes in blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation, vessel size, and location with respect to imaging location are explored. A simple technique for correcting the measured NADH fluorescence intensity changes is provided, with the utilization of a parallel measurement of a physiologically inert fluorophore. The model is applied to TPLSM measurements of NADH fluorescence intensity changes in rat somatosensory cortex during mild hypoxia and hyperoxia. The general approach of the correction algorithm can be extended to other TPLSM measurements, where changes in the optical properties of the tissue confound physiological measurements, such as the detection of calcium dynamics.

  6. Hemodynamic response characteristics of healthy people to changes in meteorological and geomagnetic factors in the north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenchenko, T. A.; Varlamova, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of variations in meteorological and geomagnetic factors on hemodynamic parameters (HP) in 27 healthy volunteers who are residents of Syktyvkar (daily monitoring of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) and stroke and cardiac output for the period from December 1, 2003, to December 31, 2004). It is shown that temperature variations and geomagnetic activity level (GMA) make the greatest impact on HP changes (85 and 48% cases, respectively). The BP level increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing levels of GMA. The sensitivity of systolic and diastolic blood pressure to the meteorological and geomagnetic factors is approximately twice as high as the sensitivity of other HP to them. The individual values of seasonal changes in BP parameters are 4-9 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 3-6 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The estimates of the characteristics of meteorological and geomagnetic sensitivity in residents of northern latitudes are in good agreement with the results obtained by us earlier for other climatic zones and geomagnetic conditions, logically complementing and enhancing the common space-time picture of the reactions of the human body to external impacts.

  7. Effect of Etomidate Versus Combination of Propofol-Ketamine and Thiopental-Ketamine on Hemodynamic Response to Laryngoscopy and Intubation: A Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Firouzian, Abolfazl; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Emadi, Seyed Abdollah; Davanlou, Ali; Motamed, Nima; Yousefi Abdolmaleki, Ensieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and intubation frequently used for airway management during general anesthesia, is frequently associated with undesirable hemodynamic disturbances. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of etomidate, combination of propofol-ketamine and thiopental-ketamine as induction agents on hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Patients and Methods: In a double blind, randomized clinical trial a total of 120 adult patients of both sexes, aged 18 - 45 years, scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned into three equally sized groups. Patients in group A received etomidate (0.3 mg/kg) plus normal saline as placebo. Patients in group B and C received propofol (1.5 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) and thiopental sodium (3 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), respectively for anesthesia induction. Before laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, immediately after, and also one and three minutes after the procedures, hemodynamic values (SBP, DBP, MAP and HR) were measured. Results: A repeated measurement ANOVA showed significant changes in mean SBP and DBP between the time points (P < 0.05). In addition, the main effect of MAP and HR were statistically significant during the course of study (P < 0.05). Furthermore, after induction of anesthesia, the three study groups had significantly different SBP, DBP and MAP changes overtime (P < 0.05). However, HR changes over time were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Combination of propofol-ketamine had superior hemodynamic stability compared to other induction agents. Conclusions: Combination of propofol-ketamine may be recommended as an effective and safe induction agent for attenuating hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and intubation with better hemodynamic stability. Although, further well-designed randomized clinical trials to confirm the safety and efficacy of this combination, especially in critically ill patients or patients with

  8. Functional evaluation of hemodynamic response during neural activation using optical microangiography integrated with dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Wang, Hequn; Reif, Roberto; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Evaluation of spatiotemporal hemodynamic and metabolic responses during neural activation is crucial in studying brain function. We explore the use of a noninvasive multifunctional optical imaging system to measure these responses in a mouse brain upon electrically stimulated neural activation, with the cranium left intact. The system is developed by integrating an optical microangiography (OMAG) imaging system with a dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (DW-LSI) system. The DW-LSI, running at an image acquisition speed of ∼100  Hz, is used to extract the large-scale two-dimensional map, revealing the localized response of blood flow, hemoglobin concentration, and metabolic rate of oxygen change. Guided by DW-LSI, the OMAG is, however, used to image the response of individual blood vessels with its unique depth-resolved capability. We show that the integrated system is capable of investigating neural activation, thus is potentially valuable in the preclinical study of the mechanism of neurovascular coupling. PMID:24549439

  9. Modeling Hemodynamic Responses in Auditory Cortex at 1.5T Using Variable Duration Imaging Acoustic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shuowen; Olulade, Olumide; Gonzalez, Javier Castillo; Santos, Joseph; Kim, Sungeun; Tamer, Gregory G.; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    A confound for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially for auditory studies, is the presence of imaging acoustic noise generated mainly as a byproduct of rapid gradient switching during volume acquisition and to a lesser extent, the radio-frequency transmit. This work utilized a novel pulse sequence to present actual imaging acoustic noise for characterization of the induced hemodynamic responses and assessment of linearity in the primary auditory cortex with respect to noise duration. Results show that responses to brief duration (46ms) imaging acoustic noise is highly nonlinear while responses to longer duration (>1s) imaging acoustic noise becomes approximately linear, with the right primary auditory cortex exhibiting a higher degree of nonlinearity than the left for the investigated noise durations. This study also assessed the spatial extent of activation induced by imaging acoustic noise, showing that the use of modeled responses (specific to imaging acoustic noise) as the reference waveform revealed additional activations in the auditory cortex not observed with a canonical gamma variate reference waveform, suggesting an improvement in detection sensitivity for imaging acoustic noise-induced activity. Longer duration (1.5s) imaging acoustic noise was observed to induce activity that expanded outwards from Heschl’s gyrus to cover the superior temporal gyrus as well as parts of the middle temporal gyrus and insula, potentially affecting higher level acoustic processing. PMID:19948232

  10. Computer program for analysis of hemodynamic response to head-up tilt test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świątek, Eliza; Cybulski, Gerard; Koźluk, Edward; Piątkowska, Agnieszka; Niewiadomski, Wiktor

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to create a computer program, written in the MATLAB environment, which enables the visualization and analysis of hemodynamic parameters recorded during a passive tilt test using the CNS Task Force Monitor System. The application was created to help in the assessment of the relationship between the values and dynamics of changes of the selected parameters and the risk of orthostatic syncope. The signal analysis included: R-R intervals (RRI), heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (sBP), diastolic blood pressure (dBP), mean blood pressure (mBP), stroke volume (SV), stroke index (SI), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), total peripheral resistance (TPR), total peripheral resistance index (TPRI), ventricular ejection time (LVET) and thoracic fluid content (TFC). The program enables the user to visualize waveforms for a selected parameter and to perform smoothing with selected moving average parameters. It allows one to construct the graph of means for any range, and the Poincare plot for a selected time range. The program automatically determines the average value of the parameter before tilt, its minimum and maximum value immediately after changing positions and the times of their occurrence. It is possible to correct the automatically detected points manually. For the RR interval, it determines the acceleration index (AI) and the brake index (BI). It is possible to save calculated values to an XLS with a name specified by user. The application has a user-friendly graphical interface and can run on a computer that has no MATLAB software.

  11. Hemodynamic Response of the Supplementary Motor Area during Locomotor Tasks with Upright versus Horizontal Postures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakajima, Katsumi; Hara, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    To understand cortical mechanisms related to truncal posture control during human locomotion, we investigated hemodynamic responses in the supplementary motor area (SMA) with quadrupedal and bipedal gaits using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in 10 healthy adults. The subjects performed three locomotor tasks where the degree of postural instability varied biomechanically, namely, hand-knee quadrupedal crawling (HKQuad task), upright quadrupedalism using bilateral Lofstrand crutches (UpQuad task), and typical upright bipedalism (UpBi task), on a treadmill. We measured the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) during the tasks. The oxy-Hb significantly decreased in the SMA during the HKQuad task, whereas it increased during the UpQuad task. No significant responses were observed during the UpBi task. Based on the degree of oxy-Hb responses, we ranked these locomotor tasks as UpQuad > UpBi > HKQuad. The order of the different tasks did not correspond with postural instability of the tasks. However, qualitative inspection of oxy-Hb time courses showed that oxy-Hb waveform patterns differed between upright posture tasks (peak-plateau-trough pattern for the UpQuad and UpBi tasks) and horizontal posture task (downhill pattern for the HKQuad task). Thus, the SMA may contribute to the control of truncal posture accompanying locomotor movements in humans. PMID:27413555

  12. Influence of endurance and resistance exercise order on the postexercise hemodynamic responses in hypertensive women.

    PubMed

    Menêses, Annelise Lins; Forjaz, Cláudia Lúcia de Moraes; de Lima, Paulo Fernando Marinho; Batista, Rafael Marinho Falcão; Monteiro, Maria de Fátima; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes

    2015-03-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of the order of endurance and resistance exercises on postexercise blood pressure (BP) and hemodynamics in hypertensive women. Nineteen hypertensive women underwent 3 sessions: control (50 minutes rest), endurance (50-60% of heart rate reserve) followed by resistance exercise (50% of 1 repetition maximum) (E + R), and resistance followed by endurance exercise (R + E). Before and 30 minutes after each session, BP, peripheral vascular resistance, cardiac output, stroke volume, and heart rate were measured. Postexercise increases in systolic (E + R: +1 ± 3 mm Hg and R + E: +3 ± 3 mm Hg), diastolic (E + R: +3 ± 1 mm Hg and R + E: +3 ± 2 mm Hg), and mean BP (E + R: +3 ± 1 mm Hg and R + E: +3 ± 2 mm Hg) were significantly lower after the exercise sessions compared with the control session (p ≤ 0.05). The exercise sessions abolished the increases in peripheral vascular resistance (E + R: +0.00 ± 0.04 mm Hg·min·L and R + E: +0.05 ± 0.05 mm Hg·min·L) and the decreases in cardiac output (E + R: +0.04 ± 0.28 L·min and R + E: -0.26 ± 0.28 L·min) observed after the control session (p ≤ 0.05). After the exercise sessions, stroke volume decreased (E + R: -14 ± 3 ml and R + E: -9 ± 4 ml) and heart rate increased (E + R: +5 ± 1 b·min and R + E: +4 ± 1 b·min) in comparison with the control session (p ≤ 0.05). For all the variables, there were no significant differences between the exercise sessions. Regardless of the order of endurance and resistance exercises, combined exercise sessions abolished increases in BP observed in a control condition due to a reduction in peripheral vascular resistance and increases in cardiac output. Thus, combined exercises should be prescribed to individuals with hypertension to control their BP, regardless of the order they are accomplished.

  13. [Echocardiography in acute pulmonary embolism. Not a routine method but useful in the diagnosis of simultaneous hemodynamic disorders].

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1998-08-19

    Echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism as illustrated by three case reports is discussed in the article. Acute pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by demonstration of right heart strain in one case, of long vermiform thrombi floating in the right atrium in another, and in the third case by demonstration of a long thrombus lodged in the foramen ovale, astride the atrial septum, and with its ends floating in either atrium. Thus, as echocardiography enables pulmonary embolism to be diagnosed by demonstration either of right heart strain or of intracardial thrombi, it is a useful diagnostic tool in cases of haemodynamic compromise, though it does not detect minor pulmonary embolism.

  14. Orthostatic haemodynamic responses in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, B; Reid, J; Fotherby, M; Crome, P

    1999-01-01

    Little is known about orthostatic blood pressure regulation in acute stroke. We determined postural haemodynamic responses in 40 patients with acute stroke (mild or moderate severity) and 40 non-stroke control in-patients, at two days (`Day 1') and one week (`Week 1') post-admission. Following a 10-minute supine rest and baseline readings, subjects sat up and blood pressure and heart rate were taken for 5 minutes. The procedure was repeated with subjects moving from supine to the standing posture. Haemodynamic changes from supine data were analysed. On standing up, the control group had a transient significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure on Day 1 but not Week 1. No significant changes were seen on either day when sitting up. In contrast to controls, the stroke group showed increases in mean arterial blood pressure on moving from supine to the sitting and standing positions on both days. Persistent postural hypotension defined as ⩾20 mmHg systolic fall occurred in <10% of either of the study groups on both days. Sitting and standing heart rates in both groups were significantly faster than supine heart rate on both days. The orthostatic blood pressure elevation is consistent with sympathetic nervous system overactivity which has been reported in acute stroke. Upright positioning as part of early rehabilitation and mobilisation following mild-to-moderate stroke would, therefore, not predispose to detrimental postural reductions in blood pressure.


Keywords: stroke; orthostatic hypotension; hypotension PMID:10715760

  15. Comparing hemodynamic and glycemic response to local anesthesia with epinephrine and without epinephrine in patients undergoing tooth extractions

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Paramjot; Bahl, Rashi; Kaura, Sameer; Bansal, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Lignocaine with epinephrine as local anesthetic (LA) provides hemostasis and decreases the risk of systemic toxicity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the response of lignocaine with and without epinephrine to evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic response in normotensive and type II controlled diabetic patients. Material and Methods: A total of 50 patients (25 healthy and 25 controlled type II diabetics) undergoing multiple tooth extractions (age group of 20–80 years) were included in this prospective, randomised, clinical study. On their first visit, the patients were given 2% lignocaine HCl with 1:200,000 epinephrine, and 2% lignocaine HCl was given on the second visit, to carry out tooth extractions. Blood pressure (BP), pulse rate, oxygen saturation, and blood glucose estimations were done at definite intervals (before, immediately after, and 20 min after the administration of LA) on both the visits. Results: The increase in blood glucose concentration following the administration of 2% lignocaine HCl with 1:200,000 epinephrine was statistically significant (P < 0.05) in controlled diabetic patients. Statistically significant variability in diastolic BP (DBP) was also noted in controlled diabetic patients. Both systolic BP and DBPs were statistically significantly elevated after the administration of 2% lignocaine HCl. Conclusion: 2% lignocaine HCl with 1:200,000 epinephrine in type II diabetics and 2% lignocaine HCl should be used with caution in normotensive as well as type II controlled diabetic patients. PMID:28356688

  16. Developmental Changes in Hemodynamic Responses and Cardiovagal Modulation during Isometric Handgrip Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Goulopoulou, Styliani; Fernhall, Bo; Kanaley, Jill A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in pressor response and cardiovagal modulation during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG) between children and adults. Beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure were measured in 23 prepubertal children and 23 adults at baseline and during IHG. Cardiovagal modulation was quantified by analysis of HR variability. Mean arterial pressure responses to IHG were greater in adults compared to children (P < .05) whereas there were no group differences in HR responses (P > .05). Children had a greater reduction in cardiovagal modulation in response to IHG compared to adults (P < .05). Changes in mean arterial pressure during IHG were correlated with baseline cardiovagal modulation and force produced during isometric contraction (P < .05). In conclusion, differences in pressor reflex response between children and adults cannot be solely explained by differences in autonomic modulation and appear to be associated with factors contributing to the force produced during isometric contraction. PMID:20862202

  17. Comparing Clonidine and Lidocaine on Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation in Controlled Hypertensive Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltani Mohammadi, Sussan; Maziar, Alireza; Saliminia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemodynamic fluctuations in response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation and their potential hazards have been well-recognized, especially in hypertensive patients. Many drugs in various combinations have been used to attenuate these adverse responses. Objectives: We conducted a study to compare lidocaine with clonidine on the attenuation of hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, in controlled hypertensive patients undergoing general anesthesia. Patients and Methods: Eighty-six patients of American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class II, who were aged 18 to 65-years-old and were scheduled for elective surgeries under general anesthesia, were included. The patients were randomly divided into two equal groups. The clonidine group received 0.2 mg oral clonidine 90 minutes before surgery and the lidocaine group received a placebo tablet at the same time. All patients in both groups were anesthetized with the same technique, including: intravenous fentanyl 3 mcg/kg, sodium thiopental 5 mg/kg, and atracurium 0.5 mg/kg. The lidocaine group received 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine but the clonidine group received the same volume of saline ninety seconds before intubation. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded before intubation and 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after endotracheal intubation. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups’ hemodynamic parameters, including heart rate and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures at the measured points. There were also no significant differences within each group in hemodynamic responses at the measured points (P > 0.05). Twenty patients in the clonidine and three patients in the lidocaine group complained of mouth dryness (P = 0.001). Fourteen patients in the clonidine and four patients in the lidocaine group had bradycardia (P = 0.008). Nineteen patients in the clonidine and six patients in the lidocaine group had orthostatic hypotension (P = 0

  18. Eccentric Exercise: Physiological Characteristics and Acute Responses.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jamie; Pearson, Simon; Ross, Angus; McGuigan, Mike

    2017-04-01

    An eccentric contraction involves the active lengthening of muscle under an external load. The molecular and neural mechanisms underpinning eccentric contractions differ from those of concentric and isometric contractions and remain less understood. A number of molecular theories have been put forth to explain the unexplained observations during eccentric contractions that deviate from the predictions of the established theories of muscle contraction. Postulated mechanisms include a strain-induced modulation of actin-myosin interactions at the level of the cross-bridge, the activation of the structural protein titin, and the winding of titin on actin. Accordingly, neural strategies controlling eccentric contractions also differ with a greater, and possibly distinct, cortical activation observed despite an apparently lower activation at the level of the motor unit. The characteristics of eccentric contractions are associated with several acute physiological responses to eccentrically-emphasised exercise. Differences in neuromuscular, metabolic, hormonal and anabolic signalling responses during, and following, an eccentric exercise bout have frequently been observed in comparison to concentric exercise. Subsequently, the high levels of muscular strain with such exercise can induce muscle damage which is rarely observed with other contraction types. The net result of these eccentric contraction characteristics and responses appears to be a novel adaptive signal within the neuromuscular system.

  19. Inter-Subject Correlation of Brain Hemodynamic Responses During Watching a Movie: Localization in Space and Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Sams, Mikko; Tohka, Jussi

    2009-01-01

    Cinema is a promising naturalistic stimulus that enables, for instance, elicitation of robust emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Inter-subject correlation (ISC) has been used as a model-free analysis method to map the highly complex hemodynamic responses that are evoked during watching a movie. Here, we extended the ISC analysis to frequency domain using wavelet analysis combined with non-parametric permutation methods for making voxel-wise statistical inferences about frequency-band specific ISC. We applied these novel analysis methods to a dataset collected in our previous study where 12 subjects watched an emotionally engaging movie “Crash” during fMRI scanning. Our results suggest that several regions within the frontal and temporal lobes show ISC predominantly at low frequency bands, whereas visual cortical areas exhibit ISC also at higher frequencies. It is possible that these findings relate to recent observations of a cortical hierarchy of temporal receptive windows, or that the types of events processed in temporal and prefrontal cortical areas (e.g., social interactions) occur over longer time periods than the stimulus features processed in the visual areas. Software tools to perform frequency-specific ISC analysis, together with a visualization application, are available as open source Matlab code. PMID:20428497

  20. Optimizing the general linear model for functional near-infrared spectroscopy: an adaptive hemodynamic response function approach

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Minako; Dan, Ippeita; Sano, Toshifumi; Dan, Haruka; Watanabe, Eiju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies utilize a general linear model (GLM) approach, which serves as a standard statistical method for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analysis. While fMRI solely measures the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal, fNIRS measures the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxy-hemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) signals at a temporal resolution severalfold higher. This suggests the necessity of adjusting the temporal parameters of a GLM for fNIRS signals. Thus, we devised a GLM-based method utilizing an adaptive hemodynamic response function (HRF). We sought the optimum temporal parameters to best explain the observed time series data during verbal fluency and naming tasks. The peak delay of the HRF was systematically changed to achieve the best-fit model for the observed oxy- and deoxy-Hb time series data. The optimized peak delay showed different values for each Hb signal and task. When the optimized peak delays were adopted, the deoxy-Hb data yielded comparable activations with similar statistical power and spatial patterns to oxy-Hb data. The adaptive HRF method could suitably explain the behaviors of both Hb parameters during tasks with the different cognitive loads during a time course, and thus would serve as an objective method to fully utilize the temporal structures of all fNIRS data. PMID:26157973

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury Creates Biphasic Systemic Hemodynamic and Organ Blood Flow Responses in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    injury. Fluid percussion brain injury produced an immediate systemic hypertension followed by a hypotension and low cardiac output. Organ blood flows...37.5°C using a heating pad. The right femoral artery was cannulated for blood pressure monitoring using a quartz transducer (Hewlett Packard) and an...Since the hypertensive responses were usually maximal at 30 sec after injury, the mean arterial pressure and heart rate at 30 sec after sham injury

  2. A Two-Part Approach to Examine the Effects of Theacrine (TeaCrine®) Supplementation on Oxygen Consumption, Hemodynamic Responses, and Subjective Measures of Cognitive and Psychometric Parameters.

    PubMed

    Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Habowski, Scott M; Sandrock, Jennifer E; Kedia, A William; Kerksick, Chad M; Lopez, Hector L

    2016-05-10

    Theacrine (1,3,7,9-tetramethyluric acid) is a naturally occurring purine alkaloid, present in Camellia assamica variety kucha tea. Using a two-part approach in humans, the impact of theacrine (TeaCrine®, TC) was used to examine subjective dose-response, daily changes in cognitive and psychometric parameters, and changes in gas exchange and vital signs. All indicators were chosen to better ascertain the previously reported animal and human outcomes involving theacrine administration. Part 1 was a randomized, open-label, dose-response investigation in nine healthy participants whereby three participants ingested 400 mg TC per day and six participants ingested 200 mg/day. Participants recorded subjective changes in cognitive, psychometric, and exercise attributes using 150-mm anchored visual analog scale (VAS) before, and 1, 4, and 6 hours after ingestion every day for 7 consecutive days. Part 2 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover investigation in 15 healthy subjects in which all participants ingested a single 200 mg dose of TC or Placebo (PLA). Anchored VAS questionnaires were used to detect subjective changes in various aspects of physical and mental energy along with changes in gas exchange and hemodynamic parameters before, and 1, 2, and 3 hours after acute ingestion. Energy, focus, and concentration increased from baseline values in both doses with no dose-response effect. VAS responses in the 200 mg for willingness to exercise, anxiety, motivation to train and libido increased across the measurement period while no such change was seen with the 400 mg dose. After consuming a single 200 mg dose, significant group × time interaction effects were seen for energy, fatigue, and concentration. No changes in resting heart rate, gas exchange, systemic hemodynamics or side effect profiles were noted.

  3. Acute amygdaloid response to systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Engler, Harald; Doenlen, Raphael; Engler, Andrea; Riether, Carsten; Prager, Geraldine; Niemi, Maj-Britt; Pacheco-López, Gustavo; Krügel, Ute; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2011-10-01

    The amygdala, a group of nuclei located in the medial temporal lobe, is a key limbic structure involved in mood regulation, associative learning, and modulation of cognitive functions. Functional neuroanatomical studies suggest that this brain region plays also an important role in the central integration of afferent signals from the peripheral immune system. In the present study, intracerebral electroencephalography and microdialysis were employed to investigate the electrophysiological and neurochemical consequences of systemic immune activation in the amygdala of freely moving rats. Intraperitoneal administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (100 μg/kg) induced with a latency of about 2 h a significant increase in amygdaloid neuronal activity and a substantial rise in extracellular noradrenaline levels. Activated neurons in the amygdaloid complex, identified by c-Fos immunohistochemistry, were mainly located in the central nucleus and, to a lesser extent, in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala. Gene expression analysis in micropunches of the amygdala revealed that endotoxin administration induced a strong time-dependent increase in IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNA levels indicating that these cytokines are de novo synthesized in the amygdala in response to peripheral immune activation. The changes in amygdaloid activity were timely related to an increase in anxiety-like behavior and decreased locomotor activity and exploration in the open-field. Taken together, these data give novel insights into different features of the acute amygdaloid response during experimental inflammation and provides further evidence that the amygdala integrates immune-derived information to coordinate behavioral and autonomic responses.

  4. Hemodynamic responses in human multisensory and auditory association cortex to purely visual stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Martin; Baumann, Simon; Marchina, Sarah; Jancke, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent findings of a tight coupling between visual and auditory association cortices during multisensory perception in monkeys and humans raise the question whether consistent paired presentation of simple visual and auditory stimuli prompts conditioned responses in unimodal auditory regions or multimodal association cortex once visual stimuli are presented in isolation in a post-conditioning run. To address this issue fifteen healthy participants partook in a "silent" sparse temporal event-related fMRI study. In the first (visual control) habituation phase they were presented with briefly red flashing visual stimuli. In the second (auditory control) habituation phase they heard brief telephone ringing. In the third (conditioning) phase we coincidently presented the visual stimulus (CS) paired with the auditory stimulus (UCS). In the fourth phase participants either viewed flashes paired with the auditory stimulus (maintenance, CS-) or viewed the visual stimulus in isolation (extinction, CS+) according to a 5:10 partial reinforcement schedule. The participants had no other task than attending to the stimuli and indicating the end of each trial by pressing a button. Results During unpaired visual presentations (preceding and following the paired presentation) we observed significant brain responses beyond primary visual cortex in the bilateral posterior auditory association cortex (planum temporale, planum parietale) and in the right superior temporal sulcus whereas the primary auditory regions were not involved. By contrast, the activity in auditory core regions was markedly larger when participants were presented with auditory stimuli. Conclusion These results demonstrate involvement of multisensory and auditory association areas in perception of unimodal visual stimulation which may reflect the instantaneous forming of multisensory associations and cannot be attributed to sensation of an auditory event. More importantly, we are able to show that brain

  5. Frontal Hemodynamic Responses to High Frequency Yoga Breathing in Schizophrenia: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhargav, Hemant; Nagendra, H. R.; Gangadhar, B. N.; Nagarathna, Raghuram

    2014-01-01

    Frontal hemodynamic responses to high frequency yoga breathing technique, Kapalabhati (KB), were compared between patients of schizophrenia (n = 18; 14 males, 4 females) and age, gender, and education matched healthy subjects (n = 18; 14 males, 4 females) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy. The diagnosis was confirmed by a psychiatrist using DSM-IV. All patients except one received atypical antipsychotics (one was on typical). They had obtained a stabilized state as evidenced by a steady unchanged medication from their psychiatrist for the past 3 months or longer. They learned KB, among other yoga procedures, in a yoga retreat. KB was practiced at the rate of 120 times/min for 1 min. Healthy subjects who were freshly learning yoga too were taught KB. Both the groups had no previous exposure to KB practice and the training was carried out over 2 weeks. A chest pressure transducer was used to monitor the frequency and intensity of the practice objectively. The frontal hemodynamic response in terms of the oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb), deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb), and total hemoglobin (totalHb) or blood volume concentration was tapped for 5 min before, 1 min during, and for 5 min after KB. This was obtained in a quiet room using a 16-channel functional near-infrared system (FNIR100-ACK-W, BIOPAC Systems, Inc., USA). The average of the eight channels for each side (right and left frontals) was obtained for the three sessions. The changes in the levels of oxyHb, deoxyHb, and blood volume for the three sessions were compared between the two groups using independent samples t-test. Within group comparison showed that the increase in bilateral oxyHb and totalHb from the baseline was highly significant in healthy controls during KB (right oxyHb, p = 0.00; left oxyHb, p = 0.00 and right totalHb, p = 0.01; left totalHb, p = 0.00), whereas schizophrenia patients did not show any significant changes in the same on both the

  6. Endothelial Msx1 transduces hemodynamic changes into an arteriogenic remodeling response

    PubMed Central

    Vandersmissen, Ine; Craps, Sander; Depypere, Maarten; Coppiello, Giulia; van Gastel, Nick; Maes, Frederik; Carmeliet, Geert; Schrooten, Jan; Jones, Elizabeth A.V.; Umans, Lieve; Devlieger, Roland; Koole, Michel; Gheysens, Olivier; Zwijsen, An; Aranguren, Xabier L.

    2015-01-01

    Collateral remodeling is critical for blood flow restoration in peripheral arterial disease and is triggered by increasing fluid shear stress in preexisting collateral arteries. So far, no arterial-specific mediators of this mechanotransduction response have been identified. We show that muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1) acts exclusively in collateral arterial endothelium to transduce the extrinsic shear stimulus into an arteriogenic remodeling response. MSX1 was specifically up-regulated in remodeling collateral arteries. MSX1 induction in collateral endothelial cells (ECs) was shear stress driven and downstream of canonical bone morphogenetic protein–SMAD signaling. Flow recovery and collateral remodeling were significantly blunted in EC-specific Msx1/2 knockout mice. Mechanistically, MSX1 linked the arterial shear stimulus to arteriogenic remodeling by activating the endothelial but not medial layer to a proinflammatory state because EC but not smooth muscle cellMsx1/2 knockout mice had reduced leukocyte recruitment to remodeling collateral arteries. This reduced leukocyte infiltration in EC Msx1/2 knockout mice originated from decreased levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1)/vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), whose expression was also in vitro driven by promoter binding of MSX1. PMID:26391659

  7. Frontal Lobe Hemodynamic Responses to Painful Stimulation: A Potential Brain Marker of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Sarah C.; Peng, Ke; Boas, David A.; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to examine patterns of both activation and deactivation that occur in the frontal lobe in response to noxious stimuli. The frontal lobe was selected because it has been shown to be activated by noxious stimuli in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. The brain region is located behind the forehead which is devoid of hair, providing a relative ease of placement for fNIRS probes on this area of the head. Based on functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showing blood-oxygenation-level dependent changes in the frontal lobes, we evaluated functional near-infrared spectroscopy measures in response to two levels of electrical pain in awake, healthy human subjects (n = 10; male = 10). Each subject underwent two recording sessions separated by a 30-minute resting period. Data collected from 7 subjects were analyzed, containing a total of 38/36 low/high intensity pain stimuli for the first recording session and 27/31 pain stimuli for the second session. Our results show that there is a robust and significant deactivation in sections of the frontal cortices. Further development and definition of the specificity and sensitivity of the approach may provide an objective measure of nociceptive activity in the brain that can be easily applied in the surgical setting. PMID:27806119

  8. A model of hemodynamic responses of rat tumors to hyperoxic gas challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Mengna; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    We measured the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration (Δ[Hb]) in rat breast 13762NF tumors with respect to oxygen or carbogen inhalation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The changes in tumor blood flow can be estimated from the NIRS data provided with certain model assumptions. In the theoretical approach, we modified the Windkessel model so as to associate the mathematical model with such physiological parameters of tumor vasculature as total hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]), tumor blood flow (TBF), and tumor metabolic rate of oxygen (TMRO2). The computational results show that hyperoxic gas administration to the rat tumors always gave rise to improvement of tumor Δ[HbO2], while the same hyperoxic gas intervention could result in different responses in tumor [HbT], TBF, and TMRO2. This preliminary study has demonstrated that NIRS, a noninvasive tool to monitor tumor oxygenation, may also be used to estimate tumor perfusion and oxygen consumption rate in response to therapeutic interventions, if a suitable mathematical model is provided.

  9. Effects of forearm bier block with bretylium on the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to handgrip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F.; Shoemaker, J. K.; McQuillan, P. M.; Kunselman, A. R.; Smith, M. B.; Yang, Q. X.; Smith, H.; Gray, K.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a reduction in sympathetic tone to exercising forearm muscle would increase blood flow, reduce muscle acidosis, and attenuate reflex responses. Subjects performed a progressive, four-stage rhythmic handgrip protocol before and after forearm bier block with bretylium as forearm blood flow (Doppler) and metabolic (venous effluent metabolite concentration and (31)P-NMR indexes) and autonomic reflex responses (heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathetic nerve traffic) were measured. Bretylium inhibits the release of norepinephrine at the neurovascular junction. Bier block increased blood flow as well as oxygen consumption in the exercising forearm (P < 0.03 and P < 0.02, respectively). However, despite this increase in flow, venous K(+) release and H(+) release were both increased during exercise (P < 0.002 for both indexes). Additionally, minimal muscle pH measured during the first minute of recovery with NMR was lower after bier block (6.41 +/- 0.08 vs. 6.20 +/- 0.06; P < 0.036, simple effects). Meanwhile, reflex effects were unaffected by the bretylium bier block. The results support the conclusion that sympathetic stimulation to muscle during exercise not only limits muscle blood flow but also appears to limit anaerobiosis and H(+) release, presumably through a preferential recruitment of oxidative fibers.

  10. Type-specific orthostatic hemodynamic response of hypertensive diseases in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Staelens, Anneleen S; Vonck, Sharona; Mesens, Tinne; Tomsin, Kathleen; Molenberghs, Geert; Gyselaers, Wilfried

    2015-10-01

    Posture changes may differ between types of hypertensive disease. The aim is to evaluate the orthostatic response of impedance cardiography (ICG) measurements in uncomplicated and hypertensive pregnancies. Measurements were performed in supine and standing position in 202 women: 41 uncomplicated pregnancies (UP), 59 gestational hypertension (GH), 35 early-onset (EPE, < 34 weeks) and 67 late-onset (LPE, ≥ 34 weeks) preeclampsia were assessed. Measurements were recorded of heart rate, blood pressure, aortic flow parameters, cardiac output, pre-ejection period and left ventricular ejection time. Overall, orthostatic shifts were different between all groups (P < 0.001). UP was different from the hypertensive complicated gestations in the orthostatic change of the aortic acceleration. In contrast to patients with preeclampsia, those with GH had an increased blood pressure and Heather index, and stable pre-ejection period after posture change. EPE differed from LPE by change in blood pressure and aortic flow parameters. In addition to static ICG-measurements, orthostatic shifts improved group characterization from 57.4% to 65.8%. The orthostatic response is altered in hypertensive pregnancies. ICG measurements in the upright as well as during an orthostatic test might have the potential to improve the discriminative yield between hypertensive diseases in pregnancy.

  11. Differences in Brain Hemodynamics in Response to Achromatic and Chromatic Cards of the Rorschach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In order to investigate the effects of color stimuli of the Rorschach inkblot method (RIM), the cerebral activity of 40 participants with no history of neurological or psychiatric illness was scanned while they engaged in the Rorschach task. A scanned image of the ten RIM inkblots was projected onto a screen in the MRI scanner. Cerebral activation in response to five achromatic color cards and five chromatic cards were compared. As a result, a significant increase in brain activity was observed in bilateral visual areas V2 and V3, parietooccipital junctions, pulvinars, right superior temporal gyrus, and left premotor cortex for achromatic color cards (p < .001). For the cards with chromatic color, significant increase in brain activity was observed in left visual area V4 and left orbitofrontal cortex (p < .001). Furthermore, a conjoint analysis revealed various regions were activated in responding to the RIM. The neuropsychological underpinnings of the response process, as described by Acklin and Wu-Holt (1996), were largely confirmed. PMID:28239255

  12. Lagrangian postprocessing of computational hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Arzani, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging, modeling and computing have rapidly expanded our capabilities to model hemodynamics in the large vessels (heart, arteries and veins). This data encodes a wealth of information that is often under-utilized. Modeling (and measuring) blood flow in the large vessels typically amounts to solving for the time-varying velocity field in a region of interest. Flow in the heart and larger arteries is often complex, and velocity field data provides a starting point for investigating the hemodynamics. This data can be used to perform Lagrangian particle tracking, and other Lagrangian-based postprocessing. As described herein, Lagrangian methods are necessary to understand inherently transient hemodynamic conditions from the fluid mechanics perspective, and to properly understand the biomechanical factors that lead to acute and gradual changes of vascular function and health. The goal of the present paper is to review Lagrangian methods that have been used in post-processing velocity data of cardiovascular flows. PMID:25059889

  13. Intravenous lipid emulsion alters the hemodynamic response to epinephrine in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Carreiro, Stephanie; Blum, Jared; Jay, Gregory; Hack, Jason B

    2013-09-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) is an adjunctive antidote used in selected critically ill poisoned patients. These patients may also require administration of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) drugs. Limited data is available to describe interactions of ILE with standard ACLS drugs, specifically epinephrine. Twenty rats with intra-arterial and intravenous access were sedated with isoflurane and split into ILE or normal saline (NS) pretreatment groups. All received epinephrine 15 μm/kg intravenously (IV). Continuous mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored until both indices returned to baseline. Standardized t tests were used to compare peak MAP, time to peak MAP, maximum change in HR, time to maximum change in HR, and time to return to baseline MAP/HR. There was a significant difference (p = 0.023) in time to peak MAP in the ILE group (54 s, 95 % CI 44-64) versus the NS group (40 s, 95 % CI 32-48) and a significant difference (p = 0.004) in time to return to baseline MAP in ILE group (171 s, 95 % CI 148-194) versus NS group (130 s, 95 % CI 113-147). There were no significant differences in the peak change in MAP, peak change in HR, time to minimum HR, or time to return to baseline HR between groups. ILE-pretreated rats had a significant difference in MAP response to epinephrine; ILE delayed the peak effect and prolonged the duration of effect of epinephrine on MAP, but did not alter the peak increase in MAP or the HR response.

  14. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2013-09-15

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay.

  15. Neonatal hemodynamic response to visual cortex activity: high-density near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Steve M.; Gregg, Nick M.; White, Brian R.; Zeff, Benjamin W.; Bjerkaas, Katelin A.; Inder, Terrie E.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2010-03-01

    The neurodevelopmental outcome of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants is a major clinical concern with many infants displaying neurobehavioral deficits in childhood. Functional neuroimaging may provide early recognition of neural deficits in high-risk infants. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has the advantage of providing functional neuroimaging in infants at the bedside. However, limitations in traditional NIRS have included contamination from superficial vascular dynamics in the scalp. Furthermore, controversy exists over the nature of normal vascular, responses in infants. To address these issues, we extend the use of novel high-density NIRS arrays with multiple source-detector distances and a superficial signal regression technique to infants. Evaluations of healthy term-born infants within the first three days of life are performed without sedation using a visual stimulus. We find that the regression technique significantly improves brain activation signal quality. Furthermore, in six out of eight infants, both oxy- and total hemoglobin increases while deoxyhemoglobin decreases, suggesting that, at term, the neurovascular coupling in the visual cortex is similar to that found in healthy adults. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using high-density NIRS arrays in infants to improve signal quality through superficial signal regression, and provide a foundation for further development of high-density NIRS as a clinical tool.

  16. Hemodynamic response and oxygen transport in pigs resuscitated with maleimide-polyethylene glycol-modified hemoglobin (MP4).

    PubMed

    Drobin, Dan; Kjellstrom, B Thomas; Malm, Elisabeth; Malavalli, Ashok; Lohman, Jeff; Vandegriff, Kim D; Young, Mark A; Winslow, Robert M

    2004-05-01

    Cell-free Hb increases systemic and pulmonary pressure and resistance and reduces cardiac output and heart rate in animals and humans, effects that have limited their clinical development as "blood substitutes." The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamic response to infusion of several formulations of a new polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified human Hb [maleimide PEG Hb (MalPEGHb)] in swine, an animal known to be sensitive to Hb-induced vasoconstriction. Anesthetized animals underwent controlled hemorrhage (50% of blood volume), followed by resuscitation (70% of shed volume) with 10% pentastarch (PS), 4% MalPEG-Hb in lactated Ringer (MP4), 4% MalPEG-Hb in pentastarch (HS4), 2% MalPEG-Hb in pentastarch (HS2), or 4% stroma-free Hb in lactated Ringer solution (SFH). Compared with baseline, restoration of blood volume after resuscitation was similar and not significantly different for the PS (103%), HS2 (99%), HS4 (106%), and MP4 (87%) animals but significantly less for the SFH animals (66%) (P < 0.05). All solutions that contained MalPEG-Hb restored mean arterial and pulmonary pressure and cardiac output. Systemic vascular resistance was unchanged, and pulmonary arterial pressure and resistance were increased slightly. Both systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance increased significantly in animals that received SFH, despite less adequate blood volume restoration. Oxygen consumption was maintained in all animals that received MalPEG-Hb, but not PS. Base excess improved only with MalPEG-Hb and PS, but not SFH. Red blood cell O2 extraction was significantly increased in animals that received Hb, regardless of formulation. These data demonstrate resuscitation with MalPEG-human Hb without increasing systemic vascular resistance and support our previous observations in animals suggesting that the efficacy of low concentrations of PEG-Hb in the plasma results from reduced vasoconstriction.

  17. Comparison of i-gel™ and laryngeal mask airway Classic™ in terms of ease of insertion and hemodynamic response: A randomized observational study

    PubMed Central

    Pratheeba, N.; Ramya, G. S.; Ranjan, R. V.; Remadevi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) Classic™ has an inflatable cuff while i-gel™ has a noninflatable cuff made of thermoplastic elastomer. Aims: To compare ease of insertion, number, and duration of insertion attempts among the two device. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the hemodynamic response and SpO2 during device insertion and during maintenance of general anesthesia. Settings and Design: This study was conducted as randomized observational study in a teaching hospital. Subjects and Methods: One hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II, patients posted for surgery under general anesthesia were divided in two groups of fifty each. LMA Classic™ and i-gel™. Ease of insertion, duration of insertion, hemodynamic data, and episodes of hypoxia during insertion, 1, 3 and 5 min for 30 min, during removal and 1 min after removal. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analyses were expressed as a mean ± standard deviation. Independent t-test used for parametric data, Chi-square test for nonparametric data and hemodynamic data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA to find statistical difference within the groups. Results: Devices were easy to insert, the mean duration of insertion attempts was 15.92 ± 1.62 s in the i-gel™ group, while it was 26.06 ± 5.12 s in the LMA Classic™ group, was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Successful and shorter duration of insertion, with less hemodynamic response makes i-gel™ a suitable alternative to LMA Classic™ during general anesthesia. PMID:27746545

  18. Metabolic context affects hemodynamic response to bupivacaine in the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Lucas B; Ripper, Richard; Kelly, Kemba; Di Gregorio, Guido; Weinberg, Guy L

    2008-03-10

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the local anesthetic bupivacaine selectively inhibits oxidative metabolism of fatty acids in isolated cardiac mitochondria. In the present investigation, we compare the development of bupivacaine cardiotoxicity during fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. Hearts from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were excised and retrograde perfused with a solution containing fatty acid (oleate or octanoate) or carbohydrate substrates for cardiac metabolism. An infusion of bupivacaine was initiated and sustained until asystole, after which full cardiac recovery was allowed. During fatty acid metabolism, substantially lower bupivacaine doses induced both arrhythmia (60.4+/-11.5 microg oleate and 106.8+/-14.8 octanoate versus 153.4+/-21.4 carbohydrate; P<0.05) and asystole (121.0+/-30.1 microg and 171.5+/-20.2 versus 344.7+/-34.6; P<0.001). Dose-response analysis revealed significantly increased sensitivity to bupivacaine toxicity during fatty acid metabolism, indicated by lower V50 doses for both heart rate (70.6+/-5.6 microg oleate and 122.3+/-6.2 octanoate versus 152.6+/-8.6) and rate-pressure product (63.4+/-5.1 microg and 133.7+/-7.9 versus 165.1+/-12.2). Time to recovery following bupivacaine exposure was elevated in the fatty acid group (24.3+/-2.0 s versus 15.8+/-3.1; P<0.04). Fatty acid metabolism was shown to predispose the isolated heart to bupivacaine toxicity, confirming that the local anesthetic exerts specific effects on lipid processes in cardiomyocytes.

  19. Hemodynamic responses to psychological stress: Comparison of normotensive and hypertensive persons using an ambulatory ventricular function monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.Z.; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Newell, J.; McKusick, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1985-05-01

    The development of a portable device for measuring ventricular function allows assessment of hemodynamic responses under a wide range of circumstances. The authors compared the effects of standardized psychological stress (PS) on an index of left ventricular ejection fraction (EFI), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and plasma norepinephrine level (NE) in 6 normotensive (N, mean BP = 121/77 +- 12/8) and six hypertensive (H, mean BP = 137/95 +- 6/6) subjects. PS included 4 minutes of mental arithmetic and a 16 minute psychiatric interview. The interview focused on life stresses such as marital and family discord, job dissatisfaction, monetary insufficiency, health concerns, and bereavement. Changes in EFI, SBP, and NE (..delta.. EFI, ..delta.. SBP, ..delta.. NE) and in their log transformed variances (..delta.. log(var)) were compared to those occurring during a 20 minute period of standarized rest (R) which consisted on listening to relaxing music. Compared to R, all 12 subjects had a significant pressor response to PS (p less than or equal to .05, range = 6 to 29mmHg). There was an increase in mean EFI in 3 N (p less than or equal to .05, range = 0.5 to 2.7) and 3 H (p less than or equal to .05, range = 1.7 to 4.4) and a decrease in 1 N (p less than or equal to .05, -2.3) and 1 H (p less than or equal to .05, -2.3). Mean NE increased in 4 N (p less than or equal to .05, range 110 to 563 pg/ml) and 6 H (p less than or equal to .05, range = 136 to 525 pg/ml). The authors conclude that (1) in both N and H, PS induces significant responses in EFI which varies in direction despite near uniform increases in SBP and NE, and (2) hypertensive persons have a greater change in variability in EFI during PS than do normotensive persons despite equivalent changes in SBP and NE.

  20. Acute Effects of Resistance Exercise With Continuous and Intermittent Blood Flow Restriction on Hemodynamic Measurements and Perceived Exertion.

    PubMed

    Neto, Gabriel R; Novaes, Jefferson S; Salerno, Verônica P; Gonçalves, Michel M; Piazera, Bruna K L; Rodrigues-Rodrigues, Thais; Cirilo-Sousa, Maria S

    2016-11-11

    This study compared the acute effects of low-intensity resistance exercise (RE) sessions for the upper limb with continuous and intermittent blood flow restriction (BFR) and high-intensity RE with no BFR on lactate, heart rate, double product (DP; heart rate times systolic blood pressure), and perceived exertion (RPE). Ten recreationally trained men (1-5 years strength training; age mean = 19 ± 0.82 years) performed three experimental protocols in random order: (a) low-intensity RE at 20% one-repetition maximum (1RM) with intermittent BFR (LI + IBFR), (b) low-intensity RE at 20% 1RM with continuous BFR (LI + CBFR), and (c) high-intensity RE at 80% 1RM. The three RE protocols increased lactate and DP at the end of the session (p < .05) and increased heart rate at the end of each exercise (p < .05). However, greater local and general RPE was observed in the high-intensity protocol compared with LI + IBFR and LI + CBFR in the lat pull-down, triceps curl, and biceps curl exercises (p < .05). A greater percentage change in DP and lactate was observed for continuous BFR compared with intermittent BFR; however, RPE was lower for intermittent BFR. In conclusion, intermittent BFR appears to be an excellent option for physical training because it did not differ significantly from continuous BFR in any variable and promoted a lower percentage change in DP and RPE.

  1. Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, P.B.; Grieninger, G.; Tosato, G.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the conference entitled Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses: Interleukin-L. Topics covered include: Interferon-B{sub 2}/26kDa Protein, Regulation of acute phase liver gene expression, and Genetics and regulation of expression of IL-6.

  2. Simulation of hemodynamic responses to the valsalva maneuver: an integrative computational model of the cardiovascular system and the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2006-02-01

    The Valsalva maneuver is a frequently used physiological test in evaluating the cardiovascular autonomic functions in human. Although a large pool of experimental data has provided substantial insights into different aspects of the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular regulations during the Valsalva maneuver, so far a complete comprehension of these mechanisms and the interactions among them is unavailable. In the present study, a computational model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) and its interaction with the autonomic nervous system (ANS) was developed for the purpose of quantifying the individual roles of the CVS and the ANS in the hemodynamic regulations during the Valsalva maneuver. A detailed computational compartmental parameter model of the global CVS, a system of mathematical equations representing the autonomic nervous reflex regulatory functions, and an empirical cerebral autoregulation (CA) model formed the main body of the present model. Based on simulations of the Valsalva maneuvers at several typical postures, it was demonstrated that hemodynamic responses to the maneuver were not only determined by the ANS-mediated cardiovascular regulations, but also significantly affected by the postural-change-induced hemodynamic alterations preceding the maneuver. Moreover, the large-magnitude overshoot in cerebral perfusion immediately after the Valsalva maneuver was found to result from a combined effect of the circulatory autonomic functions, the CA, and the cerebral venous blood pressure.

  3. Hemodynamic Responses to Two Different Anesthesia Regimens in Compromised Left Ventricular Function Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: Etomidate-Midazolam Versus Propofol-Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Aghdaii, Nahid; Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Faritus, Seyedeh Zahra; Azarfarin, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various methods have been suggested to prevent hemodynamic instability caused by propofol and adverse effects caused by etomidate induction. The current study evaluated hemodynamic effects of propofol-ketamine mixture in comparison to etomidate-midazolam mixture during anesthesia induction. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamic effects of etomidate-midazolam by comparing it with propofol-ketamine for the induction of anesthesia in patients with left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Patients and Methods: One-hundred patients aged between 40 and 65 with coronary artery disease and low ejection fraction scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass surgery participated in this study. The patients were randomly allotted to one of the two groups to receive either propofol-ketamine or etomidate-midazolam combination. Two groups were compared for pain on injection and myoclonus, Heart Rate (HR), Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP), Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP), Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Cardiac Index (CI) and Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR), before and one minute after induction of anesthesia, and one, three and five minutes after intubation. Results: Incidence of pain on injection (2 - 4%) and myoclonus (10%) was less in both groups. The hemodynamic response was similar in the two groups for all variables over the time interval, except for CI at one and three minutes after intubation (P = 0.024 and P = 0.048, respectively), and SVR in five minutes after intubation (P = 0.009), with differences being statistically significant. Conclusions: Both anesthetic regimens were acceptable for induction in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:26161330

  4. Two-detector Corrected Near Infrared Spectroscopy (C-NIRS) detects hemodynamic activation responses more robustly than single-detector NIRS.

    PubMed

    Saager, Rolf B; Telleri, Nicole L; Berger, Andrew J

    2011-04-15

    In near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) of human cerebral hemodynamics, detection of stimulus-related responses is confounded by the presence of unrelated trends in both the brain and the overlying scalp. A proposed strategy for reducing hemodynamic noise has been to record "scalp only" trends simultaneously via a second shorter-separation detector (~5 mm rather than ~30 mm) and perform a subtraction (C-NIRS, for "corrected near-infrared spectroscopy"). To compare the single- and dual-detector strategies, a 21-volunteer study of visual stimulation responses (6 stimulation blocks and 8 recording channels per measurement run) has been conducted. Activation-flagged channels were defined based upon (a) the significance (p-value) of the average rise in oxyhemoglobin concentration and (b) the average signal-to-noise over 6 stimulation epochs. At reasonable thresholds (p<0.025, SNR>1), the C-NIRS method increased the number of activation-flagged channels from 47 to 66, an increase of 40%, adding 24 channels and eliminating only 5. Of the 71 channels that were activation-flagged by at least one modality, the C-NIRS time series exhibited more significant oxyhemoglobin rise in 80% of such channels, and better signal-to-noise in 73%. In addition, single-subject C-NIRS stimulus responses were more consistent than NIRS over the six stimulation epochs, with significantly lower coefficients of variation in both amplitude and latency (i.e. time between stimulus onset and maximum hemoglobin rise). These results demonstrate that two-detector C-NIRS provides a straightforward way of (a) removing hemodynamic interference from NIRS data, (b) increasing the detection rate of cerebrally-unique responses, and (c) improving the quality of those recorded responses. Parallel insights regarding deoxyhemoglobin trends could not be drawn from this data set but should be attainable in future studies with higher signal to noise ratios.

  5. Computational simulations of hemodynamic changes within thoracic, coronary, and cerebral arteries following early wall remodeling in response to distal aortic coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Jessica S.; Humphrey, Jay D.; Figueroa, C. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pulsatile character of blood pressure and flow within large arteries plays a particularly important role as a mechano-biological stimulus for wall growth and remodeling. Nevertheless, understanding better the highly coupled interactions between evolving wall geometry, structure, and properties and the hemodynamics will require significantly more experimental data. Computational fluid–solid-growth models promise to aid in the design and interpretation of such experiments and to identify candidate mechanobiological mechanisms for the observed arterial adaptations. Motivated by recent aortic coarctation models in animals, we used a computational fluid–solid interaction model to study possible local and systemic effects on the hemodynamics within the thoracic aorta and coronary, carotid, and cerebral arteries due to a distal aortic coarctation and subsequent spatial variations in wall adaptation. In particular, we studied an initial stage of acute cardiac compensation (i.e., maintenance of cardiac output) followed by early arterial wall remodeling (i.e., spatially varying wall thickening and stiffening). Results suggested, for example, that while coarctation increased both the mean and pulse pressure in the proximal vessels, the locations nearest to the coarctation experienced the greatest changes in pulse pressure. In addition, after introducing a spatially varying wall adaptation, pressure, left ventricular work, and wave speed all increased. Finally, vessel wall strain similarly experienced spatial variations consistent with the degree of vascular wall adaptation. PMID:22415052

  6. Randomized controlled study comparing the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation with McCoy, Macintosh, and C-MAC laryngoscopes in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Buhari, Faiza Sulaiman; Selvaraj, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Earlier studies have shown that the type of laryngoscope blade influences the degree of hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the hemodynamic response to oral endotracheal intubation with C-MAC laryngoscopy and McCoy laryngoscopy compared to that of Macintosh laryngoscopy in adult patients under general anesthesia. Material and Methods: This is a prospective randomized parallel group study. Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists I patients were randomly allotted into three groups. Group A – Macintosh laryngoscopy (control group). Group B – laryngoscopy with McCoy laryngoscope. Group C – laryngoscopy with C-MAC video laryngoscope. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were monitored at baseline (just before induction), just before intubation (T0), 1 min (T1), 3 min (T3), 5 min (T5), and 10 min (T10) after intubation. Intergroup comparison of study parameters was done by unpaired sample t-test for normal data and Mann-Whitney U-test for skewed data. For within-group comparison, the repeated measures of ANOVA for normal data and Friedman followed by Wilcoxon signed rank test for skewed data were performed. Results: In C-MAC group, the HR was significantly higher than the Macintosh group at 3 min after intubation, whereas SBP, DBP, and MAP were significantly higher at 1 min. McCoy group showed a similar response compared to Macintosh group at all time intervals. Conclusion: C-MAC video laryngoscope has a comparatively greater hemodynamic response than Macintosh laryngoscope. PMID:28096584

  7. Effects of Lignocaine Administered Intravenously or Intratracheally on Airway and Hemodynamic Responses during Emergence and Extubation in Patients Undergoing Elective Craniotomies in Supine Position

    PubMed Central

    Shabnum, Tabasum; Ali, Zulfiqar; Naqash, Imtiaz Ahmad; Mir, Aabid Hussain; Azhar, Khan; Zahoor, Syed Amer; Mir, Abdul Waheed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sympathoadrenergic responses during emergence and extubation can lead to an increase in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure whereas increased airway responses may lead to coughing and laryngospasm. The aim of our study was to compare the effects of lignocaine administered intravenously (IV) or intratracheally on airway and hemodynamic responses during emergence and extubation in patients undergoing elective craniotomies. Methodology: Sixty patients with physical status American Society of Anaesthesiologists Classes I and II aged 18–70 years, scheduled to undergo elective craniotomies were included. The patients were randomly divided into three groups of twenty patients; Group 1 receiving IV lignocaine and intratracheal placebo (IV group), Group 2 receiving intratracheal lignocaine and IV placebo (I/T group), and Group 3 receiving IV and intratracheal placebo (placebo group). The tolerance to the endotracheal tube was monitored, and number of episodes of cough was recorded during emergence and at the time of extubation. Hemodynamic parameters such as HR and blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure) were also recorded. Results: There was a decrease of HR in both IV and intratracheal groups in comparison with placebo group (P < 0.005). Rise in blood pressure (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure) was comparable in both Groups 1 and 2 but was lower in comparison with placebo group (P < 0.005). Cough suppression was comparable in all the three groups. Grade III cough (15%) was documented only in placebo group. Conclusion: Both IV and intratracheal lignocaine are effective in attenuation of hemodynamic response if given within 20 min from skull pin removal to extubation. There was comparable cough suppression through intratracheal route and IV routes than the placebo group. PMID:28298788

  8. Inhalation of diethylamine--acute nasal effects and subjective response

    SciTech Connect

    Lundqvist, G.R.; Yamagiwa, M.; Pedersen, O.F.; Nielsen, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    Adult volunteers were exposed to 25 ppm (75 mg/m3) diethylamine in a climate chamber for 15 min in order to study the acute nasal reactions to an exposure equivalent to the present threshold limit value-short-term exposure limit. Changes in nasal volume and nasal resistance were measured by acoustic rhinometry and by rhinomanometry. Acute change in nasal volume, usually seen as acute nasal mucosa response to thermal stimuli, was not observed, nor was an acute change in nasal airway resistance. In a subsequent experiment, the aim was to measure acute sensory effects. Exposure to a concentration increasing from 0 to 12 ppm took place for 60 min, equal to an average concentration of 10 ppm (30 mg/m3). A moderate to strong olfactory response and distinct nasal and eye irritation were observed. In spite of considerable individual variation, the results were in agreement with sensory effect estimates obtained from animal studies.

  9. [Hemodynamic adaptations in proximal cerebrovascular occlusion].

    PubMed

    De Ley, G

    1990-01-01

    In order to gain more insight into the pathophysiology of extracerebral cerebrovascular occlusion, the cerebral hemodynamic behaviour after uni- or bilateral carotid occlusion was investigated. In Wistar rats, acute occlusion of one common carotid artery leads to a moderate bilateral lowering of the resting hemispheric brain blood flow; no interhemispheric perfusion asymmetry is observed. During hypercapnia, however, a manyfold increase of the hemispheric blood flow is seen at the intact side, whereas blood flow increase at the side of the occlusion is suppressed indicating that the cerebrovascular reserve at the side of the occlusion is largely used to preserve resting hemispheric perfusion. During the days (1, 5, 15 and 30) following the occlusion, resting hemispheric blood flow is progressively restored rather rapidly (bilateral normalization on the fifth day) whereas restoration of the cerebrovascular reserve (hemispheric blood flow increase in hypercapnia) proceeds more slowly and a nearly normal hypercapnic response is reached on day thirty. Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) show structural abnormalities of their blood vessels during the development of hypertension, leading to impaired adaptation possibilities of the cerebral vasculature after unilateral common carotid occlusion. This is indicated by the striking comparability of the compensation of hemispheric cerebral blood flow (in normo- and hypercapnia) of SH rats five days after unilateral carotid occlusion with the cerebral hemodynamic status of normotensive animals already seen 24 hours after the same occlusion. Consecutive bilateral common carotid occlusion shows that survival rate increases by increasing the interval between both occlusions. This survival relation is much more unfavorable in SH rats. The parallelism between the restoration of the measured CO2-reactivity of the blood flow in the involved hemisphere after unilateral carotid occlusion and the evolution of survival rate after

  10. Electromyographic, cerebral, and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii at three submaximal intensities.

    PubMed

    Bhambhani, Yagesh; Fan, Jui-Lin; Place, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Kayser, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the electromyographic, cerebral and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent isometric contractions of biceps brachii at 20, 40, and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Eleven volunteers completed 2 min of intermittent isometric contractions (12/min) at an elbow angle of 90° interspersed with 3 min rest between intensities in systematic order. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the right biceps brachii and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to simultaneously measure left prefrontal and right biceps brachii oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HHb), and total hemoglobin (Hbtot). Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to measure middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) bilaterally. Finger photoplethysmography was used to record beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate. EMG increased with force output from 20 to 60% MVC (P < 0.05). Cerebral HbO2 and Hbtot increased while HHb decreased during contractions with differences observed between 60% vs. 40% and 20% MVC (P < 0.05). Muscle HbO2 decreased while HHb increased during contractions with differences being observed among intensities (P < 0.05). Muscle Hbtot increased from rest at 20% MVC (P < 0.05), while no further change was observed at 40 and 60% MVC (P > 0.05). MCAv increased from rest to exercise but was not different among intensities (P > 0.05). Force output correlated with the root mean square EMG and changes in muscle HbO2 (P < 0.05), but not changes in cerebral HbO2 (P > 0.05) at all three intensities. Force output declined by 8% from the 1st to the 24th contraction only at 60% MVC and was accompanied by systematic increases in RMS, cerebral HbO2 and Hbtot with a leveling off in muscle HbO2 and Hbtot. These changes were independent of alterations in mean arterial pressure. Since cerebral blood flow and oxygenation were elevated at 60% MVC, we attribute the development of fatigue to reduced muscle oxygen availability rather than impaired central

  11. Practical issues of hemodynamic monitoring at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Patricio M; Pinsky, Michael R

    2006-12-01

    The hemodynamic monitoring of a surgical patient acquires a major relevance in high-risk patients and those suffering from surgical diseases associated with hemodynamic instability, such as hemorrhagic or septic shock. This article reviews the fundamental physiologic principles needed to understand hemodynamic monitoring at the bedside. Monitoring defines stability, instability, and response to therapy. The major hemodynamic parameters measured and derived from invasive hemodynamic monitoring, such as arterial, central venous, and pulmonary catheterization, are discussed, as are its clinical indications, benefits, and complications. The current clinical data relevant to hemodynamic monitoring are reviewed and discussed.

  12. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to intubation: Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope versus McCoy laryngoscope in presence of rigid cervical collar simulating cervical immobilization for traumatic cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Nitesh; Purohit, Shobha; Kalra, Poonam; Lall, Tarun; Khare, Avneesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intubation is known to cause an exaggerated hemodynamic response in the form of tachycardia, hypertension, and dysrhythmias. In cervical spine instability, intubation has to be performed using cervical immobilization to prevent exacerbation of spinal cord injuries. Application of rigid cervical collar may reduce cervical spine movements, but it hinders tracheal intubation with a standard laryngoscope. The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic responses to fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) and McCoy laryngoscope in patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia with rigid cervical collar simulating cervical spine immobilization in the situation of cervical trauma. Methods: Thirty-two patients in the age range 20–50 years, of American Society of Anaesthesiologist I-II, and of either sex undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into each group. There were two groups according to the technique used for intubation: Group A (flexible FOB) and Group B (McCoy laryngoscope). Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, intraoperatively, immediately before and after induction, and immediately after intubation. Thereafter, every min for next 5 min. Statistical Analysis: Intergroup comparison of categorical data was done by Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Intergroup comparison of quantitative data was done by the parametric test (unpaired t-test), and probability was considered to be significant if <0.05. Results: Due to intubation response, HR and blood pressure increased significantly (P < 0.05) above preoperative values in McCoy group as compared to the fiberoptic group. Conclusion: We suggest that the flexible FOB is an effective and better method of intubation in a situation like traumatic cervical spine injury and provides stable hemodynamics. PMID:26712970

  13. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  14. Causal connectivity alterations of cortical-subcortical circuit anchored on reduced hemodynamic response brain regions in first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing; Zou, Ke; He, Zongling; Sun, Xueli; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Some efforts were done to investigate the disruption of brain causal connectivity networks involved in major depressive disorder (MDD) using Granger causality (GC) analysis. However, the homogenous hemodynamic response function (HRF) assumption over the brain may disturb the inference of temporal precedence. Here we applied a blind deconvolution approach to examine the altered HRF shape in first-episode, drug-naïve MDD patients. The regions with abnormal HRF shape in patients were chosen as seeds to detect the GC alterations in MDD. The results demonstrated significantly decreased magnitude of spontaneous hemodynamic response of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the caudate nucleus (CAU) in MDD comparing to healthy controls, suggesting MDD patients likely had alterations in neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular physiology in these two regions. GC mapping showed increased/decreased GC in OFC-/CAU centered networks in MDD. The outgoing GC values from OFC to anterior cingulate cortex and occipital regions were positively correlated with Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, while the incoming GC from insula, middle and superior temporal gyrus to CAU were negatively correlated with HAMD scores of MDD. The abnormalities of directional connections in the cortico-subcortico-cerebellar network may lead to unbalanced integrating the emotional-related information for MDD, and further exacerbating depressive symptoms. PMID:26911651

  15. Effects of preanesthetic dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation in elderly patients undergoing treatment for hypertension: a randomized, double-blinded trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Dexmedetomidine is an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist with sedative, anxiolytic, and analgesic properties. This study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of preoperative administration of 0.5 µg/kg dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic responses caused by endotracheal intubation in elderly patients undergoing treatment for hypertension. Methods Forty elderly (≥ 65 years old) patients who had been receiving hypertension treatment, had American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II, and were scheduled to undergo elective noncardiac surgery were randomly selected and assigned to 2 groups. Group C received normal saline and group D received 0.5 µg/kg dexmedetomidine intravenously over 10 min just before endotracheal intubation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded preoperatively in the ward, immediately after study drug administration, and at 1, 3, and 5 min after endotracheal intubation. Results Compared to group C, group D showed significantly lower SBP and MAP at 1, 3, and 5 min as well as significantly lower DBP and HR at 3 and 5 min after endotracheal intubation. Conclusions In elderly patients receiving hypertension treatment, a single preanesthetic dose of dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) effectively suppressed the hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation. PMID:28184265

  16. Acute Exercise-Induced Response of Monocyte Subtypes in Chronic Heart and Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H.; Hoymans, Vicky Y.; Verpooten, Gert A.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Couttenye, Marie M.; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Monocytes (Mon1-2-3) play a substantial role in low-grade inflammation associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). The effect of an acute exercise bout on monocyte subsets in the setting of systemic inflammation is currently unknown. This study aims (1) to evaluate baseline distribution of monocyte subsets in CHF and CKD versus healthy subjects (HS) and (2) to evaluate the effect of an acute exercise bout. Exercise-induced IL-6 and MCP-1 release are related to the Mon1-2-3 response. Methods. Twenty CHF patients, 20 CKD patients, and 15 HS were included. Before and after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, monocyte subsets were quantified by flow cytometry: CD14++CD16−CCR2+ (Mon1), CD14++CD16+CCR2+ (Mon2), and CD14+CD16++CCR2− (Mon3). Serum levels of IL-6 and MCP-1 were determined by ELISA. Results. Baseline distribution of Mon1-2-3 was comparable between the 3 groups. Following acute exercise, %Mon2 and %Mon3 increased significantly at the expense of a decrease in %Mon1 in HS and in CKD. This response was significantly attenuated in CHF (P < 0.05). In HS only, MCP-1 levels increased following exercise; IL-6 levels were unchanged. Circulatory power was a strong and independent predictor of the changes in Mon1 (β = −0.461, P < 0.001) and Mon3 (β = 0.449, P < 0.001); and baseline LVEF of the change in Mon2 (β = 0.441, P < 0.001). Conclusion. The response of monocytes to acute exercise is characterized by an increase in proangiogenic and proinflammatory Mon2 and Mon3 at the expense of phagocytic Mon1. This exercise-induced monocyte subset response is mainly driven by hemodynamic changes and not by preexistent low-grade inflammation. PMID:25587208

  17. Dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging for monitoring brain metabolic and hemodynamic response to closed head traumatic brain injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, Itamar; Abookasis, David

    2015-10-01

    ) monitor brain hemodynamic and metabolic response to neuroprotective drug treatment.

  18. Acute Alcohol Effects on Contextual Memory BOLD Response: Differences Based on Fragmentary Blackout History

    PubMed Central

    Wetherill, Reagan R.; Schnyer, David M.; Fromme, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Background Contextual memory, or memory for source details, is an important aspect of episodic memory and has been implicated in alcohol-induced fragmentary blackouts (FB). Little is known, however, about how neural functioning during contextual memory processes may differ between individuals with and without a history of fragmentary blackouts. This study examined whether neural activation during a contextual memory task differed by history of fragmentary blackout and acute alcohol consumption. Methods Twenty-four matched individuals with (FB+; n = 12) and without (FB−; n = 12) a history of FBs were recruited from a longitudinal study of alcohol use and behavioral risks and completed a laboratory beverage challenge followed by two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions under no alcohol and alcohol [breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) = 0.08%] conditions. Task performance and brain hemodynamic activity during a block design contextual memory task were examined across 48 fMRI sessions. Results Groups demonstrated no differences in performance on the contextual memory task, yet exhibited different brain response patterns after alcohol intoxication. A significant FB group by beverage interaction emerged in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex with FB− individuals showing greater BOLD response after alcohol exposure (p < .05). Conclusions Alcohol had differential effects on neural activity for FB+ and FB− individuals during recollection of contextual information, perhaps suggesting a neurobiological mechanism associated with alcohol-induced fragmentary blackouts. PMID:22420742

  19. Variations in the pre-ejection period induced by deep breathing do not predict the hemodynamic response to early haemorrhage in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vistisen, Simon Tilma; Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring that can predict fluid responsiveness is an unsettled matter for spontaneously breathing patients. Mechanical ventilation induces cyclic variations in blood pressure, e.g. pulse pressure variation, whose magnitude predicts fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. In this study, we hypothesised that a deep breathing manoeuvre with its effect on heart rate variability (HRV) could induce similar cyclic variations in blood pressure in spontaneously breathing healthy subjects and that the magnitude of these variations could predict the hemodynamic response to controlled haemorrhage. 37 blood donors were instructed to perform two simple deep breathing manoeuvres prior to blood donation; one manoeuvre with a respiratory cycle every 10 s (0.1 Hz) and one every 6 s (0.167 Hz). The variation in the pre-ejection period (∆PEP) was captured with the electrocardiographic and plethysmographic curves, while the hemodynamic response to haemorrhage was estimated with the cardiac output change assessed with ultrasonography. Respiratory HRV was estimated with root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD). Deep breathing induced cyclic changes in ∆PEP magnitude was significantly correlated to RMSSD (p < 0.005). ∆PEP indexed to RMSSD increased significantly following haemorrhage at the 0.167 Hz respiratory frequency (p = 0.01). At none of the respiratory manoeuvres was ∆PEP nor ∆PEP/RMSSD prior to haemorrhage correlated to changes in cardiac output following haemorrhage. Deep breathing induces cyclic changes in blood pressure that are strongly dependent on HRV. These blood pressure variations do, however, not predict the cardiac output response to controlled haemorrhage.

  20. Low-level Pb and Cardiovascular Responses to Acute Stress in Children: The Role of Cardiac Autonomic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gump, Brooks B.; MacKenzie, James A.; Bendinskas, Kestutis; Morgan, Robert; Dumas, Amy K.; Palmer, Christopher D.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective A number of studies suggest that Pb exposure increases cardiovascular disease risk in humans. As a potential mechanism for this effect, we recently reported a significant association between early childhood Pb levels and cardiovascular response to acute stress. The current study considers the association between current Pb levels and the autonomic nervous system activation pattern underlying the cardiovascular response to stress in a new cohort of children. Methods We assessed blood Pb levels as well as cardiovascular responses to acute stress in 9–11 year old children (N = 140). Sympathetic activation (measured with pre-ejection period) and parasympathetic activation (measured with high frequency heart rate variability) were also assessed. Results In a sample with very low levels of blood Pb (M = 1.01 μg/dL), we found that increasing blood Pb was associated with coinhibition of sympathetic and parasympathetic activation in response to acute stress. In addition, increasing Pb levels were associated with the hemodynamic stress response pattern typical of coinhibition – significantly greater vascular resistance and reduced stroke volume and cardiac output. Conclusions Blood Pb levels were associated with significant autonomic and cardiovascular dysregulation in response to acute psychological stress in children. Moreover, these effects were significant at Pb levels considered to be very low and notably well below the 10 μg/dL the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of an elevated blood Pb level. The potential for autonomic dysregulation at levels of Pb typical for many US children would suggest potentially broad public health ramifications. PMID:20934510

  1. Acute exercise does not induce an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Lena; Buhl, Rikke; Nostell, Katarina; Bak, Lars; Petersen, Ellen; Lindholm, Maria; Jacobsen, Stine

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether acute strenuous exercise (1600- to 2500-m race) would elicit an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters. Blood levels of several inflammatory markers [serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, fibrinogen, white blood cell count (WBC), and iron], muscle enzymes [creatinine kinase (CK) and aspartate transaminase (AST)], and hemoglobin were assessed in 58 Standardbred trotters before and after racing. Hemoglobin levels increased and iron levels decreased 12 to 14 h after racing and haptoglobin concentrations, white blood cell counts, and iron levels were decreased 2 and/or 7 d after racing. Concentrations of CK, AST, SAA, and fibrinogen were unaltered in response to racing. Acute strenuous exercise did not elicit an acute phase reaction. The observed acute increase in hemoglobin levels and decreases in haptoglobin and iron levels may have been caused by exercise-induced hemolysis, which indicates that horses might experience a condition similar to athlete's anemia in humans. The pathogenesis and clinical implications of the hematological and blood-biochemical changes elicited by acute exercise in Standardbred trotters in the present study warrant further investigation.

  2. Bidirectional interactions between neuronal and hemodynamic responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): challenges for brain-state dependent tDCS

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical neural activity. During neural activity, the electric currents from excitable membranes of brain tissue superimpose in the extracellular medium and generate a potential at scalp, which is referred as the electroencephalogram (EEG). Respective neural activity (energy demand) has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF) that supplies glucose (energy supply) via neurovascular coupling. The hemodynamic response can be captured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which enables continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume. This neurovascular coupling phenomenon led to the concept of neurovascular unit (NVU) that consists of the endothelium, glia, neurons, pericytes, and the basal lamina. Here, recent works suggest NVU as an integrated system working in concert using feedback mechanisms to enable proper brain homeostasis and function where the challenge remains in capturing these mostly nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions within NVU for brain-state dependent tDCS. In principal accordance, we propose EEG-NIRS-based whole-head monitoring of tDCS-induced neuronal and hemodynamic alterations during tDCS. PMID:26321925

  3. Bidirectional interactions between neuronal and hemodynamic responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): challenges for brain-state dependent tDCS.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical neural activity. During neural activity, the electric currents from excitable membranes of brain tissue superimpose in the extracellular medium and generate a potential at scalp, which is referred as the electroencephalogram (EEG). Respective neural activity (energy demand) has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF) that supplies glucose (energy supply) via neurovascular coupling. The hemodynamic response can be captured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which enables continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume. This neurovascular coupling phenomenon led to the concept of neurovascular unit (NVU) that consists of the endothelium, glia, neurons, pericytes, and the basal lamina. Here, recent works suggest NVU as an integrated system working in concert using feedback mechanisms to enable proper brain homeostasis and function where the challenge remains in capturing these mostly nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions within NVU for brain-state dependent tDCS. In principal accordance, we propose EEG-NIRS-based whole-head monitoring of tDCS-induced neuronal and hemodynamic alterations during tDCS.

  4. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on hemodynamics, inflammatory response and oxidative stress during resuscitated hemorrhagic shock in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been shown to improve survival in rodent models of lethal hemorrhage. Conversely, other authors have reported that inhibition of endogenous H2S production improves hemodynamics and reduces organ injury after hemorrhagic shock. Since all of these data originate from unresuscitated models and/or the use of a pre-treatment design, we therefore tested the hypothesis that the H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), may improve hemodynamics in resuscitated hemorrhagic shock and attenuate oxidative and nitrosative stresses. Methods Thirty-two rats were mechanically ventilated and instrumented to measure mean arterial pressure (MAP) and carotid blood flow (CBF). Animals were bled during 60 minutes in order to maintain MAP at 40 ± 2 mm Hg. Ten minutes prior to retransfusion of shed blood, rats randomly received either an intravenous bolus of NaHS (0.2 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). At the end of the experiment (T = 300 minutes), blood, aorta and heart were harvested for Western blot (inductible Nitric Oxyde Synthase (iNOS), Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), phosphorylated Inhibitor κB (P-IκB), Inter-Cellular Adhesion Molecule (I-CAM), Heme oxygenase 1(HO-1), Heme oxygenase 2(HO-2), as well as nuclear respiratory factor 2 (Nrf2)). Nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion (O2-) were also measured by electron paramagnetic resonance. Results At the end of the experiment, control rats exhibited a decrease in MAP which was attenuated by NaHS (65 ± 32 versus 101 ± 17 mmHg, P < 0.05). CBF was better maintained in NaHS-treated rats (1.9 ± 1.6 versus 4.4 ± 1.9 ml/minute P < 0.05). NaHS significantly limited shock-induced metabolic acidosis. NaHS also prevented iNOS expression and NO production in the heart and aorta while significantly reducing NF-kB, P-IκB and I-CAM in the aorta. Compared to the control group, NaHS significantly increased Nrf2, HO-1 and HO-2 and limited O2- release in both aorta and heart (P < 0.05). Conclusions NaHS is

  5. [Enteroviruses responsible for acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis].

    PubMed

    Lévêque, N; Huguet, P; Norder, H; Chomel, J-J

    2010-04-01

    Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is an epidemic form of highly contagious conjunctivitis, characterized by conjunctival hemorrhages. The first AHC outbreak was described in 1969 in Ghana, West Africa, and was called Apollo disease, from the Apollo landing on the moon. This outbreak was caused by Enterovirus 70 (EV70) together with a Coxsackievirus A24 (CVA24v) variant, which are the major etiological agents involved in AHC outbreaks worldwide. AHC is known to be directly transmitted by close person-to-person contact or indirectly through soiled ophthalmological materials or unsafe recreational water. Recently, a possible airborne virus spread was suggested which could explain the high transmission rate of the disease. In the absence of a specific antiviral therapy, a rapid diagnosis of the causative agent is required to distinguish AHC due to enteroviruses from other ocular infectious diseases, for there are active drugs, or to quickly implement proper public health measures to limit the extension of the outbreak. However, virus identification remains difficult and time-consuming. Moreover, virological diagnosis is difficult to implement in developing countries where AHC has recently become a major problem for public health.

  6. Exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension in a patient with compensated cardiac disease: hemodynamic and functional response to sildenafil therapy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Memon, Nabeel; O'Murchu, Brian

    2015-02-01

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with exertional dyspnea and fatigue that had worsened over the preceding 2 years, despite a normally functioning bioprosthetic aortic valve and stable, mild left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction, 0.45). His symptoms could not be explained by physical examination, an extensive biochemical profile, or multiple cardiac and pulmonary investigations. However, abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise test results and a right heart catheterization-combined with the use of a symptom-limited, bedside bicycle ergometer-revealed that the patient's exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension was out of proportion to his compensated left heart disease. A trial of sildenafil therapy resulted in objective improvements in hemodynamic values and functional class.

  7. Atrial natriuretic factor in normal subjects and heart failure patients. Plasma levels and renal, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses to peptide infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Cody, R J; Atlas, S A; Laragh, J H; Kubo, S H; Covit, A B; Ryman, K S; Shaknovich, A; Pondolfino, K; Clark, M; Camargo, M J

    1986-01-01

    We investigated atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in humans, measuring plasma immunoreactive (ir) ANF (in femtomoles per milliliter), and renal, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses to ANF infusion, in normal subjects (NL) and congestive heart failure patients (CHF). Plasma irANF was 11 +/- 0.9 fmol/ml in NL and 71 +/- 9.9 in CHF (P less than 0.01); the latter with twofold right ventricular increment (P less than 0.05). In NL, ANF infusion of 0.10 microgram/kg per min (40 pmol/kg per min) induced increases (P less than 0.05) of absolute (from 160 +/- 23 to 725 +/- 198 mueq/min) and fractional (1-4%) sodium excretion, urine flow rate (from 10 +/- 1.6 to 20 +/- 2.6 ml/min), osmolar (from 3.2 +/- 0.6 to 6.8 +/- 1.2 ml/min) and free water (from 6.8 +/- 1.6 to 13.6 +/- 1.6 ml/min) clearances, and filtration fraction (from 20 +/- 1 to 26 +/- 2%). Plasma renin and aldosterone decreased 33% and 40%, respectively (P less than 0.01). Systolic blood pressure fell (from 112 +/- 3 to 104 +/- 5 mmHg, P less than 0.05) in seated NL; but in supine NL, the only hemodynamic response was decreased pulmonary wedge pressure (from 11 +/- 1 to 7 +/- 1 mmHg, P less than 0.05). In CHF, ANF induced changes in aldosterone and pulmonary wedge pressure, cardiac index, and systemic vascular resistance (all P less than 0.05); however, responses of renin and renal excretion were attenuated. ANF infusion increased hematocrit and serum protein concentration by 5-7% in NL (P less than 0.05) but not in CHF. Images PMID:2945832

  8. THE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE INDUCED BY BRONCHOSCOPY WITH LAVAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoscopy has been used to evaluate the inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. The procedure may affect acute inflammation in the lower respiratory tract. We reviewed consecutive bronchoscopies done in normal healthy non-smokers between April, 1998 and April, 2004. The...

  9. Fibrin(ogen) mediates acute inflammatory responses to biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Although "biocompatible" polymeric elastomers are generally nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and chemically inert, implants made of these materials may trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Early interactions between implants and inflammatory cells are probably mediated by a layer of host proteins on the material surface. To evaluate the importance of this protein layer, we studied acute inflammatory responses of mice to samples of polyester terephthalate film (PET) that were implanted intraperitoneally for short periods. Material preincubated with albumin is "passivated," accumulating very few adherent neutrophils or macrophages, whereas uncoated or plasma- coated PET attracts large numbers of phagocytes. Neither IgG adsorption nor surface complement activation is necessary for this acute inflammation; phagocyte accumulation on uncoated implants is normal in hypogammaglobulinemic mice and in severely hypocomplementemic mice. Rather, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to be critical: (a) PET coated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma attracts as few phagocytes as does albumin-coated material; (b) in contrast, PET preincubated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma containing physiologic amounts of fibrinogen elicits "normal" phagocyte recruitment; (c) most importantly, hypofibrinogenemic mice do not mount an inflammatory response to implanted PET unless the material is coated with fibrinogen or the animals are injected with fibrinogen before implantation. Thus, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to initiate the acute inflammatory response to an implanted polymer, suggesting an interesting nexus between two major iatrogenic effects of biomaterials: clotting and inflammation. PMID:8245787

  10. Acute khat use reduces response conflict in habitual users

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Sellaro, Roberta; Ruiz, Manuel J.; Sikora, Katarzyna; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Khat consumption has become a worldwide phenomenon broadening from Eastern Africa and the south west of the Arabian Peninsula to ethnic communities in the rest of the world. So far, the cognitive effects of khat use are poorly understood and no studies have looked into the relation between acute khat use and cognitive control functions, the way we control our thoughts and goal directed behavior. We studied how acute khat use affects the emergence and the resolution of response conflict, a central cognitive control function. Khat users (n = 11) and khat-free controls (n = 18) were matched in terms of education, sex, alcohol, and cannabis consumption. Groups were tested on response conflict, as measured by the Simon task. In one single session, participants worked through two task blocks: the khat group chewed exclusively khat whereas the khat-free group chewed solely a gum. Results showed that in the second block, which reflects the acute impact of khat, the khat group was better than controls in resolving stimulus-induced response conflict as indexed by a smaller Simon effect. These results suggest that the acute intake of khat may improve participants' ability of handling response conflict. PMID:23801952

  11. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease: the UIP consensus according to scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung B; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth; Meissner, Mark; Kalodiki, Evi; Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier L; Bækgaard, Niels; Beach, Kirk; Belcaro, Giovanni; Black, Stephen; Blomgren, Lena; Bouskela, Eliete; Cappelli, Massimo; Caprini, Joseph; Carpentier, Patrick; Cavezzi, Attilio; Chastanet, Sylvain; Christenson, Jan T; Christopoulos, Demetris; Clarke, Heather; Davies, Alun; Demaeseneer, Marianne; Eklöf, Bo; Ermini, Stefano; Fernández, Fidel; Franceschi, Claude; Gasparis, Antonios; Geroulakos, George; Gianesini, Sergio; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Gloviczki, Peter; Huang, Ying; Ibegbuna, Veronica; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kistner, Robert; Kölbel, Tilo; Kurstjens, Ralph L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Laredo, James; Lattimer, Christopher R; Lugli, Marzia; Lurie, Fedor; Maleti, Oscar; Markovic, Jovan; Mendoza, Erika; Monedero, Javier L; Moneta, Gregory; Moore, Hayley; Morrison, Nick; Mosti, Giovanni; Nelzén, Olle; Obermayer, Alfred; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Parsi, Kurosh; Partsch, Hugo; Passariello, Fausto; Perrin, Michel L; Pittaluga, Paul; Raju, Seshadri; Ricci, Stefano; Rosales, Antonio; Scuderi, Angelo; Slagsvold, Carl E; Thurin, Anders; Urbanek, Tomasz; M VAN Rij, Andre; Vasquez, Michael; Wittens, Cees H; Zamboni, Paolo; Zimmet, Steven; Ezpeleta, Santiago Z

    2016-06-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due to emergence of new diagnostic techniques. Duplex ultrasound scanning and other imaging techniques which evolved in the latter part of the 20th century have dominated investigation. They have greatly improved our understanding of the anatomical patterns of venous reflux and obstruction. However, they do not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all aspects of management for venous disease by evidence-based principles. These included experts from various member societies including the European Venous Forum (EVF), American Venous Forum (AVF), American College of Phlebology (ACP) and Cardiovascular Disease Educational and Research Trust (CDERT). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various forms of treatment. Chapter 1 is devoted to basic hemodynamic concepts and normal venous physiology. Chapter 2 presents the mechanism and magnitude of hemodynamic changes in acute deep vein

  12. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease: event-related desynchronization/synchronization and hemodynamic response analysis.

    PubMed

    Visani, Elisa; Minati, Ludovico; Canafoglia, Laura; Gilioli, Isabella; Salvatoni, Lucia; Varotto, Giulia; Fazio, Patrik; Aquino, Domenico; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Franceschetti, Silvana; Panzica, Ferruccio

    2010-01-01

    We performed simultaneous acquisition of EEG-fMRI in seven patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) and in six healthy controls using self-paced finger extension as a motor task. The event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) analysis showed a greater and more diffuse alpha desynchronization in central regions and a strongly reduced post-movement beta-ERS in patients compared with controls, suggesting a significant dysfunction of the mechanisms regulating active movement and movement end. The event-related hemodynamic response obtained from fMRI showed delayed BOLD peak latency in the contralateral primary motor area suggesting a less efficient activity of the neuronal populations driving fine movements, which are specifically impaired in ULD.

  13. The study of cerebral hemodynamic and neuronal response to visual stimulation using simultaneous NIR optical tomography and BOLD fMRI in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Toronov, Vladislav Y.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of near-infrared (NIR) and functional MRI (fMRI) studies is potentially a powerful method to investigate the physiological mechanism of human cerebral activity. However, current NIR methodologies do not provide adequate accuracy of localization and are not fully integrated with MRI in the sense of mutual enhancement of the two imaging modalities. Results are presented to address these issues by developing an MRI-compatible optical probe and using diffuse optical tomography for optical image reconstruction. We have developed a complete methodology that seamlessly integrates NIR tomography with fMRI data acquisition. In this paper, we apply this methodology to determine both hemodynamic and early neuronal responses in the visual cortex in humans. Early results indicate that the changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration from optical data are co-localized with fMRI BOLD signal changes, but changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration (not measurable using fMRI) show interesting spatial differences. PMID:21776185

  14. The study of cerebral hemodynamic and neuronal response to visual stimulation using simultaneous NIR optical tomography and BOLD fMRI in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Toronov, Vladislav Y.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Webb, Andrew G.

    2005-04-01

    The integration of near-infrared (NIR) and functional MRI (fMRI) studies is potentially a powerful method to investigate the physiological mechanism of human cerebral activity. However, current NIR methodologies do not provide adequate accuracy of localization and are not fully integrated with MRI in the sense of mutual enhancement of the two imaging modalities. Results are presented to address these issues by developing an MRI-compatible optical probe and using diffuse optical tomography for optical image reconstruction. We have developed a complete methodology that seamlessly integrates NIR tomography with fMRI data acquisition. In this paper, we apply this methodology to determine both hemodynamic and early neuronal responses in the visual cortex in humans. Early results indicate that the changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration from optical data are co-localized with fMRI BOLD signal changes, but changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration (not measurable using fMRI) show small spatial differences.

  15. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI in Patients with Unverricht-Lundborg Disease: Event-Related Desynchronization/Synchronization and Hemodynamic Response Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Visani, Elisa; Minati, Ludovico; Canafoglia, Laura; Gilioli, Isabella; Salvatoni, Lucia; Varotto, Giulia; Fazio, Patrik; Aquino, Domenico; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Franceschetti, Silvana; Panzica, Ferruccio

    2010-01-01

    We performed simultaneous acquisition of EEG-fMRI in seven patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) and in six healthy controls using self-paced finger extension as a motor task. The event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) analysis showed a greater and more diffuse alpha desynchronization in central regions and a strongly reduced post-movement beta-ERS in patients compared with controls, suggesting a significant dysfunction of the mechanisms regulating active movement and movement end. The event-related hemodynamic response obtained from fMRI showed delayed BOLD peak latency in the contralateral primary motor area suggesting a less efficient activity of the neuronal populations driving fine movements, which are specifically impaired in ULD. PMID:20111730

  16. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: new issues on pathogenesis and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Vitoux, Dominique; Nasr, Rihab; de The, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia appears to be one of the best understood among human malignancies. The ability of retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide to directly target the oncogenic promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic receptor A (PML-RARA) fusion protein also made this disease the first model for oncogene-targeted therapies. A set of recent data has significantly increased the complexity of our view of acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis, as well as of therapeutic response. This review summarizes and discusses these findings, which yield novels questions and models.

  17. The hemodynamic response to somatosensory stimulation in mice depends on the anesthetic used: Implications on analysis of mouse fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Felix; Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the number of functional MRI (fMRI) studies in mice has been rapidly increasing. Technological improvements provide the sensitivity required to match the high demands on spatial and temporal resolution and to analyze fast and small signal components of the fMRI response. Yet, the interpretation of mouse fMRI data largely relies on assumptions that were uncritically adopted from previous research in humans or rats. Here, we show based on a large dataset employing an innocuous electrical stimulation paradigm, that (1) the shape of the HRF shapes comprises significant transient signal components; correspondingly analysis procedures have to account for this dynamic nature and allow for variable response functions. (2) The effects of the anesthetics are crucial in determining the shape of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) and also influence the spatial specificity of BOLD signal. (3) The dominant systemic confounding contributions elicited by stimulus-evoked cardiovascular responses observed in mouse fMRI when applying block stimuli may be largely avoided by a milder event-related design applying a randomly spaced single pulse train (RSSPT). Thereby the spatial specificity of the fMRI response is largely retained. We conclude that the sensitivity, specificity and interpretability of stimulus-evoked BOLD signals in mice can be improved by combining appropriate stimulation paradigms with analysis procedures that include adapted HRFs.

  18. The glucose intolerance of acute pancreatitis: hormonal response to arginine.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S S; Duckworth, W C; Jallepalli, P; Bobal, M A; Iyer, R

    1980-01-01

    Patients with acute pancreatitis were studied by arginine infusion at 48--72 h. 7--10 days, and 18--21 days after onset of their illness. Plasma glucose, insulin, and glucagon values were determined. Acute pancreatitis was characterized by fasting hyperglycemia and hyperglucagonemia, associated with relative hyoinsulinemia. Arginine stimulation early in the disease (48--72 h) demonstrated hyperglycemia and hyperglucagonemia, which normalized by 18--21 days. Both phases of the normal biphasic insulin response to arginine were decreased during the initial arginine infusion. By 18--21 days, although the first phase was completely normal, the second phase of insulin secretion remained depressed. Acute pancreatitis is associated with damage to both the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. Glucose intolerance seen with this disease appears to be the result of hyperglucagonemia and relative hypoinsulinemia. Although the healing process at 3 wk is associated with return of plasma glucose and glucagon concentrations to normal, the impaired second phase insulin secretion persists.

  19. Individual classification of ADHD children by right prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a go/no-go task as assessed by fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yukifumi; Dan, Ippeita; Nagashima, Masako; Dan, Haruka; Uga, Minako; Ikeda, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Gunji, Yuji; Hirano, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Takamichi; Shimoizumi, Hideo; Watanabe, Eiju; Yamagata, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    While a growing body of neurocognitive research has explored the neural substrates associated with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), an objective biomarker for diagnosis has not been established. The advent of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which is a noninvasive and unrestrictive method of functional neuroimaging, raised the possibility of introducing functional neuroimaging diagnosis in young ADHD children. Previously, our fNIRS-based measurements successfully visualized the hypoactivation pattern in the right prefrontal cortex during a go/no-go task in ADHD children compared with typically developing control children at a group level. The current study aimed to explore a method of individual differentiation between ADHD and typically developing control children using multichannel fNIRS, emphasizing how spatial distribution and amplitude of hemodynamic response are associated with inhibition-related right prefrontal dysfunction. Thirty ADHD and thirty typically developing control children underwent a go/no-go task, and their cortical hemodynamics were assessed using fNIRS. We explored specific regions of interest (ROIs) and cut-off amplitudes for cortical activation to distinguish ADHD children from control children. The ROI located on the border of inferior and middle frontal gyri yielded the most accurate discrimination. Furthermore, we adapted well-formed formulae for the constituent channels of the optimized ROI, leading to improved classification accuracy with an area under the curve value of 85% and with 90% sensitivity. Thus, the right prefrontal hypoactivation assessed by fNIRS would serve as a potentially effective biomarker for classifying ADHD children at the individual level. PMID:26266096

  20. A dose-response study of orally administered clonidine as premedication in the elderly: evaluating hemodynamic safety.

    PubMed

    Filos, K S; Patroni, O; Goudas, L C; Bosas, O; Kassaras, A; Gartaganis, S

    1993-12-01

    Clonidine premedication in a dose of 5 micrograms/kg may be particularly well suited for elderly patients. To pursue this approach, sedation, intraocular pressure (IOP), and the hemodynamic profile of two doses of oral clonidine premedication were compared in 60 elderly patients, aged 65-82 yr, who underwent elective ophthalmic surgery under local anesthesia. Group 1 (n = 20) received placebo, Group 2 (n = 20) 150 micrograms of clonidine (2-2.5 micrograms/kg), and Group 3 (n = 20) 300 micrograms of clonidine (4-4.5 micrograms/kg) in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Decreases in mean arterial blood pressure were more pronounced and occurred earlier after 300 micrograms of clonidine (31.4 +/- 12.1%, P < 0.001) as compared to 150 micrograms of clonidine (18.1 +/- 10.9%, P < 0.001). Throughout the study, six patients (30%) in Group 3 (300 micrograms clonidine-treated group), but no patient in Groups 1 or 2, were treated at least once for hypotension (P < 0.05). Heart rate decreased significantly 18.5 +/- 8.1% (P < 0.001) only after 300 micrograms of clonidine. Clonidine 150 micrograms and 300 micrograms decreased IOP 32.1 +/- 14.3% (P < 0.001) and 47.8 +/- 17.2% (P < 0.001), respectively. After 150 micrograms of clonidine patients were significantly more sedated as compared to those given placebo (P < 0.01) but significantly less sedated than after 300 micrograms of clonidine (P < 0.01), where sedation persisted more than 6 h postoperatively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology.

  2. The 894G>T endothelial nitric oxide synthase genetic polymorphism affects hemodynamic responses to mental stress performed before and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Natália Galito; Neves, Fabricia Junqueira; Silva, Bruno Moreira; Sales, Allan Robson Kluser; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio

    2012-03-01

    Nitric oxide is the primary mediator of vasodilation during mental stress. Since genetic polymorphisms in the nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene seem to impair the production of NO, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of an exercise bout on hemodynamic responses to mental stress in subjects with the 894G>T polymorphism of eNOS. Subjects without (wild-type group; n = 16) or with (polymorphic-type group; n = 19) the 894G>T polymorphism underwent a mental stress challenge before and after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. Blood pressure was measured by auscultation and forearm blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography. The groups were similar regarding anthropometric, metabolic, resting blood pressure and exercise variables. Before exercise, systolic blood pressure response during mental stress was higher in the polymorphic-type group (∆wild-type: 8.0 ± 2.0% vs. ∆polymorphic-type: 12.5 ± 1.8%, P = 0.01), while the increase in forearm vascular conductance was similar between the groups (∆wild-type 90.8 ± 26.4% vs. ∆polymorphic-type: 86.3 ± 24.1%, P = 0.44). After exercise, the systolic blood pressure at baseline and during mental stress was lower than before exercise in the whole group (P < 0.05), but the pressure response during mental stress was still higher in the polymorphic-type group (∆wild-type: 5.8 ± 1.5% vs. ∆polymorphic-type: 10.2 ± 1.4%, P = 0.01). The increase in forearm vascular conductance was inhibited only in the polymorphic-type group (∆before exercise 86.3 ± 24.1% vs. ∆after exercise: 41.5 ± 12.6%, P = 0.04). In conclusion, these results suggest the 894G>T eNOS polymorphism is associated with altered hemodynamic responses to mental stress both before and after a single bout of dynamic exercise with potential clinical implications.

  3. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  4. Human Physiological Responses to Acute and Chronic Cold Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Jodie M.; Taylor, Nigel A. S.; Tipton, Michael J.; Greenleaf, John E.

    2001-01-01

    When inadequately protected humans are exposed to acute cold, excessive body heat is lost to the environment and unless heat production is increased and heat loss attenuated, body temperature will decrease. The primary physiological responses to counter the reduction in body temperature include marked cutaneous vasoconstriction and increased metabolism. These responses, and the hazards associated with such exposure, are mediated by a number of factors which contribute to heat production and loss. These include the severity and duration of the cold stimulus; exercise intensity; the magnitude of the metabolic response; and individual characteristics such as body composition, age, and gender. Chronic exposure to a cold environment, both natural and artificial, results in physiological alterations leading to adaptation. Three quite different, but not necessarily exclusive, patterns of human cold adaptation have been reported: metabolic, hypothermic, and insulative. Cold adaptation has also been associated with an habituation response, in which there is a desensitization, or damping, of the normal response to a cold stress. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the human physiological and pathological responses to cold exposure. Particular attention is directed to the factors contributing to heat production and heat loss during acute cold stress, and the ability of humans to adapt to cold environments.

  5. Response of a physiological controller for ventricular assist devices during acute patho-physiological events: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Anastasios; Pergantis, Panagiotis; Ochsner, Gregor; Amacher, Raffael; Krabatsch, Thomas; Falk, Volkmar; Meboldt, Mirko; Daners, Marianne Schmid

    2017-02-09

    The current paper analyzes the performance of a physiological controller for turbodynamic ventricular assist devices (tVADs) during acute patho-physiological events. The numerical model of the human blood circulation implemented on our hybrid mock circulation was extended in order to simulate the Valsalva maneuver (VM) and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). The performance of an end-diastolic volume (EDV)-based physiological controller for VADs, named preload responsive speed (PRS) controller was evaluated under VM and PVCs. A slow and a fast response of the PRS controller were implemented by using a 3 s moving window, and a beat-to-beat method, respectively, to extract the EDV index. The hemodynamics of a pathological circulation, assisted by a tVAD controlled by the PRS controller were analyzed and compared with a constant speed support case. The results show that the PRS controller prevented suction during the VM with both methods, while with constant speed, this was not the case. On the other hand, the pump flow reduction with the PRS controller led to low aortic pressure, while it remained physiological with the constant speed control. Pump backflow was increased when the moving window was used but it avoided sudden undesirable speed changes, which occurred during PVCs with the beat-to-beat method. In a possible clinical implementation of any physiological controller, the desired performance during frequent clinical acute scenarios should be considered.

  6. Acute Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Responses to Resistance Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A.; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T.; Zois, Christos E.; Douda, Helen T.; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key points Acute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD. Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses. With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  7. Sex differences in the enhanced responsiveness to acute angiotensin II in growth-restricted rats: role of fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Norma B.; Royals, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that Rho kinase contributes to the enhanced pressor response to acute angiotensin II in intact male growth-restricted and gonadectomized female growth-restricted rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal function were determined in conscious animals pretreated with enalapril (250 mg/l in drinking water) for 1 wk to block the endogenous renin-angiotensin system and normalize blood pressure (baseline). Blood pressure and renal hemodynamics did not differ at baseline. Acute Ang II (100 ng·kg−1·min−1) induced a greater increase in MAP and renal vascular resistance and enhanced reduction in glomerular filtration rate in intact male growth-restricted rats compared with intact male controls (P < 0.05). Cotreatment with the Rho kinase inhibitor fasudil (33 μg·kg−1·min−1) significantly attenuated these hemodynamic changes (P < 0.05), but it did not abolish the differential increase in blood pressure above baseline, suggesting that the impact of intrauterine growth restriction on blood pressure in intact male growth-restricted rats is independent of Rho kinase. Gonadectomy in conjunction with fasudil returned blood pressure back to baseline in male growth-restricted rats, and yet glomerular filtration rate remained significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Thus, these data suggest a role for enhanced renal sensitivity to acute Ang II in the developmental programming of hypertension in male growth-restricted rats. However, inhibition of Rho kinase had no effect on the basal or enhanced increase in blood pressure induced by acute Ang II in the gonadectomized female growth-restricted rat. Therefore, these studies suggest that Rho kinase inhibition exerts a sex-specific effect on blood pressure sensitivity to acute Ang II in growth-restricted rats. PMID:23344570

  8. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  9. Predicting response to antimicrobial therapy in children with acute sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nader; Wald, Ellen R.; Jeong, Jong H.; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Bowen, A’Delbert; Flom, Lynda L.; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine prognostic factors that independently predict response to antimicrobial therapy in children with acute sinusitis. Study design 206 children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis who were given antimicrobial therapy by their primary care provider were included. The severity of symptoms in the 8 to 12 days after treatment was initiated was followed using a validated scale. We examined the univariate and multivariate association between factors present at the time of diagnosis (symptoms, signs, nasopharyngeal culture result, radiograph results) and time to resolution of symptoms. This study was conducted 8 to 10 years after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination was introduced, but before introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination. Results Children with proven nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae improved more rapidly (6.5 vs. 8.5 median days to symptom resolution) than those who were not colonized with S. pneumoniae. Age and radiograph findings did not predict time to symptom resolution. Conclusions In children with acute sinusitis, proven nasopharyngeal colonization with S. pneumoniae at presentation independently predicted time to symptom resolution. Future randomized, placebo-controlled trials could investigate the usefulness of testing for the presence of nasopharyngeal pathogens as a predictor of response to treatment. PMID:24367985

  10. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Shrenik; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization and hemodynamic study is the gold standard for the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Careful interpretation of the hemodynamic data is essential to differentiate it from other diseases with restrictive physiology. In this hemodynamic review we shall briefly discuss the physiologic basis of various hemodynamic changes seen in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

  11. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration.

  12. Effects of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular responses to carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Okazaki, Kazunobu; Shibasaki, Manabu; Subudhi, Andrew W; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2014-06-01

    In normoxic conditions, a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension causes cerebral vasoconstriction, thereby reducing cerebral blood flow and modifying dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA). It is unclear to what extent these effects are altered by acute hypoxia and the associated hypoxic ventilatory response (respiratory chemoreflex). This study tested the hypothesis that acute hypoxia attenuates arterial CO2 tension-mediated regulation of cerebral blood flow to help maintain cerebral O2 homeostasis. Eight subjects performed three randomly assigned respiratory interventions following a resting baseline period, as follows: (1) normoxia (21% O2); (2) hypoxia (12% O2); and (3) hypoxia with wilful restraint of the respiratory chemoreflex. During each intervention, 0, 2.0, 3.5 or 5.0% CO2 was sequentially added (8 min stages) to inspired gas mixtures to assess changes in steady-state cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity and dCA. During normoxia, the addition of CO2 increased internal carotid artery blood flow and middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean), while reducing dCA (change in phase = -0.73 ± 0.22 rad, P = 0.005). During acute hypoxia, internal carotid artery blood flow and MCA Vmean remained unchanged, but cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity (internal carotid artery, P = 0.003; MCA Vmean, P = 0.031) and CO2-mediated effects on dCA (P = 0.008) were attenuated. The effects of hypoxia were not further altered when the respiratory chemoreflex was restrained. These findings support the hypothesis that arterial CO2 tension-mediated effects on the cerebral vasculature are reduced during acute hypoxia. These effects could limit the degree of hypocapnic vasoconstriction and may help to regulate cerebral blood flow and cerebral O2 homeostasis during acute periods of hypoxia.

  13. Effects of combined epidural and general anesthesia on intraoperative hemodynamic responses, postoperative cellular immunity, and prognosis in patients with gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Xue-Rong; Yang, Hu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study is supposed to investigate the effects of combined epidural and general anesthesia on intraoperative hemodynamic responses, postoperative cellular immunity, and prognosis in patients with gallbladder cancer (GBC). Methods: One hundred forty-four GBC patients were selected and randomly divided into the general anesthesia (GA) group and the combined epidural-general anesthesia (CEGA) group. Before anesthesia induction (t0), at intubation (t1), at the beginning of surgery (t2), 5 minutes after pneumoperitoneum (t3), at the end of surgery (t4), after recovery of spontaneous breathing (t5), after regaining consciousness (t6), and after extubation (t7), the heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and the depth of anesthesia (bispectral index [BIS]) were detected. Blood samples were separately collected 30 minutes before anesthesia induction (T1), 2 hours after the beginning of surgery (T2), at the end of surgery (T3), 1 day after surgery (T4), 3 days after surgery (T5). The survival rates of T cell subsets (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+) and natural killer (NK) cells were determined by flow cytometry. Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), visual analog scale (VAS), and sedation-agitation scale (SAS) were performed to assess postoperative adverse reactions. A 3-year follow-up was conducted. Results: Compared with the GA group, the CEGA group had significant lower SBP values at t5 and t6, lower DBP values at t1, t3, t4, and t5, lower HR values at t1 and t5, and higher BIS values at t4, t5, t6, and t7. No PONV was observed in the CEGA group. In comparison to the GA group, the VAS was markedly increased and survival rates of CD3+, CD4+, and CD4+/CD8+ cells were increased at T2, T3, T4, and T5 in the CEGA group. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were not evidently different between the CEGA group and the GA group. Conclusion: Our study provides evidence that the combined epidural

  14. Salivary Markers of Inflammation in Response to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Slavish, Danica C.; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Engeland, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the ability to detect inflammatory markers in response to stress within naturally occurring social contexts and/or across multiple time points per day within individuals. Salivary collection is a less invasive process than current methods of blood collection and enables intensive naturalistic methodologies, such as those involving extensive repeated measures per day over time. Yet the reliability and validity of saliva-based to blood-based inflammatory biomarkers in response to stress remains unclear. We review and synthesize the published studies that have examined salivary markers of inflammation following exposure to an acute laboratory stressor. Results from each study are reviewed by analyte (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, CRP) and stress type (social-cognitive and exercise-physical), after which methodological issues and limitations are addressed. Although the literature is limited, several inflammatory markers (including IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6) have been reliably determined from saliva and have increased significantly in response to stress across multiple studies, with effect sizes ranging from very small to very large. Although CRP from saliva has been associated with CRP in circulating blood more consistently than other biomarkers have been associated with their counterparts in blood, evidence demonstrating it reliably responds to acute stress is absent. Although the current literature is presently too limited to allow broad assertion that inflammatory biomarkers determined from saliva are valuable for examining acute stress responses, this review suggests that specific targets may be valid and highlights specific areas of need for future research. PMID:25205395

  15. Differences in the Pattern of Hemodynamic Response to Self-Face and Stranger-Face Images in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Sakuta, Yuiko; Shimamura, Keiichi; Ichikawa, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Megumi; Otani, Ryoko; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kanazawa, So; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Sakuta, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    There have been no reports concerning the self-face perception in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). The purpose of this study was to compare the neuronal correlates of viewing self-face images (i.e. images of familiar face) and stranger-face images (i.e. images of an unfamiliar face) in female adolescents with and without AN. We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure hemodynamic responses while the participants viewed full-color photographs of self-face and stranger-face. Fifteen females with AN (mean age, 13.8 years) and 15 age- and intelligence quotient (IQ)-matched female controls without AN (mean age, 13.1 years) participated in the study. The responses to photographs were compared with the baseline activation (response to white uniform blank). In the AN group, the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) significantly increased in the right temporal area during the presentation of both the self-face and stranger-face images compared with the baseline level. In contrast, in the control group, the concentration of oxy-Hb significantly increased in the right temporal area only during the presentation of the self-face image. To our knowledge the present study is the first report to assess brain activities during self-face and stranger-face perception among female adolescents with AN. There were different patterns of brain activation in response to the sight of the self-face and stranger-face images in female adolescents with AN and controls.

  16. Computations of uncertainty mediate acute stress responses in humans.

    PubMed

    de Berker, Archy O; Rutledge, Robb B; Mathys, Christoph; Marshall, Louise; Cross, Gemma F; Dolan, Raymond J; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-03-29

    The effects of stress are frequently studied, yet its proximal causes remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that subjective estimates of uncertainty predict the dynamics of subjective and physiological stress responses. Subjects learned a probabilistic mapping between visual stimuli and electric shocks. Salivary cortisol confirmed that our stressor elicited changes in endocrine activity. Using a hierarchical Bayesian learning model, we quantified the relationship between the different forms of subjective task uncertainty and acute stress responses. Subjective stress, pupil diameter and skin conductance all tracked the evolution of irreducible uncertainty. We observed a coupling between emotional and somatic state, with subjective and physiological tuning to uncertainty tightly correlated. Furthermore, the uncertainty tuning of subjective and physiological stress predicted individual task performance, consistent with an adaptive role for stress in learning under uncertain threat. Our finding that stress responses are tuned to environmental uncertainty provides new insight into their generation and likely adaptive function.

  17. Computations of uncertainty mediate acute stress responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    de Berker, Archy O.; Rutledge, Robb B.; Mathys, Christoph; Marshall, Louise; Cross, Gemma F.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stress are frequently studied, yet its proximal causes remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that subjective estimates of uncertainty predict the dynamics of subjective and physiological stress responses. Subjects learned a probabilistic mapping between visual stimuli and electric shocks. Salivary cortisol confirmed that our stressor elicited changes in endocrine activity. Using a hierarchical Bayesian learning model, we quantified the relationship between the different forms of subjective task uncertainty and acute stress responses. Subjective stress, pupil diameter and skin conductance all tracked the evolution of irreducible uncertainty. We observed a coupling between emotional and somatic state, with subjective and physiological tuning to uncertainty tightly correlated. Furthermore, the uncertainty tuning of subjective and physiological stress predicted individual task performance, consistent with an adaptive role for stress in learning under uncertain threat. Our finding that stress responses are tuned to environmental uncertainty provides new insight into their generation and likely adaptive function. PMID:27020312

  18. Fixation-related FMRI analysis in the domain of reading research: using self-paced eye movements as markers for hemodynamic brain responses during visual letter string processing.

    PubMed

    Richlan, Fabio; Gagl, Benjamin; Hawelka, Stefan; Braun, Mario; Schurz, Matthias; Kronbichler, Martin; Hutzler, Florian

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of using self-paced eye movements during reading (measured by an eye tracker) as markers for calculating hemodynamic brain responses measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Specifically, we were interested in whether the fixation-related fMRI analysis approach was sensitive enough to detect activation differences between reading material (words and pseudowords) and nonreading material (line and unfamiliar Hebrew strings). Reliable reading-related activation was identified in left hemisphere superior temporal, middle temporal, and occipito-temporal regions including the visual word form area (VWFA). The results of the present study are encouraging insofar as fixation-related analysis could be used in future fMRI studies to clarify some of the inconsistent findings in the literature regarding the VWFA. Our study is the first step in investigating specific visual word recognition processes during self-paced natural sentence reading via simultaneous eye tracking and fMRI, thus aiming at an ecologically valid measurement of reading processes. We provided the proof of concept and methodological framework for the analysis of fixation-related fMRI activation in the domain of reading research.

  19. Sleep Disturbance and Older Adults' Inflammatory Responses to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Kathi L.; Ng, H. Mei; Suhr, Julie A.; France, Christopher R.; Marshall, Gailen D.; Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Moynihan, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Poor sleep diminishes mental and physical health. The objective of this study was to examine associations between sleep disturbance and interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses to acute mental stress in older adults. Design Observational study of community-dwelling, healthy older adults. Setting Participants completed the study in a clinical research laboratory of a mid-sized university. Participants Generally healthy, community-dwelling men and women 50 years of age and older. Measurements IL-6 and negative affect at rest and following a series of challenging cognitive tests; sleep quality; depressive symptoms; perceived stress; loneliness. Results Participants categorized as poor sleepers based on Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores had significantly larger IL-6 responses to the cognitive stressors compared to good sleepers. The association between poor sleep and heightened IL-6 response to acute stress was not explained by other psychosocial factors previously linked to immune dysregulation, including depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and loneliness. Conclusions Findings add to the growing evidence for poor sleep as an independent risk factor for poor mental and physical health. Older adults may be particularly vulnerable to effects of sleep disturbance due to significant age-related changes in both sleep and inflammatory regulation. PMID:22327621

  20. Discrepancy among acute guideline levels for emergency response.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Mattias; Palmen, Nicole; Johanson, Gunnar

    2010-12-15

    Acute guidance values are tools for public health risk assessment and management during planning, preparedness and response related to sudden airborne release of hazardous chemicals. The two most frequently used values, i.e. Acute Exposure Guidance Levels (AEGL) and Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG), were compared in qualitative and quantitative terms. There was no significant difference between the general level of AEGL and ERPG values, suggesting the two systems are equally precautious. However, the guidance values diverged by a factor of 3 or more for almost 40% of the substances, including many of high production volume. These deviations could be explained by differences in selection of critical effect or critical study and in a few cases differences in interpretation of the same critical study. Diverging guidance values may hamper proper risk communication and risk management. Key factors for broad international acceptance of harmonized values include transparency of the decision process, agreement on definition of toxicological tiers, and a target population including sensitive groups of the general population. In addition, development of purely health based values is encouraged. Risk management issues, such as land use and emergency response planning should be treated separately, as these rely on national legislation and considerations.

  1. Lymphocyte aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness in acute leukemia of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Blumer, J.L.; Dunn, R.; Esterhay, M.D.; Yamashita, T.S.; Gross, S.

    1981-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity and inducibility were examined in mitogen-stimulated cultured lymphocytes from children with acute leukemia in remission, with nonleukemic malignancies, and with no family or personal history of malignant disease. Neither morphological differences nor differences in mitogen responsivelness were observed among the three sources of cells studied. Levels of constitutive and dibenzanthracene-induced AHH activity were found to be similar among the three groups by analysis of variance. However, when results were analyzed in terms of inducibility ratios, it was found that cells from leukemic children were significantly less inducible (p < 0.005) than cells from unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancies. The reason for this difference became apparent when statistical criteria were employed for the phenotypic separation of individuals who were highly aromatic hydrocarbon responsive and minimally responsive. A significantly larger proportion (p < 0.001) of leukemic children than unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancy were found to be minimally aromatic hydrocarbon responsive. Moreover, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsing while on therapy, longer durations of the first remission were correlated (r = 0.63, p < 0.05) with the highly inducible AHH phenotype.

  2. Acute phase protein response in the capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Bernal, Luis; Feser, Mariane; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; García-Martínez, Juan D; Cerón, José J; Tecles, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the acute phase protein response in capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). Three animal groups were used: 1) healthy animals (n=30), 2) a group in which experimental inflammation with turpentine was induced (n=6), and 3) a group affected with sarcoptic scabies (n=14) in which 10 animals were treated with ivermectin. Haptoglobin (Hp), acid-soluble glycoprotein (ASG) and albumin were analyzed in all animals. In those treated with turpentine, Hp reached its maximum value at 2 wk with a 2.7-fold increase, whereas ASG increased 1.75-fold and albumin decreased 0.87-fold 1 wk after the induction of inflammation. Capybaras affected with sarcoptic scabies presented increases in Hp and ASG of 4.98- and 3.18-fold, respectively, and a 0.87-fold decrease in albumin, compared with healthy animals. Haptoglobin and ASG can be considered as moderate, positive acute phase proteins in capybaras because they showed less than 10-fold increases after an inflammatory process and reached their peak concentrations 1 wk after the induction of inflammation. Conversely, albumin can be considered a negative acute phase protein in capybaras because it showed a reduction in concentration after inflammatory stimulus.

  3. Hemodynamic and metabolic response during dynamic and resistance exercise in different intensities: a cross-sectional study on implications of intensity on safety and symptoms in patients with coronary disease

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Flavia Rossi; Junior, Jose Carlos Bonjorno; Mendes, Renata G; Sperling, Milena Pelosi; Arakelian, Vivian M; Bassi, Daniela; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Resistance (RE) and aerobic exercise (AE) can promote hemodynamic, physiologic and clinical modifications in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The aim of the study is to assess key physiologic and clinical responses during RE at 30% and 60% of 1-RM on a 45° leg press and to compare responses during AE. We evaluated fifteen male subjects with coronary artery disease (60.8±4.7 years) that performed the following tests: (1) incremental AE test on cycle ergometer; (2) 1-RM test on a leg press at 45°; (3) and RE at 30% and 60% of 1-RM for 24 repetitions. Peak cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and the minute ventilation (VE, L/min)/VCO2 ration were measured. We found that both AE and RE at 60% of aerobic and resistance capacity elicited similar hemodynamic and ventilatory responses (p>0.05). However, RE at 30% 1-RM showed more attenuated responses of VO2, VE/VCO2, HR and CO when compared with 60% of aerobic and resistance capacity. Interestingly, the number, percentage and the severity of arrhythmias were higher at 60% 1-RM (P<0.05). Our data suggest that high repetition sets of RE at 60% 1-RM appears to result in hemodynamic, ventilatory, and metabolic changes equivalent to those observed during AE at a comparable intensity. PMID:27335689

  4. Imaging cortical absorption, scattering, and hemodynamic response during ischemic stroke using spatially modulated near-infrared illumination

    PubMed Central

    Abookasis, David; Lay, Christopher C.; Mathews, Marlon S.; Linskey, Mark E.; Frostig, Ron D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a technique that uses spatially modulated near-infrared (NIR) illumination to detect and map changes in both optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering parameters) and tissue composition (oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation) during acute ischemic injury in the rat barrel cortex. Cerebral ischemia is induced using an open vascular occlusion technique of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Diffuse reflected NIR light (680 to 980 nm) from the left parietal somatosensory cortex is detected by a CCD camera before and after MCA occlusion. Monte Carlo simulations are used to analyze the spatial frequency dependence of the reflected light to predict spatiotemporal changes in the distribution of tissue absorption and scattering properties in the brain. Experimental results from seven rats show a 17±4.7% increase in tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin and a 45±3.1, 23±5.4, and 21±2.2% decrease in oxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin concentration and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation levels, respectively, 45 min following induction of cerebral ischemia. An ischemic index (Iisch=ctHHb/ctO2Hb) reveals an average of more then twofold contrast after MCAo. The wavelength-dependence of the reduced scattering (i.e., scatter power) decreased by 35±10.3% after MCA occlusion. Compared to conventional CCD-based intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI), the use of structured illumination and model-based analysis allows for generation of separate maps of light absorption and scattering properties as well as tissue hemoglobin concentration. This potentially provides a powerful approach for quantitative monitoring and imaging of neurophysiology and metabolism with high spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:19405762

  5. Imaging cortical absorption, scattering, and hemodynamic response during ischemic stroke using spatially modulated near-infrared illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Lay, Christopher C.; Mathews, Marlon S.; Linskey, Mark E.; Frostig, Ron D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2009-03-01

    We describe a technique that uses spatially modulated near-infrared (NIR) illumination to detect and map changes in both optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering parameters) and tissue composition (oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation) during acute ischemic injury in the rat barrel cortex. Cerebral ischemia is induced using an open vascular occlusion technique of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Diffuse reflected NIR light (680 to 980 nm) from the left parietal somatosensory cortex is detected by a CCD camera before and after MCA occlusion. Monte Carlo simulations are used to analyze the spatial frequency dependence of the reflected light to predict spatiotemporal changes in the distribution of tissue absorption and scattering properties in the brain. Experimental results from seven rats show a 17+/-4.7% increase in tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin and a 45+/-3.1, 23+/-5.4, and 21+/-2.2% decrease in oxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin concentration and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation levels, respectively, 45 min following induction of cerebral ischemia. An ischemic index (Iisch=ctHHb/ctO2Hb) reveals an average of more then twofold contrast after MCAo. The wavelength-dependence of the reduced scattering (i.e., scatter power) decreased by 35+/-10.3% after MCA occlusion. Compared to conventional CCD-based intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI), the use of structured illumination and model-based analysis allows for generation of separate maps of light absorption and scattering properties as well as tissue hemoglobin concentration. This potentially provides a powerful approach for quantitative monitoring and imaging of neurophysiology and metabolism with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  6. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro- reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationships of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venotis Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). Altered vascular volume had no effect on response relations of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex but did alter the gain of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex (-7.93 q 1.71, -4.36 q 1.38, and -2.56 q 1.59 peripheral resistance units/mmHg for hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic, respectively) independent of shifts in baseline FVR and PVP. These results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulnionary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  7. Acute stress responses: A review and synthesis of ASD, ASR, and CSR.

    PubMed

    Isserlin, Leanna; Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2008-10-01

    Toward the development of a unifying diagnosis for acute stress responses this article attempts to find a place for combat stress reaction (CSR) within the spectrum of other defined acute stress responses. This article critically compares the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder (ASD), acute stress reaction (ASR), and CSR. Prospective studies concerning the predictive value of ASD, ASR, and CSR are reviewed. Questions, recommendations, and implications for clinical practice are raised concerning the completeness of the current acute stress response diagnoses, the heterogeneity of different stressors, the scope of expected outcomes, and the importance of decline in function as an indicator of future psychological, psychiatric, and somatic distress.

  8. Comparison of the hemodynamic response to different visual stimuli in single-event and block stimulation fMRI experiments.

    PubMed

    Janz, C; Schmitt, C; Speck, O; Hennig, J

    2000-11-01

    Experiments with three different types of basic visual stimulation were performed to compare cortical activation in single-event and block trials. Independent of the stimulation paradigm, the single-event presentation leads to highly consistent signal responses regarding both the activated cortical areas and the dynamics of the signal time course. In contrast, signal time courses during block paradigms depend on the stimulus applied and are a complex and nonlinear function of the single-event responses. Additionally, the initial dip during the first 2 seconds after stimulus onset is consistently observed. However, the small amplitude change (-0.1% to -0.3%) requires signal averaging to establish statistical significance of the effect. Furthermore, different patterns of activation were observed within the primary visual cortex. In an anterior part of the primary visual cortex, activation was only observed at the onset and at the cessation of stimulation involving luminance changes.

  9. Time kinetics of the endocrine response to acute psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Richter, S D; Schürmeyer, T H; Schedlowski, M; Hädicke, A; Tewes, U; Schmidt, R E; Wagner, T O

    1996-05-01

    A first-time parachute jump was chosen as a model to evaluate the endocrine response to acute psychological stress. In 43 inexperienced tandem parachutists, blood was drawn continuously from 2 h before to 1 h after the jump and analyzed at 10-min intervals for plasma concentrations of epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, GH, PRL, and TSH. In addition, heart rate was recorded throughout the experiment. There was a significant increase in heart rate and E concentrations during the jump itself. NE, cortisol, GH, PRL, and TSH peaked with a latency of 10-20 min. Apart from cortisol and TSH concentrations, which were still elevated 1 h after the stress event, plasma levels of the other endocrine variables normalized within 1 h following the jump. Statistically significant cross-correlations could be observed between E and NE (r = 0.60, no time lag) and between E and PRL (r = 0.58, 10-min time lag) only. Even in a very homogenous group of subjects and under well-controlled conditions, endocrine responses to acute psychological stress show considerable variations.

  10. Inhibition of stimulated dopamine release and hemodynamic response in the brain through electrical stimulation of rat forepaw.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Iris; Ren, Jiaqian; Wang, Fu-Nien; Xu, Haibo; Mandeville, Joseph B; Kim, Young; Rosen, Bruce R; Jenkins, Bruce G; Hui, Kathleen KS; Kwong, Kenneth K

    2008-01-01

    The subcortical response to peripheral somatosensory stimulation is not well studied. Prior literature suggests that somatosensory stimulation can affect dopaminergic tone. We studied the effects of electrical stimulation near the median nerve on the response to an amphetamine induced increase in synaptic dopamine. We applied the electrical stimulation close to the median nerve 20 minutes after administration of 3mg/kg amphetamine. We used fMRI and microdialysis to measure markers of DA release, together with the release of associated neurotransmitters of striatal Glutamate (Glu) and GABA. Result 1) Changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV), a marker used in fMRI, indicate that electrical stimulation significantly attenuated increased DA release (due to AMPH) in the striatum, thalamus, medial prefrontal and cingulate cortices. 2) Microdialysis showed that electrical stimulation increased Glu and GABA release and attenuated the AMPH-enhanced DA release. The striatal DA dynamics correlated with the CBV response. Conclusion These results demonstrate that electrical stimulation near the median nerve activates Glu/GABA release which subsequently attenuate excess striatal DA release. These data provide evidence for physiologic modulation caused by electroacupuncture at points near the median nerve. PMID:18178315

  11. Electrocardiographic, hemodynamic, and biochemical responses to acute particulate matter (PM) exposure in aged heart failure-prone rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient PM from fossil-fuel emissions is linked to cardiovascular disease and death. This association strengthens in people with preexisting cardiac disease-especially heart failure (HF). The mechanisms explaining PM-induced exacerbation ofHF are unclear. Some o...

  12. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific.

  13. Enhanced vagal baroreflex response during 24 h after acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Adams, W. C.

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated carotid-cardiac baroreflex responses in eight normotensive men (25-41 yr) on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h after graded supine cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, this 24-h protocol was repeated with no exercise (control). Beat-to-beat R-R intervals were measured during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses from 40 to -65 mmHg; changes of R-R intervals were plotted against carotid pressure (systolic pressure minus neck chamber pressure). The maximum slope of the response relationship increased (P less than 0.05) from preexercise to 12 h (3.7 +/- 0.4 to 7.1 +/- 0.7 ms/mmHg) and remained significantly elevated through 24 h. The range of the R-R response was also increased from 217 +/- 24 to 274 +/- 32 ms (P less than 0.05). No significant differences were observed during the control 24-h period. An acute bout of graded exercise designed to elicit exhaustion increases the sensitivity and range of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response for 24 h and enhances its capacity to buffer against hypotension by increasing heart rate. These results may represent an underlying mechanism that contributes to blood pressure stability after intense exercise.

  14. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro-reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationship, of the cardio-pulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venous Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). The results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  15. The role of ventilation mode using a laryngeal mask airway during gynecological laparoscopy on lung mechanics, hemodynamic response and blood gas analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jarahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Halvaei, Iman; Rahimi-Bashar, Farshid; Behdad, Shekoufeh; Abbasizadeh Nasrabady, Rouhollah; Yasaei, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are two methods for ventilation in gynecological laparoscopy: volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) and pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV). Objective: To compare the lung mechanics, hemodynamic response and arterial blood gas analysis and gas exchange of two modes of VCV and PCV using laryngeal mask airway (LMA) at different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Sixty infertile women referred for diagnostic laparoscopy, based on ventilation mode, were randomly divided into two groups of VCV (tidal volume: 10 ml/kg) and PCV. In the PCV group, ventilation was initiated with a peak airway pressure (tidal volume: 10 ml/kg, upper limit: 35 cm H2O). In both groups, the arterial blood samples were taken in several time intervals (5, 10 and 15 min after LMA insertion) for blood gas evaluation. Also the lung mechanics parameters were continuously monitored and were recorded at different time intervals. Results: There were no significant differences for patient’s age, weight, height and BMI in two groups. The peak and plateau airway pressure were significantly higher in VCV group compared to PCV group 5 and 10 min after insertion of LMA. PaO2 was significantly higher after 10 and 15 min in VCV group compared to PCV group (p=0.005 and p=0.03, respectively). PaCO2 showed significant increase after 5 min in PCV group, but the differences were not significant after 10 and 15 min in two groups. The end tidal CO2 showed significant increase after 10 and 15 min in VCV compared to PCV group. Conclusion: Both VCV and PCV seem to be suitable for gynecological laparoscopy. However, airway pressures are significantly lower in PCV compared to VCV. PMID:28066834

  16. Acute phase response in cattle infected with Anaplasma marginale.

    PubMed

    Nazifi, S; Razavi, S M; Kaviani, F; Rakhshandehroo, E

    2012-03-23

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the acute phase responses via the assessment of the concentration of serum sialic acids (total, lipid bound and protein bound), inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and acute phase proteins (Hp and SAA) in 20 adult crossbred cattle naturally infected by Anaplasma marginale. The infected animals were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of parasitemia rate (<20% and >20%). Also, as a control group, 10 clinically healthy cattle from the same farms were sampled. Our data revealed significant decreases in red blood cell count (RBC), hematocrite (PCV) and hemoglobine (Hb) in infected cattle compared to healthy ones. Conversely, the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, serum sialic acids and the circulatory IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the diseased cattle (P<0.05). In addition, it was evident that the progression of parasitemia in infected cattle did not induce any significant alterations in the hematological indices (RBCs, PCV and Hb) and the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin and fibrinogen. SAA was the most sensitive factor to change in the diseased cattle. Therefore, increase in SAA concentration may be a good indicator of inflammatory process in cattle naturally infected with Anaplasma marginale.

  17. Acute physiological responses of squirrel monkeys exposed to hyperdynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and behavioral responses to a hyperdynamic environment were examined in four adult male squirrel monkeys. After baseline monitoring at 1 G, monkeys were exposed to one of three conditions: (1) +2 Gz for 60 minutes, (2) +2.9 Gz max for 8 minutes (simulating Space Shuttle launch), or (3) +1.7 Gz max for 19 minutes (simulating Space Shuttle reentry). During all experimental conditions, heart rate rose, and colonic temperature began to decline within the first ten minutes of centrifugation and decreased by as much as 2 C in some instances. Behaviorally, during centrifugation, the monkeys seemed to exhibit drowsiness and fall asleep, an observation not made during the control period. It is concluded that primates are susceptible to acute hyperdynamic field exposure.

  18. Hemodynamic and autonomic nervous system responses to mixed meal ingestion in healthy young and old subjects and dysautonomic patients with postprandial hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Ryan, S. M.; Parker, J. A.; Freeman, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although postprandial hypotension is a common cause of falls and syncope in elderly persons and in patients with autonomic insufficiency, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS. We examined the hemodynamic, splanchnic blood pool, plasma norepinephrine (NE), and heart rate (HR) power spectra responses to a standardized 400-kcal mixed meal in 11 healthy young (age, 26 +/- 5 years) and nine healthy elderly (age, 80 +/- 5 years) subjects and 10 dysautonomic patients with symptomatic postprandial hypotension (age, 65 +/- 16 years). Cardiac and splanchnic blood pools were determined noninvasively by radionuclide scans, and forearm vascular resistance was determined using venous occlusion plethysmography. In healthy young and old subjects, splanchnic blood volume increased, but supine blood pressure remained unchanged after the meal. In both groups, HR increased and systemic vascular resistance remained stable. Forearm vascular resistance and cardiac index increased after the meal in elderly subjects, whereas these responses were highly variable and of smaller magnitude in the young. Young subjects demonstrated postprandial increases in low-frequency HR spectral power, representing cardiac sympatho-excitation, but plasma NE remained unchanged. In elderly subjects, plasma NE increased after the meal but without changes in the HR power spectrum. Patients with dysautonomia had a large postprandial decline in blood pressure associated with no change in forearm vascular resistance, a fall in systemic vascular resistance, and reduction in left ventricular end diastolic volume index. HR increased in these patients but without changes in plasma NE or the HR power spectrum. CONCLUSIONS. 1) In healthy elderly subjects, the maintenance of blood pressure homeostasis after food ingestion is associated with an increase in HR, forearm vascular resistance, cardiac index, and plasma NE. In both young and old, systemic vascular resistance is

  19. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  20. Early Biventricular Molecular Responses to an Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Erdal, Cenk; Karakülah, Gökhan; Fermancı, Emel; Kunter, İmge; Silistreli, Erdem; Canda, Tülay; Erdal, Esra; Hepaguslar, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains as one of the most common lethal diseases in the world and therefore it is necessary to understand its effect on molecular basis. Genome-wide microarray analysis provides us to predict potential biomarkers and signaling pathways for this purpose. Objectives: The aim of this study is to understand the molecular basis of the immediate right ventricular cellular response to left ventricular AMI. Material and Methods: A rat model of left anterior descending coronary artery ligation was used to assess the effect of left ventricular AMI on both the right ventricle as a remote zone and the left ventricle as an ischemic/infarct zone. Microarray technology was applied to detect the gene expression. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathways analysis were done to identify effected pathways and related genes. Results: We found that immune response, cell chemotaxis, inflammation, cytoskeleton organization are significantly deregulated in ischemic zone as early response within 30 min. Unexpectedly, there were several affected signaling pathways such as cell chemotaxis, regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, and regulation of caveolea regulation of anti-apoptosis, regulation of cytoskeleton organization and cell adhesion on the remote zone in the right ventricle. Conclusion: This data demonstrates that there is an immediate molecular response in both ventricles after an AMI. Although the ischemia did not histologically involve the right ventricle; there is a clear molecular response to the infarct in the left ventricle. This provides us new insights to understand molecular mechanisms behind AMI and to find more effective drug targets. PMID:22211093

  1. Effect of etomidate and propofol induction on hemodynamic and endocrine response in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting/mitral valve and aortic valve replacement surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Ram Prasad; Vatal, Ajay; Pathak, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The concerns for induction of anaesthesia in patients undergoing cardiac surgery include hemodynamic stability, attenuation of stress response and maintenance of balance between myocardial oxygen demand and supply. Various Intravenous anaesthetic agents like Thiopentone, Etomidate, Propofol, Midazolam, and Ketamine have been used for anesthetizing patients for cardiac surgeries. However, many authors have expressed concerns regarding induction with thiopentone, midazolam and ketamine. Hence, Propofol and Etomidate are preferred for induction in these patients. However, these two drugs have different characteristics. Etomidate is preferred for patients with poor left ventricular (LV) function as it provides stable cardiovascular profile. But there are concerns about reduction in adrenal suppression and serum cortisol levels. Propofol, on the other hand may cause a reduction in systemic vascular resistance and subsequent hypotension. Thus, this study was conducted to compare induction with these two agents in cardiac surgeries. Methods: Baseline categorical and continuous variables were compared using Fisher's exact test and student's t test respectively. Hemodynamic variables were compared using student's t test for independent samples. The primary outcome (serum cortisol and blood sugar) of the study was compared using Wilcoxon Rank Sum test. The P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Etomidate provides more stable hemodynamic parameters as compared to Propofol. Propofol causes vasodilation and may result in drop of systematic BP. Etomidate can therefore be safely used for induction in patients with good LV function for CABG/MVR/AVR on CPB without serious cortisol suppression lasting more than twenty-four hours. PMID:25849685

  2. Tempol improves renal hemodynamics and pressure natriuresis in hyperthyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez Gómez, Isabel; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; de Dios Luna, Juan; García-Estañ, Joaquín; Vargas, Félix

    2008-03-01

    Hyperthyroidism in rats is associated with increased oxidative stress. These animals also show abnormal renal hemodynamics and an attenuated pressure-diuresis-natriuresis (PDN) response. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress as a mediator of these alterations by examining acute effects of tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. The effects of increasing bolus doses of tempol (25-150 micromol/kg) on mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal vascular resistance (RVR), and cortical (CBF) and medullary (MBF) blood flow were studied in control and thyroxine (T4)-treated rats. In another experiment, tempol was infused at 150 micromol.kg(-1).h(-1) to analyze its effects on the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and on PDN response in these animals. Tempol dose dependently decreased MAP and RVR and increased CBF and MBF in control and T4-treated rats, but the T4 group showed a greater responsiveness to tempol in all of these variables. The highest dose of tempol decreased RVR by 13.5 +/- 2.1 and 5.5 +/- 1.2 mmHg.ml(-1).min(-1) in hyperthyroid (P < 0.01) and control rats, respectively. GFR was not changed by tempol in controls but was significantly increased in the hyperthyroid group. Tempol did not change the absolute or fractional PDN responses of controls but significantly improved those of hyperthyroid rats, although without attaining normal values. Tempol increased the slopes of the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and natriuresis (T4+tempol: 0.17 +/- 0.05; T4: 0.09 +/- 0.03 microeq.min(-1).g(-1).mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and reduced 8-isoprostane excretion in hyperthyroid rats. These results show that antioxidant treatment with tempol improves renal hemodynamic variables and PDN response in hyperthyroid rats, indicating the participation of an increased oxidative stress in these mechanisms.

  3. In-vivo optical imaging and spectroscopy of cerebral hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao

    Functional optical imaging techniques, such as diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy and laser speckle imaging (LSI), were used in research and clinical settings to measure cerebral hemodynamics. In this thesis, theoretical and experimental developments of the techniques and their in-vivo applications ranging from small animals to adult humans are demonstrated. Near infrared diffuse optical techniques non-invasively measure hemoglobin concentrations, blood oxygen saturation (diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, DRS) and blood flow (diffuse correlation spectroscopy, DCS) in deep tissues, e.g. brain. A noise model was derived for DCS measurements. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured with DCS was validated with arterial-spin-labeling MRI. Three-dimensional CBF tomography was obtained during cortical spreading depression from a rat using the optimized diffuse correlation tomographic method. Cerebral hemodynamics in newborn piglets after traumatic brain injury were continuously monitored optically for six hours to demonstrate the feasibility of using diffuse optical techniques as bedside patient monitors. Cerebral autoregulation in piglets and human stroke patients was demonstrated to be non-invasively assessable via the continuous DCS measurement. Significant differences of CBF responses to head-of-bead maneuvers were observed between the peri- and contra-infarct hemispheres in human stroke patients. A significant portion of patient population showed paradoxical CBF responses, indicating the importance of individualized stroke management. The development of a speckle noise model revealed the source of noise for LSI. LSI was then applied to study the acute functional recovery of the rat brain following transient brain ischemia. The spatial and temporal cerebral blood flow responses to functional stimulation were statistically quantified. The area of activation, and the temporal response to stimulation were found significantly altered by the ischemic insult, while the

  4. Acute hormonal responses following different velocities of eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Libardi, Cleiton A; Nogueira, Felipe R D; Vechin, Felipe C; Conceição, Miguel S; Bonganha, Valéria; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara Patricia T

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the acute hormonal responses following two different eccentric exercise velocities. Seventeen healthy, untrained, young women were randomly placed into two groups to perform five sets of six maximal isokinetic eccentric actions at slow (30° s(-1) ) and fast (210° s(-1) ) velocities with 60-s rest between sets. Growth hormone, cortisol, free and total testosterone were assessed by blood samples collected at baseline, immediately postexercise, 5, 15 and 30 min following eccentric exercise. Changes in hormonal responses over time were compared between groups, using a mixed model followed by a Tukey's post hoc test. The main findings of the present study were that the slow group showed higher growth hormone values immediately (5·08 ± 2·85 ng ml(-1) , P = 0·011), 5 (5·54 ± 3·01 ng ml(-1) , P = 0·004) and 15 min (4·30 ± 2·87 ng ml(-1) , P = 0·021) posteccentric exercise compared with the fast group (1·39 ± 2·41 ng ml(-1) , 1·34 ± 1·97 ng ml(-1) and 1·24 ± 1·87 ng ml(-1) , respectively), and other hormonal responses were not different between groups (P>0·05). In conclusion, slow eccentric exercise velocity enhances more the growth hormone(GH) response than fast eccentric exercise velocity without cortisol and testosterone increases.

  5. Acute phase response in lame crossbred dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, A.; Randhawa, Swaran Singh; Sharma, S.; Bansal, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to study acute phase response based on acute phase proteins (APPs) such as C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), and fibrinogen in lame crossbred dairy cattle. Materials and Methods: Lame animals (n=30) were selected within 3-7 days of being noticed as lame by the farm veterinarian, from a local dairy farm in southeast Ludhiana over a period of 6 months, stratified proportionately with respect to stage of lactation with non-lame healthy cows (n=10). All the cows were otherwise healthy and did not have any other inflammatory problems such as pneumonia, enteritis, mastitis, or any kind of acute uterine inflammation. Blood samples were collected from all the animals; serum and plasma samples were separated and stored at −20°C. The levels of CRP, Hp, and SAA were estimated using Sandwich ELISA, whereas fibrinogen was estimated by heat precipitation method. Results: SAA levels in lame cows were significantly higher (22.19±0.85 µg/ml), approximately 3 times as compared to non-lame cows (8.89±0.72 µg/ml), whereas serum Hp concentration was approximately 20 times higher in the lame cattle (21.71±3.32 mg/dl) as compared to non-lame cows (1.17±0.07 mg/dl). Fibrinogen also increased in the lame cattle (3.97±0.22 g/L) as compared to non-lame group (1.40±0.17 g/L). Serum CRP levels analyzed in the lame cattle for the first time in the present study, and significant high concentration was appreciated in lame cattle (4.41±0.33 mg/L) as compared to non-lame cattle (0.61±0.14 mg/L). Lame cattle were having more of sole hemorrhages, sole ulcers, and white line lesions as compared to non-lame cattle. Conclusion: It can be concluded that lame cattle exhibit high levels of APPs including CRP, Hp, SAA, and fibrinogen as compared to non-lame cattle. PMID:27956769

  6. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs.

  7. Effect of fluid ingestion on orthostatic responses following acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is impaired following an acute bout of exercise. This study examined the effect of fluid ingestion following treadmill exercise in restoring the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic stress. Five men (age, 29.6 +/- 3.4 yrs) were exposed to a graded lower body negative (LBNP) pressure protocol (0 to -50 mmHg) during euhydration without exercise (C), 20 minutes after exercise dehydration (D), 20 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI20), and 60 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI60). Fluid ingestion (mean +/- SE) consisted of water-ingestion equivalent to 50% of the body weight lost during exercise (520 +/- 15 ml). Exercise dehydration resulted in significantly higher heart rates (119 +/- 8 vs 82 +/- 7 bpm), lower systolic blood pressures (95 +/- 1.7 vs 108 +/- 2.3 mmHg), a smaller increase in leg circumference (3.7 +/- 4 vs 6.9 +/- 1.0 mm), and an attenuated increase in total peripheral resistance (2.58 +/- 1.2 vs 4.28 +/- 0.9 mmHg/L/min) at -50 mmHg LBNP compared to the C condition. Fluid ingestion (both 20 and 60), partially restored the heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance responses to LBNP, but did not influence the change in leg circumference during LBNP (4 +/- 0.3 for R20 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 mm for R60). These data illustrate the effectiveness of fluid ingestion on improving orthostatic responses following exercise, and suggest that dehydration is a contributing factor to orthostatic intolerance following exercise.

  8. Tail docking in pigs: acute physiological and behavioural responses.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, M A; Bryer, P J; Krebs, N; McGlone, J J

    2008-02-01

    Tail docking of piglets is a routine procedure on farms to control tail-biting behaviour; however, docking can cause an acute stress response. The objectives of this research were to determine the stress responses to tail docking in piglets and to compare two methods of tail docking; cautery iron (CAUT) and the more commonly used blunt trauma cutters (BT). At approximately 6 days of age, piglets were tail docked using CAUT (n = 20), BT (n = 20) or sham tail docked with their tails remaining intact (CON; n = 40). Blood samples were taken prior to tail docking and at 30, 60 and 90 min after tail docking to evaluate the effect of tail docking on white blood cell (WBC) measures and cortisol concentrations. The above experiment was repeated to observe behaviour without the periodic blood sampling, so as not to confound the effects of blood sampling on piglet behaviour. Piglet behaviour was recorded in the farrowing crate using 1 min scan-samples via live observations for 60 min prior to and 90 min after tail docking. Total WBC counts were reduced (P > 0.05) among BT and CAUT compared with CON piglets 30 min after tail docking. Cortisol concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) among BT compared with CON and CAUT piglets 60 min after tail docking. Cautery and BT-docked piglets spent more (P < 0.05) time posterior scooting compared with CON piglets between 0 and 15 min, and 31 and 45 min after tail docking. Piglets tail docked using CAUT and BT tended to spend more (P < 0.07) time sitting than CON piglets between 0 and 15 min post tail docking. Elevated blood cortisol can be reduced by the use of the CAUT rather than the BT method of tail docking. Although the tail docking-induced rise in cortisol was prevented by using CAUT, the behavioural response to BT and CAUT docking methods was similar.

  9. A randomized controlled trial to assess the central hemodynamic response to exercise in patients with transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, J; Tzeng, Y-C; Lambrick, D; Woolley, B; Allan, P D; O'Donnell, T; Lanford, J; Wong, L; Stoner, L

    2017-01-01

    Early exercise engagement elicits meaningful changes in peripheral blood pressure in patients diagnosed with transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke. However, central hemodynamic markers may provide clinicians with important diagnostic and prognostic information beyond that provided by peripheral blood pressure readings. The purpose of this single-centre, randomized, parallel-group clinical trial was to determine the effect of a 12-week aerobic exercise intervention on central and peripheral hemodynamic variables in patients with TIA or minor stroke. In this study, 47 participants (66±10 years) completed a baseline assessment, which involved the measurement of central and peripheral hemodynamic parameters, undertaken in the morning, in a fasted state. Participants were randomized to either a 12-week exercise or control group on completion of the baseline assessment. An identical follow-up assessment was completed post intervention. Central hemodynamic variables were assessed using an oscillometric device at both assessments. Analysis of covariance demonstrated a significant interaction for central and peripheral blood pressure and augmentation index (all P<0.05; ηp2.09–.11), with the exercise group presenting lower values than the control group post intervention (118±17 vs 132±28 mm Hg for central blood pressure; 125±19 vs 138±28 mm Hg for peripheral blood pressure; 104±49 vs 115±67% for augmentation index). The present study demonstrates that participation in an exercise program soon after stroke/TIA diagnosis may elicit significant beneficial changes to a patient's central systolic blood pressure and augmentation index. This may positively impact upon the treatment strategies implemented by clinicians in the care of patients with TIA and minor stroke. PMID:27680390

  10. The acute phase response of cod (Gadus morhua L.): expression of immune response genes.

    PubMed

    Audunsdottir, Sigridur S; Magnadottir, Bergljot; Gisladottir, Berglind; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Bragason, Birkir Th

    2012-02-01

    An acute phase response (APR) was experimentally induced in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) by intramuscular injection of turpentine oil. The change in the expression of immune related genes was monitored in the anterior kidney and the spleen over a period of 7 days. The genes examined were two types of pentraxins, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA-I), the complement component C3, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), transferrin, cathelicidin, and hepcidin. All genes were constitutively expressed in both organs and their expression amplified by the turpentine injection. A pattern of response was observed both with respect to the organ preference and to the timing of a maximum response. The increased gene expression of the pentraxins, ApoA-I and C3 was restricted to the anterior kidney, the gene expression of IL-1β, cathelicidin, and transferrin increased in both organs, while hepcidin gene expression was only significantly increased in the spleen. The pentraxins and ApoA-I appear to be early mediators of APR in cod, possibly stimulating C3 and IL-1β response, while the antimicrobial peptides may play a minor role. The increase in transferrin gene expression in both organs, and apparent indifference to cortisol release associated with the turpentine injection, suggests that this could be a typical acute phase protein in cod.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome after verapamil intoxication: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Izdes, S; Altintas, N D; Soykut, C

    2014-04-01

    Verapamil intoxication is a life-threatening condition that often presents with severe hemodynamic instability and requires vasopressor support. There are also documented case reports of the development of non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema after verapamil overdose. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for pulmonary oedema remain unclear. Here, we describe a 36-year-old woman who was admitted to the intensive care unit after ingesting high-dose verapamil and subsequently developed acute respiratory distress syndrome soon after hemodynamic stabilization. Possible mechanisms are presented after taking into account findings in the current literature. Acute respiratory distress syndrome should be considered early during the evaluation of patients with verapamil intoxication.

  12. Achilles tendon biomechanics in response to acute intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael F; Lillie, Kurtis R; Bergeron, Daniel J; Cota, Kevin C; Yoon, Joseph S; Kraemer, William J; Denegar, Craig R

    2014-05-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common disorder and is more prevalent in men. Although differences in tendon mechanics between men and women have been reported, understanding of tendon mechanics in young active people is limited. Moreover, there is limited understanding of changes in tendon mechanics in response to acute exercise. Our purpose was to compare Achilles tendon mechanics in active young adult men and women at rest and after light and strenuous activity in the form of repeated jumping with an added load. Participants consisted of 17 men and 14 women (18-30 years) who were classified as being at least moderately physically active as defined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Tendon force/elongation measures were obtained during an isometric plantarflexion contraction on an isokinetic dynamometer with simultaneous ultrasound imaging of the Achilles tendon approximate to the soleus myotendinous junction. Data were collected at rest, after a 10-minute treadmill walk, and after a fatigue protocol of 100 toe jumps performed in a Smith machine, with a load equaling 20% of body mass. We found greater tendon elongation, decreased stiffness, and lower Young's modulus only in women after the jumping exercise. Force and stress were not different between groups but decreased subsequent to the jumping exercise bout. In general, women had greater elongation and strain, less stiffness, and a lower Young's modulus during plantarflexor contraction. These data demonstrate differences in tendon mechanics between men and women and suggest a potential protective mechanism explaining the lower incidence of Achilles tendinopathy in women.

  13. Acute sun damage and photoprotective responses in whales.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Gendron, Diane; Knell, Rob J; O'Toole, Edel A; Singh, Manuraj; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2011-05-22

    Rising levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) secondary to ozone depletion are an issue of concern for public health. Skin cancers and intraepidermal dysplasia are increasingly observed in individuals that undergo chronic or excessive sun exposure. Such alterations of skin integrity and function are well established for humans and laboratory animals, but remain unexplored for mammalian wildlife. However, effects are unlikely to be negligible, particularly for species such as whales, whose anatomical or life-history traits force them to experience continuous sun exposure. We conducted photographic and histological surveys of three seasonally sympatric whale species to investigate sunburn and photoprotection. We find that lesions commonly associated with acute severe sun damage in humans are widespread and that individuals with fewer melanocytes have more lesions and less apoptotic cells. This suggests that the pathways used to limit and resolve UVR-induced damage in humans are shared by whales and that darker pigmentation is advantageous to them. Furthermore, lesions increased significantly in time, as would be expected under increasing UV irradiance. Apoptosis and melanocyte proliferation mirror this trend, suggesting that whales are capable of quick photoprotective responses. We conclude that the thinning ozone layer may pose a risk to the health of whales and other vulnerable wildlife.

  14. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Slone, William L; Moses, Blake S; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-04-26

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response.

  15. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Slone, William L.; Moses, Blake S.; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F.

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  16. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Stephanie E; Menon, Prahlad G; Kowalski, William J; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B; Butcher, Jonathan T; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-08-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) are associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. Here, we combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alter as a result of local interventions obstructing individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image-derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy-guided femtosecond laser-based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 h. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes, however, were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  17. Sildenafil Exposure and Hemodynamic Effect after Fontan Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tunks, Robert D.; Barker, Piers C. A.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Fleming, Gregory A.; Laughon, Matthew; Li, Jennifer S.; Hill, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine sildenafil exposure and hemodynamic effect in children after Fontan single-ventricle surgery. Design Prospective, dose-escalation trial. Setting Single-center, pediatric catheterization laboratory. Patients 9 children post Fontan single-ventricle surgical palliation and undergoing elective cardiac catheterization: Median (range) age and weight: 5.2 years (2.5–9.4) and 16.3 kg (9.5–28.1). Five children (55%) were male, and 6/9 (67%) had a systemic right ventricle. Interventions Catheterization and echocardiography performed before and immediately after single-dose intravenous sildenafil (0.25, 0.35, or 0.45 mg/kg over 20 minutes). Measurements Peak sildenafil and des-methyl sildenafil concentration, change in hemodynamic parameters measured by cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. Main Results Maximum sildenafil concentrations ranged from 124–646 ng/ml and were above the in vitro threshold needed for 77% phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibition in 8/9 children and 90% inhibition in 7/7 of children with doses ≥0.35 mg/kg. Sildenafil improved stroke volume (+22%, p=0.05) and cardiac output (+10%, p=0.01) with no significant change in heart rate in 8/9 children. Sildenafil also lowered systemic (-16%, p=0.01) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) in all 9 children (median baseline PVRI 2.4 [range: 1.3, 3.7]; decreased to 1.9 [0.8, 2.7] WU x m2; p=0.01) with no dose-response effect. Pulmonary arterial pressures decreased (−10%, p=0.02) and pulmonary blood flow increased (9%, p=0.02). There was no change in myocardial performance index and no adverse events. Conclusions After Fontan surgery, sildenafil infusion acutely improves cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, increasing cardiac index. For the range of doses studied, exposure was within the acute safety range reported in adult subjects. PMID:24201857

  18. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  19. [The systemic inflammatory response syndrome correction in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Agapov, M A; Khoreva, M V; Gorskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease of variable severity. In which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In our research we have estimated influence of not steroid anti-inflammatory preparation on synthesis pro-and anti-inflammatory Cytokines at healthy donors and at patients with Acute pancreatitis.

  20. Renal hemodynamic effects of relaxin in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie; Davison, John; Conrad, Kirk; Danielson, Lee

    2005-05-01

    Rat studies have convincingly demonstrated the essential role of the ovarian hormone relaxin in mediating gestational renal hemodynamic and osmoregulatory changes in that species. We describe a model in nonpregnant volunteers using exogenous hCG to stimulate the production and release of ovarian relaxin in order to assess renal hemodynamic responses. Women (n = 10) were serially studied +/- hCG stimulation during menstrual cycles with measurement of inulin, PAH, and neutral dextran clearances (to determine glomerular filtration rate [GFR], renal plasma flow [RPF], and glomerular porosity, respectively). Controls were women without ovarian function (n = 6) and men (n = 10). GFR and RPF were increased in the luteal phase compared to the follicular phase (15.3% increase in GFR, P < 0.005; 17.8% increase in RPF, P < 0.05). In controls, GFR and RPF were not significantly different between study occasions. Although exogenous hCG did not stimulate relaxin secretion in women without ovarian function or in men, it did so in normal women, but not into the pregnancy range. In no group were renal hemodynamics augmented by administered hCG. In naturally occurring cycles, increased serum relaxin is associated with augmented renal hemodynamics. As luteal stimulation with hCG failed to yield pregnancy relaxin levels, the use of exogenous relaxin for human administration is needed to further elucidate the renal vasodilatory properties of relaxin.

  1. Effects of normoxic and hypoxic exercise regimens on cardiac, muscular, and cerebral hemodynamics suppressed by severe hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jong-Shyan; Wu, Min-Huan; Mao, Tso-Yen; Fu, Tieh-cheng; Hsu, Chih-Chin

    2010-07-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning prevents cerebrovascular/cardiovascular disorders by increasing resistance to acute ischemic stress, but severe hypoxic exposure disturbs vascular hemodynamics. This study compared how various exercise regimens with/without hypoxia affect hemodynamics and oxygenation in cardiac, muscle, and cerebral tissues during severe hypoxic exposure. Sixty sedentary males were randomly divided into five groups. Each group (n = 12) received one of five interventions: 1) normoxic (21% O(2)) resting control, 2) hypoxic (15% O(2)) resting control, 3) normoxic exercise (50% maximum work rate under 21% O(2); N-E group), 4) hypoxic-relative exercise (50% maximal heart rate reserve under 15% O(2); H-RE group), or 5) hypoxic-absolute exercise (50% maximum work rate under 15% O(2); H-AE group) for 30 min/day, 5 days/wk, for 4 wk. A recently developed noninvasive bioreactance device was used to measure cardiac hemodynamics, and near-infrared spectroscopy was used to assess perfusion and oxygenation in the vastus lateralis (VL)/gastrocnemius (GN) muscles and frontal cerebral lobe (FC). Our results demonstrated that the H-AE group had a larger improvement in aerobic capacity compared with the N-E group. Both H-RE and H-AE ameliorated the suppression of cardiac stroke volume and the GN hyperemic response (Delta total Hb/min) and reoxygenation rate by acute 12% O(2) exposure. Simultaneously, the two hypoxic interventions enhanced perfusion (Delta total Hb) and O(2) extraction [Delta deoxyHb] of the VL muscle during the 12% O(2) exercise. Although acute 12% O(2) exercise decreased oxygenation (Delta O(2)Hb) of the FC, none of the 4-wk interventions influenced the cerebral perfusion and oxygenation during normoxic/hypoxic exercise tests. Therefore, we conclude that moderate hypoxic exercise training improves cardiopulmonary fitness and increases resistance to disturbance of cardiac hemodynamics by severe hypoxia, concurrence with enhancing O(2) delivery/utilization in

  2. Acute metabolic response to fasted and postprandial exercise

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Filipe Dinato; Correia, Ana Luiza Matias; Teixeira, Denilson da Silva; da Silva Neto, Domingos Vasco; Fernandes, Ítalo Sávio Gonçalves; Viana, Mário Boratto Xavier; Petitto, Mateus; da Silva Sampaio, Rodney Antônio; Chaves, Sandro Nobre; Alves, Simone Teixeira; Dantas, Renata Aparecida Elias; Mota, Márcio Rabelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the acute metabolic response to exercise in fasting and postprandial. For this, ten individuals were submitted to an incremental treadmill test, with an initial speed of 5 and 1 km/h increments every minute, with no inclination, and a body composition assessment. After this 1st day, all volunteers were submitted to two experimental procedures (fasting and postprandial), with an aerobic exercise performed for 36 minutes at 65% of maximal oxygen consumption. At postprandial procedure, all subjects ingested a breakfast containing 59.3 g of carbohydrate (76.73%), 9.97 g of protein (12.90%), 8.01 g of lipids (10.37%), with a total energy intake of 349.17 kcal. An analysis of plasma concentration of triglycerides, lactate, and glucose was performed in two stages: before and after exercise. The Shapiro–Wilk test was used to verify the normality of the data. For analysis of glucose concentration, plasma lactate, and triglycerides, we used a repeated measures analysis of variance factorial 2×2, with Bonferroni multiple comparison test. The significance level of P<0.05 was adopted. The results indicated a maintenance level of glucose at fasting and a decrease in glucose concentration at postprandial exercise. Both conditions increase plasma lactate. Triglycerides also increased in the two experimental conditions; however, after exercise fasting, the increase was significantly higher than in the postprandial exercise. These data suggest that both exercises could increase plasma lactate and triglycerides. However, exercise performed in fasting condition decreases glucose concentration and increases triglycerides, even more than postprandial exercise. PMID:26316800

  3. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  4. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  5. Catecholaminergic responses in vas deferens isolated from rats submitted to acute swimming stress.

    PubMed

    Chies, A B; Pereira, O C

    1995-09-01

    The study was performed to examine the responses to catecholamines in vas deferens isolated from rats submitted to acute swimming-induced stress. It was demonstrated that acute stress induces a significant subsensitivity of rat vas deferens to norepinephrine. This subsensitivity was inhibited when the experiment was carried out in the presence of either cocaine (10-5 M) or timolol (10-5 M). On the other hand, the rat vas deferens sensitivity to methoxamine was significantly increased by acute swimming-induced stress. Thus, despite acute swimming stress inducing a reduction in response to norepinephrine, the alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated contractile response was increased. Additionally there were increases in neuronal uptake and beta2-adrenoceptor activity that opposes the alpha1-adrenoceptor activity. Integrated, these phenomena are responsible for the rat vas deferens subsensitivity to norepinephrine which may be involved in body homeostasis in stressogenic situations.

  6. Circulatory response to hyperthermia during acute normovolaemic haemodilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Anita; Fahim, M.

    Cats anaesthetized with a mixture of chloralose and urethane were exposed to heat stress in two groups. In the first group (n=10) of control animals, the effect of heat stress on haemodynamic variables was recorded at control haematocrit (HCT) of 42.0+/-1.0%. In a second group, the effect of heat stress was studied after induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution (HCT of 13.0+/-1.0%). Haemodilution was induced to a maximum of 60% replacement of blood with dextran (mol.wt. 150000). Heat stress was induced by surface heating and core body temperature was raised from 37° C to 42° C. The effect of heat stress and haemodilution on various haemodynamic variables, viz. left ventricular pressure (LVP), left ventricular contractility (LVdP/dtmax), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), arterial blood pressure (ABP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and arterial blood PO2, PCO2 and pH was examined. Haemodilution produced significant (P<0.05) increases in HR and CO but there were no significant (P>0.05) changes in ABP, RAP, LVdP/dtmax and total peripherial resistance (TPR). Hyperthermia caused a significant fall (P<0.05) in TPR. However, the percentage fall in TPR was higher in the control group. On exposure to heat stress, there were significant (P<0.05I increases in HR and CO in both the groups; however, HR and CO values were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the haemodiluted group compared to the control. The latter findings could be due either to the higher basal values of these variables with the fall in HCT or to inefficient cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The lack of efficient regulatory control under such severe stress conditions makes the cardiovascular system of anaemic animals more vulnerable to heat stress. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed deleterious effects of heat stress in both the groups. The higher values of HR and CO in the haemodiluted group may be responsible for circulatory failure at low HCT values, indicating a higher risk

  7. Natural variations in the stress and acute phase responses of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The initial response of the innate immune system upon activation has been defined as the acute phase response (APR). Activation of the APR results in several responses that include fever, metabolic adaptations, and changes in behavior. The APR can be modulated by many factors, with stress being th...

  8. Acute pulmonary function response to ozone in young adults as a function of body mass index

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown enhanced responsiveness to ozone in obese mice. Adiposity has not been examined as a possible modulator of ozone response in humans. We therefore examined the relationship between body mass index and the acute spirometric response to ozone (O(3)) exposur...

  9. Duration of Antibody Responses after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Nai-Chang; Chang, Yi-Hua; Tian, Xiang-Yi; Na, Dan-Yu; Zhang, Li-Yuan; Zheng, Lei; Lan, Tao; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Among 176 patients who had had severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), SARS-specific antibodies were maintained for an average of 2 years, and significant reduction of immunoglobulin G–positive percentage and titers occurred in the third year. Thus, SARS patients might be susceptible to reinfection >3 years after initial exposure. PMID:18258008

  10. Multi-Agent Simulations of the Immune Response to Hiv during the Acute Stage of Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walshe, R.; Ruskin, H. J.; Callaghan, A.

    Results of multi-agent based simulations of the immune response to HIV during the acute phase of infection are presented here. The model successfully recreates the viral dynamics associated with the acute phase of infection, i.e., a rapid rise in viral load followed by a sharp decline to what is often referred to as a "set point", a result of T-cell response and emergence of HIV neutralizing antibodies. The results indicate that sufficient T Killer cell response is the key factor in controlling viral growth during this phase with antibody levels of critical importance only in the absence of a sufficient T Killer response.

  11. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  12. Monitoring hemodynamic and morphologic responses to closed head injury in a mouse model using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2013-04-01

    The authors' aim is to assess and quantitatively measure brain hemodynamic and morphological variations during closed-head injury (CHI) in mice using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (o-DRS). CHI is a type of injury to the head that does not penetrate the skull. Usually, it is caused by mechanical blows to the head and frequently occurs in traffic accidents, falls, and assaults. Measurements of brain optical properties, namely absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000 nm were carried out by employing different source-detector distance and locations to provide depth sensitivity on an intact scalp over the duration of the whole experiment. Furthermore, alteration in both cortical hemodynamics and morphologic markers, i.e., scattering power and amplitude properties were derived. CHI was induced in anesthetized male mice by a weight-drop model using ˜50 g cylindrical metal falling from a height of 90 cm onto the intact scalp producing an impact of 4500 g cm. With respect to baseline, difference in brain physiological properties was observed following injury up to 1 h post-trauma. Additionally, the reduced scattering spectral shapes followed Mie scattering theory was quantified and clearly shows changes in both scattering amplitude and power from baseline indicating structural variations likely from evolving cerebral edema during CHI. We further demonstrate high correlation between scattering amplitude and scattering power, with more than 20% difference in slope in comparison to preinjury. This result indicates the possibility of using the slope also as a marker for detection of structural changes. Finally, experiments investigating brain function during the first 20 min postinjury were conducted and changes in chromophore concentrations and scattering were observed. Overall, our experiments demonstrate the potential of using the proposed technique as a valuable quantitative noninvasive tool for

  13. A preliminary study on T-786C endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and renal hemodynamic and blood pressure responses to dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Dengel, D R; Brown, M D; Ferrell, R E; Reynolds, T H; Supiano, M A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of the T-786C endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphism on changes in renal hemodynamics and blood pressure due to Na(+) loading. Twenty-eight older (63+/-1 years), moderately obese (39+/-2 % fat) hypertensives had their glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), blood pressure (BP) and plasma nitric oxide (NO(x)) levels determined after eight days of low (20 mEq) and high (200 mEq) Na(+) diets. The two Na(+) diets were separated by a 1-week washout period. Subjects were genotyped for the eNOS-786 site and were grouped on whether they were homozygous or heterozygous for the C allele (TC+CC, n=13) or only homozygous for the T allele (TT, n=15). The TC+CC genotype group had a significantly greater increase in diastolic (P=0.021) and mean arterial (P=0.018) BP and a significant decline in both RPF (P=0.007) and GFR (P=0.029) compared to the TT genotype group with Na(+) loading. Furthermore, Na(+) loading resulted in a significant (P=0.036) increase in plasma NO(x) in the TT, but not in the TC+CC genotype group as well as a trend (P=0.051) for an increase in urine NO(x) in TC+CC, but not in the TT genotype group. The increase in BP during Na(+) loading in older hypertensives was associated with the eNOS genotype and may be related to changes in renal hemodynamics due to changes in NO metabolism.

  14. Cellular Immune Responses in Seronegative Sexual Contacts of Acute Hepatitis C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Sanaa M.; Amin, Ashraf; Madwar, Mohamed; Graham, Camilla S.; He, Qi; Al Tawil, Ahmed; Rasenack, Jens; Nakano, Tatsunori; Robertson, Betty; Ismail, Alaa; Koziel, Margaret James

    2004-01-01

    Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) is typically defined as new viremia and antibody seroconversion. Rates and immunologic correlates of hepatitis C clearance have therefore been based on clearance of viremia only in individuals who initially had an antibody response. We sought to characterize the immunological correlates of clearance in patients with acute hepatitis C and their sexual contacts. We prospectively determined CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in index patients with acute HCV and their sexual contacts who developed acute infection, either with or without spontaneous clearance, as well as those contacts who never developed viremia. Responses were measured using proliferation and ELISpot assays for CD4+ and CD8+ responses. We demonstrate in this prospective study that cellular immune responses can develop in exposed but persistently aviremic and antibody-negative individuals as well as those individuals with spontaneous clearance of acute HCV. These findings lend further credence to the importance of cellular immune responses in recovery from HCV and suggest that low exposure to HCV may lead to development of HCV-specific immune responses without ongoing HCV replication. This finding has important implications for HCV vaccine and therapeutic development. PMID:15507612

  15. Effects of prolonged hypertrophic resistance training on acute endocrine responses in young and older men.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon; Santolamazza, Fabrizio; Kraemer, William; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated changes in acute serum hormone responses to a resistance exercise bout following a prolonged period of hypertrophic resistance training in young (YM) and older men (OM). Subjects performed a 5 × 10RM leg press exercise protocol before and after 20 weeks of hypertrophic resistance training. In YM, the acute responses in growth hormone were greater compared with before training (p < .05), and cortisol concentration did not increase after training. Endocrine responses in OM were similar before and after training. Greater acute growth hormone responses after training were associated with larger gains in lean mass in the entire subject group (r = .596, p = .019). These findings suggest that, in general, YM demonstrate greater adaptability within the endocrine system compared with OM. However, adaptability in growth hormone response was associated with larger training-induced gains independent of age.

  16. Effects of Prolonged Hypertrophic Resistance Training on Acute Endocrine Responses in Young and Older Men.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon; Santolamazza, Fabrizio; Kraemer, William; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2014-05-02

    The present study investigated changes in acute serum hormone responses to a resistance exercise bout following a prolonged period of hypertrophic resistance training in young (YM) and older men (OM). Subjects performed a 5 × 10RM leg press exercise protocol before and after 20 weeks of hypertrophic resistance training. In YM, the acute responses in growth hormone were greater compared to before training (P < 0.05), and cortisol concentration did not increase after training. Endocrine responses in OM were similar before and after training. Greater acute growth hormone responses after training were associated with larger gains in lean mass in the entire subject group (r = 0.596, P = 0.019). These findings suggest that, in general, YM demonstrate greater adaptability within the endocrine system compared to OM. However, adaptability in growth hormone response was associated with larger training-induced gains independent of age.

  17. [Cardiovascular adaptability to acute hypercalcemia in the dog. The role of peroperative myocardial ischemia].

    PubMed

    Dumont, L; Stanley, P; Chartrand, C

    1985-01-01

    Since the hemodynamic consequences of acute hypercalcemia are altered by numerous interferences we have evaluated the role of peroperative myocardial ischemia on the adaptability to rapid calcium increment. Twenty-two dogs served as control and 16 were submitted to 1 hour of myocardial ischemia along with topical myocardial cooling. Each animal was equipped with blood flow transducer positioned around the ascending aorta and with central venous and aortic catheters. During each study 0.90 mEq of calcium was rapidly injected and hemodynamic data were recorded until base-line resetting. This experimental protocol was carried out 3 hours postoperatively and then daily during one month. Base-line hemodynamic data indicated the presence of myocardial failure in the experimental group in the immediate postoperative period only. Rapid calcium administration elicited transient positive inotropic response, widening of the arterial pulse pressure, reflex bradycardia and no evidence of peripheral vasoconstriction. In the early postoperative period (3 hours after surgery) the failing myocardium is more sensitive to the inotropic effect of hypercalcemia. Twenty-four hours after surgery both groups of animals have the same hemodynamic response to this stress; thereafter for both groups this response gradually decreased and finally stabilized by the 6th to 10th day after surgery. Acute hypercalcemia bears hemodynamic consequences that are amplified early after peroperative myocardial ischemia. However in long term this surgical component widely used clinically does not interfered with the cardiovascular adaptability to this pharmacological stress.

  18. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Pérez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Sánchez-Payá, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  19. Cortisol response to acute stress in jundiá Rhamdia quelen acutely exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of agrichemicals.

    PubMed

    Cericato, Leonardo; Neto, Joaquim Gonçalves Machado; Fagundes, Michele; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Quevedo, Rosmari Mezzalira; Finco, Jovani; da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; Koakoski, Gessi; Centenaro, Lucas; Pottker, Emanuele; Anziliero, Deniz; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to agrichemicals can have deleterious effects on fish, such as disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-inter-renal axis (HPI) that could impair the ability of fish to respond to stressors. In this study, fingerlings of the teleost jundiá (Rhamdia quelen) were used to investigate the effects of the commonly used agrichemicals on the fish response to stress. Five common agrichemicals were tested: the fungicide - tebuconazole, the insecticide - methyl-parathion, and the herbicides - atrazine, atrazine+simazine, and glyphosate. Control fishes were not exposed to agrichemicals and standard stressors. In treatments 2-4, the fishes were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations (16.6%, 33.3%, and 50% of the LC(50)) of each agrichemical for 96 h, and at the end of this period, were subjected to an acute stress-handling stimulus by chasing them with a pen net. In treatments 5-7 (16.6%, 33.3%, and 50% of the LC(50)), the fishes were exposed to the same concentrations of the agrichemicals without stress stimulus. Treatment 8 consisted of jundiás not exposed to agrichemicals, but was subjected to an acute stress-handling stimulus. Jundiás exposed to methyl-parathion, atrazine+simazine, and glyphosate presented a decreased capacity in exhibiting an adequate response to cope with stress and in maintaining the homeostasis, with cortisol level lower than that in the control fish (P<0.01). In conclusion, the results of this study clearly demonstrate that the acute exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of methyl-parathion, atrazine+simazine, and glyphosate exert a deleterious effect on the cortisol response to an additional acute stressor in the jundiá fingerlings.

  20. Gastric acid response to acute exposure to hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The influence of environmental stressors on the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease has received increased awareness. Stress affects different physiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow. Repeated exposures of rapid-onset, highly-sustained hypergravity cause severe physical stress in the pilot. Although the effects of exposure to hypergravity on cardiovascular and cerebral functions have been the subjects of numerous studies, crucial information regarding pathophysiological changes in the gastrointestinal tract following hypergravity exposure is lacking. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute exposure to hypergravity on gastric secretory activity and gastrin release. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to +10Gz three times for 3 min. Gastric juice and blood were collected. The volume and total acidity of gastric juice, and the plasma gastrin level was measured. Acute exposure to +10Gz significantly decreased the gastric juice parameters. The gastric juice volume and total acidity of hypergravity-exposed rats were 3.54 ± 0.32 mL/100 g and 84.90 ± 5.17 mEq/L, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of the nonexposed rats (4.62 ± 0.39 mL/100 g and 97.37 ± 5.42 mEq/L; P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). In contrast, plasma gastrin level was not significantly altered following hypergravity exposure. We demonstrated that acute exposure to hypergravity led to a significant decrease in the gastric juice volume and acidity but did not alter the plasma gastrin level. PMID:27992379

  1. Hemodynamic shear stress and the endothelium in cardiovascular pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Endothelium lining the cardiovascular system is highly sensitive to hemodynamic shear stresses that act at the vessel luminal surface in the direction of blood flow. Physiological variations of shear stress regulate acute changes in vascular diameter and when sustained induce slow, adaptive, structural-wall remodeling. Both processes are endothelium-dependent and are systemically and regionally compromised by hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes and inflammatory disorders. Shear stress spans a range of spatiotemporal scales and contributes to regional and focal heterogeneity of endothelial gene expression, which is important in vascular pathology. Regions of flow disturbances near arterial branches, bifurcations and curvatures result in complex spatiotemporal shear stresses and their characteristics can predict atherosclerosis susceptibility. Changes in local artery geometry during atherogenesis further modify shear stress characteristics at the endothelium. Intravascular devices can also influence flow-mediated endothelial responses. Endothelial flow-induced responses include a cell-signaling repertoire, collectively known as mechanotransduction, that ranges from instantaneous ion fluxes and biochemical pathways to gene and protein expression. A spatially decentralized mechanism of endothelial mechanotransduction is dominant, in which deformation at the cell surface induced by shear stress is transmitted as cytoskeletal tension changes to sites that are mechanically coupled to the cytoskeleton. A single shear stress mechanotransducer is unlikely to exist; rather, mechanotransduction occurs at multiple subcellular locations. PMID:19029993

  2. Cardiovascular and endocrine responses to acute hypoxaemia during and following dexamethasone infusion in the ovine fetus

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Andrew J W; Gardner, David S; Edwards, C Mark B; Fowden, Abigail L; Giussani, Dino A

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fetal treatment with dexamethasone on ovine fetal cardiovascular defence responses to acute hypoxaemia, occurring either during or 48 h following the period of glucocorticoid exposure. To address the mechanisms underlying these responses, chemoreflex function and plasma concentrations of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasopressin were measured. Under general halothane anaesthesia, 26 Welsh Mountain sheep fetuses were surgically prepared for long-term recording at between 117 and 120 days of gestation (dGA; term is ∼145 days) with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Following at least 5 days of recovery, fetuses were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups. After 48 h of baseline recording, at 125 ± 1 dGA, half of the fetuses (n = 13) were continuously infused i.v. with dexamethasone for 48 h at a rate of 2.06 ± 0.13 μg kg−1 h−1. The remaining 13 fetuses were infused with heparinized saline at the same rate (controls). At 127 ± 1 dGA, 2 days from the onset of infusions, seven fetuses from each group were subjected to 1 h of acute hypoxaemia. At 129 ± 1 dGA, 2 days after the end of infusions, six fetuses from each group were subjected to 1 h of acute hypoxaemia. Similar reductions in fetal partial pressure of arterial oxygen occurred in control and dexamethasone-treated fetuses during the acute hypoxaemia protocols. In control fetuses, acute hypoxaemia led to transient bradycardia, femoral vasoconstriction and significant increases in plasma concentrations of catecholamines, vasopressin and NPY. In fetuses subjected to acute hypoxaemia during dexamethasone treatment, the increase in plasma NPY was enhanced, the bradycardic response was prolonged, and the plasma catecholamine and vasopressin responses were diminished. In fetuses subjected to acute hypoxaemia 48 h following dexamethasone treatment, femoral vasoconstriction and plasma catecholamine and vasopressin

  3. Long-lasting memory T cell responses following self-limited acute hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Penna, A; Artini, M; Cavalli, A; Levrero, M; Bertoletti, A; Pilli, M; Chisari, F V; Rehermann, B; Del Prete, G; Fiaccadori, F; Ferrari, C

    1996-01-01

    The molecular and cellular basis of long-term T cell memory against viral antigens is still largely undefined. To characterize anti-viral protection by memory T cells against non-cytopathic viruses able to cause acute self-limited and chronic infections, such as the hepatitis B virus (HBV), we studied HLA class II restricted responses against HBV structural antigens in 17 patients with acute hepatitis B, during the acute stage of infection and 2.2 to 13 yr after clinical resolution of disease. Results indicate that: (a) significant T cell proliferative responses to HBV nucleocapsid antigens were detectable in all patients during the acute phase of infection and in 14/17 also 2-13 yr after clinical resolution of disease; b) long-lasting T cell responses were sustained by CD45RO+T cells, predominantly expressing the phenotype of recently activated cells; c) limiting dilution analysis showed that in some patients the frequency of HBV-specific T cells was comparable to that observed in the acute stage of infection and, usually, higher than in patients with chronic HBV infection; d) the same amino acid sequences were recognized by T cells in the acute and recovery phases of infection; and e) HBV-DNA was detectable by nested-PCR in approximately half of the subjects. to conclusion, our results show that vigorous anti-viral T cell responses are detectable in vitro several years after clinical recovery from acute hepatitis B. Detection of minute amounts of virus in some recovered subjects suggests that long-term maintenance of an active anti-viral T cell response could be important not only for protection against reinfection but also for keeping the persisting virus under tight control. PMID:8787682

  4. Cross-genotype-specific T-cell responses in acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Gisa, A; Suneetha, P V; Behrendt, P; Pischke, S; Bremer, B; Falk, C S; Manns, M P; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H; Kraft, A R M

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E is an inflammatory liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In tropical regions, HEV is highly endemic and predominantly mediated by HEV genotypes 1 and 2 with >3 million symptomatic cases per year and around 70 000 deaths. In Europe and America, the zoonotic HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been reported with continues increasing new infections per year. So far, little is known about T-cell responses during acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Therefore, we did a comprehensive study investigating HEV-specific T-cell responses using genotypes 3- and 1-specific overlapping peptides. Additional cytokines and chemokines were measured in the plasma. In four patients, longitudinal studies were performed. Broad functional HEV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were detectable in patients acutely infected with HEV genotype 3. Elevated of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels during acute HEV infection correlated with ALT levels. Memory HEV-specific T-cell responses were detectable up to >1.5 years upon infection. Importantly, cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses (between genotypes 1 and 3) were measurable in all investigated patients. In conclusion, we could show for the first time HEV-specific T-cell responses during and after acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Our data of cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses might suggest a potential role in cross-genotype-specific protection between HEV genotypes 1 and 3.

  5. Effects on hemodynamics and gas exchange of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, Joan; Masclans, Joan Ramon; Sacanell, Judit; Chacon, Pilar; Sabin, Pilar; Planas, Merce

    2008-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the effects on hemodynamics and gas exchange of a lipid emulsion enriched with omega-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS. Methods The design was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study in our Intensive Medicine Department of Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona-Spain). We studied 16 consecutive patients with ARDS and intolerance to enteral nutrition (14 men and 2 women; mean age: 58 ± 13 years; APACHE II score: 17.8 ± 2.3; Lung Injury Score: 3.1 ± 0.5; baseline PaO2/FiO2 ratio: 149 ± 40). Patients were randomized into 2 groups: Group A (n = 8) received the study emulsion Lipoplus® 20%, B.Braun Medical (50% MCT, 40% LCT, 10% ω-3); Group B (n = 8) received the control emulsion Intralipid® Fresenius Kabi (100% LCT). Lipid emulsions were administered during 12 h at a dose of 0.12 g/kg/h. Measurements of the main hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters were made at baseline (immediately before administration of the lipid emulsions), every hour during the lipid infusion, at the end of administration, and six hours after the end of administration lipid infusion. Results No statistically significant changes were observed in the different hemodynamic values analyzed. Likewise, the gas exchange parameters did not show statistically significant differences during the study. No adverse effect attributable to the lipid emulsions was seen in the patients analyzed. Conclusion The lipid emulsion enriched with omega-3 fatty acids was safe and well tolerated in short-term administration to patients with ARDS. It did not cause any significant changes in hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. Trial registration ISRCTN63673813 PMID:18947396

  6. Acute dissociation predicts rapid habituation of skin conductance responses to aversive auditory probes.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Timo; Merckelbach, Harald; ter Burg, Linda; Cima, Maaike; Simeon, Daphne

    2008-04-01

    The present study examined how acute dissociation, trait-like dissociative symptoms, and physiological reactivity relate to each other. Sixty-nine undergraduate students were exposed to 14 aversive auditory probes, while their skin conductance responses were measured. A combination of self-reported anxiety and trait-like dissociation was found to predict variability in peritraumatic dissociation levels induced by the aversive probes. Furthermore, high levels of acute dissociation were associated with faster habituation of skin conductance responding, while trait-like dissociation was unrelated to habituation. Interestingly, individuals who reported childhood trauma displayed elevated skin conductance responses. Our findings contribute to the growing body of evidence indicating that subjective feelings of acute dissociation have their objective concomitants, notably fast habituation of physiologic responses.

  7. Profiling the Humoral Immune Response of Acute and Chronic Q Fever by Protein Microarray*

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Adam; Chen, Chen; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Pablo, Jozelyn; Hendrix, Laura R.; Samuel, James E.; Felgner, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    Antigen profiling using comprehensive protein microarrays is a powerful tool for characterizing the humoral immune response to infectious pathogens. Coxiella burnetii is a CDC category B bioterrorist infectious agent with worldwide distribution. In order to assess the antibody repertoire of acute and chronic Q fever patients we have constructed a protein microarray containing 93% of the proteome of Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. Here we report the profile of the IgG and IgM seroreactivity in 25 acute Q fever patients in longitudinal samples. We found that both early and late time points of infection have a very consistent repertoire of IgM and IgG response, with a limited number of proteins undergoing increasing or decreasing seroreactivity. We also probed a large collection of acute and chronic Q fever patient samples and identified serological markers that can differentiate between the two disease states. In this comparative analysis we confirmed the identity of numerous IgG biomarkers of acute infection, identified novel IgG biomarkers for acute and chronic infections, and profiled for the first time the IgM antibody repertoire for both acute and chronic Q fever. Using these results we were able to devise a test that can distinguish acute from chronic Q fever. These results also provide a unique perspective on isotype switch and demonstrate the utility of protein microarrays for simultaneously examining the dynamic humoral immune response against thousands of proteins from a large number of patients. The results presented here identify novel seroreactive antigens for the development of recombinant protein-based diagnostics and subunit vaccines, and provide insight into the development of the antibody response. PMID:21817167

  8. Acute and chronic responses of denitrifying culture to diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Gamze; Aydin, Egemen; Topuz, Emel; Yangin-Gomec, Cigdem; Okutman Tas, Didem

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic effect as well as biodegradation potential at different sludge retention times (SRTs) of a priority pollutant, diclofenac on denitrification process was assessed. The continuous amendment of the culture for 6months with 1μg/L diclofenac resulted in 30% decrease in gas production. The average diclofenac removal observed in the diclofenac-acclimated culture was less than 15%. Batch tests showed that nitrate was removed in diclofenac free-control reactor at a higher rate compared to diclofenac amended reactor. Although, SRT did not have any progressive effect on diclofenac degradation, the system operated at low SRT was more sensitive to diclofenac and resulted in an increase in N2O emission. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operated at higher SRTs may tolerate and recover from the adverse effects of such micropollutants. The study can lead to other researchers to understand the fate and effect of other emerging pollutants in the anoxic unit of WWTPs.

  9. Diminished acute phase response and increased hepatic inflammation of aged rats in response to intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Christian R; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Pérez, Claudio; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Riquelme, Denise M; Ordenes, Gamaliel; Oshima, Kiyoko; Aravena, Mauricio; Pérez, Viviana I; Nishimura, Sumiyo; Sabaj, Valeria; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2008-12-01

    Aging is associated with a deterioration of the acute phase response to inflammatory challenges. However, the nature of these defects remains poorly defined. We analyzed the hepatic inflammatory response after intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) given to Fisher 344 rats aged 6, 15, and 22-23 months. Induction of the acute phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, and T-kininogen was reduced and/or retarded with aging. Initial induction of interleukin-6 in aged rats was normal, but the later response was increased relative to younger counterparts. An exacerbated hepatic injury was observed in aged rats receiving LPS, as evidenced by the presence of multiple microabscesses in portal tracts, confluent necrosis, higher neutrophil accumulation, and elevated serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, relative to younger animals. Our results suggest that aged rats displayed a reduced expression of APPs and increased hepatic injury in response to the inflammatory insult.

  10. Responses of Hyalella azteca to acute and chronic microplastic exposures.

    PubMed

    Au, Sarah Y; Bruce, Terri F; Bridges, William C; Klaine, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    Limited information is available on the presence of microplastics in freshwater systems, and even less is known about the toxicological implications of the exposure of aquatic organisms to plastic particles. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of microplastic ingestion on the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. Hyalella azteca was exposed to fluorescent polyethylene microplastic particles and polypropylene microplastic fibers in individual 250-mL chambers to determine 10-d mortality. In acute bioassays, polypropylene microplastic fibers were significantly more toxic than polyethylene microplastic particles; 10-d lethal concentration 50% values for polyethylene microplastic particles and polypropylene microplastic fibers were 4.64 × 10(4) microplastics/mL and 71.43 microplastics/mL, respectively. A 42-d chronic bioassay using polyethylene microplastic particles was conducted to quantify effects on reproduction, growth, and egestion. Chronic exposure to polyethylene microplastic particles significantly decreased growth and reproduction at the low and intermediate exposure concentrations. During acute exposures to polyethylene microplastic particles, the egestion times did not significantly differ from the egestion of normal food materials in the control; egestion times for polypropylene microplastic fibers were significantly slower than the egestion of food materials in the control. Amphipods exposed to polypropylene microplastic fibers also had significantly less growth. The greater toxicity of microplastic fibers than microplastic particles corresponded with longer residence times for the fibers in the gut. The difference in residence time might have affected the ability to process food, resulting in an energetic effect reflected in sublethal endpoints.

  11. Blood flow responses to mild-intensity exercise in ectopic vs. orthotopic prostate tumors; dependence upon host tissue hemodynamics and vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Emmanuel; Becker, Veronika G C; McCullough, Danielle J; Stabley, John N; Gittemeier, Elizabeth M; Opoku-Acheampong, Alexander B; Sieman, Dietmar W; Behnke, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Given the critical role of tumor O2 delivery in patient prognosis and the rise in preclinical exercise oncology studies, we investigated tumor and host tissue blood flow at rest and during exercise as well as vascular reactivity using a rat prostate cancer model grown in two transplantation sites. In male COP/CrCrl rats, blood flow (via radiolabeled microspheres) to prostate tumors [R3327-MatLyLu cells injected in the left flank (ectopic) or ventral prostate (orthotopic)] and host tissue was measured at rest and during a bout of mild-intensity exercise. α-Adrenergic vasoconstriction to norepinephrine (NE: 10(-9) to 10(-4) M) was determined in arterioles perforating the tumors and host tissue. To determine host tissue exercise hyperemia in healthy tissue, a sham-operated group was included. Blood flow was lower at rest and during exercise in ectopic tumors and host tissue (subcutaneous adipose) vs. the orthotopic tumor and host tissue (prostate). During exercise, blood flow to the ectopic tumor significantly decreased by 25 ± 5% (SE), whereas flow to the orthotopic tumor increased by 181 ± 30%. Maximal vasoconstriction to NE was not different between arterioles from either tumor location. However, there was a significantly higher peak vasoconstriction to NE in subcutaneous adipose arterioles (92 ± 7%) vs. prostate arterioles (55 ± 7%). Establishment of the tumor did not alter host tissue blood flow from either location at rest or during exercise. These data demonstrate that blood flow in tumors is dependent on host tissue hemodynamics and that the location of the tumor may critically affect how exercise impacts the tumor microenvironment and treatment outcomes.

  12. An Exploration of the Effect of Hemodynamic Changes Due to Normal Aging on the fNIRS Response to Semantic Processing of Words

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mahnoush; Pouliot, Philippe; Bonnéry, Clément; Leclerc, Paul-Olivier; Desjardins, Michèle; Lesage, Frédéric; Joanette, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Like other neuroimaging techniques assessing cerebral blood oxygenation, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been applied in many neurocognitive studies. With NIRS, neural activation can be explored indirectly via hemodynamic changes in the imaged region. In studies of aging, changes in baseline physiology and brain anatomy confound NIRS measures seeking to investigate age-related changes in neuronal activity. The field is thus hampered by the complexity of the aging process itself, and statistical inferences from functional data acquired by optical imaging techniques must be interpreted with care. Multimodal integration of NIRS with both structural and baseline physiological assessments is crucial to avoid misinterpreting neuroimaging signals. In this study, a combination of two different optical techniques, anatomical MRI and Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), was used to investigate age-related changes in activation during a lexical-semantic processing task. Quantitative analysis revealed decreased baseline oxyhemoglobin and cerebral blood flow in the older adults. Using baseline physiology measures as regressors in the investigation of functional concentration changes when doing analyses of variance, we found significant changes in task-induced areas of activity. In the right hemisphere, more significant age-related activity was observed around the junction of the inferior frontal gyrus and inferior precentral sulcus, along with engagement of Wernicke’s area. In the left hemisphere, the degree and extent of frontal activation, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus, differed between age groups. Measuring background physiological differences and using their values as regressors in statistical analyses allowed a more appropriate, age-corrected understanding of the functional differentiations between age groups. Age-corrected baselines are thus essential to investigate which components of the NIRS signal are altered by aging. PMID

  13. Predisposition to essential hypertension and renal hemodynamics in recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hannedouche, T P; Marques, L P; Guicheney, P; Lacour, B; Boitard, C; Grünfeld, J P

    1992-10-01

    The offspring of essential hypertensive parents have been found to exhibit abnormalities in renal hemodynamics and sodium handling before the eventual occurrence of hypertension. The reported abnormalities represent a wide spectrum of changes including increased GFR, normal or decreased RPF, slight increase in blood pressure (although within the normal range), and an exaggerated natriuresis response to a sodium load. The heterogeneity of these abnormalities may reflect the specific conditions of the studies, the lability of the changes, or different subgroups of subjects with genetic predisposition to essential hypertension. Several lines of evidence have suggested a relationship between hypertension and the development of diabetic nephropathy in insulin-dependent diabetics. This laboratory has found that recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetics can exhibit renal hemodynamics abnormalities very early in the course of diabetes according to a positive or negative family history of essential hypertension. These changes include increased GFR and mean arterial pressure, but no differences in renal sodium and lithium handling in diabetics with a genetic predisposition to essential hypertension. In addition, diabetics with a positive family history of essential hypertension exhibited a more-marked vasodilative response to an acute interruption of the renin-angiotensin system, further suggesting inadequate angiotensin modulation of renal vascular tone. The significance of these abnormalities in relation to the development of diabetic nephropathy requires further investigation.

  14. Behavioral and neurochemical changes in response to acute stressors: influence of previous chronic exposure to immobilization.

    PubMed

    Pol, O; Campmany, L; Gil, M; Armario, A

    1992-07-01

    The effect of daily (2 h) exposure to immobilization (IMO) for 15 days on the behavioral and neurochemical responses of adult male rats to acute stress caused by 2-h IMO or 2-h tail-shock was studied. The brain areas studied were frontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, midbrain, and pons plus medulla. Chronic exposure to IMO did not alter noradrenaline (NA), 3-methoxy,4-hydroxyphenyletileneglycol-SO4 (MHPG-SO4), serotonin, or 5-hydroxindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations in any brain area as measured approximately 20 h after the last exposure to IMO. Exposure to behavioral tests did not modify neurochemical variables except NA levels in the hypothalamus of nonchronically stressed (control) rats. Both exposure to 2-h IMO or 2-h shock significantly decreased NA levels in hypothalamus and midbrain of nonchronically stressed rats. These decreases in response to the two acute stressors were not observed in chronically stressed rats. However, MHPG-SO4 levels increased to the same extent in control and chronically stressed rats after exposure to the acute stressors. Likewise, increased 5-HIAA concentrations observed in response to acute stressors were similar in control and chronically stressed rats. The inhibition of activity (areas crossed and rearing) in the holeboard caused by acute IMO was less marked in rats previously exposed to the same stressor than in control rats, but the response to shock was similar. In the forced swim test, acute IMO decreased struggling in control rats but tended to increase it in chronically stressed rats. The response to shock followed the same pattern as that to IMO, although it was slight.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Roles of STAT3 in Protein Secretion Pathways during the Acute-Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N.; Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Ferrari, Joseph D.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary A.; Mella, Juan R.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characteristic of perhaps all infections, including bacterial pneumonia. In conjunction with the acute-phase response, additional biological pathways are induced in the liver and are dependent on the transcription factors STAT3 and NF-κB, but these responses are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that pneumococcal pneumonia and other severe infections increase expression of multiple components of the cellular secretory machinery in the mouse liver, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) translocon complex, which mediates protein translation into the ER, and the coat protein complexes (COPI and COPII), which mediate vesicular transport of proteins to and from the ER. Hepatocyte-specific mutation of STAT3 prevented the induction of these secretory pathways during pneumonia, with similar results observed following pharmacological activation of ER stress by using tunicamycin. These findings implicate STAT3 in the unfolded protein response and suggest that STAT3-dependent optimization of secretion may apply broadly. Pneumonia also stimulated the binding of phosphorylated STAT3 to promoter regions of secretion-related genes in the liver, supporting a direct role for STAT3 in their transcription. Altogether, these results identify a novel function of STAT3 during the acute-phase response, namely, the induction of secretory machinery in hepatocytes. This may facilitate the processing and delivery of newly synthesized loads of acute-phase proteins, enhancing innate immunity and preventing liver injury during infection. PMID:23460517

  16. Influence of acute stress on response inhibition in healthy men: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Dierolf, Angelika Margarete; Fechtner, Julia; Böhnke, Robina; Wolf, Oliver T; Naumann, Ewald

    2017-02-07

    The current study investigated the influence of acute stress and the resulting cortisol increase on response inhibition and its underlying cortical processes, using EEG. Before and after an acute stressor or a control condition, 39 healthy men performed a go/no-go task while ERPs (N2, P3), reaction times, errors, and salivary cortisol were measured. Acute stress impaired neither accuracy nor reaction times, but differentially affected the neural correlates of response inhibition; namely, stress led to enhanced amplitudes of the N2 difference waves (N2d, no-go minus go), indicating enhanced response inhibition and conflict monitoring. Moreover, participants responding to the stressor with an acute substantial rise in cortisol (high cortisol responders) showed reduced amplitudes of the P3 of the difference waves (P3d, no-go minus go) after the stressor, indicating an impaired evaluation and finalization of the inhibitory process. Our findings indicate that stress leads to a reallocation of cognitive resources to the neural subprocesses of inhibitory control, strengthening premotor response inhibition and the detection of response conflict, while concurrently diminishing the subsequent finalization process within the stream of processing.

  17. Multiple T-cell responses are associated with better control of acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianping; Zhao, Yan; Peng, Yanchun; Han, Zhen; Liu, Guihai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Sai; Sun, Huanhuan; Wu, Hao; Dong, Tao; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses play pivotal roles in controlling the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but the correlation between CTL responses and the progression of HIV-1 infection are controversial on account of HIV immune escape mutations driven by CTL pressure were reported. The acute HIV-1-infected patients from Beijing were incorporated into our study to investigate the effects of CTL response on the progression of HIV-1 infection. A longitudinal study was performed on acute HIV-1-infected patients to clarify the kinetic of T-cell responses, the dynamic of escape mutations, as well as the correlation between effective T-cell response and the progression of HIV infection. Seven human leukocyte antigen-B51+ (HLA-B51+) individuals were screened from 105 acute HIV-1 infectors. The detailed kinetic of HLA-B51-restricted CTL responses was described through blood sampling time points including seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection in the 7 HLA-B51+ individuals, by using 16 known HLA-B51 restricted epitopes. Pol743–751 (LPPVVAKEI, LI9), Pol283–289 (TAFTIPSI, TI8), and Gag327–3459 (NANPDCKTI, NI9) were identified as 3 dominant epitopes, and ranked as starting with LI9, followed by TI8 and NI9 in the ability to induce T-cell responses. The dynamics of escape mutations in the 3 epitopes were also found with the same order as T-cell response, by using sequencing for viral clones on blood sampling at seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection. We use solid evidence to demonstrate the correlation between T-cell response and HIV-1 mutation, and postulate that multiple T-cell responses might benefit the control of HIV-1 infection, especially in acute infection phase. PMID:27472741

  18. Endocrine responses in the rhesus monkey during acute cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, W.G.; Saxton, J.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors studied five young male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), 3.4 to 6.7 kg, to determine the relationship between fluid balance hormones and urine production during acute, dry cold exposure. Each monkey served as its own control in duplicate experimental sessions at 6C or 26C. A 6-h experimental session consisted of 120 min equilibration at 26C, 120 min experimental exposure, and 120 min recovery at 26C. Urinary and venous catheters were inserted on the morning of a session. Rectal (Tre) and skin temperatures were monitored continuously. Blood samples were taken at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min of exposure, and at 60 min postexposure. Plasma was analyzed for arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone (PA), and osmolality. Urine samples were analyzed for osmolality, electrolytes, and creatinine. Mean Tre was 1.6C lower after 120 min at 6C than at 26C. Urine volume and osmolality were not altered by cold exposure, as they are in humans and rats. Vasopressin and PA increased sharply, with mean plasma levels in monkeys exposed to cold more than threefold and tenfold, respectively, the levels in monkeys exposed at 26C. In contrast, ANF, PRA, and plasma osmolality were not significantly changed by cold exposure. The absence of a cold-induced diuresis in the monkey may be related to the marked increase in plasma AVP level.

  19. Prenatal cortisol exposure predicts infant cortisol response to acute stress.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas G; Bergman, Kristin; Sarkar, Pampa; Glover, Vivette

    2013-03-01

    Experimental animal findings suggest that early stress and glucocorticoid exposure may program the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the offspring. The extension of these findings to human development is not yet clear. A prospective longitudinal study was conducted on 125 mothers and their normally developing children. Amniotic fluid was obtained at, on average, 17.2 weeks gestation; infant behavior and cortisol response to a separation-reunion stress was assessed at 17 months. Amniotic fluid cortisol predicted infant cortisol response to separation-reunion stress: infants who were exposed to higher levels of cortisol in utero showed higher pre-stress cortisol values and blunted response to stress exposure. The association was independent of prenatal, obstetric, and socioeconomic factors and child-parent attachment. The findings provide some of the strongest data in humans that HPA axis functioning in the child may be predicted from prenatal cortisol exposure.

  20. Acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Miyaji, Katsumasa; Akagi, Satoshi; Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Ogawa, Aiko; Fuke, Soichiro; Fujio, Hideki; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Nagase, Satoshi; Kohno, Kunihisa; Morita, Hiroshi; Kusano, Kengo F; Matsubara, Hiromi; Ohe, Tohru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Acute vasoreactivity testing for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been reported to be useful to identify patients with sustained beneficial response to oral calcium-channel blockers (CCBs), but there is a risk of exacerbation during the testing with oral CCBs. Therefore, we developed a testing method utilizing intravenous nicardipine, a short-acting CCB, and examined the safety and usefulness of acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine in PAH patients. Acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine was performed in 65 PAH patients. Nicardipine was administered by short-time continuous infusion (1 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ for 5 min and 2 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ for 5 min) followed by bolus injection (5 μg/kg). Hemodynamic responses were continuously measured using a right heart catheter. Acute responders were defined as patients who showed a decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure of at least 10 mmHg to an absolute level below 40 mmHg with preserved or increased cardiac output. Two acute responders and sixty-three non-acute responders were identified. There was no hemodynamic instability requiring additional inotropic agents or death during the testing. Acute responders had good responses to long-term oral CCBs. The acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine might be safe and useful for identifying CCB responders in PAH patients.

  1. Acute effects of cocaine and cannabis on response inhibition in humans: an ERP investigation.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Desirée B; De Bruijn, Ellen R A; van Wel, Janelle H P; Ramaekers, Johannes G; Verkes, Robbert J

    2016-11-01

    Substance abuse has often been associated with alterations in response inhibition in humans. Not much research has examined how the acute effects of drugs modify the neurophysiological correlates of response inhibition, or how these effects interact with individual variation in trait levels of impulsivity and novelty seeking. This study investigated the effects of cocaine and cannabis on behavioural and event-related potential (ERP) correlates of response inhibition in 38 healthy drug using volunteers. A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized three-way crossover design was used. All subjects completed a standard Go/NoGo task after administration of the drugs. Compared with a placebo, cocaine yielded improved accuracy, quicker reaction times and an increased prefrontal NoGo-P3 ERP. Cannabis produced opposing results; slower reaction times, impaired accuracy and a reduction in the amplitude of the prefrontal NoGo-P3. Cannabis in addition decreased the amplitude of the parietally recorded P3, while cocaine did not affect this. Neither drugs specifically affected the N2 component, suggesting that pre-motor response inhibitory processes remain unaffected. Neither trait impulsivity nor novelty seeking interacted with drug-induced effects on measures of response inhibition. We conclude that acute drug effects on response inhibition seem to be specific to the later, evaluative stages of response inhibition. The acute effects of cannabis appeared less specific to response inhibition than those of cocaine. Together, the results show that the behavioural effects on response inhibition are reflected in electrophysiological correlates. This study did not support a substantial role of vulnerability personality traits in the acute intoxication stage.

  2. Investigation of the Strawberry Acute Cold Response through Transcriptome Sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria xananassa) is a valuable perennial crop, yet in most growing regions cold temperature stress can dramatically impinge on fresh fruit production. In the interest of long-term crop improvement it is important to understand the molecular response of strawberry to cold, a...

  3. Preparing Emergency Physicians for Acute Disaster Response: A Review of Current Training Opportunities in the US.

    PubMed

    Hansoti, Bhakti; Kellogg, Dylan S; Aberle, Sara J; Broccoli, Morgan C; Feden, Jeffrey; French, Arthur; Little, Charles M; Moore, Brooks; Sabato, Joseph; Sheets, Tara; Weinberg, R; Elmes, Pat; Kang, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Study Objective This study aimed to review available disaster training options for health care providers, and to provide specific recommendations for developing and delivering a disaster-response-training program for non-disaster-trained emergency physicians, residents, and trainees prior to acute deployment.

  4. Protective effect of resveratrol in endotoxemia-induced acute phase response in rats.

    PubMed

    Sebai, Hichem; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Sani, Mamane; Aouani, Ezzedine; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha

    2009-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a glycolipid component of the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria can elicit a systemic inflammatory process leading to septic shock and death. Acute phase response is characterized by fever, leucocytosis, thrombocytopenia, altered metabolic responses and redox balance by inducing excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4' trihydroxystilbene) is a natural polyphenol exhibiting antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the protective effect of resveratrol on endotoxemia-induced acute phase response in rats. When acutely administered by i.p. route, resveratrol (40 mg/kg b.w.) counteracted the effect of a single injection of LPS (4 mg/kg b.w.) which induced fever, a decrease in white blood cells (WBC) and platelets (PLT) counts. When i.p. administered during 7 days at 20 mg/kg per day (subacute treatment), resveratrol abrogated LPS-induced erythrocytes lipoperoxidation and catalase (CAT) activity depression to control levels. In the plasma compartment, LPS increased malondialdehyde (MDA) via nitric monoxide (NO) elevation and decreased iron level. All these deleterious LPS effects were reversed by a subacute resveratrol pre-treatment via a NO independent way. Resveratrol exhibited potent protective effect on LPS-induced acute phase response in rats.

  5. Case Comparison of Response To Aquatic Exercise: Acute versus Chronic Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobily, Kenneth E.; Mobily, Paula R.; Lessard, Kerry A.; Berkenpas, Molly S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the effects of individualized aquatic exercise programs on people with knee impairments. An adolescent athlete with an acute injury demonstrated significant functional improvement. A 33-year-old with arthritis demonstrated only marginal progress. Comparison of cases relative to valid data collection methods and response to aquatic…

  6. Modulation of the acute phase response in feedlot steers supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1079 (SC) on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 266 ± 4 kilograms body weight) were separated into three treatment groups (n = 6/treatm...

  7. Rapid dendritic cell recruitment is a hallmark of the acute inflammatory response at mucosal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of challenge sites such as skin and the peritoneal cavity has identified neutrophils as virtually the sole cellular participants in acute bacterial inflammation, peak influx occurring 24-48 h in advance of mononuclear cell populations associated with adaptive immunity. This study challenges the general applicability of this paradigm. We demonstrate here that the earliest detectable cellular response after inhalation of Moraxella catarrhalis organisms is the recruitment of putative class II major histocompatibility complex-bearing dendritic cell (DC) precursors into the airway epithelium, the initial wave arriving in advance of the neutrophil influx. Unlike the neutrophils which rapidly transit into the airway lumen, the DC precursors remain within the epithelium during the acute inflammatory response where they differentiate, and develop the dendriform morphology typical of resident DC found in the normal epithelium. During the ensuing 48-h period, these cells then migrate to the regional lymph nodes. No comparable DC response was observed after epidermal or intraperitoneal challenge, and it may be that mucosal surfaces are unique in their requirement for rapid DC responses during acute inflammation. We hypothesize that the role of the DC influx during acute inflammation may be surveillance for opportunistic viruses, and that this covert protective mechanism is operative at a restricted number of mucosal tissue sites. PMID:8145044

  8. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  9. Lay Public's Knowledge and Decisions in Response to Symptoms of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cytryn, Kayla N.; Yoskowitz, Nicole A.; Cimino, James J.; Patel, Vimla L.

    2009-01-01

    Despite public health initiatives targeting rapid action in response to symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI), people continue to delay in going to a hospital when experiencing these symptoms due to lack of recognition as cardiac-related. The objective of this research was to characterize lay individuals' knowledge of symptoms of acute myocardial…

  10. Acute Stressors and Cortisol Responses: A Theoretical Integration and Synthesis of Laboratory Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Sally S.; Kemeny, Margaret E.

    2004-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviews 208 laboratory studies of acute psychological stressors and tests a theoretical model delineating conditions capable of eliciting cortisol responses. Psychological stressors increased cortisol levels; however, effects varied widely across tasks. Consistent with the theoretical model, motivated performance tasks elicited…

  11. Hemodynamic and neurochemical determinates of renal function in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Cameron; Cherney, David Z I; Parker, Andrea B; Mak, Susanna; Floras, John S; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Parker, John D

    2016-01-15

    Abnormal renal function is common in acute and chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) and is related to the severity of congestion. However, treatment of congestion often leads to worsening renal function. Our objective was to explore basal determinants of renal function and their response to hemodynamic interventions. Thirty-seven patients without CHF and 59 patients with chronic CHF (ejection fraction; 23 ± 8%) underwent right heart catheterization, measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR; inulin) and renal plasma flow (RPF; para-aminohippurate), and radiotracer estimates of renal sympathetic activity. A subset (26 without, 36 with CHF) underwent acute pharmacological intervention with dobutamine or nitroprusside. We explored the relationship between baseline and drug-induced hemodynamic changes and changes in renal function. In CHF, there was an inverse relationship among right atrial mean pressure (RAM) pressure, RPF, and GFR. By contrast, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI), and measures of renal sympathetic activity were not significant predictors. In those with CHF there was also an inverse relationship among the drug-induced changes in RAM as well as pulmonary artery mean pressure and the change in GFR. Changes in MAP and CI did not predict the change in GFR in those with CHF. Baseline values and changes in RAM pressure did not correlate with GFR in those without CHF. In the CHF group there was a positive correlation between RAM pressure and renal sympathetic activity. There was also an inverse relationship among RAM pressure, GFR, and RPF in patients with chronic CHF. The observation that acute reductions in RAM pressure is associated with an increase in GFR in patients with CHF has important clinical implications.

  12. Acute alcohol intoxication suppresses the pulmonary ELR-negative CXC chemokine response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Happel, Kyle I; Rudner, Xiaowen; Quinton, Lee J; Movassaghi, Jennifer L; Clark, Charles; Odden, Anthony R; Zhang, Ping; Bagby, Gregory J; Nelson, Steve; Shellito, Judd E

    2007-08-01

    Alcohol abuse impairs the pulmonary immune response to infection and increases the morbidity and mortality of bacterial pneumonia. Acute alcohol intoxication suppresses lung expression of CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg motif (ELR+) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, but its effect on the structurally related ELR- CXC chemokines, which attract T cells, is unknown. We therefore investigated the effect of acute alcohol intoxication on the pulmonary response to intratracheal (i.t.) LPS challenge for the ELR- CXC chemokines monokine induced by gamma (MIG or CXCL9), interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and interferon-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC or CXCL11). Male C57BL/6 or C3H/HeN mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (3.0 g/kg) or phosphate buffered saline 30 min before i.t. LPS challenge. Chemokine mRNA transcripts were measured at 0, 2, 6, and 16 h. Acute alcohol intoxication inhibited the lung's expression of all three chemokine genes in response to LPS. Lung IFN-gamma mRNA was also inhibited by acute intoxication over the same time course. The in vitro effect of ethanol on chemokine secretion was further studied in the MH-S alveolar macrophage cell line. IP-10, MIG, and I-TAC in response to LPS were enhanced by exogenous interferon (IFN)-gamma, and these responses were blunted by exposure to ethanol. Alcohol exposure did not affect MH-S cell nuclear factor kappa beta p65 nuclear localization during challenge, despite dose-dependent inhibition of Erk 1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, phospho-signal transduction and activator of transcription 1 was not decreased in the presence of acute ethanol, thereby indicating that acute intoxication does not affect IFN-gamma signaling in MH-S cells. Recruitment of CD3+ T cells into the alveolar space 4 days after LPS challenge was moderately impaired by acute ethanol intoxication. These results implicate acute ethanol intoxication as a significant inhibitor of

  13. Adaptations in responsiveness of brainstem pain-modulating neurons in acute compared with chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel R; Heinricher, Mary M

    2013-06-01

    Despite similar behavioral hypersensitivity, acute and chronic pain have distinct neural bases. We used intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant to directly compare activity of pain-modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in acute vs chronic inflammation. Heat-evoked and von Frey-evoked withdrawal reflexes and corresponding RVM neuronal activity were recorded in lightly anesthetized animals either during the first hour after complete Freund's adjuvant injection (acute) or 3 to 10 days later (chronic). Thermal and modest mechanical hyperalgesia during acute inflammation were associated with increases in the spontaneous activity of pain-facilitating ON-cells and suppression of pain-inhibiting OFF-cells. Acute hyperalgesia was reversed by RVM block, showing that the increased activity of RVM ON-cells is necessary for acute behavioral hypersensitivity. In chronic inflammation, thermal hyperalgesia had resolved but mechanical hyperalgesia had become pronounced. The spontaneous discharges of ON- and OFF-cells were not different from those in control subjects, but the mechanical response thresholds for both cell classes were reduced into the innocuous range. RVM block in the chronic condition worsened mechanical hyperalgesia. These studies identify distinct contributions of RVM ON- and OFF-cells to acute and chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia. During early immune-mediated inflammation, ON-cell spontaneous activity promotes hyperalgesia. After inflammation is established, the antinociceptive influence of OFF-cells is dominant, yet the lowered threshold for the OFF-cell pause allows behavioral responses to stimuli that would normally be considered innocuous. The efficacy of OFF-cells in counteracting sensitization of ascending transmission pathways could therefore be an important determining factor in development of chronic inflammatory pain.

  14. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-05

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  15. Baseline values of cardiovascular and respiratory parameters predict response to acute hypoxia in young healthy men.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, V N; Krivoschekov, S G; Divert, V E; Komlyagina, T G; Consedine, N S

    2017-02-28

    The majority of the available works have studied distinct hypoxic responses of respiratory and cardiovascular systems. This study examines how these systems interact while responding to hypoxia and whether baseline metrics moderate reactions to a hypoxic challenge. Central hemodynamic, aortic wave reflection, and gas exchange parameters were measured in 27 trained young men before and after 10-min normobaric isocapnic hypoxia (10 % O2). Associations were assessed by correlation and multiple regression analyses. Hypoxic changes in the parameters of pulse wave analysis such as augmentation index (-114 %, p=0.007), pulse pressure amplification (+6 %, p=0.020), time to aortic reflection wave (+21 %, p<0.001) report on the increase in arterial distensibility. Specifically, initially compliant arteries blunt the positive cardiac chronotropic response to hypoxia and facilitate the myocardial workload. The degree of blood oxygen desaturation is directly correlated with both baseline values and hypoxic responses of aortic and peripheral blood pressures. The hypoxia-induced gain in ventilation (VE), while controlling for basal VE and heart rate (HR), is inversely associated with deltaHR and deltasystolic blood pressure. The study suggests that cardiovascular and respiratory systems mutually supplement each other when responding to hypoxic challenge.

  16. Microbiologic Characteristics, Serologic Responses, and Clinical Manifestations in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Taiwan1

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Wang, Wei-Kung; Chen, Pei-Jer; Wang, Jin-Town; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2003-01-01

    The genome of one Taiwanese severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) strain (TW1) was 29,729 nt in length. Viral RNA may persist for some time in patients who seroconvert, and some patients may lack an antibody response (immunoglobulin G) to SARS-CoV >21 days after illness onset. An upsurge of antibody response was associated with the aggravation of respiratory failure. PMID:14519257

  17. Leg Vascular Responsiveness During Acute Orthostasis Following Simulated Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blamick, Cynthia A.; Goldwater, Danielle J.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1988-01-01

    Ten men (35-49 years old) underwent lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exposures before and offer 10 d of continuous 6 degrees head-down bedrest in order to predict the effect of weightlessness on the responsiveness of leg vasculature to an orthostatic stress. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and Impedance rheographic indices of arterial pulse volume (APV) of the legs were measured during rest and at 1 min at -30 mm Hg LBNP. Bedrest-induced deconditioning was manifested by decreases (p less than 0.06) in plasma volume (17%), peak oxygen uptake (16%), and LBNP tolerance (17%). Resting HR was unchanged after bedrest, but HR was higher (p less than 0.05) at 1 min of -30 mm Hg LBNP after, compared with before bedrest. Responses of MAP to -30 mm Hg LBNP were not altered by bodrest. Resting APV was decreased (p less than 0.05) by simulated weightlessness. However, APV was reduced (p less than 0.05) from rest to 1 min -30 mm Hg LBNP by the same relative magnitude before and after bodrest (-21.4 +/- 3.4% and -20.5 +/- 2.7%, respectively). We conclude that peripheral arterial vasoconstriction, as indicated by reductions in APV during LBNP, was not affected by bedrest. These results suggest that there was no apparent alteration in responsiveness of the leg vasculature following simulated weightlessness. Therefore, it appears unlikely that control mechanisms of peripheral resistance contribute significantly to reduced orthostatic tolerance following space-flight.

  18. Predictors of an acute antidepressant response to fluoxetine and sertraline.

    PubMed

    Flament, M F; Lane, R M; Zhu, R; Ying, Z

    1999-09-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine have different pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic profiles which may be of clinical relevance in the determination of response in different subtypes of depression. A randomized, double-blind, 6-week study comparing sertraline (50-100 mg/day) with fluoxetine (20-40 mg/day) in 286 outpatients with major depression, who had demonstrated comparable efficacy and tolerability for the two drugs, was analysed by subgroups of patients at baseline with melancholia, severe depression, single depressive episode, multiple depressive episodes, high anxiety, low anxiety, psychomotor retardation and psychomotor agitation. Multiple logistic regression with regressors including treatment-by-subgroup variables revealed that, within certain subgroups, the efficacy might differ substantially from that of the whole treatment group. However, the only treatment-by-subgroup interaction term that was significant was anxiety (P < 0.05). There was no evidence of interaction in single or recurrent episode subgroups, and these were not included in subsequent analyses. Subsequent two-sample statistical comparison tests of response (i.e. Hamilton Depression Scale reduction > or = 50%) rates at study endpoint between treatment groups demonstrated that patients with melancholic depression and those with symptoms of psychomotor agitation yielded a significantly greater proportion of responders with sertraline compared to fluoxetine (P < 0.05). Response rates in sertraline- and fluoxetine-treated patients, respectively, were: overall study 59%, 51%; melancholia 59%, 44%; severe depression 59%, 41%; low anxiety 71%, 55%; high anxiety 47%, 48%; psychomotor retardation, 48%, 46%; and psychomotor agitation 62%, 39%. Multiple logistic regression adjusting for possible confounding factors, that included a treatment by anxiety interaction term, also led to similar findings. In particular, the analysis showed that significant differences existed in favour of sertraline in patients

  19. Models and Methods to Investigate Acute Stress Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Arsenault, Ryan; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation within the livestock industry and throughout society that animal stress is an important issue that must be addressed. With implications for animal health, well-being, and productivity, minimizing animal stress through improved animal management procedures and/or selective breeding is becoming a priority. Effective management of stress, however, depends on the ability to identify and quantify the effects of various stressors and determine if individual or combined stressors have distinct biological effects. Furthermore, it is critical to determine the duration of stress-induced biological effects if we are to understand how stress alters animal production and disease susceptibility. Common stress models used to evaluate both psychological and physical stressors in cattle are reviewed. We identify some of the major gaps in our knowledge regarding responses to specific stressors and propose more integrated methodologies and approaches to measuring these responses. These approaches are based on an increased knowledge of both the metabolic and immune effects of stress. Finally, we speculate on how these findings may impact animal agriculture, as well as the potential application of large animal models to understanding human stress. PMID:26633525

  20. Acute and sub-lethal response to mercury in Arctic and boreal calanoid copepods.

    PubMed

    Overjordet, Ida Beathe; Altin, Dag; Berg, Torunn; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Acute lethal toxicity, expressed as LC50 values, is a widely used parameter in risk assessment of chemicals, and has been proposed as a tool to assess differences in species sensitivities to chemicals between climatic regions. Arctic Calanus glacialis and boreal Calanus finmarchicus were exposed to mercury (Hg(2+)) under natural environmental conditions including sea temperatures of 2° and 10°C, respectively. Acute lethal toxicity (96 h LC50) and sub-lethal molecular response (GST expression; in this article gene expression is used as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression is also regulated, e.g., at translation and protein stability level) were studied. The acute lethal toxicity was monitored for 96 h using seven different Hg concentrations. The sub-lethal experiment was set up on the basis of nominal LC50 values for each species using concentrations equivalent to 50, 5 and 0.5% of their 96 h LC50 value. No significant differences were found in acute lethal toxicity between the two species. The sub-lethal molecular response revealed large differences both in response time and the fold induction of GST, where the Arctic species responded both faster and with higher mRNA levels of GST after 48 h exposure. Under the natural exposure conditions applied in the present study, the Arctic species C. glacialis may potentially be more susceptible to mercury exposure on the sub-lethal level.

  1. The Esophageal Propulsive Force: Esophageal Response to Acute Obstruction*

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Daniel H.; Zboralske, F. Frank

    1967-01-01

    The response of the normal human esophagus to an obstructing intraluminal bolus was investigated and compared to the response evoked by transient intraluminal distention. A balloon, immobilized within the esophagus by external attachment to a force transducer, was inflated with from 3 to 25 ml of air for from 3 to 210 sec. Pressure phenomena occurring in the esophagus were simultaneously recorded from the body of the esophagus above and below the balloon. Transient distention (5 sec or less) with small volumes (5 ml or less) often evoked a secondary peristaltic wave in the esophagus distal to the balloon, but infrequently resulted in the registration of any force exerted upon the balloon to drive it downward. Conversely, distentions of longer duration and with greater volume elicited an esophageal propulsive force exerted upon the balloon oriented to propel it aborally, and much less often evoked a propagated wave of secondary peristalsis. The propulsive force, obviously resulting from esophageal muscular contraction, occurred promptly, and once initiated, was sustained until deflation of the balloon. It varied widely in magnitude, from 4 to 200 g, and was associated with no motor phenomena recorded from the body of the esophagus proximal or distal to the balloon which could account for its presence, onset, magnitude, or duration. The force was inhibited by deglutition, but arrival of the primary peristaltic wave at the bolus resulted in augmentation of the force. When the obstructing balloon was freed from its attachment, the persistent, stationary force was converted to a propagated one that propelled the balloon before it. It the balloon was arrested before entering the stomach, the moving contraction was also arrested and the persistent propulsive force acting upon the balloon was maintained. The velocity of the moving contraction wave was determined in great part by the resistance offered by the bolus. Unrestrained, the balloon was propelled aborally at 4-8 cm

  2. Heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures in acute posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke; Suendermann, Oliver; Boellinghaus, Inga; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna; Gamer, Matthias; Briddon, Emma; Martin, Melanie Walwyn; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Physiological responses to trauma reminders are one of the core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nevertheless, screening measures for PTSD largely rely on symptom self-reports. It has been suggested that psychophysiological assessments may be useful in identifying trauma survivors with PTSD (Orr and Roth, 2000). This study investigated whether heart rate (HR) responses to standardized trauma-related pictures distinguish between trauma survivors with and without acute PTSD. Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N = 162) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post-trauma while their ECG was recorded. At 1 and 6 months, structured clinical interviews assessed PTSD diagnoses. Participants completed self-report measures of PTSD severity and depression, peritraumatic responses, coping behaviors and appraisals. Trauma survivors with acute PTSD showed greater HR responses to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, as indicated by a less pronounced mean deceleration, greater peak responses, and a greater proportion showing HR acceleration of greater than 1 beat per minute. There were no group differences in HR responses to generally threatening or neutral pictures. HR responses to trauma-related pictures contributed to the prediction of PTSD diagnosis over and above what could be predicted from self-reports of PTSD and depression. HR responses to trauma-related pictures were related to fear and data-driven processing during the trauma, safety behaviors, suppression of trauma memories, and overgeneralized appraisals of danger. The results suggest that HR responses to standardized trauma-related pictures may help identify a subgroup of patients with acute PTSD who show generalized fear responses to trauma reminders. The early generalization of triggers of reexperiencing symptoms observed in this study is consistent with associative learning and cognitive models of PTSD. PMID

  3. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  4. The clinical and hemodynamic presentation of the shock patient.

    PubMed

    Summers, G

    1990-06-01

    It is the nurse's responsibility to assess the critically ill patient and to interpret data so that therapy can be directed to optimally treat that individual. Shock is a complex progressive syndrome that includes specific types, such as cardiogenic, septic, anaphylactic, and hypovolemic. Clinical and hemodynamic parameters provide clues to the specific type of shock and its clinical progress. The progression of the shock state must be monitored by critical care nurses who are knowledgeable of and proficient in clinical assessment skills and the acquisition and interpretation of significant hemodynamic data.

  5. Acute Exercise Modulates Feature-selective Responses in Human Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Tom; Elliott, James C; Serences, John T; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2017-04-01

    An organism's current behavioral state influences ongoing brain activity. Nonhuman mammalian and invertebrate brains exhibit large increases in the gain of feature-selective neural responses in sensory cortex during locomotion, suggesting that the visual system becomes more sensitive when actively exploring the environment. This raises the possibility that human vision is also more sensitive during active movement. To investigate this possibility, we used an inverted encoding model technique to estimate feature-selective neural response profiles from EEG data acquired from participants performing an orientation discrimination task. Participants (n = 18) fixated at the center of a flickering (15 Hz) circular grating presented at one of nine different orientations and monitored for a brief shift in orientation that occurred on every trial. Participants completed the task while seated on a stationary exercise bike at rest and during low- and high-intensity cycling. We found evidence for inverted-U effects; such that the peak of the reconstructed feature-selective tuning profiles was highest during low-intensity exercise compared with those estimated during rest and high-intensity exercise. When modeled, these effects were driven by changes in the gain of the tuning curve and in the profile bandwidth during low-intensity exercise relative to rest. Thus, despite profound differences in visual pathways across species, these data show that sensitivity in human visual cortex is also enhanced during locomotive behavior. Our results reveal the nature of exercise-induced gain on feature-selective coding in human sensory cortex and provide valuable evidence linking the neural mechanisms of behavior state across species.

  6. Muscle Contraction Induces Acute Hydroxymethylation of the Exercise-Responsive Gene Nr4a3

    PubMed Central

    Pattamaprapanont, Pattarawan; Garde, Christian; Fabre, Odile; Barrès, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training triggers numerous positive adaptations through the regulation of genes controlling muscle structure and function. Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, participate in transcriptional activation by allowing the recruitment of the transcription machinery to gene promoters. Exercise induces dynamic DNA demethylation at gene promoters; however, the contribution of the demethylation precursor hydroxymethylcytosine is unknown. Given the evanescent nature of hydroxymethylcytosine, a muscle contraction model that allows for the collection of samples that are repeatedly stimulated over time is required to determine whether contraction-induced demethylation is preceded by changes in the hydroxymethylcytosine level. Here, we established an acute skeletal muscle contraction model to mimic the effects of acute exercise on gene expression. We used this model to investigate the effect of muscle contraction on DNA demethylation and hydroxymethylation. First, we performed an acute exercise study in healthy humans to identify an exercise-responsive gene that we could study in culture. We identified the nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 3 (Nr4a3) gene with the highest fold-expression increase after acute exercise. We then refined an electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) protocol that could induce expression of the Nr4a3 gene in C2C12 myotubes. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we found that in response to EPS, a region of the Nr4a3 promoter is rapidly demethylated at 60 min and re-methylated at 120 min. Of interest, hydroxymethylation of the differentially methylated region of Nr4a3 promoter after EPS was elevated immediately after EPS, with lowest levels reached at 60 min after EPS. In conclusion, we have established a cell culture-based protocol to mimic the acute transcriptional responses to exercise. Furthermore, we provide insight into the mechanism by which the exercise-responsive gene Nr4a3 is demethylated after muscle

  7. Hemodynamic aspects of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Ken; Sato, Mika; Satoh, Yuichi; Watahiki, Yasuhito; Kondoh, Yasushi; Sugawara, Maki; Box, Georgia; Wright, David; Leung, Sumie; Yuya, Hiromichi; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2002-11-01

    Neuroradiological functional imaging techniques demonstrate the patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism that are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from other dementing disorders. Besides the distribution patterns of perfusion or energy metabolism, vascular transit time (VTT), vascular reactivity (VR), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which can be measured with positron emission tomography (PET), provide hemodynamic aspects of brain pathophysiology. In order to evaluate the hemodynamic features of AD, PET studies were carried out in 20 patients with probable AD and 20 patients with vascular dementia (VaD). The PET findings were not included in their diagnostic process of AD. Using oxygen-15-labeled compounds, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), OEF, cerebral blood volume, and VTT were measured quantitatively during resting state. To evaluate VR, CBF was also measured during CO(2) inhalation. There was a significant increase in OEF in and around the parietotemporal cortices, but both VTT and VR were well preserved in patients with AD. By contrast, VR was markedly depressed and VTT was mildly prolonged in patients with VaD. Thus, from the hemodynamic point of view, the preservation of vascular reserve may be a distinct difference between AD and VaD. Furthermore, this indicates a hemodynamic integrity of the vasculature in the level of arterioles in AD.

  8. Positive emotional style and subjective, cardiovascular and cortisol responses to acute laboratory stress.

    PubMed

    Bostock, Sophie; Hamer, Mark; Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Mitchell, Ellen S; Steptoe, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    The relationships between positive emotional style and acute salivary cortisol and cardiovascular responses to laboratory stress tasks were examined in 40 young women (mean age=28.8 years). Positive emotional style (PES) was measured by aggregating daily positive mood rating scales over one week. Negative affect was assessed with the short form Profile of Mood States. Salivary cortisol was measured in response to two behavioural tasks, a 5 min speech task and a 5 min mirror tracing task. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate responses were monitored using a Finometer during baseline, tasks and recovery. Higher PES was associated with more complete diastolic BP recovery (p=0.027) and lower acute cortisol response to stress (p=0.018), after adjusting for baseline measures, age, BMI and negative affect. Individuals with higher PES reported lower subjective tension during the tasks and perceived the tasks as more controllable. There were no differences in ratings of task involvement or in objective measures of task performance. A retrospective measure of positive affect (POMS vigour) was associated with diastolic BP recovery but not cortisol responses or subjective tension. The findings suggest that positive affective traits, assessed using repeated assessments of daily mood, are related to adaptive recovery from acute psychological stress. Our results reinforce evidence linking positive affect with adaptive diastolic BP recovery, while extending the results to cortisol. Investigations into the biological correlates of affective traits should consider utilising repeated measures of experienced affect.

  9. Development of an emergency department response to acute stroke ("Code Stroke").

    PubMed

    Leira, Enrique C; Ahmed, Azeemuddin

    2009-01-01

    Minimizing delays is a crucial step in improving outcomes with acute stroke therapies whose efficacy is clearly time dependent. Logistic and human barriers to rapid stroke care can be overcome with a systematic "Code Stroke" approach provided by a structured multidisciplinary acute stroke response team. Such teams should include Emergency Medical Services providers, neurologists, neurosurgeons, diagnostic radiologists, nurses, radiology technicians, laboratory personnel, hospital administrators, and emergency medicine, intensive care, and neurointerventional physicians. An acute stroke team improves treatment practices and provides a gratifying experience for patients, families, and referring physicians. On the other hand, maintaining proficiency of the team's operation is time consuming and personally onerous for team responders. Successful maintenance requires strong departmental and institutional commitment.

  10. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant holstein heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor–mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial...

  11. Acute blood pressure response in hypertensive elderly women immediately after water aerobics exercise: A crossover study.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Raphael Martins; Vilaça-Alves, José; Noleto, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Silva, Juliana Sá; Costa, Andressa Moura; Silva, Christoffer Novais Farias; Póvoa, Thaís Inácio Rolim; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2017-01-01

    Water aerobics exercise is widely recommended for elderly people. However, little is known about the acute effects on hemodynamic variables. Thus, we assessed the effects of a water aerobic session on blood pressure in hypertensive elderly women. Fifty hypertensive elderly women aged 67.8 ± 4.1 years, 1.5 ± 0.6 m high and BMI 28.6 ± 3.9 kg/m(2), participated in a crossover clinical trial. The experiment consisted of a 45-minute water aerobics session (70%-75% HRmax adjusted for the aquatic environment) (ES) and a control session (no exercise for 45 minutes) (CS). Heart rate was monitored using a heart rate monitor and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measurements were taken using a semi-automatic monitor before and immediately after the sessions, and at 10, 20 and 30 minutes thereafter. It was using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) with Bonferroni's post-hoc test (p < 0.05). At the end of the experimental session, ES showed a rise in SBP of 17.4 mmHg (14.3%, p < 0.001) and DBP of 5.4 mmHg (7.8%, p < 0.001) compared to CS. At 10 minutes after exercise, BP declined in ES by a greater magnitude than in CS (SBP 7.5 mmHg, 6.2%, p = 0.005 and DBP 3.8 mmHg, 5.5%, p = 0.013). At 20 minutes after exercise and thereafter, SBP and DBP were similar in both ES and CS. In conclusion, BP returned to control levels within 10-20 minutes remaining unchanged until 30 minutes after exercise, and post-exercise hypotension was not observed. Besides, BP changed after exercise was a safe rise of small magnitude for hypertensive people.

  12. Acute responses of American kestrels to methyl parathion and fenvalerate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Franson, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and toxicological effects of p.o, methyl parathion (0.375-3.0 mg/kg) or fenvalerate (1000-4000 mg/kg) were examined over a 10 h period in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) maintained in thermoneutral (22?.C) and cold (-5?.C) environments. Methyl parathion was highly toxic (LD50=3.08 mg/kg, 95% confidence limits=2.29-4.l4 mg/kg, producing overt intoxication (abnormal posture, ataxia, paresis), dose-dependent inhibition (26-67%) of brain acetylcholinesterase activity, hyperglycemia, and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration. Transient but pronounced hypothermia was associated with plasma cholinesterase inhibition in excess of 50% (2 h after intubation), although this response was highly variable (plasma ChE inhibition vs. A cloacal temperature, r=-0.60). Fenvalerate, at doses far exceeding those encountered in the environment, caused mild intoxication (irregular head movement) and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, but did not alter cloacal temperature, plasma activities of CK, U-HBDH, and LDK, or concentrations of corticosterone, glucose, triiodothyronine, and uric acid. Cold exposure intensified methyl parathion toxicity, but did not affect that of fenvalerate. It would thus appear that the organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion poses far greater hazard than the pyrethroid fenvalerate to raptorial birds.

  13. Stress and adaptation responses to repeated acute acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which groups of adult male chickens (single-comb white leghorn) were exposed daily to acceleration (centrifugation) of 2 or 3 G for 10 min, 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hr (continuously), or 0 time (controls). After approximately five months of this intermittent treatment (training), the birds were exposed to continuous accelerations of the same G force (intensity). The degree of stress and adaptation of each bird was determined by survival and relative lymphocyte count criteria. Intermittent training exposures of 2 G developed levels of adaptation in birds directly proportional to the duration of their daily exposure. Intermittent training periods at 3 G, however, produced a physiological deterioration in birds receiving daily exposures of 8 hr or more. Adaptive benefits were found only in the 1- and 4-hr-daily intermittent 3-G exposure groups. Exposure to 3 G produced an immediate stress response as indicated by a low relative lymphocyte count which returned to control (preexposed) values prior to the next daily acceleration period in the 10-min, 1-hr, and 4-hr groups. This daily recovery period from stress appeared to be necessary for adaptation as opposed to deterioration for the more severe environmental (3 G) alteration.

  14. Acrolein-Induced Dyslipidemia and Acute Phase Response Independenly of HMG-CoA Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Prough, Russell A.; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Haberzettl, Petra; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    Scope Aldehydes are ubiquitous natural constituents of foods, water and beverages. Dietary intake represents the greatest source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. Oral acrolein induces dyslipidemia acutely and chronically increases atherosclerosis in mice, yet the mechanisms are unknown. Because lipid synthesis and trafficking are largely under hepatic control, we examined hepatic genes in murine models of acute and chronic oral acrolein exposure. Methods and results Changes in hepatic gene expression were examined using a Steroltalk microarray. Acute acrolein feeding modified plasma and hepatic proteins and increased plasma triglycerides within 15 min. By 6h, acrolein altered hepatic gene expression including Insig1, Insig2 and Hmgcr genes and stimulated an acute phase response (APR) with up-regulation of serum amyloid A genes (Saa) and systemic hypoalbuminemia. To test if decreased HMG-CoA reductase activity could modify acrolein-induced dyslipidemia or the APR, mice were pretreated with simvastatin. Statin treatment, however, did not alter acrolein-induced dyslipidemia or hypoalbuminemia associated with an APR. Few hepatic genes were dysregulated by chronic acrolein feeding in apoE-null mice. These studies confirmed that acute acrolein exposure altered expression of hepatic genes involved with lipid synthesis and trafficking and APR, and thus, indicated a hepatic locus of acrolein-induced dyslipidemia and APR that was independent of HMG CoA-reductase. Conclusion Dietary intake of acrolein could contribute to cardiovascular disease risk by disturbing hepatic function. PMID:21812109

  15. The effects of hemodynamic lag on functional connectivity and behavior after stroke.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Joshua S; Snyder, Abraham Z; Ramsey, Lenny; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Stroke disrupts the brain's vascular supply, not only within but also outside areas of infarction. We investigated temporal delays (lag) in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in 130 stroke patients scanned two weeks, three months and 12 months post stroke onset. Thirty controls were scanned twice at an interval of three months. Hemodynamic lag was determined using cross-correlation with the global gray matter signal. Behavioral performance in multiple domains was assessed in all patients. Regional cerebral blood flow and carotid patency were assessed in subsets of the cohort using arterial spin labeling and carotid Doppler ultrasonography. Significant hemodynamic lag was observed in 30% of stroke patients sub-acutely. Approximately 10% of patients showed lag at one-year post-stroke. Hemodynamic lag corresponded to gross aberrancy in functional connectivity measures, performance deficits in multiple domains and local and global perfusion deficits. Correcting for lag partially normalized abnormalities in measured functional connectivity. Yet post-stroke FC-behavior relationships in the motor and attention systems persisted even after hemodynamic delays were corrected. Resting state fMRI can reliably identify areas of hemodynamic delay following stroke. Our data reveal that hemodynamic delay is common sub-acutely, alters functional connectivity, and may be of clinical importance.

  16. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices.Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a

  17. Social stress modulates the cortisol response to an acute stressor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, J D; Gollock, M J; Gilmour, K M

    2014-01-15

    In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) of subordinate social status, circulating cortisol concentrations were elevated under resting conditions but the plasma cortisol and glucose responses to an acute stressor (confinement in a net) were attenuated relative to those of dominant trout. An in vitro head kidney preparation, and analysis of the expression of key genes in the stress axis prior to and following confinement in a net were then used to examine the mechanisms underlying suppression of the acute cortisol stress response in trout experiencing chronic social stress. With porcine adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) as the secretagogue, ACTH-stimulated cortisol production was significantly lower for head kidney preparations from subordinate trout than for those from dominant trout. Dominant and subordinate fish did not, however, differ in the relative mRNA abundance of melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) or cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) within the head kidney, although the relative mRNA abundance of these genes was significantly higher in both dominant and subordinate fish than in sham trout (trout that did not experience social interactions but were otherwise treated identically to the dominant and subordinate fish). The relative mRNA abundance of all three genes was significantly higher in trout exposed to an acute net stressor than under control conditions. Upstream of cortisol production in the stress axis, plasma ACTH concentrations were not affected by social stress, nor was the relative mRNA abundance of the binding protein for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-BP). The relative mRNA abundance of CRF in the pre-optic area of subordinate fish was significantly higher than that of dominant or sham fish 1h after exposure to the stressor. Collectively, the results indicate that chronic social stress modulates cortisol production at the level of the interrenal cells, resulting in an attenuated

  18. The acute response of practical occlusion in the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, Jeremy P; Kearney, Monica L; Thrower, Austin D; Collins, Sean; Pujol, Thomas J

    2010-10-01

    Training at low intensities with moderate vascular occlusion results in increased muscle hypertrophy, strength, and endurance. Elastic knee wraps, applied to the proximal portion of the target muscle, might elicit a stimulus similar to the KAATSU Master Apparatus. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that intermittently occluding the leg extensors with elastic knee wraps would increase whole-blood lactate (WBL) over control (CON). Twelve healthy men and women participated in this study (age 21.2 ± 0.35 years, height 168.9 ± 2.60 cm, and body mass 71.2 ± 4.16 kg). One repetition maximum (1RM) testing for the leg extensors was performed on a leg extension machine for the first trial, followed by occlusion (OCC) and CON trials. Four sets of leg extension exercise (30-15-15-15) were completed with 150-second rest between sets at 30% 1RM. Whole-blood lactate, heart rate (HR), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs) were measured after every set of exercise and 3 minutes postexercise. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance with statistical significance set at p ≤ 0.05. Whole-blood lactate increased in response to exercise (p = 0.01) but was not different between groups (OCC 6.28 ± 0.66 vs. CON 5.35 ± 0.36 mmol·L, p = 0.051). Heart rate (OCC 128.86 ± 4.37 vs. CON 119.72 ± 4.10 b·min⁻¹) was higher with OCC from sets 2-4 (p ≤ 0.03), with no difference 3 minutes postexercise (p = 0.29). Rating of perceived exertion was higher with OCC after every set (OCC 15.10 ± 0.31 vs. CON 12.16 ± 0.50, p = 0.01). In conclusion, no differences exist for WBL between groups, although there was a trend for higher levels with OCC. The current protocol for practical occlusion did not significantly increase metabolic stress more than normal low-intensity exercise. This study does not support the use of knee wraps as a mode of blood-flow restriction.

  19. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  20. Event-related cerebral hemodynamics reveal target-specific resource allocation for both "go" and "no-go" response-based vigilance tasks.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Tyler H; Funke, Matthew E; Dillard, Michael; Funke, Gregory J; Warm, Joel S; Parasuraman, Raja

    2013-08-01

    Transcranial Doppler sonography was used to measure cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the right and left cerebral hemispheres during the performance of a 50-min visual vigilance session. Observers monitored a simulated flight of unmanned aerial vehicles for cases in which one of the vehicles was flying in an inappropriate direction relative to its cohorts. Two types of vigilance tasks were employed: a traditional task in which observers made button press ("go") responses to critical signals, and a modification of the traditional task called the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) in which "go" responses acknowledged nonsignal events and response withholding ("no-go") signified signal detection. Signal detections and global CBFV scores declined over time. In addition, fine-grained event-related analyses revealed that the detection of signals was accompanied by an elevation of CBFV that was not present with missed signals. As was the case with the global scores, the magnitude of the transient CBFV increments associated with signal detection also declined over time, and these findings were independent of task type. The results support the view of CBFV as an index of the cognitive evaluation of stimulus significance, and a resource model of vigilance in which the need for continuous attention produces a depletion of information-processing assets that are not replenished as the task progresses. Further, temporal declines in the magnitude of event-related CBFV in response to critical signals only is evidence that the decrement function in vigilance is due to attentional processing and not specific task elements such as the required response format.

  1. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key

  2. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key points

  3. Specific immune responses against epitopes derived from Aurora kinase A and B in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Vanessa; Egenrieder, Stephanie; Götz, Marlies; Herbst, Cornelia; Greiner, Jochen; Hofmann, Susanne

    2013-07-01

    Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases which play an important role in the process of mitosis and cell cycle regulation. Aurora kinase inhibitors are described to sensitize malignant cells to cytosine arabinoside and specific antibodies by mediating apoptosis. Aurora kinases are overexpressed in most acute leukemias but also in solid tumors. In this study we investigated whether epitopes derived from Aurora kinase A and B are able to elicit cellular immune responses in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to investigate their role as potential targets for specific immunotherapy. Samples of eight patients with AML were analyzed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays and compared with immune responses of nine healthy volunteers (HVs). Specific CD8 + T cell responses were detected against the epitopes Aura A1, A2, B1, B2, B3, B4 and B5. Immune responses for epitopes derived from Aura B were induced more frequently compared to Aura A. The antigens with the most frequent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses were Aura B3, B4 and B5, although the number of patients tested for these antigens was low. Aura B5 did not elicit specific CTL responses in HVs. For epitope Aura B6 no immune response was detected in HVs or patients. Taken together, with the combination of Aurora kinase inhibitors and an immunotherapeutic approach, an effective blast and minimal residual disease elimination might be achieved.

  4. Hemodynamic response to exercise and head-up tilt of patients implanted with a rotary blood pump: a computational modeling study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Einly; Salamonsen, Robert Francis; Mansouri, Mahdi; Gaddum, Nicholas; Mason, David Glen; Timms, Daniel L; Stevens, Michael Charles; Fraser, John; Akmeliawati, Rini; Lovell, Nigel Hamilton

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigates the response of implantable rotary blood pump (IRBP)-assisted patients to exercise and head-up tilt (HUT), as well as the effect of alterations in the model parameter values on this response, using validated numerical models. Furthermore, we comparatively evaluate the performance of a number of previously proposed physiologically responsive controllers, including constant speed, constant flow pulsatility index (PI), constant average pressure difference between the aorta and the left atrium, constant average differential pump pressure, constant ratio between mean pump flow and pump flow pulsatility (ratioP I or linear Starling-like control), as well as constant left atrial pressure ( P l a ¯ ) control, with regard to their ability to increase cardiac output during exercise while maintaining circulatory stability upon HUT. Although native cardiac output increases automatically during exercise, increasing pump speed was able to further improve total cardiac output and reduce elevated filling pressures. At the same time, reduced venous return associated with upright posture was not shown to induce left ventricular (LV) suction. Although P l a ¯ control outperformed other control modes in its ability to increase cardiac output during exercise, it caused a fall in the mean arterial pressure upon HUT, which may cause postural hypotension or patient discomfort. To the contrary, maintaining constant average pressure difference between the aorta and the left atrium demonstrated superior performance in both exercise and HUT scenarios. Due to their strong dependence on the pump operating point, PI and ratioPI control performed poorly during exercise and HUT. Our simulation results also highlighted the importance of the baroreflex mechanism in determining the response of the IRBP-assisted patients to exercise and postural changes, where desensitized reflex response attenuated the percentage increase in cardiac output during exercise and

  5. Body temperature modulates the antioxidant and acute immune responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Mestre-Alfaro, Antonia; Ferrer, Miguel D; Banquells, Montserrat; Riera, Joan; Drobnic, Franchek; Sureda, Antoni; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of whole body heat in combination with exercise on the oxidative stress and acute phase immune response. Nine male endurance-trained athletes voluntarily performed two running bouts of 45 minutes at 75-80% of VO(2max) in a climatic chamber in two conditions: cold and hot humid environment. Leukocyte, neutrophil and basophil counts significantly rose after exercise in both environments; it was significantly greater in the hot environment. Lymphocyte and neutrophil antioxidant enzyme activities and carbonyl index significantly increased or decreased after exercise only in the hot environment, respectively. The lymphocytes expression of catalase, Hsp72 and CuZn-superoxide dismutase was increased in the hot environment and Sirt3 in the cold environment, mainly during recovery. In conclusion, the increased core body temperature results in the acute phase immune response associated to intense exercise and in the immune cell adaptations to counteract the oxidative stress situation.

  6. Adrenal response to acute stress in mammillary medial nuclei lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Suarez, M; Perassi, N I

    1993-01-01

    In view of the inhibitory influence of Mammillary Medial Nuclei, pars lateralis (MMN) on corticoadrenal activity, experiments were conducted in order to determine whether these nuclei are involved in the control of adrenal response to ether stress. In bilateral MMN lesioned rats, prestress plasma corticosterone concentration (C) is significantly higher than that in sham lesioned animals. Acute stress produced a significant C increase in both, sham and lesioned rats, being this increase lower in lesioned animals. After exposure to ether vapors. adrenal concentration of norepinephrine was similar in lesioned and control animals. Whereas, adrenal epinephrine concentration was significantly higher in lesioned rats than that found in the sham lesioned ones. This study demonstrates that the integrity of MMN is not essential for adrenal response to acute stress.

  7. Characterizing dynamic interactions between ultradian glucocorticoid rhythmicity and acute stress using the phase response curve.

    PubMed

    Rankin, James; Walker, Jamie J; Windle, Richard; Lightman, Stafford L; Terry, John R

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a dynamic oscillatory hormone signalling system that regulates the pulsatile secretion of glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. In addition to regulation of basal levels of glucocorticoids, the HPA axis provides a rapid hormonal response to stress that is vitally important for homeostasis. Recently it has become clear that glucocorticoid pulses encode an important biological signal that regulates receptor signalling both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. It is therefore important to understand how stressful stimuli disrupt the pulsatile dynamics of this system. Using a computational model that incorporates the crucial feed-forward and feedback components of the axis, we provide novel insight into experimental observations that the size of the stress-induced hormonal response is critically dependent on the timing of the stress. Further, we employ the theory of Phase Response Curves to show that an acute stressor acts as a phase-resetting mechanism for the ultradian rhythm of glucocorticoid secretion. Using our model, we demonstrate that the magnitude of an acute stress is a critical factor in determining whether the system resets via a Type 1 or Type 0 mechanism. By fitting our model to our in vivo stress-response data, we show that the glucocorticoid response to an acute noise stress in rats is governed by a Type 0 phase-resetting curve. Our results provide additional evidence for the concept of a deterministic sub-hypothalamic oscillator regulating the ultradian glucocorticoid rhythm, which constitutes a highly responsive peripheral hormone system that interacts dynamically with hypothalamic inputs to regulate the overall hormonal response to stress.

  8. Calpain Protects the Heart from Hemodynamic Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Taneike, Manabu; Mizote, Isamu; Morita, Takashi; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hikoso, Shungo; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Takeda, Toshihiro; Oka, Takafumi; Tamai, Takahito; Oyabu, Jota; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Junji; Mochizuki, Naoki; Komuro, Issei; Otsu, Kinya

    2011-01-01

    Calpains make up a family of Ca2+-dependent intracellular cysteine proteases that include ubiquitously expressed μ- and m-calpains. Both are heterodimers consisting of a distinct large catalytic subunit (calpain 1 for μ-calpain and calpain 2 for m-calpain) and a common regulatory subunit (calpain 4). The physiological roles of calpain remain unclear in the organs, including the heart, but it has been suggested that calpain is activated by Ca2+ overload in diseased hearts, resulting in cardiac dysfunction. In this study, cardiac-specific calpain 4-deficient mice were generated to elucidate the role of calpain in the heart in response to hemodynamic stress. Cardiac-specific deletion of calpain 4 resulted in decreased protein levels of calpains 1 and 2 and showed no cardiac phenotypes under base-line conditions but caused left ventricle dilatation, contractile dysfunction, and heart failure with interstitial fibrosis 1 week after pressure overload. Pressure-overloaded calpain 4-deficient hearts took up a membrane-impermeant dye, Evans blue, indicating plasma membrane disruption. Membrane repair assays using a two-photon laser-scanning microscope revealed that calpain 4-deficient cardiomyocytes failed to reseal a plasma membrane that had been disrupted by laser irradiation. Thus, the data indicate that calpain protects the heart from hemodynamic stresses, such as pressure overload. PMID:21795695

  9. First implantable hemodynamic monitoring device placement in single ventricle fontan anatomy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Elisa A; Berman, Darren; Daniels, Curt J

    2016-08-01

    The Fontan anatomy leads to elevated central venous pressure along with chronic venous congestion and low cardiac output; this is felt to be responsible for deterioration of exercise tolerance and functional capacity over time. Real-time hemodynamic evaluation of the Fontan anatomy has not been evaluated until now. Here, we report the technical aspects of the first two adult Fontan patients to undergo placement of an invasive hemodynamic monitor (IHM). We validate IHM readings with invasive pulmonary artery catheter derived hemodynamics in the Fontan and show successful home transmission of pulmonary artery hemodynamic tracings. This technology has the capacity to change current understanding of Fontan hemodynamics and treatment in patients with complex single-ventricle anatomy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cardiac function after acute support with direct mechanical ventricular actuation in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Patrick I; Anstadt, Mark P; Del Rio, Carlos L; Preston, Thomas J; Ueyama, Yukie; Youngblood, Brad L

    2014-01-01

    Direct mechanical ventricular actuation (DMVA) exerts direct cardiac compression/decompression and does not require blood contact. The safety and effects of DMVA support in chronically dysfunctional beating hearts in vivo have not been established. This study evaluated hemodynamics and load-independent systolic/diastolic cardiac function before/after acute support (2 hours) using DMVA in small hearts with induced chronic failure. Chronic heart failure was created in seven small dogs (15 ± 2 kg) via either serial coronary microembolizations or right-ventricular overdrive pacing. Dogs were instrumented to measure cardiac output, hemodynamic pressures, left ventricular volumes for pressure-volume analysis via preload reduction. Temporary cardiac support using a DMVA device was instituted for 2 hours. Hemodynamic and mechanical assessments, including dobutamine dose-responses, were compared both before and after support. Hemodynamic indices were preserved with support. Both left-ventricular systolic and diastolic function were improved postsupport, as the slopes of the preload-recruitable stroke work (+29 ± 7%, p < 0.05) and the end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship (EDPVR: -28 ± 9%, p < 0.05) improved post-DMVA support. Diastolic/systolic myocardial reserve, as assessed by responsiveness to dobutamine challenges, was preserved after DMVA support. Short-term DMVA support can safely and effectively sustain hemodynamics, whereas triggering favorable effects on cardiac function in the setting of chronic heart failure. In particular, DMVA support preserved load-independent diastolic function and reserve.

  11. Hemodynamic and Light-Scattering Changes of Rat Spinal Cord and Primary Somatosensory Cortex in Response to Innocuous and Noxious Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    He, Ji-Wei; Liu, Hanli; Peng, Yuan Bo

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies with an exceptional spatial resolution and noninvasiveness have become a powerful tool for assessing neural activity in both animals and humans. However, the effectiveness of neuroimaging for pain remains unclear partly because the neurovascular coupling during pain processing is not completely characterized. Our current work aims to unravel patterns of neurovascular parameters in pain processing. A novel fiber-optic method was used to acquire absolute values of regional oxy- (HbO) and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, oxygen saturation rates (SO2), and the light-scattering coefficients from the spinal cord and primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in 10 rats. Brief mechanical and electrical stimuli (ranging from innocuous to noxious intensities) as well as a long-lasting noxious stimulus (formalin injection) were applied to the hindlimb under pentobarbital anesthesia. Interhemispheric comparisons in the spinal cord and SI were used to confirm functional activation during sensory processing. We found that all neurovascular parameters showed stimulation-induced changes; however, patterns of changes varied with regions and stimuli. Particularly, transient increases in HbO and SO2 were more reliably attributed to brief stimuli, whereas a sustained decrease in SO2 was more reliably attributed to formalin. Only the ipsilateral SI showed delayed responses to brief stimuli. In conclusion, innocuous and noxious stimuli induced significant neurovascular responses at critical centers (e.g., the spinal cord and SI) along the somatosensory pathway; however, there was no single response pattern (as measured by amplitude, duration, lateralization, decrease or increase) that was able to consistently differentiate noxious stimuli. Our results strongly suggested that the neurovascular response patterns differ between brief and long-lasting noxious stimuli, and can also differ between the spinal cord and SI. Therefore, a use of multiple-parameter strategy

  12. Are Hemodynamics Surrogate Endpoints in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Fritz, Jason S.; Smith, K. Akaya; Palevsky, Harold I.; Klinger, James R.; Halpern, Scott D.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background While frequently assessed in trials and clinical practice, hemodynamic response to therapy has never been validated as a surrogate endpoint for clinical events in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods and Results We performed a patient-level pooled analysis of four randomized placebo-controlled trials to determine if treatment-induced changes in hemodynamic values at 12 weeks accounted for the relationship between treatment assignment and the probability of early clinical events (death, lung transplantation, atrial septostomy, PAH hospitalization, withdrawal for clinical worsening, escalation in PAH therapy). We included 1119 subjects with PAH. The median (interquartile range) age was 48 (37 – 59), and 23% were men. 656 (59%) received active therapy (101 [15%] iloprost, 118 [18%] sitaxsentan, 204 [31%] sildenafil, and 233 [36%] subcutaneous treprostinil). Active treatment significantly lowered right atrial pressure (RAP), mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output and index (p < 0.01 for all). Changes in hemodynamic values (except for RAP and mPAP) were significantly associated with the risk of a clinical event (p ≤ 0.01 for all). While active treatment approximately halved the odds of a clinical event compared to placebo (p < 0.001), changes in hemodynamics accounted for only 1.2 – 13.9% of the overall treatment effect. Conclusions Treatment-induced changes in hemodynamics at 12 weeks only partially explain the impact of therapy on the probability of early clinical events in PAH. These findings suggest that resting hemodynamics are not valid surrogate endpoints for short-term events in PAH clinical trials. PMID:24951771

  13. Neurohormonal and Inflammatory Hyper-Responsiveness to Acute Mental Stress in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Ali A.; Deuster, Patricia A.; Francis, Jennifer L.; Bonsall, Robert W.; Tracy, Russell P.; Kop, Willem J.

    2010-01-01

    Depression is associated with dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, overactivity of the sympathoadrenal system, and increased levels of inflammation markers. It is not known whether these biological processes are disproportionately elevated in response to acute negative emotional arousal by mental stress (MS). The present study investigates responses of neurohormones and inflammatory markers to MS in 14 clinically depressed (age: 42±10 years; 50% female) and 14 non-depressed control participants (age: 39±6 years; 50% female). Heightened acute MS reactivity was documented in depressed participants (adrenocorticotropic hormone, ρ=0.001; Norepinephrine, ρ=0.042; Epinephrine, ρ=0.039), and a delayed increase in cortisol was observed (ρ=0.002). Inflammation markers increased more strongly in depressed vs. non-depressed participants (IL-6, ρ=0.027; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, ρ=0.050; and recovery C-reactive protein, ρ=0.003). It is concluded that depressed individuals display hyper-reactivity of neuroimmunological markers in response to acute negative emotions. This hyper-reactivity may serve a pathologic role in the elevated morbidity and mortality risk associated with depression. PMID:20117167

  14. Dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Saito, Akatsuki; Katakai, Yuko; Iwasaki, Yuki; Kurosawa, Terue; Hamano, Masataka; Higashino, Atsunori; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Kurane, Ichiro; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examined the dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus (DENV) infection in a marmoset model. Here, we found that DENV infection in marmosets greatly induced responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. Interestingly, the strength of the immune response was greater in animals infected with a dengue fever strain than in those infected with a dengue hemorrhagic fever strain of DENV. In contrast, when animals were re-challenged with the same DENV strain used for primary infection, the neutralizing antibody induced appeared to play a critical role in sterilizing inhibition against viral replication, resulting in strong but delayed responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. The results in this study may help to better understand the dynamics of cellular and humoral immune responses in the control of DENV infection.

  15. Acute and chronic stress models differentially impact the inflammatory and antibody titer responses to respiratory vaccination in naive beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of an acute vs. chronic stress model on serum antibody titer and acute phase responses. Seronegative beef steers (n=32; 209 +/- 8 kg) were stratified by body weight and assigned randomly to 1 of 3 treatments: 1) Chronic stress (CHR), 0.5 mg/...

  16. Tim-3 directly enhances CD8 T cell responses to acute Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jacob V.; Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel; Pham, Nhat-Long L.; Traver, Geri L.; Rothman, Paul B.; Harty, John T.; Colgan, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Tim-3 is a surface molecule expressed throughout the immune system that can mediate both stimulatory and inhibitory effects. Previous studies have provided evidence that Tim-3 functions to enforce CD8 T cell exhaustion, a dysfunctional state associated with chronic stimulation. In contrast, the role of Tim-3 in the regulation of CD8 T cell responses to acute and transient stimulation remains undefined. To address this knowledge gap, we examined how Tim-3 affects CD8 T cell responses to acute Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. Analysis of wild-type (WT) mice infected with LM revealed that Tim-3 was transiently expressed by activated CD8 T cells and was associated primarily with acquisition of an effector phenotype. Comparison of responses to LM by WT and Tim-3 KO mice showed that the absence of Tim-3 significantly reduced the magnitudes of both primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses, which correlated with decreased IFN-γ production and degranulation by Tim-3 KO cells stimulated with peptide antigen ex vivo. To address the T cell-intrinsic role of Tim-3, we analyzed responses to LM infection by WT and Tim-3 KO TCR-transgenic CD8 T cells following adoptive transfer into a shared WT host. In this setting, the accumulation of CD8 T cells and the generation of cytokine-producing cells were significantly reduced by the lack of Tim-3, demonstrating that this molecule has a direct effect on CD8 T cell function. Combined, our results suggest that Tim-3 can mediate a stimulatory effect on CD8 T cell responses to an acute infection. PMID:24567532

  17. [Hemorheology, hemodynamics and microcirculation. 1].

    PubMed

    Larcan, A; Stoltz, J F

    1989-01-01

    The microcirculation constitutes an ubiquitous vascular network presenting a mesh pattern, and comprising different types of vessels, arterioles, small veins, capillaries, arteriovenous shunts or similar structures, and lymphatics. Many dimensions have to be recognized, or simply mentioned, if one is to understand the hemodynamic and hemorheological particulars of this territory, which differ, in many aspects, from those specific to the macrocirculation (number and length of the vessels, diameter and cross section, intercapillary distance, geometric characteristics, intravascular pressure, pressure gradient, pressure-volume relationship, flow rate, mean velocity of plasma and RBC, velocity profile, local hematocrit, in situ viscosity, kinematic viscosity, wall shearing conditions, local oxygen transport, aggregation and deformability of RBC, leukocyte properties, etc.). The flow rate in capillary tubes and capillary vessels of the living organism varies with many factors, such as proximal hemodynamics, hemorheological characteristics of blood (fibrinogen, macro- and micro-hematocrit), some known effects (Farheus, Farheus Lindqvist), local diameter, the plasma layer which plays the role of the limiting layer, the endothelial film, the wall effect, and so forth. Models of the circulation have been propounded, none of which takes into account the whole of these phenomena due to their great complexity. Hemodynamic and hemorheological interactions provide for a better understanding of certain concepts, such as vascular resistance, hindrance, capacitance, local flow rates, real capillary opening and closing, development of two-directional functional shunts, autoregulation, pressure-volume relationship, critical closing pressure, circulatory current slowing effect, sequelae of intravascular aggregation of formed blood elements.

  18. Freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint: adaptationist perspectives on the acute stress response spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia). In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed. Specifically, that fear-induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival response to an inescapable threat. The article suggests that faintness evolved in response to middle paleolithic intra-group and inter-group violence (of con-specifics) rather than as a pan-mammalian defense response, as is presently assumed. Based on recent literature, freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint provides a more complete description of the human acute stress response sequence than current descriptions. Faintness, one of three primary physiological reactions involved in BIITS phobia, is extremely rare in other phobias. Since heritability estimates are higher for faintness than for fears or phobias, the author suggests that trait-faintness may be a useful complement to trait-anxiety as an endophenotype in research on the human fear circuitry. Some implications for the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as well as for clinical, health services, and transcriptomic research are briefly discussed.

  19. Undernutrition, the Acute Phase Response to Infection, and Its Effects on Micronutrient Status Indicators12

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Kara A.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection and undernutrition are prevalent in developing countries and demonstrate a synergistic relation. Undernutrition increases infection-related morbidity and mortality. The acute phase response (APR) is an innate, systemic inflammatory reaction to a wide array of disruptions in a host’s homeostasis, including infection. Released from immune cells in response to deleterious stimuli, proinflammatory cytokines act on distant tissues to induce behavioral (e.g., anorexia, weakness, and fatigue) and systemic effects of the APR. Cytokines act to increase energy and protein requirements to manifest fever and support hepatic acute phase protein (APP) production. Blood concentrations of glucose and lipid are augmented to provide energy to immune cells in response to cytokines. Additionally, infection decreases intestinal absorption of nutrients and can cause direct loss of micronutrients. Traditional indicators of iron, zinc, and vitamin A status are altered during the APR, leading to inaccurate estimations of deficiency in populations with a high or unknown prevalence of infection. Blood concentrations of APPs can be measured in nutrition interventions to assess the time stage and severity of infection and correct for the APR; however, standardized cutoffs for nutrition applications are needed. Protein-energy malnutrition leads to increased gut permeability to pathogens, abnormal immune cell populations, and impaired APP response. Micronutrient deficiencies cause specific immune impairments that affect both innate and adaptive responses. This review describes the antagonistic interaction between the APR and nutritional status and emphasizes the need for integrated interventions to address undernutrition and to reduce disease burden in developing countries. PMID:25398733

  20. Two genes controlling acute phase responses by the antitumor polysacch aride, lentinan.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y Y; Takahama, S; Kohara, Y; Yonekawa, H

    1996-01-01

    Lentinan, a beta-1,6;1,3-glucan, is tumor-specific for transplantable mouse solid-type tumors and it also stimulates the production of acute phase proteins (APPs). The APP response to lentinan is of the delayed type (DT-APR) and differs from that to lipopolysaccharide, which is acute. We found that the responses were genetically controlled in mice and that low responsiveness is dominant (Maeda et al. 1991). Using 123 segregants of crosses between SWR/J (a high responder) and Mus spretus (a low responder), we analyzed the linkage between DT-APR responsiveness and the DNA polymerase chain reaction-simple sequence length polymorphism (PCR-SSLP) phenotype using 80 chromosome-specific microsatellite markers. We identified two loci (ltn1.1 and ltn1.2) responsible for DT-APR. ltn1.1 is closely linked to D3Mit11 on chromosome 3 and ltn1.2 to D11Nds9 on chromosome 11 (P <0.001). The linkage analysis also suggested that ltn1.2 is the major determinant for DT-APR. Correlation between lentinan-specific IL-6 mRNA expression (the late expression) controlled recessively and DT-APR induction suggests that the ltn1 loci control some process(es) of IL-6 expression in the regulation step before NF-IL6.

  1. Contribution of infralimbic cortex in the cardiovascular response to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ribeiro, Flávia Camargos de Figueirêdo; Zaretsky, Dmitry V; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Santos, Robson A S; DiMicco, Joseph A; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2012-09-15

    The infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (IL) modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine function via projections to subcortical structures involved in the response to stress. We evaluated the contribution of the IL to the cardiovascular response evoked by acute stress. Under anesthesia (80 mg/kg ketamine-11.5 mg/kg xylazine), rats were implanted with telemetry probes or arterial lines for recording heart rate and blood pressure. Guide cannulas were implanted to target the IL for microinjection of muscimol (100 pmol/100 nl), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) (6 pmol/100 nl), or vehicle (100 nl). Microinjection of muscimol, an agonist of GABA(A) receptors, into the IL had no effect on stress-evoked cardiovascular and thermogenic changes in any of the paradigms evaluated (cage switch, restraint plus air-jet noise, or air-jet stress). However, microinjection of the excitatory amino acid NMDA into the IL attenuated the pressor and tachycardic response to air-jet stress. Pretreatment with the selective NMDA antagonist dl-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5, 100 pmol/100 nl) blocked the effect of NMDA on the cardiovascular response to air-jet stress. We conclude that 1) the IL region is not tonically involved in cardiovascular or thermogenic control during stress or under baseline conditions, and 2) activation of NMDA receptors in the IL can suppress the cardiovascular response to acute stress exposure.

  2. microRNA function is limited to cytokine control in the acute response to virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Lauren C.; Schmid, Sonja; Sachs, David; Shim, Jaehee V.; Lim, Jean K.; tenOever, Benjamin R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY With the capacity to fine-tune protein expression via sequence-specific interactions, microRNAs (miRNAs) help regulate cell maintenance and differentiation. While some studies have also implicated miRNAs as regulators of the antiviral response, others have found that the RISC complex that facilitates miRNA-mediated silencing is rendered non-functional during cellular stress, including virus infection. To determine the global role of miRNAs in the cellular response to virus infection, we generated a vector that rapidly eliminates total cellular miRNA populations in terminally differentiated primary cultures. Loss of miRNAs has a negligible impact on both innate sensing of and immediate response to acute viral infection. In contrast, miRNA depletion specifically enhances cytokine expression, providing a post-translational mechanism for immune cell activation during cellular stress. This work highlights the physiological role of miRNAs during the antiviral response and suggests their contribution is limited to chronic infections and the acute activation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:26651947

  3. Acute-phase responses vary with pathogen identity in house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    PubMed

    Coon, Courtney A C; Warne, Robin W; Martin, Lynn B

    2011-06-01

    Pathogens may induce different immune responses in hosts contingent on pathogen characteristics, host characteristics, or interactions between the two. We investigated whether the broadly effective acute-phase response (APR), a whole body immune response that occurs in response to constitutive immune receptor activation and includes fever, secretion of immune peptides, and sickness behaviors such as anorexia and lethargy, varies with pathogen identity in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). Birds were challenged with a subcutaneous injection of either a glucan at 0.7 mg/kg (to simulate fungal infection), a synthetic double-stranded RNA at 25 mg/kg (to simulate viral infection), or LPS at 1 mg/kg (to simulate a gram-negative bacterial infection), and then body mass, core body temperature changes, sickness behaviors, and secretion of an acute-phase protein, haptoglobin, were compared. Despite using what are moderate-to-high pyrogen doses for other vertebrates, only house sparrows challenged with LPS showed measurable APRs. Febrile, behavioral, and physiological responses to fungal and viral mimetics had minimal effects.

  4. Effects of subanaesthetic sevoflurane on ventilation. 1: Response to acute and sustained hypercapnia in humans.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J J; Manning-Fox, J; Dorrington, K L; Robbins, P A

    1999-08-01

    We have determined the influence of 0.1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane on ventilation, the acute ventilatory response to a step change in end-tidal carbon dioxide and the ventilatory response to sustained hypercapnia in 10 healthy adult volunteers. Subjects undertook a preliminary 10-min period of breathing air without sevoflurane to determine their normal ventilation and natural end-tidal PCO2. This 10-min period was repeated while breathing 0.1 MAC of sevoflurane. Subjects then undertook two procedures: end-tidal PO2 was maintained at 13.3 kPa and end-tidal PCO2 at 1.3 kPa above the subject's normal value for 30 min of data collection, first with and then without 0.1 MAC of sevoflurane. A dynamic end-tidal forcing system was used to generate these gas profiles. Sevoflurane did not significantly change ventilation: 10.1 (SEM 1.0) litre min-1 without sevoflurane, 9.6 (0.9) litre min-1 with sevoflurane. The response to acute hypercapnia was also unchanged: mean carbon dioxide response slopes were 20.2 (2.7) litre min-1 kPa-1 without sevoflurane and 18.8 (2.7) litre min-1 kPa-1 with sevoflurane. Sustained hypercapnia caused a significant gradual increase in ventilation and tidal volume over time and significant gradual reduction in inspiratory and expiratory times. Sevoflurane did not affect these trends during sustained hypercapnia. These results suggest that 0.1 MAC of sevoflurane does not significantly affect the acute ventilatory response to hypercapnia and does not modify the progressive changes in ventilation and pattern of breathing that occur with sustained hypercapnia.

  5. Presence of an acute phase response in sheep with clinical classical scrapie

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Work with experimental scrapie in sheep has been performed on-site for many years including studies on PrPSc dissemination and histopathology of organs and tissues both at preclinical and clinical stages. In this work serum was sampled at regular intervals from lambs which were infected immediately after birth and from parallel healthy controls, and examined for acute phase proteins. In contrast to earlier experiments, which extensively studied PrPSc dissemination and histopathology in peripheral tissues and brain, this experiment is focusing on examination of serum for non-PrPSc markers that discriminates the two groups, and give insight into other on-going processes detectable in serum samples. Results There was clear evidence of an acute phase response in sheep with clinical scrapie, both experimental and natural. All the three proteins, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A, were increased at the clinical stage of scrapie. Conclusion There was evidence of a systemic measurable acute phase response at the clinical terminal end-stage of classical scrapie. PMID:22805457

  6. The implicit affiliation motive moderates cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress in high school students.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Mirko; Schüler, Julia; Budde, Henning

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously shown that the implicit affiliation motive - the need to establish and maintain friendly relationships with others - leads to chronic health benefits. The underlying assumption for the present research was that the implicit affiliation motive also moderates the salivary cortisol response to acute psychological stress when some aspects of social evaluation and uncontrollability are involved. By contrast we did not expect similar effects in response to exercise as a physical stressor. Fifty-nine high school students aged M=14.8 years were randomly assigned to a psychosocial stress (publishing the results of an intelligence test performed), a physical stress (exercise intensity of 65-75% of HRmax), and a control condition (normal school lesson) each lasting 15min. Participants' affiliation motives were assessed using the Operant Motive Test and salivary cortisol samples were taken pre and post stressor. We found that the strength of the affiliation motive negatively predicted cortisol reactions to acute psychosocial but not to physical stress when compared to a control group. The results suggest that the affiliation motive buffers the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the HPA axis.

  7. Do acute psychological and psychobiological responses to trauma predict subsequent symptom severities of PTSD and depression?

    PubMed Central

    Ehring, Thomas; Ehlers, Anke; Cleare, Anthony J.; Glucksman, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between the acute psychological and psychobiological trauma response and the subsequent development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms in 53 accident survivors attending an emergency department. Lower levels of salivary cortisol measured in the emergency room predicted greater symptom levels of PTSD and depression 6 months later, and lower diastolic blood pressure, past emotional problems, greater dissociation and data-driven processing predicted greater PTSD symptoms. Heart rate was not predictive. Low cortisol levels correlated with data-driven processing during the accident, and, in female participants only, with prior trauma and prior emotional problems. Higher evening cortisol 6 months after the accident correlated with PTSD and depressive symptoms at 6 months, but this relationship was no longer significant when levels of pain were controlled. The results support the role of the acute response to trauma in the development and maintenance of PTSD and provide promising preliminary evidence for a meaningful relationship between psychobiological and psychological factors in the acute trauma phase. PMID:18789538

  8. Examining the association between adult attachment style and cortisol responses to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Tara; Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    The quality of social relationships may contribute to variations in biological stress responses, thereby affecting health risk. The association between an important indicator of social relationships, adult attachment style, and cortisol has been relatively unexplored. The present study examined adult romantic attachment style and cortisol responses to acute laboratory stress. Salivary cortisol was measured in response to two behavioural tasks, a colour/word interference task and mirror tracing task, in 498 healthy men and women from the Heart Scan study, a subsample of the Whitehall II cohort. Participants were classified as secure, fearful, preoccupied or dismissive on the basis of responses to the Relationship Questionnaire. Cortisol output was lowest in the fearful group, followed by the preoccupied group, with both secure and dismissive groups having higher levels. The results from this study tentatively support the proposition that attachment style is a factor in determining the manifestation of HPA dysregulation.

  9. Investigation of neural correlates between perception of pain and hemodynamic response measured in the pre-frontal cortex using functional near infra-red spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Venkatagiri

    Perception of pain is multi-dimensional, comprising three major psychological dimensions: sensory-discriminative, motivational-affective and cognitive-evaluative. This dissertation study investigates the cognitive evaluation of pain, by acquiring functional Near Infra-Red Spectroscopic (fNIRS) measurements from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas, during mechanical and thermal pain stimulation induced on the subject's volar forearm. Clustered-wise analysis on the oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) response from specific PFC areas was followed by categorizing the resulting HbO response into early (0.1--12sec) and late (12.1--25sec) phases. For each respective phase, regression analysis was carried between the HbO-derived parameters and behaviorally measured pain rating. The major findings of this study include: (1) across both 41°C and 48°C thermal stimulation, significant DeltaHbO deactivation was observed during the late phase, in the left hemispheric (LH) anterior PFC (aPFC) or Brodmann area 10 (BA 10). (2) Significant correlates of pain rating were observed in the LH prefrontal areas: (a) under mechanical stimulation, early phase HbO-derived peak intensity (PI) from LH aPFC correlated with the pain rating. (b) Under both 41°C and 48°C thermal stimulation, late phase HbO-derived PI from the LH dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC or BA 46) showed correlation with the pain rating. (3) The significant correlates observed from the right hemispheric (RH) PFC were: (a) under mechanical stimulation, early phase HbO-derived FWHM from the RH aPFC correlated with the pain rating. (b) Under 41°C thermal stimulation, late phase HbO-derived PI from the RH DLPFC area correlated with the pain rating. (4) The late phase HbO-derived time to peak from LH aPFC reflected cognitive discrimination of two different pain levels (41°C and 48°C). The observed trend for DeltaHbO activation and deactivation could possibly be due to synaptic-induced vasodilation and vasoconstriction leading to increased or

  10. Acute responses to exercise training and relationship with exercise adherence in moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Amanda K; Wardini, Rima; Chan-Thim, Emilie; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L; Pepin, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to (i) compare, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, acute responses to continuous training at high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at ventilatory threshold (CTVT) and interval training (IT); (ii) examine associations between acute responses and 12-week adherence; and (iii) investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated/moderated by affect/vigour. Thirty-five COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 60.2 ± 15.8% predicted), underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT or IT, were monitored throughout about before training, and underwent 12 weeks of exercise training during which adherence was tracked. Compared with CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate and respiratory rate (RR), while IT induced higher [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]maximal voluntary ventilation, RR and lower pulse oxygen saturation. From pre- to post-exercise, positive affect increased (F = 9.74, p < 0.001) and negative affect decreased (F = 6.43, p = 0.005) across groups. CTVT reported greater end-exercise vigour compared to CTHI (p = 0.01) and IT (p = 0.02). IT exhibited lowest post-exercise vigour (p = 0.04 versus CTHI, p = 0.02 versus CTVT) and adherence rate (F = 6.69, p = 0.004). Mean [Formula: see text] (r = -0.466, p = 0.007) and end-exercise vigour (r = 0.420, p = 0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. End-exercise vigour moderated the relationship between [Formula: see text] and adherence (β = 2.74, t(32) = 2.32, p = 0.03). In summary, CTHI, CTVT and IT improved affective valence from rest to post-exercise and induced a significant 12-week exercise training effect. However, they elicited different acute physiological responses, which in turn were associated with differences in 12-week adherence to the target training intensity. This association was moderated by acute end-exercise vigour.

  11. Celebral, Splanchnic and Low