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Sample records for acute hemodynamic response

  1. Acute hemodynamic responses to weightlessness in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Elton, K. F.; Holt, T. A.; Mukai, C.; Bennett, B. S.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    As NASA designs space flights requiring prolonged periods of weightlessness for a broader segment of the population, it will be important to know the acute and sustained effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular system since this information will contribute to understanding of the clinical pharmacology of drugs administered in space. Due to operational constraints on space flights, earliest effects of weightlessness have not been documented. We examined hemodynamic responses of humans to transitions from acceleration to weightlessness during parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Impedance cardiography data were collected over four sets of 8-10 parabolas, with a brief rest period between sets. Each parabola included a period of 1.8 Gz, then approximately 20 seconds of weightlessness, and finally a period of 1.6 Gz; the cycle repeated almost immediately for the remainder of the set. Subjects were semi-supine (Shuttle launch posture) for the first set, then randomly supine, sitting and standing for each subsequent set. Transition to weightlessness while standing produced decreased heart rate, increased thoracic fluid content, and increased stroke index. Surprisingly, the onset of weightlessness in the semi-supine posture produced little evidence of a headward fluid shift. Heart rate, stroke index, and cardiac index are virtually unchanged after 20 seconds of weightlessness, and thoracic fluid content is slightly decreased. Semi-supine responses run counter to Shuttle crewmember reports of noticeable fluid shift after minutes to hours in orbit. Apparently, the headward fluid shift commences in the semi-supine posture before launch. is augmented by launch acceleration, but briefly interrupted immediately in orbit, then resumes and is completed over the next hours.

  2. Acute hemodynamic responses to weightlessness in humans.

    PubMed

    Lathers, C M; Charles, J B; Elton, K F; Holt, T A; Mukai, C; Bennett, B S; Bungo, M W

    1989-07-01

    As NASA designs space flights requiring prolonged periods of weightlessness for a broader segment of the population, it will be important to know the acute and sustained effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular system since this information will contribute to understanding of the clinical pharmacology of drugs administered in space. Due to operational constraints on space flights, earliest effects of weightlessness have not been documented. We examined hemodynamic responses of humans to transitions from acceleration to weightlessness during parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Impedance cardiography data were collected over four sets of 8-10 parabolas, with a brief rest period between sets. Each parabola included a period of 1.8 Gz, then approximately 20 seconds of weightlessness, and finally a period of 1.6 Gz; the cycle repeated almost immediately for the remainder of the set. Subjects were semi-supine (Shuttle launch posture) for the first set, then randomly supine, sitting and standing for each subsequent set. Transition to weightlessness while standing produced decreased heart rate, increased thoracic fluid content, and increased stroke index. Surprisingly, the onset of weightlessness in the semi-supine posture produced little evidence of a headward fluid shift. Heart rate, stroke index, and cardiac index are virtually unchanged after 20 seconds of weightlessness, and thoracic fluid content is slightly decreased. Semi-supine responses run counter to Shuttle crewmember reports of noticeable fluid shift after minutes to hours in orbit. Apparently, the headward fluid shift commences in the semi-supine posture before launch. is augmented by launch acceleration, but briefly interrupted immediately in orbit, then resumes and is completed over the next hours. PMID:2760255

  3. Transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin) in healthy persons: acute effects on skin temperature and hemodynamic orthostatic response.

    PubMed

    Haebisch, E M

    1995-01-01

    In order to find an explanation for individual reactions to transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) we studied the skin temperature and hemodynamic reactions in 63 healthy persons. The data were obtained before and after the application of GTN and Glycerin (GL) placebo patches, during one hour. The skin temperature was measured on both forearms, the local (left sided) and systemic (right sided) reaction on GTN was related to the skin fold and the calculated body fat content. The bilateral rise of skin temperature and its duration was higher and longer in obese than in lean persons mainly in obese women. The UV induced thermo and the later photothermoreaction (Erythema) was reduced on the left forearm after the application of GTN and GL patches. The observed hemodynamic GTN effect confirmed known postural reactions, such as decreased arterial pressure (delta mAP = -2.9%), increased heart rate (delta HR = +7.4%) and QTc prolongation (delta QTc = +4.9%) in upright position. An adverse drug effect with increased mean blood pressure (delta mAP = +12%) and increased heart rate (delta HR = +10.4%) mainly in supine position was observed in 11% of the participants, but only in men. Such a reaction was already described by Murell, 1879. Individual GTN effects were analyzed and related to habits and family history. In male smokers and in persons with hypertensive and diabetic close relatives, the hypotensive GTN effect was accentuated in supine position. In the upright position the group with hypertensives in the family presented a moderate hypotensive reaction without secondary tachycardia and the smokers presented only a slightly increased heart rate. Our observations suggest that individual reactions to transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) with its active component nitric oxide (NO) depends on physiological conditions, related to endogenous vasoactive substances, mainly the interaction with EDRF (the endogenous NO) and the activity of the Renin-Angiotensin System. PMID

  4. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  5. [ASSOCIATED RESPIRATORY AND HEMODYNAMICS RESPONSE TO ACUTE NORMOBARIC PROGRESSIVE HYPOXIA IN ANESTHETIZED RATS].

    PubMed

    Donina, Zh A; Baranova, E V; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-10-01

    The interdependent reactions of the cardiorespiratory system during experimental simulation of progressive acute hypoxia were studied in anesthetized Wistar rats. The results indicate that the extremely low oxygen content in the inhaled gas mixture to less than 6% lead to terminal sedation and apnea. After the cessation of hypoxic exposure were observed spontaneous autoresuscitation. Effects of progressive hypoxia, is an example of a multi-component interdependent reactions of the cardiorespiratory system, which are based on the respiratory and vasomotor center function disturbance and the predominance of parasympathetic influences on the heart. The obtained data can be used as a model of hypoxic apnea to examine the influence of physiologically active substances on the cardiorespiratory system at disease pathology. PMID:26827496

  6. Spatiotemporal hemodynamic response functions derived from physiology.

    PubMed

    Aquino, K M; Robinson, P A; Drysdale, P M

    2014-04-21

    Probing neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) relies upon understanding the hemodynamic response to changes in neural activity. Although existing studies have extensively characterized the temporal hemodynamic response, less is understood about the spatial and spatiotemporal hemodynamic responses. This study systematically characterizes the spatiotemporal response by deriving the hemodynamic response due to a short localized neural drive, i.e., the spatiotemporal hemodynamic response function (stHRF) from a physiological model of hemodynamics based on a poroelastic model of cortical tissue. In this study, the model's boundary conditions are clarified and a resulting nonlinear hemodynamic wave equation is derived. From this wave equation, damped linear hemodynamic waves are predicted from the stHRF. The main features of these waves depend on two physiological parameters: wave propagation speed, which depends on mean cortical stiffness, and damping which depends on effective viscosity. Some of these predictions were applied and validated in a companion study (Aquino et al., 2012). The advantages of having such a theory for the stHRF include improving the interpretation of spatiotemporal dynamics in fMRI data; improving estimates of neural activity with fMRI spatiotemporal deconvolution; and enabling wave interactions between hemodynamic waves to be predicted and exploited to improve the signal to noise ratio of fMRI. PMID:24398024

  7. The impact of beat-to-beat variability in optimising the acute hemodynamic response in cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Steven; Walker, Cameron; Crozier, Andrew; Hyde, Eoin R.; Blazevic, Bojan; Behar, Jonathan M.; Claridge, Simon; Sohal, Manav; Shetty, Anoop; Jackson, Tom; Rinaldi, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute indicators of response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) are critical for developing lead optimisation algorithms and evaluating novel multi-polar, multi-lead and endocardial pacing protocols. Accounting for beat-to-beat variability in measures of acute haemodynamic response (AHR) may help clinicians understand the link between acute measurements of cardiac function and long term clinical outcome. Methods and results A retrospective study of invasive pressure tracings from 38 patients receiving an acute pacing and electrophysiological study was performed. 602 pacing protocols for left ventricle (LV) (n = 38), atria–ventricle (AV) (n = 9), ventricle–ventricle (VV) (n = 12) and endocardial (ENDO) (n = 8) optimisation were performed. AHR was measured as the maximal rate of LV pressure development (dP/dtMx) for each beat. The range of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of mean AHR was ~ 7% across all optimisation protocols compared with the reported CRT response cut off value of 10%. A single clear optimal protocol was identifiable in 61%, 22%, 25% and 50% for LV, AV, VV and ENDO optimisation cases, respectively. A level of service (LOS) optimisation that aimed to maximise the expected AHR 5th percentile, minimising variability and maximising AHR, led to distinct optimal protocols from conventional mean AHR optimisation in 34%, 78%, 67% and 12.5% of LV, AV, VV and ENDO optimisation cases, respectively. Conclusion The beat-to-beat variation in AHR is significant in the context of CRT cut off values. A LOS optimisation offers a novel index to identify the optimal pacing site that accounts for both the mean and variation of the baseline measurement and pacing protocol. PMID:26844303

  8. Review: hemodynamic response to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    Historically, and at present, carbon monoxide is a major gaseous poison responsible for widespread morbidity and mortality. From threshold to maximal nonlethal levels, a variety of cardiovascular changes occur, both immediately and in the long term, whose homeostatic function it is to renormalize tissue oxygen delivery. However, notwithstanding numerous studies over the past century, the literature remains equivocal regarding the hemodynamic responses in animals and humans, although CO hypoxia is clearly different in several respects from hypoxic hypoxia. Factors complicating interpretation of experimental findings include species, CO dose level and rate, route of CO delivery, duration, level of exertion, state of consciousness, and anesthetic agent used. Augmented cardiac output usually observed with moderate COHb may be compromised in more sever poisoning for the same reasons, such that regional or global ischemia result. The hypotension usually seen in most animal studies is thought to be a primary cause of CNS damage resulting from acute CO poisoning, yet the exact mechanism(s) remains unproven in both animals and humans, as does the way in which CO produces hypotension. This review briefly summarizes the literature relevant to the short- and long-term hemodynamic responses reported in animals and humans. It concludes by presenting an overview using data from a single species in which the most complete work has been done to date.

  9. Hemodynamic evaluation of a chronically implanted, electrically powered left ventricular assist system: responses to acute circulatory stress.

    PubMed

    McKay, R G; Penny, W F; Wyman, R M; Clay, W; Carr, J G; Bernhard, W F; Grossman, W

    1991-12-01

    Hemodynamic stress testing was performed in four calves with a chronically implanted left ventricular assist device consisting of a double-valved pump interposed between the left ventricular apex and the descending thoracic aorta. The device was powered either pneumatically (n = 1) or with a transcutaneous energy transmission system (n = 3). Hemodynamic evaluation (cardiac output and right and left ventricular and pulmonary and carotid artery pressures) was carried out at baseline and during all hemodynamically stressed states. Atrial pacing and ventricular pacing to a heart rate of 140 beats/min resulted in no significant change in right or left heart filling pressures or cardiac output. Preload reduction with nitroprusside or transient inferior vena cava balloon occlusion resulted in a marked decrease in left ventricular pressure with preservation of mean arterial pressure. Phenylephrine administration resulted in a marked rise in mean arterial pressure with no change in cardiac output or filling pressure. Induction of ventricular fibrillation resulted in a decrease of mean left ventricular pressure to 11 +/- 8 mm Hg, but mean arterial pressure was maintained at greater than or equal to 50 mm Hg. It is concluded that a multicomponent, implantable, electrically powered assist system is capable of maintaining a normal cardiac output under a wide range of loading conditions and chronotropic states. Although this device is clearly preload dependent, it is capable of maintaining normal systemic pressures during conditions of severe left ventricular dysfunction and circulatory collapse. PMID:1960330

  10. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  11. In Heart Failure Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block Single Lead MultiSpot Left Ventricular Pacing Does Not Improve Acute Hemodynamic Response To Conventional Biventricular Pacing. A Multicenter Prospective, Interventional, Non-Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterliński, Maciej; Sokal, Adam; Lenarczyk, Radosław; Van Heuverswyn, Frederic; Rinaldi, C. Aldo; Vanderheyden, Marc; Khalameizer, Vladimir; Francis, Darrel; Heynens, Joeri; Stegemann, Berthold; Cornelussen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent efforts to increase CRT response by multiSPOT pacing (MSP) from multiple bipols on the same left ventricular lead are still inconclusive. Aim The Left Ventricular (LV) MultiSPOTpacing for CRT (iSPOT) study compared the acute hemodynamic response of MSP pacing by using 3 electrodes on a quadripolar lead compared with conventional biventricular pacing (BiV). Methods Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent an acute hemodynamic study to determine the %change in LV+dP/dtmax from baseline atrial pacing compared to the following configurations: BiV pacing with the LV lead in a one of lateral veins, while pacing from the distal, mid, or proximal electrode and all 3 electrodes together (i.e. MSP). All measurements were repeated 4 times at 5 different atrioventricular delays. We also measured QRS-width and individual Q-LV durations. Results Protocol was completed in 24 patients, all with LBBB (QRS width 171±20 ms) and 58% ischemic aetiology. The percentage change in LV+dP/dtmax for MSP pacing was 31.0±3.3% (Mean±SE), which was not significantly superior to any BiV pacing configuration: 28.9±3.2% (LV-distal), 28.3±2.7% (LV-mid), and 29.5±3.0% (LV-prox), respectively. Correlation between LV+dP/dtmax and either QRS-width or Q-LV ratio was poor. Conclusions In patients with LBBB MultiSPOT LV pacing demonstrated comparable improvement in contractility to best conventional BiV pacing. Optimization of atrioventricular delay is important for the best performance for both BiV and MultiSPOT pacing configurations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01883141 PMID:27124724

  12. Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Timothy W

    2016-04-01

    A review is presented of the physical principles governing the distribution of blood flow and blood pressure in the vascular system. The main factors involved are the pulsatile driving pressure generated by the heart, the flow characteristics of blood, and the geometric structure and mechanical properties of the vessels. The relationship between driving pressure and flow in a given vessel can be understood by considering the viscous and inertial forces acting on the blood. Depending on the vessel diameter and other physical parameters, a wide variety of flow phenomena can occur. In large arteries, the propagation of the pressure pulse depends on the elastic properties of the artery walls. In the microcirculation, the fact that blood is a suspension of cells strongly influences its flow properties and leads to a nonuniform distribution of hematocrit among microvessels. The forces acting on vessel walls include shear stress resulting from blood flow and circumferential stress resulting from blood pressure. Biological responses to these forces are important in the control of blood flow and the structural remodeling of vessels, and also play a role in major disease processes including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Consideration of hemodynamics is essential for a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of the circulatory system. PMID:27065172

  13. Hemodynamic and hormonal responses to nicorandil in a canine model of acute ischemic heart failure: a comparison with cromakalim and nitroglycerin.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, T; Kamei, K; Sugo, I; Kamiyama, T; Sudo, H; Ohba, Y

    1999-01-01

    The pharmacologic profiles of nicorandil in the cardiovascular system have been characterized by K-channel opening and nitrate activities. However, the effects of nicorandil on acute heart failure have yet to be elucidated. To investigate the effects of nicorandil under such pathophysiologic conditions, we administered nicorandil intravenously to dogs with acute ischemic heart failure induced by coronary embolization and compared the results with those induced by cromakalim and nitroglycerin. The heart failure in this experiment was demonstrated by a reduction of mean blood pressure (MBP) from 143+/-3 to 129+/-2 mm Hg (p < 0.01); cardiac output (CO) from 2.18+/-0.10 to 1.06+/-0.05 L/min (p < 0.01); stroke volume (SV) from 12.7+/-0.6 to 6.8+/-0.3 ml/min (p < 0.01); Vmax, an index of the contractility of the left ventricle, from 105.5+/-4.4 to 49.9+/-1.8 1/s (p < 0.01), and an increase in right atrial pressure (RAP) from 2.9+/-0.3 to 5.3+/-0.3 mm Hg (p < 0.01); left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) from 2.5+/-0.4 to 26.0+/-1.4 mm Hg (p < 0.01); and T, time constant of left ventricular relaxation, from 38.3+/-0.8 to 62.4+/-2.8 ms (p < 0.01). Furthermore, plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased (from 1.72+/-0.29 to 5.03+/-0.68 ng AngI/ml/h, p < 0.01; from 103.9+/-5.8 to 411.5+/-29.4 pg/ml, p < 0.01, respectively), whereas brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) remained unchanged (from 23.1+/-2.2 to 26.9+/-1.4 pg/ml). Nicorandil (10-40 microg/kg/min, i.v. infusion for 20 min for each dosing) or cromakalim (0.25-1 microg/kg/min) decreased MBP, systemic vascular resistance (SVR), RAP, and LVEDP, and increased CO, SV, and Vmax. However, the reduction of RAP in cromakalim was significantly smaller than those of nicorandil and nitroglycerin in comparison at similar hypotensive doses. Nitroglycerin (2.5-10 microg/kg/min) decreased MBP, RAP, and LVEDP, and increased Vmax but did not change CO or SV. Increased plasma ANP levels, an

  14. Acute ethanol intoxication and the trauma patient: hemodynamic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bilello, John; McCray, Victor; Davis, James; Jackson, Lascienya; Danos, Leigh Ann

    2011-09-01

    Many trauma patients are acutely intoxicated with alcohol. Animal studies have demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication inhibits the normal release of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vasopressin in response to acute hemorrhage. Ethanol also increases nitric oxide release and inhibits antidiuretic hormone secretion. This article studies the effects of alcohol intoxication (measured by blood alcohol level, BAL) on the presentation and resuscitation of trauma patients with blunt hepatic injuries. A retrospective registry and chart review was conducted of all patients who presented with blunt liver injuries at an ACS-verified, level I trauma center. Data collected included admission BAL, systolic blood pressure, hematocrit, International Normalized Ratio (INR), liver injury grade, Injury Severity Score (ISS), intravenous fluid and blood product requirements, base deficit, and mortality. From September 2002 to May 2008, 723 patients were admitted with blunt hepatic injuries. Admission BAL was obtained in 569 patients, with 149 having levels >0.08%. Intoxicated patients were more likely to be hypotensive on admission (p = 0.01) despite a lower liver injury grade and no significant difference in ISS. There was no significant difference in the percent of intoxicated patients requiring blood transfusion. However, when blood was given, intoxicated patients required significantly more units of packed red blood cells (PRBC) than their nonintoxicated counterparts (p = 0.01). Intoxicated patients also required more intravenous fluid during their resuscitation (p = 0.002). Alcohol intoxication may impair the ability of blunt trauma patients to compensate for acute blood loss, making them more likely to be hypotensive on admission and increasing their PRBC and intravenous fluid requirements. All trauma patients should have BAL drawn upon admission and their resuscitation should be performed with an understanding of the physiologic alterations associated with acute alcohol

  15. Hemodynamic and symptomatic effects of acute interventions on tilt in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, V. M.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Novak, V.; Low, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to alleviate symptoms in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Drugs reported to be of benefit include midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, and phenobarbital. Other measures used include volume expansion and physical countermaneuvers. These treatments may influence pathophysiologic mechanisms of POTS such as alpha-receptor dysfunction, beta-receptor supersensitivity, venous pooling, and brainstem center dysfunction. The authors prospectively studied hemodynamic indices and symptom scores in patients with POTS who were acutely treated with a variety of interventions. Twenty-one subjects who met the criteria for POTS were studied (20 women, 1 man; mean age, 28.7 +/- 6.8 y; age range, 14-39 y). Patients were studied with a 5-minute head-up tilt protocol, ECG monitoring, and noninvasive beat-to-beat blood pressure monitoring, all before and after the administration of an intervention (intravenous saline, midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, or phenobarbital). The hemodynamic indices studied were heart rate (ECG) and systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressure. Patients used a balanced verbal scale to record any change in their symptoms between the tilts. Symptom scores improved significantly after the patients received midodrine and saline. Midodrine and propranolol reduced the resting heart rate response to tilt (p <0.005) and the immediate and 5-minute heart rate responses to tilt (p <0.002). Clonidine accentuated the immediate decrease in blood pressure on tilt up (p <0.05). It was concluded that midodrine and intravenous saline are effective in decreasing symptoms on tilt in patients with POTS when given acutely. Effects of treatments on heart rate and blood pressure responses generally reflected the known pharmacologic mechanisms of the agents.

  16. Hemodynamic Responses to Speech and Music in Preverbal Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Baumbauer, Kyle; Bortfeld, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided clues about the ontogeny of lateralization of auditory processing in humans, but most have employed specific subtypes of stimuli and/or have assessed responses in discrete temporal windows. The present study used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to establish changes in hemodynamic activity in the neocortex of preverbal infants (aged 4-11 months) while they were exposed to two distinct types of complex auditory stimuli (full sentences and musical phrases). Measurements were taken from bilateral temporal regions, including both anterior and posterior superior temporal gyri. When the infant sample was treated as a homogenous group, no significant effects emerged for stimulus type. However, when infants' hemodynamic responses were categorized according to their overall changes in volume, two very clear neurophysiological patterns emerged. A high responder group, showed a pattern of early and increasing activation, primarily in the left hemisphere, similar to that observed in comparable studies with adults. In contrast, a low responder group showed a pattern of gradual decreases inactivation over time. Although age did track with responder type, no significant differences between these groups emerged for stimulus type, suggesting that the high versus low responder characterization generalizes across classes of auditory stimuli. These results highlight a new way to conceptualize the variable cortical blood flow patterns that are frequently observed across infants and stimuli, with hemodynamic response volumes potentially serving as an early indicator of developmental changes in auditory processing sensitivity. PMID:23777481

  17. Hemodynamic responses to speech and music in preverbal infants.

    PubMed

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Baumbauer, Kyle; Bortfeld, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided clues about the ontogeny of lateralization of auditory processing in humans, but most have employed specific subtypes of stimuli and/or have assessed responses in discrete temporal windows. The present study used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to establish changes in hemodynamic activity in the neocortex of preverbal infants (aged 4-11 months) while they were exposed to two distinct types of complex auditory stimuli (full sentences and musical phrases). Measurements were taken from bilateral temporal regions, including both anterior and posterior superior temporal gyri. When the infant sample was treated as a homogenous group, no significant effects emerged for stimulus type. However, when infants' hemodynamic responses were categorized according to their overall changes in volume, two very clear neurophysiological patterns emerged. A high-responder group showed a pattern of early and increasing activation, primarily in the left hemisphere, similar to that observed in comparable studies with adults. In contrast, a low-responder group showed a pattern of gradual decreases in activation over time. Although age did track with responder type, no significant differences between these groups emerged for stimulus type, suggesting that the high- versus low-responder characterization generalizes across classes of auditory stimuli. These results highlight a new way to conceptualize the variable cortical blood flow patterns that are frequently observed across infants and stimuli, with hemodynamic response volumes potentially serving as an early indicator of developmental changes in auditory-processing sensitivity. PMID:23777481

  18. Coronary hemodynamic responses during local hemodilution in canine hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, G.J. )

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemodilution per se on coronary hemodynamics, experiments were performed in 36 anesthetized, open-chest dogs whose left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was perfused selectively with either normal arterial blood or arterial blood diluted with lactated Ringer solution. LAD blood flow (CBF) was measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter and its transmural distribution assessed with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. With perfusion pressure normal, graded hemodilution caused progressive, transmurally uniform increases in CBF that showed an nonlinear relationship to inflow hematocrit. Increased peak reactive hyperemic flow and decreased dilator reserve ratio indicated that both reduced viscosity and vasodilation contributed to increased CBF during hemodilution. Hypotension alone reduced CBF, with greater effect in the subendocardium. Additional hemodilution returned CBF to normotensive value, but relative subendocardial hypoperfusion persisted. The present study provides fundamental information on effects of hemodilution on coronary hemodynamics without the systemic responses that complicated previous studies utilizing whole body exchange transfusions.

  19. Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

  20. Effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Raven, Peter B; Rebuffat, Thomas; Denise, Pierre; Lericollais, Romain; Sugawara, Jun; Normand, Hervé

    2015-10-15

    Systemic blood distribution is an important factor involved in regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, the effect of an acute change in central blood volume (CBV) on CBF regulation remains unclear. To address our question, we sought to examine the CBF and systemic hemodynamic responses to microgravity during parabolic flight. Twelve healthy subjects were seated upright and exposed to microgravity during parabolic flight. During the brief periods of microgravity, mean arterial pressure was decreased (-26 ± 1%, P < 0.001), despite an increase in cardiac output (+21 ± 6%, P < 0.001). During microgravity, central arterial pulse pressure and estimated carotid sinus pressure increased rapidly. In addition, this increase in central arterial pulse pressure was associated with an arterial baroreflex-mediated decrease in heart rate (r = -0.888, P < 0.0001) and an increase in total vascular conductance (r = 0.711, P < 0.001). The middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) remained unchanged throughout parabolic flight (P = 0.30). During microgravity the contribution of cardiac output to MCA Vmean was gradually reduced (P < 0.05), and its contribution was negatively correlated with an increase in total vascular conductance (r = -0.683, P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the acute loading of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors by increases in CBV during microgravity results in acute and marked systemic vasodilation. Furthermore, we conclude that this marked systemic vasodilation decreases the contribution of cardiac output to CBF. These findings suggest that the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex-mediated peripheral vasodilation along with dynamic cerebral autoregulation counteracts a cerebral overperfusion, which otherwise would occur during acute increases in CBV. PMID:26310936

  1. [Hemodynamic response to cotton allergen exposure in the industrial environment].

    PubMed

    Bakuleva, N S; Usol'tsev, B G; Orlova, O A

    1983-03-01

    The methods of functional diagnosis (mechanocardiography, rheoencephalography) were used to examine the responses of the central and craniocerebral hemodynamics to inhalations of specific cotton allergens in female workers of a textile factory with different grades of sensitization. It was discovered that both the initial level and response pattern on the part of the cardiovascular system and craniocerebral circulation depend to a certain measure on the level of background reactivity. The data obtained enable prognosing the status of the cardiovascular system and taking measures aimed at its correction in subjects sensitized to cotton dust, who continue working in cotton industry. PMID:6830989

  2. Coronary hemodynamic responses during local hemodilution in canine hearts.

    PubMed

    Crystal, G J

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemodilution per se on coronary hemodynamics, experiments were performed in 36 anesthetized, open-chest dogs whose left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was perfused selectively with either normal arterial blood or arterial blood diluted with lactated Ringer solution. LAD blood flow (CBF) was measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter and its transmural distribution assessed with 15-microns radioactive microspheres. LAD perfusion pressure was set at the normal level (approximately 100 mmHg) or at 50% of that level to simulate coronary insufficiency. Dilator reserve capacity was calculated from ratio of reactive hyperemic peak flow following release of 90-s occlusion to control (preocclusion) flow. Systemic hemodynamic parameters were maintained near control values during coronary hemodilution. With perfusion pressure normal, graded hemodilution caused progressive, transmurally uniform increases in CBF that showed a nonlinear relationship to inflow hematocrit. Increased peak reactive hyperemic flow and decreased dilator reserve ratio indicated that both reduced viscosity and vasodilation contributed to increased CBF during hemodilution. Hypotension alone reduced CBF, with greater effect in the subendocardium. Additional hemodilution returned CBF to normotensive value, but relative subendocardial hypoperfusion persisted. The present study provides fundamental information on effects of hemodilution on coronary hemodynamics without the systemic responses that complicated previous studies utilizing whole body exchange transfusions. PMID:3348430

  3. Biochemical and hemodynamic changes in normal subjects during acute and rigorous bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Afonin, Victor B.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Rigorous bed rest (RBR) induces significant biochemical and circulatory changes. However, little is known about acute rigorous bed rest (ARBR). Measuring biochemical and circulatory variables during ARBR and RBR the aim of this study was to establish the significance of ARBR effect. Studies were done during 3 days of a pre-bed rest (BR) period and during 7 days of ARBR and RBR period. Thirty normal male individuals aged, 24.1±6.3 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided equally into three groups: 10 subjects placed under active control conditions served as unrestricted ambulatory control subjects (UACS), 10 subjects submitted to an acute rigorous bed rest served as acute rigorous bed rested subjects (ARBRS) and 10 subjects submitted to a rigorous bed rest served as rigorous bed rested subjects (RBRS). The UACS were maintained under an average running distance of 9.7 km day -1. For the ARBR effect simulation, ARBRS were submitted abruptly to BR for 7 days. They did not have any prior knowledge of the exact date and time when they would be asked to confine to RBR. For the RBR effect simulation, RBRS were subjected to BR for 7 days on a predetermined date and time known to them right away from the start of the study. Plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma cortisol (PC), plasma aldosterone (PA), plasma and urinary sodium (Na) and potassium (K) levels, heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and arterial blood pressure (ABP) increased significantly, and urinary aldosterone (UA), stroke volume (SV) and plasma volume (PV) decreased significantly ( p<0.05) in ARBRS and RBRS as compared with their pre-BR values and the values in UACS. Electrolyte, hormonal and hemodynamic responses were significantly ( p<0.05) greater and occurred significantly faster ( p<0.05) during ARBR than RBR. Parameters change insignificantly ( p>0.05) in UACS compared with pre-BR control values. It was concluded that, the more abruptly muscular activity is restricted in experimental subjects

  4. Hemodynamic response patterns to mental stress: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Rüddel, H; Langewitz, W; Schächinger, H; Schmieder, R; Schulte, W

    1988-08-01

    Stress has been identified as contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. The pathophysiologic link between stress and disease still remains unclear. Because experimental stress testing in the laboratory permits the examination of the underlying mechanism for stress-induced blood pressure, analyses of cardiovascular reactivity during emotional stress could be of particular clinical importance. The analyses of pooled data during the past 6 years (n = 298, age from 20 to 60 years, normotensive subjects as well as patients with borderline and mild essential hypertension) reveal that stress-induced changes in stroke volume and especially in total peripheral resistance are crucial parameters to analyze the hemodynamic stress response. However, neither those simple nor complex response patterns such as "hot reactor" describe clinically distinct subgroups of persons. When physiologic testing was repeated in hypertensive patients after effective long-term antihypertensive therapy with clonidine, oxprenolol, nitrendipine, or enalapril, no attenuation of the stress-induced increase in blood pressure was found in any of these groups. However, heart rate reactivity and stress-induced changes in total peripheral resistance were altered significantly by oxprenolol and nitrendipine. The beta-adrenoceptor blocker decreased heart rate reactivity and increased reactivity of peripheral resistance; the calcium antagonist decreased stress-induced changes in peripheral resistance and increased the heart rate response. The centrally acting sympatholytic regimen and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor had no impact on the hemodynamic response pattern during emotional challenge. PMID:3394640

  5. Impaired cardiac contractility response to hemodynamic stress in S100A1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Jun; Cole, Timothy J; Tenis, Nora; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Köntgen, Frank; Kemp, Bruce E; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2002-04-01

    Ca(2+) signaling plays a central role in cardiac contractility and adaptation to increased hemodynamic demand. We have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the S100A1 gene coding for the major cardiac isoform of the large multigenic S100 family of EF hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins. S100A1(-/-) mice have normal cardiac function under baseline conditions but have significantly reduced contraction rate and relaxation rate responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation that are associated with a reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity. In S100A1(-/-) mice, basal left-ventricular contractility deteriorated following 3-week pressure overload by thoracic aorta constriction despite a normal adaptive hypertrophy. Surprisingly, heterozygotes also had an impaired response to acute beta-adrenergic stimulation but maintained normal contractility in response to chronic pressure overload that coincided with S100A1 upregulation to wild-type levels. In contrast to other genetic models with impaired cardiac contractility, loss of S100A1 did not lead to cardiac hypertrophy or dilation in aged mice. The data demonstrate that high S100A1 protein levels are essential for the cardiac reserve and adaptation to acute and chronic hemodynamic stress in vivo. PMID:11909974

  6. Impaired Cardiac Contractility Response to Hemodynamic Stress in S100A1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiao-Jun; Cole, Timothy J.; Tenis, Nora; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Köntgen, Frank; Kemp, Bruce E.; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling plays a central role in cardiac contractility and adaptation to increased hemodynamic demand. We have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the S100A1 gene coding for the major cardiac isoform of the large multigenic S100 family of EF hand Ca2+-binding proteins. S100A1−/− mice have normal cardiac function under baseline conditions but have significantly reduced contraction rate and relaxation rate responses to β-adrenergic stimulation that are associated with a reduced Ca2+ sensitivity. In S100A1−/− mice, basal left-ventricular contractility deteriorated following 3-week pressure overload by thoracic aorta constriction despite a normal adaptive hypertrophy. Surprisingly, heterozygotes also had an impaired response to acute β-adrenergic stimulation but maintained normal contractility in response to chronic pressure overload that coincided with S100A1 upregulation to wild-type levels. In contrast to other genetic models with impaired cardiac contractility, loss of S100A1 did not lead to cardiac hypertrophy or dilation in aged mice. The data demonstrate that high S100A1 protein levels are essential for the cardiac reserve and adaptation to acute and chronic hemodynamic stress in vivo. PMID:11909974

  7. Development of BOLD signal hemodynamic responses in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Arichi, Tomoki; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; Varela, Marta; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Allievi, Alessandro; Merchant, Nazakat; Tusor, Nora; Counsell, Serena J.; Burdet, Etienne; Beckmann, Christian F.; Edwards, A. David

    2012-01-01

    In the rodent brain the hemodynamic response to a brief external stimulus changes significantly during development. Analogous changes in human infants would complicate the determination and use of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in developing populations. We aimed to characterize HRF in human infants before and after the normal time of birth using rapid sampling of the Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signal. A somatosensory stimulus and an event related experimental design were used to collect data from 10 healthy adults, 15 sedated infants at term corrected post menstrual age (PMA) (median 41 + 1 weeks), and 10 preterm infants (median PMA 34 + 4 weeks). A positive amplitude HRF waveform was identified across all subject groups, with a systematic maturational trend in terms of decreasing time-to-peak and increasing positive peak amplitude associated with increasing age. Application of the age-appropriate HRF models to fMRI data significantly improved the precision of the fMRI analysis. These findings support the notion of a structured development in the brain's response to stimuli across the last trimester of gestation and beyond. PMID:22776460

  8. Ischemic preconditioning reduces hemodynamic response during metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Mulliri, Gabriele; Sainas, Gianmarco; Magnani, Sara; Palazzolo, Girolamo; Milia, Nicola; Orrù, Andrea; Roberto, Silvana; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Milia, Raffaele; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been shown to improve exercise performance and to delay fatigue. However, the precise mechanisms through which IP operates remain elusive. It has been hypothesized that IP lowers the sensation of fatigue by reducing the discharge of group III and IV nerve endings, which also regulate hemodynamics during the metaboreflex. We hypothesized that IP reduces the blood pressure response during the metaboreflex. Fourteen healthy males (age between 25 and 48 yr) participated in this study. They underwent the following randomly assigned protocol: postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) test, during which the metaboreflex was elicited after dynamic handgrip; control exercise recovery session (CER) test; and PEMI after IP (IP-PEMI) test. IP was obtained by occluding forearm circulation for three cycles of 5 min spaced by 5 min of reperfusion. Hemodynamics were evaluated by echocardiography and impedance cardiography. The main results were that after IP the mean arterial pressure response was reduced compared with the PEMI test (means ± SD +3.37 ± 6.41 vs. +9.16 ± 7.09 mmHg, respectively). This was the consequence of an impaired venous return that impaired the stroke volume during the IP-PEMI more than during the PEMI test (-1.43 ± 15.35 vs. +10.28 ± 10.479 ml, respectively). It was concluded that during the metaboreflex, IP affects hemodynamics mainly because it impairs the capacity to augment venous return and to recruit the cardiac preload reserve. It was hypothesized that this is the consequence of an increased nitric oxide production, which reduces the possibility to constrict venous capacity vessels. PMID:26936782

  9. Relationships between hemodynamic, hemorheological and metabolic responses during exercise.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Tripette, Julien; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Baskurt, Oguz K; Toth, Kalman; Meiselman, Herbert J; Hue, Olivier; Antoine-Jonville, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Aerobic performance is dependent on both cardio-respiratory and peripheral factors with hemodynamic parameters playing a major role. However, whether blood rheology might affect aerobic performance through an effect on hemodynamic factors is not known. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationships between hemodynamic, hemorheological and metabolic parameters in response to a sub-maximal cycling exercise protocol consisting of three successive levels of nine min duration (50, 100 and 150 W). Ten young sportsmen participated in the present study. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured manually, with thoracic impedance used to monitor cardiac output (Qc): systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was then calculated. Whole blood viscosity (etab) was measured and used to calculate systemic vascular hindrance. Hematocrit (Hct) was determined by micro-centrifugation and red blood cell (RBC) deformability (EI) was determined by ecktacytometry. A breath-by-breath gas analyzer was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2); the Fick equation was used to calculate arterio-venous oxygen difference [(a-v)O(2)] from VO(2) and Qc. All measurements were performed at rest, during exercise and during recovery. Compared to baseline, Qc, MAP, Hct, EI, VO(2), and (a-v)O(2) increased during exercise. etab increased above baseline only at 150 W and remained elevated during recovery; the increase in etab during the last level of exercise was associated with a decrease of SVR and systemic vascular hindrance. There was a significant negative correlation between EI and SVR (r=-0.35, p<0.01) and a significant positive relationship between EI and (a-v)O(2) (r=0.35, p<0.01) and between EI and VO(2) (r=0.37, p<0.01) across all exercise workloads, thus suggesting a potential role for RBC deformability as a factor affecting aerobic performance via oxygen delivery to tissues. These data lend support to the concept that hemorheological parameters may contribute to hemodynamic and cardio

  10. Estimating Hemodynamic Responses to the Wingate Test Using Thoracic Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Bovee, Curtis; DeBoe, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Techniques including direct Fick and Doppler echocardiography are frequently used to assess hemodynamic responses to exercise. Thoracic impedance has been shown to be a noninvasive alternative to these methods for assessing these responses during graded exercise to exhaustion, yet its feasibility during supramaximal bouts of exercise is relatively unknown. We used thoracic impedance to estimate stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) during the Wingate test (WAnT) and compared these values to those from graded exercise testing (GXT). Active men (n = 9) and women (n = 7) (mean age = 24.8 ± 5.9 yr) completed two Wingate tests and two graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. During exercise, heart rate (HR), SV, and CO were continuously estimated using thoracic impedance. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to identify potential differences in hemodynamic responses across protocols. Results: Maximal SV (138.6 ± 37.4 mL vs. 135.6 ± 26.9 mL) and CO (24.5 ± 6.1 L·min-1 vs. 23.7 ± 5.1 L·min-1) were similar (p > 0.05) between repeated Wingate tests. Mean maximal HR was higher (p < 0.01) for GXT (185 ± 7 b·min-1) versus WAnT (177 ± 11 b·min-1), and mean SV was higher in response to WAnT (137.1 ± 32.1 mL) versus GXT (123.0 ± 32.0 mL), leading to similar maximal cardiac output between WAnT and GXT (23.9 ± 5.6 L·min-1 vs. 22.5 ± 6.0 L·min-1). Our data show no difference in hemodynamic responses in response to repeated administrations of the Wingate test. In addition, the Wingate test elicits similar cardiac output compared to progressive cycling to VO2max. Key points Measurement of cardiac output (CO), the rate of oxygen transport delivered by the heart to skeletal muscle, is not widely-employed in Exercise Physiology due to the level of difficulty and invasiveness characteristic of most techniques used to measure this variable. Nevertheless, thoracic impedance has been shown to provide a noninvasive and simpler approach to continuously

  11. Phonocardiographic Assessment of Hemodynamic Response to Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Howard S.; Ferguson, James J.

    1990-01-01

    The time to systolic murmur peak is a clinical index that is useful in assessing the severity of valvular aortic stenosis. To determine whether phonocardiography could be used to detect a change in the timing of the murmur and thus to measure hemodynamic improvements in elderly balloon aortic valvuloplasty patients, we retrospectively reviewed phonocardiographic tracings of 18 patients taken before and after the procedure. Ten men and 8 women were included in the study; the mean age was 80.7 ± 11.2 years (range, 64 to 90). Phonocardiographic signals were digitized, and the R-wave to murmur peak interval (R-MP) was measured. In 11 patients, the R-MP decreased (mean decrease, 16% ± 11%): of these, 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in mean gradient; 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in peak-to-peak gradient; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 38%. Seven patients had an increase in R-MP (mean increase, 10% ± 9%): of these, 6 had a decrease in mean gradient of less than 25%; 6 had a decrease in peak-to-peak gradient of less than 25%; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 21%. Pre- and post-balloon aortic valvuloplasty heart rates were not significantly different (71 ± 8 beats/min versus 73 ± 5 beats/min). In this study, hemodynamic improvements after valvuloplasty were manifested by a reduction in the R-MP interval. We conclude that phonocardiography may be a practical, noninvasive method of assessing the hemodynamic response to balloon aortic valvuloplasty. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:42-7) PMID:15227188

  12. Outcome of Acute Graft Rejection Associated with Hemodynamic Compromise in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tissot, Cecile; Buckvold, Shannon; Gralla, Jane; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Pietra, Biagio A.; Miyamoto, Shelley D.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to analyze the outcome of hemodynamically significant acute graft rejection in pediatric heart transplant recipients from a single-center experience. Acute graft rejection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality for patients who undergo orthotopic heart transplantation and has been associated with the severity of the rejection episode. A retrospective review of all children experiencing a hemodynamically significant rejection episode after orthotopic heart transplantation was performed. Fifty-three patients with 54 grafts had 70 rejection episodes requiring intravenous inotropic support. Forty-one percent of these patients required high-dose inotropic support, with the remaining 59% of patients requiring less inotropic support. Overall graft survival to hospital discharge was 41% for patients in the high-dose group compared to 94% in the low-dose group. Six-month graft survival in patients who required high-dose inotropes remained at 41% compared to 44% in the low-dose group. Hemodynamically significant acute graft rejection in pediatric heart transplant recipients is a devastating problem with poor short- and long-term outcomes. Survival to hospital discharge is dismal in patients who require high-dose inotropic support. In contrast, survival to discharge is quite good in patients who require only low-dose inotropic support; however, six-month graft survival in this group is low secondary to a high incidence of graft failure related to worsening or aggressive transplant coronary artery disease. PMID:20963408

  13. Genes influence the amplitude and timing of brain hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zuyao Y; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Thompson, Paul M; McMahon, Katie L; Blokland, Gabriëlla A M; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Calhoun, Vince; Martin, Nicholas G; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the hemodynamic response function (HRF) reflects regulation of regional cerebral blood flow in response to neuronal activation. The HRF varies significantly between individuals. This study investigated the genetic contribution to individual variation in HRF using fMRI data from 125 monozygotic (MZ) and 149 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. The resemblance in amplitude, latency, and duration of the HRF in six regions in the frontal and parietal lobes was compared between MZ and DZ twin pairs. Heritability was estimated using an ACE (Additive genetic, Common environmental, and unique Environmental factors) model. The genetic influence on the temporal profile and amplitude of HRF was moderate to strong (24%-51%). The HRF may be used in the genetic analysis of diseases with a cerebrovascular etiology. PMID:26375212

  14. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  15. Optimal hemodynamic response model for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Muhammad A.; Jeong, Myung Yung; Mannan, Malik M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging non-invasive brain imaging technique and measures brain activities by means of near-infrared light of 650–950 nm wavelengths. The cortical hemodynamic response (HR) differs in attributes at different brain regions and on repetition of trials, even if the experimental paradigm is kept exactly the same. Therefore, an HR model that can estimate such variations in the response is the objective of this research. The canonical hemodynamic response function (cHRF) is modeled by two Gamma functions with six unknown parameters (four of them to model the shape and other two to scale and baseline respectively). The HRF model is supposed to be a linear combination of HRF, baseline, and physiological noises (amplitudes and frequencies of physiological noises are supposed to be unknown). An objective function is developed as a square of the residuals with constraints on 12 free parameters. The formulated problem is solved by using an iterative optimization algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters in the model. Inter-subject variations in HRF and physiological noises have been estimated for better cortical functional maps. The accuracy of the algorithm has been verified using 10 real and 15 simulated data sets. Ten healthy subjects participated in the experiment and their HRF for finger-tapping tasks have been estimated and analyzed. The statistical significance of the estimated activity strength parameters has been verified by employing statistical analysis (i.e., t-value > tcritical and p-value < 0.05). PMID:26136668

  16. Hemodynamic response in a geographical word naming verbal fluency test.

    PubMed

    Marino, Julian; Redondo, Santiago; Luna, Fernando G; Sanchez, Luis M; Torres, Gustavo Foa

    2014-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic response was studied in a new Verbal Fluency Task (VFT) that demanded the production of geographical words while fMRI data was obtained. Participants completed 7 trials with a total duration of 2 min. 20 s. Four simple arithmetic subtraction trials were alternated with 3 geographical naming trials. Each trial had a duration of 20 s. Brain activity was contrasted between both conditions and significant differences (p < .05, Family Wise Error correction) were observed in the prefrontal medial gyrus, typically associated with word retrieval and phonological awareness, and in the parahippocampal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex and lingual gyrus, areas related to spatial cognition. These results indicate that geographic VFT could be incorporated into a browser of cognitive processes using VFT considering its specific relationship with spatial cognition. Further investigations are proposed, taking special interest in the gender variable and eliminating phonological restrictions, because the evoked Argentinean cities and towns ended in a consonant letter. PMID:25012096

  17. Early interventional therapy for acute massive pulmonary embolism guided by minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Weiwen; Lu, Wei; Chen, Meiqin; Luo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring in the early catheter-based intervention for acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: A total of 40 cases with acute massive PE were randomized into experimental and control group with 20 cases in each group. In the experimental group, the hemodynamics was monitored via Vigileo/FloTrac system, while echocardiography was used in the control group. Twelve hours after systemic thrombolysis, catheter-based clot fragmentation and local thrombolysis were employed in the experimental group if Vigileo/FloTrac system revealed hemodynamic abnormality. For the control group, the application of catheter was determined by the findings in echocardiography at 24 hours after systemic thrombolysis. Results: A total of 12 cases in the experimental group underwent catheter therapy successfully while 4 cases in the control group received the same treatment. Compared to the control group, 12 hours after catheter intervention the experimental group had higher PaO2/FIO2 and right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) but lower pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), indicating the effectiveness of Vigileo/FloTrac monitoring. The 28-day survival rates were identical between the groups although one patent in the control group died. Both the RVEF and PASP were significantly improved in the experimental group in 6 months compared to the control group. Conclusions: In massive PE, hemodynamic monitoring via Vigileo/FloTrac system might be useful in the decision making for catheter intervention after systemic thrombolysis and might improve the outcomes for patients. PMID:26550360

  18. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, Uwe; Burke, Edward J.; Butler, Bruce D.; Davis, Karen L.; Katz, Jeffrey; Melamed, Evan; Morris, William P.; Allen, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 years ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 deg down (LLR-10 deg; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  19. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, U.; Burke, E. J.; Butler, B. D.; Davis, K. L.; Katz, J.; Melamed, E.; Morris, W. P.; Allen, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 yr ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 degrees down (LLR-10 degrees; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  20. Relation between respiratory function and pulmonary hemodynamics before and after intravenous administration of furosemide in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rolla, G; Bucca, C; Sclavo, M; Borello, G; Bellone, E

    1981-01-01

    Static lung volumes, flow volume curve in air and in a helium-oxygen mixture, PaO2 and pulmonary vascular pressures were measured in 16 patients 2 weeks after uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction and repeated 2 h after furosemide 40 mg i.v. administration. The patients with wedge pressure (WP) greater than 18 mm Hg had significantly lower values of FEV1, FEV1/VC%, MEF40 and MEF 25 in comparison with the patients with WE less than 18 mm Hg. A negative correlation was found between both PAP and WP and MEF25 values (p less than 0.001). After furosemide respiratory function tests improved only in patients with a good hemodynamic response to the drug. PaO2 did not change significantly. Airflow response to helium seemed to be a useful test for determining the site of major bronchial compression. PMID:7313341

  1. Glomerular hemodynamic alterations during acute hyperinsulinemia in normal and diabetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, B. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Thies, R. S.; Collins, R. C.; Blantz, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of insulin dependent diabetes invariably requires exogenous insulin to control blood glucose. Insulin treatment, independent of other factors associated with insulin dependent diabetes, may induce changes that affect glomerular function. Due to exogenous delivery of insulin in insulin dependent diabetes entering systemic circulation prior to the portal vein, plasma levels of insulin are often in excess of that observed in non-diabetics. The specific effects of hyperinsulinemia on glomerular hemodynamics have not been previously examined. Micropuncture studies were performed in control (non-diabetic), untreated diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats 7 to 10 days after administration of 65 mg/kg body weight streptozotocin. After the first period micropuncture measurements were obtained, 5 U of regular insulin (Humulin-R) was infused i.v., and glucose clamped at euglycemic values (80 to 120 mg/dl). Blood glucose concentration in non-diabetic controls was 99 +/- 6 mg/dl. In control rats, insulin infusion and glucose clamp increased nephron filtration rate due to decreases in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance (afferent greater than efferent) resulting in increased plasma flow and increased glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient. However, insulin infusion and glucose clamp produced the opposite effect in both untreated and insulin-treated diabetic rats with afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction resulting in decreases in plasma flow, glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient and nephron filtration rate. Thromboxane A2 (TX) synthetase inhibition partially decreased the vasoconstrictive response due to acute insulin infusion in diabetic rats preventing the decrease in nephron filtration rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Gender affects sympathetic and hemodynamic response to postural stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Khan, M.; Kimmerly, D. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in sympathetic reflex responses to head-up tilt (HUT) between males (n = 9) and females (n = 8) were associated with decrements in postural vasomotor responses in women. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography), heart rate, stroke volume (SV; Doppler), and blood pressure (Finapres) were measured during a progressive HUT protocol (5 min at each of supine, 20 degrees, 40 degrees, and 60 degrees ). MSNA and hemodynamic responses were also measured during the cold pressor test (CPT) to examine nonbaroreflex neurovascular control. SV was normalized to body surface area (SV(i)) to calculate the index of cardiac output (Q(i)), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). During HUT, heart rate increased more in females versus males (P < 0.001) and SV(i) and Q(i) decreased similarly in both groups. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased to a lesser extent in females versus males in the HUT (P < 0.01) but increases in TPR during HUT were similar. MSNA burst frequency was lower in females versus males in supine (P < 0.03) but increased similarly during HUT. Average amplitude/burst increased in 60 degrees HUT for males but not females. Both males and females demonstrated an increase in MAP as well as MSNA burst frequency, mean burst amplitude, and total MSNA during the CPT. However, compared with females, males demonstrated a greater neural response (DeltaTotal MSNA) due to a larger increase in mean burst amplitude (P < 0.05). Therefore, these data point to gender-specific autonomic responses to cardiovascular stress. The different MSNA response to postural stress between genders may contribute importantly to decrements in blood pressure control during HUT in females.

  3. Acute effect of cycling intervention on carotid arterial hemodynamics: basketball athletes versus sedentary controls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the acute effects of a cycling intervention on carotid arterial hemodynamics between basketball athletes and sedentary controls. Methods Ten young long-term trained male basketball athletes (BA) and nine age-matched male sedentary controls (SC) successively underwent four bouts of exercise on a bicycle ergometer at the same workload. Hemodynamic variables at right common carotid artery were determined at rest and immediately following each bout of exercise. An ANCOVA was used to compare differences between the BA and SC groups at rest and immediately following the cycling intervention. The repeated ANOVA was used to assess differences between baseline and each bout of exercise within the BA or SC group. Results In both groups, carotid hemodynamic variables showed significant differences at rest and immediately after the cycling intervention. At rest, carotid arterial stiffness was significantly decreased and carotid arterial diameter was significantly increased in the BA group as compared to the SC group. Immediately following the cycling intervention, carotid arterial stiffness showed no obvious changes in the BA group but significantly increased in the SC group. It is worth noting that while arterial stiffness was lower in the BA group than in the SC group, the oscillatory shear index (OSI) was significantly higher in the BA group than in the SC group both at rest and immediately following the cycling intervention. Conclusion Long-term basketball exercise had a significant impact on common carotid arterial hemodynamic variables not only at rest but also after a cycling intervention. The role of OSI in the remodeling of arterial structure and function in the BA group at rest and after cycling requires clarification. PMID:25602805

  4. Correlation between electrical and hemodynamic responses during visual stimulation with graded contrasts.

    PubMed

    Si, Juanning; Zhang, Xin; Li, Yuejun; Zhang, Yujin; Zuo, Nianming; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-09-01

    Brain functional activity involves complex cellular, metabolic, and vascular chain reactions, making it difficult to comprehend. Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) have been combined into a multimodal neuroimaging method that captures both electrophysiological and hemodynamic information to explore the spatiotemporal characteristics of brain activity. Because of the significance of visually evoked functional activity in clinical applications, numerous studies have explored the amplitude of the visual evoked potential (VEP) to clarify its relationship with the hemodynamic response. However, relatively few studies have investigated the influence of latency, which has been frequently used to diagnose visual diseases, on the hemodynamic response. Moreover, because the latency and the amplitude of VEPs have different roles in coding visual information, investigating the relationship between latency and the hemodynamic response should be helpful. In this study, checkerboard reversal tasks with graded contrasts were used to evoke visual functional activity. Both EEG and fNIRS were employed to investigate the relationship between neuronal electrophysiological activities and the hemodynamic responses. The VEP amplitudes were linearly correlated with the hemodynamic response, but the VEP latency showed a negative linear correlation with the hemodynamic response. PMID:27494269

  5. Acute hemodynamic effects and blood pool kinetics of polystyrene microspheres following intravenous administration

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, J.D.; Kanke, M.; Simmons, G.H.; DeLuca, P.P.

    1981-06-01

    The acute hemodynamic effect of intravenous administration of polystyrene microspheres was investigated and correlated with their distribution pattern and kinetics. Microspheres of three diameters (3.4, 7.4, and 11.6 micrometer) were administered. The 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres were filtered by the pulmonary capillary network following intravenous administration, the majority during the first pass. There was no significant hemodynamic effect following administrations of the 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres in doses as high as 3.0 X 10(9) and 6.1 X 10(8) respectively (total cross-sectional area of 1.3 X 10(11) and 6.4 X 10(10) micrometer2, respectively). Intravenous administration of 3.4-micrometer diameter microspheres produced significant dose-dependent systemic hypotension and depression of myocardial performance at dosages as slow as 1.0 X 10(10) (cross-sectional area of 9.1 X 10(10) micrometer2). These differences in acute hemodynamic effect from the 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres may be due to the differences in distribution kinetics and fate of the 3.4-micrometer diameter microspheres, which readily pass through the lungs to the spleen. Although elimination of the smaller spheres from the blood during the first 6-8 min was rapid, i.e., t 1/2 . 1.62 and 1.72 min from the venous and arterial blood circulation, respectively, levels of 10(3) spheres/g of blood were present in the circulation for greater than 1 hr. These findings must be considered in the planning of intravenous administration of microspheres as a drug delivery system to target organs.

  6. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to static and dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Bezucha, G R; Lenser, M C; Hanson, P G; Nagle, F J

    1982-12-01

    Eight healthy male adults (25-34 yr) were studied to compare hemodynamic responses to static exercise (30% MVC in leg extension), static-dynamic exercise (one-arm cranking, 66 and 79% VO2 max-arm), and dynamic exercise (two-leg cycling, 58 and 82% VOmax-legs). Leg extension (LE) strength was measured by a spring scale. Cranking and cycling were performed on a Quinton bicycle ergometer. VO2 was measured using an automated open-circuit system. Heart rate (HR) was monitored from a CM-5 ECG lead, and arterial pressure (Pa) was measured from an indwelling brachial artery catheter. Cardiac output (Q) was measured using a CO2-rebreathing procedure. Total peripheral resistance (TPR) was calculated using the mean arterial pressure (Pa) as the systemic pressure gradient. In 30% LE, a significant (P less than 0.05) Pa increase occurred (pressor response) mediated primarily by an increase in Q. One-arm cranking and two-leg cycling at similar relative VO2 demands resulted in nearly identical increases in Pa due to different contributions of Q and TPR. Q and the arteriovenous O2 difference varied as a function of VO2 regardless of the mode of exercise (static or dynamic). On the other hand, the HR response, which accounted for increased Q in the exercises containing a static component, and Pa varied with mode of exercise. Any generalized scheme of cardiovascular control during exercise must account for the potential influence of dynamic and static components of the exercise. PMID:7153155

  7. Catheter-Directed Therapy in Acute Pulmonary Embolism with Right Ventricular Dysfunction: A Promising Modality to Provide Early Hemodynamic Recovery.

    PubMed

    Gorek Dilektasli, Asli; Demirdogen Cetinoglu, Ezgi; Acet, Nilufer Aylin; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Ursavas, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Guven; Coskun, Funda; Karadag, Mehmet; Ege, Ercument

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Catheter-directed therapy (CDT) for pulmonary embolism (PE) is considered as an alternative to systemic thrombolysis (ST) in patients with hemodynamically unstable acute PE who are considered at high bleeding risk for ST. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CDT in the management of acute PE with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD). The primary outcomes were mortality, clinical success, and complications. Secondary outcomes were change in hemodynamic parameters in the first 24 hours following the procedure. MATERIAL AND METHODS Medical records of consecutive patients diagnosed as having acute massive or submassive PE with accompanying RVD treated by immediate CDT at our institution from January 2007 to January 2014 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, mortality, achievement of clinical success, and minor and major bleeding complications were analyzed in the overall study group, as well as massive vs. submassive PE subgroups. Change in hemodynamic parameters in the second, eighth, and 24th hours after the CDT procedure were also analyzed. RESULTS The study included 15 consecutive patients (M/F=10/5) with a mean age of 54.2±16.6 years who underwent immediate CDT. Nine of the patients had submassive PE, and 6 had massive PE. In-hospital mortality rate was 13.3% (95% CI, 0.04-0.38). One major, but not life-threatening, bleeding episode was evident in the whole group. Hemodynamic parameters were stabilized and clinical success was achieved in 14/15 (93.3%; 95% CI, 70.2-98.8) of the patients in the first 24 hours. Notably, the hemodynamic recovery was significantly evident in the first 8 hours after the procedure. CONCLUSIONS CDT is a promising treatment option for patients with acute PE with RVD with no fatal bleeding complication. In experienced centers, CDT should be considered as a first-line treatment for patients with acute PE and RVD and contraindications for ST, with the advantage of providing early hemodynamic recovery. PMID:27081754

  8. A Model System for Mapping Vascular Responses to Complex Hemodynamics at Arterial Bifurcations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Swartz, Daniel D.; Wang, Zhijie; Hoi, Yiemeng; Kolega, John; Metaxa, Eleni M.; Szymanski, Michael P.; Yamamoto, Junichi; Sauvageau, Eric; Levy, Elad I.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Cerebral aneurysms are preferentially located at arterial bifurcation apices with complex hemodynamics. To understand disease mechanisms associated with aneurysm initiation, we attempted to establish a causal relationship between local hemodynamics and vascular responses. Methods Arterial bifurcations were surgically created from native common carotid arteries in two dogs, angiographically imaged 2 weeks and 2 months later, and then excised. We characterized local morphological changes in response to specifically manipulated hemodynamics. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on the in vivo images and results mapped onto histological images. Results Local flow conditions, such as high wall shear stress and high wall shear stress gradient, were found to be associated with vascular changes, including an intimal pad in the flow impingement region and a “groove” bearing the characteristics of an early aneurysm. Conclusion This novel method of histohemodynamic micromapping reveals a direct correlation between an altered hemodynamic microenvironment and vascular responses consistent with aneurysm development. PMID:17143243

  9. Saturation thresholds of evoked neural and hemodynamic responses in awake and asleep rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schei, Jennifer L.; Van Nortwick, Amy S.; Meighan, Peter C.; Rector, David M.

    2011-03-01

    Neural activation generates a hemodynamic response to the localized region replenishing nutrients to the area. Changes in vigilance state have been shown to alter the vascular response where the vascular response is muted during wake compared to quiet sleep. We tested the saturation thresholds of the neurovascular response in the auditory cortex during wake and sleep by chronically implanting rats with an EEG electrode, a light emitting diode (LED, 600 nm), and photodiode to simultaneously measure evoked response potentials (ERPs) and evoked hemodynamic responses. We stimulated the cortex with a single speaker click delivered at random intervals 2-13 s at varied stimulus intensities ranging from 45-80 dB. To further test the potential for activity related saturation, we sleep deprived animals for 2, 4, or 6 hours and recorded evoked responses during the first hour recovery period. With increasing stimulus intensity, integrated ERPs and evoked hemodynamic responses increased; however the hemodynamic response approached saturation limits at a lower stimulus intensity than the ERP. With longer periods of sleep deprivation, the integrated ERPs did not change but evoked hemodynamic responses decreased. There may be physical limits in cortical blood delivery and vascular compliance, and with extended periods of neural activity during wake, vessels may approach these limits.

  10. Self-reported tolerance influences prefrontal cortex hemodynamics and affective responses.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between cognitive and sensory processes in the brain contributes to the regulation of affective responses (pleasure-displeasure). Exercise can be used to manipulate sensory processes (by increasing physiological demand) in order to examine the role of dispositional traits that may influence an individual's ability to cognitively regulate these responses. With the use of near infrared spectroscopy, in this study we examined the influence of self-reported tolerance upon prefrontal cortex (PFC) hemodynamics and affective responses. The hemodynamic response was measured in individuals with high or low tolerance during an incremental exercise test. Sensory manipulation was standardized against metabolic processes (ventilatory threshold [VT] and respiratory compensation point [RCP]), and affective responses were recorded. The results showed that the high-tolerance group displayed a larger hemodynamic response within the right PFC above VT (which increased above RCP). The low-tolerance group showed a larger hemodynamic response within the left PFC above VT. The high-tolerance group reported a more positive/less negative affective response above VT. These findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence of differential hemodynamic responses within the PFC that are associated with tolerance in the presence of increased physiological demands. This study supports the role of dispositional traits and previous theorizing into the underlying mechanisms (cognitive vs. sensory processes) of affective responses. PMID:26337703

  11. The Acute Effect of Resistance Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction with Hemodynamic Variables on Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Joamira P.; Silva, Eliney D.; Silva, Julio C. G.; Souza, Thiago S. P.; Lima, Eloíse O.; Guerra, Ialuska; Sousa, Maria S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the heart rate (HR) before, during and after training at moderate intensity (MI, 50%-1RM) and at low intensity with blood flow restriction (LIBFR). In a randomized controlled trial study, 14 subjects (average age 45±9,9 years) performed one of the exercise protocols during two separate visits to the laboratory. SBP, DBP and HR measurements were collected prior to the start of the set and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after knee extension exercises. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to identify significant variables (2 × 5; group × time). The results demonstrated a significant reduction in SBP in the LIBFR group. These results provide evidence that strength training performed acutely alters hemodynamic variables. However, training with blood flow restriction is more efficient in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive individuals than training with moderate intensity. PMID:25713647

  12. Clinical Implications of Cluster Analysis-Based Classification of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Correlation with Bedside Hemodynamic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tariq; Desai, Nihar; Wilson, Francis; Schulte, Phillip; Dunning, Allison; Jacoby, Daniel; Allen, Larry; Fiuzat, Mona; Rogers, Joseph; Felker, G. Michael; O’Connor, Christopher; Patel, Chetan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Classification of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is based on subjective criteria that crudely capture disease heterogeneity. Improved phenotyping of the syndrome may help improve therapeutic strategies. Objective To derive cluster analysis-based groupings for patients hospitalized with ADHF, and compare their prognostic performance to hemodynamic classifications derived at the bedside. Methods We performed a cluster analysis on baseline clinical variables and PAC measurements of 172 ADHF patients from the ESCAPE trial. Employing regression techniques, we examined associations between clusters and clinically determined hemodynamic profiles (warm/cold/wet/dry). We assessed association with clinical outcomes using Cox proportional hazards models. Likelihood ratio tests were used to compare the prognostic value of cluster data to that of hemodynamic data. Results We identified four advanced HF clusters: 1) male Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, multiple comorbidities, lowest B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels; 2) females with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, few comorbidities, most favorable hemodynamics; 3) young African American males with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, most adverse hemodynamics, advanced disease; and 4) older Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, concomitant renal insufficiency, highest BNP levels. There was no association between clusters and bedside-derived hemodynamic profiles (p = 0.70). For all adverse clinical outcomes, Cluster 4 had the highest risk, and Cluster 2, the lowest. Compared to Cluster 4, Clusters 1–3 had 45–70% lower risk of all-cause mortality. Clusters were significantly associated with clinical outcomes, whereas hemodynamic profiles were not. Conclusions By clustering patients with similar objective variables, we identified four clinically relevant phenotypes of ADHF patients, with no discernable relationship to hemodynamic profiles, but distinct associations with adverse outcomes. Our analysis

  13. Mayer waves reduce the accuracy of estimated hemodynamic response functions in functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Meryem A; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M; Lin, Pei-Yi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino; Boas, David A

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of cerebral hemodynamics reveals a wide spectrum of oscillations ranging from 0.0095 to 2 Hz. While most of these oscillations can be filtered out during analysis of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals when estimating stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses, oscillations around 0.1 Hz are an exception. This is due to the fact that they share a common spectral range with typical stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses from the brain. Here we investigate the effect of hemodynamic oscillations around 0.1 Hz on the estimation of hemodynamic response functions from fNIRS data. Our results show that for an expected response of ~1 µM in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), Mayer wave oscillations with an amplitude > ~1 µM at 0.1 Hz reduce the accuracy of the estimated response as quantified by a 3 fold increase in the mean squared error and decrease in correlation (R(2) below 0.78) when compared to the true HRF. These results indicate that the amplitude of oscillations at 0.1 Hz can serve as an objective metric of the expected HRF estimation accuracy. In addition, we investigated the effect of short separation regression on the recovered HRF, and found that this improves the recovered HRF when large amplitude 0.1 Hz oscillations are present in fNIRS data. We suspect that the development of other filtering strategies may provide even further improvement. PMID:27570699

  14. Mayer waves reduce the accuracy of estimated hemodynamic response functions in functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino; Boas, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of cerebral hemodynamics reveals a wide spectrum of oscillations ranging from 0.0095 to 2 Hz. While most of these oscillations can be filtered out during analysis of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals when estimating stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses, oscillations around 0.1 Hz are an exception. This is due to the fact that they share a common spectral range with typical stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses from the brain. Here we investigate the effect of hemodynamic oscillations around 0.1 Hz on the estimation of hemodynamic response functions from fNIRS data. Our results show that for an expected response of ~1 µM in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), Mayer wave oscillations with an amplitude > ~1 µM at 0.1 Hz reduce the accuracy of the estimated response as quantified by a 3 fold increase in the mean squared error and decrease in correlation (R2 below 0.78) when compared to the true HRF. These results indicate that the amplitude of oscillations at 0.1 Hz can serve as an objective metric of the expected HRF estimation accuracy. In addition, we investigated the effect of short separation regression on the recovered HRF, and found that this improves the recovered HRF when large amplitude 0.1 Hz oscillations are present in fNIRS data. We suspect that the development of other filtering strategies may provide even further improvement. PMID:27570699

  15. The acute effect of maximal exercise on central and peripheral arterial stiffness indices and hemodynamics in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Melo, Xavier; Fernhall, Bo; Santos, Diana A; Pinto, Rita; Pimenta, Nuno M; Sardinha, Luís B; Santa-Clara, Helena

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the effects of a bout of maximal running exercise on arterial stiffness in children and adults. Right carotid blood pressure and artery stiffness indices measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index α and β (echo-tracking), contralateral carotid blood pressure, and upper and lower limb and central/aortic PWV (applanation tonometry) were taken at rest and 10 min after a bout of maximal treadmill running in 34 children (7.38 ± 0.38 years) and 45 young adults (25.22 ± 0.91 years) having similar aerobic potential. Two-by-two repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were used to detect differences with exercise between groups. Carotid pulse pressure (PP; η(2) = 0.394) increased more in adults after exercise (p < 0.05). Compliance (η(2) = 0.385) decreased in particular in adults and in those with high changes in distending pressure, similarly to stiffness index α and β. Carotid PWV increased more in adults and was related to local changes in PP but not mean arterial pressure (MAP). Stiffness in the lower limbs decreased (η(2) = 0.115) but apparently only in those with small MAP changes (η(2) = 0.111). No significant exercise or group interaction effects were found when variables were adjusted to height. An acute bout of maximal exercise can alter arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in the carotid artery and within the active muscle beds. Arterial stiffness and hemodynamic response to metabolic demands during exercise in children simply reflect their smaller body size and may not indicate a particular physiological difference compared with adults. PMID:26842667

  16. Effects of prostaglandin inhibition on intrarenal hemodynamics in acutely saline-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Düsing, R; Melder, B; Kramer, H J

    1977-09-01

    We studied the effect of inhibition of the prostaglandin (PG)-synthesizing enzyme system in female Sprague-Dawley rats following acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume (ECV). In 57 conscious rats expansion of the ECV with isotonic saline corresponding to an increase in body weight of 10% was induced. Prior to ECV expansion 31 rats received indomethacin (10 mg/kg of body wt) by stomach tube. In six non-ECV-expanded rats indomethacin had no effect on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF). In ECV-expanded rats pretreated with indomethacin, GFR was unaltered but 125I-hippuran clearance decreased, and filtration fraction significantly increased. Intrarenal 86Rb distribution was similar in control and ECV-expanded rats. Indomethacin caused a slight increase in relative cortical 86 RB activity in non-ECV-expanded rats, but had no effect on intrarenal 86Rb distribution in ECV-expanded rats. No difference in intracortical glomerular perfusion was noted between control and ECV-expanded rats. In indomethacin-treated ECV-expanded rats an increase in relative inner cortical perfusion was observed. Absolute perfusion remained unaltered. Thus the decrease in total RPF was entirely due to decreased perfusion of outer cortical nephrons. Renal prostaglandins therefore may play a permissive role for physical factors to promote renal sodium excretion in acute ECV expansion via changes in intrarenal hemodynamics. PMID:890884

  17. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  18. Catheter-Directed Therapy in Acute Pulmonary Embolism with Right Ventricular Dysfunction: A Promising Modality to Provide Early Hemodynamic Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Dilektasli, Asli Gorek; Cetinoglu, Ezgi Demirdogen; Acet, Nilufer Aylin; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Ursavas, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Guven; Coskun, Funda; Karadag, Mehmet; Ege, Ercument

    2016-01-01

    Background Catheter-directed therapy (CDT) for pulmonary embolism (PE) is considered as an alternative to systemic thrombolysis (ST) in patients with hemodynamically unstable acute PE who are considered at high bleeding risk for ST. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CDT in the management of acute PE with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD). The primary outcomes were mortality, clinical success, and complications. Secondary outcomes were change in hemodynamic parameters in the first 24 hours following the procedure. Material/Methods Medical records of consecutive patients diagnosed as having acute massive or submassive PE with accompanying RVD treated by immediate CDT at our institution from January 2007 to January 2014 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, mortality, achievement of clinical success, and minor and major bleeding complications were analyzed in the overall study group, as well as massive vs. submassive PE subgroups. Change in hemodynamic parameters in the second, eighth, and 24th hours after the CDT procedure were also analyzed. Results The study included 15 consecutive patients (M/F=10/5) with a mean age of 54.2±16.6 years who underwent immediate CDT. Nine of the patients had submassive PE, and 6 had massive PE. In-hospital mortality rate was 13.3% (95% CI, 0.04–0.38). One major, but not life-threatening, bleeding episode was evident in the whole group. Hemodynamic parameters were stabilized and clinical success was achieved in 14/15 (93.3%; 95% CI, 70.2–98.8) of the patients in the first 24 hours. Notably, the hemodynamic recovery was significantly evident in the first 8 hours after the procedure. Conclusions CDT is a promising treatment option for patients with acute PE with RVD with no fatal bleeding complication. In experienced centers, CDT should be considered as a first-line treatment for patients with acute PE and RVD and contraindications for ST, with the advantage of providing early hemodynamic recovery. PMID:27081754

  19. Intraoperative brain hemodynamic response assessment with real-time hyperspectral optical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurence, Audrey; Pichette, Julien; Angulo-Rodríguez, Leticia M.; Saint Pierre, Catherine; Lesage, Frédéric; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Leblond, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Following normal neuronal activity, there is an increase in cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume to provide oxygenated hemoglobin to active neurons. For abnormal activity such as epileptiform discharges, this hemodynamic response may be inadequate to meet the high metabolic demands. To verify this hypothesis, we developed a novel hyperspectral imaging system able to monitor real-time cortical hemodynamic changes during brain surgery. The imaging system is directly integrated into a surgical microscope, using the white-light source for illumination. A snapshot hyperspectral camera is used for detection (4x4 mosaic filter array detecting 16 wavelengths simultaneously). We present calibration experiments where phantoms made of intralipid and food dyes were imaged. Relative concentrations of three dyes were recovered at a video rate of 30 frames per second. We also present hyperspectral recordings during brain surgery of epileptic patients with concurrent electrocorticography recordings. Relative concentration maps of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin were extracted from the data, allowing real-time studies of hemodynamic changes with a good spatial resolution. Finally, we present preliminary results on phantoms obtained with an integrated spatial frequency domain imaging system to recover tissue optical properties. This additional module, used together with the hyperspectral imaging system, will allow quantification of hemoglobin concentrations maps. Our hyperspectral imaging system offers a new tool to analyze hemodynamic changes, especially in the case of epileptiform discharges. It also offers an opportunity to study brain connectivity by analyzing correlations between hemodynamic responses of different tissue regions.

  20. Hemodynamic and ADH responses to central blood volume shifts in cardiac-denervated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Thompson, C. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Savin, W. M.; Gordon, E. P.; Haskell, W. L.; Schroeder, J. S.; Sandler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes designed to induce blood volume shifts in ten cardiac transplant recipients to assess the contribution of cardiac and vascular volume receptors in the control of ADH secretion. Each subject underwent 15 min of a control period in the seated posture, then assumed a lying posture for 30 min at 6 deg head down tilt (HDT) followed by 20 min of seated recovery. Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions (echocardiography) were taken at 0 and 15 min before HDT, 5, 15, and 30 min of HDT, and 5, 15, and 30 min of seated recovery. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Resting plasma volume (PV) was measured by Evans blue dye and percent changes in PV during posture changes were calculated from changes in hematocrit. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded every 2 min. Results indicate that cardiac volume receptors are not the only mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute blood volume shifts in man.

  1. Acute effects of intravenous dronedarone on electrocardiograms, hemodynamics and cardiac functions in anesthetized dogs

    PubMed Central

    SAENGKLUB, Nakkawee; LIMPRASUTR, Vudhiporn; SAWANGKOON, Suwanakiet; BURANAKARL, Chollada; HAMLIN, Robert L.; KIJTAWORNRAT, Anusak

    2015-01-01

    Dronedarone is a class III antiarrhythmic that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but limited information was found in dogs. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of escalating concentrations of dronedarone on electrocardiograms (ECG), hemodynamics and cardiac mechanics in healthy dogs. A total of 7 beagle dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and instrumented to obtain lead II ECG, pressures at ascending aorta, right atrium, pulmonary artery and left ventricle, and left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Five dogs were given vehicle and followed by escalating doses of dronedarone (0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg, 15 min for each dose), and two dogs were used as a vehicle-treated control. All parameters were measured at 15 min after the end of each dose. The results showed that all parameters in vehicle-treated dogs were unaltered. Dronedarone at 2.5 mg/kg significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.01), reduced cardiac output (P<0.01) and increased systemic vascular resistance (P<0.01). Dronedarone produced negative inotropy assessed by significantly lowered end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, contractility index and dP/dtmax. It also impaired diastolic function by significantly increased end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship, tau and dP/dtmin. These results suggested that acute effects of dronedarone produced negative dromotropy, inotropy and lusitropy in anesthetized dogs. Care should be taken when given dronedarone to dogs, especially when the patients have impaired cardiac function. PMID:26346474

  2. Acute effects of intravenous dronedarone on electrocardiograms, hemodynamics and cardiac functions in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Saengklub, Nakkawee; Limprasutr, Vudhiporn; Sawangkoon, Suwanakiet; Buranakarl, Chollada; Hamlin, Robert L; Kijtawornrat, Anusak

    2016-03-01

    Dronedarone is a class III antiarrhythmic that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but limited information was found in dogs. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of escalating concentrations of dronedarone on electrocardiograms (ECG), hemodynamics and cardiac mechanics in healthy dogs. A total of 7 beagle dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and instrumented to obtain lead II ECG, pressures at ascending aorta, right atrium, pulmonary artery and left ventricle, and left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Five dogs were given vehicle and followed by escalating doses of dronedarone (0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg, 15 min for each dose), and two dogs were used as a vehicle-treated control. All parameters were measured at 15 min after the end of each dose. The results showed that all parameters in vehicle-treated dogs were unaltered. Dronedarone at 2.5 mg/kg significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.01), reduced cardiac output (P<0.01) and increased systemic vascular resistance (P<0.01). Dronedarone produced negative inotropy assessed by significantly lowered end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, contractility index and dP/dtmax. It also impaired diastolic function by significantly increased end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship, tau and dP/dtmin. These results suggested that acute effects of dronedarone produced negative dromotropy, inotropy and lusitropy in anesthetized dogs. Care should be taken when given dronedarone to dogs, especially when the patients have impaired cardiac function. PMID:26346474

  3. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (-17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution. PMID:27503416

  4. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (‑17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution.

  5. Flexibly combined optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle system for comprehensive imaging of hemodynamic and metabolic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Qin, Jia; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    We have proposed and developed a multi-modal non-invasive biomedical optical imager. It was combined from the subsystems of optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging. The system was designed to maintain the performances of both subsystems. It was capable of simultaneously imaging the hemodynamic and metabolic responses in tissue environment in vivo. To achieve such requirements, we utilized unique optical setup, such as paired dichroic mirrors to compensate dispersion, additional relay lens to increase working distance and translational sample probe to freely select imaging area and focal plane. The multi-functionality of the system was demonstrated in an investigation of hemodynamic and metabolic responses on an acute wound healing model in mouse pinna in vivo. The microvasculature, blood flow and hemoglobin concentration from millimeter down to capillary level were comprehensively visualized. The captured instantaneous responses to wound onset differed greatly between localized areas; after that blood flow had a rebalance tendency, and hemoglobin concentration dynamically recovered to baseline situation.

  6. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-shan; Li, Su-zhi; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (−17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution. PMID:27503416

  7. A NO way to BOLD? Dietary nitrate alters the hemodynamic response to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Ho, Yi-Ching Lynn; Møller, Arne; Roepstorff, Andreas; Lund, Torben E

    2013-12-01

    Neurovascular coupling links neuronal activity to vasodilation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent vasodilator, and in neurovascular coupling NO production from NO synthases plays an important role. However, another pathway for NO production also exists, namely the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. On this basis, we hypothesized that dietary nitrate (NO3-) could influence the brain's hemodynamic response to neuronal stimulation. In the present study, 20 healthy male participants were given either sodium nitrate (NaNO3) or sodium chloride (NaCl) (saline placebo) in a crossover study and were shown visual stimuli based on the retinotopic characteristics of the visual cortex. Our primary measure of the hemodynamic response was the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (0.64×0.64×1.8 mm) in the visual cortex. From this response, we made a direct estimate of key parameters characterizing the shape of the BOLD response (i.e. lag and amplitude). During elevated nitrate intake, corresponding to the nitrate content of a large plate of salad, both the hemodynamic lag and the BOLD amplitude decreased significantly (7.0±2% and 7.9±4%, respectively), and the variation across activated voxels of both measures decreased (12.3±4% and 15.3±7%, respectively). The baseline cerebral blood flow was not affected by nitrate. Our experiments demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary nitrate may modulate the local cerebral hemodynamic response to stimuli. A faster and smaller BOLD response, with less variation across local cortex, is consistent with an enhanced hemodynamic coupling during elevated nitrate intake. These findings suggest that dietary patterns, via the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, may be a potential way to affect key properties of neurovascular coupling. This could have major clinical implications, which remain to be explored. PMID:23827330

  8. Hemodynamic Responses Associated with Post-exercise Hypotension in Normotensive Black Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headley, Samuel A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the hemodynamic responses during recovery from moderate intensity exercise in young Black normotensive males. Nineteen normotensive men (age 24-26 years) walked continuously on a treadmill for 40 minutes at 50-60 percent heart rate reserve. Following exercise, blood pressure (by auscultation) and…

  9. Optical coherence tomography angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers

    PubMed Central

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Thapa, Damber; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow changes are highly related to neural activities in the retina. It has been reported that neural activity increases when flickering light stimulation of the retina is used. It is known that blood flow changes with flickering light stimulation can be altered in patients with vascular disease and that measurement of flicker-induced vasodilatation is an easily applied tool for monitoring functional microvascular alterations. However, details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood due to the limitation of existing techniques. In this study, flickering light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to investigate stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography imaging system was developed to provide dynamic mapping of hemodynamic responses in the ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, outer plexiform layer and choroid layer before, during and after flickering light stimulation. Experimental results showed hemodynamic responses with different magnitudes and time courses in individual retinal layers. We anticipate that the dynamic OCT angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses can greatly foster the study of neurovascular coupling mechanisms in the retina, promising new biomarkers for retinal disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:27570706

  10. Optical coherence tomography angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers.

    PubMed

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Thapa, Damber; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-08-01

    Blood flow changes are highly related to neural activities in the retina. It has been reported that neural activity increases when flickering light stimulation of the retina is used. It is known that blood flow changes with flickering light stimulation can be altered in patients with vascular disease and that measurement of flicker-induced vasodilatation is an easily applied tool for monitoring functional microvascular alterations. However, details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood due to the limitation of existing techniques. In this study, flickering light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to investigate stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography imaging system was developed to provide dynamic mapping of hemodynamic responses in the ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, outer plexiform layer and choroid layer before, during and after flickering light stimulation. Experimental results showed hemodynamic responses with different magnitudes and time courses in individual retinal layers. We anticipate that the dynamic OCT angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses can greatly foster the study of neurovascular coupling mechanisms in the retina, promising new biomarkers for retinal disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:27570706

  11. Comparative study of intravenously administered clonidine and magnesium sulfate on hemodynamic responses during laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Nand Kishore; Verma, Anil; Agarwal, Apurva; Pandey, HD

    2011-01-01

    Background: Both magnesium and clonidine are known to inhibit catecholamine and vasopressin release and attenuate hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum. This randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled study has been designed to assess which agent attenuates hemodynamic stress response to pneumoperitoneum better. Materials and Methods: 120 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into 4 groups of 30 each. Group K patients received 50 ml normal saline over a period of 15 min after induction and before pneumoperitoneum, group M patients received 50 mg/kg of magnesium sulfate in normal saline (total volume 50 ml) over same time duration. Similarly group C1 patients received 1 μg/kg clonidine and group C2 1.5 μg/kg clonidine respectively in normal saline (total volume 50 ml). Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded before induction (baseline value), at the end of infusions and every 5 min after pneumoperitoneum. Statistical Analysis: Paired t test was used for intra-group comparison and ANOVA for inter-group comparison. Results: Systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in control group as compared to all other groups during pneumoperitoneum. On comparing patients in group M and group C1, no significant difference in systolic BP was found at any time interval. Patients in group C2 showed best control of systolic BP. As compared to group M and group C1, BP was significantly lower at 10, 30 and 40 min post pneumoperitoneum. No significant episodes of hypotension were found in any of the groups. Extubation time and time to response to verbal command like eye opening was significantly longer in group M as compared to other groups. Conclusion: Administration of magnesium sulfate or clonidine attenuates hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum. Although magnesium sulfate 50 mg/kg produces hemodynamic stability comparable to clonidine 1 μg/kg, clonidine in doses of 1.5μg/kg blunts the hemodynamic response to

  12. Hemodynamic response of children with attention-deficit and hyperactive disorder (ADHD) to emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroko; Nakato, Emi; Kanazawa, So; Shimamura, Keiichi; Sakuta, Yuiko; Sakuta, Ryoichi; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2014-10-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have difficulty recognizing facial expressions. They identify angry expressions less accurately than typically developing (TD) children, yet little is known about their atypical neural basis for the recognition of facial expressions. Here, we used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to examine the distinctive cerebral hemodynamics of ADHD and TD children while they viewed happy and angry expressions. We measured the hemodynamic responses of 13 ADHD boys and 13 TD boys to happy and angry expressions at their bilateral temporal areas, which are sensitive to face processing. The ADHD children showed an increased concentration of oxy-Hb for happy faces but not for angry faces, while TD children showed increased oxy-Hb for both faces. Moreover, the individual peak latency of hemodynamic response in the right temporal area showed significantly greater variance in the ADHD group than in the TD group. Such atypical brain activity observed in ADHD boys may relate to their preserved ability to recognize a happy expression and their difficulty recognizing an angry expression. We firstly demonstrated that NIRS can be used to detect atypical hemodynamic response to facial expressions in ADHD children. PMID:25152531

  13. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on pulmonary hemodynamics after acute lung injury in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Romand, J.A.; Pinsky, M.R.; Firestone, L.; Zar, H.A.; Lancaster, J.R. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mismatch in ventilation-to-perfusion ratio characterize acute lung injury (ALI). Pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) decreases when nitric oxide (NO) is inhaled during hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV); thus NO inhalation may reduce PVR and improve gas exchange in ALI. The authors studied the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of NO inhalation during HPV and then ALI in eight anesthetized open-chest mechanically ventilated dogs. Right atrial pressure, Ppa, and left ventricular and arterial pressures were measured, and cardiac output was estimated by an aortic flow probe. Shunt and dead space were also estimated. The effect of 5-min exposures to 0, 17, 28, 47, and 0 ppm inhaled NO was recorded during hyperoxia, hypoxia, and oleic acid-induced ALI. During ALI, partial [beta]-adrenergic blockage (propanolol, 0.15 mg/kg iv) was induced and 74 ppm NO was inhaled. Nitrosylhemoglobin (NO-Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) levels were measured. During hyperoxia, NO inhalation had no measurable effects. Hypoxia increased Ppa and calculated PVR, both of which decreased with 17 ppm NO. ALI decreased arterial Po[sub 2] and increased airway pressure, shunt, and dead space ventilation. Ppa and PVR were greater during ALI than during hyperoxia. NO inhalation had no measurable effect during ALI before or after [beta]-adrenergic blockage. MetHb remained low, and NO-Hb was unmeasurable. Bolus infusion of nitroglycerin (15 [mu]g) induced an immediate decrease in Ppa and PVR during ALI. Short-term NO inhalation does not affect PVR or gas exchange in dogs with oleic acid-induced ALI, nor does it increase NO-Hb or MetHb. In contrast, NO can diminish hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary vascular tone. These data suggest that NO inhalation selectively dilates the pulmonary circulation and specifically reduces HPV but not oleic acid-induced increases in pulmonary vasomotor tone. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Physiological responses to environmental factors related to space flight. [hemodynamic and metabolic responses to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    Physiological base line data are established, and physiological procedures and instrumentation necessary for the automatic measurement of hemodynamic and metabolic parameters during prolonged periods of weightlessness are developed.

  15. Hemodynamic responses to speech and music in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Kotilahti, Kalle; Nissilä, Ilkka; Näsi, Tiina; Lipiäinen, Lauri; Noponen, Tommi; Meriläinen, Pekka; Huotilainen, Minna; Fellman, Vineta

    2010-04-01

    We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to study responses to speech and music on the auditory cortices of 13 healthy full-term newborn infants during natural sleep. The purpose of the study was to investigate the lateralization of speech and music responses at this stage of development. NIRS data was recorded from eight positions on both hemispheres simultaneously with electroencephalography, electrooculography, electrocardiography, pulse oximetry, and inclinometry. In 11 subjects, statistically significant (P < 0.02) oxygenated (HbO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) responses were recorded. Both stimulus types elicited significant HbO2 and HbT responses on both hemispheres in five subjects. Six of the 11 subjects had positive HbO2 and HbT responses to both stimulus types, whereas one subject had negative responses. Mixed positive and negative responses were observed in four neonates. On both hemispheres, speech and music responses were significantly correlated (r = 0.64; P = 0.018 on the left hemisphere (LH) and r = 0.60; P = 0.029 on the right hemisphere (RH)). On the group level, the average response to the speech stimuli was statistically significantly greater than zero in the LH, whereas responses on the RH or to the music stimuli did not differ significantly from zero. This suggests a more coherent response to speech on the LH. However, significant differences in lateralization of the responses or mean response amplitudes of the two stimulus types were not observed on the group level. PMID:19790172

  16. Abnormal hemodynamic response to forepaw stimulation in rat brain after cocaine injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Park, Kicheon; Choi, Jeonghun; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous measurement of hemodynamics is of great importance to evaluate the brain functional changes induced by brain diseases such as drug addiction. Previously, we developed a multimodal-imaging platform (OFI) which combined laser speckle contrast imaging with multi-wavelength imaging to simultaneously characterize the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygenated- and deoxygenated- hemoglobin (HbO and HbR) from animal brain. Recently, we upgraded our OFI system that enables detection of hemodynamic changes in response to forepaw electrical stimulation to study potential brain activity changes elicited by cocaine. The improvement includes 1) high sensitivity to detect the cortical response to single forepaw electrical stimulation; 2) high temporal resolution (i.e., 16Hz/channel) to resolve dynamic variations in drug-delivery study; 3) high spatial resolution to separate the stimulation-evoked hemodynamic changes in vascular compartments from those in tissue. The system was validated by imaging the hemodynamic responses to the forepaw-stimulations in the somatosensory cortex of cocaine-treated rats. The stimulations and acquisitions were conducted every 2min over 40min, i.e., from 10min before (baseline) to 30min after cocaine challenge. Our results show that the HbO response decreased first (at ~4min) followed by the decrease of HbR response (at ~6min) after cocaine, and both did not fully recovered for over 30min. Interestingly, while CBF decreased at 4min, it partially recovered at 18min after cocaine administration. The results indicate the heterogeneity of cocaine's effects on vasculature and tissue metabolism, demonstrating the unique capability of optical imaging for brain functional studies.

  17. Optogenetic fMRI in the mouse hippocampus: Hemodynamic response to brief glutamatergic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Lebhardt, Philipp; Hohenberg, Christian Clemm von; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Kelsch, Wolfgang; Sartorius, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    The combination of optogenetics with functional magnetic resonance imaging is a promising tool to study the causal relationship between specific neuronal populations and global brain activity. We employed this technique to study the brain response to recruitment of glutamatergic neurons in the mouse hippocampus. The light-sensitive protein channelrhodopsin-2 was expressed in α-CamKII-positive glutamatergic neurons in the left hippocampus (N = 10). Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed during local laser stimulation, with stimulus duration of 1 second. The hemodynamic response to these stimuli was analyzed on a whole-brain level. In a secondary analysis, we examined the impact of the stimulation locus on the dorso-ventral axis within the hippocampal formation. The hemodynamic response in the mouse hippocampus had an earlier peak and a shorter duration compared to those observed in humans. Photostimulation was associated with significantly increased blood oxygen level-dependent signal in group statistics: bilaterally in the hippocampus, frontal lobe and septum, ipsilaterally in the nucleus accumbens and contralaterally in the striatum. More dorsal position of the laser fiber was associated with a stronger activation in projection regions (insular cortex and striatum). The characterization of brain-region-specific hemodynamic response functions may enable more precise interpretation of future functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments. PMID:26661158

  18. Beneficial hemodynamic effects of nicorandil in a canine model of acute congestive heart failure: comparison with nitroglycerin and cromakalim.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, K; Matsuzaki, T; Ojiri, Y; Koyama, T; Nakasone, J; Sakanashi, M

    1998-01-01

    Comparative hemodynamic effects of nicorandil (NCR), nitroglycerin (NTG) and cromakalim (CRM) were examined in a canine model of acute congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF was produced by injections of saponin into coronary arteries of anesthetized dogs followed by volume loading and continuous i.v. infusion of methoxamine. After the treatment, aortic blood flow (AoF), left ventricular dP/dt and myocardial segment shortening (SS) markedly decreased, while the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), the right atrial pressure (RAP) and the systemic vascular resistance (SVR) increased. NCR (n = 6), NTG (n = 6) and CRM (n = 8), which were administered i.v. after production of CHF, caused a comparable reduction in LVEDP. NCR and CRM profoundly increased AoF and SS but NTG did only slightly. On the other hand, NTG and NCR but not CRM significantly reduced RAP. Intracoronary NCR (n = 8) exerted no or similar effects on SS as well as systemic hemodynamic indices to those observed with i.v. NCR despite distinct coronary vasodilation. These results indicate that NCR may exert beneficial hemodynamic effects in an experimental CHF mainly due to lessening both afterload and preload rather than the coronary vasodilating effect. PMID:9646059

  19. Hemodynamic response to burst-suppressed and discontinuous electroencephalography activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chalia, Maria; Lee, Chuen Wai; Dempsey, Laura A; Edwards, Andrea D; Singh, Harsimrat; Michell, Andrew W; Everdell, Nicholas L; Hill, Reuben W; Hebden, Jeremy C; Austin, Topun; Cooper, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Burst suppression (BS) is an electroencephalographic state associated with a profound inactivation of the brain. BS and pathological discontinuous electroencephalography (EEG) are often observed in term-age infants with neurological injury and can be indicative of a poor outcome and lifelong disability. Little is known about the neurophysiological mechanisms of BS or how the condition relates to the functional state of the neonatal brain. We used simultaneous EEG and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) to investigate whether bursts of EEG activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are associated with an observable cerebral hemodynamic response. We were able to identify significant changes in concentration of both oxy and deoxyhemoglobin that are temporally correlated with EEG bursts and present a relatively consistent morphology across six infants. Furthermore, DOT reveals patient-specific spatial distributions of this hemodynamic response that may be indicative of a complex pattern of cortical activation underlying discontinuous EEG activity that is not readily apparent in scalp EEG. PMID:27446969

  20. Renal hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to urapidil in hypertensive man

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, P.W.; van Es, P.N.; de Bruyn, H.A.; Birkenhaeger, W.H.D.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the acute effects of urapidil on renal vascular tone and on pressor systems we performed a randomized placebo-controlled crossover study in 8 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension. Each subject received, on two separate days one week apart, an intravenous injection of either placebo or urapidil (25 mg, to be increased to 50 mg if blood pressure did not fall within 5 minutes). Before and following this injection we measured blood pressure and heart rate (Dinamap), renal plasma flow (/sup 125/I-hippuran), renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and catecholamines. The results show that urapidil, when compared to placebo, significantly reduced blood pressure, while increasing heart rate, renal blood flow, noradrenaline and adrenaline. Dopamine levels, on the other hand, were suppressed. While renin and angiotensin II were only mildly stimulated, aldosterone levels increased markedly. It is concluded that urapidil, given intravenously, has an immediate blood pressure lowering effect associated with a fall in renal vascular tone and an increase in renal perfusion. As a consequence both the sympathetic system and the renin-angiotensin system are stimulated, although the latter only to a mild degree. The rise in aldosterone may be related to withdrawal of dopaminergic tone.

  1. Acute Hemodynamic Effects of the Braslet-M Device on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Barratt, Michael R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Ebert, Douglas; Martin, David; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Braslet-M occlusion device is prescribed for cosmonauts as a countermeasure for early phases of spaceflight to temporarily alleviate symptoms associated with the cephalad fluid shift. Using a multipurpose ultrasound (US) device onboard, we assessed the acute hemodynamic effects of the Bracelet-M device on a long duration International Space Station (ISS) crewmember. Methods A combination of just-in-time training and real-time remote expert assistance was used to conduct the imaging procedures. An HDI-5000 imager (Philips, Bothell, WA) was used, provided by the ISS Human Research Facility. Superficial femoral artery (SFA), femoral vein (FV) flow spectra were obtained at mid-thigh level. Left ventricle was imaged through the apical 4-chamber view, with Color M-Mode to measure propagation velocity (V (p)). After 10 minutes of Bracelet-M use, data collection was repeated. All data were transmitted in DICOM format to ground for analysis. Results With Braslet-M, cardiac V(p) slope decreased (56ms to 42ms). A stagnation signature in the FV was seen suggesting impeded flow (rouleaux formation, too-low-to-measure velocity, and increase in diameter). Quadri-phasic flow in SFA was seen both before and after Braslet-M application. Velocities in the SFA decreased with Braslet-M (65cm/sec to 52cm/sec) and so did the time velocity integrals (16.97 to 12.4); the flow pattern spoke of resistivity increase in the vascular bed. Conclusion In the long duration ISS crewmember we observed effects of lower extremity venous occlusion through both central and peripheral indicators. A part of circulating volume transferred to peripheral potential vascular space. Impediment to venous outflow was demonstrated objectively, with a commensurate change in the flow pattern of the main feeding artery. Central volume reduction caused lower V(p). Additional studies are warranted to determine the time course of the changes and the dynamics in interstitial fluid sequestration, as well as the safe

  2. Hemodynamic responses can modulate the brain oscillations in low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Wang, Yi-Feng; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have showed that the steady-state responses were able to be used as an effective index for modulating the neural oscillations in the high frequency ranges (> 1 Hz). However, the neural oscillations in low frequency ranges (<1 Hz) remain unknown. In this study, a series of fNIRS experimental tests were conducted to validate if the low frequency bands (0.1 Hz - 0.8 Hz) steady-state hemoglobin responses (SSHbRs) could be evoked and modulate the neural oscillation during a serial reaction time (SRT) task.

  3. Reduced Prefrontal Cortex Hemodynamic Response in Adults with Methamphetamine Induced Psychosis: Relevance for Impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Naoko; Nakanishi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shohei; Ota, Toyosaku; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with methamphetamine abuse/dependence often exhibit high levels of impulsivity, which may be associated with the structural abnormalities and functional hypoactivities observed in the frontal cortex of these subjects. Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a simple and non-invasive method for characterizing the clinical features of various psychiatric illnesses, few studies have used NIRS to directly investigate the association between prefrontal cortical activity and inhibitory control in patients with methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MAP). Using a 24-channel NIRS system, we compared hemodynamic responses during the Stroop color-word task in 14 patients with MAP and 21 healthy controls matched for age, sex and premorbid IQ. In addition, we used the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11) to assess impulsivity between subject groups. The MAP group exhibited significantly less activation in the anterior and frontopolar prefrontal cortex accompanied by lower Stroop color-word task performance, compared with controls. Moreover, BIS-11 scores were significantly higher in the MAP group, and were negatively correlated with the hemodynamic responses in prefrontal cortex. Our data suggest that reduced hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might reflect higher levels of impulsivity in patients with MAP, providing new insights into disrupted inhibitory control observed in MAP. PMID:27050450

  4. Exploring diazepam's effect on hemodynamic responses of mouse brain tissue by optical spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple duel-optical spectroscopic imaging apparatus capable of simultaneously determining relative changes in brain oxy-and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations was used following administration of the anxiolytic compound diazepam in mice with strong dominant (Dom) and submissive (Sub) behavioral traits. Three month old mice (n = 30) were anesthetized and after 10 min of baseline imaging, diazepam (1.5 mg/kg) was administered and measurements were taken for 80 min. The mouse head was illuminated by white light based LED's and diffused reflected light passing through different channels, consisting of a bandpass filter and a CCD camera, respectively, was collected and analyzed to measure the hemodynamic response. This work's major findings are threefold: first, Dom and Sub animals showed statistically significant differences in hemodynamic response to diazepam administration. Secondly, diazepam was found to more strongly affect the Sub group. Thirdly, different time-series profiles were observed post-injection, which can serve as a possible marker for the groups' differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the effects of an anxiolytic drug on brain hemodynamic responses in mice using diffused light optical imaging. PMID:25071958

  5. Social cognition and prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a working memory task in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Itakura, Masashi; Yamanashi, Takehiko; Yamada, Sayaka; Masai, Mieko; Miura, Akihiko; Yamauchi, Takahira; Satake, Takahiro; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Roberts, David L; Kaneko, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Social cognition is an important determinant of functional impairment in schizophrenia, but its relationship with the prefrontal functional abnormalities associated with the condition is still unclear. The present study aimed to explore the relationship between social cognition and prefrontal function in patients with schizophrenia using 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty-six patients with schizophrenia and 26 age-, gender-, and intelligence quotient-matched healthy controls (HCs) participated in the study. Hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal and superior temporal cortical regions were assessed during a working memory task using NIRS. Social cognition was assessed using the Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire (SCSQ). The observed hemodynamic responses were significantly reduced in the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), the frontopolar cortex, and temporal regions in subjects with schizophrenia compared to HCs. Additionally, lateral PFC hemodynamic responses assessed during the working memory task demonstrated a strong positive correlation with the SCSQ theory of mind (ToM) subscale score even after controlling for working memory performance. These results suggest that ToM integrity is closely related to lateral PFC functional abnormalities found in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, this study provides evidence to suggest that NIRS could be used to identify biomarkers of social cognition function in subjects with schizophrenia. PMID:26928254

  6. Social cognition and prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a working memory task in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Itakura, Masashi; Yamanashi, Takehiko; Yamada, Sayaka; Masai, Mieko; Miura, Akihiko; Yamauchi, Takahira; Satake, Takahiro; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Roberts, David L.; Kaneko, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Social cognition is an important determinant of functional impairment in schizophrenia, but its relationship with the prefrontal functional abnormalities associated with the condition is still unclear. The present study aimed to explore the relationship between social cognition and prefrontal function in patients with schizophrenia using 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty-six patients with schizophrenia and 26 age-, gender-, and intelligence quotient-matched healthy controls (HCs) participated in the study. Hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal and superior temporal cortical regions were assessed during a working memory task using NIRS. Social cognition was assessed using the Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire (SCSQ). The observed hemodynamic responses were significantly reduced in the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), the frontopolar cortex, and temporal regions in subjects with schizophrenia compared to HCs. Additionally, lateral PFC hemodynamic responses assessed during the working memory task demonstrated a strong positive correlation with the SCSQ theory of mind (ToM) subscale score even after controlling for working memory performance. These results suggest that ToM integrity is closely related to lateral PFC functional abnormalities found in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, this study provides evidence to suggest that NIRS could be used to identify biomarkers of social cognition function in subjects with schizophrenia. PMID:26928254

  7. Reduced Prefrontal Cortex Hemodynamic Response in Adults with Methamphetamine Induced Psychosis: Relevance for Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Naoko; Nakanishi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shohei; Ota, Toyosaku; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with methamphetamine abuse/dependence often exhibit high levels of impulsivity, which may be associated with the structural abnormalities and functional hypoactivities observed in the frontal cortex of these subjects. Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a simple and non-invasive method for characterizing the clinical features of various psychiatric illnesses, few studies have used NIRS to directly investigate the association between prefrontal cortical activity and inhibitory control in patients with methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MAP). Using a 24-channel NIRS system, we compared hemodynamic responses during the Stroop color-word task in 14 patients with MAP and 21 healthy controls matched for age, sex and premorbid IQ. In addition, we used the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11) to assess impulsivity between subject groups. The MAP group exhibited significantly less activation in the anterior and frontopolar prefrontal cortex accompanied by lower Stroop color-word task performance, compared with controls. Moreover, BIS-11 scores were significantly higher in the MAP group, and were negatively correlated with the hemodynamic responses in prefrontal cortex. Our data suggest that reduced hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might reflect higher levels of impulsivity in patients with MAP, providing new insights into disrupted inhibitory control observed in MAP. PMID:27050450

  8. Acute Hemodynamic Efficacy of a 32-ml Subcutaneous Counterpulsation Device in a Calf Model of Diminished Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Steven C.; Litwak, Kenneth N.; Giridharan, Guruprasad A.; Pantalos, George M.; Dowling, Robert D.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Slaughter, Mark S.; Sobieski, Michael A.; Spence, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The acute hemodynamic efficacy of an implantable counter-pulsation device (CPD) was evaluated. The CPD is a valveless single port, 32-ml stroke volume blood chamber designed to be connected to the human axillary artery using a simple surface surgical procedure. Blood is drawn into the pump during systole and ejected during diastole. The acute hemodynamic effects of the 32-ml CPD were compared to a standard clinical 40-ml intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) in calves (80 kg, n = 10). The calves were treated by a single oral dose of Monensin to produce a model of diminished cardiac function (DCF). The CPD and IABP produced similar increases in cardiac output (6% CPD vs. 5% IABP, p > 0.5) and reduction in left ventricular external work (14% CPD vs. 13% IABP, p > 0.5) compared to DCF (p < 0.05). However, the ratio of diastolic coronary artery flow to left ventricular external work increase from DCF baseline (p < 0.05) was greater with the CPD compared to the IABP (15% vs. 4%, p < 0.05). The CPD also produced a greater reduction in left ventricular myocardial oxygen consumption from DCF baseline (p < 0.05) compared to the IABP (13% vs. 9%, p < 0.05) despite each device providing similar improvements in cardiac output. There was no early indication of hemolysis, thrombus formation, or vascular injury. The CPD provides hemodynamic efficacy equivalent to an IABP and may become a therapeutic option for patients who may benefit from prolonged counterpulsation. PMID:19033769

  9. Acute hemodynamic efficacy of a 32-ml subcutaneous counterpulsation device in a calf model of diminished cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Steven C; Litwak, Kenneth N; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Pantalos, George M; Dowling, Robert D; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Slaughter, Mark S; Sobieski, Michael A; Spence, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    The acute hemodynamic efficacy of an implantable counterpulsation device (CPD) was evaluated. The CPD is a valveless single port, 32-ml stroke volume blood chamber designed to be connected to the human axillary artery using a simple surface surgical procedure. Blood is drawn into the pump during systole and ejected during diastole. The acute hemodynamic effects of the 32-ml CPD were compared to a standard clinical 40-ml intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) in calves (80 kg, n = 10). The calves were treated by a single oral dose of Monensin to produce a model of diminished cardiac function (DCF). The CPD and IABP produced similar increases in cardiac output (6% CPD vs. 5% IABP, p > 0.5) and reduction in left ventricular external work (14% CPD vs. 13% IABP, p > 0.5) compared to DCF (p < 0.05). However, the ratio of diastolic coronary artery flow to left ventricular external work increase from DCF baseline (p < 0.05) was greater with the CPD compared to the IABP (15% vs. 4%, p < 0.05). The CPD also produced a greater reduction in left ventricular myocardial oxygen consumption from DCF baseline (p < 0.05) compared to the IABP (13% vs. 9%, p < 0.05) despite each device providing similar improvements in cardiac output. There was no early indication of hemolysis, thrombus formation, or vascular injury. The CPD provides hemodynamic efficacy equivalent to an IABP and may become a therapeutic option for patients who may benefit from prolonged counterpulsation. PMID:19033769

  10. [The effect of transcardiac galvanization on the size of the necrotic mass and on the central hemodynamic indices in patients with an acute myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Maslov, A G; Karpov, R S; Metelkin, A V; Lychev, V G; Vidiakov, G E; Shishkin, M S; Timofeev, A V; Derzoglo, G D

    1994-01-01

    The authors examined 110 males and females admitted to hospital within 6 hours since the onset of new macrofocal anterior myocardial infarction running without complications. All the patients underwent transcardiac galvanization (TG) in the initial disease hours. Precardiac mapping, tetrapolar rheography and clinical observation provided evidence on TG course action on the necrosis mass, central hemodynamics and clinical appearance of the disease in the acute and postinfarction periods. TG promoted faster and more marked improvement of cardiac muscle contractility, attaining higher functional level of inotropic myocardial activity up to the disease month 6. This was associated with alleviation of circulatory disorders both at the hospital and postinfarction stage. The response to course TG results from cardioprotective action of constant electric current on ischemic myocardium which limits the zone of the lesion thus reducing early fatal cases number and preventing cardiogenic shock. PMID:7985146

  11. Hemodynamic and neurohormonal responses to extreme orthostatic stress in physically fit young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, E. K.; Goswami, N.; Rössler, A.; Vrecko, K.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    2009-04-01

    Blood pressure stability may be jeopardized in astronauts experiencing orthostatic stress. There is disagreement about cardiovascular and endocrine stress responses that emerge when a critical (presyncopal) state is reached. We studied hemodynamic and neurohormonal changes as induced by an orthostatic stress paradigm (head-up tilt combined with lower body negative pressure) that leads to a syncopal endpoint. From supine control to presyncope, heart rate increased by 78% and thoracic impedance by 12%. There was a 49% fall in stroke volume index, 19% in mean arterial blood pressure, 14% in total peripheral resistance index and 11% in plasma volume. Plasma norepinephrine rose by 107, epinephrine by 491, plasma renin activity by 167, and cortisol by 25%. Hemodynamic and hormonal changes of clearly different magnitude emerge in presyncope as compared to supine rest. Additional studies are warranted to reveal the exact time course of orthostatic changes up to syncopal levels.

  12. Empirical Evaluation of Visual Fatigue from Display Alignment Errors Using Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wiyor, Hanniebey D.; Ntuen, Celestine A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of stereoscopic display alignment errors on visual fatigue and prefrontal cortical tissue hemodynamic responses. We collected hemodynamic data and perceptual ratings of visual fatigue while participants performed visual display tasks on 8 ft × 6 ft NEC LT silver screen with NEC LT 245 DLP projectors. There was statistical significant difference between subjective measures of visual fatigue before air traffic control task (BATC) and after air traffic control task (ATC 3), (P < 0.05). Statistical significance was observed between left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex oxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-HbO2), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-Hbb), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (r DLPFC-Hbb) on stereoscopic alignment errors (P < 0.05). Thus, cortical tissue oxygenation requirement in the left hemisphere indicates that the effect of visual fatigue is more pronounced in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:27006917

  13. Hemodynamic responses to seated and supine lower body negative pressure - Comparison with +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polese, Alvese; Sandler, Harold; Montgomery, Leslie D.

    1992-01-01

    The hemodynamic responses to LBNP in seated subjects and in subjects in supine body positions were compared and were correlated with hemodynamic changes which occurred during a simulated (by centrifugation) Shuttle reentry acceleration with a slow onset rate of 0.002 G/s and during gradual onset exposures to +3 Gz and +4 Gz. Results demonstrate that seated LBNP at a level of -40 mm Hg can serve as a static simulator for changes in the heart rate and in mean blood pressure induced by gradual onset acceleration stress occurring during Shuttle reentry. The findings also provide a rationale for using LBNP during weightlessness as a means of imposing G-loading on the circulation prior to reentry.

  14. Hemodynamic responses of the equine digit to intravenous and digital arterial infusion of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Hunt, R J; Moore, J N; Allen, D

    1990-04-01

    In 6 adult horses anesthetized with pentobarbital, the hemodynamic responses of the equine digit to infusion of dopamine were evaluated by use of an isolated extra corporeal pump perfused digital preparation. Digital blood flow was maintained at a constant rate that was independent of systemic hemodynamic changes. Three sequential experiments were performed on each horse. In the first experiment (n = 6), dopamine was infused IV at rates of 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 micrograms/kg/min. For the second experiment (n = 5), dopamine (400 micrograms/ml) was infused into the digital artery at the rates of 0.07, 0.7, and 1.2 ml/min. The third experiment (n = 5) consisted of a 5-minute intra-arterial infusion of phentolamine followed by the intra-arterial infusion of dopamine while continuing the infusion of phentolamine. Digital venous, arterial, and capillary pressures, total digital vascular resistance, and precapillary to postcapillary resistance ratios were determined in each experiment. Systemic infusion of dopamine did not induce changes in the hemodynamics of the digital vasculature. Digital arterial infusion of dopamine alone resulted in a dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure, total digital vascular resistance, and an increase in the precapillary to postcapillary resistance ratio. Phentolamine attenuated the vasoconstrictive response elicited by intra-arterial infusion of dopamine. PMID:2327616

  15. Multivariate analysis of correlation between electrophysiological and hemodynamic responses during cognitive processing.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Jan; Sudre, Gustavo; Vartiainen, Johanna; Liljeström, Mia; Mitchell, Tom; Salmelin, Riitta

    2014-05-15

    Animal and human studies have frequently shown that in primary sensory and motor regions the BOLD signal correlates positively with high-frequency and negatively with low-frequency neuronal activity. However, recent evidence suggests that this relationship may also vary across cortical areas. Detailed knowledge of the possible spectral diversity between electrophysiological and hemodynamic responses across the human cortex would be essential for neural-level interpretation of fMRI data and for informative multimodal combination of electromagnetic and hemodynamic imaging data, especially in cognitive tasks. We applied multivariate partial least squares correlation analysis to MEG-fMRI data recorded in a reading paradigm to determine the correlation patterns between the data types, at once, across the cortex. Our results revealed heterogeneous patterns of high-frequency correlation between MEG and fMRI responses, with marked dissociation between lower and higher order cortical regions. The low-frequency range showed substantial variance, with negative and positive correlations manifesting at different frequencies across cortical regions. These findings demonstrate the complexity of the neurophysiological counterparts of hemodynamic fluctuations in cognitive processing. PMID:24518260

  16. Multivariate analysis of correlation between electrophysiological and hemodynamic responses during cognitive processing

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, Jan; Sudre, Gustavo; Vartiainen, Johanna; Liljeström, Mia; Mitchell, Tom; Salmelin, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Animal and human studies have frequently shown that in primary sensory and motor regions the BOLD signal correlates positively with high-frequency and negatively with low-frequency neuronal activity. However, recent evidence suggests that this relationship may also vary across cortical areas. Detailed knowledge of the possible spectral diversity between electrophysiological and hemodynamic responses across the human cortex would be essential for neural-level interpretation of fMRI data and for informative multimodal combination of electromagnetic and hemodynamic imaging data, especially in cognitive tasks. We applied multivariate partial least squares correlation analysis to MEG–fMRI data recorded in a reading paradigm to determine the correlation patterns between the data types, at once, across the cortex. Our results revealed heterogeneous patterns of high-frequency correlation between MEG and fMRI responses, with marked dissociation between lower and higher order cortical regions. The low-frequency range showed substantial variance, with negative and positive correlations manifesting at different frequencies across cortical regions. These findings demonstrate the complexity of the neurophysiological counterparts of hemodynamic fluctuations in cognitive processing. PMID:24518260

  17. Functional imaging of hemodynamic stimulus response in the rat retina with ultrahigh-speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Baumann, Bernhard; Clermont, Allen C.; Feener, Edward P.; Boas, David A.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-03-01

    Measuring retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus is important for investigating pathophysiology in small animal models of diabetic retinopathy, because a reduction in the hyperemic response is thought to be one of the earliest changes in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we investigated functional imaging of retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus in the rat retina using an ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT system at 840nm with an axial scan rate of 244kHz. At 244kHz the nominal axial velocity range that could be measured without phase wrapping was +/-37.7mm/s. Pulsatile total retinal arterial blood flow as a function of time was measured using an en face Doppler approach where a 200μm × 200μm area centered at the central retinal artery was repeatedly raster scanned at a volume acquisition rate of 55Hz. Three-dimensional capillary imaging was performed using speckle decorrelation which has minimal angle dependency compared to other angiography techniques based on OCT phase information. During OCT imaging, a flicker stimulus could be applied to the retina synchronously by inserting a dichroic mirror in the imaging interface. An acute transient increase in total retinal blood flow could be detected. At the capillary level, an increase in the degree of speckle decorrelation in capillary OCT angiography images could also be observed, which indicates an increase in the velocity of blood at the capillary level. This method promises to be useful for the investigation of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  18. Acute effects of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cantow, Kathleen; Pohlmann, Andreas; Flemming, Bert; Ferrara, Fabienne; Waiczies, Sonia; Grosenick, Dirk; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol is increasingly used as intravascular contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study details the impact of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. In 10 anesthetized rats, a single intravenous injection of isotonic saline (used as volume control) was followed by three consecutive injections of ferumoxytol to achieve cumulative doses of 6, 10, and 41 mg Fe/kg body mass. Arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygen tension were continuously measured. Regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was characterized by dedicated interventions: brief periods of suprarenal aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. None of the three doses of ferumoxytol resulted in significant changes in any of the measured parameters as compared to saline. Ferumoxytol did not significantly alter regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation as studied by aortic occlusion and hypoxia. The only significant effect of ferumoxytol at the highest dose was a blunting of the hyperoxia-induced increase in arterial pressure. Taken together, ferumoxytol has only marginal effects on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. This makes ferumoxytol a prime candidate as contrast agent for renal MRI including the assessment of renal blood volume fraction. PMID:27436132

  19. Acute effects of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Cantow, Kathleen; Pohlmann, Andreas; Flemming, Bert; Ferrara, Fabienne; Waiczies, Sonia; Grosenick, Dirk; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol is increasingly used as intravascular contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study details the impact of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. In 10 anesthetized rats, a single intravenous injection of isotonic saline (used as volume control) was followed by three consecutive injections of ferumoxytol to achieve cumulative doses of 6, 10, and 41 mg Fe/kg body mass. Arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygen tension were continuously measured. Regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was characterized by dedicated interventions: brief periods of suprarenal aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. None of the three doses of ferumoxytol resulted in significant changes in any of the measured parameters as compared to saline. Ferumoxytol did not significantly alter regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation as studied by aortic occlusion and hypoxia. The only significant effect of ferumoxytol at the highest dose was a blunting of the hyperoxia-induced increase in arterial pressure. Taken together, ferumoxytol has only marginal effects on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. This makes ferumoxytol a prime candidate as contrast agent for renal MRI including the assessment of renal blood volume fraction. PMID:27436132

  20. Effect of Lower Body Compression Garments on Hemodynamics in Response to Running Session

    PubMed Central

    Venckūnas, Tomas; Trinkūnas, Eugenijus; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Poderys, Jonas; Grūnovas, Albinas; Brazaitis, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Compression garments are often worn during exercise and allegedly have ergogenic and/or physiological effects. In this study, we compared hemodynamics and running performance while wearing compression and loose-fit breeches. We hypothesized that in neutral-warm environment compression breeches impair performance by diminishing body cooling via evaporative sweat loss and redistributing blood from active musculature to skin leading to a larger rise in body temperature and prolonging recovery of hemodynamics after exercise. Methods. Changes in hemodynamics (leg blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure during orthoclinostatic test), calf muscle tissue oxygenation, and skin and core temperatures were measured in response to 30 min running (simulation of aerobic training session) followed by maximal 400 m sprint (evaluation of running performance) in recreationally active females (25.1 ± 4.2 yrs; 63.0 ± 8.6 kg) wearing compression or loose-fit breeches in randomized fashion. Results. Wearing compression breeches resulted in larger skin temperature rise under the garment during exercise and recovery (by about 1°C, P < 0.05; statistical power > 85%), while core temperature dynamics and other measured parameters including circulation, running performance, and sensations were similar compared to wearing loose-fit breeches (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Compared with loose-fit breeches, compression breeches have neither positive nor negative physiological and performance effects for females running in thermoneutral environment. PMID:25202721

  1. Early hemodynamic response to the tilt test in patients with syncope

    PubMed Central

    Koźluk, Edward; Cybulski, Gerard; Piątkowska, Agnieszka; Zastawna, Inga; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Strasz, Anna; Gąsiorowska, Anna; Kempa, Maciej; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to evaluate the differences in the early hemodynamic response to the tilt test (HUTT) in patients with and without syncope using impedance cardiography (ICG). Material and methods One hundred twenty-six patients (72 female/48 male; 37 ±17 years) were divided into a group with syncope (HUTT(+), n = 45 patients) and a group without syncope (HUTT(–), n = 81 patients). ECG and ICG signals were continuously recorded during the whole examination, allowing the calculation of heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO) for every beat. The hemodynamic parameters (averaged over 1 min) were analyzed at the following points of the HUTT: the last minute of resting, the period immediately after the tilt (0 min), 1 min and 5 min after the maneuver. The absolute changes of HR, SV and CO were calculated for 0, 1, and 5 min after the maneuver in relation to the values at rest (ΔHR, ΔSV, ΔCO). Also, the percentage changes were calculated (HRi, SVi, COi). Results There were no differences between the groups in absolute and percentage changes of hemodynamic parameters immediately after and 1 min after tilting. Significant differences between the HUTT(+) and HUTT(–) groups were observed in the 5th min of tilting: for ΔSV (–27.2 ±21.2 ml vs. –9.7 ±27.2 ml; p = 0.03), ΔCO (–1.78 ±1.62 l/min vs. –0.34 ±2.48 l/min; p = 0.032), COi (–30 ±28% vs. –0.2 ±58%; p = 0.034). Conclusions In the 5th min the decrease of hemodynamic parameters (ΔSV, ΔCO, COi) was significantly more pronounced in HUTT(+) patients in comparison to the HUTT(–) group. PMID:25624842

  2. Hemodynamic Flow-Induced Mechanotransduction Signaling Influences the Radiation Response of the Vascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Mohan; Aravindan, Natarajan; Sprague, Eugene A; Mohan, Sumathy

    2016-08-01

    Hemodynamic shear stress is defined as the physical force exerted by the continuous flow of blood in the vascular system. Endothelial cells, which line the inner layer of blood vessels, sense this physiological force through mechanotransduction signaling and adapt to maintain structural and functional homeostasis. Hemodynamic flow, shear stress and mechanotransduction signaling are, therefore, an integral part of endothelial pathophysiology. Although this is a well-established concept in the cardiovascular field, it is largely dismissed in studies aimed at understanding radiation injury to the endothelium and subsequent cardiovascular complications. We and others have reported on the differential response of the endothelium when the cells are under hemodynamic flow shear compared with static culture. Further, we have demonstrated significant differences in the gene expression of static versus shear-stressed irradiated cells in four key pathways, reinforcing the importance of shear stress in understanding radiation injury of the endothelium. This article further emphasizes the influence of hemodynamic shear stress and the associated mechanotransduction signaling on physiological functioning of the vascular endothelium and underscores its significance in understanding radiation injury to the vasculature and associated cardiac complications. Studies of radiation effect on endothelial biology and its implication on cardiotoxicity and vascular complications thus far have failed to highlight the significance of these factors. Factoring in these integral parts of the endothelium will enhance our understanding of the contribution of the endothelium to radiation biology. Without such information, the current approaches to studying radiation-induced injury to the endothelium and its consequences in health and disease are limited. PMID:27387860

  3. Modeling of the acute effects of primary hypertension and hypotension on the hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Coley, Stuart C; Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Frangi, Alejandro F; Marzo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamics is a risk factor in intracranial aneurysms (IA). Hypertension and pharmacologically induced hypotension are common in IA patients. This study investigates how hypertension and hypotension may influence aneurysmal hemodynamics. Images of 23 IAs at typical locations were used to build patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics models. The effects of hypotension and hypertension were simulated through boundary conditions by modulating the normotensive flow and pressure waveforms, in turn produced by a 1D systemic vascular model. Aneurysm location and flow pattern types were used to categorize the influence of hypotension and hypertension on relevant flow variables (velocity, pressure and wall shear stress). Results indicate that, compared to other locations, vertebrobasilar aneurysms (VBA) are more sensitive to flow changes. In VBAs, space-averaged velocity at peak systole increased by 30% in hypertension (16-21% in other locations). Flow in VBAs in hypotension decreased by 20% (10-13% in other locations). Momentum-driven hemodynamic types were also more affected by hypotension and hypertension, than shear-driven types. This study shows how patient-specific modeling can be effectively used to identify location-specific flow patterns in a clinically-relevant study, thus reinforcing the role played by modeling technologies in furthering our understanding of cardiovascular disease, and their potential in future healthcare. PMID:25118666

  4. Retrieving the Hemodynamic Response Function in resting state fMRI: Methodology and application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Rong; Deshpande, Gopikhrishna; Laureys, Steven; Marinazzo, Daniele

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present a procedure to retrieve the hemodynamic response function (HRF) from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. The fundamentals of the procedures are further validated by considering simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. The typical HRF shape at rest for a group of healthy subject is presented. Then we present the modifications to the shape of the HRF at rest following two physiological modulations: eyes open versus eyes closed and propofol-induced modulations of consciousness. PMID:26737671

  5. Hemodynamic Response Alteration As a Function of Task Complexity and Expertise-An fNIRS Study in Jugglers.

    PubMed

    Carius, Daniel; Andrä, Christian; Clauß, Martina; Ragert, Patrick; Bunk, Michael; Mehnert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Detailed knowledge about online brain processing during the execution of complex motor tasks with a high motion range still remains elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hemodynamic responses within sensorimotor networks as well as in visual motion area during the execution of a complex visuomotor task such as juggling. More specifically, we were interested in how far the hemodynamic response as measured with functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) adapts as a function of task complexity and the level of the juggling expertise. We asked expert jugglers to perform different juggling tasks with different levels of complexity such as a 2-ball juggling, 3- and 5-ball juggling cascades. We here demonstrate that expert jugglers show an altered neurovascular response with increasing task complexity, since a 5-ball juggling cascade showed enhanced hemodynamic responses for oxygenated hemoglobin as compared to less complex tasks such as a 3- or 2-ball juggling pattern. Moreover, correlations between the hemodynamic response and the level of the juggling expertise during the 5-ball juggling cascade, acquired by cinematographic video analysis, revealed only a non-significant trend in primary motor cortex, indicating that a higher level of expertise might be associated with lower hemodynamic responses. PMID:27064925

  6. Hemodynamic Response Alteration As a Function of Task Complexity and Expertise—An fNIRS Study in Jugglers

    PubMed Central

    Carius, Daniel; Andrä, Christian; Clauß, Martina; Ragert, Patrick; Bunk, Michael; Mehnert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Detailed knowledge about online brain processing during the execution of complex motor tasks with a high motion range still remains elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hemodynamic responses within sensorimotor networks as well as in visual motion area during the execution of a complex visuomotor task such as juggling. More specifically, we were interested in how far the hemodynamic response as measured with functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) adapts as a function of task complexity and the level of the juggling expertise. We asked expert jugglers to perform different juggling tasks with different levels of complexity such as a 2-ball juggling, 3- and 5-ball juggling cascades. We here demonstrate that expert jugglers show an altered neurovascular response with increasing task complexity, since a 5-ball juggling cascade showed enhanced hemodynamic responses for oxygenated hemoglobin as compared to less complex tasks such as a 3- or 2-ball juggling pattern. Moreover, correlations between the hemodynamic response and the level of the juggling expertise during the 5-ball juggling cascade, acquired by cinematographic video analysis, revealed only a non-significant trend in primary motor cortex, indicating that a higher level of expertise might be associated with lower hemodynamic responses. PMID:27064925

  7. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate hemodynamic responses to deception in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fenghua; Sharma, Vikrant; Kozel, F Andrew; Liu, Hanli

    2009-12-15

    Deception involves complex neural processes and correlates in the brain. Functional brain imaging techniques have been used to study and understand brain mechanisms during deception. In this study, we utilized functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to investigate hemodynamic responses to deception in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) at the individual level. The protocol involved a mock theft scenario that was previously used in a functional MRI (fMRI) study of detecting deception. Subjects (N=11) were instructed to steal a ring or a watch and then conceal the item that they stole. Participants then responded to visually presented questions regarding which item they took. While the subjects were answering the questions, their PFC activity was measured using fNIRS. The brain activity associated with deceptive responses demonstrated significant changes in hemoglobin concentrations with respect to the baseline, while the response of truth telling was not statistically different from baseline. The regions of greater activation induced by deception identified by fNIRS were approximately consistent with those reported by the previous fMRI study using a similar protocol. This study demonstrates that fNIRS is a promising new technique to understand hemodynamic and neural correlates of deception and thus to detect deception with the added advantages of being compact, technically easier to implement, and inexpensive compared to functional MRI. PMID:19782657

  8. Modeling of the hemodynamic responses in block design fMRI studies

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Zuyao Y; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M; McMahon, Katie L; Blokland, Gabriella G A M; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Reutens, David C

    2014-01-01

    The hemodynamic response function (HRF) describes the local response of brain vasculature to functional activation. Accurate HRF modeling enables the investigation of cerebral blood flow regulation and improves our ability to interpret fMRI results. Block designs have been used extensively as fMRI paradigms because detection power is maximized; however, block designs are not optimal for HRF parameter estimation. Here we assessed the utility of block design fMRI data for HRF modeling. The trueness (relative deviation), precision (relative uncertainty), and identifiability (goodness-of-fit) of different HRF models were examined and test–retest reproducibility of HRF parameter estimates was assessed using computer simulations and fMRI data from 82 healthy young adult twins acquired on two occasions 3 to 4 months apart. The effects of systematically varying attributes of the block design paradigm were also examined. In our comparison of five HRF models, the model comprising the sum of two gamma functions with six free parameters had greatest parameter accuracy and identifiability. Hemodynamic response function height and time to peak were highly reproducible between studies and width was moderately reproducible but the reproducibility of onset time was low. This study established the feasibility and test–retest reliability of estimating HRF parameters using data from block design fMRI studies. PMID:24252847

  9. Hypertrophic response to hemodynamic overload: role of load vs. renin-angiotensin system activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Carabello, B. A.; Conrad, C. C.; Buckley, J. M.; DeFreyte, G.; Barnes, M.; Tomanek, R. J.; Wei, C. C.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is one of the basic mechanisms by which the heart compensates for hemodynamic overload. The mechanisms by which hemodynamic overload is transduced by the cardiac muscle cell and translated into cardiac hypertrophy are not completely understood. Candidates include activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin II receptor (AT1) stimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that load, independent of the RAS, is sufficient to stimulate cardiac growth. Four groups of cats were studied: 14 normal controls, 20 pulmonary artery-banded (PAB) cats, 7 PAB cats in whom the AT1 was concomitantly and continuously blocked with losartan, and 8 PAB cats in whom the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was concomitantly and continuously blocked with captopril. Losartan cats had at least a one-log order increase in the ED50 of the blood pressure response to angiotensin II infusion. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy was assessed using the RV mass-to-body weight ratio and ventricular cardiocyte size. RV hemodynamic overload was assessed by measuring RV systolic and diastolic pressures. Neither the extent of RV pressure overload nor RV hypertrophy that resulted from PAB was affected by AT1 blockade with losartan or ACE inhibition with captopril. RV systolic pressure was increased from 21 +/- 3 mmHg in normals to 68 +/- 4 mmHg in PAB, 65 +/- 5 mmHg in PAB plus losartan and 62 +/- 3 mmHg in PAB plus captopril. RV-to-body weight ratio increased from 0.52 +/- 0.04 g/kg in normals to 1.11 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB, 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus losartan and 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus captopril. Thus 1) pharmacological modulation of the RAS with losartan and captopril did not change the extent of the hemodynamic overload or the hypertrophic response induced by PAB; 2) neither RAS activation nor angiotensin II receptor stimulation is an obligatory and necessary component of the signaling pathway that acts as an intermediary coupling load to the

  10. Relationship between prefrontal hemodynamic responses and quality of life differs between melancholia and non-melancholic depression.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Noa; Mikawa, Wakako; Tsujimoto, Emi; Akashi, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Toru; Kirime, Eiji; Shirakawa, Osamu

    2016-07-30

    This study aimed to determine whether quality of life (QOL) reflects specific functional abnormalities of frontotemporal hemodynamic responses in melancholia. We recruited 30 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with melancholic features (MDD-MF), 52 with non-melancholic features (MDD-NMF), and 68 healthy control subjects who were matched for age, sex ratio, and years of education. QOL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and regional hemodynamic responses during a verbal fluency task were monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Patients with MDD-MF scored significantly lower than those with MDD-NMF on the role emotional domain of SF-36. Both MDD patient groups exhibited lower hemodynamic responses in the frontotemporal regions than the control group. Hemodynamic responses in the frontotemporal regions were significantly smaller in patients with MDD-MF than in those with MDD-NMF. The role emotional domain of patients with MDD-MF was significantly and positively correlated with hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal region, whereas that of patients with MDD-NMF revealed no significant correlation. In conclusion, our results indicate that patients with MDD-MF exhibit qualitatively distinct prefrontal dysfunction patterns associated with emotional role functioning compared with patients with MDD-NMF. PMID:27259838

  11. Cerebral hemodynamics in human acute ischemic stroke: a study with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Ostergaard, L; Roivainen, R; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Könönen, M; Hämäläinen, A; Vanninen, E J; Soimakallio, S; Kuikka, J T; Aronen, H J

    2000-06-01

    Nineteen patients with acute ischemic stroke (<24 hours) underwent diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging at the acute stage and 1 week later. Eleven patients also underwent technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at the acute stage. Relative (ischemic vs. contralateral control) cerebral blood flow (relCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transit time were measured in the ischemic core, in the area of infarct growth, and in the eventually viable ischemic tissue on PWI maps. The relCBF was also measured from SPECT. There was a curvilinear relationship between the relCBF measured from PWI and SPECT (r = 0.854; P < 0.001). The tissue proceeding to infarction during the follow-up had significantly lower initial CBF and cerebral blood volume values on PWI maps (P < 0.001) than the eventually viable ischemic tissue had. The best value for discriminating the area of infarct growth from the eventually viable ischemic tissue was 48% for PWI relCBF and 87% for PWI relative cerebral blood volume. Combined diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging enables one to detect hemodynamically different subregions inside the initial perfusion abnormality. Tissue survival may be different in these subregions and may be predicted. PMID:10894174

  12. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation: Propacetamol versus Lidocaine—A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Nabavian, Omid; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Kord, Hadi; Vafainejad, Hossein; Kord Valeshabad, Reza; Reza Feili, Ali; Rezaei, Mehdi; Darabi, Hamed; Koohkan, Mohammad; Golbinimofrad, Poorya; Jafari, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of propacetamol on attenuating hemodynamic responses subsequent laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation compared to lidocaine. In this randomized clinical trial, 62 patients with the American Anesthesiologists Society (ASA) class I/II who required laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g/I.V./infusion (group P) or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg (group L) prior to laryngoscopy. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, before laryngoscopy and within nine minutes after intubation. In both groups P and L, MAP increased after laryngoscopy and the changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were significant changes of HR in both groups after intubation (P < 0.02), but the trend of changes was different between two groups (P < 0.001). In group L, HR increased after intubation and its change was statistically significant within 9 minutes after intubation (P < 0.001), while in group P, HR remained stable after intubation (P = 0.8). Propacetamol 2 gr one hour prior intubation attenuates heart rate responses after laryngoscopy but is not effective to prevent acute alterations in blood pressure after intubation. PMID:24822063

  13. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation: Propacetamol versus Lidocaine-A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Nabavian, Omid; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Kord, Hadi; Vafainejad, Hossein; Kord Valeshabad, Reza; Reza Feili, Ali; Rezaei, Mehdi; Darabi, Hamed; Koohkan, Mohammad; Golbinimofrad, Poorya; Jafari, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of propacetamol on attenuating hemodynamic responses subsequent laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation compared to lidocaine. In this randomized clinical trial, 62 patients with the American Anesthesiologists Society (ASA) class I/II who required laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g/I.V./infusion (group P) or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg (group L) prior to laryngoscopy. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, before laryngoscopy and within nine minutes after intubation. In both groups P and L, MAP increased after laryngoscopy and the changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were significant changes of HR in both groups after intubation (P < 0.02), but the trend of changes was different between two groups (P < 0.001). In group L, HR increased after intubation and its change was statistically significant within 9 minutes after intubation (P < 0.001), while in group P, HR remained stable after intubation (P = 0.8). Propacetamol 2 gr one hour prior intubation attenuates heart rate responses after laryngoscopy but is not effective to prevent acute alterations in blood pressure after intubation. PMID:24822063

  14. Early and late stimulus-evoked cortical hemodynamic responses provide insight into the neurogenic nature of neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Kennerley, Aneurin J; Harris, Sam; Bruyns-Haylett, Michael; Boorman, Luke; Zheng, Ying; Jones, Myles; Berwick, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding neurovascular coupling is a prerequisite for the interpretation of results obtained from modern neuroimaging techniques. This study investigated the hemodynamic and neural responses in rat somatosensory cortex elicited by 16 seconds electrical whisker stimuli. Hemodynamics were measured by optical imaging spectroscopy and neural activity by multichannel electrophysiology. Previous studies have suggested that the whisker-evoked hemodynamic response contains two mechanisms, a transient ‘backwards' dilation of the middle cerebral artery, followed by an increase in blood volume localized to the site of neural activity. To distinguish between the mechanisms responsible for these aspects of the response, we presented whisker stimuli during normocapnia (‘control'), and during a high level of hypercapnia. Hypercapnia was used to ‘predilate' arteries and thus possibly ‘inhibit' aspects of the response related to the ‘early' mechanism. Indeed, hemodynamic data suggested that the transient stimulus-evoked response was absent under hypercapnia. However, evoked neural responses were also altered during hypercapnia and convolution of the neural responses from both the normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions with a canonical impulse response function, suggested that neurovascular coupling was similar in both conditions. Although data did not clearly dissociate early and late vascular responses, they suggest that the neurovascular coupling relationship is neurogenic in origin. PMID:22126914

  15. Multi-parametric imaging of cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic response followed by ischemic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    We use rodent parietal cortex as a model system and utilize a synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging (SDW-LSCI) technique to explore the hemodynamic response of infarct and penumbra to a brain injury (middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model). The SDW-LSCI system is able to take snapshots rapidly (maximum 500 Hz) over the entire brain surface, providing key information about the hemodynamic response, in terms of which it may be used to elucidate evolution of penumbra region from onsite to 90 min of MCAO. Changes in flow are quantified as to the flow experiencing physical occlusions of the MCA normalized to that of baseline. Furthermore, the system is capable of providing information as to the changes of the concentration of oxygenated, (HbO) deoxygenated (Hb), and total hemoglobin (HbT) in the cortex based on the spectral characteristics of HbO and Hb. We observe that the oxygenation variations in the four regions are detectable and distinct. Combining the useful information, four regions of interest (ROI), infarct, penumbra, reduced flow and contralateral portions in the brain upon ischemic injury may be differentiated. Implications of our results are discussed with respect to current understanding of the mechanisms underlying MCAO. We anticipate that SDW-LSCI holds promise for rapid and large field of view localization of ischemic injury.

  16. Oral clonidine versus gabapentin as premedicant for obtunding hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Suresh K.; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Promila

    2014-01-01

    Background: We compared the effects of oral clonidine and gabapentin as premedicant in obtunding hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation in normotensive patients undergoing elective surgery. Methods: A total of 100 patients of either sex enrolled in the study were randomly divided into two groups of 50 each. Group A patients received oral clonidine 200 μg and Group B patients received oral gabapentin 900 mg, 90 min prior to induction of anesthesia. Results: Both groups were matched for age, sex weight and intubation time. Anxiety score and sedation scores before induction were significantly better in Group A as compared with Group B. Heart rate rise was obtunded in Group A except at 1 min, as compared with Group B in which tachycardia persisted even at 3 and 5 min following intubation. Mean arterial pressure was maintained below baseline at all times in Group A as compared with Group B in which significant rise (+7.55%, P < 0.001) was seen at 1 min after intubation. Conclusion: Oral clonidine provided good attenuation of hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation as compared with oral gabapentin. PMID:24843327

  17. A physiologically-based spatiotemporal model of fMRI hemodynamic responses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Jackie; Drysdale, Peter; Robinson, Peter

    2006-03-01

    A 3D cerebrovascular model is developed to describe the spatiotemporal Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) response. Modelling spatial effects is particularly important as technology improves, shrinking image voxels and thereby increasing voxel interdependence. Specifically, poroelastic theory, originally developed in geophysics, is used to model the brain tissue and vasculature as a porous continuum. The model yields equations describing conservation of mass, momentum, and deoxyhemoglobin, plus the effect of neuronal activity on blood flow. The equations reproduce existing, non-spatial, hemodynamic models in the relevant limit. Imposition of continuity of flow between adjacent points enables potential investigation of spatial phenomena such as `blood steal' which has been proposed to account for negative BOLD signals abutting sites of positive BOLD responses. This model will enable future study of spatiotemporal relationships between stimuli and experimental fMRI BOLD responses.

  18. Interneurons contribute to the hemodynamic/metabolic response to epileptiform discharges.

    PubMed

    Saillet, Sandrine; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ghestem, Antoine; Giusiano, Bernard; Ivanov, Anton I; Hitziger, Sebastian; Vanzetta, Ivo; Bernard, Christophe; Bénar, Christian-G

    2016-03-01

    Interpretation of hemodynamic responses in epilepsy is hampered by an incomplete understanding of the underlying neurovascular coupling, especially the contributions of excitation and inhibition. We made simultaneous multimodal recordings of local field potentials (LFPs), firing of individual neurons, blood flow, and oxygen level in the somatosensory cortex of anesthetized rats. Epileptiform discharges induced by bicuculline injections were used to trigger large local events. LFP and blood flow were robustly coupled, as were LFP and tissue oxygen. In a parametric linear model, LFP and the baseline activities of cerebral blood flow and tissue partial oxygen tension contributed significantly to blood flow and oxygen responses. In an analysis of recordings from 402 neurons, blood flow/tissue oxygen correlated with the discharge of putative interneurons but not of principal cells. Our results show that interneuron activity is important in the vascular and metabolic responses during epileptiform discharges. PMID:26745250

  19. CMOS Image Sensor and System for Imaging Hemodynamic Changes in Response to Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Noor, Muhammad S; McCracken, Clinton B; Kiss, Zelma H T; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Murari, Kartikeya

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic intervention used for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. It is known that DBS modulates neural activity which changes metabolic demands and thus the cerebral circulation state. However, it is unclear whether there are correlations between electrophysiological, hemodynamic and behavioral changes and whether they have any implications for clinical benefits. In order to investigate these questions, we present a miniaturized system for spectroscopic imaging of brain hemodynamics. The system consists of a 144 ×144, [Formula: see text] pixel pitch, high-sensitivity, analog-output CMOS imager fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, along with a miniaturized imaging system comprising illumination, focusing, analog-to-digital conversion and μSD card based data storage. This enables stand alone operation without a computer, nor electrical or fiberoptic tethers. To achieve high sensitivity, the pixel uses a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA). The nMOS transistors are in the pixel while pMOS transistors are column-parallel, resulting in a fill factor (FF) of 26%. Running at 60 fps and exposed to 470 nm light, the CMOS imager has a minimum detectable intensity of 2.3 nW/cm(2) , a maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 49 dB at 2.45 μW/cm(2) leading to a dynamic range (DR) of 61 dB while consuming 167 μA from a 3.3 V supply. In anesthetized rats, the system was able to detect temporal, spatial and spectral hemodynamic changes in response to DBS. PMID:26357405

  20. A numerical framework to investigate hemodynamics during endovascular mechanical recanalization in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Neidlin, Michael; Büsen, Martin; Brockmann, Carolin; Wiesmann, Martin; Sonntag, Simon J; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Kaufmann, Tim A S

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic stroke, caused by embolism of cerebral vessels, inflicts high morbidity and mortality. Endovascular aspiration of the blood clot is an interventional technique for the recanalization of the occluded arteries. However, the hemodynamics in the Circle of Willis (CoW) are not completely understood, which results in medical misjudgment and complications during surgeries. In this study we establish a multiscale description of cerebral hemodynamics during aspiration thrombectomy. First, the CoW is modeled as a 1D pipe network on the basis of computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans. Afterwards, a vascular occlusion is placed in the middle cerebral artery and the relevant section of the CoW is transferred to a 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) domain. A suction catheter in different positions is included in the CFD simulations. The boundary conditions of the 3D domain are taken from the 1D domain to ensure system coupling. A Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase simulation describes the process of thrombus aspiration. The physiological blood flow in the 1D and 3D domains is validated with literature data. Further on, it is proved that domain reduction and pressure coupling at the boundaries are an appropriate method to reduce computational costs. Future work will apply the developed framework to various clinical questions. PMID:26420012

  1. Relation between the neuronal and hemodynamic response in the lesioned rat spinal cord following peripheral nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubeau, S.; Beaumont, E.; Lesage, F.

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we explore the hemodynamic response in the lesioned rat spinal cord following peripheral nerve stimulation. Oxy and deoxy hemoglobin were measured (using a four color LED multispectral intrinsic optical imaging system) simultaneously with blood flow (laser speckle measurement). Both optical and electrophysiological data are compared spatially and against stimulation strength. When compared with non-lesioned animals, the hemodynamic response is seen to display significant differences exhibiting increased initial dip and decreased blood drain following stimulation. The origin of the difference is observed to be due to the vascular nature of the injury. The distinct hemodynamic responses may have a strong impact on General Linear Model based fMRI studies of spinal cord lesions due to the difficulty in separating vascular effects from neuronal plasticity following injury.

  2. Glomerular hemodynamics in established glycerol-induced acute renal failure in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfert, A I; Oken, D E

    1989-01-01

    The glomerular dynamic correlates of failed filtration were studied in volume replete rats with established glycerol-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Over one-half of all nephrons formed virtually no filtrate, while the single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) of fluid-filled nephrons, measured at the glomerulotubular junction to preclude the possibility of covert tubular leakage, averaged one-sixth of control (P less than 0.001). Even that low mean value was elevated by a few nephrons with a near normal SNGFR. Renal failure thus reflected both total filtration failure in the majority of nephrons and massively reduced filtration in most of the remainder. Glomerular capillary pressure (Pg) averaged some 14 mmHg below control (P less than 0.001), whereas the arterial colloid osmotic and Bowman's space pressures were not significantly altered. Renocortical and whole kidney blood flow were also unchanged. Marked internephron functional heterogeneity precluded estimates of the ultrafiltration coefficient. However, the fall in SNGFR correlated well with the markedly depressed Pg and afferent net filtration pressure (delta PnetA, P less than 0.001), which in turn were caused by increased preglomerular resistance and a reciprocal fall in efferent arteriolar resistance. This complex change in intrarenal resistances was largely, if not entirely, responsible for failed filtration in this ARF model. PMID:2592568

  3. Efficacy of the valsalva maneuver on needle projection pain and hemodynamic responses during spinal puncture.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sussan Soltani; Pajand, Amin Ghasemi; Shoeibi, Gita

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the valsalva maneuver that can induce baroreceptor activation and nociception, on needle projection pain and hemodynamic responses associated with spinal puncture. Ninety adults, ASA physical status I and II undergoing elective surgeries were included. Patients were randomized into three equal groups. Group I (C): control; Group II (B): ball; pressed a rubber ball (attention-diverting method); Group III (V): valsalva; blew into sphygmomanometer tubing and hold the mercury column up to 30 mm Hg for a period of at least 20s. Spinal needle projection pain was graded using numeric rating scale (NRS): 1-10, where scales of 1-3 were rated as mild, 4-6 as moderate, and >6 as severe. Blood pressure and heart rate, five minutes before the procedure, during the spinal puncture and first and third minutes after that, were also recorded. Significant reduction in NRS was observed in the valsalva group compared with the control and the ball groups (p=0.001). There were statistical but no significant clinical differences in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rates between the study groups (P=0.008 and P=0.016 respectively). In conclusion valsalva maneuver can decrease the skin puncture pain associated with spinal needle projection while observing hemodynamic changes. PMID:21369370

  4. Brief report: the effects of the menstrual cycle on the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Hanci, Volkan; Yurtlu, Serhan; Hakimoglu, Sedat; Yilmaz, Mensure; Ayoglu, Hilal; Basaran, Mustafa; Erdogan, Gülay; Okyay, Rahsan Dilek; Turan, Isil Ozkoçak

    2010-08-01

    We designed this study to determine the effect of the menstrual cycle on the hemodynamic response to tracheal intubation (TI). Sixty-two ASA I women who were either in the follicular phase (group F, n = 31) or luteal phase (group L, n = 31) of their menstrual cycle were included in the study. Patients received propofol and rocuronium for intubation. Hemodynamic variables were recorded before administration of the IV anesthetic, as well as after TI. Rate pressure products were calculated. Groups were similar in terms of demographic data. Rate pressure products values at the first minute after TI were significantly increased in group L than were those in group F (P < 0.001). We conclude that the phase of the menstrual cycle is an important factor in the hemodynamic response to TI. PMID:20584874

  5. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42±36.69% and 130.58±31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17±14.65%, 24.52±20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62±18.56% and 59±18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52±22.42% and 54.24±11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  6. Stimulus-induced and state-dependent sustained gamma activity is tightly coupled to the hemodynamic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Koch, Stefan P; Werner, Peter; Steinbrink, Jens; Fries, Pascal; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2009-11-01

    A prompt behavioral response to a stimulus depends both on the salience of the stimulus as well as the subject's preparedness. Thus, both stimulus properties and cognitive factors, such as attention, may determine the strength of neuronal synchronization in the gamma range. For a comprehensive investigation of stimulus-response processing through noninvasive imaging, it is, however, a crucial issue whether both kinds of gamma modulation elicit a hemodynamic response. Here, we show that, in the human visual cortex, stimulus strength and internal state modulate sustained gamma activity and hemodynamic response in close correspondence. When participants reported velocity changes of gratings varying in contrast, gamma activity (35-70 Hz) increased systematically with contrast. For stimuli of constant contrast, the amplitude of gamma activity before the behaviorally relevant velocity change was inversely correlated to the behavioral response latency. This indicates that gamma activity also reflects an overall attentive state. For both sources of variance, gamma activity was tightly coupled to the hemodynamic response measured through optical topography. Because of the close relationship between high-frequency neuronal activity and the hemodynamic signal, we conclude that both stimulus-induced and state-dependent gamma activity trigger a metabolic demand and are amenable to vascular-based imaging. PMID:19890006

  7. Non-parametric temporal modeling of the hemodynamic response function via a liquid state machine.

    PubMed

    Avesani, Paolo; Hazan, Hananel; Koilis, Ester; Manevitz, Larry M; Sona, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Standard methods for the analysis of functional MRI data strongly rely on prior implicit and explicit hypotheses made to simplify the analysis. In this work the attention is focused on two such commonly accepted hypotheses: (i) the hemodynamic response function (HRF) to be searched in the BOLD signal can be described by a specific parametric model e.g., double-gamma; (ii) the effect of stimuli on the signal is taken to be linearly additive. While these assumptions have been empirically proven to generate high sensitivity for statistical methods, they also limit the identification of relevant voxels to what is already postulated in the signal, thus not allowing the discovery of unknown correlates in the data due to the presence of unexpected hemodynamics. This paper tries to overcome these limitations by proposing a method wherein the HRF is learned directly from data rather than induced from its basic form assumed in advance. This approach produces a set of voxel-wise models of HRF and, as a result, relevant voxels are filterable according to the accuracy of their prediction in a machine learning framework. This approach is instantiated using a temporal architecture based on the paradigm of Reservoir Computing wherein a Liquid State Machine is combined with a decoding Feed-Forward Neural Network. This splits the modeling into two parts: first a representation of the complex temporal reactivity of the hemodynamic response is determined by a universal global "reservoir" which is essentially temporal; second an interpretation of the encoded representation is determined by a standard feed-forward neural network, which is trained by the data. Thus the reservoir models the temporal state of information during and following temporal stimuli in a feed-back system, while the neural network "translates" this data to fit the specific HRF response as given, e.g. by BOLD signal measurements in fMRI. An empirical analysis on synthetic datasets shows that the learning process can

  8. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of rat deep brain: hemodynamic responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Hosaka, Tomoya; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-03-01

    Hemodynamic responses of the brain to hypoxia or ischemia are one of the major interests in neurosurgery and neuroscience. In this study, we performed real-time transcutaneous PA imaging of the rat brain that was exposed to a hypoxic stress and investigated depth-resolved responses of the brain, including the hippocampus. A linear-array 8ch 10-MHz ultrasonic sensor (measurement length, 10 mm) was placed on the shaved scalp. Nanosecond, 570-nm and 595- nm light pulses were used to excite PA signals indicating cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood deoxygenation, respectively. Under spontaneous respiration, inhalation gas was switched from air to nitrogen, and then reswitched to oxygen, during which real-time PA imaging was performed continuously. High-contrast PA signals were observed from the depth regions corresponding to the scalp, skull, cortex and hippocampus. After starting hypoxia, PA signals at 595 nm increased immediately in both the cortex and hippocampus for about 1.5 min, showing hemoglobin deoxygenation. On the other hand, PA signals at 570 nm coming from these regions did not increase in the early phase but started to increase at about 1.5 min after starting hypoxia, indicating reactive hyperemia to hypoxia. During hypoxia, PA signals coming from the scalp decreased transiently, which is presumably due to compensatory response in the peripheral tissue to preserve blood perfusion in the brain. The reoxygenation caused a gradual recovery of these PA signals. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of PA imaging for real-time, depth-resolved observation of cerebral hemodynamics.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 does not have acute effects on central or renal hemodynamics in patients with type 2 diabetes without nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Ali; Simonsen, Lene; Asmar, Meena; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J; Frandsen, Erik; Moro, Cedric; Sorensen, Charlotte M; Jonassen, Thomas; Bülow, Jens

    2016-05-01

    During acute administration of native glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), we previously demonstrated central hemodynamic effects in healthy males, whereas renal hemodynamics, despite renal uptake of GLP-1 in excess of glomerular filtration, was unaffected. In the present study, we studied hemodynamic effects of GLP-1 in patients with type 2 diabetes under fixed sodium intake. During a 3-h infusion of GLP-1 (1.5 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) or saline, intra-arterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured continuously, concomitantly with cardiac output estimated by pulse contour analysis. Renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, and uptake/release of hormones and ions were measured using Fick's Principle after catheterization of a renal vein. Urine collection was conducted throughout the experiments at voluntary voiding, and patients remained supine during the experiments. During the GLP-1 infusion, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and cardiac output remained unchanged, whereas heart rate increased significantly. Arterio-venous gradients for GLP-1 exceeded glomerular filtrations significantly, but renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate as well as renal sodium and lithium excretion were not affected. In conclusion, acute administration of GLP-1 in patients with type 2 diabetes leads to a positive chronotropic effect, but in contrast to healthy individuals, cardiac output does not increase in patients with type 2 diabetes. Renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion are not affected. PMID:26956188

  10. Multiparametric optical coherence tomography imaging of the inner retinal hemodynamic response to visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2013-08-01

    The hemodynamic response to neuronal activation is a well-studied phenomenon in the brain, due to the prevalence of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The retina represents an optically accessible platform for studying lamina-specific neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system; however, due to methodological limitations, this has been challenging to date. We demonstrate techniques for the imaging of visual stimulus-evoked hyperemia in the rat inner retina using Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography. Volumetric imaging with three-dimensional motion correction, en face flow calculation, and normalization of dynamic signal to static signal are techniques that reduce spurious changes caused by motion. We anticipate that OCT imaging of retinal functional hyperemia may yield viable biomarkers in diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, where the neurovascular unit may be impaired.

  11. Multiparametric optical coherence tomography imaging of the inner retinal hemodynamic response to visual stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The hemodynamic response to neuronal activation is a well-studied phenomenon in the brain, due to the prevalence of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The retina represents an optically accessible platform for studying lamina-specific neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system; however, due to methodological limitations, this has been challenging to date. We demonstrate techniques for the imaging of visual stimulus-evoked hyperemia in the rat inner retina using Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography. Volumetric imaging with three-dimensional motion correction, en face flow calculation, and normalization of dynamic signal to static signal are techniques that reduce spurious changes caused by motion. We anticipate that OCT imaging of retinal functional hyperemia may yield viable biomarkers in diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, where the neurovascular unit may be impaired. PMID:23955476

  12. Reductions in central venous pressure by lower body negative pressure or blood loss elicit similar hemodynamic responses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Blair D.; van Helmond, Noud; Curry, Timothy B.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hemodynamic and blood analyte responses to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) and pulse pressure (PP) elicited during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to those observed during graded blood loss (BL) in conscious humans. We hypothesized that the stimulus-response relationships of CVP and PP to hemodynamic responses during LBNP would mimic those observed during BL. We assessed CVP, PP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and other hemodynamic markers in 12 men during LBNP and BL. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of catecholamines, hematocrit, hemoglobin, arginine vasopressin, and blood gases. LBNP consisted of 5-min stages at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg of suction. BL consisted of 5 min at baseline and following three stages of 333 ml of hemorrhage (1,000 ml total). Individual r2 values and linear regression slopes were calculated to determine whether the stimulus (CVP and PP)-hemodynamic response trajectories were similar between protocols. The CVP-MAP trajectory was the only CVP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (0.93 ± 0.27 vs. 0.13 ± 0.26; P = 0.037). The PP-heart rate trajectory was the only PP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (−1.85 ± 0.45 vs. −0.46 ± 0.27; P = 0.024). Norepinephrine, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were all lower at termination in the BL protocol compared with LBNP (P < 0.05). Consistent with our hypothesis, LBNP mimics the hemodynamic stimulus-response trajectories observed during BL across a significant range of CVP in humans. PMID:24876357

  13. Changes in glomerular hemodynamic response to angiotensin II after subacute renal denervation in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, B J; Mundy, C A; Maciejewski, A R; Printz, M P; Ziegler, M G; Pelayo, J C; Blantz, R C

    1986-01-01

    We examined the changes in glomerular hemodynamics produced by angiotensin II (AII) in both normal Munich-Wistar rats and rats which were unilaterally renal denervated (measured kidney) 4-6 d prior to the measurement periods. Measurements of glomerular dynamics were performed in a control period after plasma volume expansion and during infusion of 11 ng X 100 g body wt-1 X min-1 of AII. The glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient increased from 38 +/- 1 to 49 +/- 1 mmHg in denervated rats compared with a lesser response in controls (from 39 +/- 1 to 45 +/- 1 mmHg, P less than 0.05). Single nephron plasma flow decreased from 213 +/- 17 to 87 +/- 4 nl X min-1 X g kidney wt (KW)-1 in denervated kidneys versus a more modest decrease in control kidneys (from 161 +/- 9 to 102 +/- 5 nl X min X gKW-1). These changes were due to a greater increase in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance after AII infusion in denervated compared with control kidneys. Glomerular AII receptor maximum binding was 1,196 +/- 267 fmol/mg protein in denervated kidneys compared with 612 +/- 89 fmol/mg protein (P less than 0.01) in controls with no change in receptor affinity. We conclude the subacute unilateral renal denervation results in renal vasodilation, denervation magnifies the vasoconstrictive effect of AII infusion on glomerular hemodynamics, and the observed increased response to AII after denervation is associated with increases in glomerular AII receptors. PMID:3745432

  14. [The effects of premedication on induction doses of propofol and hemodynamic responses during induction].

    PubMed

    Kodaka, M; Okamoto, Y; Kakoi, H; Ishizuka, I; Miyao, H; Kawasaki, J; Kawazoe, T

    1997-10-01

    We chose five sedatives for premedication and investigated the effect of these drugs on the induction doses of propofol. One hundred patients were allocated into one of five groups of 20. These groups consisted of control group (C) given only atropine 0.5 mg i.m.; CL group (plus clonidine 0.15 mg orally); H group (plus hydroxyzine 25 mg i.m.); M group (plus midazolam 3 mg i.m.) and D group (plus diazepam 10 mg orally). The induction dose was measured using loss of count technique. Arterial pressure and heart rate were measured, before and after propofol induction as well as after intubation. We also calculated rate pressure products (RPP) at each point. The induction doses were significantly lower in M-group than those in C-group. On the other hand, in hemodynamic responses, RPP was unchanged in any groups after propofol induction and after the intubation. Both propofol and midazolam have been known to have a depressive effect on the central nervous system via GABA-A receptor-mediated inhibition, although the exact receptor for propofol is unknown. We thought, therefore, that when the interaction occurred, both midazolam and propofol had the same effect on the GABA-A receptor and increased chloride ion flux through the channels. Hydroxyzine and clonidine, however, do not share a common receptor or exert effect on the GABA-A receptor. We consider that this was one of the reasons why induction doses of both H and CL group could not decrease significantly. We concluded that midazolam 3 mg decreased propofol induction dose significantly. Both midazolam 3 mg and clonidine 0.15 mg decreased RPP before induction and hemodynamic responses to induction and intubation were stable. PMID:9369050

  15. Acute Myocardial Response to Stretch: What We (don't) Know

    PubMed Central

    Neves, João S.; Leite-Moreira, André M.; Neiva-Sousa, Manuel; Almeida-Coelho, João; Castro-Ferreira, Ricardo; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial stretch, as result of acute hemodynamic overload, is one of the most frequent challenges to the heart and the ability of the heart to intrinsically adapt to it is essential to prevent circulatory congestion. In this review, we highlight the historical background, the currently known mechanisms, as well as the gaps in the understanding of this physiological response. The systolic adaptation to stretch is well-known for over 100 years, being dependent on an immediate increase in contractility—known as the Frank-Starling mechanism—and a further progressive increase—the slow force response. On the other hand, its diastolic counterpart remains largely unstudied. Mechanosensors are structures capable of perceiving mechanical signals and activating pathways that allow their transduction into biochemical responses. Although the connection between these structures and stretch activated pathways remains elusive, we emphasize those most likely responsible for the initiation of the acute response. Calcium-dependent pathways, including angiotensin- and endothelin-related pathways; and cGMP-dependent pathways, comprising the effects of nitric oxide and cardiac natriuretic hormones, embody downstream signaling. The ischemic setting, a paradigmatic situation of acute hemodynamic overload, is also touched upon. Despite the relevant knowledge accumulated, there is much that we still do not know. The quest for further understanding the myocardial response to acute stretch may provide new insights, not only in its physiological importance, but also in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26779036

  16. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  17. Converting enzyme inhibition and the glomerular hemodynamic response to glycine in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Slomowitz, L A; Peterson, O W; Thomson, S C

    1999-07-01

    GFR normally increases during glycine infusion. This response is absent in humans and rats with established diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) restores the effect of glycine on GFR. To ascertain the glomerular hemodynamic basis for this effect of ACEI, micropuncture studies were performed in male Wistar-Froemter rats after 5 to 6 wk of insulin-treated streptozotocin diabetes. The determinants of single-nephron GFR (SNGFR) were assessed in each rat before and during glycine infusion. Studies were performed in diabetics, diabetics after 5 d of ACEI (enalapril in the drinking water), and weight-matched controls. Diabetic rats manifest renal hypertrophy and glomerular hyperfiltration but not glomerular capillary hypertension. ACEI reduced glomerular capillary pressure, increased glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient, and did not mitigate hyperfiltration. In controls, glycine increased SNGFR by 30% due to increased nephron plasma flow. In diabetics, glycine had no effect on any determinant of SNGFR. In ACEI-treated diabetics, the SNGFR response to glycine was indistinguishable from nondiabetics, but the effect of glycine was mediated by greater ultrafiltration pressure rather than by greater plasma flow. These findings demonstrate that: (1) The absent response to glycine in established diabetes does not indicate that renal functional reserve is exhausted by hyperfiltration; and (2) ACEI restores the GFR response to glycine in established diabetes, but this response is mediated by increased ultrafiltration pressure rather than by increased nephron plasma flow. PMID:10405200

  18. Modeling the Hemodynamic Response Function in fMRI: Efficiency, Bias and Mis-modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Martin A.; Loh, Ji Meng; Atlas, Lauren Y.; Wager, Tor D.

    2012-01-01

    Most brain research to date has focused on studying the amplitude of evoked fMRI responses, though there has recently been an increased interest in measuring onset, peak latency and duration of the responses as well. A number of modeling procedures provide measures of the latency and duration of fMRI responses. In this work we compare several techniques that vary in their assumptions, model complexity, and interpretation. For each method, we introduce methods for estimating amplitude, peak latency, and duration and for performing inference in a multi-subject fMRI setting. We then assess the techniques’ relative sensitivity and their propensity for mis-attributing task effects on one parameter (e.g., duration) to another (e.g., amplitude). Finally, we introduce methods for quantifying model misspecification and assessing bias and power-loss related to the choice of model. Overall, the results show that it is surprisingly difficult to accurately recover true task-evoked changes in BOLD signal and that there are substantial differences among models in terms of power, bias and parameter confusability. Because virtually all fMRI studies in cognitive and affective neuroscience employ these models, the results bear on the interpretation of hemodynamic response estimates across a wide variety of psychological and neuroscientific studies. PMID:19084070

  19. Acute Hemodynamic Effects of a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: A Randomized, Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Philip L; Raj, Vidya; Black, Bonnie K; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Dupont, William D; Robertson, David; Raj, Satish R

    2014-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are often prescribed in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), and act at synaptic terminals to increase monoamine neurotransmitters. We hypothesized that they act to increase blood pressure (BP) and attenuate reflex tachycardia, thereby improving symptoms. Acute hemodynamic profiles after SSRI administration in POTS patients have not previously been reported. Methods Patients with POTS (n=39; F=37, 39 ±9 years) underwent a randomized crossover trial with sertraline 50mg and placebo. Heart rate (HR), systolic, diastolic, and mean BP were measured with the patient seated and standing for 10 minutes prior to drug or placebo administration, and then hourly for 4 hours. The primary endpoint was standing HR at 4 hours. Results At 4 hours, standing HR and systolic BP were not significantly different between sertraline and placebo. Seated systolic (106±12 mmHg vs. 101±8 mmHg; P=0.041), diastolic (72±8 mmHg vs. 69±8 mmHg; P=0.022), and mean BP (86±9 mmHg vs. 81±9 mmHg; P=0.007) were significantly higher after sertraline administration than placebo. At 4 hours, symptoms were worse with sertraline than placebo. Conclusions Sertraline had a modest pressor effect in POTS patients, but this did not translate into a reduced HR or improved symptoms. PMID:24227635

  20. Hemodynamics of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Burkhoff, Daniel; Sayer, Gabriel; Doshi, Darshan; Uriel, Nir

    2015-12-15

    An increasing number of devices can provide mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to patients with acute hemodynamic compromise and chronic end-stage heart failure. These devices work by different pumping mechanisms, have various flow capacities, are inserted by different techniques, and have different sites from which blood is withdrawn and returned to the body. These factors result in different primary hemodynamic effects and secondary responses of the body. However, these are not generally taken into account when choosing a device for a particular patient or while managing a patient undergoing MCS. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of cardiac, vascular, and pump mechanics and illustrate how they provide a broad foundation for understanding the complex interactions between the heart, vasculature, and device, and how they may help guide future research to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26670067

  1. Evaluation of the Hemodynamic Response to Endotracheal Intubation Comparing the Airtraq® with Macintosh Laryngoscopes in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilovska-Brzanov, Aleksandra; Jarallah, Mohhamed Al; Cogliati, Andrea; Mojsova-Mijovska, Maja; Mijuskovic, Dragan; Slaveski, Dimce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac patients are more prone to develop hemodynamic instability on induction of anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. The Airtraq® optical laryngoscope is a single-use rigid video laryngoscope that has been developed to facilitate tracheal intubation. There are limited studies comparing differences in the circulatory responses to Airtraq® and direct Macintosh larynngoscopy in cardiac patients. Aim: The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether there was clinically significant difference between the hemodynamic response to orotracheal intubation guided by either of the two devices (Airtraq® and Macintosh laryngoscopes) in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Material and methods: In this clinical study we analyzed the hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation performed with Airtraq® or Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery under general anesthesia. Results: We analyzed: blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, mean), heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation (all notified before induction in anesthesia, immediately after induction, at the time of intubation and thereafter one and five minutes after intubation). We also recorded the maximal values of blood pressure and heart rate, as well as calculated the product of heart rate and systolic blood pressure. There were statistically significant differences in the hemodynamic response between the groups. At the time of intubation, there was significant inter-group difference in heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure. Endotracheal intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope was accompanied by significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate compared to Airtraq® group. Conclusion: The Airtraq® laryngoscope performed better than the Macintosh laryngoscope in terms of hemodynamic to the patient undergoing routine coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:26635435

  2. Acute hemodynamic effects of angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibition after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider's solution.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Alexandro; Kempfert, Jörg; Pritzwald-Stegmann, Patrick; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Dhein, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Evidence as to how ACE inhibitors attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) after cardioplegic arrest remains scarce. Twenty-four rabbit hearts were perfused on a Langendorff apparatus. Control hearts (n = 6) were arrested with pure histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK)-Bretschneider. Treatment groups received added to the cardioplegic solution (n = 6) captopril (100 μmol/l) and losartan (100 μmol/l) for selective AT1-receptor antagonism or BQ123 (100 nmol/l) for selective ETA-receptor antagonism. Pre-ischemic equilibration of 45 min was followed by 90 min of cardioplegic arrest and 30 min of reperfusion. Indices of myocardial contractility (LVP, dp/dt max, dp/dt min), coronary flow, heart rate, and O2 consumption were recorded before and after ischemic arrest. Tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were measured to evaluate energy content and oxidative stress, respectively. After selective cardiac arrest with Bretschneider, captopril-treated hearts showed improved hemodynamics compared to control and the other treatment groups. Oxygen consumption was significantly decreased during early reperfusion in captopril-treated hearts (34 ± 3 μmol/min/g/mmHg) compared to controls and losartan- and BQ123-treated hearts (controls: 77 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.003; losartan: 54 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.015; BQ123: 64 ± 13 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.046). The ATP content of the reperfused tissue was significantly elevated after captopril treatment compared to control group (24 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2 μmol/g, p = 0.033), whereas the level of MDA was substantially decreased (0.58 ± 0.163 vs. 1.5 ± 0.28 μmol/g, p = 0.009). ACE inhibition leads to a significantly greater and faster recovery of myocardial contractility after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider solution. Due to decreased oxygen consumption, myocardial protection is enhanced. The association between ACE and ischemia cannot be clarified by selective blockade of

  3. Increased sensitivity of fast BOLD fMRI with a subject-specific hemodynamic response function and application to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Sébastien; Safi-Harb, Mouna; Levan, Pierre; An, Dongmei; Watanabe, Satsuki; Gotman, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Activation detection in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) typically assumes the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity to be invariant across brain regions and subjects. Reports of substantial variability of the morphology of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses are accumulating, suggesting that the use of a single generic model of the expected response in general linear model (GLM) analyses does not provide optimal sensitivity due to model misspecification. Relaxing assumptions of the model can limit the impact of hemodynamic response function (HRF) variability, but at a cost on model parsimony. Alternatively, better specification of the model could be obtained from a priori knowledge of the HRF of a given subject, but the effectiveness of this approach has only been tested on simulation data. Using fast BOLD fMRI, we characterized the variability of hemodynamic responses to a simple event-related auditory-motor task, as well as its effect on activation detection with GLM analyses. We show the variability to be higher between subjects than between regions and variation in different regions to correlate from one subject to the other. Accounting for subject-related variability by deriving subject-specific models from responses to the task in some regions lead to more sensitive detection of responses in other regions. We applied the approach to epilepsy patients, where task-derived patient-specific models provided additional information compared to the use of a generic model for the detection of BOLD responses to epileptiform activity identified on scalp electro-encephalogram (EEG). This work highlights the importance of improving the accuracy of the model for detecting neuronal activation with fMRI, and the fact that it can be done at no cost to model parsimony through the acquisition of independent a priori information about the hemodynamic response. PMID:24582920

  4. Cerebral hemodynamic responses to seizure in the mouse brain: simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy-electroencephalography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungduk; Lee, Mina; Koh, Dalkwon; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2010-05-01

    We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) simultaneously on the mouse brain and investigated the hemodynamic response to epileptic episodes under pharmacologically driven seizure. γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were applied to induce absence and tonic-clonic seizures, respectively. The epileptic episodes were identified from the single-channel EEG, and the corresponding hemodynamic changes in different regions of the brain were characterized by multichannel frequency-domain NIRS. Our results are the following: (i) the oxyhemoglobin level increases in the case of GBL-treated mice but not 4-AP-treated mice compared to the predrug state; (ii) the dominant response to each absence seizure is a decrease in deoxyhemolobin; (iii) the phase shift between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin reduces in GBL-treated mice but no 4-AP-treated mice; and (iv) the spatial correlation of hemodynamics increased significantly in 4-AP-treated mice but not in GBL-treated mice. Our results shows that spatiotemporal tracking of cerebral hemodynamics using NIRS can be successfully applied to the mouse brain in conjunction with electrophysiological recording, which will support the study of molecular, cellular, and network origin of neurovascular coupling in vivo.

  5. Near-infrared spectroscopic imaging of stimulus-related hemodynamic responses on the neonatal auditory cortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotilahti, Kalle; Nissila, Ilkka; Makela, Riikka; Noponen, Tommi; Lipiainen, Lauri; Gavrielides, Nasia; Kajava, Timo; Huotilainen, Minna; Fellman, Vineta; Merilainen, Pekka; Katila, Toivo

    2005-04-01

    We have used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to study hemodynamic auditory evoked responses on 7 full-term neonates. Measurements were done simultaneously above both auditory cortices to study the distribution of speech and music processing between hemispheres using a 16-channel frequency-domain instrument. The stimulation consisted of 5-second samples of music and speech with a 25-second silent interval. In response to stimulation, a significant increase in the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin ([HbO2]) was detected in 6 out of 7 subjects. The strongest responses in [HbO2] were seen near the measurement location above the ear on both hemispheres. The mean latency of the maximum responses was 9.42+/-1.51 s. On the left hemisphere (LH), the maximum amplitude of the average [HbO2] response to the music stimuli was 0.76+/- 0.38 μ M (mean+/-std.) and to the speech stimuli 1.00+/- 0.45 μ+/- μM. On the right hemisphere (RH), the maximum amplitude of the average [HbO2] response was 1.29+/- 0.85 μM to the music stimuli and 1.23+/- 0.93 μM to the speech stimuli. The results indicate that auditory information is processed on both auditory cortices, but LH is more concentrated to process speech than music information. No significant differences in the locations and the latencies of the maximum responses relative to the stimulus type were found.

  6. The Hemodynamic Response to Dexmedetomidine Loading Dose in Children With and Without Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Robert H.; Nichols, Christopher S.; Twite, Mark D.; Cardwell, Kathryn A.; Pan, Zhaoxing; Pietra, Biagio; Miyamoto, Shelley D.; Auerbach, Scott R.; Darst, Jeffrey R.; Ivy, D. Dunbar

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dexmedetomidine, an α-2 receptor agonist, is widely used in children with cardiac disease. Significant hemodynamic responses, including systemic and pulmonary vasoconstriction, have been reported after dexmedetomidine administration. Our primary goal of this prospective, observational study was to quantify the effects of dexmedetomidine initial loading doses on mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) in children with and without pulmonary hypertension. METHODS Subjects were children undergoing cardiac catheterization for either routine surveillance after cardiac transplantation (n = 21) or pulmonary hypertension studies (n = 21). After anesthetic induction with sevoflurane and tracheal intubation, sevoflurane was discontinued and anesthesia was maintained with midazolam 0.1 mg/kg IV (or 0.5 mg/kg orally preoperatively) and remifentanil IV infusion 0.5 to 0.8 μg/kg/min. Ventilation was mechanically controlled to maintain Pco2 35 to 40 mm Hg. When end-tidal sevoflurane was 0% and fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio2) was 0.21, baseline heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, PAP, right atrial pressure, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, cardiac output, and arterial blood gases were measured, and indexed systemic vascular resistance, indexed pulmonary vascular resistance, and cardiac index were calculated. Each subject then received a 10-minute infusion of dexmedetomidine of 1 μg/kg, 0.75 μg/kg, or 0.5 μg/kg. Measurements and calculations were repeated at the conclusion of the infusion. RESULTS Most hemodynamic responses were similar in children with and without pulmonary hypertension. Heart rate decreased significantly, and mean arterial blood pressure and indexed systemic vascular resistance increased significantly. Cardiac index did not change. A small, statistically significant increase in PAP was observed in transplant patients but not in subjects with pulmonary hypertension. Changes in indexed pulmonary

  7. Joint maximum likelihood estimation of activation and Hemodynamic Response Function for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Negar; Nosratinia, Aria

    2014-07-01

    Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the brain activity by measuring blood oxygenation level, which is related to brain activity via a temporal impulse response function known as the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF). The HRF varies from subject to subject and within areas of the brain, therefore a knowledge of HRF is necessary for accurately computing voxel activations. Conversely a knowledge of active voxels is highly beneficial for estimating the HRF. This work presents a joint maximum likelihood estimation of HRF and activation based on low-rank matrix approximations operating on regions of interest (ROI). Since each ROI has limited data, a smoothing constraint on the HRF is employed via Tikhonov regularization. The method is analyzed under both white noise and colored noise. Experiments with synthetic data show that accurate estimation of the HRF is possible with this method without prior assumptions on the exact shape of the HRF. Further experiments involving real fMRI experiments with auditory stimuli are used to validate the proposed method. PMID:24835179

  8. Landiolol reduces hemodynamic responses to bronchoscopy-assisted suctioning in intubated ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Tochikubo, Junpei; Adachi, Yushi U; Ejima, Tadashi; Numaguchi, Atsushi; Matsuda, Naoyuki; Sato, Shigehito; Shiiya, Norihiko

    2014-01-01

    Landiolol is an ultra-short-acting β1-selective antagonist developed in Japan that was recently approved for the treatment of tachycardia in intensive care units (ICUs). This study investigated the protective effects of landiolol against the cardiovascular responses during bronchoscopic endotracheal suctioning. This study enrolled 15 patients requiring orotracheal intubation in an ICU. All of the patients required endotracheal suctioning using fiber bronchoscopy while sedated at a Ramsay Scale of 2-3. All subsequent suctioning procedures were assigned randomly to three groups using a cross-over design: saline as a placebo (group C) or 20 or 40 μg kg(-1) min(-1) landiolol, respectively (groups L20 and L40). The infusion was started 3 min before bronchoscopy and continued for 6 min. The central venous pressure (CVP) heart rate (HR) and arterial blood pressure (BP) were recorded. Fourteen patients completed the investigation, and 30 procedures (n = 10/group) were analyzed. The suctioning significantly increased the CVP, HR, and BP in groups C and L20, although the changes in BP were of shorter duration in group L20. No significant increase in the hemodynamic parameters was observed in group L40. The administration of landiolol 40 μg kg(-1) min(-1) prevented a harmful hyperdynamic circulatory response to bronchoscopic endotracheal suctioning, without obvious decreases in HR or BP after the intervention. PMID:25520823

  9. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  10. Effect of hemorrhage rate on early hemodynamic responses in conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Daluwatte, Chathuri; Marques, Nicole R; Khan, Muzna; Salter, Michael; Wolf, Jordan; Nelson, Christina; Salsbury, John; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Kinsky, Michael; Kramer, George C; Strauss, David G

    2016-04-01

    Physiological compensatory mechanisms can mask the extent of hemorrhage in conscious mammals, which can be further complicated by individual tolerance and variations in hemorrhage onset and duration. We assessed the effect of hemorrhage rate on tolerance and early physiologic responses to hemorrhage in conscious sheep. Eight Merino ewes (37.4 ± 1.1 kg) were subjected to fast (1.25 mL/kg/min) and slow (0.25 mL/kg/min) hemorrhages separated by at least 3 days. Blood was withdrawn until a drop in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >30 mmHg and returned at the end of the experiment. Continuous monitoring includedMAP, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulse oximetry, and tissue oximetry. Cardiac output by thermodilution and arterial blood samples were also measured. The effects of fast versus slow hemorrhage rates were compared for total volume of blood removed and stoppage time (whenMAP < 30 mmHg of baseline) and physiological responses during and after the hemorrhage. Estimated blood volume removed whenMAPdropped 30 mmHg was 27.0 ± 4.2% (mean ± standard error) in the slow and 27.3 ± 3.2% in the fast hemorrhage (P = 0.47, pairedttest between rates). Pressure and tissue oximetry responses were similar between hemorrhage rates. Heart rate increased at earlier levels of blood loss during the fast hemorrhage, but hemorrhage rate was not a significant factor for individual hemorrhage tolerance or hemodynamic responses. In 5/16 hemorrhages MAP stopping criteria was reached with <25% of blood volume removed. This study presents the physiological responses leading up to a significant drop in blood pressure in a large conscious animal model and how they are altered by the rate of hemorrhage. PMID:27044850

  11. An investigation of positive and inverted hemodynamic response functions across multiple visual areas

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Alexander M.; Mathis, Jedidiah R.; DeYoe, Edgar A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant regional variability in the hemodynamic response function (HRF), highlighting the difficulty of correctly interpreting functional MRI (fMRI) data without proper modeling of the HRF. The focus of this study was to investigate the HRF variability within visual cortex. The HRF was estimated for a number of cortical visual areas by deconvolution of fMRI blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses to brief, large-field visual stimulation. Significant HRF variation was found across visual areas V1, V2, V3, V4, VO-1,2, V3AB, IPS-0,1,2,3, LO-1,2, and TO-1,2. Additionally, a subpopulation of voxels was identified that exhibited an impulse response waveform that was similar, but not identical, to an inverted version of the commonly described and modeled positive HRF. These voxels were found within the retinotopic confines of the stimulus and were intermixed with those showing positive responses. The spatial distribution and variability of these HRFs suggest a vascular origin for the inverted waveforms. We suggest that the polarity of the HRF is a separate factor that is independent of the suppressive or activating nature of the underlying neuronal activity. Correctly modeling the polarity of the HRF allows one to recover an estimate of the underlying neuronal activity rather than discard the responses from these voxels on the assumption that they are artifactual. We demonstrate this approach on phase-encoded retinotopic mapping data as an example of the benefits of accurately modeling the HRF during the analysis of fMRI data. PMID:25044672

  12. Thermal and hemodynamic response to whole-body cryostimulation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Pawel; Klawe, Jacek J; Pawlak, Joanna; Tafil-Klawe, Malgorzata; Newton, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) is an increasing applied cryotherapeutic method, that involves application of a cryotherapeutic factor to stimulate the body by the means of intense hypothermia of virtually the body's entire area. This method is still not well recognized in Western Europe. However in recent years it is becoming increasingly popular in sports medicine and also in clinical application. Cryotherapeutic agents used in WBC are considered to be a strong stress stimulus which is associated with a variety of changes in functional parameters, particularly of the cardiovascular and autonomic nervous systems. However, such strong influence upon the entire body could be associated with the risk of unexpected reactions which might be dangerous for homeostasis. The present study evaluated the complex hemodynamic physiological reactions in response to WBC exposure in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy male volunteers participated. Each subject was exposed to WBC (-120°C) for 3-min. None of the participants had been exposed to such conditions previously. The research was conducted with modern and reliable measurements techniques, which assessed complex hemodynamic reactions and skin temperature changes non-invasively. All measurements were performed four times (before WBC, after WBC, WBC+3h and WBC+6h) with a Task Force Monitor (TFM - CNSystems, Medizintechnik, Gratz, Austria). Body superficial temperature was measured by infrared thermographic techniques - infra-red camera Flir P640 (Flir Systems Inc., Sweden). Our results show a significant decrease in heart rate, cardiac output, and increase in stroke volume, total peripheral resistance and baroreceptors reflex sensitivity. These changes were observed just after WBC exposure. At stages WBC+3h and WBC+6h there was observed a significant drop in baroreceptors reflex sensitivity due to increased thermogenesis. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that WBC strongly stimulates the baroreceptor cardiac reflex in

  13. Sympathetic Neural and Hemodynamic Responses During Cold Pressor Test in Elderly Blacks and Whites.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Jarvis, Sara S; Best, Stuart A; Edwards, Jeffrey G; Hendrix, Joseph M; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2016-05-01

    The sympathetic response during the cold pressor test (CPT) has been reported to be greater in young blacks than whites, especially in those with a family history of hypertension. Because blood pressure (BP) increases with age, we evaluated whether elderly blacks have greater sympathetic activation during CPT than age-matched whites. BP, heart rate, cardiac output, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity were measured during supine baseline, 2-minute CPT, and 3-minute recovery in 47 elderly (68±7 [SD] years) volunteers (12 blacks and 35 whites). Baseline BP, heart rate, cardiac output, or muscle sympathetic nerve activity did not differ between races. Systolic and diastolic BP and heart rate increased during CPT (allP<0.001) with no racial differences (allP>0.05). Cardiac output increased during CPT and ≤30 s of recovery in both groups, but was lower in blacks than whites. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity increased during CPT in both groups (bothP<0.001); the increase in burst frequency was similar between groups, whereas the increase in total activity was smaller in blacks (P=0.030 for interaction). Peak change (Δ) in diastolic BP was correlated with Δ total activity at 1 minute into CPT in both blacks (r=0.78,P=0.003) and whites (r=0.43,P=0.009), whereas the slope was significantly greater in blacks (P=0.007). Thus, elderly blacks have smaller sympathetic and central hemodynamic (eg, cardiac output) responses, but a greater pressor response for a given sympathetic activation during CPT than elderly whites. This response may stem from augmented sympathetic vascular transduction, greater sympathetic activation to other vascular bed(s), or enhanced nonadrenergically mediated vasoconstriction in elderly blacks. PMID:27021009

  14. Hemodynamic Nonlinearities Affect BOLD fMRI Response Timing and Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    de Zwart, Jacco A; van Gelderen, Peter; Jansma, J Martijn; Fukunaga, Masaki; Bianciardi, Marta; Duyn, Jeff H

    2009-01-01

    The interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies based on Blood Oxygen-Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast generally relies on the assumption of a linear relationship between evoked neuronal activity and fMRI response. While nonlinearities in this relationship have been suggested by a number of studies, it remains unclear to what extent they relate to the neurovascular response and are therefore inherent to BOLD-fMRI. Full characterization of potential vascular nonlinearities is required for accurate inferences about the neuronal system under study. To investigate the extent of vascular nonlinearities, evoked activity was studied in humans with BOLD-fMRI (n=28) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) (n=5). Brief (600-800 ms) rapidly repeated (1 Hz) visual stimuli were delivered using a stimulation paradigm that minimized neuronal nonlinearities. Nevertheless, BOLD-fMRI experiments showed substantial remaining nonlinearities. The smallest stimulus separation (200-400 ms) resulted in significant response broadening (15-20% amplitude decrease; 10-12% latency increase; 6-14% duration increase) with respect to a linear prediction. The substantial slowing and widening of the response in the presence of preceding stimuli suggests a vascular rather than neuronal origin to the observed non-linearity. This was confirmed by the MEG data, which showed no significant neuro-electric nonlinear interactions between stimuli as little as 200 ms apart. The presence of substantial vascular nonlinearities has important implications for rapid event-related studies by fMRI and other imaging modalities that infer neuronal activity from hemodynamic parameters. PMID:19520175

  15. Acute hemodynamic effects of nebulized iloprost via the I-neb Adaptive Aerosol Delivery system in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Manuel J.; Ghofrani, Hossein A.; Voswinckel, Robert; Seeger, Werner; Schulz, Richard; Reichenberger, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Inhaled iloprost has proven to be an effective therapy in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the acute hemodynamic effect of nebulized iloprost delivered via the I-neb Adaptive Aerosol Delivery (AAD) system remains unclear and needs to be assessed. In this study, 126 patients with PH were classified according to current guidelines (59, 34, 29, and 4 patients in groups 1/1′, 3, 4, and 5, respectively; 20 patients had idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension [iPAH]), were randomly assigned to inhale iloprost 2.5 g (n = 67) or 5.0 g (n = 59) via the I-neb AAD system, and were assessed by right heart catheterization. In seven patients with iPAH, iloprost plasma levels were measured. The two iloprost doses caused decreases from baseline in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR; 2.5 g: –14.7%; 5.0 g: –15.6%) and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP; 2.5 g: –11.0%; 5.0 g: –10.1%) while cardiac index (CI) increased (2.5 g: +6.5%; 5.0 g: +6.4%). The subset with iPAH also showed decreases from baseline in PVR and mPAP and an increase in CI. Peak iloprost plasma levels showed no significant difference after inhalation of 2.5 g or 5.0 g iloprost (95.5 pg/mL vs. 73.0 pg/mL; P = 0.06). In summary, nebulized iloprost delivered via the I-neb AAD system reduced mPAP and PVR and increased CI from baseline in a heterogeneous group of patients with PH and in the subset with iPAH. In patients with iPAH, inhalation of 2.5 g or 5.0 g iloprost resulted in broadly similar peak iloprost plasma levels. PMID:25992279

  16. Effects of high doses of dexamethasone on hemodynamic and immunohistochemical characteristics of acute paraquat intoxication in rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Ekerbicer, N; Gurpinar, T; Tarakci, F; Turkoz Uluer, E; İnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium) (PQ), is a nonselective contact herbicide that is highly toxic to humans. The kidney is affected during PQ intoxication. Dexamethasone (Dexa) has anti-inflammatory effects and is used to treat cases of PQ poisoning. We investigated in rat kidney hemodynamic effects and immunohistochemical characteristics of Dexa treatment in acute PQ poisoning. Adult male rats were divided into four groups: 1, untreated control; 2, treated with 100 mg/kg Dexa; 3, treated with 25 mg/kg PQ; 4, treated with PQ + Dexa. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded during the experimental period (2 h). Tissues were removed after 2 h and immunohistochemistry was performed after 24 h. Paraffin sections of kidney were prepared and anti-cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1), anti-cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), anti-angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), anti-aquaporin-1 (AQU-1), anti-vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) primary antibodies were used for immunohistochemical examination. Immunoreactivities were scored as: (1) minimal, (2) weak, (3) mild, (4) moderate, (5) strong and (6) very strong. MAP and HR were measured at 10 min, 20 min, 1 h and 2 h. MAP at 10 and 20 min and 1 h was increased in the Dexa group. HR also was increased in all groups compared to controls at 2 h. Compared to groups 2 and 4, MAP values decreased significantly in group 3 at 1 h. The intensity of all of immunoreactivities was decreased in group 2. In group 3, immunoreactivities of COX-1, COX-2 and ACE were decreased compared to the control and the other groups, whereas AQU-1 and VCAM immunoreactivities were the same as the control group. ACE and VCAM immunoreactivities were decreased in group 4 compared to the control group, while COX-1, COX-2 and AQU-1 immunoreactivities were close to those of the control group. Dexa appears to be useful for treating PQ intoxication. PMID:26796020

  17. State-space models of impulse hemodynamic responses over motor, somatosensory, and visual cortices

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Keum-Shik; Nguyen, Hoang-Dung

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents state space models of the hemodynamic response (HR) of fNIRS to an impulse stimulus in three brain regions: motor cortex (MC), somatosensory cortex (SC), and visual cortex (VC). Nineteen healthy subjects were examined. For each cortex, three impulse HRs experimentally obtained were averaged. The averaged signal was converted to a state space equation by using the subspace method. The activation peak and the undershoot peak of the oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) in MC are noticeably higher than those in SC and VC. The time-to-peaks of the HbO in three brain regions are almost the same (about 6.76 76 ± 0.2 s). The time to undershoot peak in VC is the largest among three. The HbO decreases in the early stage (~0.46 s) in MC and VC, but it is not so in SC. These findings were well described with the developed state space equations. Another advantage of the proposed method is its easy applicability in generating the expected HR to arbitrary stimuli in an online (or real-time) imaging. Experimental results are demonstrated. PMID:24940540

  18. Specificity of hemodynamic brain responses to painful stimuli: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Meryem A; Aasted, Christopher M; Petkov, Mihayl P; Borsook, David; Boas, David A; Becerra, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Assessing pain in individuals not able to communicate (e.g. infants, under surgery, or following stroke) is difficult due to the lack of non-verbal objective measures of pain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) being a portable, non-invasive and inexpensive method of monitoring cerebral hemodynamic activity has the potential to provide such a measure. Here we used functional NIRS to evaluate brain activation to an innocuous and a noxious electrical stimulus on healthy human subjects (n = 11). For both innocuous and noxious stimuli, we observed a signal change in the primary somatosensory cortex contralateral to the stimulus. The painful and non-painful stimuli can be differentiated based on their signal size and profile. We also observed that repetitive noxious stimuli resulted in adaptation of the signal. Furthermore, the signal was distinguishable from a skin sympathetic response to pain that tended to mask it. Our results support the notion that functional NIRS has a potential utility as an objective measure of pain. PMID:25820289

  19. Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses During Dynamic Posturography: Analysis with a Multichannel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Hiromasa; Nishijo, Hisao; Ishikawa, Akihiro; Shojaku, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate cortical roles in standing balance, cortical hemodynamic activity was recorded from the right hemisphere using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while subjects underwent the sensory organization test (SOT) protocol that systematically disrupts sensory integration processes (i.e., somatosensory or visual inputs or both). Eleven healthy men underwent the SOT during NIRS recording. Group statistical analyses were performed based on changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in 10 different cortical regions of interest and on a general linear analysis with NIRS statistical parametric mapping. The statistical analyses indicated significant activation in the right frontal operculum (f-Op), right parietal operculum (p-Op), and right superior temporal gyrus (STG), right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), right dorsal and ventral premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) under various conditions. The activation patterns in response to specific combinations of SOT conditions suggested that (1) f-Op, p-Op, and STG are essential for sensory integration when standing balance is perturbed; (2) the SMA is involved in the execution of volitional action and establishment of new motor programs to maintain postural balance; and (3) the PPC and PMC are involved in the updating and computation of spatial reference frames during instances of sensory conflict between vestibular and visual information. PMID:26635574

  20. A signal subspace approach for modeling the hemodynamic response function in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Ardekani, Babak A; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2003-10-01

    Many fMRI analysis methods use a model for the hemodynamic response function (HRF). Common models of the HRF, such as the Gaussian or Gamma functions, have parameters that are usually selected a priori by the data analyst. A new method is presented that characterizes the HRF over a wide range of parameters via three basis signals derived using principal component analysis (PCA). Covering the HRF variability, these three basis signals together with the stimulation pattern define signal subspaces which are applicable to both linear and nonlinear modeling and identification of the HRF and for various activation detection strategies. Analysis of simulated fMRI data using the proposed signal subspace showed increased detection sensitivity compared to the case of using a previously proposed trigonometric subspace. The methodology was also applied to activation detection in both event-related and block design experimental fMRI data using both linear and nonlinear modeling of the HRF. The activated regions were consistent with previous studies, indicating the ability of the proposed approach in detecting brain activation without a priori assumptions about the shape parameters of the HRF. The utility of the proposed basis functions in identifying the HRF is demonstrated by estimating the HRF in different activated regions. PMID:14599533

  1. Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses During Dynamic Posturography: Analysis with a Multichannel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hiromasa; Nishijo, Hisao; Ishikawa, Akihiro; Shojaku, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate cortical roles in standing balance, cortical hemodynamic activity was recorded from the right hemisphere using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while subjects underwent the sensory organization test (SOT) protocol that systematically disrupts sensory integration processes (i.e., somatosensory or visual inputs or both). Eleven healthy men underwent the SOT during NIRS recording. Group statistical analyses were performed based on changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in 10 different cortical regions of interest and on a general linear analysis with NIRS statistical parametric mapping. The statistical analyses indicated significant activation in the right frontal operculum (f-Op), right parietal operculum (p-Op), and right superior temporal gyrus (STG), right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), right dorsal and ventral premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) under various conditions. The activation patterns in response to specific combinations of SOT conditions suggested that (1) f-Op, p-Op, and STG are essential for sensory integration when standing balance is perturbed; (2) the SMA is involved in the execution of volitional action and establishment of new motor programs to maintain postural balance; and (3) the PPC and PMC are involved in the updating and computation of spatial reference frames during instances of sensory conflict between vestibular and visual information. PMID:26635574

  2. Specificity of Hemodynamic Brain Responses to Painful Stimuli: A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Aasted, Christopher M.; Petkov, Mihayl P.; Borsook, David; Boas, David A.; Becerra, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Assessing pain in individuals not able to communicate (e.g. infants, under surgery, or following stroke) is difficult due to the lack of non-verbal objective measures of pain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) being a portable, non-invasive and inexpensive method of monitoring cerebral hemodynamic activity has the potential to provide such a measure. Here we used functional NIRS to evaluate brain activation to an innocuous and a noxious electrical stimulus on healthy human subjects (n = 11). For both innocuous and noxious stimuli, we observed a signal change in the primary somatosensory cortex contralateral to the stimulus. The painful and non-painful stimuli can be differentiated based on their signal size and profile. We also observed that repetitive noxious stimuli resulted in adaptation of the signal. Furthermore, the signal was distinguishable from a skin sympathetic response to pain that tended to mask it. Our results support the notion that functional NIRS has a potential utility as an objective measure of pain. PMID:25820289

  3. Implantable self-reset CMOS image sensor and its application to hemodynamic response detection in living mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takehara, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A self-reset pixel of 15 × 15 µm2 with high signal-to-noise ratio (effective peak SNR ≃64 dB) for an implantable image sensor has been developed for intrinsic signal detection arising from hemodynamic responses in a living mouse brain. For detecting local conversion between oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) in brain tissues, an implantable imaging device was fabricated with our newly designed self-reset image sensor and orange light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ = 605 nm). We demonstrated imaging of hemodynamic responses in the sensory cortical area accompanied by forelimb stimulation of a living mouse. The implantable imaging device for intrinsic signal detection is expected to be a powerful tool to measure brain activities in living animals used in behavioral analysis.

  4. Attenuation of hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and orotracheal intubation using intravenous clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sakshi; Kulkarni, Anita; Bhargava, Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Alpha-2 agonists are being increasingly used as adjuncts in general anesthesia and the present study was carried out to study the effect of clonidine as an adjuvant to low dose fentanyl in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and orotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: Ninety female patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I, II, and III in age group 25-65 years, body mass index (BMI) 21-26 kg/m2, and diagnosed as carcinoma breast scheduled for breast surgery were included in this Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired t-test, and chi-square test was applied where deemed appropriate. P-value at or below the level of 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Intravenous (IV) clonidine 1.0 μg kg-1 and clonidine 2.0 μg kg-1 significantly attenuated the hyperdynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Clonidine 2.0 μg kg-1 was associated with adverse effects like hypotension at the time of induction and postoperative sedation which was not observed with clonidine 1.0 μg kg-1. Conclusions: A single intravenous low dose clonidine (1.0 μg kg-1) when combined with low dose fentanyl (2 μg kg-1) is a practical, pharmacological and safe method with minimal side effects to attenuate the hyperdynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. PMID:25788783

  5. Hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Lee, Joshua F; Berbert, Amanda; Witman, Melissa A H; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter

    2014-11-15

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for exercise intolerance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the present study sought to evaluate the hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in this cohort. In 25 HFrEF patients (64 ± 2 yr) and 17 healthy, age-matched control subjects (64 ± 2 yr), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and limb blood flow were examined during graded static-intermittent handgrip (HG) and dynamic single-leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise. During HG exercise, MAP increased similarly between groups. CO increased significantly (+1.3 ± 0.3 l/min) in the control group, but it remained unchanged across workloads in HFrEF patients. At 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), forearm blood flow was similar between groups, while HFrEF patients exhibited an attenuated increase at the two highest intensities compared with controls, with the greatest difference at the highest workload (352 ± 22 vs. 492 ± 48 ml/min, HFrEF vs. control, 45% MVC). During KE exercise, MAP and CO increased similarly across work rates between groups. However, HFrEF patients exhibited a diminished leg hyperemic response across all work rates, with the most substantial decrement at the highest intensity (1,842 ± 64 vs. 2,675 ± 81 ml/min; HFrEF vs. control, 15 W). Together, these findings indicate a marked attenuation in exercising limb perfusion attributable to impairments in peripheral vasodilatory capacity during both arm and leg exercise in patients with HFrEF, which likely plays a role in limiting exercise capacity in this patient population. PMID:25260608

  6. Detecting the subtle shape differences in hemodynamic responses at the group level.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S; Adleman, Nancy E; Leibenluft, Ellen; Cox, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the hemodynamic response (HDR) is still not fully understood due to the multifaceted processes involved. Aside from the overall amplitude, the response may vary across cognitive states, tasks, brain regions, and subjects with respect to characteristics such as rise and fall speed, peak duration, undershoot shape, and overall duration. Here we demonstrate that the fixed-shape (FSM) or adjusted-shape (ASM) methods may fail to detect some shape subtleties (e.g., speed of rise or recovery, or undershoot). In contrast, the estimated-shape method (ESM) through multiple basis functions can provide the opportunity to identify some subtle shape differences and achieve higher statistical power at both individual and group levels. Previously, some dimension reduction approaches focused on the peak magnitude, or made inferences based on the area under the curve (AUC) or interaction, which can lead to potential misidentifications. By adopting a generic framework of multivariate modeling (MVM), we showcase a hybrid approach that is validated by simulations and real data. With the whole HDR shape integrity maintained as input at the group level, the approach allows the investigator to substantiate these more nuanced effects through the unique HDR shape features. Unlike the few analyses that were limited to main effect, two- or three-way interactions, we extend the modeling approach to an inclusive platform that is more adaptable than the conventional GLM. With multiple effect estimates from ESM for each condition, linear mixed-effects (LME) modeling should be used at the group level when there is only one group of subjects without any other explanatory variables. Under other situations, an approximate approach through dimension reduction within the MVM framework can be adopted to achieve a practical equipoise among representation, false positive control, statistical power, and modeling flexibility. The associated program 3dMVM is publicly available as part of the

  7. Detecting the subtle shape differences in hemodynamic responses at the group level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Cox, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the hemodynamic response (HDR) is still not fully understood due to the multifaceted processes involved. Aside from the overall amplitude, the response may vary across cognitive states, tasks, brain regions, and subjects with respect to characteristics such as rise and fall speed, peak duration, undershoot shape, and overall duration. Here we demonstrate that the fixed-shape (FSM) or adjusted-shape (ASM) methods may fail to detect some shape subtleties (e.g., speed of rise or recovery, or undershoot). In contrast, the estimated-shape method (ESM) through multiple basis functions can provide the opportunity to identify some subtle shape differences and achieve higher statistical power at both individual and group levels. Previously, some dimension reduction approaches focused on the peak magnitude, or made inferences based on the area under the curve (AUC) or interaction, which can lead to potential misidentifications. By adopting a generic framework of multivariate modeling (MVM), we showcase a hybrid approach that is validated by simulations and real data. With the whole HDR shape integrity maintained as input at the group level, the approach allows the investigator to substantiate these more nuanced effects through the unique HDR shape features. Unlike the few analyses that were limited to main effect, two- or three-way interactions, we extend the modeling approach to an inclusive platform that is more adaptable than the conventional GLM. With multiple effect estimates from ESM for each condition, linear mixed-effects (LME) modeling should be used at the group level when there is only one group of subjects without any other explanatory variables. Under other situations, an approximate approach through dimension reduction within the MVM framework can be adopted to achieve a practical equipoise among representation, false positive control, statistical power, and modeling flexibility. The associated program 3dMVM is publicly available as part of the

  8. Hemodynamic Response to Interictal Epileptiform Discharges Addressed by Personalized EEG-fNIRS Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Giovanni; Machado, Alexis; von Ellenrieder, Nicolas; Watanabe, Satsuki; Hall, Jeffery A.; Lina, Jean-Marc; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed at studying the hemodynamic response (HR) to Interictal Epileptic Discharges (IEDs) using patient-specific and prolonged simultaneous ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) and functional Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (fNIRS) recordings. Methods: The epileptic generator was localized using Magnetoencephalography source imaging. fNIRS montage was tailored for each patient, using an algorithm to optimize the sensitivity to the epileptic generator. Optodes were glued using collodion to achieve prolonged acquisition with high quality signal. fNIRS data analysis was handled with no a priori constraint on HR time course, averaging fNIRS signals to similar IEDs. Cluster-permutation analysis was performed on 3D reconstructed fNIRS data to identify significant spatio-temporal HR clusters. Standard (GLM with fixed HRF) and cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analyses were performed for comparison purposes. Results: fNIRS detected HR to IEDs for 8/9 patients. It mainly consisted oxy-hemoglobin increases (seven patients), followed by oxy-hemoglobin decreases (six patients). HR was lateralized in six patients and lasted from 8.5 to 30 s. Standard EEG-fMRI analysis detected an HR in 4/9 patients (4/9 without enough IEDs, 1/9 unreliable result). The cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analysis restricted to the region investigated by fNIRS showed additional strong and non-canonical BOLD responses starting earlier than the IEDs and lasting up to 30 s. Conclusions: (i) EEG-fNIRS is suitable to detect the HR to IEDs and can outperform EEG-fMRI because of prolonged recordings and greater chance to detect IEDs; (ii) cluster-permutation analysis unveils additional HR features underestimated when imposing a canonical HR function (iii) the HR is often bilateral and lasts up to 30 s. PMID:27047325

  9. Ketamine modulates fetal hemodynamic and endocrine responses to umbilical cord occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Miguel A; Chang, Eileen I; Antolic, Andrew; Wood, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    Umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) is a hypoxic insult that has been used to model birth asphyxia and umbilical cord compression in utero. UCO triggers vigorous neural and endocrine responses that include increased plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations, increased blood pressure (BP), and decreased heart rate (HR). We have previously reported that ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, can modify the fetal hemodynamic and ACTH responses to ventilatory hypoxia and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. We performed the present experiments to test the hypothesis that ketamine has similar effects on the neuroendocrine and cardiovascular responses to UCO Fetal sheep were chronically catheterized at gestational day 125. Ketamine (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously to the fetus 10 min prior to the insult. UCO was induced for 30 min by reducing the umbilical vein blood flow until fetal PaO2 levels were reduced from 17 ± 1 to 11 ± 1 mm Hg. UCO produced an initial increase on fetal BP in both control and ketamine groups (P = 0.018 time), followed by a decrease in the control group, but values remained higher with ketamine. HR decreased after UCO (P = 0.041 stimulus*time) in both groups, but the reduction was greater initially in control compared to ketamine groups. Fetal PaCO2 levels increased after UCO (P < 0.01 stimulus*time), but values were higher in the control versus ketamine groups. UCO significantly decreased fetal pH values (P < 0.01 stimulus*time) with a greater effect on the control versus ketamine group. Ketamine delayed the cortisol responses to UCO (P < 0.001 stimulus*time), and UCO produced a robust increase in ACTH levels from 19 ± 2 to 280 ± 27 pg/mL (P < 0.001 stimulus*time), but there were no differences in ACTH levels between UCO groups. We conclude that ketamine augmented the cardiovascular response to UCO, but did not alter the ACTH response to UCO. PMID:27597770

  10. Central circulatory hemodynamics as a function of gravitational stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, Rick D.; White, C. D.; Fanton, J. W.; Owens, R. W.; Barber, J. F.; Lewkowski, B. E.; Goff, O. T.

    1991-01-01

    This study focuses on an evaluation of the central hemodynamics in a nonhuman primate model to variations in gravitational states. The baboon, phylogenectically close to man, was chosen as the human surrogate. The study environments selected are head-down and head-up tilt in the physiology laboratory, centrifugation to test hypergravic stress, and parabolic flights to test transient acute responses to microgravity.

  11. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Hardik; Wiseman, Natalie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wentao; Welch, Robert D; O'Neil, Brian J; Zuk, Conor; Wang, Xiao; Mika, Valerie; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Haacke, E Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL). We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively). We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both). mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25659079

  12. Cerebral Hemodynamic Changes of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Hardik; Wiseman, Natalie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wentao; Welch, Robert D.; O’Neil, Brian J.; Zuk, Conor; Wang, Xiao; Mika, Valerie; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Haacke, E. Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL). We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively). We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both). mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25659079

  13. Reliability and reactivity of the prefrontal hemodynamic responses in essential hypertension: a functional near infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Grant, Hercules; Bhambhani, Yagesh; Singhal, Anthony; Haennel, Robert; Warren, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Prefrontal (PFC) cerebral vasoreactivity may be altered in hypertension but has not been studied during postural change and carbon dioxide (CO2) rebreathing. In this study, a dual procedure of 5% CO2 rebreathing with positional change (standing to supine and reverse) was performed on normotensive (N = 24) and essential hypertensive males (N = 16) (18-55 years) to assess reliability of PFC responses using functional near infrared spectroscopy. The groups (matched on age levels, N = 13) were also compared on their hemodynamic reactivity (change of oxyhemoglobin or total hemoglobin as a function of change in end tidal CO2). Test-retest reliability within one session and 7 days later was moderate to high (intraclass correlation coefficient = .63-.901) in both normotensive and hypertensive groups for all hemodynamic measures; whereas reliability of reactivity measures for oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin was moderate (intraclass correlation coefficient = .68-.762). Functional near infrared spectroscopy-measured PFC hemodynamic responses are highly reproducible in normotensive and adult essential hypertensive males. PMID:26329474

  14. Hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation performed with video and direct laryngoscopy in patients scheduled for major cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sarkılar, Gamze; Sargın, Mehmet; Sarıtaş, Tuba Berra; Borazan, Hale; Gök, Funda; Kılıçaslan, Alper; Otelcioğlu, Şeref

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to compare the hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation performed with direct and video laryngoscope in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery and to assess the airway and laryngoscopic characteristics. One hundred ten patients were equally allocated to either direct Macintosh laryngoscope (n = 55) or indirect Macintosh C-MAC video laryngoscope (n = 55). Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded prior to induction anesthesia, and immediately and two minutes after intubation. Airway characteristics (modified Mallampati, thyromental distance, sternomental distance, mouth opening, upper lip bite test, Wilson risk sum score), mask ventilation, laryngoscopic characteristics (Cormack-Lehane, percentage of glottic opening), intubation time, number of attempts, external pressure application, use of stylet and predictors of difficult intubation (modified Mallampati grade 3-4, thyromental distance < 6 cm, upper lip bite test class 3, Wilson risk sum score ≥ 2, Cormack-Lehane grade 3-4) were recorded. Hemodynamic parameters were similar between the groups at all time points of measurement. Airway characteristics and mask ventilation were no significant between the groups. The C-MAC video laryngoscope group had better laryngoscopic view as assessed by Cormack-Lehane and percentage of glottic view, and a longer intubation time. Number of attempts, external pressure, use of stylet, and difficult intubation parameters were similar. Endotracheal intubation performed with direct Macintosh laryngoscope or indirect Macintosh C-MAC video laryngoscope causes similar and stable hemodynamic responses. PMID:26379966

  15. Functional hemodynamic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R; Payen, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a cost-effective manner. PMID:16356240

  16. Hemodynamic monitoring devices: putting it all together.

    PubMed

    Naik, Bhiken I; Durieux, Marcel E

    2014-12-01

    Perioperative hemodynamic optimization of the high-risk surgical patient is associated with reduced postoperative morbidity and mortality. The hemodynamic parameters to be optimized (using goal-directed algorithms) encompass preload, contractility, afterload, volume responsiveness, and end-organ perfusion. Current hemodynamic monitors facilitate multi-modal monitoring of these macro-hemodynamic targets. This review focuses on the variety of invasive, minimally invasive, and noninvasive hemodynamic monitors available to the clinician. PMID:25480776

  17. Variability in Prefrontal Hemodynamic Response during Exposure to Repeated Self-Selected Music Excerpts, a Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Saba; Schudlo, Larissa; Chau, Tom; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes. PMID:25837268

  18. Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Saba; Schudlo, Larissa; Chau, Tom; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes. PMID:25837268

  19. Hemodynamic and hormonal responses to lower body negative pressure in men with varying profiles of strength and aerobic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Mathes, K. L.; Lasley, M. L.; Tomaselli, C. M.; Frey, M. A.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    Hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were examined in 24 healthy men to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of reflex control of blood pressure during orthostatic challenge is associated with interactions between strength and aerobic power. Subjects underwent treadmill tests to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2max) and isokinetic dynamometer tests to determine knee extensor strength. Based on predetermined criteria, subjects were classified into one of four fitness profiles of six subjects each, matched for age, height, and body mass: (a) low strength/average aerobic fitness, (b) low strength/high aerobic fitness, (c) high strength/average aerobic fitness, and (d) high strength/high aerobic fitness. Following 90 min of 0.11 rad (6 degrees) head-down tilt (HDT), each subject underwent graded LBNP to -6.7 kPa or presyncope, with maximal duration 15 min, while hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses were measured. All groups exhibited typical hemodynamic, hormonal, and fluid shift responses during LBNP, with no intergroup differences between high and low strength characteristics. Subjects with high aerobic power exhibited greater (P < 0.05) stroke volume and lower (P < 0.05) heart rate, vascular peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure during rest, HDT, and LBNP. Seven subjects, distributed among the four fitness profiles, became presyncopal. These subjects showed greatest reduction in mean arterial pressure during LBNP, had greater elevations in vasopressin, and lesser increases in heart rate and peripheral resistance. Neither VO2max nor leg strength were associated with fall in arterial pressure or with syncopal episodes. We conclude that interactions between aerobic and strength fitness characteristics do not influence responses to LBNP challenge.

  20. Effect of the Pulsatile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation on Hemodynamic Energy and Systemic Microcirculation in a Piglet Model of Acute Cardiac Failure.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hideshi; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito; Douguchi, Takuma; Obata, Hideaki; Inamori, Syuji; Iwasaki, Tatsuo; Kasahara, Shingo; Sano, Shunji; Ündar, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of pulsatile and nonpulsatile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on hemodynamic energy and systemic microcirculation in an acute cardiac failure model in piglets. Fourteen piglets with a mean body weight of 6.08 ± 0.86 kg were divided into pulsatile (N = 7) and nonpulsatile (N = 7) ECMO groups. The experimental ECMO circuit consisted of a centrifugal pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a pneumatic pulsatile flow generator system developed in-house. Nonpulsatile ECMO was initiated at a flow rate of 140 mL/kg/min for the first 30 min with normal heart beating, with rectal temperature maintained at 36°C. Ventricular fibrillation was then induced with a 3.5-V alternating current to generate a cardiac dysfunction model. Using this model, we collected the data on pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups. The piglets were weaned off ECMO at the end of the experiment (180 min after ECMO was initiated). The animals did not receive blood transfusions, inotropic drugs, or vasoactive drugs. Blood samples were collected to measure hemoglobin, methemoglobin, blood gases, electrolytes, and lactic acid levels. Hemodynamic energy was calculated using the Shepard's energy equivalent pressure. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor brain and kidney perfusion. The pulsatile ECMO group had a higher atrial pressure (systolic and mean), and significantly higher regional saturation at the brain level, than the nonpulsatile group (for both, P < 0.05). Additionally, the pulsatile ECMO group had higher methemoglobin levels within the normal range than the nonpulsatile group. Our study demonstrated that pulsatile ECMO produces significantly higher hemodynamic energy and improves systemic microcirculation, compared with nonpulsatile ECMO in acute cardiac failure. PMID:26526784

  1. MR Perfusion-derived Hemodynamic Parametric Response Mapping of Bevacizumab Efficacy in Recurrent Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kickingereder, Philipp; Radbruch, Alexander; Burth, Sina; Wick, Antje; Heiland, Sabine; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Bonekamp, David

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To better understand the effect of bevacizumab therapy on tumor blood flow and oxygenation status in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Materials and Methods Retrospective data evaluation was approved by the local ethics committee of the University of Heidelberg (ethics approval number, S-320/2012), and informed consent was waived. A total of 71 patients who received a diagnosis of recurrent glioblastoma underwent conventional anatomic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and dynamic susceptibility contrast material-enhanced MR imaging at baseline and at the first follow-up examination after initiation of bevacizumab therapy. Parametric response maps (PRMs) were created with multistep (nonlinear) registration of patients' post- to pretreatment images and voxel-wise subtraction between Gaussian-normalized relative cerebral blood volume (nrCBV) and Gaussian-normalized relative cerebral blood flow (nrCBF) maps. Intratumor voxels were stratified as being increased (PRM[+]) or decreased (PRM[-]) if they exceeded a threshold that represented the 95% confidence interval in the normal-appearing brain. Correlation with progression-free and overall survival was performed with Cox proportional hazards models. Results The risks for disease progression and death significantly increased with (a) higher baseline nrCBV (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.86, P < .01; HR = 1.52, P < .01) and nrCBF (HR = 1.78, P < .01; HR = 1.86, P < .01) values and (b) higher PRM(-) of nrCBV (HR = 1.03, P = .01; HR = 1.02, P = .03) and nrCBF (HR = 1.04, P < .01; HR = 1.03, P < .01), but not with higher PRM(+) of nrCBV and nrCBF, and not for the relative change in mean nrCBV and nrCBF, confirming the superiority of the PRM approach. The magnitude of PRM(-) for both nrCBV and nrCBF significantly increased for higher baseline values (P < .01). Conclusion Pretreatment hemodynamic parameters are the principal determinant of response to bevacizumab therapy in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Although the

  2. Acute hemodynamic effects of single-dose sildenafil when added to established bosentan therapy in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: results of the COMPASS-1 study.

    PubMed

    Gruenig, Ekkehard; Michelakis, Evangelos; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Meyer, F Joachim; Doelberg, Martin; Bach, Doris; Dingemanse, Jasper; Galiè, Nazzareno

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the acute pharmacodynamic effects of sildenafil in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and concomitant bosentan treatment, in view of a mutual pharmacokinetic interaction between the 2 drugs. This prospective, open-label, noncomparative, multicenter, phase II study enrolled 45 patients (>or=18 years) with stable PAH (idiopathic, familial, or related to corrected congenital systemic-to-pulmonary shunts, drugs, or toxins) and on bosentan treatment for at least 3 months. Patients underwent right heart catheterization to evaluate the acute hemodynamic effects of (a) inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) and (b) a single oral dose of sildenafil (25 mg). Mean pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) decreased from baseline following iNO (-15%; 95% confidence limits: -21%, -8%; P = .0001). A statistically significant decrease from baseline in mean PVR was also observed 60 minutes following sildenafil administration (-15%; 95% confidence limits: -21%, -10%; P < .0001). The reduction in PVR following sildenafil was comparable to that resulting from iNO. There were no unexpected safety findings. The pharmacodynamic effect suggests that addition of sildenafil to bosentan treatment can elicit additional hemodynamic benefits. These data represent a rationale for long-term combination studies with the 2 compounds. PMID:19755415

  3. Pros and Cons of Using the Informed Basis Set to Account for Hemodynamic Response Variability with Developmental Data

    PubMed Central

    Cignetti, Fabien; Salvia, Emilie; Anton, Jean-Luc; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Assaiante, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Conventional analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using the general linear model (GLM) employs a neural model convolved with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF) peaking 5 s after stimulation. Incorporation of a further basis function, namely the canonical HRF temporal derivative, accounts for delays in the hemodynamic response to neural activity. A population that may benefit from this flexible approach is children whose hemodynamic response is not yet mature. Here, we examined the effects of using the set based on the canonical HRF plus its temporal derivative on both first- and second-level GLM analyses, through simulations and using developmental data (an fMRI dataset on proprioceptive mapping in children and adults). Simulations of delayed fMRI first-level data emphasized the benefit of carrying forward to the second-level a derivative boost that combines derivative and nonderivative beta estimates. In the experimental data, second-level analysis using a paired t-test showed increased mean amplitude estimate (i.e., increased group contrast mean) in several brain regions related to proprioceptive processing when using the derivative boost compared to using only the nonderivative term. This was true especially in children. However, carrying forward to the second-level the individual derivative boosts had adverse consequences on random-effects analysis that implemented one-sample t-test, yielding increased between-subject variance, thus affecting group-level statistic. Boosted data also presented a lower level of smoothness that had implication for the detection of group average activation. Imposing soft constraints on the derivative boost by limiting the time-to-peak range of the modeled response within a specified range (i.e., 4–6 s) mitigated these issues. These findings support the notion that there are pros and cons to using the informed basis set with developmental data. PMID:27471441

  4. Influence of Spinal and General Anesthesia on the Metabolic, Hormonal, and Hemodynamic Response in Elective Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Snezana B.; Pavlovic, Aleksandar P.; Trpkovic, Sladjana V.; Ilić, Aleksandra N.; Sekulic, Ana D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the significance of spinal anesthesia in the suppression of the metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic response to surgical stress in elective surgical patients compared to general anesthesia. Material/Methods The study was clinical, prospective, and controlled and it involved 2 groups of patients (the spinal and the general anesthesia group) who underwent the same surgery. We monitored the metabolic and hormonal response to perioperative stress based on serum cortisol level and glycemia. We also examined how the different techniques of anesthesia affect these hemodynamic parameters: systolic arterial pressure (AP), diastolic AP, heart rate (HR), and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). These parameters were measured before induction on anesthesia (T1), 30 min after the surgical incisions (T2), 1 h postoperatively (T3) and 24 h after surgery (T4). Results Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in the general anesthesia group compared to the spinal anesthesia group (p<0.01). Glycemia was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.05). There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between serum cortisol levels and glycemia at all times observed (p<0.01). Systolic and diastolic AP did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.191, p=0.101). The HR was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.01). SpO2 values did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.081). Conclusions Based on metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses, spinal anesthesia proved more effective than general anesthesia in suppressing stress response in elective surgical patients. PMID:25284266

  5. Pharmacologic agents for acute hemodynamic instability: Recent advances in the management of perioperative shock- A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morozowich, Steven T.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of evidence evaluating the efficacy of vasoactive agents in the management of hemodynamic instability and circulatory shock, it appears no agent is superior. This is becoming increasingly accepted as current guidelines are moving away from detailed algorithms for the management of shock, and instead succinctly state that vasoactive agents should be individualized and guided by invasive hemodynamic monitoring. This extends to the perioperative period, where vasoactive agent selection and use may still be left to the discretion of the treating physician with a goal-directed approach, consisting of close hemodynamic monitoring and administration of the lowest effective dose to achieve the hemodynamic goals. Successful therapy depends on the ability to rapidly diagnose the etiology of circulatory shock and thoroughly understand its pathophysiology as well as the pharmacology of vasoactive agents. This review focuses on the physiology and resuscitation goals in perioperative shock, as well as the pharmacology and recent advances in vasoactive agent use in its management. PMID:26440241

  6. Comparison of hemodynamic response to adrenaline infiltration in children undergoing cleft palate repair during general anesthesia with sevoflurane and isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Gunnam, Poojita Reddy; Durga, Padmaja; Gurajala, Indira; Kaluvala, Prasad Rao; Veerabathula, Prardhana; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Systemic absorption of adrenaline often used for infiltration during cleft palate surgery leads to adverse hemodynamic responses. These hemodynamic responses may be attenuated by the volatile anesthetics. This study aims to compare the hemodynamic responses to adrenaline infiltration during isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) anesthesia. Material and Methods: Sixty children aged between 9 months and 48 months, weighing between 8 kg and 20 kg, undergoing primary repair of cleft palate were randomly allocated into two groups: Group ISO - anesthesia maintained with ISO (2 minimum alveolar concentrations [MAC]) and nitrous oxide 50% and group SEVO - maintained on SEVO (2 MAC) and nitrous oxide 50%. Surgical site was infiltrated with 1 ml/kg of 1:200,000 solution of adrenaline with 0.5% lignocaine. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were noted at the end of infiltration and every 1 min for 5 min following infiltration. The percentage change of hemodynamic responses from baseline, following infiltration were compared between the two groups. Results: There was no significant change in HR from baseline, and the response was comparable between the agents at all times. The blood pressure (BP) increased from baseline in both the groups but the increase was greater in SEVO than ISO group at 2 and 3 min after infiltration. The maximum change in HR from baseline (group ISO median 10.9% [interquartile range (IQR) 4.5-23.0] vs. group SEVO 26.5% [11.9-44.6]) was comparable in both the groups (P = 0.169). The maximum change in SBP was significantly greater in group SEVO than group ISO (42.8% [IQR 20.0-60.9] vs. 26.0 [11.3-44.5], P = 0.04). The incidence of significant change (>20%) of SBP, DBP, and MAP from baseline was significantly greater in group SEVO after infiltration and 1 min and 2 min after infiltration. There were no arrhythmias in any of the groups. Conclusion

  7. Differences in the hemodynamic response to event-related motor and visual paradigms as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasdzewski, G.; Strangman, G.; Wagner, J.; Kwong, K. K.; Poldrack, R. A.; Boas, D. A.; Sutton, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Several current brain imaging techniques rest on the assumption of a tight coupling between neural activity and hemodynamic response. The nature of this neurovascular coupling, however, is not completely understood. There is some evidence for a decoupling of these processes at the onset of neural activity, which manifests itself as a momentary increase in the relative concentration of deoxyhemoglobin (HbR). The existence of this early component of the hemodynamic response function, however, is controversial, as it is inconsistently found. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows quantification of levels of oxyhemoglobin (HbO(2)) and HbR during task performance in humans. We acquired NIRS data during performance of simple motor and visual tasks, using rapid-presentation event-related paradigms. Our results demonstrate that rapid, event-related NIRS can provide robust estimates of the hemodynamic response without artifacts due to low-frequency signal components, unlike data from blocked designs. In both the motor and visual data the onset of the increase in HbO(2) occurs before HbR decreases, and there is a poststimulus undershoot. Our results also show that total blood volume (HbT) drops before HbO(2) and undershoots baseline, raising a new issue for neurovascular models. We did not find early deoxygenation in the motor data using physiologically plausible values for the differential pathlength factor, but did find one in the visual data. We suggest that this difference, which is consistent with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, may be attributable to different capillary transit times in these cortices.

  8. Hemodynamic Responses of Unfit Healthy Women at a Training Session with Nintendo Wii: A Possible Impact on the General Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato S; Figueiredo, Luiz F; Conceição, Isabel; Carvalho, Carolina; Lattari, Eduardo; Mura, Gioia; Machado, Sérgio; da Silva, Elirez B

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was assess the effect of a training session with Nintendo Wii® on the hemodynamic responses of healthy women not involved in regular physical exercise. Method: Twenty-five healthy unfit women aged 28 ± 6 years played for 10 minutes the game Free Run (Wii Fit Plus). The resting heart rate (RHR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP), and double (rate-pressure) product (DP) were measured before and after activity. The HR during the activity (exercise heart rate, EHR) was measured every minute. Results: A statistically significant difference was observed between the RHR (75 ± 9 bpm) and the mean EHR (176 ± 15 bpm) (P < 0.001). The EHR remained in the target zone for aerobic exercise until the fifth minute of activity, which coincided with the upper limit of the aerobic zone (80% heart rate reserve (HRR) + RHR) from the sixth to tenth minute. The initial (110 ± 8 mmHg) and final (145 ± 17 mmHg) SBP (P < 0.01) were significantly different, as were the initial (71 ± 8 mmHg) and final (79 ± 9 mmHg) DBP (P < 0.01). A statistically significant difference was observed between the pre- (8.233 ± 1.141 bpm-mmHg) and post-activity (25.590 ± 4.117 bpm-mmHg) DP (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Physical exercise while playing Free Run sufficed to trigger acute hemodynamic changes in healthy women who were not engaged in regular physical exercise. PMID:25614754

  9. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-06-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 + 81 to 350 + 77 ml (p < 0.01) and from 52 + 26 to 43 + 20 volume units (p < 0.01), respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 + 10 to 17 + 9 mm Hg and 10 + 5 to and + 5 mm Hg (both p < 0.01). Altough stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 + 6% to 22 + 5% and from 25 + 9% to 29 + 11%, respectively (both p < 0.01). During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. Thus, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured.

  10. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-06-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 +/- 81 to 350 +/- 77 ml and from 52 +/- 26 to 43 +/- 20 volume units, respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 +/- 10 to 17 +/- 9 mm Hg and 10 +/- 5 to 6 +/- 5 mm Hg. Although stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 +/- 6% to 22+/- 5% and from 25 +/- 9% to 29 +/- 11%, respectively. During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. This, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured.

  11. Dopaminergic drugs in congestive heart failure: hemodynamic and neuroendocrine responses to ibopamine, dopamine, and dihydroergotoxine.

    PubMed

    Metra, M; Missale, C; Spano, P F; Cas, L D

    1995-05-01

    Ibopamine has hemodynamic and neurohumoral effects potentially useful for the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF), but its mechanism of action is not completely clear. To evaluate the role of dopaminergic receptor stimulation in the hemodynamic and neurohumoral activity of ibopamine, we compared the effects of ibopamine, 100 mg orally (p.o.) with those of the dopamine 2, 4, and 6 micrograms/kg/min intravenously (i.v.) and of the DA2 agonist dihydroergotoxine 6 micrograms/kg i.v. in 13 patients with chronic CHF [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < or = 35%]. All patients underwent right heart Swan-Ganz catheterization with determination of hemodynamic parameters at baseline, after 30 min of infusion of each dose of dopamine (DA) and < or = 6 h after ibopamine and dihydroergotoxine administration. Blood samples for the assessment of plasma renin activity (PRA), aldosterone, norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (Epi) were also obtained. Ibopamine induced a peak 21% increase of cardiac index (CI) with a 23 and 25% increase in stroke volume (SV) and stroke work indexes (SWI), respectively, and an 18% reduction in systemic vascular resistance (SVR). Similar changes were observed after DA infused at the doses of 2 and 4 micrograms/kg/min, whereas with the dose of 6 micrograms/kg/min heart rate (HR) increased by 23% and SV index (SVI) did not change further. Dihydroergotoxine administration induced only a significant 9% decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), with a 13% reduction in SVR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7630152

  12. Imagery use and affective responses during exercise: an examination of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2013-10-01

    Imagery, as a cognitive strategy, can improve affective responses during moderate-intensity exercise. The effects of imagery at higher intensities of exercise have not been examined. Further, the effect of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise is unknown. Using a crossover design (imagery and control), activity of the frontal cortex (reflected by changes in cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy) and affective responses were measured during exercise at intensities 5% above the ventilatory threshold (VT) and the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Results indicated that imagery use influenced activity of the frontal cortex and was associated with a more positive affective response at intensities above VT, but not RCP to exhaustion (p < .05). These findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise at intensities above VT that positively impact affective responses. PMID:24197718

  13. Effects of acute systemic administration of TiO2, ZnO, SiO2, and Ag nanoparticles on hemodynamics, hemostasis and leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Haberl, Nadine; Hirn, Stephanie; Holzer, Martin; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Rehberg, Markus; Krombach, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that engineered nanomaterials (ENM), once arrived in the circulation, may affect the cardiovascular system. The aim of this in vivo study was to screen major cardiovascular effects of acute systemic administration of a panel of five nanomaterials, TiO2 anatase (NM-101), TiO2 rutile (NM-104), ZnO (NM-110), SiO2 (NM-200) and Ag (NM-300). Mice were anesthetized and the ENM were injected at a dose of 1 mg/kg via a catheter placed in the left femoral artery. Hemodynamic parameters were determined by invasive measurement of blood pressure and non-invasive measurement of heart rate. Ten minutes after injection of the ENM, the formation of light/dye-induced thrombi was assessed in the cremasteric microcirculation by intravital microscopy. In addition, the numbers of rolling, firmly adherent and transmigrated leukocytes were recorded in postcapillary cremasteric venules over a time period of 120 min after injection of ENM by intravital microscopy. The systemic administration of a single dose of the ENM tested did not dramatically alter hemodynamic parameters or affect early steps of leukocyte recruitment. However, the presence of circulating TiO2 anatase, but not of TiO2 rutile, SiO2, ZnO or Ag nanoparticles, significantly accelerated thrombus formation in the murine microcirculation. Moreover, TiO2 anatase but not TiO2 rutile nanoparticles increased murine platelet aggregation in vitro. Taken together, only one of the five systemically administered ENM, TiO2 anatase, affected hemostasis, whereas none of the ENM tested in this screening study dramatically modulated hemodynamic parameters or early steps of leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25670207

  14. Hemodynamic variables and progression of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: data from the prospective observational FINNAKI study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Knowledge of the association of hemodynamics with progression of septic acute kidney injury (AKI) is limited. However, some recent data suggest that mean arterial pressure (MAP) exceeding current guidelines (60–65 mmHg) may be needed to prevent AKI. We hypothesized that higher MAP during the first 24 hours in the intensive care unit (ICU), would be associated with a lower risk of progression of AKI in patients with severe sepsis. Methods We identified 423 patients with severe sepsis and electronically recorded continuous hemodynamic data in the prospective observational FINNAKI study. The primary endpoint was progression of AKI within the first 5 days of ICU admission defined as new onset or worsening of AKI by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. We evaluated the association of hemodynamic variables with this endpoint. We included 53724 10-minute medians of MAP in the analysis. We analysed the ability of time-adjusted MAP to predict progression of AKI by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Of 423 patients, 153 (36.2%) had progression of AKI. Patients with progression of AKI had significantly lower time-adjusted MAP, 74.4 mmHg [68.3-80.8], than those without progression, 78.6 mmHg [72.9-85.4], P < 0.001. A cut-off value of 73 mmHg for time-adjusted MAP best predicted the progression of AKI. Chronic kidney disease, higher lactate, higher dose of furosemide, use of dobutamine and time-adjusted MAP below 73 mmHg were independent predictors of progression of AKI. Conclusions The findings of this large prospective multicenter observational study suggest that hypotensive episodes (MAP under 73 mmHg) are associated with progression of AKI in critically ill patients with severe sepsis. PMID:24330815

  15. Pathobiochemical mechanisms during the acute phase response.

    PubMed

    Kleesiek, K; Greiling, H

    1984-01-01

    The acute phase response is characterised by the following sequence of principle phenomena: (1) an early local inflammatory reaction, (2) formation of inflammatory humoral factors inducing a systemic reaction, (3) stimulation of glycoprotein synthesis predominantly in the hepatocytes, and (4) an increase in the plasma concentration of acute phase proteins, when the rate of biosynthesis exceeds the degradation rate. Inflammatory mediators (lysosomal enzymes, oxygen derived radicals, prostaglandins) are mainly released during phagocytosis by granulocytes and macrophages. The signal reaching the hepatocytes is not yet clearly identified. A leukocyte endogenous mediator (LEM) released by macrophages is described. There is evidence that prostaglandins and probably proteinase alpha 2-macroglobulin complexes are also involved. The hepatic acute phase protein synthesis is modulated by hormones (insulin, cortisol, somatotropin). The biochemical events in the hepatocyte include an increase in protein synthesis and the regulatory control of the glycosylation of polypeptide precursors. The secreted glycoproteins serve variously as inhibitors or mediators of the inflammatory processes. PMID:6208159

  16. Double dissociation between perspective-taking and empathic-concern as predictors of hemodynamic response to another's mistakes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Matthew S; Stevens, Michael C; Harenski, Carla L; Kiehl, Kent A

    2009-06-01

    Identifying another's mistakes requires a basic representation of other's action patterns as well as recognition and understanding of their failed goal-attainment. In previous work, we identified several regions, including inferior parietal cortex and rostral/ventral anterior cinguli (r/vACC), that show unique sensitivity to the observation of another's errors. Here we utilize the same sample to show that participants' level of self-reported perspective-taking (but not empathic concern) correlated with hemodynamic response in IPC, while participants' level of self-reported empathic concern (but not perspective taking) correlated with hemodynamic response in r/vACC. This functional dissociation provides strong evidence for separate roles for IPC and r/vACC in the processing of observed errors. IPC may foster a sense of agency by distinguishing self- from other-performed actions; r/vACC may, in turn, promote a more contextually-mediated understanding of the other's failed goal-attainment. PMID:19244454

  17. Dysregulation of oxygen hemodynamic responses to synaptic train stimulation in a rat hippocampal model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Galeffi, Francesca; Degan, Simone; Britz, Gavin; Turner, Dennis A

    2016-04-01

    We investigated microvascular reactivity to synaptic train stimulation after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage in adult rats, analyzing tissue oxygen levels [pO2] in intact hippocampus. In control rats, hippocampal pO2averaged 11.4 mm Hg whereas hemodynamic responses averaged 13.1 mm Hg (to a 25 s train). After subarachnoid hemorrhage (at 2 days), we recorded a dramatic elevation in baseline pO2in the hippocampus (to 68.4 mm Hg) accompanied by inverted pO2responses to synaptic train stimulation (-9.46 mm Hg). These significant changes in baseline hippocampal pO2and inverted pO2responses after subarachnoid hemorrhage indicate severe alterations of neurovascular coupling and neuronal viability. PMID:26721394

  18. Hemodynamic effects of left atrial or left ventricular cannulation for acute circulatory support in a bovine model of left heart injury.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Navin K; Paruchuri, Vikram; Pham, Duc Thinh; Reyelt, Lara; Murphy, Barbara; Beale, Corinna; Bogins, Courtney; Wiener, Daniel; Nilson, James; Esposito, Michele; Perkins, Scott; Perides, George; Karas, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the hemodynamic effects of a trans-aortic axial flow catheter (Impella CP) in the left ventricle (LV) versus left atrial (LA) to femoral artery bypass using a centrifugal pump (TandemHeart: TH) in a bovine model of acute LV injury. In three male calves, we performed sequential activation of a CP then TH device in each animal. After 60 minutes of left anterior descending artery ligation, a CP was activated at maximal power. The CP was then removed and the TH activated at 5,500 then a maximum of 7,500 rotations per minute (RPM). The CP generated a maximum 3.1 ± 0.2 L/minute (LPM) of flow, whereas the TH at 5,500 and 7,500 RPM generated 3.1 ± 0.4 and 4.4 ± 0.3 LPM. At 3.1 LPM, the CP and TH reduced LV stroke work (LVSW) similarly. The TH reduced stroke volume, whereas the CP did not. The CP reduced end-systolic pressure, whereas the TH did not. At a maximum flow of 4.4 LPM, the TH provided a greater reduction in LVSW than maximal CP activation. This is the first report to compare the hemodynamic effects of trans-aortic LV unloading versus LA-to-femoral artery (FA) bypass. PMID:25485565

  19. The Pentax airway scope versus the Macintosh laryngoscope: Comparison of hemodynamic responses and concentrations of plasma norepinephrine to tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pentax Airway Scope (AWS) is a video laryngoscope designed to facilitate tracheal intubation with a high-resolution image. The Pentax AWS has been reported to cause less hemodynamic stress than the Macintosh laryngoscope. The aims of this study are to investigate the differences in hemodynamic responses and norepinephrine concentrations to tracheal intubation between procedures using he Pentax AWS and the Macintosh laryngoscope. Methods Forty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists class I-II, age range: 18-60 years) were randomly assigned to be intubated with either the Pentax AWS or the Macintosh laryngoscope while under general anesthesia. Routine monitoring, including invasive arterial blood pressure and bispectral index, were applied. Thiopental (4 mg/kg), fentanyl (1 µg/kg), midazolam (0.05 mg/kg), and rocuronium (0.6 mg/kg) were administered for anesthetic induction. Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures and heart rates were recorded pre-intubation, immediately post-intubation (T0), and over the following 10 minutes at one minute intervals (T1, T2, T3, T4, T5…T10). Patient blood was sampled for norepinephrine concentrations pre-intubation (baseline) and post-intubation (T1). Evidence of sore throat was evaluated 30 min and 24 hr after extubation. Data were transformed to % basal and expressed as mean ± SD. Results The systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure, and heart rate at T0 and T4 were significantly different between the two groups. There was no significant difference in plasma norepinephrine between the two groups. The difference in incidence of sore throat was not significant between the two groups. Conclusions Pentax-AWS for tracheal intubation has greater hemodynamic stability than the Macintosh blade laryngoscope. PMID:23646240

  20. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Intubation by Gabapentin in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Marashi, Seyed Mojtaba; Saeedinia, Seyed Mostafa; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Movafegh, Ali; Marashi, Shaqayeq

    2015-12-01

    A varieties of medications have been suggested to prevent hemodynamic instabilities following laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. This study was conducted to determine the beneficial effects of gabapentin on preventing hemodynamic instabilities associated with intubation in patients who were a candidate for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). This double blinded randomized, parallel group clinical trial was carried out on 58 normotensive patients scheduled for elective CABG under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in Shariati Hospital. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups of 29 patients that received 1200 mg of gabapentin in two dosages (600 mg, 8 hours before anesthesia induction and 600 mg, 2 hours before anesthesia induction) as gabapentin group or received talc powder as placebo (placebo group). Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured immediately before intubation, during intubation, immediately after intubation, 1 and 2 minutes after tracheal intubation. Inter-group comparisons significantly showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and heart rate immediately before intubation, during intubation, immediately after intubation, 1 and 2 minutes after tracheal intubation in the placebo group in comparison to gabapentin group. The median of anxiety verbal analog scale (VAS) at the pre-induction room in gabapentin and placebo groups were 2 and 4, respectively that was significantly lower in the former group (P. value =0.04 ); however, regarding median of pain score no difference was observed between them (P. value =0.07). Gabapentin (1200 mg) given preoperatively can effectively attenuate the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy, intubation and also reduce preoperative related anxiety in patients who were a candidate for CABG. PMID:26749228

  1. Comparison of hemodynamic and metabolic stress responses caused by endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Güleç, Handan; Çakan, Türkay; Yaman, Halil; Kilinç, Aytül Şadan; Başar, Hülya

    2012-01-01

    Background: We aimed to compare hemodynamic and endocrine alterations caused by stress response due to Proseal laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube usage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty-three ASA I-II patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway. Standard general anaesthesia was performed in both groups with the same drugs in induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. After anaesthesia induction and 20 minutes after CO2 insufflations, venous blood samples were obtained for measuring adrenalin, noradrenalin, dopamine and cortisol levels. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were recorded at the 1st, 5th, 15th, 30th and 45th minutes after the insertion of airway devices. Results: No statistically significant differences in age, body mass index, gender, ASA physical status, and operation time were found between the groups (p > 0.05). Changes in hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were not statistically significant when compared between and within groups (p > 0.05). Although no statistically significant differences were observed between and within groups when adrenalin, noradrenalin and dopamine values were compared, serum cortisol levels after CO2 insufflation in PLMA group were significantly lower than the ETT group (p = 0.024). When serum cortisol levels were compared within groups, cortisol levels 20 minutes after CO2 insufflation were significantly higher (46.1 (9.5-175.7) and 27.0 (8.3-119.4) in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively) than cortisol levels after anaesthesia induction (11.3 (2.8-92.5) and 16.6 (4.4-45.4) in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively) in both groups (p = 0.001). Conclusion: PLMA usage is a suitable, effective and safe alternative to ETT in laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients with lower metabolic stress. PMID:23264788

  2. Measuring brain hemodynamic changes in a songbird: responses to hypercapnia measured with functional MRI and near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignal, C.; Boumans, T.; Montcel, B.; Ramstein, S.; Verhoye, M.; Van Audekerke, J.; Mathevon, N.; Van der Linden, A.; Mottin, S.

    2008-05-01

    Songbirds have been evolved into models of choice for the study of the cerebral underpinnings of vocal communication. Nevertheless, there is still a need for in vivo methods allowing the real-time monitoring of brain activity. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has been applied in anesthetized intact songbirds. It relies on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast revealing hemodynamic changes. Non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is based on the weak absorption of near-infrared light by biological tissues. Time-resolved femtosecond white laser NIRS is a new probing method using real-time spectral measurements which give access to the local variation of absorbing chromophores such as hemoglobins. In this study, we test the efficiency of our time-resolved NIRS device in monitoring physiological hemodynamic brain responses in a songbird, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), using a hypercapnia event (7% inhaled CO2). The results are compared to those obtained using BOLD fMRI. The NIRS measurements clearly demonstrate that during hypercapnia the blood oxygen saturation level increases (increase in local concentration of oxyhemoglobin, decrease in deoxyhemoglobin concentration and total hemoglobin concentration). Our results provide the first correlation in songbirds of the variations in total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation level obtained from NIRS with local BOLD signal variations.

  3. Hemodynamic variations measured with near-infrared spectroscopy in human forearm muscles in response to venous occlusion: an electrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Toi, Vo; Hoimes, Matthew L.; Nadgir, Shalini; Fantini, Sergio

    2005-04-01

    We present data collected with near-infrared spectroscopy on the human forearm (brachioradialis muscle) to characterize the hemodynamic response to venous occlusion in muscle. Venous occlusion was achieved in the upper arm by inflating a pneumatic cuff to a pressure of 60 mmHg. We performed absolute measurements of concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin on six healthy adult human subjects. On all six subjects, we consistently found that during a 40-s venous occlusion the hemoglobin concentration increases (by 5.6+/-2.3 μM), while the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin decreases (by 2.1+/-0.7%). This accumulation and desaturation of blood in the forearm in response to the upper arm occlusion can be described with an electrical model in which the charge stored by a capacitor represents the local blood volume, and the electrical current represents blood flow.

  4. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  5. Gender differences in response to acute and chronic angiotensin II infusion: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Toering, Tsjitske J; van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Visser, Folkert W; Buikema, Hendrik; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M; Lely, A Titia

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease progress at a slower rate to end stage renal disease than men. As angiotensin II has both hemodynamic and direct renal effects, we hypothesized that the female protection may result from gender differences in responses to angiotensin II. Therefore, we studied gender differences in response to angiotensin II, during acute (human) and chronic (rats) angiotensin II administration. In young healthy men (n = 18) and women (n = 18) we studied the responses of renal hemodynamics (125I-iothalamate and 131I-Hippuran) and blood pressure to graded angiotensin II infusion (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 ng/kg/min for 1 h). Men had increased responses of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05), and a more pronounced decrease in effective renal plasma flow (P = 0.009) than women. We measured the changes in proteinuria and blood pressure in response to chronic administration (200 ng/kg/min for 3 weeks) of angiotensin II in rats. Male rats had an increased response of proteinuria compared with females (GEE analysis, P = 0.001). Male, but not female, angiotensin II-treated rats had increased numbers of renal interstitial macrophages compared to sham-treated rats (P < 0.001). In conclusion, gender differences are present in the response to acute and chronic infusion of angiotensin II. Difference in angiotensin II sensitivity could play a role in gender differences in progression of renal disease. PMID:26149279

  6. Control of the Acute Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Irving; Broder, Martin L.; Karp, David

    1978-01-01

    In order to investigate the magnitude and kinetics of the C-reactive protein (CRP) response after differing degrees of tissue injury, we studied changes in serum concentration of this acute phase protein in 19 patients after mild or extensive acute myocardial infarction. An increase in serum CRP concentration was seen in all patients. The rate of increase in concentration was found to be exponential, with a mean hourly rate constant for the entire group of patients of 0.085 (doubling time, 8.2 h). Patients with extensive infarction attained mean serum CRP levels about 4 times as great as did patients with mild infarction. No difference could be shown in the mean rate constant between these groups, the greater CRP response in the former group resulting principally from a more protracted period of rise in serum CRP concentration. A lag period before serum CRP levels began to rise was noted in only 4 of the 13 patients in whom this could be assessed. 7 of 10 patients with presumed unstable angina (coronary insufficiency) showed no rise in CRP concentration, while a small increase as noted in 3 patients. The data suggest that acute tissue injury, such as myocardial infarction, rapidly leads to acceleration in synthesis of CRP, and that the duration of this period of acceleration is related to the extent of tissue injury. PMID:621273

  7. Noninvasive monitoring hemodynamic responses in RIF tumors during and after PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Durduran, Turgut; Busch, Theresa M.; Wang, Hsing-Wen; Zhou, Chao; Saunders, H. Mark; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-06-01

    Changes in blood flow and oxygenation during and after PDT provide information about tumor vessel and cellular damage. The characterization of these changes may improve our understanding of PDT mechanisms and help predict treatment efficacy. We have designed a hybrid system that can non-invasively measure in vivo hemodynamic changes and provide independent information about tumor oxygenation and blood flow. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) monitors blood flow by measuring the optical phase shifts caused by moving blood cells, while diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) spectroscopy measures tissue absorption and scattering. When mounted on a camera, our unique probe allows non-contact measurements that avoid compressing the tumor and altering blood flow. An optical filter mounted in front of the camera lens cut off light below 650nm, which allowed monitoring of blood flow during PDT. The utility of the hybrid system was demonstrated by monitoring the hemodynamic changes during and after PDT in mice bearing the experimental radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF). For the first time, we non-invasively and continually monitored the in vivo flow changes during PDT. Relative oxygen consumption was calculated using flow values measured by DCS and oxygenation measured by a broadband absorption spectrometer. During PDT an initial rapid increase in blood flow was found, followed by a decrease and slow recovery. After PDT, substantial and continued reductions in blood saturation, blood flow and oxygen consumption were found after 3 hours, suggesting that permanent damage to tumor cells and blood vessels had occurred. The comparison of flow values after PDT as measured by DCS and by Power Doppler ultrasound (CWFA) demonstrated that both techniques non-invasively detected similar global changes in tumor blood flow or perfusion after PDT.

  8. Effect of mild hypocapnia on hemodynamic and bispectral index responses to tracheal intubation during propofol anesthesia in children.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Hong Soon; Kim, Jong Yeop

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of mild hypocapnia on hypertension and arousal response after tracheal intubation in children during propofol anesthesia. Forty-four children, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II patients, aged 3-9 years were randomly allocated to either the normocapnia group [end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (ETCO2=35 mmHg, n=22)] or the hypocapnia group (ETCO2=25 mmHg, n=22). Anesthesia was induced with propofol 2.5 mg/kg. Five minutes after the administration of rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg, laryngoscopy was attempted. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), SpO2 and bispectral index (BIS) were measured during induction and intubation periods. The maximal change in the BIS with tracheal intubation (ΔBIS) was defined as the difference between the baseline value and the maximal value within the first 5 min after intubation. Before tracheal intubation, the change in BIS over time was not different between the groups. After tracheal intubation, the changes in the MAP, HR and BIS over time were not significantly different between the groups. The mean value±SD of ΔBIS was 5.7±5.2 and 7.4±5.5 in the normocapnia and hypocapnia groups, respectively, without any intergroup difference. This study showed that mild hypocapnia did not attenuate hemodynamic and BIS responses to tracheal intubation in children during propofol anesthesia. Our results suggested that hyperventilation has no beneficial effect on hemodynamic and arousal responses to tracheal intubation in children. PMID:24526409

  9. Evaluation of Hemodynamic Response Function in Vision and Motor Brain Regions for the Young and Elderly Adults

    PubMed Central

    Morsheddost, Hassan; Asemani, Davud; Alizadeh Shalchy, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Prior studies comparing Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF) in the young and elderly adults based on fMRI data have reported inconsistent findings for brain vision and motor regions in healthy aging. It is shown that the averaging method employed in all previous works has caused this inconsistency. The averaging is so sensitive to outliers and noise. However, fMRI data are obscured with a major contribution of noise particularly in the elderly case. Methods: Deconvolution algorithm is here proposed for HRF extraction to achieve more robustness against noise. In spite of earlier works, proposed deconvolution algorithm yields compatible HRF results using either original or denoised fMRI data, though a large percentage of selected active voxels change in the latter case. In the current study, event-related fMRI data have been used for 18 subjects (8 young and 10 elderly adults) with a simple visual and motor task of pressing a key with index in response to the visual presentation of the word tap. Considering anatomically-defined vision and motor regions and preprocessing steps in FSL and SPM, the activated voxels have been selected according to t-test for which HRF is estimated using deconvolution method. Results: Experimental results demonstrate that HRF peak amplitudes do not differ significantly (P=0.8) in the vision region for the young and the elderly. In motor region, the HRF peak significantly increases for the young compared to the elderly (P<0.03). Repeating the procedure on the denoised fMRI data using MDL algorithm, the same results have been obtained. Discussion: In this study, a comparative study has been realized on the hemodynamic response properties associated with the young and the elderly adults on a simple visual and motor task.

  10. Angiotensin inhibition in severe heart failure: acute central and limb hemodynamic effects of captopril with observations on sustained oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Faxon, D P; Halperin, J L; Creager, M A; Gavras, H; Schick, E C; Ryan, T J

    1981-05-01

    The systemic, pulmonary, and limb circulatory responses to the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, were determined in 10 patients with severe, chronic heart failure. Immediate effects include sustained reductions in arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and improvement in cardiac output, as reported with other vasodilator drugs. Calf vascular resistance did not change despite substantial lowering of total systemic vascular resistance, indicating that arteriolar dilatation occurred on a selective basis. Transient reduction in mean right atrial pressure paralleled slight calf venodilatation, but effects upon the resistance vasculature predominated. Plasma renin activity and norepinephrine concentrations increased after therapy in the acute phase as plasma aldosterone levels consistently fell. During maintenance oral treatment over 7 to 15 months (median, 11.5 months), patients displayed symptomatic benefit, improved functional capacity, and greater exercise tolerance. No major adverse reactions developed. These findings suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition with captopril in congestive heart failure patients improved cardiocirculatory function through selective arteriolar dilatation. The reordering of regional blood flow which appears to result from release of angiotensin-mediated vasoconstriction, as well as the suppression of aldosterone, may underlie the prolonged benefit observed in these patients. This oral vasodilator appears to represent an effective adjunct for the treatment of advanced, chronic heart failure refractory to conventional measures. PMID:7013458

  11. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress magnitude.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2012-02-15

    The adaptation of vascular endothelial cells to shear stress alteration induced by global hemodynamic changes, such as those accompanying exercise or digestion, is an essential component of normal endothelial physiology in vivo. An understanding of the transient regulation of endothelial phenotype during adaptation to changes in mural shear will advance our understanding of endothelial biology and may yield new insights into the mechanism of atherogenesis. In this study, we characterized the adaptive response of arterial endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress magnitude in well-defined in vitro settings. Porcine endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal level shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz for 24 h, after which an acute increase in shear stress to 30 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) was applied. Endothelial permeability nearly doubled after 40-min exposure to the elevated shear stress and then decreased gradually. Transcriptomics studies using microarray techniques identified 86 genes that were sensitive to the elevated shear. The acute increase in shear stress promoted the expression of a group of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. The adaptive response of the global gene expression profile is triphasic, consisting of an induction period, an early adaptive response (ca. 45 min) and a late remodeling response. Our results suggest that endothelial cells exhibit a specific phenotype during the adaptive response to changes in shear stress; this phenotype is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. PMID:22140046

  12. Effects of chronic dietary nitrate supplementation on the hemodynamic response to dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Seok; Stebbins, Charles L; Jung, Eunji; Nho, Hosung; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Chang, Myoung-Jei; Choi, Hyun-Min

    2015-09-01

    While acute treatment with beetroot juice (BRJ) containing nitrate (NO3 (-)) can lower systolic blood pressure (SBP), afterload, and myocardial O2 demand during submaximal exercise, effects of chronic supplementation with BRJ (containing a relatively low dose of NO3 (-), 400 mg) on cardiac output (CO), SBP, total peripheral resistance (TPR), and the work of the heart in response to dynamic exercise are not known. Thus, in 14 healthy males (22 ± 1 yr), we compared effects of 15 days of both BRJ and nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (NDBRJ) supplementation on plasma concentrations of NOx (NO3 (-)/NO2 (-)), SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), CO, TPR, and rate pressure product (RPP) at rest and during progressive cycling exercise. Endothelial function was also assessed via flow-mediated dilation (FMD). BRJ supplementation increased plasma NOx from 83.8 ± 13.8 to 167.6 ± 13.2 μM. Compared with NDBRJ, BRJ reduced SBP, DBP, MAP, and TPR at rest and during exercise (P < 0.05). In addition, RPP was decreased during exercise, while CO was increased, but only at rest and the 30% workload (P < 0.05). BRJ enhanced FMD-induced increases in brachial artery diameter (pre: 12.3 ± 1.6%; post: 17.8 ± 1.9%). We conclude that 1) chronic supplementation with BRJ lowers blood pressure and vascular resistance at rest and during exercise and attenuates RPP during exercise and 2) these effects may be due, in part, to enhanced endothelium-induced vasodilation in contracting skeletal muscle. Findings suggest that BRJ can act as a dietary nutraceutical capable of enhancing O2 delivery and reducing work of the heart, such that exercise can be performed at a given workload for a longer period of time before the onset of fatigue. PMID:26084693

  13. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  14. Hemodynamic, renal, and hormonal responses to alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Ogihara, T; Nakamaru, M; Hara, H; Higaki, J; Rakugi, H; Tateyama, H; Minamino, T; Iinuma, K; Kumahara, Y

    1987-08-01

    Hemodynamic, renal, and hormonal effects of intravenous bolus injection of 50 micrograms synthetic alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha-hANP) were studied in eight patients with congestive heart failure. alpha-hANP caused significant reductions in mean blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. These responses were sustained up to 90 minutes and not accompanied by reflex tachycardia. Cardiac index and stroke volume index increased significantly at 90 minutes and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and mean right atrial pressure remained unchanged. Urine volume, urinary sodium excretion, creatinine clearance, and fractional excretion of sodium increased significantly, but fractional excretion of potassium and phosphate did not change. Elevated plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone, and norepinephrine were suppressed after the injection of alpha-hANP. The bolus injection of this peptide has moderately hypotensive, vasorelaxant, and natriuretic effects in patients with congestive heart failure. PMID:2955995

  15. An Analysis on Lyapunov Spectrum of Hemodynamic Response in Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopic Measurement during Different Imaginary Motor Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soe, Ni Ni; Nakagawa, Masahiro

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the novel approach to evaluate the effects of different motor activation tasks of functional near infrared spectroscopy signal (fNIRS). Functional near infrared spectroscopy is a practical non-invasive optical technique to detect characteristic of hemodynamic response during functional activation of the cerebral cortex. In this paper, fNIRS measurements were made in the area of motor cortex. Three subjects, aged 23-30 years, participated in the experiment. The application of the Lyapunov analysis which is a method of nonlinear analysis to analyze and to quantify the chaotic property in the time series of the hemoglobin dynamics of the various motor imagery tasks of fNIRS signal was presented. The strength of chaos was estimated by the Kolmogorov entropy which is related to Lyapunov spectrum. Experimental results show that these nonlinear measures are good discriminators of NIRS signals. The Lyapunov spectra, Lyapunov dimension (DL), and Kolmogorov entropy (K) all indicated chaotic behavior.

  16. The acute phase response in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Herrán, Andrés; Sierra-Biddle, Deirdre; García-Unzueta, Maria Teresa; Puente, Jesús; Vázquez-Barquero, José Luis; Antonio Amado, José

    2005-12-01

    An acute-phase response (APR), manifested as an increase of acute-phase proteins has been shown in major depression. Panic disorder (PD) may share some aetiopathogenic mechanisms with depression, but APR has not been studied in this disorder. Forty-one panic patients in the first stages of their illness were compared with 32 healthy subjects of comparable sex, age, and body mass index. Clinical diagnosis was established with the mini international neuropsychiatric interview, and severity with the panic disorder severity scale and the CGI scale. Laboratory determinations included four acute phase proteins (APPs) [albumin, gammaglobulins, fibrinogen, C-reactive-protein (CRP)] and basal cortisol level. Patients were studied after 8-wk follow-up taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to assess the evolution of the APPs. Gammaglobulin levels were lower, and both cortisol and CRP levels were higher in PD patients than in controls. APP did not differ between patients with or without agoraphobia. At follow-up, patients who responded to SSRIs presented a decrease in albumin levels, and a trend towards a decrease in cortisol and CRP compared with levels at intake. The conclusions of this study are that there is an APR in patients suffering from PD, and this APR tends to diminish after a successful treatment with SSRIs. PMID:15927091

  17. Effect of Etomidate Versus Combination of Propofol-Ketamine and Thiopental-Ketamine on Hemodynamic Response to Laryngoscopy and Intubation: A Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Firouzian, Abolfazl; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Emadi, Seyed Abdollah; Davanlou, Ali; Motamed, Nima; Yousefi Abdolmaleki, Ensieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and intubation frequently used for airway management during general anesthesia, is frequently associated with undesirable hemodynamic disturbances. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of etomidate, combination of propofol-ketamine and thiopental-ketamine as induction agents on hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Patients and Methods: In a double blind, randomized clinical trial a total of 120 adult patients of both sexes, aged 18 - 45 years, scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned into three equally sized groups. Patients in group A received etomidate (0.3 mg/kg) plus normal saline as placebo. Patients in group B and C received propofol (1.5 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) and thiopental sodium (3 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), respectively for anesthesia induction. Before laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, immediately after, and also one and three minutes after the procedures, hemodynamic values (SBP, DBP, MAP and HR) were measured. Results: A repeated measurement ANOVA showed significant changes in mean SBP and DBP between the time points (P < 0.05). In addition, the main effect of MAP and HR were statistically significant during the course of study (P < 0.05). Furthermore, after induction of anesthesia, the three study groups had significantly different SBP, DBP and MAP changes overtime (P < 0.05). However, HR changes over time were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Combination of propofol-ketamine had superior hemodynamic stability compared to other induction agents. Conclusions: Combination of propofol-ketamine may be recommended as an effective and safe induction agent for attenuating hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and intubation with better hemodynamic stability. Although, further well-designed randomized clinical trials to confirm the safety and efficacy of this combination, especially in critically ill patients or patients with

  18. Hemodynamic response characteristics of healthy people to changes in meteorological and geomagnetic factors in the north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenchenko, T. A.; Varlamova, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of variations in meteorological and geomagnetic factors on hemodynamic parameters (HP) in 27 healthy volunteers who are residents of Syktyvkar (daily monitoring of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) and stroke and cardiac output for the period from December 1, 2003, to December 31, 2004). It is shown that temperature variations and geomagnetic activity level (GMA) make the greatest impact on HP changes (85 and 48% cases, respectively). The BP level increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing levels of GMA. The sensitivity of systolic and diastolic blood pressure to the meteorological and geomagnetic factors is approximately twice as high as the sensitivity of other HP to them. The individual values of seasonal changes in BP parameters are 4-9 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 3-6 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The estimates of the characteristics of meteorological and geomagnetic sensitivity in residents of northern latitudes are in good agreement with the results obtained by us earlier for other climatic zones and geomagnetic conditions, logically complementing and enhancing the common space-time picture of the reactions of the human body to external impacts.

  19. Hemodynamic responses on prefrontal cortex related to meditation and attentional task

    PubMed Central

    Deepeshwar, Singh; Vinchurkar, Suhas Ashok; Visweswaraiah, Naveen Kalkuni; Nagendra, Hongasandra RamaRao

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies state that meditation increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The present study employed functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to evaluate the relative hemodynamic changes in PFC during a cognitive task. Twenty-two healthy male volunteers with ages between 18 and 30 years (group mean age ± SD; 22.9 ± 4.6 years) performed a color-word stroop task before and after 20 min of meditation and random thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed followed by a post hoc analysis with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons between the mean values of “During” and “Post” with “Pre” state. During meditation there was an increased in oxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbO) and total hemoglobin (ΔTHC) concentration with reduced deoxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbR) concentration over the right prefrontal cortex (rPFC), whereas in random thinking there was increased ΔHbR with reduced total hemoglobin concentration on the rPFC. The mean reaction time (RT) was shorter during stroop color word task with concomitant reduction in ΔTHC after meditation, suggestive of improved performance and efficiency in task related to attention. Our findings demonstrated that meditation increased cerebral oxygenation and enhanced performance, which was associated with activation of the PFC. PMID:25741245

  20. Hemodynamic responses on prefrontal cortex related to meditation and attentional task.

    PubMed

    Deepeshwar, Singh; Vinchurkar, Suhas Ashok; Visweswaraiah, Naveen Kalkuni; Nagendra, Hongasandra RamaRao

    2014-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies state that meditation increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The present study employed functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to evaluate the relative hemodynamic changes in PFC during a cognitive task. Twenty-two healthy male volunteers with ages between 18 and 30 years (group mean age ± SD; 22.9 ± 4.6 years) performed a color-word stroop task before and after 20 min of meditation and random thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed followed by a post hoc analysis with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons between the mean values of "During" and "Post" with "Pre" state. During meditation there was an increased in oxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbO) and total hemoglobin (ΔTHC) concentration with reduced deoxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbR) concentration over the right prefrontal cortex (rPFC), whereas in random thinking there was increased ΔHbR with reduced total hemoglobin concentration on the rPFC. The mean reaction time (RT) was shorter during stroop color word task with concomitant reduction in ΔTHC after meditation, suggestive of improved performance and efficiency in task related to attention. Our findings demonstrated that meditation increased cerebral oxygenation and enhanced performance, which was associated with activation of the PFC. PMID:25741245

  1. Concurrent fMRI and optical measures for the investigation of the hemodynamic response function.

    PubMed

    Kennerley, Aneurin J; Berwick, Jason; Martindale, John; Johnston, David; Papadakis, Nikos; Mayhew, John E

    2005-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal variations are based on a combination of changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV), and blood oxygenation. We investigated the relationship between these hemodynamic parameters in the rodent barrel cortex by performing fMRI concurrently with laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) or optical imaging spectroscopy (OIS), following whisker stimulation and hypercapnic challenge. A difference between the positions of the maximum blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) and CBV changes was observed in coronal fMRI maps, with the BOLD region being more superficial. A 6.5% baseline blood volume fraction in this superficial region dropped to 4% in deeper cortical layers (corresponding to total hemoglobin baseline volumes Hbt0 = 110 microM and 67 microM, respectively), as inferred from maps of deltaR2*. Baseline volume profiles were used to parameterize the Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) to interpret the 2D OIS. From this it was found that the optical blood volume measurements (i.e., changes in total hemoglobin) equated with CBV-MRI measurements when the MRI data were taken from superficial cortical layers. Optical measures of activation showed a good spatial overlap with fMRI measurements taken in the same plane (covering the right hemisphere surface). Changes in CBV and CBF followed the scaling relationship CBV = CBF(alpha), with mean alpha = 0.38 +/- 0.06. PMID:16032695

  2. Functional Hemodynamic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic monitoring is the assessment of the dynamic interactions of hemodynamic variables in response to a defined perturbation. Dynamic tissue O2 saturation (StO2) responses to complete stop flow conditions (vascular occlusion test), which can be created by measuring hand StO2 and occluding flow with a blood pressure cuff, assesses cardiovascular sufficiency and microcirculatory blood flow distribution. Recent interest in functional hemodynamic monitoring for the bedside assessment of cardiovascular insufficiency has heightened with the documentation of its accuracy in predicting volume responsiveness using a wide variety of monitoring devices both invasive and non-invasive and across multiple patient groups and clinical conditions. Accordingly, fluid responsiveness can be predicted in a quantities fashion by measuring as arterial pulse pressure variation, left ventricular stroke volume variation or their surrogates during positive pressure breathing or the change in cardiac output response to a passive leg raising maneuver. However, volume responsiveness, though important, reflects only part of the overall spectrum of functional physiological variables that can be measured to define physiologic state and monitor response to therapy. PMID:25435480

  3. Computer program for analysis of hemodynamic response to head-up tilt test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ŚwiÄ tek, Eliza; Cybulski, Gerard; Koźluk, Edward; PiÄ tkowska, Agnieszka; Niewiadomski, Wiktor

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to create a computer program, written in the MATLAB environment, which enables the visualization and analysis of hemodynamic parameters recorded during a passive tilt test using the CNS Task Force Monitor System. The application was created to help in the assessment of the relationship between the values and dynamics of changes of the selected parameters and the risk of orthostatic syncope. The signal analysis included: R-R intervals (RRI), heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (sBP), diastolic blood pressure (dBP), mean blood pressure (mBP), stroke volume (SV), stroke index (SI), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), total peripheral resistance (TPR), total peripheral resistance index (TPRI), ventricular ejection time (LVET) and thoracic fluid content (TFC). The program enables the user to visualize waveforms for a selected parameter and to perform smoothing with selected moving average parameters. It allows one to construct the graph of means for any range, and the Poincare plot for a selected time range. The program automatically determines the average value of the parameter before tilt, its minimum and maximum value immediately after changing positions and the times of their occurrence. It is possible to correct the automatically detected points manually. For the RR interval, it determines the acceleration index (AI) and the brake index (BI). It is possible to save calculated values to an XLS with a name specified by user. The application has a user-friendly graphical interface and can run on a computer that has no MATLAB software.

  4. Variability in coronary hemodynamics in response to ergonovine in patients with normal coronary arteries and atypical chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A.B.; Donmichael, T.A.; Botvinick, E.H.; Ishimori, T.; Parmley, W.W.; Chatterjee, K.

    1983-03-01

    Because an increase in coronary vascular resistance in response to ergonovine maleate has been suggested as a possible diagnostic aid for variant angina, changes were evaluated in coronary hemodynamics and serial myocardial thallium-201 perfusion scans in 15 patients without angina and with normal coronary arteries in response to ergonovine (0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 mg intravenously). For the group, heart rate-blood pressure product increased significantly (p less than 0.001) without any change in coronary sinus flow, coronary vascular resistance, myocardial oxygen extraction, arterial-coronary sinus oxygen difference and lactate extraction. In 7 of 15 patients, however, coronary vascular resistance increased (mean 39%, range 11 to 75%, probability (p) less than 0.001), and coronary sinus flow decreased (14%, p less than 0.001), despite an increase in heart rate-blood pressure product (36%, p less than 0.02). No electrocardiographic, metabolic or thallium-201 scan abnormalities occurred. Therefore, significant increases in coronary vascular resistance in response to ergonovine may occur in patients with normal coronary arteries and atypical chest pain.

  5. Hemodynamic Response of the Supplementary Motor Area during Locomotor Tasks with Upright versus Horizontal Postures in Humans.

    PubMed

    Yozu, Arito; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakajima, Katsumi; Hara, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    To understand cortical mechanisms related to truncal posture control during human locomotion, we investigated hemodynamic responses in the supplementary motor area (SMA) with quadrupedal and bipedal gaits using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in 10 healthy adults. The subjects performed three locomotor tasks where the degree of postural instability varied biomechanically, namely, hand-knee quadrupedal crawling (HKQuad task), upright quadrupedalism using bilateral Lofstrand crutches (UpQuad task), and typical upright bipedalism (UpBi task), on a treadmill. We measured the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) during the tasks. The oxy-Hb significantly decreased in the SMA during the HKQuad task, whereas it increased during the UpQuad task. No significant responses were observed during the UpBi task. Based on the degree of oxy-Hb responses, we ranked these locomotor tasks as UpQuad > UpBi > HKQuad. The order of the different tasks did not correspond with postural instability of the tasks. However, qualitative inspection of oxy-Hb time courses showed that oxy-Hb waveform patterns differed between upright posture tasks (peak-plateau-trough pattern for the UpQuad and UpBi tasks) and horizontal posture task (downhill pattern for the HKQuad task). Thus, the SMA may contribute to the control of truncal posture accompanying locomotor movements in humans. PMID:27413555

  6. Hemodynamic Response of the Supplementary Motor Area during Locomotor Tasks with Upright versus Horizontal Postures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakajima, Katsumi; Hara, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    To understand cortical mechanisms related to truncal posture control during human locomotion, we investigated hemodynamic responses in the supplementary motor area (SMA) with quadrupedal and bipedal gaits using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in 10 healthy adults. The subjects performed three locomotor tasks where the degree of postural instability varied biomechanically, namely, hand-knee quadrupedal crawling (HKQuad task), upright quadrupedalism using bilateral Lofstrand crutches (UpQuad task), and typical upright bipedalism (UpBi task), on a treadmill. We measured the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) during the tasks. The oxy-Hb significantly decreased in the SMA during the HKQuad task, whereas it increased during the UpQuad task. No significant responses were observed during the UpBi task. Based on the degree of oxy-Hb responses, we ranked these locomotor tasks as UpQuad > UpBi > HKQuad. The order of the different tasks did not correspond with postural instability of the tasks. However, qualitative inspection of oxy-Hb time courses showed that oxy-Hb waveform patterns differed between upright posture tasks (peak-plateau-trough pattern for the UpQuad and UpBi tasks) and horizontal posture task (downhill pattern for the HKQuad task). Thus, the SMA may contribute to the control of truncal posture accompanying locomotor movements in humans. PMID:27413555

  7. Post-resistance exercise hemodynamic and autonomic responses: Comparison between normotensive and hypertensive men.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, A C C; Sousa, J C S; Cavalli, A A P; Silva, N D; Costa, L A R; Tobaldini, E; Montano, N; Silva, G V; Ortega, K; Mion, D; Tinucci, T; Forjaz, C L M

    2015-08-01

    To compare post-resistance exercise hypotension (PREH) and its mechanisms in normotensive and hypertensive individuals, 14 normotensives and 12 hypertensives underwent two experimental sessions: control (rest) and exercise (seven exercises, three sets, 50% of one repetition maximum). Hemodynamic and autonomic clinic measurements were taken before (Pre) and at two moments post-interventions (Post 1: between 30 and 60 min; Post 2: after 7 h). Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was monitored for 24 h. At Post 1, exercise decreased systolic BP similarly in normotensives and hypertensives (-8 ± 2 vs -13 ± 2 mmHg, P > 0.05), whereas diastolic BP decreased more in hypertensives (-4 ± 1 vs -9 ± 1 mmHg, P < 0.05). Cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance did not change in normotensives and hypertensives (0.0 ± 0.3 vs 0.0 ± 0.3 L/min; -1 ± 1 vs -2 ± 2 U, P > 0.05). After exercise, heart rate (+13 ± 3 vs +13 ± 2 bpm) and its variability (low- to high-frequency components ratio, 1.9 ± 0.4 vs +1.4 ± 0.3) increased whereas stroke volume (-14 ± 5 vs -11 ± 5 mL) decreased similarly in normotensives and hypertensives (all, P > 0.05). At Post 2, all variables returned to pre-intervention, and ambulatory data were similar between sessions. Thus, a session of resistance exercise promoted PREH in normotensives and hypertensives. Although this PREH was greater in hypertensives, it did not last during the ambulatory period, which limits its clinical relevance. In addition, the mechanisms of PREH were similar in hypertensives and normotensives. PMID:24981630

  8. Impact of task-related changes in heart rate on estimation of hemodynamic response and model fit.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Sarah F; Ivry, Richard B; Schlerf, John E

    2016-05-15

    The blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal, as measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), is widely used as a proxy for changes in neural activity in the brain. Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and respiratory variation (RV) affect the BOLD signal in a way that may interfere with the estimation and detection of true task-related neural activity. This interference is of particular concern when these variables themselves show task-related modulations. We first establish that a simple movement task reliably induces a change in HR but not RV. In group data, the effect of HR on the BOLD response was larger and more widespread throughout the brain than were the effects of RV or phase regressors. The inclusion of HR regressors, but not RV or phase regressors, had a small but reliable effect on the estimated hemodynamic response function (HRF) in M1 and the cerebellum. We next asked whether the inclusion of a nested set of physiological regressors combining phase, RV, and HR significantly improved the model fit in individual participants' data sets. There was a significant improvement from HR correction in M1 for the greatest number of participants, followed by RV and phase correction. These improvements were more modest in the cerebellum. These results indicate that accounting for task-related modulation of physiological variables can improve the detection and estimation of true neural effects of interest. PMID:26944859

  9. Caudal bupivacaine and morphine provides effective postoperative analgesia but does not prevent hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum for major laparoscopic surgeries in children.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Riddhi; Baidya, Dalim K; Arora, Mahesh Kumar; Maitra, Souvik; Darlong, Vanlal; Goswami, Devalina; Mohanaselvi, S; Bajpai, Minu

    2015-08-01

    The use of a caudal block in laparoscopic surgery in children is limited to minor procedures like inguinal hernia repair, and intravenous opioids remain the analgesic modality of choice in major laparoscopic surgery. However, a caudal block is frequently performed at our institute even for laparoscopic surgery. Therefore, we planned to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of caudal bupivacaine and morphine in major laparoscopic surgery as compared to intravenous opioids. Our hypothesis was that a single-shot caudal block would increase the duration of analgesia and minimize the hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum. After institutional ethics committee clearance, data were collected for 65 ASA I-II children aged 6 months to 12 years who underwent laparoscopic surgery in the last 14 months. Demographic, surgical, and perioperative anesthetic and analgesic data were noted and analyzed. Twenty-four children received a caudal block with 0.25 % bupivacaine (1-1.25 ml/kg) with morphine (30-50 mcg/kg). In the caudal group, the time to first analgesic request was increased (165 vs. 45 min; p = 0.00) and tachycardia response to port site incision was less observed (33 vs. 63 % children; p = 0.019). Hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum was equal in both of the groups. Single-shot caudal injection of local anesthetic with morphine reduces port site skin incision response and increases the duration of postoperative analgesia but fails to prevent hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum. PMID:25686563

  10. Comparing Clonidine and Lidocaine on Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation in Controlled Hypertensive Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltani Mohammadi, Sussan; Maziar, Alireza; Saliminia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemodynamic fluctuations in response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation and their potential hazards have been well-recognized, especially in hypertensive patients. Many drugs in various combinations have been used to attenuate these adverse responses. Objectives: We conducted a study to compare lidocaine with clonidine on the attenuation of hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, in controlled hypertensive patients undergoing general anesthesia. Patients and Methods: Eighty-six patients of American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class II, who were aged 18 to 65-years-old and were scheduled for elective surgeries under general anesthesia, were included. The patients were randomly divided into two equal groups. The clonidine group received 0.2 mg oral clonidine 90 minutes before surgery and the lidocaine group received a placebo tablet at the same time. All patients in both groups were anesthetized with the same technique, including: intravenous fentanyl 3 mcg/kg, sodium thiopental 5 mg/kg, and atracurium 0.5 mg/kg. The lidocaine group received 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine but the clonidine group received the same volume of saline ninety seconds before intubation. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded before intubation and 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after endotracheal intubation. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups’ hemodynamic parameters, including heart rate and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures at the measured points. There were also no significant differences within each group in hemodynamic responses at the measured points (P > 0.05). Twenty patients in the clonidine and three patients in the lidocaine group complained of mouth dryness (P = 0.001). Fourteen patients in the clonidine and four patients in the lidocaine group had bradycardia (P = 0.008). Nineteen patients in the clonidine and six patients in the lidocaine group had orthostatic hypotension (P = 0

  11. Inter-Subject Correlation of Brain Hemodynamic Responses During Watching a Movie: Localization in Space and Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Sams, Mikko; Tohka, Jussi

    2009-01-01

    Cinema is a promising naturalistic stimulus that enables, for instance, elicitation of robust emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Inter-subject correlation (ISC) has been used as a model-free analysis method to map the highly complex hemodynamic responses that are evoked during watching a movie. Here, we extended the ISC analysis to frequency domain using wavelet analysis combined with non-parametric permutation methods for making voxel-wise statistical inferences about frequency-band specific ISC. We applied these novel analysis methods to a dataset collected in our previous study where 12 subjects watched an emotionally engaging movie “Crash” during fMRI scanning. Our results suggest that several regions within the frontal and temporal lobes show ISC predominantly at low frequency bands, whereas visual cortical areas exhibit ISC also at higher frequencies. It is possible that these findings relate to recent observations of a cortical hierarchy of temporal receptive windows, or that the types of events processed in temporal and prefrontal cortical areas (e.g., social interactions) occur over longer time periods than the stimulus features processed in the visual areas. Software tools to perform frequency-specific ISC analysis, together with a visualization application, are available as open source Matlab code. PMID:20428497

  12. Voluntary Modulation of Hemodynamic Responses in Swallowing Related Motor Areas: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Based Neurofeedback Study

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Silvia Erika; Gressenberger, Bettina; Kurzmann, Jürgen; Neuper, Christa; Wood, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we show for the first time that motor imagery of swallowing, which is defined as the mental imagination of a specific motor act without overt movements by muscular activity, can be successfully used as mental strategy in a neurofeedback training paradigm. Furthermore, we demonstrate its effects on cortical correlates of swallowing function. Therefore, N = 20 healthy young adults were trained to voluntarily increase their hemodynamic response in swallowing related brain areas as assessed with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). During seven training sessions, participants received either feedback of concentration changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb group, N = 10) or deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxy-Hb group, N = 10) over the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) during motor imagery of swallowing. Before and after the training, we assessed cortical activation patterns during motor execution and imagery of swallowing. The deoxy-Hb group was able to voluntarily increase deoxy-Hb over the IFG during imagery of swallowing. Furthermore, swallowing related cortical activation patterns were more pronounced during motor execution and imagery after the training compared to the pre-test, indicating cortical reorganization due to neurofeedback training. The oxy-Hb group could neither control oxy-Hb during neurofeedback training nor showed any cortical changes. Hence, successful modulation of deoxy-Hb over swallowing related brain areas led to cortical reorganization and might be useful for future treatments of swallowing dysfunction. PMID:26575032

  13. Effects of race and sex on blood pressure and hemodynamic stress response as a function of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Ahwal; Mills; Kalshan; Nelesen

    1997-08-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of race and sex on responses to cardiovascular stress during two menstrual cycle phases. METHODS: Subjects were exposed to two stressors, a mirror star-tracing task and a speaking task. Blood pressure, heart rate, and impedance cardiography measures of reactivity were recorded. Women were examined both during the follicular and during the luteal phase of their menstrual cycle with men matched for the number of days between testing sessions (approximately 6 weeks). The subjects were 33 black and white women and 37 black and white men who were healthy, normotensive, and not being administered medication. RESULTS: For black women, the reactivity of the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) to the speaking task was less in the luteal phase than it was in the follicular phase, whereas for white women (and men) there was no difference between the two phases (testing sessions) (P < 0.04). Women had greater heart rate reactivities in both menstrual phases than did men (P < 0.05). During the stage of preparing to speak, black and white women had greater DBP reactivities than did men; however, their DBP responses were attenuated during the luteal phase compared with the follicular phase (P < 0.05). In reponse to the mirror star task, white men and women had greater DBP than did blacks (P < 0.05) whereas blacks had less of a decrease in stroke volume than did whites (P < 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The present investigation confirms results from previous studies on the effects of sex and menstrual cycle on the response to hemodynamic stress. Our findings also suggest that racial differences in stress reactivity may influence this phenomenon. PMID:10234110

  14. Predictors of response to terlipressin plus albumin in hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) type 1: Relationship of serum creatinine to hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Thomas D.; Sanyal, Arun J.; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Blei, Andres; Carl, Daniel; Bexon, Alice S.; Teuber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Administration of terlipressin plus albumin is effective in reversing type 1 HRS as compared to albumin alone. However, only about 1/3 of patients respond to treatment, therefore, predictors of response and survival would help identify the patients most likely to benefit from treatment. Methods We analyzed our controlled trial of terlipressin vs. placebo (Gastroenterology 2008;134:1360) to define factors predictive of a response and to correlate hemodynamic changes to changes in renal function. Results Single variant analysis showed treatment with terlipressin, MELD score, and baseline serum creatinine to be predictive of HRS reversal. Alcoholic hepatitis, baseline serum creatinine, and MELD score were predictive of survival. When treatment was not considered as a variable, only baseline serum creatinine predicted HRS reversal. Baseline serum creatinine, presence of alcoholic hepatitis, and Child-Pugh score were also predictive of survival on multivariate analysis. The rise in mean arterial pressure (MAP) following terlipressin administration was not predictive of HRS reversal. However, in those who achieved HRS reversal from terlipressin, there was a significant rise in MAP from beginning to end of treatment. Conclusions The most consistent predictor of response to terlipressin and of survival is the baseline serum creatinine. Patients most likely to benefit from terlipressin have earlier onset renal failure (i.e. serum creatinine <5.0 mg/dl). A sustained rise in MAP is required for HRS reversal. As MAP is a surrogate marker for the hyperdynamic circulation, it is only with improvement in the hyperdynamic circulation that HRS reversal is observed. PMID:21167235

  15. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Response to Laryngoscopy and Endotracheal Intubation with Pre Induction IV Fentanyl Versus Combination of IV Fentanyl and Sub Lingual Nitroglycerin Spray

    PubMed Central

    Channaiah, Vijayalakshmi B.; Kurek, Nicholas S.; Moses, Ryder; Chandra, Sathees B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Endotracheal intubation is one of the most invasive stimuli in anesthesia and it's often accompanied by a hemodynamic pressor response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a single pre-induction 2 µg/kg bolus injection of fentanyl followed by two puffs of nitroglycerin sub lingual spray (400 µg /spray) with a thiopentone/suxamethonium sequence in the attenuation of the hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation in normotensive patients. Material and methods: The study consisted of 80 randomly selected ASA physical status I/II male/female adults who were aged between 18 through 60 years and scheduled for elective surgery. Group I received a single 2 µg/kg IV bolus of fentanyl diluted to 5 ml with normal saline 5 min prior to laryngoscopy followed by two puffs of nitroglycerin sub lingual spray (400 µg/spray) 2 minutes prior to intubation (n=40). Group II received a single 2 µg/kg IV bolus of fentanyl diluted to 5 ml with normal saline 5 min prior to laryngoscopy (n=40). Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and rate pressure product were compared to basal values at pre-induction, induction, intubation and post-intubation as well as at time increments of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 min. Results: Fentanyl combined with nitroglycerin did not attenuate hemodynamic pressor responses more than fentanyl alone. Increases of HR (7.9%), DBP (4.0%), MAP (3.6%) and RPP (6.0%) along with attenuation of SBP (2.7%) were observed in the fentanyl-nitroglycerin group as compared to the equivalent control measured values. Conclusions: A single pre-induction bolus injection of fentanyl followed by two puffs of nitroglycerin sub lingual spray in a thiopentone/suxamethonium anesthetic sequence neither successfully attenuates nor successfully suppresses the hemodynamic pressor response more effectively than fentanyl alone in normotensive patients resulting from endotracheal intubation. PMID

  16. Lagrangian postprocessing of computational hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Arzani, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging, modeling and computing have rapidly expanded our capabilities to model hemodynamics in the large vessels (heart, arteries and veins). This data encodes a wealth of information that is often under-utilized. Modeling (and measuring) blood flow in the large vessels typically amounts to solving for the time-varying velocity field in a region of interest. Flow in the heart and larger arteries is often complex, and velocity field data provides a starting point for investigating the hemodynamics. This data can be used to perform Lagrangian particle tracking, and other Lagrangian-based postprocessing. As described herein, Lagrangian methods are necessary to understand inherently transient hemodynamic conditions from the fluid mechanics perspective, and to properly understand the biomechanical factors that lead to acute and gradual changes of vascular function and health. The goal of the present paper is to review Lagrangian methods that have been used in post-processing velocity data of cardiovascular flows. PMID:25059889

  17. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function. PMID:26997623

  18. The Richness of Task-Evoked Hemodynamic Responses Defines a Pseudohierarchy of Functionally Meaningful Brain Networks.

    PubMed

    Orban, Pierre; Doyon, Julien; Petrides, Michael; Mennes, Maarten; Hoge, Richard; Bellec, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging can measure distributed and subtle variations in brain responses associated with task performance. However, it is unclear whether the rich variety of responses observed across the brain is functionally meaningful and consistent across individuals. Here, we used a multivariate clustering approach that grouped brain regions into clusters based on the similarity of their task-evoked temporal responses at the individual level, and then established the spatial consistency of these individual clusters at the group level. We observed a stable pseudohierarchy of task-evoked networks in the context of a delayed sequential motor task, where the fractionation of networks was driven by a gradient of involvement in motor sequence preparation versus execution. In line with theories about higher-level cognitive functioning, this gradient evolved in a rostro-caudal manner in the frontal lobe. In addition, parcellations in the cerebellum and basal ganglia matched with known anatomical territories and fiber pathways with the cerebral cortex. These findings demonstrate that subtle variations in brain responses associated with task performance are systematic enough across subjects to define a pseudohierarchy of task-evoked networks. Such networks capture meaningful functional features of brain organization as shaped by a given cognitive context. PMID:24729172

  19. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2013-09-15

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay. PMID:23851277

  20. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-01-01

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm2 at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay. PMID:23851277

  1. Hemodynamic responses in human multisensory and auditory association cortex to purely visual stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Martin; Baumann, Simon; Marchina, Sarah; Jancke, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent findings of a tight coupling between visual and auditory association cortices during multisensory perception in monkeys and humans raise the question whether consistent paired presentation of simple visual and auditory stimuli prompts conditioned responses in unimodal auditory regions or multimodal association cortex once visual stimuli are presented in isolation in a post-conditioning run. To address this issue fifteen healthy participants partook in a "silent" sparse temporal event-related fMRI study. In the first (visual control) habituation phase they were presented with briefly red flashing visual stimuli. In the second (auditory control) habituation phase they heard brief telephone ringing. In the third (conditioning) phase we coincidently presented the visual stimulus (CS) paired with the auditory stimulus (UCS). In the fourth phase participants either viewed flashes paired with the auditory stimulus (maintenance, CS-) or viewed the visual stimulus in isolation (extinction, CS+) according to a 5:10 partial reinforcement schedule. The participants had no other task than attending to the stimuli and indicating the end of each trial by pressing a button. Results During unpaired visual presentations (preceding and following the paired presentation) we observed significant brain responses beyond primary visual cortex in the bilateral posterior auditory association cortex (planum temporale, planum parietale) and in the right superior temporal sulcus whereas the primary auditory regions were not involved. By contrast, the activity in auditory core regions was markedly larger when participants were presented with auditory stimuli. Conclusion These results demonstrate involvement of multisensory and auditory association areas in perception of unimodal visual stimulation which may reflect the instantaneous forming of multisensory associations and cannot be attributed to sensation of an auditory event. More importantly, we are able to show that brain

  2. Effects of forearm bier block with bretylium on the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to handgrip.

    PubMed

    Lee, F; Shoemaker, J K; McQuillan, P M; Kunselman, A R; Smith, M B; Yang, Q X; Smith, H; Gray, K; Sinoway, L I

    2000-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a reduction in sympathetic tone to exercising forearm muscle would increase blood flow, reduce muscle acidosis, and attenuate reflex responses. Subjects performed a progressive, four-stage rhythmic handgrip protocol before and after forearm bier block with bretylium as forearm blood flow (Doppler) and metabolic (venous effluent metabolite concentration and (31)P-NMR indexes) and autonomic reflex responses (heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathetic nerve traffic) were measured. Bretylium inhibits the release of norepinephrine at the neurovascular junction. Bier block increased blood flow as well as oxygen consumption in the exercising forearm (P < 0.03 and P < 0.02, respectively). However, despite this increase in flow, venous K(+) release and H(+) release were both increased during exercise (P < 0.002 for both indexes). Additionally, minimal muscle pH measured during the first minute of recovery with NMR was lower after bier block (6.41 +/- 0.08 vs. 6.20 +/- 0.06; P < 0.036, simple effects). Meanwhile, reflex effects were unaffected by the bretylium bier block. The results support the conclusion that sympathetic stimulation to muscle during exercise not only limits muscle blood flow but also appears to limit anaerobiosis and H(+) release, presumably through a preferential recruitment of oxidative fibers. PMID:10924057

  3. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on hemodynamic responses of postmenopausal women to passive heating.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, S L; Kenney, W L

    2000-07-01

    To examine the influence of chronic hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the central and peripheral cardiovascular responses of postmenopausal women to direct passive heating, seven women taking estrogen replacement therapy, seven women taking estrogen and progesterone therapy, and seven women not taking HRT were passively heated with water-perfused suits to their individual limit of thermal tolerance. Measurements included heart rate (HR), cardiac output, blood pressure, skin blood flow, splanchnic blood flow, renal blood flow, esophageal temperature, and mean skin temperature. Cardiac output was higher in women taking estrogen and progesterone therapy than in women not taking HRT (7.12 +/- 0.70 vs. 5.02 +/- 0. 57 l/min at the limit of thermal tolerance, respectively; P < 0.05) because of a higher HR. However, when the HR data were plotted as a percentage of the maximum HR or percentage of HR reserve, there were no differences among the three groups of women. Neither splanchnic nor renal blood flow differed among the groups of women. These data suggest that HRT has little effect on the cardiovascular responses to direct passive heating. PMID:10904040

  4. Effects of forearm bier block with bretylium on the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to handgrip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F.; Shoemaker, J. K.; McQuillan, P. M.; Kunselman, A. R.; Smith, M. B.; Yang, Q. X.; Smith, H.; Gray, K.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a reduction in sympathetic tone to exercising forearm muscle would increase blood flow, reduce muscle acidosis, and attenuate reflex responses. Subjects performed a progressive, four-stage rhythmic handgrip protocol before and after forearm bier block with bretylium as forearm blood flow (Doppler) and metabolic (venous effluent metabolite concentration and (31)P-NMR indexes) and autonomic reflex responses (heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathetic nerve traffic) were measured. Bretylium inhibits the release of norepinephrine at the neurovascular junction. Bier block increased blood flow as well as oxygen consumption in the exercising forearm (P < 0.03 and P < 0.02, respectively). However, despite this increase in flow, venous K(+) release and H(+) release were both increased during exercise (P < 0.002 for both indexes). Additionally, minimal muscle pH measured during the first minute of recovery with NMR was lower after bier block (6.41 +/- 0.08 vs. 6.20 +/- 0.06; P < 0.036, simple effects). Meanwhile, reflex effects were unaffected by the bretylium bier block. The results support the conclusion that sympathetic stimulation to muscle during exercise not only limits muscle blood flow but also appears to limit anaerobiosis and H(+) release, presumably through a preferential recruitment of oxidative fibers.

  5. Endothelial Msx1 transduces hemodynamic changes into an arteriogenic remodeling response

    PubMed Central

    Vandersmissen, Ine; Craps, Sander; Depypere, Maarten; Coppiello, Giulia; van Gastel, Nick; Maes, Frederik; Carmeliet, Geert; Schrooten, Jan; Jones, Elizabeth A.V.; Umans, Lieve; Devlieger, Roland; Koole, Michel; Gheysens, Olivier; Zwijsen, An; Aranguren, Xabier L.

    2015-01-01

    Collateral remodeling is critical for blood flow restoration in peripheral arterial disease and is triggered by increasing fluid shear stress in preexisting collateral arteries. So far, no arterial-specific mediators of this mechanotransduction response have been identified. We show that muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1) acts exclusively in collateral arterial endothelium to transduce the extrinsic shear stimulus into an arteriogenic remodeling response. MSX1 was specifically up-regulated in remodeling collateral arteries. MSX1 induction in collateral endothelial cells (ECs) was shear stress driven and downstream of canonical bone morphogenetic protein–SMAD signaling. Flow recovery and collateral remodeling were significantly blunted in EC-specific Msx1/2 knockout mice. Mechanistically, MSX1 linked the arterial shear stimulus to arteriogenic remodeling by activating the endothelial but not medial layer to a proinflammatory state because EC but not smooth muscle cellMsx1/2 knockout mice had reduced leukocyte recruitment to remodeling collateral arteries. This reduced leukocyte infiltration in EC Msx1/2 knockout mice originated from decreased levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1)/vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), whose expression was also in vitro driven by promoter binding of MSX1. PMID:26391659

  6. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  7. Hemodynamic changes in the kidney in a pediatric rat model of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Holthoff, Joseph H; Burns, Samuel T; Wang, Zhen; Thakali, Keshari M; Gokden, Neriman; Rhee, Sung W; Mayeux, Philip R

    2011-07-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality in children. Understanding the development of pediatric sepsis and its effects on the kidney are critical in uncovering new therapies. The goal of this study was to characterize the development of sepsis-induced AKI in the clinically relevant cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of peritonitis in rat pups 17-18 days old. CLP produced severe sepsis demonstrated by time-dependent increase in serum cytokines, NO, markers of multiorgan injury, and renal microcirculatory hypoperfusion. Although blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged after CLP, renal blood flow (RBF) was decreased 61% by 6 h. Renal microcirculatory analysis showed the number of continuously flowing cortical capillaries decreased significantly from 69 to 48% by 6 h with a 66% decrease in red blood cell velocity and a 57% decline in volumetric flow. The progression of renal microcirculatory hypoperfusion was associated with peritubular capillary leakage and reactive nitrogen species generation. Sham adults had higher mean arterial pressure (118 vs. 69 mmHg), RBF (4.2 vs. 1.1 ml·min(-1)·g(-1)), and peritubular capillary velocity (78% continuous flowing capillaries vs. 69%) compared with pups. CLP produced a greater decrease in renal microcirculation in pups, supporting the notion that adult models may not be the most appropriate for studying pediatric sepsis-induced AKI. Lower RBF and reduced peritubular capillary perfusion in the pup suggest the pediatric kidney may be more susceptible to AKI than would be predicted using adults models. PMID:21511700

  8. Hemodynamic and regional blood flow distribution responses to dextran, hydralazine, isoproterenol and amrinone during experimental cardiac tamponade

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, R.W.; Fowler, N.O.; Gabel, M.

    1983-06-01

    Four different interventions were examined in dogs with cardiac tamponade. Infusion of 216 to 288 ml saline solution into the pericardium reduced cardiac output from 3.5 +/- 0.3 to 1.7 +/- 0.2 liters/min as systemic vascular resistance increased from 4,110 +/- 281 to 6,370 +/- 424 dynes . s . cm-5. Left ventricular epicardial and endocardial blood flows were 178 +/- 13 and 220 +/- 12 ml/min per 100 g, respectively, and decreased to 72 +/- 14 and 78 +/- 11 ml/min per 100 g with tamponade. Reductions of 25 to 65% occurred in visceral and brain blood flows and in a composite brain sample. Cardiac output during tamponade was significantly increased by isoproterenol, 0.5 microgram/kg per min intravenously; hydralazine, 40 mg intravenously; dextran infusion or combined hydralazine and dextran, but not by amrinone. Total systemic vascular resistance was reduced by all interventions. Left ventricular epicardial flow was increased by isoproterenol, hydralazine and the hydralazine-dextran combination. Endocardial flow was increased by amrinone and the combination of hydralazine and dextran. Right ventricular myocardial blood flow increased with all interventions except dextran. Kidney cortical and composite brain blood flows were increased by both dextran alone and by the hydralazine-dextran combinations. Blood flow to small intestine was increased by all interventions as was that to large intestine by all except amrinone and hydralazine. Liver blood flow response was variable. The most pronounced hemodynamic and tissue perfusion improvements during cardiac tamponade were effected by combined vasodilation-blood volume expansion with a hydralazine-dextran combination. Isoproterenol had as dramatic an effect but it was short-lived. Amrinone was the least effective intervention.

  9. Microstructural brain differences predict functional hemodynamic responses in a reward processing task.

    PubMed

    Camara, Estela; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Münte, Thomas F

    2010-08-25

    Many aspects of human behavior are driven by rewards, yet different people are differentially sensitive to rewards and punishment. In this study, we show that white matter microstructure in the uncinate/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, defined by fractional anisotropy values derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images, correlates with both short-term (indexed by the fMRI blood oxygenation level-dependent response to reward in the nucleus accumbens) and long-term (indexed by the trait measure sensitivity to punishment) reactivity to rewards. Moreover, trait measures of reward processing were also correlated with reward-related functional activation in the nucleus accumbens. The white matter tract revealed by the correlational analysis connects the anterior temporal lobe with the medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortex and also supplies the ventral striatum. The pattern of strong correlations suggests an intimate relationship between white matter structure and reward-related behavior that may also play a role in a number of pathological conditions, such as addiction and pathological gambling. PMID:20739561

  10. Effect of parameter variations on the hemodynamic response under rotary blood pump assistance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Einly; Dokos, Socrates; Salamonsen, Robert F; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L; Ayre, Peter J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2012-05-01

    Numerical models, able to simulate the response of the human cardiovascular system (CVS) in the presence of an implantable rotary blood pump (IRBP), have been widely used as a predictive tool to investigate the interaction between the CVS and the IRBP under various operating conditions. The present study investigates the effect of alterations in the model parameter values, that is, cardiac contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and total blood volume on the efficiency of rotary pump assistance, using an optimized dynamic heart-pump interaction model previously developed in our laboratory based on animal experimental measurements obtained from five canines. The effect of mean pump speed and the circulatory perturbations on left and right ventricular pressure volume loops, mean aortic pressure, mean cardiac output, pump assistance ratio, and pump flow pulsatility from both the greyhound experiments and model simulations are demonstrated. Furthermore, the applicability of some of the previously proposed control parameters, that is, pulsatility index (PI), gradient of PI with respect to pump speed, pump differential pressure, and aortic pressure are discussed based on our observations from experimental and simulation results. It was found that previously proposed control strategies were not able to perform well under highly varying circulatory conditions. Among these, control algorithms which rely on the left ventricular filling pressure appear to be the most robust as they emulate the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. PMID:22489771

  11. Effects of dichloroacetate on hemodynamic responses to dynamic exercise in dogs.

    PubMed

    Delehanty, J M; Imai, N; Liang, C S

    1992-02-01

    To determine whether lactic acid production contributes significantly to the cardiac responses to muscular dynamic exercise, we administered intravenous sodium dichloroacetate (32 mumol.kg-1.min-1), a pyruvate dehydrogenase activator that facilitates lactate metabolism via the tricarboxylic cycle, in 12 dogs during two graded levels of treadmill exercise. Similar exercise was carried out in nine normal dogs receiving equimolar doses of NaCl. In the latter group, arterial lactate increased progressively from 0.80 +/- 0.11 (SE) mmol/l at rest to 2.13 +/- 0.28 mmol/l by the end of exercise. In contrast, arterial lactate did not change significantly (0.98 +/- 0.12 to 0.95 +/- 0.11 mmol/l) during exercise in dogs receiving dichloroacetate infusion. Dichloroacetate infusion also reduced the increases in plasma norepinephrine, heart rate, and left ventricular contractile indexes that occurred during exercise, suggesting that the sympathetic cardiac stimulation occurring during exercise may be related to the production of lactic acid. However, dichloroacetate affected neither the net increase in cardiac output nor the relationship between total body oxygen consumption and cardiac output that occurred during exercise. Thus we conclude that lactic acid production is not essential to the increase in cardiac output that occurs during mild-to-moderate exercise. PMID:1559926

  12. Effect of propranolol administration on hemodynamic and metabolic responses of burned pediatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, D N; Barrow, R E; Rutan, T C; Minifee, P; Jahoor, F; Wolfe, R R

    1988-01-01

    Hypermetabolism, increased heart rate, and lipolysis are responses to high catecholamine levels associated with burn injury. This study tests the hypothesis that adrenergic beta blockade in burns could reduce myocardial work, lipolysis, and negative nitrogen balance without adversely affecting cardiac or metabolic function. Eighteen patients with burns of 70 +/- 3% total burn surface area (TBSA) (Mean +/- SEM), were studied after a 5-day infusion of 2 mg/Kg of intravenous (I.V.) propranolol infusion every 24 hours without their cardiac output or resting energy expenditure being adversely reduced. Heart rate, left ventricular work, and rate pressure product were significantly reduced by 20, 22, and 36%, respectively (P less than 0.05). Plasma glucose, free fatty acids, triglycerides, and insulin levels remained unchanged. The rate of urea production, however, was significantly increased by 54 +/- 12% in fasted patients, and to a much lesser 12 +/- 2% in fed patients. The marked decrease in myocardial work afforded by propranolol administration may be of clinical benefit in the treatment of large burns. Variations in drug dosage and feeding regimens will, however, need to be perfected to limit catabolic effects. PMID:3052328

  13. Neonatal hemodynamic response to visual cortex activity: high-density near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Steve M.; Gregg, Nick M.; White, Brian R.; Zeff, Benjamin W.; Bjerkaas, Katelin A.; Inder, Terrie E.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2010-03-01

    The neurodevelopmental outcome of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants is a major clinical concern with many infants displaying neurobehavioral deficits in childhood. Functional neuroimaging may provide early recognition of neural deficits in high-risk infants. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has the advantage of providing functional neuroimaging in infants at the bedside. However, limitations in traditional NIRS have included contamination from superficial vascular dynamics in the scalp. Furthermore, controversy exists over the nature of normal vascular, responses in infants. To address these issues, we extend the use of novel high-density NIRS arrays with multiple source-detector distances and a superficial signal regression technique to infants. Evaluations of healthy term-born infants within the first three days of life are performed without sedation using a visual stimulus. We find that the regression technique significantly improves brain activation signal quality. Furthermore, in six out of eight infants, both oxy- and total hemoglobin increases while deoxyhemoglobin decreases, suggesting that, at term, the neurovascular coupling in the visual cortex is similar to that found in healthy adults. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using high-density NIRS arrays in infants to improve signal quality through superficial signal regression, and provide a foundation for further development of high-density NIRS as a clinical tool.

  14. Pulmonary hemodynamic responses to in utero ventilation in very immature fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The onset of ventilation at birth decreases pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) resulting in a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF). As the large cross sectional area of the pulmonary vascular bed develops late in gestation, we have investigated whether the ventilation-induced increase in PBF is reduced in immature lungs. Methods Surgery was performed in fetal sheep at 105 d GA (n = 7; term ~147 d) to insert an endotracheal tube, which was connected to a neonatal ventilation circuit, and a transonic flow probe was placed around the left pulmonary artery. At 110 d GA, fetuses (n = 7) were ventilated in utero (IUV) for 12 hrs while continuous measurements of PBF were made, fetuses were allowed to develop in utero for a further 7 days following ventilation. Results PBF changes were highly variable between animals, increasing from 12.2 ± 6.6 mL/min to a maximum of 78.1 ± 23.1 mL/min in four fetuses after 10 minutes of ventilation. In the remaining three fetuses, little change in PBF was measured in response to IUV. The increases in PBF measured in responding fetuses were not sustained throughout the ventilation period and by 2 hrs of IUV had returned to pre-IUV control values. Discussion and conclusion Ventilation of very immature fetal sheep in utero increased PBF in 57% of fetuses but this increase was not sustained for more than 2 hrs, despite continuing ventilation. Immature lungs can increase PBF during ventilation, however, the present studies show these changes are transient and highly variable. PMID:20723253

  15. Hemodynamic responses to psychological stress: Comparison of normotensive and hypertensive persons using an ambulatory ventricular function monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.Z.; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Newell, J.; McKusick, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1985-05-01

    The development of a portable device for measuring ventricular function allows assessment of hemodynamic responses under a wide range of circumstances. The authors compared the effects of standardized psychological stress (PS) on an index of left ventricular ejection fraction (EFI), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and plasma norepinephrine level (NE) in 6 normotensive (N, mean BP = 121/77 +- 12/8) and six hypertensive (H, mean BP = 137/95 +- 6/6) subjects. PS included 4 minutes of mental arithmetic and a 16 minute psychiatric interview. The interview focused on life stresses such as marital and family discord, job dissatisfaction, monetary insufficiency, health concerns, and bereavement. Changes in EFI, SBP, and NE (..delta.. EFI, ..delta.. SBP, ..delta.. NE) and in their log transformed variances (..delta.. log(var)) were compared to those occurring during a 20 minute period of standarized rest (R) which consisted on listening to relaxing music. Compared to R, all 12 subjects had a significant pressor response to PS (p less than or equal to .05, range = 6 to 29mmHg). There was an increase in mean EFI in 3 N (p less than or equal to .05, range = 0.5 to 2.7) and 3 H (p less than or equal to .05, range = 1.7 to 4.4) and a decrease in 1 N (p less than or equal to .05, -2.3) and 1 H (p less than or equal to .05, -2.3). Mean NE increased in 4 N (p less than or equal to .05, range 110 to 563 pg/ml) and 6 H (p less than or equal to .05, range = 136 to 525 pg/ml). The authors conclude that (1) in both N and H, PS induces significant responses in EFI which varies in direction despite near uniform increases in SBP and NE, and (2) hypertensive persons have a greater change in variability in EFI during PS than do normotensive persons despite equivalent changes in SBP and NE.

  16. Hemodynamic responses of the caudal artery to toxic tall fescue in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Aiken, G E; Kirch, B H; Strickland, J R; Bush, L P; Looper, M L; Schrick, F N

    2007-09-01

    Color Doppler ultrasonography was used to compare blood flow characteristics in the caudal artery of heifers fed diets with endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) infected (E+) or noninfected (E-) tall fescue seed. Eighteen crossbred (Angus x Brangus) heifers were assigned to 6 pens and were fed chopped alfalfa hay for 5 d and chopped alfalfa hay plus a concentrate that contained E-tall fescue seed for 9 d during an adjustment period. An 11-d experimental period followed, with animals in 3 pens fed chopped alfalfa hay plus a concentrate with E+ seed and those in the other 3 pens fed chopped hay plus concentrate with E E- seed. Color Doppler ultrasound measurements (caudal artery area, peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, mean velocity, heart rate, stroke volume, and flow rate) and serum prolactin were monitored during the adjustment (baseline measures) and during the experimental period. Three baseline measures were collected on d 3, 5, and 6 during the adjustment period for comparison to post E+ seed exposure. Statistical analyses compared the proportionate differences between baseline and response at 4, 28, 52, 76, 100, 172, and 268 h from initial feeding of E+ seed. Serum prolactin concentrations on both diets were lower (P <0.001) than baseline beginning at 4 h from the start of the experimental period. However, trends in serum prolactin concentrations for heifers on the E- diet suggested ambient temperature was affecting these concentrations. Caudal artery area in E+ heifers had declined (P <0.10) from baseline by 4 h and was consistently lower (P <0.05) for the remainder of the period. Heart rates for E+ heifers were lower than the baseline rate from 4 (P <0.10) to 100 (P <0.001) h, but were similar (P >0.10) to the baseline for 172 and 268 h measures. Blood flow in E+ heifers was consistently lower than the baseline from 4 (P <0.05) to 172 (P <0.001) h, but was similar to the baseline at 268 h when heart rate was similar to the baseline rate

  17. Interleukin-1 receptor blockade improves survival and hemodynamic performance in Escherichia coli septic shock, but fails to alter host responses to sublethal endotoxemia.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, E; Marano, M A; Van Zee, K J; Rock, C S; Hawes, A S; Thompson, W A; DeForge, L; Kenney, J S; Remick, D G; Bloedow, D C

    1992-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the extent to which an endogenous interleukin-1 (IL-1) response contributes to the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of sublethal endotoxemia or lethal Gram-negative septic shock. Young, healthy baboons received either a sublethal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an LD100 of live Escherichia coli bacteria, and one half of the animals in each group were continuously infused with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Plasma IL-1 beta was not detected in this model of endotoxemia. Administration of IL-1ra had only minimal effects on the modest hemodynamic and metabolic responses to sublethal endotoxemia, and did not attenuate the plasma cytokine response. In contrast, high circulating levels of IL-1 beta (range 300-800 pg/ml) were seen during lethal E. coli septic shock. IL-1ra treatment significantly attenuated the decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) (from -72 +/- 8 to -43 +/- 6 mm Hg; P less than 0.05) and cardiac output (from -0.81 +/- 0.17 to -0.48 +/- 0.15 liter/min; P less than 0.05), and significantly improved survival from 43 to 100% at 24 h (P less than 0.05). The plasma IL-1 beta and IL-6 responses to lethal E. coli septic shock were also significantly diminished by IL-1ra treatment (P less than 0.05), whereas tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) concentrations were unaffected. We conclude that an exaggerated systemic IL-1 beta response is characteristic of lethal E. coli septic shock, and contributes significantly to the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of E. coli septic shock. IL-1ra can significantly attenuate the cytokine cascade and improve survival. PMID:1533231

  18. Inhalation of diethylamine--acute nasal effects and subjective response

    SciTech Connect

    Lundqvist, G.R.; Yamagiwa, M.; Pedersen, O.F.; Nielsen, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    Adult volunteers were exposed to 25 ppm (75 mg/m3) diethylamine in a climate chamber for 15 min in order to study the acute nasal reactions to an exposure equivalent to the present threshold limit value-short-term exposure limit. Changes in nasal volume and nasal resistance were measured by acoustic rhinometry and by rhinomanometry. Acute change in nasal volume, usually seen as acute nasal mucosa response to thermal stimuli, was not observed, nor was an acute change in nasal airway resistance. In a subsequent experiment, the aim was to measure acute sensory effects. Exposure to a concentration increasing from 0 to 12 ppm took place for 60 min, equal to an average concentration of 10 ppm (30 mg/m3). A moderate to strong olfactory response and distinct nasal and eye irritation were observed. In spite of considerable individual variation, the results were in agreement with sensory effect estimates obtained from animal studies.

  19. Modeling the adaptive permeability response of porcine iliac arteries to acute changes in mural shear.

    PubMed

    Hazel, A L; Grzybowski, D M; Friedman, M H

    2003-04-01

    The hypothesis that much of the uptake of macromolecules by the vascular wall takes place while the endothelial lining is adapting to changes in its hemodynamic environment is being tested by a series of in vivo measurements of the uptake of Evans-blue-dye-labeled albumin by porcine iliac arteries subjected to acute changes in blood flow. The uptake data are interpreted through an ad hoc model of the dynamic permeability response that is proposed to accompany alterations in mural shear. The model is able to correlate, with a single set of parameters, the vascular response to a variety of experimental protocols, including sustained step increases and decreases in shear, and alternations in shear of various periods. The best-fit parameters of the model suggest that the adaptive response to an increase in shear proceeds with a latency of approximately 1.5 min and a time constant of approximately 90 min that is substantially shorter than the response to a decrease in shear. PMID:12723682

  20. Acute Glucose Response Properties Beyond Feeding.

    PubMed

    Burnett, C Joseph; Krashes, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Hypothalamic AgRP neurons potently coordinate feeding behavior to ensure an organism's viability. However, their acute role in glucose-regulatory function remains to be addressed. Steculorum et al. now report that activation of a specific set of AgRP neurons results in an impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in brown fat through a myogenic signature program. PMID:27052261

  1. Invasive hemodynamic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Magder, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Although invasive hemodynamic monitoring requires considerable skill, studies have shown a striking lack of knowledge of the measurements obtained with the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). This article reviews monitoring using a PAC. Issues addressed include basic physiology that determines cardiac output and blood pressure; methodology in the measurement of data obtained from a PAC; use of the PAC in making a diagnosis and for patient management, with emphasis on a responsive approach to management; and uses of the PAC that are not indications by themselves for placing the catheter, but can provide useful information when a PAC is in place. PMID:25435479

  2. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  3. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  4. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to intubation: Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope versus McCoy laryngoscope in presence of rigid cervical collar simulating cervical immobilization for traumatic cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Nitesh; Purohit, Shobha; Kalra, Poonam; Lall, Tarun; Khare, Avneesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intubation is known to cause an exaggerated hemodynamic response in the form of tachycardia, hypertension, and dysrhythmias. In cervical spine instability, intubation has to be performed using cervical immobilization to prevent exacerbation of spinal cord injuries. Application of rigid cervical collar may reduce cervical spine movements, but it hinders tracheal intubation with a standard laryngoscope. The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic responses to fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) and McCoy laryngoscope in patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia with rigid cervical collar simulating cervical spine immobilization in the situation of cervical trauma. Methods: Thirty-two patients in the age range 20–50 years, of American Society of Anaesthesiologist I-II, and of either sex undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into each group. There were two groups according to the technique used for intubation: Group A (flexible FOB) and Group B (McCoy laryngoscope). Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, intraoperatively, immediately before and after induction, and immediately after intubation. Thereafter, every min for next 5 min. Statistical Analysis: Intergroup comparison of categorical data was done by Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Intergroup comparison of quantitative data was done by the parametric test (unpaired t-test), and probability was considered to be significant if <0.05. Results: Due to intubation response, HR and blood pressure increased significantly (P < 0.05) above preoperative values in McCoy group as compared to the fiberoptic group. Conclusion: We suggest that the flexible FOB is an effective and better method of intubation in a situation like traumatic cervical spine injury and provides stable hemodynamics. PMID:26712970

  5. Premedication effect of dexmedetomidine and alfentanil on seizure time, recovery duration, and hemodynamic responses in electroconvulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Esmail; Modir, Hesameddin; Bagheri, Niknam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Jamilian, Hamidreza; Eshrati, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for many mental disorders, especially severe and persistent depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine and alfentanil on agitation, satisfaction, seizure duration, and patients hemodynamic after ECT. Materials and Methods: In a three phase crossover randomized clinical trial, 75 patients aged between 18 and 50 years and candidate for ECT were enrolled and assigned into three groups (25 patients in each group). All patients, respectively, took premedication of dexmedetomidine, alfentanil, or saline in three consecutive phases. Patients received 0.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, 10 μg/kg alfentanil or normal saline intravenously, 10 min before induction. Finally, seizure and recovery duration, satisfaction and agitation score, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference about seizure duration, agitation score, and hemodynamic parameters between groups but recovery duration was significantly lower in the control group than dexmedetomidine (P = 0.016) and alfentanil group (P = 0.0001). Patients’ satisfaction was significantly higher in intervention groups (alfentanil and dexmedetomidine groups) (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Given the equal effects of alfentanil and dexmedetomidine, it seems that choosing one of these two drugs for premedication of patients undergoing ECT is appropriate. Drug choice is influenced by numerous factors such as accessibility of each drug and the dominance of anesthesiologist and psychiatrist. PMID:27052067

  6. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction as a contributor to response in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Burrowes, K S; Clark, A R; Wilsher, M L; Milne, D G; Tawhai, M H

    2014-08-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an adaptive response unique to the lung whereby blood flow is diverted away from areas of low alveolar oxygen to improve ventilation-perfusion matching and resultant gas exchange. Some previous experimental studies have suggested that the HPV response to hypoxia is blunted in acute pulmonary embolism (APE), while others have concluded that HPV contributes to elevated pulmonary blood pressures in APE. To understand these contradictory observations, we have used a structure-based computational model of integrated lung function in 10 subjects to study the impact of HPV on pulmonary hemodynamics and gas exchange in the presence of regional arterial occlusion. The integrated model includes an experimentally-derived model for HPV. Its function is validated against measurements of pulmonary vascular resistance in normal subjects at four levels of inspired oxygen. Our results show that the apparently disparate observations of previous studies can be explained within a single model: the model predicts that HPV increases mean pulmonary artery pressure in APE (by 8.2 ± 7.0% in these subjects), and concurrently shows a reduction in response to hypoxia in the subjects who have high levels of occlusion and therefore maximal HPV in normoxia. PMID:24770844

  7. Hemodynamic Responses to Etomidate Versus Ketamine-Thiopental Sodium Combination for Anesthetic Induction in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Patients with Low Ejection Fraction: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohammad Reza; Soleimani, Aria; Zeydi, Amir Emami; Nia, Hamid Sharif; Habibi, Ali; Onagh, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Background: During induction of anesthesia and intubation, hemodynamic changes are very important; especially in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and left ventricular dysfunction. A little information is available on the hemodynamic effects of a combination of ketamine-thiopental for induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, with impaired ventricular function. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic responses to etomidate versus ketamine-thiopental sodium combination for anesthetic induction in CABG surgery patients with low ejection fraction (EF<45%). Materials and Methods: In a double blind randomized clinical trial, a total of 100 patients, scheduled for elective CABG surgery were randomly assigned into two groups. These patients received either etomidate or ketamine-thiopental sodium combination at induction of anesthesia. Hemodynamics variable were measured and recorded at baseline, immediately before and after laryngoscopy and intubation, one, two and three minutes after intubation. Also, muscle twitching incidence among patients in two groups was evaluated. Results: No significant differences between the two groups regarding the changes of hemodynamic variables including systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and heart rate, were notice (p>0.05). Muscle twitching was not observed in the two groups. Conclusion: Hemodynamic stability after administration of ketamine-thiopental sodium combination for induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing CABG surgery, with impaired ventricular function, supports the clinical impression that this combination is safe in CABG surgery patients with low EF. PMID:25478364

  8. Acute Exercise-Induced Response of Monocyte Subtypes in Chronic Heart and Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H.; Hoymans, Vicky Y.; Verpooten, Gert A.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Couttenye, Marie M.; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Monocytes (Mon1-2-3) play a substantial role in low-grade inflammation associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). The effect of an acute exercise bout on monocyte subsets in the setting of systemic inflammation is currently unknown. This study aims (1) to evaluate baseline distribution of monocyte subsets in CHF and CKD versus healthy subjects (HS) and (2) to evaluate the effect of an acute exercise bout. Exercise-induced IL-6 and MCP-1 release are related to the Mon1-2-3 response. Methods. Twenty CHF patients, 20 CKD patients, and 15 HS were included. Before and after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, monocyte subsets were quantified by flow cytometry: CD14++CD16−CCR2+ (Mon1), CD14++CD16+CCR2+ (Mon2), and CD14+CD16++CCR2− (Mon3). Serum levels of IL-6 and MCP-1 were determined by ELISA. Results. Baseline distribution of Mon1-2-3 was comparable between the 3 groups. Following acute exercise, %Mon2 and %Mon3 increased significantly at the expense of a decrease in %Mon1 in HS and in CKD. This response was significantly attenuated in CHF (P < 0.05). In HS only, MCP-1 levels increased following exercise; IL-6 levels were unchanged. Circulatory power was a strong and independent predictor of the changes in Mon1 (β = −0.461, P < 0.001) and Mon3 (β = 0.449, P < 0.001); and baseline LVEF of the change in Mon2 (β = 0.441, P < 0.001). Conclusion. The response of monocytes to acute exercise is characterized by an increase in proangiogenic and proinflammatory Mon2 and Mon3 at the expense of phagocytic Mon1. This exercise-induced monocyte subset response is mainly driven by hemodynamic changes and not by preexistent low-grade inflammation. PMID:25587208

  9. Causal connectivity alterations of cortical-subcortical circuit anchored on reduced hemodynamic response brain regions in first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing; Zou, Ke; He, Zongling; Sun, Xueli; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Some efforts were done to investigate the disruption of brain causal connectivity networks involved in major depressive disorder (MDD) using Granger causality (GC) analysis. However, the homogenous hemodynamic response function (HRF) assumption over the brain may disturb the inference of temporal precedence. Here we applied a blind deconvolution approach to examine the altered HRF shape in first-episode, drug-naïve MDD patients. The regions with abnormal HRF shape in patients were chosen as seeds to detect the GC alterations in MDD. The results demonstrated significantly decreased magnitude of spontaneous hemodynamic response of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the caudate nucleus (CAU) in MDD comparing to healthy controls, suggesting MDD patients likely had alterations in neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular physiology in these two regions. GC mapping showed increased/decreased GC in OFC-/CAU centered networks in MDD. The outgoing GC values from OFC to anterior cingulate cortex and occipital regions were positively correlated with Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, while the incoming GC from insula, middle and superior temporal gyrus to CAU were negatively correlated with HAMD scores of MDD. The abnormalities of directional connections in the cortico-subcortico-cerebellar network may lead to unbalanced integrating the emotional-related information for MDD, and further exacerbating depressive symptoms. PMID:26911651

  10. Causal connectivity alterations of cortical-subcortical circuit anchored on reduced hemodynamic response brain regions in first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing; Zou, Ke; He, Zongling; Sun, Xueli; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Some efforts were done to investigate the disruption of brain causal connectivity networks involved in major depressive disorder (MDD) using Granger causality (GC) analysis. However, the homogenous hemodynamic response function (HRF) assumption over the brain may disturb the inference of temporal precedence. Here we applied a blind deconvolution approach to examine the altered HRF shape in first-episode, drug-naïve MDD patients. The regions with abnormal HRF shape in patients were chosen as seeds to detect the GC alterations in MDD. The results demonstrated significantly decreased magnitude of spontaneous hemodynamic response of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the caudate nucleus (CAU) in MDD comparing to healthy controls, suggesting MDD patients likely had alterations in neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular physiology in these two regions. GC mapping showed increased/decreased GC in OFC-/CAU centered networks in MDD. The outgoing GC values from OFC to anterior cingulate cortex and occipital regions were positively correlated with Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, while the incoming GC from insula, middle and superior temporal gyrus to CAU were negatively correlated with HAMD scores of MDD. The abnormalities of directional connections in the cortico-subcortico-cerebellar network may lead to unbalanced integrating the emotional-related information for MDD, and further exacerbating depressive symptoms. PMID:26911651

  11. Acute Alcohol Effects on Contextual Memory BOLD Response: Differences Based on Fragmentary Blackout History

    PubMed Central

    Wetherill, Reagan R.; Schnyer, David M.; Fromme, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Background Contextual memory, or memory for source details, is an important aspect of episodic memory and has been implicated in alcohol-induced fragmentary blackouts (FB). Little is known, however, about how neural functioning during contextual memory processes may differ between individuals with and without a history of fragmentary blackouts. This study examined whether neural activation during a contextual memory task differed by history of fragmentary blackout and acute alcohol consumption. Methods Twenty-four matched individuals with (FB+; n = 12) and without (FB−; n = 12) a history of FBs were recruited from a longitudinal study of alcohol use and behavioral risks and completed a laboratory beverage challenge followed by two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions under no alcohol and alcohol [breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) = 0.08%] conditions. Task performance and brain hemodynamic activity during a block design contextual memory task were examined across 48 fMRI sessions. Results Groups demonstrated no differences in performance on the contextual memory task, yet exhibited different brain response patterns after alcohol intoxication. A significant FB group by beverage interaction emerged in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex with FB− individuals showing greater BOLD response after alcohol exposure (p < .05). Conclusions Alcohol had differential effects on neural activity for FB+ and FB− individuals during recollection of contextual information, perhaps suggesting a neurobiological mechanism associated with alcohol-induced fragmentary blackouts. PMID:22420742

  12. Effect of acute transdermal estrogen administration on basal, mental stress and cold pressor-induced sympathetic responses in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sofowora, Gbemiga G; Singh, Iqbal; He, Huai B; Wood, Alastair J J; Stein, C Michael

    2005-06-01

    Administration of estrogen has vascular effects through poorly defined mechanisms that may include sympathetic withdrawal. To define the effects of acute estrogen administration on sympathetic responses, nineteen healthy postmenopausal women (age 54+/-2 years) were studied after application of a placebo or estrogen patch for 36 hours, in random order. A p-value, adjusted for multiple comparisons, of <0.017 was used to determine statistical significance. Heart rate, blood pressure, and norepinephrine spillover were measured at rest, during mental stress (Stroop test), and during a cold pressor test. Estrogen did not attenuate basal or stimulated hemodynamic responses significantly. The increase in mean arterial pressure after the Stroop test (5.9+/-1.2mm/ Hg on placebo vs 6.1+/-1.6mm/Hg on estrogen, p=0.9) and after the cold pressor test (12.6+/-2.4mm/Hg on placebo vs 13.0+/-2.2 mm/Hg on estrogen, p=0.8) did not differ. Basal, mental stress and cold pressor-stimulated norepinephrine spillover were not significantly affected by short-term estrogen administration. Norepinephrine spillover tended to be higher after estrogen (1296.2+/-238 ng/min) than placebo (832.5+/-129 ng/min) (p=0.02) at baseline and after the Stroop test (1881.1+/-330 ng/min vs 1014.6+/-249 ng/min) (p=0.02). Acute transdermal estrogen administration did not attenuate norepinephrine spillover or sympathetically mediated hemodynamic responses. PMID:15944868

  13. INTERSUBJECT VARIABILITY IN HUMAN ACUTE OZONE RESPONSIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Individuals exposed to ozone experience a wide range in the magnitudes of lung function decrements and symptoms produced. hese intersubject differences in response are reproducible over periods of time of at least one year, suggesting that responsiveness to ozone is a characteris...

  14. Dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging for monitoring brain metabolic and hemodynamic response to closed head traumatic brain injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, Itamar; Abookasis, David

    2015-10-01

    ) monitor brain hemodynamic and metabolic response to neuroprotective drug treatment.

  15. Mathematical model for the hemodynamic response to venous occlusion measured with near-infrared spectroscopy in the human forearm.

    PubMed

    Vo, Toi Van; Hammer, Peter E; Hoimes, Matthew L; Nadgir, Shalini; Fantini, Sergio

    2007-04-01

    We propose a mathematical model to describe the hemodynamic changes induced by a venous occlusion in a human limb. These hemodynamic changes, which include an increase in blood volume, a reduction in blood flow, and modifications to the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, can all be measured noninvasively with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). To test the model, we have performed NIRS measurements on the human forearm, specifically on the brachioradialis muscle, during venous occlusion induced by a pneumatic cuff inflated around the upper arm to pressures within the range 10-60 mmHg. We have found a good agreement between parameters measured by NIRS (total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin saturation) and the corresponding model parameters (capacitor voltage and arterial/capillary branch current). In particular, model and experiment indicate that the time constant for blood accumulation during venous occlusion (approximately 73-79 s) is much slower than the time constant for blood drainage following cuff release (approximately 5 s). These results indicate that this mathematical model can be a valuable analytical tool to characterize, optimize, and further develop diagnostic measurement schemes that use venous occlusion approaches. PMID:17405365

  16. The effects of clonidine premedication and scalp infiltration of lidocaine on hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and skull pin head-holder insertion during skull base procedures.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W S; Theard, M A; Cheng, M A; Leonetti, J P; Crowder, C M; Tempelhoff, R

    2001-08-01

    This study was designed to determine if oral clonidine or lidocaine, injected into the scalp before head-holder (H-H) insertion, would attenuate the hemodynamic effects associated with intubation and H-H placement. Thirty-four patients undergoing skull base procedures were randomized to four groups. Group 1 received clonidine 5 mcg/kg po before surgery with 10 to 15 ml of 1% lidocaine infiltrated at pin insertion sites; Group 2 received clonidine with saline infiltration; Group 3 received a placebo preoperatively and had lidocaine infiltrated at pin sites; and Group 4 received a placebo with saline infiltrated. All patients had a standard anesthetic titrated to a 10 to 14 Hz EEG endpoint during laryngoscopy and H-H placement. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similar between groups during intubation, but heart rate (HR) increased in patients who did not receive clonidine. H-H application increased HR and MAP in Group 4. HR also increased after H-H placement in patients who received oral clonidine, while patients receiving scalp lidocaine or both clonidine and scalp lidocaine had little change in either value. Clonidine attenuated HR increases after laryngoscopy but not after H-H placement. Lidocaine injected at the pin sites reduced HR, and MAP increased after H-H insertion. The combination of oral clonidine and scalp lidocaine blunted hemodynamic responses to both intubation and H-H placement. PMID:17167618

  17. The Effects of Clonidine Premedication and Scalp Infiltration of Lidocaine on Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Skull Pin Head-Holder Insertion During Skull Base Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Jellish, W. Scott; Theard, M. Angele; Cheng, Mary Ann; Leonetti, John P.; Crowder, C. Michael; Tempelhoff, Rene

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if oral clonidine or lidocaine, injected into the scalp before head-holder (H-H) insertion, would attenuate the hemodynamic effects associated with intubation and H-H placement. Thirty-four patients undergoing skull base procedures were randomized to four groups. Group 1 received clonidine 5 mcg/kg po before surgery with 10 to 15 ml of 1% lidocaine infiltrated at pin insertion sites; Group 2 received clonidine with saline infiltration; Group 3 received a placebo preoperatively and had lidocaine infiltrated at pin sites; and Group 4 received a placebo with saline infiltrated. All patients had a standard anesthetic titrated to a 10 to 14 Hz EEG endpoint during laryngoscopy and H-H placement. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similar between groups during intubation, but heart rate (HR) increased in patients who did not receive clonidine. H-H application increased HR and MAP in Group 4. HR also increased after H-H placement in patients who received oral clonidine, while patients receiving scalp lidocaine or both clonidine and scalp lidocaine had little change in either value. Clonidine attenuated HR increases after laryngoscopy but not after H-H placement. Lidocaine injected at the pin sites reduced HR, and MAP increased after H-H insertion. The combination of oral clonidine and scalp lidocaine blunted hemodynamic responses to both intubation and H-H placement. PMID:17167618

  18. Bidirectional interactions between neuronal and hemodynamic responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): challenges for brain-state dependent tDCS

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical neural activity. During neural activity, the electric currents from excitable membranes of brain tissue superimpose in the extracellular medium and generate a potential at scalp, which is referred as the electroencephalogram (EEG). Respective neural activity (energy demand) has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF) that supplies glucose (energy supply) via neurovascular coupling. The hemodynamic response can be captured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which enables continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume. This neurovascular coupling phenomenon led to the concept of neurovascular unit (NVU) that consists of the endothelium, glia, neurons, pericytes, and the basal lamina. Here, recent works suggest NVU as an integrated system working in concert using feedback mechanisms to enable proper brain homeostasis and function where the challenge remains in capturing these mostly nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions within NVU for brain-state dependent tDCS. In principal accordance, we propose EEG-NIRS-based whole-head monitoring of tDCS-induced neuronal and hemodynamic alterations during tDCS. PMID:26321925

  19. Bidirectional interactions between neuronal and hemodynamic responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): challenges for brain-state dependent tDCS.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical neural activity. During neural activity, the electric currents from excitable membranes of brain tissue superimpose in the extracellular medium and generate a potential at scalp, which is referred as the electroencephalogram (EEG). Respective neural activity (energy demand) has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF) that supplies glucose (energy supply) via neurovascular coupling. The hemodynamic response can be captured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which enables continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume. This neurovascular coupling phenomenon led to the concept of neurovascular unit (NVU) that consists of the endothelium, glia, neurons, pericytes, and the basal lamina. Here, recent works suggest NVU as an integrated system working in concert using feedback mechanisms to enable proper brain homeostasis and function where the challenge remains in capturing these mostly nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions within NVU for brain-state dependent tDCS. In principal accordance, we propose EEG-NIRS-based whole-head monitoring of tDCS-induced neuronal and hemodynamic alterations during tDCS. PMID:26321925

  20. [Enteroviruses responsible for acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis].

    PubMed

    Lévêque, N; Huguet, P; Norder, H; Chomel, J-J

    2010-04-01

    Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is an epidemic form of highly contagious conjunctivitis, characterized by conjunctival hemorrhages. The first AHC outbreak was described in 1969 in Ghana, West Africa, and was called Apollo disease, from the Apollo landing on the moon. This outbreak was caused by Enterovirus 70 (EV70) together with a Coxsackievirus A24 (CVA24v) variant, which are the major etiological agents involved in AHC outbreaks worldwide. AHC is known to be directly transmitted by close person-to-person contact or indirectly through soiled ophthalmological materials or unsafe recreational water. Recently, a possible airborne virus spread was suggested which could explain the high transmission rate of the disease. In the absence of a specific antiviral therapy, a rapid diagnosis of the causative agent is required to distinguish AHC due to enteroviruses from other ocular infectious diseases, for there are active drugs, or to quickly implement proper public health measures to limit the extension of the outbreak. However, virus identification remains difficult and time-consuming. Moreover, virological diagnosis is difficult to implement in developing countries where AHC has recently become a major problem for public health. PMID:19836177

  1. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease: the UIP consensus according to scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung B; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth; Meissner, Mark; Kalodiki, Evi; Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier L; Bækgaard, Niels; Beach, Kirk; Belcaro, Giovanni; Black, Stephen; Blomgren, Lena; Bouskela, Eliete; Cappelli, Massimo; Caprini, Joseph; Carpentier, Patrick; Cavezzi, Attilio; Chastanet, Sylvain; Christenson, Jan T; Christopoulos, Demetris; Clarke, Heather; Davies, Alun; Demaeseneer, Marianne; Eklöf, Bo; Ermini, Stefano; Fernández, Fidel; Franceschi, Claude; Gasparis, Antonios; Geroulakos, George; Sergio, Gianesini; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Gloviczki, Peter; Huang, Ying; Ibegbuna, Veronica; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kistner, Robert; Kölbel, Tilo; Kurstjens, Ralph L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Laredo, James; Lattimer, Christopher R; Lugli, Marzia; Lurie, Fedor; Maleti, Oscar; Markovic, Jovan; Mendoza, Erika; Monedero, Javier L; Moneta, Gregory; Moore, Hayley; Morrison, Nick; Mosti, Giovanni; Nelzén, Olle; Obermayer, Alfred; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Parsi, Kurosh; Partsch, Hugo; Passariello, Fausto; Perrin, Michel L; Pittaluga, Paul; Raju, Seshadri; Ricci, Stefano; Rosales, Antonio; Scuderi, Angelo; Slagsvold, Carl E; Thurin, Anders; Urbanek, Tomasz; M VAN Rij, Andre; Vasquez, Michael; Wittens, Cees H; Zamboni, Paolo; Zimmet, Steven; Ezpeleta, Santiago Z

    2016-06-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due to emergence of new diagnostic techniques. Duplex ultrasound scanning and other imaging techniques which evolved in the latter part of the 20th century have dominated investigation. They have greatly improved our understanding of the anatomical patterns of venous reflux and obstruction. However, they do not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all aspects of management for venous disease by evidence-based principles. These included experts from various member societies including the European Venous Forum (EVF), American Venous Forum (AVF), American College of Phlebology (ACP) and Cardiovascular Disease Educational and Research Trust (CDERT). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various forms of treatment. Chapter 1 is devoted to basic hemodynamic concepts and normal venous physiology. Chapter 2 presents the mechanism and magnitude of hemodynamic changes in acute deep vein

  2. Acute khat use reduces response conflict in habitual users

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Sellaro, Roberta; Ruiz, Manuel J.; Sikora, Katarzyna; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Khat consumption has become a worldwide phenomenon broadening from Eastern Africa and the south west of the Arabian Peninsula to ethnic communities in the rest of the world. So far, the cognitive effects of khat use are poorly understood and no studies have looked into the relation between acute khat use and cognitive control functions, the way we control our thoughts and goal directed behavior. We studied how acute khat use affects the emergence and the resolution of response conflict, a central cognitive control function. Khat users (n = 11) and khat-free controls (n = 18) were matched in terms of education, sex, alcohol, and cannabis consumption. Groups were tested on response conflict, as measured by the Simon task. In one single session, participants worked through two task blocks: the khat group chewed exclusively khat whereas the khat-free group chewed solely a gum. Results showed that in the second block, which reflects the acute impact of khat, the khat group was better than controls in resolving stimulus-induced response conflict as indexed by a smaller Simon effect. These results suggest that the acute intake of khat may improve participants' ability of handling response conflict. PMID:23801952

  3. THE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE INDUCED BY BRONCHOSCOPY WITH LAVAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoscopy has been used to evaluate the inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. The procedure may affect acute inflammation in the lower respiratory tract. We reviewed consecutive bronchoscopies done in normal healthy non-smokers between April, 1998 and April, 2004. The...

  4. PREDICTORS OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE RESPONSE TO OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purposes of this study were to identify personal characteristics which predict individual differences in acute response to ozone exposure and to develop a predictive model for decrements in FEV1 as a function of ozone concentration and individual predictors. esponse and predi...

  5. Complement and cytokine response in acute Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, John-Paul; Langley, Kathryn; Heelas, Edward; Machin, Samuel J; Scully, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Complement dysregulation is key in the pathogenesis of atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (aHUS), but no clear role for complement has been identified in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP). We aimed to assess complement activation and cytokine response in acute antibody-mediated TTP. Complement C3a and C5a and cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor, interferon-γ and IL-17a) were measured in 20 acute TTP patients and 49 remission cases. Anti-ADAMTS13 immunoglobulin G (IgG) subtypes were measured in acute patients in order to study the association with complement activation. In acute TTP, median C3a and C5a were significantly elevated compared to remission, C3a 63·9 ng/ml vs. 38·2 ng/ml (P < 0·001) and C5a 16·4 ng/ml vs. 9·29 ng/ml (P < 0·001), respectively. Median IL-6 and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in the acute vs. remission groups, IL-6: 8 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P = 0·003), IL-10: 6 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P < 0·001). C3a levels correlated with both anti-ADAMTS13 IgG (rs = 0·604, P = 0·017) and IL-10 (rs = 0·692, P = 0·006). No anti-ADAMTS13 IgG subtype was associated with higher complement activation, but patients with the highest C3a levels had 3 or 4 IgG subtypes present. These results suggest complement anaphylatoxin levels are higher in acute TTP cases than in remission, and the complement response seen acutely may relate to anti-ADAMTS13 IgG antibody and IL-10 levels. PMID:24372446

  6. EATING BEHAVIOR IN RESPONSE TO ACUTE STRESS.

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Veronica; Bontea, Amalia; Anton-Păduraru, Dana-teodora

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a medical and social problem with a dramatically increasing prevalence. It is important to take action since childhood to prevent and treat obesity and metabolic syndrome. Infantile obesity affects all body systems starting in childhood and continuing to adulthood. Understanding the impact of stressors on weight status may be especially important for preventing obesity. The relationship between stress, eating behavior and obesity is not fully understood. However, there is evidence that stress causes disorders in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, system that regulates both stress and feeding responses. Also, the response is different depending on the type of stressors. Chronic stress, especially when people live in a palatable food environment, induces HPA stimulation, excess glucocorticoids, insulin resistance, which lead to inhibition of lipid mobilization, accumulation of triglyceride and retention of abdominal fat. PMID:27483696

  7. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease: event-related desynchronization/synchronization and hemodynamic response analysis.

    PubMed

    Visani, Elisa; Minati, Ludovico; Canafoglia, Laura; Gilioli, Isabella; Salvatoni, Lucia; Varotto, Giulia; Fazio, Patrik; Aquino, Domenico; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Franceschetti, Silvana; Panzica, Ferruccio

    2010-01-01

    We performed simultaneous acquisition of EEG-fMRI in seven patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) and in six healthy controls using self-paced finger extension as a motor task. The event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) analysis showed a greater and more diffuse alpha desynchronization in central regions and a strongly reduced post-movement beta-ERS in patients compared with controls, suggesting a significant dysfunction of the mechanisms regulating active movement and movement end. The event-related hemodynamic response obtained from fMRI showed delayed BOLD peak latency in the contralateral primary motor area suggesting a less efficient activity of the neuronal populations driving fine movements, which are specifically impaired in ULD. PMID:20111730

  8. Cigarette smoke inhalation and the acute airway response.

    PubMed Central

    Higenbottam, T; Feyeraband, C; Clark, T J

    1980-01-01

    The acute airway response to smoking varying numbers (one to four) of identical cigarettes in rapid succession and smoking single cigarettes of differing tar/nicotine yields was assessed repeatedly in 13 healthy smokers. The airway response was variable, indicating airway narrowing consistently in only three subjects. There appeared no difference between forced spirometry and measurement of airway resistance in detecting the airway response. No relationship was observed between the airway response and amount of smoke inhaled into the lungs as measured either by changes in venous blood nicotine or percentage carboxyhaemoglobin. When five smokers inhaled smoke directly from a cigarette acute airway narrowing was consistently observed. A normal smoking pattern consisting of an initial drag of smoke into the mouth, followed after a pause by inhalation of smoke diluted with air, did not consistently cause airway narrowing although similar amounts of smoke as the direct drag were inhaled as assessed by changes in venous blood nicotine. The manner of smoke inhalation affects the relative concentrations of the different constituents of smoke reaching the lungs and also appears to be the main determinant of the acute airway response to smoking, which was unrelated to the number of cigarettes smoked or the tar content of the smoke. This suggests that patterns of smoke inhalation may influence the pathogenesis of bronchial disease associated with smoking. PMID:7434266

  9. Association of decreased prefrontal hemodynamic response during a verbal fluency task with EGR3 gene polymorphism in patients with schizophrenia and in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yukika; Takizawa, Ryu; Koike, Shinsuke; Kinoshita, Akihide; Satomura, Yoshihiro; Kawasaki, Shingo; Yamasue, Hidenori; Tochigi, Mamoru; Kakiuchi, Chihiro; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Yamada, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2014-01-15

    The early growth response 3 (EGR3) gene is an immediate early gene that is expressed throughout the brain and has been suggested as a potential susceptibility gene for schizophrenia (SZ). EGR3 impairment is associated with various neurodevelopmental dysfunctions, and some animal studies have reported a role for EGR3 function in the prefrontal cortex. Therefore, EGR3 genotype variation may be reflected in prefrontal function. By using multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in an imaging genetics approach, we tested for an association between the EGR3 gene polymorphism and prefrontal hemodynamic response during a cognitive task in patients with SZ. We assessed 73 chronic patients with SZ and 73 age-, gender-, and genotype-matched healthy controls (HC) who provided written informed consent. We used NIRS to measure changes in prefrontal oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (oxyHb) during the letter version of a verbal fluency task (VFT). Statistical comparisons were performed among EGR3 genotype subgroups (rs35201266, GG/GA/AA). The AA genotype group showed significantly smaller oxyHb increases in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during the VFT than the GG and GA genotype groups; this was true for both patients with SZ and HC. Our findings provide in vivo human evidence of a significant influence of EGR3 polymorphisms on prefrontal hemodynamic activation level in healthy adults and in patients with SZ. Genetic variation in EGR3 may affect prefrontal function through neurodevelopment. This study illustrates the usefulness of NIRS in imaging genetics investigations on psychiatric disorders. PMID:23962955

  10. Using patient-specific hemodynamic response function in epileptic spike analysis of human epilepsy: a study based on EEG-fNIRS.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ke; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Vannasing, Phetsamone; Tremblay, Julie; Lesage, Frédéric; Pouliot, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be combined with electroencephalography (EEG) to continuously monitor the hemodynamic signal evoked by epileptic events such as seizures or interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs, aka spikes). As estimation methods assuming a canonical shape of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) might not be optimal, we sought to model patient-specific HRF (sHRF) with a simple deconvolution approach for IED-related analysis with EEG-fNIRS data. Furthermore, a quadratic term was added to the model to account for the nonlinearity in the response when IEDs are frequent. Prior to analyzing clinical data, simulations were carried out to show that the HRF was estimable by the proposed deconvolution methods under proper conditions. EEG-fNIRS data of five patients with refractory focal epilepsy were selected due to the presence of frequent clear IEDs and their unambiguous focus localization. For each patient, both the linear sHRF and the nonlinear sHRF were estimated at each channel. Variability of the estimated sHRFs was seen across brain regions and different patients. Compared with the SPM8 canonical HRF (cHRF), including these sHRFs in the general linear model (GLM) analysis led to hemoglobin activations with higher statistical scores as well as larger spatial extents on all five patients. In particular, for patients with frequent IEDs, nonlinear sHRFs were seen to provide higher sensitivity in activation detection than linear sHRFs. These observations support using sHRFs in the analysis of IEDs with EEG-fNIRS data. PMID:26619785

  11. Hormonal, cardiovascular, and subjective responses to acute stress in smokers

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Harriet

    2009-01-01

    Rationale There are complex relationships between stress and smoking; smoking may reduce the emotional discomfort of stress, yet nicotine activates stress systems and may alter responses to acute stress. It is important to understand how smoking affects physiological and psychological outcomes after stress and how these may interact to motivate smoking. Objectives This study aimed to examine the magnitude and time course of hormonal, cardiovascular, and psychological responses to acute psychosocial stress in smokers and non-smokers to investigate whether responses to acute stress are altered in smokers. Materials and methods Healthy male non-smokers (n=20) and smokers (n=15) participated in two experimental sessions involving a standardized public speaking stress procedure and a control non-stressful task. The outcome measures included self-reported mood, cardiovascular measures (heart rate and blood pressure), and plasma hormone levels (noradrenaline, cortisol, progesterone, and allopregnanolone). Results Smokers exhibited blunted increases in cortisol after the Trier Social Stress Test, and they reported greater and more prolonged subjective agitation than non-smokers. Stress-induced changes in progesterone were similar between smokers and non-smokers, although responses overall were smaller among smokers. Stress did not significantly alter levels of allopregnanolone, but smokers exhibited lower plasma concentrations of this neurosteroid. Conclusions These findings suggest that smoking dampens hormonal responses to stress and prolongs subjective discomfort. Dysregulated stress responses may represent a breakdown in the body’s ability to cope efficiently and effectively with stress and may contribute to smokers’ susceptibility to acute stress, especially during abstinence. PMID:18936915

  12. Acute phase protein and antioxidant responses in dogs with experimental acute monocytic ehrlichiosis treated with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Karnezi, Dimitra; Ceron, Jose J; Theodorou, Konstantina; Leontides, Leonidas; Siarkou, Victoria I; Martinez, Silvia; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Harrus, Shimon; Koutinas, Christos K; Pardali, Dimitra; Mylonakis, Mathios E

    2016-02-29

    There is currently lack of information on the changes of acute phase proteins (APP) and antioxidant markers and their clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). The objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), ferritin and paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) during treatment of dogs with acute CME with rifampicin. Blood serum samples from ten Beagle dogs with experimental acute CME were retrospectively examined. Five dogs (Group A) were treated with rifampicin (10mg/Kg/24h), per os, for 3 weeks and 5 dogs (Group B) received no treatment (infected controls). Two Beagle dogs served as uninfected controls. Blood serum samples were serially examined prior to Ehrlichia canis inoculation and on post-inoculation days 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. Significant changes of CRP, Hp, ferritin and PON-1 values were found in the majority of infected dogs. However, their concentrations did not differ between the two groups during the treatment observation period. The results of this study indicate that although several APP and PON-1 tend to significantly change in the majority of dogs with acute CME, they were of limited clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in this experimental setting. PMID:26854345

  13. The hemodynamic response to somatosensory stimulation in mice depends on the anesthetic used: Implications on analysis of mouse fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Felix; Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the number of functional MRI (fMRI) studies in mice has been rapidly increasing. Technological improvements provide the sensitivity required to match the high demands on spatial and temporal resolution and to analyze fast and small signal components of the fMRI response. Yet, the interpretation of mouse fMRI data largely relies on assumptions that were uncritically adopted from previous research in humans or rats. Here, we show based on a large dataset employing an innocuous electrical stimulation paradigm, that (1) the shape of the HRF shapes comprises significant transient signal components; correspondingly analysis procedures have to account for this dynamic nature and allow for variable response functions. (2) The effects of the anesthetics are crucial in determining the shape of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) and also influence the spatial specificity of BOLD signal. (3) The dominant systemic confounding contributions elicited by stimulus-evoked cardiovascular responses observed in mouse fMRI when applying block stimuli may be largely avoided by a milder event-related design applying a randomly spaced single pulse train (RSSPT). Thereby the spatial specificity of the fMRI response is largely retained. We conclude that the sensitivity, specificity and interpretability of stimulus-evoked BOLD signals in mice can be improved by combining appropriate stimulation paradigms with analysis procedures that include adapted HRFs. PMID:25979665

  14. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Clinical Response to Parenteral Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Malkasian, Kay L.; Marshall, John R.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The bacteriology of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and clinical response to parenteral doxycycline were evaluated in 30 patients. Only 3 of 21 cul-de-sac cultures from PID patients were sterile, whereas all 8 normal control subjects yielded negative results (P< 0.005). Poor correlation was observed between cervical and cul-de-sac cultures. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, isolated from the cervix in 17 patients (57%), was recovered from the cul-de-sac only once. Streptococcus, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, coliforms, and other organisms normally present in the vagina were the predominant isolates recovered from the cul-de-sac. Parenteral doxycycline resulted in rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (within 48 h) in 20 of 27 evaluable patients (74%). In five others, signs and symptoms of infection abated within 4 days. The remaining two patients failed to respond; in both cases, adnexal masses developed during doxycycline therapy. Gonococci were eradicated from the cervix in all but one patient who, nevertheless, had a rapid defervescence of symptoms. There was no clear-cut correlation between the clinical response and in vitro susceptibility of cul-de-sac isolates to doxycycline. These data confirm the usefulness of broad-spectrum antibiotics in acute PID. Culdocentesis is a reliable means of obtaining material for the bacteriological diagnosis of acute PID; however, the pathogenetic role and relative importance of gonococci and various other bacteria in acute PID need to be clarified further. PMID:1169908

  15. Individual classification of ADHD children by right prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a go/no-go task as assessed by fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yukifumi; Dan, Ippeita; Nagashima, Masako; Dan, Haruka; Uga, Minako; Ikeda, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Gunji, Yuji; Hirano, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Takamichi; Shimoizumi, Hideo; Watanabe, Eiju; Yamagata, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    While a growing body of neurocognitive research has explored the neural substrates associated with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), an objective biomarker for diagnosis has not been established. The advent of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which is a noninvasive and unrestrictive method of functional neuroimaging, raised the possibility of introducing functional neuroimaging diagnosis in young ADHD children. Previously, our fNIRS-based measurements successfully visualized the hypoactivation pattern in the right prefrontal cortex during a go/no-go task in ADHD children compared with typically developing control children at a group level. The current study aimed to explore a method of individual differentiation between ADHD and typically developing control children using multichannel fNIRS, emphasizing how spatial distribution and amplitude of hemodynamic response are associated with inhibition-related right prefrontal dysfunction. Thirty ADHD and thirty typically developing control children underwent a go/no-go task, and their cortical hemodynamics were assessed using fNIRS. We explored specific regions of interest (ROIs) and cut-off amplitudes for cortical activation to distinguish ADHD children from control children. The ROI located on the border of inferior and middle frontal gyri yielded the most accurate discrimination. Furthermore, we adapted well-formed formulae for the constituent channels of the optimized ROI, leading to improved classification accuracy with an area under the curve value of 85% and with 90% sensitivity. Thus, the right prefrontal hypoactivation assessed by fNIRS would serve as a potentially effective biomarker for classifying ADHD children at the individual level. PMID:26266096

  16. BOLD effect: new aspects of the hemodynamic response through combination of fMRI and optical recording in the barrel cortex of the gerbil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Andreas; Stiller, Detelf; Scheich, Henning

    2000-04-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique widely used to map brain-functions. Nevertheless, its hemodynamic basis and spatial precision with which fMRI reflects sites of neuronal activity are not completely understood. We therefore combined fMRI, based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, with optical recording of intrinsic signals (ORIS), a technique, which has a better spatial and temporal resolution. Furthermore, ORIS can distinguish between localized changes in deoxyhemoglobin, and more widespread changes in cerebral blood volume/flow. In gerbils hemodynamic responses over the contralateral barrel cortex were studied with both methods, using identical stimulation of a single vibrissae and identical integration and correlation analysis strategies. Analysis of integration maps and of the spatial distribution and temporal correlation with the block-design of vibrissal stimulation revealed that the BOLD signal, at the site of neuronal activation, does not reflect a depletion of deoxyhemoglobin, as generally assumed. Instead, its positive polarity is likely due to an increase in cerebral blood volume (CBV) whose highly dynamic effect on the BOLD signal exceeds that of the increase in deoxyhemoglobin remaining elevated during prolonged stimulation. This is so, because we show, that blood flow does wash out deoxyhemoglobin but at a rate which is to decrease the deoxyhemoglobin concentration in the voxel below resting level. The wash out causes an accumulation of deoxyhemoglobin in the draining venous side, but at a time window which can be clearly distinguished from the specific activity by applying an analysis strategy based on correlation functions. Therefore, draining veins do not appear as confounding problem. This knowledge could be useful to model the BOLD effect more accurately and improve the spatial resolution of fMRI.

  17. Acute Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Responses to Resistance Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A.; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T.; Zois, Christos E.; Douda, Helen T.; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key points Acute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD. Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses. With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  18. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  19. Human Physiological Responses to Acute and Chronic Cold Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Jodie M.; Taylor, Nigel A. S.; Tipton, Michael J.; Greenleaf, John E.

    2001-01-01

    When inadequately protected humans are exposed to acute cold, excessive body heat is lost to the environment and unless heat production is increased and heat loss attenuated, body temperature will decrease. The primary physiological responses to counter the reduction in body temperature include marked cutaneous vasoconstriction and increased metabolism. These responses, and the hazards associated with such exposure, are mediated by a number of factors which contribute to heat production and loss. These include the severity and duration of the cold stimulus; exercise intensity; the magnitude of the metabolic response; and individual characteristics such as body composition, age, and gender. Chronic exposure to a cold environment, both natural and artificial, results in physiological alterations leading to adaptation. Three quite different, but not necessarily exclusive, patterns of human cold adaptation have been reported: metabolic, hypothermic, and insulative. Cold adaptation has also been associated with an habituation response, in which there is a desensitization, or damping, of the normal response to a cold stress. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the human physiological and pathological responses to cold exposure. Particular attention is directed to the factors contributing to heat production and heat loss during acute cold stress, and the ability of humans to adapt to cold environments.

  20. Comparison of nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system and atenolol on antianginal efficacies and exercise hemodynamic responses in stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W A; Wellington, K L; Chess, M A; Liang, C S

    1994-01-01

    A gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) of nifedipine has been developed to provide a once-daily dosing, and predictable, relatively constant plasma concentrations. This study compared the antianginal efficacy of nifedipine GITS with a once-a-day beta-receptor blocker, atenolol. Seventeen patients with documented coronary artery disease and stable stress-induced angina pectoris were studied during a 2-week, single-blind, placebo baseline phase and a 12-week randomized, double-blind, active drug crossover efficacy phase, using the bicycle exercise test and ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings. Patients exercised significantly longer with nifedipine GITS (883 +/- 47 seconds) and atenolol (908 +/- 44 seconds) than with placebo (794 +/- 41 seconds). Nifedipine GITS reduced systolic blood pressure at all stages of exercise compared with placebo but, because heart rate tended to increase more during nifedipine therapy, there was no difference in rate-pressure products between the placebo and nifedipine GITS periods. In contrast, atenolol reduced heart rate, systolic blood pressure and rate-pressure product during exercise compared with placebo. Whereas left ventricular ejection fractions (by radionuclide angiocardiography) increased with exercise, the maximal increase was smaller with atenolol than with placebo and nifedipine. The net increase in left ventricular ejection fraction at the end of exercise was greater with nifedipine than with placebo or atenolol. Ambulatory electrocardiograms showed only a small number of ischemic events. Neither nifedipine GITS nor atenolol reduced the number of ischemic events or total duration of ST-segment deviations significantly. It is concluded that nifedipine GITS is as effective an antianginal agent as atenolol, but the hemodynamic effects of the 2 agents differ.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8279372

  1. Sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, T S; Young, J B; Landsberg, L

    1983-01-01

    The sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxic exposure at 10.5 and 7.5% oxygen were determined in the rat. Cardiac norepinephrine (NE) turnover was used to assess sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, and urinary excretion of epinephrine (E) was measured as an index of adrenal medullary activity. The responses of the adrenal medulla and SNS were distinct and dependent upon the degree and duration of hypoxic exposure. Chronic hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen increased cardiac NE turnover by 130% after 3, 7, and 14 d of hypoxic exposure. Urinary excretion of NE was similarly increased over this time interval, while urinary E excretion was marginally elevated. In contrast, acute exposure to moderate hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen was not associated with an increase in SNS activity; in fact, decreased SNS activity was suggested by diminished cardiac NE turnover and urinary NE excretion over the first 12 h of hypoxic exposure, and by a rebound increase in NE turnover after reexposure to normal oxygen tension. Adrenal medullary activity, on the other hand, increased substantially during acute exposure to moderate hypoxia (2-fold increase in urinary E excretion) and severe hypoxia (greater than 10-fold). In distinction to the lack of effect of acute hypoxic exposure (10.5% oxygen), the SNS was markedly stimulated during the first day of hypoxia exposure at 7.5% oxygen, an increase that was sustained throughout at least 7 d at 7.5% oxygen. These results demonstrate that chronic exposure to moderate and severe hypoxia increases the activity of the SNS and adrenal medulla, the effect being greater in severe hypoxic exposure. The response to acute hypoxic exposure is more complicated; during the first 12 h of exposure at 10.5% oxygen, the SNS is not stimulated and appears to be restrained, while adrenal medullary activity is enhanced. Acute exposure to a more severe degree of hypoxia (7.5% oxygen), however, is associated with stimulation of both the SNS and adrenal medulla

  2. Mast cells mediate acute inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liping; Jennings, Timothy A.; Eaton, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Implanted biomaterials trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in such acute inflammatory responses can be arbitrarily divided into phagocyte transmigration, chemotaxis, and adhesion to implant surfaces. We earlier observed that two chemokines—macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1—and the phagocyte integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)/surface fibrinogen interaction are, respectively, required for phagocyte chemotaxis and adherence to biomaterial surfaces. However, it is still not clear how the initial transmigration of phagocytes through the endothelial barrier into the area of the implant is triggered. Because implanted biomaterials elicit histaminic responses in the surrounding tissue, and histamine release is known to promote rapid diapedesis of inflammatory cells, we evaluated the possible role of histamine and mast cells in the recruitment of phagocytes to biomaterial implants. Using i.p. and s.c. implantation of polyethylene terephthalate disks in mice we find: (i) Extensive degranulation of mast cells, accompanied by histamine release, occurs adjacent to short-term i.p. implants. (ii) Simultaneous administration of H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists (pyrilamine and famotidine, respectively) greatly diminishes recruitment and adhesion of both neutrophils (<20% of control) and monocytes/macrophages (<30% of control) to implants. (iii) Congenitally mast cell-deficient mice also exhibit markedly reduced accumulation of phagocytes on both i.p. and s.c implants. (iv) Finally, mast cell reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice restores “normal” inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants. We conclude that mast cells and their granular products, especially histamine, are important in recruitment of inflammatory cells to biomaterial implants. Improved knowledge of such responses may permit purposeful modulation of both acute and chronic inflammation affecting implanted biomaterials. PMID

  3. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  4. Reduced dorsolateral prefrontal cortical hemodynamic response in adult obsessive-compulsive disorder as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy during the verbal fluency task

    PubMed Central

    Hirosawa, Rikuei; Narumoto, Jin; Sakai, Yuki; Nishida, Seiji; Ishida, Takuya; Nakamae, Takashi; Takei, Yuichi; Fukui, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Background Near-infrared spectroscopy has helped our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders and has advantages including noninvasiveness, lower cost, and ease of use compared with other imaging techniques, like functional magnetic resonance imaging. The verbal fluency task is the most common and well established task used to assess cognitive activation during near-infrared spectroscopy. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that the orbitofrontal cortex and other brain regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, may play important roles in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study aimed to evaluate hemodynamic responses in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in patients with OCD using near-infrared spectroscopy during the verbal fluency task and to compare these with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex responses in healthy controls. Methods Twenty patients with OCD and 20 controls matched for age, gender, handedness, and estimated intelligence quotient participated in this study. The verbal fluency task was used to elicit near-infrared spectroscopic activation and consisted of a 30-second pre-task, followed by three repetitions of a 20-second verbal fluency task (total 60 seconds), followed by a 70-second post-task period. The near-infrared spectroscopy experiment was conducted on the same day as surveys of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depression, and anxiety. Z-scores for changes in the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin were compared between the OCD patients and controls in 14 channels set over the left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and frontopolar areas. Results During the verbal fluency task, significant task-related activation was detected in both the OCD group and the controls. Changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly smaller in the OCD group than in the controls, but were not statistically

  5. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Shrenik; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization and hemodynamic study is the gold standard for the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Careful interpretation of the hemodynamic data is essential to differentiate it from other diseases with restrictive physiology. In this hemodynamic review we shall briefly discuss the physiologic basis of various hemodynamic changes seen in a patient with constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26071303

  6. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration. PMID:26924539

  7. Acute hypoxemia in humans enhances the neutrophil inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Douglas Y; Moore, Ernest E; Partrick, David A; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Offner, Patrick J; Silliman, Christopher C

    2002-04-01

    The neutrophil (PMN) is regarded as a key component in the hyperinflammatory response known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF) are related to the severity of this hyperinflammation. ICU patients who are at highest risk of developing MOF may have acute hypoxic events that complicate their hospital course. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of acute hypoxia and subsequent hypoxemia on circulating PMNs in human volunteers. Healthy subjects were exposed to a changing O2/N2 mixture until their O2 saturation (SaO2) reached a level of 68% saturation. These subjects were then exposed to room air and then returned to their baseline SaO2. PMNs were isolated from pre- and post-hypoxemic arterial blood samples and were then either stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or PMA alone, or they were primed with L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine, beta-acetyl-gamma-O-alkyl (PAF) followed by fMLP activation. Reactive oxygen species generation as measured by superoxide anion production was enhanced in primed PMNs after hypoxemia. Protease degranulation as measured by elastase release was enhanced in both quiescent PMNs and primed PMNs after fMLP activation following the hypoxemic event. Adhesion molecule upregulation as measured by CD11b/CD18, however, was not significantly changed after hypoxemia. Apoptosis of quiescent PMNs was delayed after the hypoxemic event. TNFalpha, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8 cytokine levels were unchanged following hypoxemia. These results indicate that relevant acute hypoxemic events observed in the clinical setting enhance several PMN cytotoxic functions and suggest that a transient hypoxemic insult may promote hyperinflammation. PMID:11954825

  8. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  9. Effects of age on hemorheological responses to acute endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Ahmadizad, Sajad; Moradi, Akram; Nikookheslat, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Hadi; Rahbaran, Adel; Connes, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of age on the acute responses of hemorheological variables and biochemical parameters to a single bout of sub-maximal endurance exercise. Fifteen young (20-30 years), 15 middle-aged (40-50 years) and 12 old (60-70 years) male subjects participated in the study. All subjects performed one single bout of endurance exercise encompassed 30-min cycling at 70-75% of maximal heart rate which was followed by 30-min recovery. Three blood samples were taken before, immediately after exercise and after 30-min recovery. Resting levels of hematocrit, red blood cells count, plasma albumin and fibrinogen concentrations, plasma viscosity and whole blood viscosity were significantly different among the three groups (P < 0.01). Thirty minutes of cycling resulted in significant increases (P < 0.05) in all parameters; while these changes were temporary and returned to pre-exercise level at the end of recovery. Responses of all parameters to exercise and recovery were not significantly different among the three groups (P > 0.05). Fibrinogen changes during exercise and recovery were corrected for exercise- and recovery-induced changes in plasma volume. Data analysis showed effects of exercise and recovery only for raw data (P > 0.05). In addition, raw and corrected fibrinogen data in response to exercise and recovery were not age-related. Our results demonstrate that age does not affect the hemorheological responses to an acute endurance exercise in healthy men. PMID:22214687

  10. Salivary Markers of Inflammation in Response to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Slavish, Danica C.; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Engeland, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the ability to detect inflammatory markers in response to stress within naturally occurring social contexts and/or across multiple time points per day within individuals. Salivary collection is a less invasive process than current methods of blood collection and enables intensive naturalistic methodologies, such as those involving extensive repeated measures per day over time. Yet the reliability and validity of saliva-based to blood-based inflammatory biomarkers in response to stress remains unclear. We review and synthesize the published studies that have examined salivary markers of inflammation following exposure to an acute laboratory stressor. Results from each study are reviewed by analyte (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, CRP) and stress type (social-cognitive and exercise-physical), after which methodological issues and limitations are addressed. Although the literature is limited, several inflammatory markers (including IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6) have been reliably determined from saliva and have increased significantly in response to stress across multiple studies, with effect sizes ranging from very small to very large. Although CRP from saliva has been associated with CRP in circulating blood more consistently than other biomarkers have been associated with their counterparts in blood, evidence demonstrating it reliably responds to acute stress is absent. Although the current literature is presently too limited to allow broad assertion that inflammatory biomarkers determined from saliva are valuable for examining acute stress responses, this review suggests that specific targets may be valid and highlights specific areas of need for future research. PMID:25205395

  11. Reduced Acute Inflammatory Responses to Microgel Conformal Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Amanda W.; Singh, Neetu; Burns, Kellie L.; Babensee, Julia E.; Lyon, L. Andrew; García, Andrés J.

    2008-01-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into the body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. This inflammatory cascade involves protein adsorption, leukocyte recruitment and activation, cytokine release, and fibrous encapsulation of the implant. We present a coating strategy based on thin films of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel microparticles (i.e. microgels) cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. These particles were grafted onto a clinically relevant polymeric material to generate conformal coatings that significantly reduced in vitro fibrinogen adsorption and primary human monocytes/macrophage adhesion and spreading. These microgel coatings also reduced leukocyte adhesion and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1) in response to materials implanted acutely in the murine intraperitoneal space. These microgel coatings can be applied to biomedical implants as a protective coating to attenuate biofouling, leukocyte adhesion and activation, and adverse host responses for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:18804859

  12. Computations of uncertainty mediate acute stress responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    de Berker, Archy O.; Rutledge, Robb B.; Mathys, Christoph; Marshall, Louise; Cross, Gemma F.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stress are frequently studied, yet its proximal causes remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that subjective estimates of uncertainty predict the dynamics of subjective and physiological stress responses. Subjects learned a probabilistic mapping between visual stimuli and electric shocks. Salivary cortisol confirmed that our stressor elicited changes in endocrine activity. Using a hierarchical Bayesian learning model, we quantified the relationship between the different forms of subjective task uncertainty and acute stress responses. Subjective stress, pupil diameter and skin conductance all tracked the evolution of irreducible uncertainty. We observed a coupling between emotional and somatic state, with subjective and physiological tuning to uncertainty tightly correlated. Furthermore, the uncertainty tuning of subjective and physiological stress predicted individual task performance, consistent with an adaptive role for stress in learning under uncertain threat. Our finding that stress responses are tuned to environmental uncertainty provides new insight into their generation and likely adaptive function. PMID:27020312

  13. Acute phase protein response in the capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Bernal, Luis; Feser, Mariane; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; García-Martínez, Juan D; Cerón, José J; Tecles, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the acute phase protein response in capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). Three animal groups were used: 1) healthy animals (n=30), 2) a group in which experimental inflammation with turpentine was induced (n=6), and 3) a group affected with sarcoptic scabies (n=14) in which 10 animals were treated with ivermectin. Haptoglobin (Hp), acid-soluble glycoprotein (ASG) and albumin were analyzed in all animals. In those treated with turpentine, Hp reached its maximum value at 2 wk with a 2.7-fold increase, whereas ASG increased 1.75-fold and albumin decreased 0.87-fold 1 wk after the induction of inflammation. Capybaras affected with sarcoptic scabies presented increases in Hp and ASG of 4.98- and 3.18-fold, respectively, and a 0.87-fold decrease in albumin, compared with healthy animals. Haptoglobin and ASG can be considered as moderate, positive acute phase proteins in capybaras because they showed less than 10-fold increases after an inflammatory process and reached their peak concentrations 1 wk after the induction of inflammation. Conversely, albumin can be considered a negative acute phase protein in capybaras because it showed a reduction in concentration after inflammatory stimulus. PMID:22102653

  14. Differences in the Pattern of Hemodynamic Response to Self-Face and Stranger-Face Images in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takeshi; Sakuta, Yuiko; Shimamura, Keiichi; Ichikawa, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Megumi; Otani, Ryoko; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Kanazawa, So; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Sakuta, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    There have been no reports concerning the self-face perception in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). The purpose of this study was to compare the neuronal correlates of viewing self-face images (i.e. images of familiar face) and stranger-face images (i.e. images of an unfamiliar face) in female adolescents with and without AN. We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure hemodynamic responses while the participants viewed full-color photographs of self-face and stranger-face. Fifteen females with AN (mean age, 13.8 years) and 15 age- and intelligence quotient (IQ)-matched female controls without AN (mean age, 13.1 years) participated in the study. The responses to photographs were compared with the baseline activation (response to white uniform blank). In the AN group, the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) significantly increased in the right temporal area during the presentation of both the self-face and stranger-face images compared with the baseline level. In contrast, in the control group, the concentration of oxy-Hb significantly increased in the right temporal area only during the presentation of the self-face image. To our knowledge the present study is the first report to assess brain activities during self-face and stranger-face perception among female adolescents with AN. There were different patterns of brain activation in response to the sight of the self-face and stranger-face images in female adolescents with AN and controls. PMID:26151754

  15. Hemodynamic and metabolic response during dynamic and resistance exercise in different intensities: a cross-sectional study on implications of intensity on safety and symptoms in patients with coronary disease

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Flavia Rossi; Junior, Jose Carlos Bonjorno; Mendes, Renata G; Sperling, Milena Pelosi; Arakelian, Vivian M; Bassi, Daniela; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Resistance (RE) and aerobic exercise (AE) can promote hemodynamic, physiologic and clinical modifications in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The aim of the study is to assess key physiologic and clinical responses during RE at 30% and 60% of 1-RM on a 45° leg press and to compare responses during AE. We evaluated fifteen male subjects with coronary artery disease (60.8±4.7 years) that performed the following tests: (1) incremental AE test on cycle ergometer; (2) 1-RM test on a leg press at 45°; (3) and RE at 30% and 60% of 1-RM for 24 repetitions. Peak cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and the minute ventilation (VE, L/min)/VCO2 ration were measured. We found that both AE and RE at 60% of aerobic and resistance capacity elicited similar hemodynamic and ventilatory responses (p>0.05). However, RE at 30% 1-RM showed more attenuated responses of VO2, VE/VCO2, HR and CO when compared with 60% of aerobic and resistance capacity. Interestingly, the number, percentage and the severity of arrhythmias were higher at 60% 1-RM (P<0.05). Our data suggest that high repetition sets of RE at 60% 1-RM appears to result in hemodynamic, ventilatory, and metabolic changes equivalent to those observed during AE at a comparable intensity. PMID:27335689

  16. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro- reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationships of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venotis Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). Altered vascular volume had no effect on response relations of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex but did alter the gain of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex (-7.93 q 1.71, -4.36 q 1.38, and -2.56 q 1.59 peripheral resistance units/mmHg for hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic, respectively) independent of shifts in baseline FVR and PVP. These results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulnionary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  17. Amplitude variability over trials in hemodynamic responses in adolescents with ADHD: The role of the anterior default mode network and the non-specific role of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, L; Eichele, T; van Wageningen, H; Plessen, K J; Stevens, M C

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that intra-individual variability (IIV) in performance on attention and other cognitive tasks might be a cognitive endophenotype in individuals with ADHD. Despite robust IIV findings in behavioral data, only sparse data exist on how what type of brain dysfunction underlies variable response times. In this study, we asked whether ADHD IIV in reaction time on a commonly-used test of attention might be related to variation in hemodynamic responses (HRs) observed trial-to-trial. Based on previous studies linking IIV to regions within the "default mode" network (DMN), we predicted that adolescents with ADHD would have higher HR variability in the DMN compared with controls, and this in turn would be related to behavioral IIV. We also explored the influence of social anxiety on HR variability in ADHD as means to test whether higher arousal associated with high trait anxiety would affect the neural abnormalities. We assessed single-trial variability of HRs, estimated from fMRI event-related responses elicited during an auditory oddball paradigm in adolescents with ADHD and healthy controls (11-18 years old; N = 46). Adolescents with ADHD had higher HR variability compared with controls in anterior regions of the DMN. This effect was specific to ADHD and not associated with traits of age, IQ and anxiety. However, an ADHD effect of higher HR variability also appeared in a basal ganglia network, but for these brain regions the relationships of HR variability and social anxiety levels were more complex. Performance IIV correlated significantly with variability of HRs in both networks. These results suggest that assessment of trial-to-trial HR variability in ADHD provides information beyond that detectable through analysis of behavioral data and average brain activation levels, revealing specific neural correlates of a possible ADHD IIV endophenotype. PMID:27622136

  18. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology. PMID:25907748

  19. Polyphasic innate immune responses to acute and chronic LCMV infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Brian A.; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Price, Aryn A.; Grakoui, Arash; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Summary Resolution of acute and chronic viral infections requires activation of innate cells to initiate and maintain adaptive immune responses. Here we report that infection with acute Armstrong (ARM) or chronic Clone 13 (C13) strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) led to two distinct phases of innate immune response. During the first 72hr of infection, dendritic cells upregulated activation markers, and stimulated anti-viral CD8+ T cells, independent of viral strain. Seven days after infection, there was an increase in Ly6Chi monocytic and Gr-1hi neutrophilic cells in lymphoid organs and blood. This expansion in cell numbers was enhanced and sustained in C13 infection, whereas it occurred only transiently with ARM infection. These cells resembled myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and potently suppressed T cell proliferation. The reduction of monocytic cells in Ccr2−/− mice or after Gr-1 antibody depletion enhanced anti-viral T cell function. Thus, innate cells have an important immunomodulatory role throughout chronic infection. PMID:23438822

  20. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and intubation with Truview PCD™, McGrath® and Macintosh laryngoscope in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: A randomized prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tempe, Deepak K.; Chaudhary, Kapil; Diwakar, Anitha; Datt, Vishnu; Virmani, Sanjula; Tomar, Akhlesh S.; Mohandas, Anoop; Mohire, Vishwanath Bharav

    2016-01-01

    Context: We hypothesized that reduced oropharyngolaryngeal stimulation with video laryngoscopes would attenuate hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Aim: Comparison of hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation with video laryngoscopes and Macintosh (MC) laryngoscope. Setting and Design: Superspecialty tertiary care public hospital; prospective, randomized control study. Methods: Sixty adult patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were randomly allocated to three groups of 20 each: MC, McGrath (MG), and Truview (TV). Hemodynamic parameters were serially recorded before and after intubation. Laryngoscopic grade, laryngoscopy, and tracheal intubation time, ST segment changes, and intra-/post-operative complications were also recorded and compared between groups. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 17 was used, and appropriate tests applied. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Heart rate and diastolic arterial pressure increased at 0 and 1 min of intubation in all the three groups (P < 0.05) while mean arterial pressure increased at 0 min in the MG and TV groups and at 1 min in all three groups (P < 0.05). A significant increase in systolic arterial pressure was only observed in TV group at 1 min (P < 0.05). These hemodynamic parameters returned to baseline by 3 min of intubation in all the groups. The intergroup comparisons of all hemodynamic parameters were not significant at any time of observation. Highest intubation difficulty score was observed with MC (2.16 ± 1.86) as compared with MG (0.55 ± 0.88) and TV (0.42 ± 0.83) groups (P = 0.003 and P = 0.001, respectively). However, duration of laryngoscopy and intubation was significantly less in MC (36.68 ± 16.15 s) as compared with MG (75.25 ± 30.94 s) and TV (60.47 ± 27.45 s) groups (P = 0.000 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions: Video laryngoscopes did not demonstrate any advantage in terms of hemodynamic response in patients with normal airway

  1. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific. PMID:26476140

  2. Electrocardiographic, hemodynamic, and biochemical responses to acute particulate matter (PM) exposure in aged heart failure-prone rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient PM from fossil-fuel emissions is linked to cardiovascular disease and death. This association strengthens in people with preexisting cardiac disease-especially heart failure (HF). The mechanisms explaining PM-induced exacerbation ofHF are unclear. Some o...

  3. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro-reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationship, of the cardio-pulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venous Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). The results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  4. Enhanced vagal baroreflex response during 24 h after acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Adams, W. C.

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated carotid-cardiac baroreflex responses in eight normotensive men (25-41 yr) on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h after graded supine cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, this 24-h protocol was repeated with no exercise (control). Beat-to-beat R-R intervals were measured during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses from 40 to -65 mmHg; changes of R-R intervals were plotted against carotid pressure (systolic pressure minus neck chamber pressure). The maximum slope of the response relationship increased (P less than 0.05) from preexercise to 12 h (3.7 +/- 0.4 to 7.1 +/- 0.7 ms/mmHg) and remained significantly elevated through 24 h. The range of the R-R response was also increased from 217 +/- 24 to 274 +/- 32 ms (P less than 0.05). No significant differences were observed during the control 24-h period. An acute bout of graded exercise designed to elicit exhaustion increases the sensitivity and range of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response for 24 h and enhances its capacity to buffer against hypotension by increasing heart rate. These results may represent an underlying mechanism that contributes to blood pressure stability after intense exercise.

  5. Comparing hemodynamic models with DCM

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Klaas Enno; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Drysdale, Peter M.; Robinson, Peter A.; Friston, Karl J.

    2007-01-01

    The classical model of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses by Buxton et al. [Buxton, R.B., Wong, E.C., Frank, L.R., 1998. Dynamics of blood flow and oxygenation changes during brain activation: the Balloon model. Magn. Reson. Med. 39, 855–864] has been very important in providing a biophysically plausible framework for explaining different aspects of hemodynamic responses. It also plays an important role in the hemodynamic forward model for dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of fMRI data. A recent study by Obata et al. [Obata, T., Liu, T.T., Miller, K.L., Luh, W.M., Wong, E.C., Frank, L.R., Buxton, R.B., 2004. Discrepancies between BOLD and flow dynamics in primary and supplementary motor areas: application of the Balloon model to the interpretation of BOLD transients. NeuroImage 21, 144–153] linearized the BOLD signal equation and suggested a revised form for the model coefficients. In this paper, we show that the classical and revised models are special cases of a generalized model. The BOLD signal equation of this generalized model can be reduced to that of the classical Buxton model by simplifying the coefficients or can be linearized to give the Obata model. Given the importance of hemodynamic models for investigating BOLD responses and analyses of effective connectivity with DCM, the question arises which formulation is the best model for empirically measured BOLD responses. In this article, we address this question by embedding different variants of the BOLD signal equation in a well-established DCM of functional interactions among visual areas. This allows us to compare the ensuing models using Bayesian model selection. Our model comparison approach had a factorial structure, comparing eight different hemodynamic models based on (i) classical vs. revised forms for the coefficients, (ii) linear vs. non-linear output equations, and (iii) fixed vs. free parameters, ε, for region-specific ratios of intra- and extravascular signals. Using fMRI data

  6. Analysis of plasma serotonin levels and hemodynamic responses following chronic serotonin infusion in broilers challenged with bacterial lipopolysaccharide and microparticles.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M E; Taylor, R L; Wideman, R F

    2008-01-01

    There has been extensive interest in the role of serotonin (5-hydoxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension because episodes of pulmonary arterial hypertension in humans have been linked to serotoninergic appetite-suppressant drugs. In this study, we investigated the role of serotonin in the development of pulmonary hypertension induced by intravenously injecting bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) and cellulose microparticles. In experiment 1, we used a 5-HT ELISA kit for the in vitro quantitative determination of 5-HT in plasma during the development of pulmonary hypertension induced by injecting LPS and cellulose microparticles i.v. in broilers. In experiment 2, broilers were either chronically infused with 5-HT via surgically implanted osmotic pumps or received sham surgery as a control. After a period of 10 d, the pulmonary arterial pressure was recorded during challenge with injected LPS or microparticles. Microparticles elicited 5-HT plasma levels more than 2-fold greater than those elicited by LPS from 15 to 45 min postinjection. This indicates that 5-HT is an important mediator in the pulmonary hypertensive response of broilers to microparticles, but may not play a prominent role in the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS. Furthermore, chronic 5-HT infusion via osmotic pumps caused an increase in the duration of the pulmonary hypertensive response of broilers to microparticles, indicating that the infused 5-HT was sequestered by circulating thrombocytes and then released upon microparticle-mediated thrombocyte activation. Serotonin appears to play a less prominent role in the pulmonary hypertensive response of broilers to LPS, indicating that other mediators within the innate response to inflammatory stimuli may also be involved. These results are consistent with our hypothesis that pulmonary arterial hypertension ensues when vasoconstrictors such as 5-HT overwhelm the dilatory affects of vasodilators such as nitric

  7. Differentiating hemodynamic responses in rat primary somatosensory cortex during non-noxious and noxious electrical stimulation by optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Weihua; Li, Pengcheng; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2007-02-16

    Nociception in the primary somatosensory (S1) cortex remains in need of further elucidation. The spatiotemporal comparison on changes of the cerebral blood volume evoked by graded peripheral electrical stimulation was performed in rat contralateral somatosensory cortex with optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI, optical reflectance at 550 nm). Non-noxious electrical stimulus was applied with 5 Hz pulses (0.5 ms peak duration) for 2 s at the threshold current for muscle twitch, while noxious stimulus was delivered at currents of 10x and 20x amplitude of the predetermined threshold. Although the dimensions of peak response defined in the spatial domain (cerebral blood volume increase) in the S1 cortex presented no significant difference under non-/noxious stimuli, its early response component (about 1 s after stimulation onset) revealed by OISI technique was suggested to differentiate the loci of activated cortical region due to different stimulation in this study. The magnitude and duration of the optical intrinsic signal (OIS) response was found increasing with the varying stimulus intensity. Regions activated by the delivery of a noxious stimulus were surrounded by a ring of inverted optical intrinsic signal, the amplitude of that was inversely proportional to the strength of the optical signal attributable to activation. Intense stimuli significantly augmented the inverted optical signal in magnitude and spatial extent. These results indicated that noxious stimulation evoked different response patterns in the contralateral S1 cortex. The magnitude-dependent inverted optical signal might contribute to the differentiation of nociceptive input in the S1 cortex. PMID:17196176

  8. Acute phase proteins response to feed deprivation in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Najafi, P; Zulkifli, I; Soleimani, A F; Goh, Y M

    2016-04-01

    Feed deprivation in poultry farming imposes some degree of stress to the birds, and adversely affects their well -being. Serum levels of acute phase proteins (APP) are potential physiological indicators of stress attributed to feed deprivation. However, it has not been determined how long it takes for a measurable APP response to stressors to occur in avian species. An experiment was designed to delineate the APP and circulating levels of corticosterone responses in commercial broiler chickens to feed deprivation for 30 h. It was hypothesized that feed deprivation would elicit both APP and corticosterone (CORT) reactions within 30 h that is probably associated with stress of hunger. Twenty-one day old birds were subjected to one of 5 feed deprivation periods: 0 (ad libitum, AL), 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 h. Upon completion of the deprivation period, blood samples were collected to determine serum CORT, ovotransferrin (OVT), α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), and ceruloplasmin (CP) concentrations. Results showed that feed deprivation for 24 h or more caused a marked elevation in CORT (P=0.002 and P<0.0001, respectively) when compared to AL. However, increases in AGP (P=0.0005), CP (P=0.0002), and OVT (P=0.0003) were only noted following 30 h of feed deprivation. It is concluded that elicitation of AGP, CP, and OVT response may represent a more chronic stressful condition than CORT response in assessing the well-being of broiler chickens. PMID:26908886

  9. [The use of a vitamin and metabolite complex for correcting the disorders in systemic and organ hemodynamics during liver resection under conditions of acute blood loss].

    PubMed

    Shcherban', A N; Korkhov, S I; Nazarov, N V; Krivitskiĭ, N M; Kislukhin, V V; Kopytov, S V; Kholodov, I G

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of some infusion media, vitamins, and metabolites in resection of the liver in acute blood loss was studied in experiments on dogs. Inclusion of vitamins B1, B2, and B6, lipoic acid, calcium pantothenate, nicotinamide, solution of alpha-glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (aminalone) in the infusion led to a sharp increase of myocardial contractility, increase of cardiac output and total hepatic blood flow, normalization of biochemical blood values, and restoration of the activity of hepatocyte enzymes. PMID:2080080

  10. Vagolytic atropine attenuates cerebral vasodilation response during acute orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woo-Jong; Lee, Kichang; Kim, Young-Kug; Song, Kyo-Joon; Jeong, Sung-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Background Atropine is an anticholinergic drug which is commonly used in clinical practice. The effect of parasympathetic block with atropine on dynamic cerebrovascular regulation remains unclear. This study was aimed to identify effects of vagolytic atropine on cerebrovascular response during acute orthostatic hypotension in humans. Methods Continuous middle cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV, transcranial Doppler) and arterial blood pressure (ABP, Finometer) were measured during a sit-to-stand procedure in 10 healthy subjects with placebo and vagolytic (10 µg/kg) doses of atropine. Cerebral vascular tone was assessed by cerebrovascular resistance (CVR = ABP / CBFV). Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was also assessed by transfer function analysis of ABP and CBFV. Results During the standing session, ABP fell to a similar extent in both groups by an average of 23 to 25 mmHg (26% to 29%). CBFV also fell in all subjects but significantly more in vagolytic atropine (-15.0 ± 7.0 cm/s) compared with placebo (-12.0 ± 5.8 cm/s, P < 0.05). CVR was decreased significantly in the placebo group during posture change (1.56 ± 0.44 vs. 1.38 ± 0.38, P < 0.05), in contrast, lesser decreased in the atropine group (1.60 ± 0.50 vs. 1.53 ± 0.42, P = 0.193). Transfer function coherence in the very-low-frequency range was significantly increased in the atropine group during the standing session (0.55 ± 0.14), compared with the sitting session (0.45 ± 0.14, P = 0.006). Conclusions These data present that vagolytic atropine attenuates cerebral vasodilation response to acute orthostatic hypotension, suggesting the use of atropine may need care in patients with cerebrovascular disease with vagal impairment. PMID:26634084

  11. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing. PMID:25102201

  12. Uncontrolled immune response in acute myocardial infarction: unraveling the thread.

    PubMed

    Bodi, Vicente; Sanchis, Juan; Nunez, Julio; Mainar, Luis; Minana, Gema; Benet, Isabel; Solano, Carlos; Chorro, Francisco J; Llacer, Angel

    2008-12-01

    Recently, the theory that hyperinflammation is the body's primary response to potent stimulus has been challenged. Indeed, a deregulation of the immune system could be the cause of multiple organ failure. So far, clinicians have focused on the last steps of the inflammatory cascade. However, little attention has been paid to lymphocytes, which play an important role as strategists of the inflammatory response. Experimental evidence suggests a crucial role of T lymphocytes in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In summary, from the bottom of an imaginary inverted pyramid, a few regulatory T-cells control the upper parts represented by the wide spectrum of the inflammatory cascade. In AMI, a loss of regulation of the inflammatory system occurs in patients with a decreased activity of regulatory T-cells. As a consequence, aggressive T-cells boost and anti-inflammatory T-cells drop. A pleiotropic proinflammatory imbalance with damaging effects in terms of left ventricular performance and patient outcome is the result of this uncontrolled immune response. It is needed to unravel the thread of the inflammatory cells to better understand the pathophysiology as well as to open innovative therapeutic options in AMI. PMID:19033000

  13. Acute Cardiovascular Response to Sign Chi Do Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Carol E.; Carlson, John; Garver, Kayla

    2015-01-01

    Safe and gentle exercise may be important for older adults overcoming a sedentary lifestyle. Sign Chi Do (SCD), a novel form of low impact exercise, has shown improved balance and endurance in healthy older adults, and there have been no SCD-related injuries reported. Sedentary older adults are known to have a greater cardiovascular (CV) response to physical activity than those who regularly exercise. However their CV response to SCD is unknown. This study explored the acute CV response of older adults to SCD. Cross-sectional study of 34 sedentary and moderately active adults over age 55 with no previous experience practicing SCD. Participants completed a 10 min session of SCD. CV outcomes of heart rate, blood pressure, rate pressure product were recorded at 0, 5, 10 min of SCD performance, and after 10 min of rest. HR was recorded every minute. There was no difference in CV scores of sedentary and moderately active older adults after a session of SCD-related activity. All CV scores increased at 5 min, were maintained at 10 min, and returned to baseline within 10 min post SCD (p < 0.05). SCD may be a safe way to increase participation in regular exercise by sedentary older adults.

  14. Tenascin C protects aorta from acute dissection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Taizo; Shiraishi, Kozoh; Furusho, Aya; Ito, Sohei; Hirakata, Saki; Nishida, Norifumi; Yoshimura, Koichi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Takanobu; Ueno, Takafumi; Hamano, Kimikazu; Hiroe, Michiaki; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Aoki, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is caused by the disruption of intimomedial layer of the aortic walls, which is immediately life-threatening. Although recent studies indicate the importance of proinflammatory response in pathogenesis of AAD, the mechanism to keep the destructive inflammatory response in check is unknown. Here, we report that induction of tenascin-C (TNC) is a stress-evoked protective mechanism against the acute hemodynamic and humoral stress in aorta. Periaortic application of CaCl2 caused stiffening of abdominal aorta, which augmented the hemodynamic stress and TNC induction in suprarenal aorta by angiotensin II infusion. Deletion of Tnc gene rendered mice susceptible to AAD development upon the aortic stress, which was accompanied by impaired TGFβ signaling, insufficient induction of extracellular matrix proteins and exaggerated proinflammatory response. Thus, TNC works as a stress-evoked molecular damper to maintain the aortic integrity under the acute stress.

  15. Hemodynamic and autonomic nervous system responses to mixed meal ingestion in healthy young and old subjects and dysautonomic patients with postprandial hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Ryan, S. M.; Parker, J. A.; Freeman, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although postprandial hypotension is a common cause of falls and syncope in elderly persons and in patients with autonomic insufficiency, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS. We examined the hemodynamic, splanchnic blood pool, plasma norepinephrine (NE), and heart rate (HR) power spectra responses to a standardized 400-kcal mixed meal in 11 healthy young (age, 26 +/- 5 years) and nine healthy elderly (age, 80 +/- 5 years) subjects and 10 dysautonomic patients with symptomatic postprandial hypotension (age, 65 +/- 16 years). Cardiac and splanchnic blood pools were determined noninvasively by radionuclide scans, and forearm vascular resistance was determined using venous occlusion plethysmography. In healthy young and old subjects, splanchnic blood volume increased, but supine blood pressure remained unchanged after the meal. In both groups, HR increased and systemic vascular resistance remained stable. Forearm vascular resistance and cardiac index increased after the meal in elderly subjects, whereas these responses were highly variable and of smaller magnitude in the young. Young subjects demonstrated postprandial increases in low-frequency HR spectral power, representing cardiac sympatho-excitation, but plasma NE remained unchanged. In elderly subjects, plasma NE increased after the meal but without changes in the HR power spectrum. Patients with dysautonomia had a large postprandial decline in blood pressure associated with no change in forearm vascular resistance, a fall in systemic vascular resistance, and reduction in left ventricular end diastolic volume index. HR increased in these patients but without changes in plasma NE or the HR power spectrum. CONCLUSIONS. 1) In healthy elderly subjects, the maintenance of blood pressure homeostasis after food ingestion is associated with an increase in HR, forearm vascular resistance, cardiac index, and plasma NE. In both young and old, systemic vascular resistance is

  16. In-vivo optical imaging and spectroscopy of cerebral hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao

    Functional optical imaging techniques, such as diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy and laser speckle imaging (LSI), were used in research and clinical settings to measure cerebral hemodynamics. In this thesis, theoretical and experimental developments of the techniques and their in-vivo applications ranging from small animals to adult humans are demonstrated. Near infrared diffuse optical techniques non-invasively measure hemoglobin concentrations, blood oxygen saturation (diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, DRS) and blood flow (diffuse correlation spectroscopy, DCS) in deep tissues, e.g. brain. A noise model was derived for DCS measurements. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured with DCS was validated with arterial-spin-labeling MRI. Three-dimensional CBF tomography was obtained during cortical spreading depression from a rat using the optimized diffuse correlation tomographic method. Cerebral hemodynamics in newborn piglets after traumatic brain injury were continuously monitored optically for six hours to demonstrate the feasibility of using diffuse optical techniques as bedside patient monitors. Cerebral autoregulation in piglets and human stroke patients was demonstrated to be non-invasively assessable via the continuous DCS measurement. Significant differences of CBF responses to head-of-bead maneuvers were observed between the peri- and contra-infarct hemispheres in human stroke patients. A significant portion of patient population showed paradoxical CBF responses, indicating the importance of individualized stroke management. The development of a speckle noise model revealed the source of noise for LSI. LSI was then applied to study the acute functional recovery of the rat brain following transient brain ischemia. The spatial and temporal cerebral blood flow responses to functional stimulation were statistically quantified. The area of activation, and the temporal response to stimulation were found significantly altered by the ischemic insult, while the

  17. Effect of etomidate and propofol induction on hemodynamic and endocrine response in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting/mitral valve and aortic valve replacement surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Ram Prasad; Vatal, Ajay; Pathak, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The concerns for induction of anaesthesia in patients undergoing cardiac surgery include hemodynamic stability, attenuation of stress response and maintenance of balance between myocardial oxygen demand and supply. Various Intravenous anaesthetic agents like Thiopentone, Etomidate, Propofol, Midazolam, and Ketamine have been used for anesthetizing patients for cardiac surgeries. However, many authors have expressed concerns regarding induction with thiopentone, midazolam and ketamine. Hence, Propofol and Etomidate are preferred for induction in these patients. However, these two drugs have different characteristics. Etomidate is preferred for patients with poor left ventricular (LV) function as it provides stable cardiovascular profile. But there are concerns about reduction in adrenal suppression and serum cortisol levels. Propofol, on the other hand may cause a reduction in systemic vascular resistance and subsequent hypotension. Thus, this study was conducted to compare induction with these two agents in cardiac surgeries. Methods: Baseline categorical and continuous variables were compared using Fisher's exact test and student's t test respectively. Hemodynamic variables were compared using student's t test for independent samples. The primary outcome (serum cortisol and blood sugar) of the study was compared using Wilcoxon Rank Sum test. The P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Etomidate provides more stable hemodynamic parameters as compared to Propofol. Propofol causes vasodilation and may result in drop of systematic BP. Etomidate can therefore be safely used for induction in patients with good LV function for CABG/MVR/AVR on CPB without serious cortisol suppression lasting more than twenty-four hours. PMID:25849685

  18. Influence of endurance exercise performance on hemodynamic and hormonal responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and +Gz tolerance in the aspect of individual sensitivity to motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Turski, B K; Debinski, W B; Gembicka-Kuzak, D M; Kaczorowski, Z; Klossowski, M; Dabrowski, O B

    1996-09-01

    A possible relationship between endurance exercise training, susceptibility to motion sickness, and orthostatic tolerance was investigated. Male subjects underwent acceleration tolerance tests, lower body negative pressure, and Coriolis tests. During the experimental protocol, hemodynamic parameters were measured including heart rate, stroke volume, blood pressure, and cardiac output, and blood was drawn and analyzed for various hormones. Specific results are presented and discussed. PMID:11540301

  19. Acute phase proteins in salmonids: evolutionary analyses and acute phase response.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Hiney, M P; Shields, D C; Uhlar, C M; Lindsay, A J; Whitehead, A S

    1997-01-01

    Inflammation induces dramatic changes in the biosynthetic profile of the liver, leading to increased serum concentrations of positive acute phase (AP) proteins and decreased concentrations of negative AP proteins. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and the pentraxins C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP) are major AP proteins: their serum levels can rise by 1000-fold, indicating that they play a critical role in defense and/or the restoration of homeostasis. We have cloned SAA and a SAP-like pentraxin from salmonid fish species. The salmonid SAA shares approximately 70% amino acid identity with mammalian AP SAA. When salmonids are challenged with an AP stimulus, i.e., Aeromonas salmonicida, SAA responds dramatically as a major AP reactant. The salmonid pentraxin shows approximately 40% amino acid identity to both mammalian SAP and CRP. Evolutionary analysis suggests the presence of only a single such protein in teleosts and lower animal species. Surprisingly, the salmonid pentraxin behaves as a negative AP reactant, reminiscent of the SAP-like Syrian hamster female protein, in that hepatic mRNA concentrations decline to 50% of prestimulus levels. This study reinforces the hypothesis that SAA induction is an essential and universal feature of the vertebrate AP response and that it represents part of an ancient host defense system. Conversely, the species-dependent heterogeneity of pentraxin expression during the vertebrate AP response supports the possibility that its most important ancestral (and perhaps present) function is not related to its AP behavior. PMID:8977214

  20. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs. PMID:24714543

  1. Acute and delayed thermoregulatory response of mice exposed to brevetoxin.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Kimm-Brinson, K L; Padnos, B; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-09-01

    Thermal dysthesia, characterized by a painful sensation of warm and cool surfaces, is one of many ailments in humans exposed to various marine algal toxins such as brevetoxin (PbTx). There is no animal model to study thermal dysthesia and little is known of the mechanism of action. There is also little known on the acute and delayed thermoregulatory effects of PbTx. In this study, we developed a behavioral system to assess the possible development of thermal dysthesia in mice exposed to PbTx. Female mice were implanted with radiotransmitters to monitor core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). In one experiment, mice were dosed with the control vehicle or 180 microg/kg PbTx and placed on a floor temperature gradient to measure the selected foot temperature (SFT) while air temperature was kept constant. PbTx-treated mice underwent a 10 degrees C reduction in SFT concomitant with a 3 degrees C reduction in Tc within 30 min after exposure. In another study, Tc and MA were monitored in mice maintained in their home cages after dosing with 180 microg/kg PbTx. Tc but not MA increased for 2-5 days after exposure. SFT was unaffected by PbTx when tested 1-12 days after exposure. However, PbTx-treated mice underwent an increase in Tc when placed in the temperature gradient for up to 12 days after exposure. This suggests that PbTx augments the stress-induced hyperthermia from being placed in a novel environment. Overall, acute PbTx exposure leads to a regulated reduction in Tc as characterized by a preference for cooler SFTs and a reduced Tc. Thermal dysthesia was not apparent, but the exaggerated hyperthermic response with a normal SFT in the temperature gradient may suggest an altered processing of thermal stimuli in mice treated with PbTx. PMID:11384725

  2. Local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity in mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Pisauro, M Andrea; Benucci, Andrea; Carandini, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    Imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging seek to estimate neural signals in local brain regions through measurements of hemodynamic activity. However, hemodynamic activity is accompanied by large vascular fluctuations of unclear significance. To characterize these fluctuations and their impact on estimates of neural signals, we used optical imaging in visual cortex of awake mice. We found that hemodynamic activity can be expressed as the sum of two components, one local and one global. The local component reflected presumed neural signals driven by visual stimuli in the appropriate retinotopic region. The global component constituted large fluctuations shared by larger cortical regions, which extend beyond visual cortex. These fluctuations varied from trial to trial, but they did not constitute noise; they correlated with pupil diameter, suggesting that they reflect variations in arousal or alertness. Distinguishing local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity may help understand neurovascular coupling and interpret measurements of hemodynamic responses. PMID:26984421

  3. Local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity in mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pisauro, M. Andrea; Benucci, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging seek to estimate neural signals in local brain regions through measurements of hemodynamic activity. However, hemodynamic activity is accompanied by large vascular fluctuations of unclear significance. To characterize these fluctuations and their impact on estimates of neural signals, we used optical imaging in visual cortex of awake mice. We found that hemodynamic activity can be expressed as the sum of two components, one local and one global. The local component reflected presumed neural signals driven by visual stimuli in the appropriate retinotopic region. The global component constituted large fluctuations shared by larger cortical regions, which extend beyond visual cortex. These fluctuations varied from trial to trial, but they did not constitute noise; they correlated with pupil diameter, suggesting that they reflect variations in arousal or alertness. Distinguishing local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity may help understand neurovascular coupling and interpret measurements of hemodynamic responses. PMID:26984421

  4. The effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on the response of cerebral blood flow to acute hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Sugawara, Jun; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the response of cerebral blood flow to an acute change in perfusion pressure is modified by an acute increase in central blood volume. Nine young, healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. To measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation during normocapnic and hypercapnic (5%) conditions, the change in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity was analyzed during acute hypotension caused by two methods: 1) thigh-cuff occlusion release (without change in central blood volume); and 2) during the recovery phase immediately following release of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -50 mmHg) that initiated an acute increase in central blood volume. In the thigh-cuff occlusion release protocol, as expected, hypercapnia decreased the rate of regulation, as an index of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (0.236 ± 0.018 and 0.167 ± 0.025 s(-1), P = 0.024). Compared with the cuff-occlusion release, the acute increase in central blood volume (relative to the LBNP condition) with LBNP release attenuated dynamic cerebral autoregulation (P = 0.009). Therefore, the hypercapnia-induced attenuation of dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not observed in the LBNP release protocol (P = 0.574). These findings suggest that an acute change in systemic blood distribution modifies dynamic cerebral autoregulation during acute hypotension. PMID:26159757

  5. Acute salivary hormone responses to complex exercise bouts.

    PubMed

    Beaven, C Martyn; Gill, Nicholas D; Ingram, John R; Hopkins, Will G

    2011-04-01

    The combination of resistance and plyometric training, or complex training, may yield greater functional gains than either method alone. As steroid hormones respond to exercise stimuli and modulate the functional outcomes, it is possible that complex training creates an enhanced anabolic physiological milieu for adaptation. We investigated acute responses of salivary testosterone and cortisol to complex exercise bouts. After a standardized warm-up, 16 semiprofessional rugby players performed 1 of 4 exercise bouts in a cross-over manner: power-power; power-strength; strength-power; or strength-strength. Each player completed each of the 4 bouts twice over a 4-week period in a balanced random order such that each player performed a total of 8 bouts. The power block consisted of 3 sets of 3 repetitions of jump squat exercise at 50% of 1-repetition maximum load. The strength block consisted of three sets of three repetitions of box squat exercise at a 3-repetition maximum load. There were 3-minute rest periods between sets and 4-minute rest periods between exercise blocks. Saliva was sampled before, during, and immediately after the exercise bout. The greatest overall hormonal responses were a small increase in testosterone (13%; 90% confidence limits ± 7%) and a trivial increase in cortisol (27%; ± 30%) after the strength-power bout. A clear difference was observed between the strength-power and the power-power bouts immediately after exercise for testosterone (10%; ± 8%) and cortisol (29%; ± 17%). The preceding exercise block had little effect on subsequent strength and power performance. The hormonal response after the strength-power bout suggests that this exercise sequence provides an enhanced anabolic milieu for adaptation. PMID:20703172

  6. Tail docking in pigs: acute physiological and behavioural responses.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, M A; Bryer, P J; Krebs, N; McGlone, J J

    2008-02-01

    Tail docking of piglets is a routine procedure on farms to control tail-biting behaviour; however, docking can cause an acute stress response. The objectives of this research were to determine the stress responses to tail docking in piglets and to compare two methods of tail docking; cautery iron (CAUT) and the more commonly used blunt trauma cutters (BT). At approximately 6 days of age, piglets were tail docked using CAUT (n = 20), BT (n = 20) or sham tail docked with their tails remaining intact (CON; n = 40). Blood samples were taken prior to tail docking and at 30, 60 and 90 min after tail docking to evaluate the effect of tail docking on white blood cell (WBC) measures and cortisol concentrations. The above experiment was repeated to observe behaviour without the periodic blood sampling, so as not to confound the effects of blood sampling on piglet behaviour. Piglet behaviour was recorded in the farrowing crate using 1 min scan-samples via live observations for 60 min prior to and 90 min after tail docking. Total WBC counts were reduced (P > 0.05) among BT and CAUT compared with CON piglets 30 min after tail docking. Cortisol concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) among BT compared with CON and CAUT piglets 60 min after tail docking. Cautery and BT-docked piglets spent more (P < 0.05) time posterior scooting compared with CON piglets between 0 and 15 min, and 31 and 45 min after tail docking. Piglets tail docked using CAUT and BT tended to spend more (P < 0.07) time sitting than CON piglets between 0 and 15 min post tail docking. Elevated blood cortisol can be reduced by the use of the CAUT rather than the BT method of tail docking. Although the tail docking-induced rise in cortisol was prevented by using CAUT, the behavioural response to BT and CAUT docking methods was similar. PMID:22445023

  7. Effect of fluid ingestion on orthostatic responses following acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is impaired following an acute bout of exercise. This study examined the effect of fluid ingestion following treadmill exercise in restoring the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic stress. Five men (age, 29.6 +/- 3.4 yrs) were exposed to a graded lower body negative (LBNP) pressure protocol (0 to -50 mmHg) during euhydration without exercise (C), 20 minutes after exercise dehydration (D), 20 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI20), and 60 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI60). Fluid ingestion (mean +/- SE) consisted of water-ingestion equivalent to 50% of the body weight lost during exercise (520 +/- 15 ml). Exercise dehydration resulted in significantly higher heart rates (119 +/- 8 vs 82 +/- 7 bpm), lower systolic blood pressures (95 +/- 1.7 vs 108 +/- 2.3 mmHg), a smaller increase in leg circumference (3.7 +/- 4 vs 6.9 +/- 1.0 mm), and an attenuated increase in total peripheral resistance (2.58 +/- 1.2 vs 4.28 +/- 0.9 mmHg/L/min) at -50 mmHg LBNP compared to the C condition. Fluid ingestion (both 20 and 60), partially restored the heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance responses to LBNP, but did not influence the change in leg circumference during LBNP (4 +/- 0.3 for R20 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 mm for R60). These data illustrate the effectiveness of fluid ingestion on improving orthostatic responses following exercise, and suggest that dehydration is a contributing factor to orthostatic intolerance following exercise.

  8. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children. PMID:24889648

  9. Hemodynamics in fetal arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Acharya, Ganesh

    2016-06-01

    Fetal arrhythmias are among the few conditions that can be managed in utero. However, accurate diagnosis is essential for appropriate management. Ultrasound-based imaging methods can be used to study fetal heart structure and function noninvasively and help to understand fetal cardiovascular pathophysiology, and they remain the mainstay of evaluating fetuses with arrhythmias in clinical settings. Hemodynamic evaluation using Doppler echocardiography allows the elucidation of the electrophysiological mechanism and helps to make an accurate diagnosis. It can also be used as a tool to understand fetal cardiac pathophysiology, for assessing fetal condition and monitoring the effect of antiarrhythmic treatment. This narrative review describes Doppler techniques that are useful for evaluating fetal cardiac rhythms to refine diagnosis and provides an overview of hemodynamic changes observed in different types of fetal arrhythmia. PMID:26660845

  10. Early morphofunctional plasticity of microglia in response to acute lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Madore, C; Joffre, C; Delpech, J C; De Smedt-Peyrusse, V; Aubert, A; Coste, L; Layé, S; Nadjar, A

    2013-11-01

    Within the central nervous system (CNS) the traditional role of microglia has been in brain infection and disease, phagocytosing debris and secreting factors to modify disease progression. This led to the concept of "resting" versus "activated" microglia. However, this is misleading because multiple phenotypic and morphological stages of microglia can influence neuronal structure and function in any condition and recent evidence extends their role to healthy brain homeostasis. The present work was thus aimed at reappraising the concept of morphofunctional activity of microglia in a context of peripheral acute immune challenge, where microglial activity is known to be modified, using the new state-of-the-art techniques available. To do so, mice were injected peripherally with lipopolysaccharide, a potent inducer of cerebral inflammation, and we assessed early cytokines production, phenotype, motility and morphology of microglial cells. Our results showed that LPS induced a widespread inflammatory response both peripherally and centrally, as revealed by the quantification of cytokines levels. We also found an alteration of microglial motility that was confirmed by in vivo studies showing an overall reduction of microglial processes length in the hippocampus of LPS-treated animals. Finally, analysis of various surface receptors expression revealed that LPS did not significantly impact microglial phenotype 2h after the injection but rather induced an increase of CD11b(+)/CD45(high) cells. These latter may be at the vasculature, at the CNS vicinity, or may have invaded the CNS. PMID:23994463

  11. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Slone, William L; Moses, Blake S; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-04-26

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  12. Acute electrophysiological responses of bradykinin-stimulated human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Estacion, M

    1991-05-01

    1. Acute responses to bradykinin in human dermal fibroblasts were studied at 20-24 degrees C using both the patch-clamp technique to monitor ion currents and Fura-2 fluorescence to monitor [Ca2+]i. 2. During subconfluent culture, human dermal fibroblasts can express a diversity of ion channels as described in the preceding paper. 3. When GTP (1 mM) was included in the pipette solution, two additional ion channel populations were transiently augmented in response to bradykinin stimulation. 4. The first is a component of outwardly rectifying current which reached maximal induction within 10-15 s after bradykinin addition (1 microM) and then decayed back to near baseline over 60 s. 5. Ion substitution experiments combined with tail current analysis indicate that the outward current is carried predominantly by K+. 6. Video imaging of single-cell Fura-2 fluorescence from both intact cells and patch-clamped cells showed temporal correlation of the K+ current modulation and the Ca2+ transients in response to bradykinin stimulation. 7. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, caused both an increase in intracellular calcium and the augmentation of the outward K+ current. The amount of additional K+ current was correlated with [Ca2+]i levels and could be elicited even without the presence of GTP in the pipette. 8. Apamin, a blocker of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels, inhibited (at 1 microM) the ionomycin-induced modulation of K+ current. 9. In addition, an inward current was transiently induced in response to bradykinin. This current was strictly dependent on the presence of GTP in the pipette solution. This current showed little voltage dependence, as evidenced by a linear current vs. voltage relation, and a reversal potential near but measurably more positive than 0 mV. 10. This current could be decoupled from the Ca2+ transient and be irreversibly induced by including GTP gamma S (100 microM) in the pipette solution. 11. Ion substitution experiments show that this is a non

  13. Sildenafil Exposure and Hemodynamic Effect after Fontan Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tunks, Robert D.; Barker, Piers C. A.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Fleming, Gregory A.; Laughon, Matthew; Li, Jennifer S.; Hill, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine sildenafil exposure and hemodynamic effect in children after Fontan single-ventricle surgery. Design Prospective, dose-escalation trial. Setting Single-center, pediatric catheterization laboratory. Patients 9 children post Fontan single-ventricle surgical palliation and undergoing elective cardiac catheterization: Median (range) age and weight: 5.2 years (2.5–9.4) and 16.3 kg (9.5–28.1). Five children (55%) were male, and 6/9 (67%) had a systemic right ventricle. Interventions Catheterization and echocardiography performed before and immediately after single-dose intravenous sildenafil (0.25, 0.35, or 0.45 mg/kg over 20 minutes). Measurements Peak sildenafil and des-methyl sildenafil concentration, change in hemodynamic parameters measured by cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. Main Results Maximum sildenafil concentrations ranged from 124–646 ng/ml and were above the in vitro threshold needed for 77% phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibition in 8/9 children and 90% inhibition in 7/7 of children with doses ≥0.35 mg/kg. Sildenafil improved stroke volume (+22%, p=0.05) and cardiac output (+10%, p=0.01) with no significant change in heart rate in 8/9 children. Sildenafil also lowered systemic (-16%, p=0.01) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) in all 9 children (median baseline PVRI 2.4 [range: 1.3, 3.7]; decreased to 1.9 [0.8, 2.7] WU x m2; p=0.01) with no dose-response effect. Pulmonary arterial pressures decreased (−10%, p=0.02) and pulmonary blood flow increased (9%, p=0.02). There was no change in myocardial performance index and no adverse events. Conclusions After Fontan surgery, sildenafil infusion acutely improves cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, increasing cardiac index. For the range of doses studied, exposure was within the acute safety range reported in adult subjects. PMID:24201857

  14. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  15. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  16. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu, Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose. PMID:16781746

  17. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    PubMed Central

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette; Poulsen, Karin T.; Campbell, Fiona M.; Eckersall, P. David; Heegaard, Peter M.H.

    2009-01-01

    The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we studied gene expression changes in peripheral lymphoid tissues as compared to hepatic expression changes, 14–18 h after lung infection in pigs. The lung infection was established with the pig specific respiratory pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Quantitative real-time PCR based expression analysis were performed on samples from liver, tracheobronchial lymph node, tonsils, spleen and on blood leukocytes, supplemented with measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14–18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase protein response occurring concomitantly with the hepatic response. This suggests that the acute phase protein response is a more disseminated systemic response than previously thought. The current study provides to our knowledge the first example of porcine extrahepatic expression and regulation of C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, pig major acute phase protein, and transferrin in peripheral lymphoid tissues. PMID:19236838

  18. Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate increased intestinal hemodynamics without systemic circulatory changes in healthy newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangqin; Morton, Jude; Miedzyblocki, Margaret; Lee, Tze Fun; Bigam, David L; Fok, Tai Fai; Chen, Chao; Lee, Shoo K; Davidge, Sandra T; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2009-10-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, tanshinone IIA is a lipid-soluble component of Danshen that has been widely used for various cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders, including neonatal asphyxia. Despite promising effects, little is known regarding the hemodynamic effects of tanshinone IIA in newborn subjects. To examine the dose-response effects of sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) on systemic and regional hemodynamics and oxygen transport, 12 newborn piglets were anesthetized and acutely instrumented for the placement of femoral arterial and venous, pulmonary arterial catheters to measure mean arterial, central venous, and pulmonary arterial pressures, respectively. The blood flow at the common carotid, renal, pulmonary, and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries were continuously monitored after treating the piglets with either STS (0.1-30 mg/kg iv) or saline treatment (n = 6/group). To further delineate the underlying mechanisms for vasorelaxant effects of STS, in vitro vascular myography was carried out to compare its effect on rat mesenteric and carotid arteries (n = 4-5/group). STS dose-dependently increased the SMA blood flow and the corresponding oxygen delivery with no significant effect on systemic and pulmonary, carotid and renal hemodynamic parameters. In vitro studies also demonstrated that STS selectively dilated rat mesenteric but not carotid arteries. Vasodilation in mesenteric arteries was inhibited by apamin and TRAM-34 (calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors) but not by meclofenamate (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) or N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor). In summary, without significant hemodynamic effects on newborn piglets, intravenous infusion of STS selectively increased mesenteric perfusion in a dose-dependent manner, possibly via an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor vasodilating pathway. PMID:19617411

  19. Acute molecular response of mouse hindlimb muscles to chronic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, R. C.; Bombach, K. L.; Ankrapp, D. P.; Krill-Burger, J. M.; Sciulli, C. M.; Petrosko, P.; Wiseman, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulation of the mouse hindlimb via the sciatic nerve was performed for a 4-h period to investigate acute muscle gene activation in a model of muscle phenotype conversion. Initial force production (1.6 ± 0.1 g/g body wt) declined 45% within 10 min and was maintained for the remainder of the experiment. Force returned to initial levels upon study completion. An immediate-early growth response was present in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle (FOS, JUN, activating transcription factor 3, and musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene) with a similar but attenuated pattern in the soleus muscle. Transcript profiles showed decreased fast fiber-specific mRNA (myosin heavy chains 2A and 2B, fast troponins T3 and I, α-tropomyosin, muscle creatine kinase, and parvalbumin) and increased slow transcripts (myosin heavy chain-1β/slow, troponin C slow, and tropomyosin 3y) in the EDL versus soleus muscles. Histological analysis of the EDL revealed glycogen depletion without inflammatory cell infiltration in stimulated versus control muscles, whereas ultrastructural analysis showed no evidence of myofiber damage after stimulation. Multiple fiber type-specific transcription factors (tea domain family member 1, nuclear factor of activated T cells 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and -β, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α) increased in the EDL along with transcription factors characteristic of embryogenesis (Kruppel-like factor 4; SRY box containing 17; transcription factor 15; PBX/knotted 1 homeobox 1; and embryonic lethal, abnormal vision). No established in vivo satellite cell markers or genes activated in our parallel experiments of satellite cell proliferation in vitro (cyclins A2, B2, C, and E1 and MyoD) were differentially increased in the stimulated muscles. These results indicated that the molecular onset of fast to slow phenotype conversion occurred in the EDL within 4 h of stimulation

  20. Circulatory response to hyperthermia during acute normovolaemic haemodilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Anita; Fahim, M.

    Cats anaesthetized with a mixture of chloralose and urethane were exposed to heat stress in two groups. In the first group (n=10) of control animals, the effect of heat stress on haemodynamic variables was recorded at control haematocrit (HCT) of 42.0+/-1.0%. In a second group, the effect of heat stress was studied after induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution (HCT of 13.0+/-1.0%). Haemodilution was induced to a maximum of 60% replacement of blood with dextran (mol.wt. 150000). Heat stress was induced by surface heating and core body temperature was raised from 37° C to 42° C. The effect of heat stress and haemodilution on various haemodynamic variables, viz. left ventricular pressure (LVP), left ventricular contractility (LVdP/dtmax), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), arterial blood pressure (ABP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and arterial blood PO2, PCO2 and pH was examined. Haemodilution produced significant (P<0.05) increases in HR and CO but there were no significant (P>0.05) changes in ABP, RAP, LVdP/dtmax and total peripherial resistance (TPR). Hyperthermia caused a significant fall (P<0.05) in TPR. However, the percentage fall in TPR was higher in the control group. On exposure to heat stress, there were significant (P<0.05I increases in HR and CO in both the groups; however, HR and CO values were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the haemodiluted group compared to the control. The latter findings could be due either to the higher basal values of these variables with the fall in HCT or to inefficient cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The lack of efficient regulatory control under such severe stress conditions makes the cardiovascular system of anaemic animals more vulnerable to heat stress. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed deleterious effects of heat stress in both the groups. The higher values of HR and CO in the haemodiluted group may be responsible for circulatory failure at low HCT values, indicating a higher risk

  1. Endogenous pain inhibition is unrelated to autonomic responses in acute whiplash-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    De Kooning, Margot; Daenen, Liesbeth; Roussel, Nathalie; Cras, Patrick; Buyl, Ronald; Ickmans, Kelly; Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) demonstrate an inefficient endogenous pain inhibition and may experience a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system reactivity to pain. This study compared the autonomic response to painful stimuli between patients with acute and chronic WAD and healthy controls. In addition, the role of the autonomic nervous system for explaining inefficient endogenous pain inhibition was examined in acute WAD. Seventeen patients with acute WAD, 30 patients with chronic WAD, and 31 healthy controls participated in an experiment evaluating the autonomic nervous system at rest and during painful stimuli. Skin conductance and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were monitored continuously during conditioned pain modulation. A significant autonomic response to pain was present for skin conductance and two HRV parameters in all experimental groups. There was an interaction effect in the skin conductance response to pain but not in HRV responses in any of the groups. In patients with acute WAD, no significant correlations were present between pain, pressure pain thresholds, pain inhibition, and any of the autonomic parameters. This study refutes autonomic dysfunction at rest and in response to pain in acute WAD. The dysfunctional conditioned pain modulation appears unrelated to autonomic responses to pain. PMID:26348457

  2. Acute pulmonary function response to ozone in young adults as a function of body mass index

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown enhanced responsiveness to ozone in obese mice. Adiposity has not been examined as a possible modulator of ozone response in humans. We therefore examined the relationship between body mass index and the acute spirometric response to ozone (O(3)) exposur...

  3. Hemodynamic and clinical response to three-day infusion of sulmazol (AR-L 115 BS) in severe congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Renard, M; Jacobs, P; Dechamps, P; Dresse, A; Bernard, R

    1983-10-01

    Sulmazol (AR-L 115 BS) is a new positively inotropic drug with arterial and venous vasodilating properties. We studied the effects of sulmazol (three-day infusion) on clinical tolerance, hemodynamics, and blood gas levels in ten patients with severe chronic heart failure. The hemodynamic monitoring included a Swan-Ganz catheter in the pulmonary artery and a radial catheter. Blood gas levels were determined on samples of arterial and mixed venous blood. After 24 hours of infusion, there was a significant increase in cardiac index (2 to 2.5 L/min/sq m; p less than 0.005) and a significant decrease in pulmonary wedge pressure (28 to 19 mm Hg; p less than 0.001) and in right atrial pressure (7 to 4 mm Hg; p less than 0.001) without significant changes in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These beneficial effects lasted during the three days of infusion. Oxygen delivery was significantly increased (350 to 443 ml/min/sq m; p less than 0.005) without significant change in arterial oxygen tension. The side effects included nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and mild thrombocytopenia. We conclude that sulmazol is a potent drug which may improve severely deteriorated left and right ventricular function in patients with chronic refractory heart failure without affecting the heart rate and the systolic blood pressure. PMID:6413136

  4. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  5. Acute-phase response factor, a nuclear factor binding to acute-phase response elements, is rapidly activated by interleukin-6 at the posttranslational level.

    PubMed Central

    Wegenka, U M; Buschmann, J; Lütticken, C; Heinrich, P C; Horn, F

    1993-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is known to be a major mediator of the acute-phase response in liver. We show here that IL-6 triggers the rapid activation of a nuclear factor, termed acute-phase response factor (APRF), both in rat liver in vivo and in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells in vitro. APRF bound to IL-6 response elements in the 5'-flanking regions of various acute-phase protein genes (e.g., the alpha 2-macroglobulin, fibrinogen, and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein genes). These elements contain a characteristic hexanucleotide motif, CTGGGA, known to be required for the IL-6 responsiveness of these genes. Analysis of the binding specificity of APRF revealed that it is different from NF-IL6 and NF-kappa B, transcription factors known to be regulated by cytokines and involved in the transcriptional regulation of acute-phase protein genes. In HepG2 cells, activation of APRF was observed within minutes after stimulation with IL-6 or leukemia-inhibitory factor and did not require ongoing protein synthesis. Therefore, a preexisting inactive form of APRF is activated by a posttranslational mechanism. We present evidence that this activation occurs in the cytoplasm and that a phosphorylation is involved. These results lead to the conclusions that APRF is an immediate target of the IL-6 signalling cascade and is likely to play a central role in the transcriptional regulation of many IL-6-induced genes. Images PMID:7678052

  6. Acute response and chronic stimulus for cardiac structural and functional adaptation in a professional boxer.

    PubMed

    Oxborough, David; George, Keith; Utomi, Victor; Lord, Rachel; Morton, James; Jones, Nigel; Somauroo, John

    2014-06-01

    The individual response to acute and chronic changes in cardiac structure and function to intense exercise training is not fully understood and therefore evidence in this setting may help to improve the timing and interpretation of pre-participation cardiac screening. The following case report highlights an acute increase in right ventricular (RV) size and a reduction in left ventricular (LV) basal radial function with concomitant increase at the mid-level in response to a week's increase in training volume in a professional boxer. These adaptations settle by the second week; however, chronic physiological adaptation occurs over a 12-week period. Electrocardiographic findings demonstrate an acute lateral T-wave inversion at 1 week, which revert to baseline for the duration of training. It appears that a change in training intensity and volume generates an acute response within the RV that acts as a stimulus for chronic adaptation in this professional boxer. PMID:25988031

  7. Multi-Agent Simulations of the Immune Response to Hiv during the Acute Stage of Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walshe, R.; Ruskin, H. J.; Callaghan, A.

    Results of multi-agent based simulations of the immune response to HIV during the acute phase of infection are presented here. The model successfully recreates the viral dynamics associated with the acute phase of infection, i.e., a rapid rise in viral load followed by a sharp decline to what is often referred to as a "set point", a result of T-cell response and emergence of HIV neutralizing antibodies. The results indicate that sufficient T Killer cell response is the key factor in controlling viral growth during this phase with antibody levels of critical importance only in the absence of a sufficient T Killer response.

  8. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  9. Executive function and endocrinological responses to acute resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Wang, Chun-Hao; Pan, Chien-Yu; Chen, Fu-Chen; Huang, Tsang-Hai; Chou, Feng-Ying

    2014-01-01

    This study had the following two aims: First, to explore the effects of acute resistance exercise (RE, i.e., using exercise machines to contract and stretch muscles) on behavioral and electrophysiological performance when performing a cognitive task involving executive functioning in young male adults; Second, to investigate the potential biochemical mechanisms of such facilitative effects using two neurotrophic factors [i.e., growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)] and the cortisol levels elicited by such an exercise intervention mode with two different exercise intensities. Sixty young male adults were recruited and randomly assigned to a high-intensity (HI) exercise group, moderate-intensity (MI) exercise group, and non-exercise-intervention (NEI) group. Blood samples were taken, and the behavioral and electrophysiological indices were simultaneously measured when individuals performed a Go/No-Go task combined with the Erikson Flanker paradigm at baseline and after either an acute bout of 30 min of moderate- or high-intensity RE or a control period. The results showed that the acute RE could not only benefit the subjects' behavioral (i.e., RTs and accuracy) performance, as found in previous studies, but also increase the P3 amplitude. Although the serum GH and IGF-1 levels were significantly increased via moderate or high intensity RE in both the MI and HI groups, the increased serum levels of neurotrophic factors were significantly decreased about 20 min after exercise. In addition, such changes were not correlated with the changes in cognitive (i.e., behavioral and electrophysiological) performance. In contrast, the serum levels of cortisol in the HI and MI groups were significantly lower after acute RE, and the changes in cortisol levels were significantly associated with the changes in electrophysiological (i.e., P3 amplitude) performance. The findings suggest the beneficial effects of acute RE on executive functioning could be due to

  10. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Pérez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Sánchez-Payá, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  11. The role of parvovirus B19 and the immune response in the pathogenesis of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jonathan R; Mattey, Derek L

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we review the evidence suggesting a possible role for B19 virus in the pathogenesis of a subset of cases of acute leukemia. Human parvovirus B19 infection may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute leukemia and may also precede the development of acute leukemia by up to 180 days. Parvovirus B19 targets erythroblasts in the bone marrow and may cause aplastic crisis in patients with shortened-red cell survival. Aplastic crisis represents a prodrome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 2% patients. There is a significant overlap between those HLA classes I and II alleles that are associated with a vigorous immune response and development of symptoms during B19 infection and those HLA alleles that predispose to development of acute leukemia. Acute symptomatic B19 infection is associated with low circulating IL-10 consistent with a vigorous immune response; deficient IL-10 production at birth was recently found to be associated with subsequent development of acute leukemia. Anti-B19 IgG has been associated with a particular profile of methylation of human cancer genes in patients with acute leukemia, suggesting an additional hit and run mechanism. The proposed role for parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of acute leukemia fits well with the delayed infection hypothesis and with the two-step mutation model, which describes carriage of the first mutation prior to birth, followed by suppression of hematopoiesis, which allows rapid proliferation of cells harboring the first mutation, acquisition of a second activating mutation, and expansion of cells carrying both mutations, resulting in acute leukemia. PMID:25855476

  12. Monitoring hemodynamic and morphologic responses to closed head injury in a mouse model using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2013-04-01

    The authors' aim is to assess and quantitatively measure brain hemodynamic and morphological variations during closed-head injury (CHI) in mice using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (o-DRS). CHI is a type of injury to the head that does not penetrate the skull. Usually, it is caused by mechanical blows to the head and frequently occurs in traffic accidents, falls, and assaults. Measurements of brain optical properties, namely absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000 nm were carried out by employing different source-detector distance and locations to provide depth sensitivity on an intact scalp over the duration of the whole experiment. Furthermore, alteration in both cortical hemodynamics and morphologic markers, i.e., scattering power and amplitude properties were derived. CHI was induced in anesthetized male mice by a weight-drop model using ˜50 g cylindrical metal falling from a height of 90 cm onto the intact scalp producing an impact of 4500 g cm. With respect to baseline, difference in brain physiological properties was observed following injury up to 1 h post-trauma. Additionally, the reduced scattering spectral shapes followed Mie scattering theory was quantified and clearly shows changes in both scattering amplitude and power from baseline indicating structural variations likely from evolving cerebral edema during CHI. We further demonstrate high correlation between scattering amplitude and scattering power, with more than 20% difference in slope in comparison to preinjury. This result indicates the possibility of using the slope also as a marker for detection of structural changes. Finally, experiments investigating brain function during the first 20 min postinjury were conducted and changes in chromophore concentrations and scattering were observed. Overall, our experiments demonstrate the potential of using the proposed technique as a valuable quantitative noninvasive tool for

  13. Prenatal and acute cocaine exposure affects neural responses and habituation to visual stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Elizabeth; Kopotiyenko, Konstantin; Zhdanova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants have many effects on visual function, from adverse following acute and prenatal exposure to therapeutic on attention deficit. To determine the impact of prenatal and acute cocaine exposure on visual processing, we studied neuronal responses to visual stimuli in two brain regions of a transgenic larval zebrafish expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP-HS. We found that both red light (LF) and dark (DF) flashes elicited similar responses in the optic tectum neuropil (TOn), while the dorsal telencephalon (dTe) responded only to LF. Acute cocaine (0.5 μM) reduced neuronal responses to LF in both brain regions but did not affect responses to DF. Repeated stimulus presentation (RSP) led to habituation of dTe neurons to LF. Acute cocaine prevented habituation. TOn habituated to DF, but not LF, and DF habituation was not modified by cocaine. Remarkably, prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) prevented the effects of acute cocaine on LF response amplitude and habituation later in development in both brain regions, but did not affect DF responses. We discovered that, in spite of similar neural responses to LF and DF in the TO (superior colliculus in mammals), responses to LF are more complex, involving dTe (homologous to the cerebral cortex), and are more vulnerable to cocaine. Our results demonstrate that acute cocaine exposure affects visual processing differentially by brain region, and that PCE modifies zebrafish visual processing in multiple structures in a stimulus-dependent manner. These findings are in accordance with the major role that the optic tectum and cerebral cortex play in sustaining visual attention, and support the hypothesis that modification of these areas by PCE may be responsible for visual deficits noted in humans. This model offers new methodological approaches for studying the adverse and therapeutic effects of psychostimulants on attention, and for the development of new pharmacological interventions. PMID:26379509

  14. Prenatal and acute cocaine exposure affects neural responses and habituation to visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Riley, Elizabeth; Kopotiyenko, Konstantin; Zhdanova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants have many effects on visual function, from adverse following acute and prenatal exposure to therapeutic on attention deficit. To determine the impact of prenatal and acute cocaine exposure on visual processing, we studied neuronal responses to visual stimuli in two brain regions of a transgenic larval zebrafish expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP-HS. We found that both red light (LF) and dark (DF) flashes elicited similar responses in the optic tectum neuropil (TOn), while the dorsal telencephalon (dTe) responded only to LF. Acute cocaine (0.5 μM) reduced neuronal responses to LF in both brain regions but did not affect responses to DF. Repeated stimulus presentation (RSP) led to habituation of dTe neurons to LF. Acute cocaine prevented habituation. TOn habituated to DF, but not LF, and DF habituation was not modified by cocaine. Remarkably, prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) prevented the effects of acute cocaine on LF response amplitude and habituation later in development in both brain regions, but did not affect DF responses. We discovered that, in spite of similar neural responses to LF and DF in the TO (superior colliculus in mammals), responses to LF are more complex, involving dTe (homologous to the cerebral cortex), and are more vulnerable to cocaine. Our results demonstrate that acute cocaine exposure affects visual processing differentially by brain region, and that PCE modifies zebrafish visual processing in multiple structures in a stimulus-dependent manner. These findings are in accordance with the major role that the optic tectum and cerebral cortex play in sustaining visual attention, and support the hypothesis that modification of these areas by PCE may be responsible for visual deficits noted in humans. This model offers new methodological approaches for studying the adverse and therapeutic effects of psychostimulants on attention, and for the development of new pharmacological interventions. PMID:26379509

  15. An experimental test of the capture-restraint protocol for estimating the acute stress response.

    PubMed

    Pakkala, Jesse J; Norris, D Ryan; Newman, Amy E M

    2013-01-01

    Stress-induced increases in glucocorticoids (GCs) modulate behavior and are key in directing energy reserves. The capture-restraint protocol was developed to experimentally stimulate and quantify the magnitude of the acute stress response by comparing baseline GC levels with those collected after restraining a subject for a period of time, typically 30 min. This protocol has been used extensively in the field and lab, yet few studies have investigated whether it parallels hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activation under natural acute stressors. We examined the hypothesis that acute stress from the capture-restraint protocol accurately mimics the adrenocortical response induced by a natural acute stressor. Using wild-caught rock pigeons Columba livia in a repeated-measures design, we compared plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations at baseline, after exposure to acute capture-restraint (30 min in a cloth bag), after tethering in a harness (30 min), and after a real but nonlethal attack by a predatory raptor. As found in previous studies, the capture-restraint treatment significantly increased CORT levels of pigeons compared with baseline. However, we also found that when pigeons were exposed to an attack by a raptor, their CORT levels were more than twice as high compared with the capture-restraint treatment. Our results provide evidence that an authentic acute stressor can activate the HPA axis to a greater extent than the capture-restraint protocol and also suggest that real predation attempts can have a significant effect on acute stress levels of wild birds. PMID:23434787

  16. Angus and Romosinuano steers exhibit differential acute phase responses following an endotoxin challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our primary objective was to elucidate the acute phase response in cattle while evaluating potential genetic differences between two diverse Bos taurus breeds [Angus (AG) and Romosinuano (RO)] in response to an endotoxin challenge. The Romosinuano is a tropically adapted Bos taurus breed developed i...

  17. Computational Hemodynamics Framework for the Analysis of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mut, Fernando; Löhner, Rainald; Chien, Aichi; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Putman, Christopher; Cebral, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms is important for clinicians because the natural rupture risk can be exceeded by the small but significant risk carried by current treatments. To this end numerous investigators have used image-based computational fluid dynamics models to extract patient-specific hemodynamics information, but there is no consensus on which variables or hemodynamic characteristics are the most important. This paper describes a computational framework to study and characterize the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms in order to relate it to clinical events such as growth or rupture. In particular, a number of hemodynamic quantities are proposed to describe the most salient features of these hemodynamic environments. Application to a patient population indicates that ruptured aneurysms tend to have concentrated inflows, concentrated wall shear stress distributions, high maximal wall shear stress and smaller viscous dissipation ratios than unruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, these statistical associations are largely unaffected by the choice of physiologic flow conditions. This confirms the notion that hemodynamic information derived from image-based computational models can be used to assess aneurysm rupture risk, to test hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for aneurysm formation, progression and rupture, and to answer specific clinical questions. PMID:21643491

  18. Responses to acute pain and the nursing implications.

    PubMed

    Wells, N

    1984-01-01

    Management of acute pain offers many techniques--peripherally, to reduce the sensory input from the nociceptors and ascending fibres, and centrally by altering cognition, evaluation and emotional arousal to the sensory input. Scientifically-based nursing intervention is imperative. Therefore, nurses needed a better understanding of recent research regarding pain. As well, recognition that all individuals express and cope with pain in different ways, and therefore exhibit different pain behaviours, is necessary if effective nursing care is to be given. Finally, with all the interacting variables and methods of intervention available, pain medication should never be the only intervention used for the patient with pain. PMID:6142910

  19. Cardiovascular and endocrine responses to acute hypoxaemia during and following dexamethasone infusion in the ovine fetus

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Andrew J W; Gardner, David S; Edwards, C Mark B; Fowden, Abigail L; Giussani, Dino A

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fetal treatment with dexamethasone on ovine fetal cardiovascular defence responses to acute hypoxaemia, occurring either during or 48 h following the period of glucocorticoid exposure. To address the mechanisms underlying these responses, chemoreflex function and plasma concentrations of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasopressin were measured. Under general halothane anaesthesia, 26 Welsh Mountain sheep fetuses were surgically prepared for long-term recording at between 117 and 120 days of gestation (dGA; term is ∼145 days) with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Following at least 5 days of recovery, fetuses were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups. After 48 h of baseline recording, at 125 ± 1 dGA, half of the fetuses (n = 13) were continuously infused i.v. with dexamethasone for 48 h at a rate of 2.06 ± 0.13 μg kg−1 h−1. The remaining 13 fetuses were infused with heparinized saline at the same rate (controls). At 127 ± 1 dGA, 2 days from the onset of infusions, seven fetuses from each group were subjected to 1 h of acute hypoxaemia. At 129 ± 1 dGA, 2 days after the end of infusions, six fetuses from each group were subjected to 1 h of acute hypoxaemia. Similar reductions in fetal partial pressure of arterial oxygen occurred in control and dexamethasone-treated fetuses during the acute hypoxaemia protocols. In control fetuses, acute hypoxaemia led to transient bradycardia, femoral vasoconstriction and significant increases in plasma concentrations of catecholamines, vasopressin and NPY. In fetuses subjected to acute hypoxaemia during dexamethasone treatment, the increase in plasma NPY was enhanced, the bradycardic response was prolonged, and the plasma catecholamine and vasopressin responses were diminished. In fetuses subjected to acute hypoxaemia 48 h following dexamethasone treatment, femoral vasoconstriction and plasma catecholamine and vasopressin

  20. Comparative analysis of the acute response of zebrafish Danio rerio skin to two different bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Lü, Aijun; Hu, Xiucai; Wang, Yi; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Aihua; Shen, Lulu; Ming, Qinglei; Feng, Zhaojun

    2013-12-01

    Skin is an important innate immune organ in fish; however, little is known about the skin's immune response to infectious pathogens. We conducted a comparative analysis of the acute immune response of Zebrafish Danio rerio skin against gram-positive (Staphylococcus chromogenes) and gram-negative (Citrobacter freundii) bacterial infections. Gene expression profiles induced from the two different infections were identified by microarray hybridization, with many genes demonstrating an acute immune response in the skin. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in response to stress and stimulus, complement activation, acute-phase response, and defense and immune response. Compared with transcription patterns of skin from the two infections, a similar innate immunity (e.g., transferrin, coagulation factor, complements, and lectins) was observed but with different acute-phase genes (e.g., ceruloplasmin, alpha-1-microglobulin, vitellogenin, and heat shock protein). These results suggest that the skin of fish plays an important role in the innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:24341765

  1. Acute phase protein response in Alpine ibex with sarcoptic mange.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mizanur; Lecchi, Cristina; Fraquelli, Cristina; Sartorelli, Paola; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2010-03-25

    The acute phase proteins (APP) are a group of serum proteins that change their concentration in animals following external or internal challenges, such as infection, inflammation or stress. The concentrations of four APPs, including serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and ceruloplasmin (Cp) were determined in serum collected from healthy Alpine ibexes (Capra ibex) and ibexes with Sarcoptes scabiei mange. Primary structures of all four APPs were determined by cDNA sequencing. The concentrations of all four APPs were higher in serum of animals with clinical signs of sarcoptic mange when compared to healthy animals. Two of the APPs, including SAA and AGP, acted as major APPs, since their serum concentrations were increased more than 10-folds when compared to healthy animals (P<0.001). The other two APPs, including Hp and Cp, acted as minor acute phase proteins, as their concentrations were increased from two to five folds (P<0.001). These findings provide a remarkable potential as diagnostic markers for the early detection of sarcoptic mange in free ranging animals. PMID:20036058

  2. Acute and chronic responses of denitrifying culture to diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Gamze; Aydin, Egemen; Topuz, Emel; Yangin-Gomec, Cigdem; Okutman Tas, Didem

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic effect as well as biodegradation potential at different sludge retention times (SRTs) of a priority pollutant, diclofenac on denitrification process was assessed. The continuous amendment of the culture for 6months with 1μg/L diclofenac resulted in 30% decrease in gas production. The average diclofenac removal observed in the diclofenac-acclimated culture was less than 15%. Batch tests showed that nitrate was removed in diclofenac free-control reactor at a higher rate compared to diclofenac amended reactor. Although, SRT did not have any progressive effect on diclofenac degradation, the system operated at low SRT was more sensitive to diclofenac and resulted in an increase in N2O emission. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operated at higher SRTs may tolerate and recover from the adverse effects of such micropollutants. The study can lead to other researchers to understand the fate and effect of other emerging pollutants in the anoxic unit of WWTPs. PMID:25460991

  3. Responses of Hyalella azteca to acute and chronic microplastic exposures.

    PubMed

    Au, Sarah Y; Bruce, Terri F; Bridges, William C; Klaine, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    Limited information is available on the presence of microplastics in freshwater systems, and even less is known about the toxicological implications of the exposure of aquatic organisms to plastic particles. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of microplastic ingestion on the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. Hyalella azteca was exposed to fluorescent polyethylene microplastic particles and polypropylene microplastic fibers in individual 250-mL chambers to determine 10-d mortality. In acute bioassays, polypropylene microplastic fibers were significantly more toxic than polyethylene microplastic particles; 10-d lethal concentration 50% values for polyethylene microplastic particles and polypropylene microplastic fibers were 4.64 × 10(4) microplastics/mL and 71.43 microplastics/mL, respectively. A 42-d chronic bioassay using polyethylene microplastic particles was conducted to quantify effects on reproduction, growth, and egestion. Chronic exposure to polyethylene microplastic particles significantly decreased growth and reproduction at the low and intermediate exposure concentrations. During acute exposures to polyethylene microplastic particles, the egestion times did not significantly differ from the egestion of normal food materials in the control; egestion times for polypropylene microplastic fibers were significantly slower than the egestion of food materials in the control. Amphipods exposed to polypropylene microplastic fibers also had significantly less growth. The greater toxicity of microplastic fibers than microplastic particles corresponded with longer residence times for the fibers in the gut. The difference in residence time might have affected the ability to process food, resulting in an energetic effect reflected in sublethal endpoints. PMID:26042578

  4. Swimming exercise changes hemodynamic responses evoked by blockade of excitatory amino receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Cristiana A; Schoorlemmer, Gerhardus H M; Lazari, Maria de Fátima M; Giannocco, Gisele; Lopes, Oswaldo U; Colombari, Eduardo; Sato, Monica A

    2014-01-01

    Exercise training reduces sympathetic activity in hypertensive humans and rats. We hypothesized that the swimming exercise would change the neurotransmission in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a key region involved in sympathetic outflow, and hemodynamic control in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Bilateral injections of kynurenic acid (KYN) were carried out in the RVLM in sedentary- (S-) or exercised- (E-) SHR and WKY rats submitted to swimming for 6 weeks. Rats were α-chloralose anesthetized and artificially ventilated, with Doppler flow probes around the lower abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Injections into the RVLM were made before and after i.v. L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase, NOS, inhibitor). Injections of KYN into the RVLM elicited a major vasodilation in the hindlimb more than in the mesenteric artery in E-SHR compared to S-SHR, but similar decrease in arterial pressure was observed in both groups. Injections of KYN into the RVLM after i.v. L-NAME attenuated the hindlimb vasodilation evoked by KYN and increased the mesenteric vasodilation in E-SHR. Swimming exercise can enhance the hindlimb vasodilation mediated by peripheral NO release, reducing the activation of neurons with EAA receptors in the RVLM in SHR. PMID:24696852

  5. Diminished acute phase response and increased hepatic inflammation of aged rats in response to intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Christian R; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Pérez, Claudio; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Riquelme, Denise M; Ordenes, Gamaliel; Oshima, Kiyoko; Aravena, Mauricio; Pérez, Viviana I; Nishimura, Sumiyo; Sabaj, Valeria; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2008-12-01

    Aging is associated with a deterioration of the acute phase response to inflammatory challenges. However, the nature of these defects remains poorly defined. We analyzed the hepatic inflammatory response after intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) given to Fisher 344 rats aged 6, 15, and 22-23 months. Induction of the acute phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, and T-kininogen was reduced and/or retarded with aging. Initial induction of interleukin-6 in aged rats was normal, but the later response was increased relative to younger counterparts. An exacerbated hepatic injury was observed in aged rats receiving LPS, as evidenced by the presence of multiple microabscesses in portal tracts, confluent necrosis, higher neutrophil accumulation, and elevated serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, relative to younger animals. Our results suggest that aged rats displayed a reduced expression of APPs and increased hepatic injury in response to the inflammatory insult. PMID:19126842

  6. Roles of STAT3 in Protein Secretion Pathways during the Acute-Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N.; Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Ferrari, Joseph D.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary A.; Mella, Juan R.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characteristic of perhaps all infections, including bacterial pneumonia. In conjunction with the acute-phase response, additional biological pathways are induced in the liver and are dependent on the transcription factors STAT3 and NF-κB, but these responses are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that pneumococcal pneumonia and other severe infections increase expression of multiple components of the cellular secretory machinery in the mouse liver, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) translocon complex, which mediates protein translation into the ER, and the coat protein complexes (COPI and COPII), which mediate vesicular transport of proteins to and from the ER. Hepatocyte-specific mutation of STAT3 prevented the induction of these secretory pathways during pneumonia, with similar results observed following pharmacological activation of ER stress by using tunicamycin. These findings implicate STAT3 in the unfolded protein response and suggest that STAT3-dependent optimization of secretion may apply broadly. Pneumonia also stimulated the binding of phosphorylated STAT3 to promoter regions of secretion-related genes in the liver, supporting a direct role for STAT3 in their transcription. Altogether, these results identify a novel function of STAT3 during the acute-phase response, namely, the induction of secretory machinery in hepatocytes. This may facilitate the processing and delivery of newly synthesized loads of acute-phase proteins, enhancing innate immunity and preventing liver injury during infection. PMID:23460517

  7. Determinants to optimize response to clopidogrel in acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Gori, Anna Maria; Marcucci, Rossella; Saracini, Claudia; Vestrini, Anna; Abbate, Rosanna

    2010-01-01

    The inhibition of platelet function by antiplatelet therapy determines the improvement of the survival of patients with clinically evident cardiovascular disease. Clopidogrel in combination with aspirin is the recommended standard of care for reducing the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, major adverse cardiovascular events including stent thrombosis occur in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that high post-treatment platelet reactivity on antiplatelet treatment is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical events. Clopidogrel requires conversion to active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. The active metabolite inhibits ADP-stimulated platelet activation by irreversibly binding to P2Y12 receptors. Recently, the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 allele has been associated with decreased metabolization of clopidogrel, poor antiaggregant effect, and increased cardiovascular events. In high risk vascular patients, the CYP2C19*2 polymorphism is a strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events and particularly of stent thrombosis. Prospective studies evaluating if an antiplatelet treatment tailored on individual characteristics of patients, CYP2C19*2 genotypes, platelet phenotype, drug–drug interaction, as well as traditional and procedural risk factors, are now urgently needed for the identification of therapeutic strategies providing the best benefit for the single subject. PMID:23226041

  8. Endocrine responses in the rhesus monkey during acute cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, W.G.; Saxton, J.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors studied five young male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), 3.4 to 6.7 kg, to determine the relationship between fluid balance hormones and urine production during acute, dry cold exposure. Each monkey served as its own control in duplicate experimental sessions at 6C or 26C. A 6-h experimental session consisted of 120 min equilibration at 26C, 120 min experimental exposure, and 120 min recovery at 26C. Urinary and venous catheters were inserted on the morning of a session. Rectal (Tre) and skin temperatures were monitored continuously. Blood samples were taken at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min of exposure, and at 60 min postexposure. Plasma was analyzed for arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone (PA), and osmolality. Urine samples were analyzed for osmolality, electrolytes, and creatinine. Mean Tre was 1.6C lower after 120 min at 6C than at 26C. Urine volume and osmolality were not altered by cold exposure, as they are in humans and rats. Vasopressin and PA increased sharply, with mean plasma levels in monkeys exposed to cold more than threefold and tenfold, respectively, the levels in monkeys exposed at 26C. In contrast, ANF, PRA, and plasma osmolality were not significantly changed by cold exposure. The absence of a cold-induced diuresis in the monkey may be related to the marked increase in plasma AVP level.

  9. Acute ventilatory response to green coffee dust extract.

    PubMed

    Zuskin, E; Kanceljak, B; Witek, T J; Schachter, E N

    1991-03-01

    The lung function response to inhalation of an extract of green coffee was studied in ten healthy subjects who were prescreened for airway hyperresponsiveness to an aerosol of green coffee extract. The effects of this provocation were evaluated at rest and following moderate exercise as well as with and without pretreatment with 80 mg of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). There was a statistically significant decrement in lung function over time (P less than .001) following coffee provocation both at rest and following exercise. No significant protection against this response was observed with DSCG pretreatment. While the majority of these "healthy" coffee reactors exhibited baseline nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine (PC20 FEV1 less than 25 mg/mL in 7/10), there was no correlation in these ten subjects between baseline responsiveness to methacholine and the degree of lung function decrement following coffee (P greater than .05). Also, no correlation was observed between skin prick and lung function response to coffee extract. We conclude that inhalation of green coffee extract causes significant bronchoconstriction in selected healthy volunteers and that this response is not prevented by pretreatment with DSCG. PMID:1900983

  10. Blood flow responses to mild-intensity exercise in ectopic vs. orthotopic prostate tumors; dependence upon host tissue hemodynamics and vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Emmanuel; Becker, Veronika G C; McCullough, Danielle J; Stabley, John N; Gittemeier, Elizabeth M; Opoku-Acheampong, Alexander B; Sieman, Dietmar W; Behnke, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Given the critical role of tumor O2 delivery in patient prognosis and the rise in preclinical exercise oncology studies, we investigated tumor and host tissue blood flow at rest and during exercise as well as vascular reactivity using a rat prostate cancer model grown in two transplantation sites. In male COP/CrCrl rats, blood flow (via radiolabeled microspheres) to prostate tumors [R3327-MatLyLu cells injected in the left flank (ectopic) or ventral prostate (orthotopic)] and host tissue was measured at rest and during a bout of mild-intensity exercise. α-Adrenergic vasoconstriction to norepinephrine (NE: 10(-9) to 10(-4) M) was determined in arterioles perforating the tumors and host tissue. To determine host tissue exercise hyperemia in healthy tissue, a sham-operated group was included. Blood flow was lower at rest and during exercise in ectopic tumors and host tissue (subcutaneous adipose) vs. the orthotopic tumor and host tissue (prostate). During exercise, blood flow to the ectopic tumor significantly decreased by 25 ± 5% (SE), whereas flow to the orthotopic tumor increased by 181 ± 30%. Maximal vasoconstriction to NE was not different between arterioles from either tumor location. However, there was a significantly higher peak vasoconstriction to NE in subcutaneous adipose arterioles (92 ± 7%) vs. prostate arterioles (55 ± 7%). Establishment of the tumor did not alter host tissue blood flow from either location at rest or during exercise. These data demonstrate that blood flow in tumors is dependent on host tissue hemodynamics and that the location of the tumor may critically affect how exercise impacts the tumor microenvironment and treatment outcomes. PMID:27125846

  11. An Exploration of the Effect of Hemodynamic Changes Due to Normal Aging on the fNIRS Response to Semantic Processing of Words

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mahnoush; Pouliot, Philippe; Bonnéry, Clément; Leclerc, Paul-Olivier; Desjardins, Michèle; Lesage, Frédéric; Joanette, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Like other neuroimaging techniques assessing cerebral blood oxygenation, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been applied in many neurocognitive studies. With NIRS, neural activation can be explored indirectly via hemodynamic changes in the imaged region. In studies of aging, changes in baseline physiology and brain anatomy confound NIRS measures seeking to investigate age-related changes in neuronal activity. The field is thus hampered by the complexity of the aging process itself, and statistical inferences from functional data acquired by optical imaging techniques must be interpreted with care. Multimodal integration of NIRS with both structural and baseline physiological assessments is crucial to avoid misinterpreting neuroimaging signals. In this study, a combination of two different optical techniques, anatomical MRI and Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), was used to investigate age-related changes in activation during a lexical-semantic processing task. Quantitative analysis revealed decreased baseline oxyhemoglobin and cerebral blood flow in the older adults. Using baseline physiology measures as regressors in the investigation of functional concentration changes when doing analyses of variance, we found significant changes in task-induced areas of activity. In the right hemisphere, more significant age-related activity was observed around the junction of the inferior frontal gyrus and inferior precentral sulcus, along with engagement of Wernicke’s area. In the left hemisphere, the degree and extent of frontal activation, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus, differed between age groups. Measuring background physiological differences and using their values as regressors in statistical analyses allowed a more appropriate, age-corrected understanding of the functional differentiations between age groups. Age-corrected baselines are thus essential to investigate which components of the NIRS signal are altered by aging. PMID

  12. Hemodynamic and neurochemical determinates of renal function in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Cameron; Cherney, David Z I; Parker, Andrea B; Mak, Susanna; Floras, John S; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Parker, John D

    2016-01-15

    Abnormal renal function is common in acute and chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) and is related to the severity of congestion. However, treatment of congestion often leads to worsening renal function. Our objective was to explore basal determinants of renal function and their response to hemodynamic interventions. Thirty-seven patients without CHF and 59 patients with chronic CHF (ejection fraction; 23 ± 8%) underwent right heart catheterization, measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR; inulin) and renal plasma flow (RPF; para-aminohippurate), and radiotracer estimates of renal sympathetic activity. A subset (26 without, 36 with CHF) underwent acute pharmacological intervention with dobutamine or nitroprusside. We explored the relationship between baseline and drug-induced hemodynamic changes and changes in renal function. In CHF, there was an inverse relationship among right atrial mean pressure (RAM) pressure, RPF, and GFR. By contrast, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI), and measures of renal sympathetic activity were not significant predictors. In those with CHF there was also an inverse relationship among the drug-induced changes in RAM as well as pulmonary artery mean pressure and the change in GFR. Changes in MAP and CI did not predict the change in GFR in those with CHF. Baseline values and changes in RAM pressure did not correlate with GFR in those without CHF. In the CHF group there was a positive correlation between RAM pressure and renal sympathetic activity. There was also an inverse relationship among RAM pressure, GFR, and RPF in patients with chronic CHF. The observation that acute reductions in RAM pressure is associated with an increase in GFR in patients with CHF has important clinical implications. PMID:26561645

  13. Investigation of the Strawberry Acute Cold Response through Transcriptome Sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria xananassa) is a valuable perennial crop, yet in most growing regions cold temperature stress can dramatically impinge on fresh fruit production. In the interest of long-term crop improvement it is important to understand the molecular response of strawberry to cold, a...

  14. THE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE IN E. COLI CHALLENGED PIGS TREATED WITH SYSTEMIC ANTIBIOTICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in serum C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (HG) and cortisol (CS), and rectal temperature (RT) were evaluated in response to an acute enterotoxemia elicited by antibiotic injection. Twenty-four, 24-day old, pigs were individually housed and provided feed and water ad libitum. Twelve pig...

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF CARDIOPULMONARY RESPONSE IN AWAKE RATS DURING ACUTE EXPOSURE TO NEAR AMBIENT CONCENTRATIONS OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although rodents are the most commonly studied animal species for ozone (O3) research, no acute cardiopulmonary function studies during exposure have been reported. wake Fischer-344 rats were exposed to )3 and response was evaluated before, during and after the exposure using a p...

  16. COMPARISON OF THE RESPONSES OF CHILDREN AND ADULTS TO ACUTE OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the paper is to compare the results of two studies in which the respiratory responses of children and adults to acute ozone (O3) exposure were measured. Forty-two 18-30 year old males were exposed for 2.5 hours in a controlled environmental chamber to either 0.0 or...

  17. Modulation of the acute phase response in feedlot steers supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1079 (SC) on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 266 ± 4 kilograms body weight) were separated into three treatment groups (n = 6/treatm...

  18. Altered postnatal acute phase response in heifers exposed to lipopolysachcharide in utero

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to LPS challenge in heifer calves. Pregnant crossbred cows (n=50) were separated into prenatal stress (PNS; n=25; administered 0.1 microgram per kilogram...

  19. Lay Public's Knowledge and Decisions in Response to Symptoms of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cytryn, Kayla N.; Yoskowitz, Nicole A.; Cimino, James J.; Patel, Vimla L.

    2009-01-01

    Despite public health initiatives targeting rapid action in response to symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI), people continue to delay in going to a hospital when experiencing these symptoms due to lack of recognition as cardiac-related. The objective of this research was to characterize lay individuals' knowledge of symptoms of acute myocardial…

  20. Case Comparison of Response To Aquatic Exercise: Acute versus Chronic Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobily, Kenneth E.; Mobily, Paula R.; Lessard, Kerry A.; Berkenpas, Molly S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the effects of individualized aquatic exercise programs on people with knee impairments. An adolescent athlete with an acute injury demonstrated significant functional improvement. A 33-year-old with arthritis demonstrated only marginal progress. Comparison of cases relative to valid data collection methods and response to aquatic…

  1. Acute inflammation stimulates a regenerative response in the neonatal mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chunyong; Nie, Yu; Lian, Hong; Liu, Rui; He, Feng; Huang, Huihui; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac injury in neonatal 1-day-old mice stimulates a regenerative response characterized by reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation, which is distinguished from the fibrotic repair process in adults. Acute inflammation occurs immediately after heart injury and has generally been believed to exert a negative effect on heart regeneration by promoting scar formation in adults; however, little is known about the role of acute inflammation in the cardiac regenerative response in neonatal mice. Here, we show that acute inflammation induced cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical intramyocardial microinjection of immunogenic zymosan A particles into the neonatal mouse heart. We also found that cardiac injury-induced regenerative response was suspended after immunosuppression in neonatal mice, and that cardiomyocytes could not be reactivated to proliferate after neonatal heart injury in the absence of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the major downstream effector of IL-6 signaling, decreased reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical resection. Our results indicate that acute inflammation stimulates the regenerative response in neonatal mouse heart, and suggest that modulation of inflammatory signals might have important implications in cardiac regenerative medicine. PMID:26358185

  2. Profile of the bovine acute-phase response following an intravenous bolus-dose lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to further define the acute-phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in beef steers. In Exp. 1, 9 crossbred beef steers (449 ± 12 kg BW) were used in a completely random design to determine the effects of 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 micrograms of LPS/kilogram of bod...

  3. Leg vascular responsiveness during acute orthostasis following simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blamick, Cynthia A.; Goldwater, Danielle; Convertino, Victor A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of weightlessness on vascular response to orthostatic stress was investigated in human subjects by measuring changes in the arterial pulse volume (APV) of the legs during exposure to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) applied before and after 10 days of continuous 6-deg head-down bed rest. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and impedance rheographic indices of APV were measured during rest and at 1 min of -30 mm Hg LBNP. Bed rest was found not to alter the responses of MAP to LBNP. Resting APV was decreased after bed rest; however, APV was reduced upon transfer from rest to 1-min LBPN by the same relative magnitude before and after bedrest. It is concluded that peripheral arterial vasoconstriction, as indicated by reduction in APV during LBNP, is not affected by bedrest. The results suggest that there was no apparent alteration in responsiveness of the leg vasculature following simulated weightlessness, and that the control mechanisms of peripheral resistance do not contribute significantly to reduced orthostatic tolerance following spaceflight.

  4. Effects of copper on the acute cortisol response and associated physiology in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Tellis, Margaret S; Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of chronic waterborne copper (Cu) exposure on the acute stress-induced cortisol response and associated physiological consequences in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Trout were exposed to 30 μg Cu/L in moderately hard water (120 mg/L as CaCO(3)) for 40 days, following which time the acute cortisol response was examined with a series of stressors. At 40 days, a 65% increase in Cu was observed in the gill, but no accumulation was observed in the liver, brain or head kidney. Stressors such as air exposure or confinement did not elicit an increase in circulating cortisol levels for Cu-exposed fish, in contrast to controls. However, this inhibitory effect on the acute cortisol response appeared to have few implications on the ability of Cu-exposed fish to maintain ion and carbohydrate homeostasis. For example, plasma Na(+), Ca(2+) and glucose levels as well as hepatic glycogen levels were the same post-stress in control and Cu-exposed fish. Trout were also challenged with exposure to 50% seawater for 48 h, where Cu-exposed trout maintained plasma Na(+), glucose and hepatic glycogen levels. However, Cu-exposed fish experienced decreased plasma K(+) levels throughout the Cu exposure and stress tests. In conclusion, chronic Cu exposure resulted in the abolition of an acute cortisol response post-stress. There was no Cu accumulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI axis) suggesting this was not a direct toxic effect of Cu on the cortisol regulatory pathway. However, the lack of an acute cortisol response in Cu-exposed fish did not impair the ability of the fish to maintain ion and carbohydrate homeostasis. This effect on cortisol may be a strategy to reduce costs during the chronic stress of Cu exposure, and not endocrine disruption as a result of toxic injury. PMID:21964321

  5. Opioid activity in behavioral and heart rate responses of tethered pigs to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Loijens, L W S; Janssens, C J J G; Schouten, W G P; Wiegant, V M

    2002-04-15

    In a longitudinal experiment, effects of long-term tether housing on heart rate and behavioral responses to an acute stressor (a 15-min challenge with a nosesling) were investigated in pigs. The animals were challenged during loose housing and again after 10-11 weeks of tether housing. To detect possible changes in endogenous opioid systems modifying these responses, the pigs were pretreated with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.5 mg/kg body weight, iv). In response to the nosesling challenge, the animals showed pronounced resistance behavior and a sharp rise in heart rate. Following this initial phase of resistance, the heart rate dropped to prechallenge levels or below this line, and the pigs seemed to become sedated. Pretreatment with naloxone increased the heart rate response in animals that were long-term tether housed (n=12). No such effect was found in the control group (n=5) that was loose-housed during the entire experiment, indicating that the impact of endogenous opioid systems mitigating heart rate responses to acute stress had increased as a result of long-term tether housing. Changes in the effect of naloxone on the behavioral response were not found. Adaptive changes in opioid systems may prevent excessive physiological reactions to acute stress and, thus, may serve as a coping mechanism. PMID:12020727

  6. Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, Alexander N.; Foong, Rachel E.; Bozanich, Elizabeth M.; Berry, Luke J.; Garratt, Luke W.; Gualano, Rosa C.; Jones, Jessica E.; Dousha, Lovisa F.; Zosky, Graeme R.; Sly, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Larcombe et al. (2011) Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 334–342. Background  Males are generally more susceptible to respiratory infections; however, there are few data on the physiological responses to such infections in males and females. Objectives  To determine whether sexual dimorphism exists in the physiological/inflammatory responses of weanling and adult BALB/c mice to influenza. Methods  Weanling and adult mice of both sexes were inoculated with influenza A or appropriate control solution. Respiratory mechanics, responsiveness to methacholine (MCh), viral titre and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellular inflammation/cytokines were measured 4 (acute) and 21 (resolution) days post‐inoculation. Results  Acute infection impaired lung function and induced hyperresponsiveness and cellular inflammation in both sexes at both ages. Males and females responded differently with female mice developing greater abnormalities in tissue damping and elastance and greater MCh responsiveness at both ages. BAL inflammation, cytokines and lung viral titres were similar between the sexes. At resolution, all parameters had returned to baseline levels in adults and weanling males; however, female weanlings had persisting hyperresponsiveness. Conclusions  We identified significant differences in the physiological responses of male and female mice to infection with influenza A, which occurred in the absence of variation in viral titre and cellular inflammation. PMID:21668688

  7. Nonlinear extension of a hemodynamic linear model for coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sassaroli, Angelo; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we are proposing an extension of a recent hemodynamic model (Fantini, 2014a), which was developed within the framework of a novel approach to the study of tissue hemodynamics, named coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS). The previous hemodynamic model, from a signal processing viewpoint, treats the tissue microvasculature as a linear time-invariant system, and considers changes of blood volume, capillary blood flow velocity and the rate of oxygen diffusion as inputs, and the changes of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations (measured in near infrared spectroscopy) as outputs. The model has been used also as a forward solver in an inversion procedure to retrieve quantitative parameters that assess physiological and biological processes such as microcirculation, cerebral autoregulation, tissue metabolic rate of oxygen, and oxygen extraction fraction. Within the assumption of "small" capillary blood flow velocity oscillations the model showed that the capillary and venous compartments "respond" to this input as low pass filters, characterized by two distinct impulse response functions. In this work, we do not make the assumption of "small" perturbations of capillary blood flow velocity by solving without approximations the partial differential equation that governs the spatio-temporal behavior of hemoglobin saturation in capillary and venous blood. Preliminary comparison between the linear time-invariant model and the extended model (here identified as nonlinear model) are shown for the relevant parameters measured in CHS as a function of the oscillation frequency (CHS spectra). We have found that for capillary blood flow velocity oscillations with amplitudes up to 10% of the baseline value (which reflect typical scenarios in CHS), the discrepancies between CHS spectra obtained with the linear and nonlinear models are negligible. For larger oscillations (~50%) the linear and nonlinear models yield CHS spectra with differences within typical

  8. Renal hemodynamic changes induced by captopril and angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Hemmi, H; Inoue, A; Takano, M; Kadomatsu, S; Tanimoto, H; Tanegashima, M; Hayashi, I; Fushimi, T; Hasegawa, A

    1997-01-01

    We studied the relationship between renal hemodynamic changes induced by a single acute administration of captopril (50 mg p.o.) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in 27 healthy human volunteers, 7 with DD genotype, 10 with ID, and 10 with II genotype. The increase in effective renal plasma flow (p < 0.02) and the fall in renal vascular resistance (p < 0.01) in response to captopril were significantly less in subjects with the DD genotype than in subjects with the other genotypes. These data suggest that intrarenal ACE inhibition by captopril differs according to ACE gene ID polymorphism in healthy humans. PMID:9069453

  9. Leg Vascular Responsiveness During Acute Orthostasis Following Simulated Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blamick, Cynthia A.; Goldwater, Danielle J.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1988-01-01

    Ten men (35-49 years old) underwent lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exposures before and offer 10 d of continuous 6 degrees head-down bedrest in order to predict the effect of weightlessness on the responsiveness of leg vasculature to an orthostatic stress. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and Impedance rheographic indices of arterial pulse volume (APV) of the legs were measured during rest and at 1 min at -30 mm Hg LBNP. Bedrest-induced deconditioning was manifested by decreases (p less than 0.06) in plasma volume (17%), peak oxygen uptake (16%), and LBNP tolerance (17%). Resting HR was unchanged after bedrest, but HR was higher (p less than 0.05) at 1 min of -30 mm Hg LBNP after, compared with before bedrest. Responses of MAP to -30 mm Hg LBNP were not altered by bodrest. Resting APV was decreased (p less than 0.05) by simulated weightlessness. However, APV was reduced (p less than 0.05) from rest to 1 min -30 mm Hg LBNP by the same relative magnitude before and after bodrest (-21.4 +/- 3.4% and -20.5 +/- 2.7%, respectively). We conclude that peripheral arterial vasoconstriction, as indicated by reductions in APV during LBNP, was not affected by bedrest. These results suggest that there was no apparent alteration in responsiveness of the leg vasculature following simulated weightlessness. Therefore, it appears unlikely that control mechanisms of peripheral resistance contribute significantly to reduced orthostatic tolerance following space-flight.

  10. Acute infection by hepatitis E virus with a slight immunoglobulin M antibody response.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yuki; Oshiro, Yukio; Imanishi, Mamiko; Ishige, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody response is generally regarded as a useful marker for diagnosing primary infection. However, in some cases, this antibody is not detected during the acute phase of infection. An 81-year-old man with stable membranous nephropathy who presented with asymptomatic acute liver dysfunction came to our hospital. HEV RNA of genotype 3 was detected in his serum, and he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis E. According to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, high-level positivity for anti-HEV IgG and IgA antibodies was observed, but the assay was negative for IgM antibody throughout the clinical course of infection. The patient was not immunosuppressed. We further investigated the presence of IgM antibody using two other polyclonal antibodies against human IgM as secondary antibodies and another recombinant ORF2 protein of genotype 3 as an immobilized antigen. IgM was weakly detected in the serum during the acute phase only by the test with the antigen of genotype 3. Multi-genotype antigens can detect a slight IgM antibody response; however, anti-HEV IgA is more useful in diagnosing primary HEV infection, particularly in cases with a low IgM antibody response. PMID:26215116

  11. Cumulative exposure to prior collective trauma and acute stress responses to the Boston marathon bombings.

    PubMed

    Garfin, Dana Rose; Holman, E Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2015-06-01

    The role of repeated exposure to collective trauma in explaining response to subsequent community-wide trauma is poorly understood. We examined the relationship between acute stress response to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings and prior direct and indirect media-based exposure to three collective traumatic events: the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Representative samples of residents of metropolitan Boston (n = 846) and New York City (n = 941) completed Internet-based surveys shortly after the Boston Marathon bombings. Cumulative direct exposure and indirect exposure to prior community trauma and acute stress symptoms were assessed. Acute stress levels did not differ between Boston and New York metropolitan residents. Cumulative direct and indirect, live-media-based exposure to 9/11, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook shooting were positively associated with acute stress responses in the covariate-adjusted model. People who experience multiple community-based traumas may be sensitized to the negative impact of subsequent events, especially in communities previously exposed to similar disasters. PMID:25896419

  12. Response of Brazilian native trees to acute ozone dose.

    PubMed

    Moura, Bárbara Baêsso; de Souza, Sílvia Ribeiro; Alves, Edenise Segala

    2014-03-01

    Ozone (O3) is a toxic secondary pollutant able to cause an intense oxidative stress that induces visual symptoms on sensitive plant species. Controlled fumigation experiment was conducted with the aim to verify the O3 sensibility of three tropical species: Piptadenia gonoachanta (Mart.) Macbr. (Fabaceae), Astronium graveolens Jacq. (Anacardiaceae), and Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae). The microscopical features involved in the oxidative stress were recognized based on specific histochemical analysis. The three species showed visual symptoms, characterized as necrosis and stippling between the veins, mostly visible on the adaxial leaf surface. All the studied species presented hypersensitive-like response (HR-like), and peroxide hydrogen accumulation (H2O2) followed by cell death and proanthocyanidin oxidation in P. gonoachanta and A. graveolens. In P. gonoachanta, a decrease in chlorophyll autofluorescence occurred on symptomatic tissues, and in A. graveolens and C. floribundus, a polyphenol compound accumulation occurred. The responses of Brazilian native species were similar to those described for sensitive species from temperate climate, and microscopical markers may be useful for the detection of ozone symptoms in future studies in the field. PMID:24297466

  13. Models and Methods to Investigate Acute Stress Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Arsenault, Ryan; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation within the livestock industry and throughout society that animal stress is an important issue that must be addressed. With implications for animal health, well-being, and productivity, minimizing animal stress through improved animal management procedures and/or selective breeding is becoming a priority. Effective management of stress, however, depends on the ability to identify and quantify the effects of various stressors and determine if individual or combined stressors have distinct biological effects. Furthermore, it is critical to determine the duration of stress-induced biological effects if we are to understand how stress alters animal production and disease susceptibility. Common stress models used to evaluate both psychological and physical stressors in cattle are reviewed. We identify some of the major gaps in our knowledge regarding responses to specific stressors and propose more integrated methodologies and approaches to measuring these responses. These approaches are based on an increased knowledge of both the metabolic and immune effects of stress. Finally, we speculate on how these findings may impact animal agriculture, as well as the potential application of large animal models to understanding human stress. PMID:26633525

  14. A Revised Hemodynamic Theory of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Bradley D; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) afflicts one out of every 40 individuals worldwide, causing irreversible central blindness in millions. The transformation of various tissue layers within the macula in the retina has led to competing conceptual models of the molecular pathways, cell types, and tissues responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A model that has persisted for over 6 decades is the hemodynamic, or vascular theory of AMD progression, which states that vascular dysfunction of the choroid underlies AMD pathogenesis. Here, we re-evaluate this hypothesis in light of recent advances on molecular, anatomic, and hemodynamic changes underlying choroidal dysfunction in AMD. We propose an updated, detailed model of hemodynamic dysfunction as a mechanism of AMD development and progression. PMID:27423265

  15. Response of lymphoid organs to low dose rate Cf-252, Cs-137 and acute Co-60

    SciTech Connect

    Feola, J.; Maruyama, Y.; Magura, C.; Hwang, H.N.

    1986-01-01

    RBE of low dose rate (LDR) /sup 252/Cf radiation was studied for thymus using weight loss compared to unirradiated controls. These were compared against LDR /sup 137/Cs and acute /sup 60/Co effects. For thymus, biexponential dose response curves were noted for acute /sup 60/Co and LDR /sup 137/Cs irradiations. No dose rate effect was noted with /sup 137/Cs. D/sub 37/ for the first component D/sub 1/ was 109 cGy and for the second D/sub 2/ was 624 cGy for /sup 60/Co. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is a complex endpoint and was different for the low dose (sensitive) and high dose (resistant) responses and for /sup 252/Cf. RBE/sub n/ of the sensitive portion was 1.7 and for overall was 4.0. Spleen response was also determined for the 3 radiations. Biexponential dose-response curves were also observed for resting spleen to acute /sup 60/Co and LDR /sup 137/Cs radiation. D/sub 1/ = 285 cGy and D/sub 2/ = 1538 cGy for acute /sup 60/Co; D/sub 1/ = 205 cGy for /sup 137/Cs and indicated a dose rate effect = 1.04 for /sup 137/Cs. The LDR /sup 137/Cs was 1.3x more effective than acute /sup 60/Co for the sensitive response; it was 1.9 x greater for the resistant response. However, the response to /sup 252/Cf vs. /sup 137/Cs for the spleen indicated that there was a greater sensitivity to dose rate than to LET. RBE/sub n/ for /sup 252/Cf vs. /sup 137/Cs was 1.0. Stimulation of spleen growth after injection of Corynebacterium parvum allowed study of radiation effects of proliferating spleen cells at day 10. Acute /sup 60/Co and LDR /sup 137/Cs ..gamma..-rays had reduced effects compared to LDR /sup 252/Cf radiation and RBE was 4.0 vs. LDR /sup 137/Cs. RBE in lymphoid organs thus depended on organ, on assay and on resting/proliferating status.

  16. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant holstein heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor–mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial...

  17. Acute Inflammatory Responses of Nanoparticles in an Intra-Tracheal Instillation Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Armstead, Andrea L.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Porter, Dale W.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Li, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hard metal tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) “dusts” in enclosed industrial environments is known to contribute to the development of hard metal lung disease and an increased risk for lung cancer. Currently, the influence of local and systemic inflammation on disease progression following WC-Co exposure remains unclear. To better understand the relationship between WC-Co nanoparticle (NP) exposure and its resultant effects, the acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses caused by WC-Co NPs were explored using an intra-tracheal instillation (IT) model and compared to those of CeO2 (another occupational hazard) NP exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IT dose (0-500 μg per rat) of WC-Co or CeO2 NPs. Following 24-hr exposure, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and whole blood were collected and analyzed. A consistent lack of acute local pulmonary inflammation was observed in terms of the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid parameters examined (i.e. LDH, albumin, and macrophage activation) in animals exposed to WC-Co NP; however, significant acute pulmonary inflammation was observed in the CeO2 NP group. The lack of acute inflammation following WC-Co NP exposure contrasts with earlier in vivo reports regarding WC-Co toxicity in rats, illuminating the critical role of NP dose and exposure time and bringing into question the potential role of impurities in particle samples. Further, we demonstrated that WC-Co NP exposure does not induce acute systemic effects since no significant increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines were observed. Taken together, the results of this in vivo study illustrate the distinct differences in acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to NPs composed of WC-Co and CeO2; therefore, it is important that the outcomes of pulmonary exposure to one type of NPs may not be implicitly extrapolated to other types of NPs. PMID:25738830

  18. Acute inflammatory responses of nanoparticles in an intra-tracheal instillation rat model.

    PubMed

    Armstead, Andrea L; Minarchick, Valerie C; Porter, Dale W; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Li, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hard metal tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) "dusts" in enclosed industrial environments is known to contribute to the development of hard metal lung disease and an increased risk for lung cancer. Currently, the influence of local and systemic inflammation on disease progression following WC-Co exposure remains unclear. To better understand the relationship between WC-Co nanoparticle (NP) exposure and its resultant effects, the acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses caused by WC-Co NPs were explored using an intra-tracheal instillation (IT) model and compared to those of CeO2 (another occupational hazard) NP exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IT dose (0-500 μg per rat) of WC-Co or CeO2 NPs. Following 24-hr exposure, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and whole blood were collected and analyzed. A consistent lack of acute local pulmonary inflammation was observed in terms of the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid parameters examined (i.e. LDH, albumin, and macrophage activation) in animals exposed to WC-Co NP; however, significant acute pulmonary inflammation was observed in the CeO2 NP group. The lack of acute inflammation following WC-Co NP exposure contrasts with earlier in vivo reports regarding WC-Co toxicity in rats, illuminating the critical role of NP dose and exposure time and bringing into question the potential role of impurities in particle samples. Further, we demonstrated that WC-Co NP exposure does not induce acute systemic effects since no significant increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines were observed. Taken together, the results of this in vivo study illustrate the distinct differences in acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to NPs composed of WC-Co and CeO2; therefore, it is important that the outcomes of pulmonary exposure to one type of NPs may not be implicitly extrapolated to other types of NPs. PMID:25738830

  19. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices. PMID:27445229

  20. Stress and adaptation responses to repeated acute acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which groups of adult male chickens (single-comb white leghorn) were exposed daily to acceleration (centrifugation) of 2 or 3 G for 10 min, 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hr (continuously), or 0 time (controls). After approximately five months of this intermittent treatment (training), the birds were exposed to continuous accelerations of the same G force (intensity). The degree of stress and adaptation of each bird was determined by survival and relative lymphocyte count criteria. Intermittent training exposures of 2 G developed levels of adaptation in birds directly proportional to the duration of their daily exposure. Intermittent training periods at 3 G, however, produced a physiological deterioration in birds receiving daily exposures of 8 hr or more. Adaptive benefits were found only in the 1- and 4-hr-daily intermittent 3-G exposure groups. Exposure to 3 G produced an immediate stress response as indicated by a low relative lymphocyte count which returned to control (preexposed) values prior to the next daily acceleration period in the 10-min, 1-hr, and 4-hr groups. This daily recovery period from stress appeared to be necessary for adaptation as opposed to deterioration for the more severe environmental (3 G) alteration.

  1. Acute responses of American kestrels to methyl parathion and fenvalerate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Franson, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and toxicological effects of p.o, methyl parathion (0.375-3.0 mg/kg) or fenvalerate (1000-4000 mg/kg) were examined over a 10 h period in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) maintained in thermoneutral (22?.C) and cold (-5?.C) environments. Methyl parathion was highly toxic (LD50=3.08 mg/kg, 95% confidence limits=2.29-4.l4 mg/kg, producing overt intoxication (abnormal posture, ataxia, paresis), dose-dependent inhibition (26-67%) of brain acetylcholinesterase activity, hyperglycemia, and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration. Transient but pronounced hypothermia was associated with plasma cholinesterase inhibition in excess of 50% (2 h after intubation), although this response was highly variable (plasma ChE inhibition vs. A cloacal temperature, r=-0.60). Fenvalerate, at doses far exceeding those encountered in the environment, caused mild intoxication (irregular head movement) and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, but did not alter cloacal temperature, plasma activities of CK, U-HBDH, and LDK, or concentrations of corticosterone, glucose, triiodothyronine, and uric acid. Cold exposure intensified methyl parathion toxicity, but did not affect that of fenvalerate. It would thus appear that the organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion poses far greater hazard than the pyrethroid fenvalerate to raptorial birds.

  2. Acute inflammatory response in spinal cord following impact injury.

    PubMed

    Carlson, S L; Parrish, M E; Springer, J E; Doty, K; Dossett, L

    1998-05-01

    Numerous factors are involved in the spread of secondary damage in spinal cord after traumatic injury, including ischemia, edema, increased excitatory amino acids, and oxidative damage to the tissue from reactive oxygen species. Neutrophils and macrophages can produce reactive oxygen species when activated and thus may contribute to the lipid peroxidation that is known to occur after spinal cord injury. This study examined the rostral-caudal distribution of neutrophils and macrophages/microglia at 4, 6, 24, and 48 h after contusion injury to the T10 spinal cord of rat (10 g weight, 50 mm drop). Neutrophils were located predominantly in necrotic regions, with a time course that peaked at 24 h as measured with assays of myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). The sharpest peak of MPO activity was localized between 4 mm rostral and caudal to the injury. Macrophages/microglia were visualized with antibodies against ED1 and OX-42. Numerous cells with a phagocytic morphology were present by 24 h, with a higher number by 48 h. These cells were predominantly located within the gray matter and dorsal funiculus white matter. The number of cells gradually declined through 6 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion. OX-42 staining also revealed reactive microglia with blunt processes, particularly at levels distant to the lesion. The number of macrophages/microglia was significantly correlated with the amount of tissue damage at each level. Treatments to decrease the inflammatory response are likely to be beneficial to recovery of function after traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:9582256

  3. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices.Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a

  4. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  5. Social stress modulates the cortisol response to an acute stressor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, J D; Gollock, M J; Gilmour, K M

    2014-01-15

    In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) of subordinate social status, circulating cortisol concentrations were elevated under resting conditions but the plasma cortisol and glucose responses to an acute stressor (confinement in a net) were attenuated relative to those of dominant trout. An in vitro head kidney preparation, and analysis of the expression of key genes in the stress axis prior to and following confinement in a net were then used to examine the mechanisms underlying suppression of the acute cortisol stress response in trout experiencing chronic social stress. With porcine adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) as the secretagogue, ACTH-stimulated cortisol production was significantly lower for head kidney preparations from subordinate trout than for those from dominant trout. Dominant and subordinate fish did not, however, differ in the relative mRNA abundance of melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) or cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) within the head kidney, although the relative mRNA abundance of these genes was significantly higher in both dominant and subordinate fish than in sham trout (trout that did not experience social interactions but were otherwise treated identically to the dominant and subordinate fish). The relative mRNA abundance of all three genes was significantly higher in trout exposed to an acute net stressor than under control conditions. Upstream of cortisol production in the stress axis, plasma ACTH concentrations were not affected by social stress, nor was the relative mRNA abundance of the binding protein for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-BP). The relative mRNA abundance of CRF in the pre-optic area of subordinate fish was significantly higher than that of dominant or sham fish 1h after exposure to the stressor. Collectively, the results indicate that chronic social stress modulates cortisol production at the level of the interrenal cells, resulting in an attenuated

  6. Hippocampal protection in mice with an attenuated inflammatory monocyte response to acute CNS picornavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Charles L.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Sundsbak, Rhianna S.; Sauer, Brian M.; LaFrance, Stephanie J.; Buenz, Eric J.; Schmalstieg, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury during acute viral infection of the brain is associated with the development of persistent cognitive deficits and seizures in humans. In C57BL/6 mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, hippocampal CA1 neurons are injured by a rapid innate immune response, resulting in profound memory deficits. In contrast, infected SJL and B6xSJL F1 hybrid mice exhibit essentially complete hippocampal and memory preservation. Analysis of brain-infiltrating leukocytes revealed that SJL mice mount a sharply attenuated inflammatory monocyte response as compared to B6 mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments isolated the attenuation to the SJL immune system. Adoptive transfer of B6 inflammatory monocytes into acutely infected B6xSJL hosts converted these mice to a hippocampal damage phenotype and induced a cognitive deficit marked by failure to recognize a novel object. These findings show that inflammatory monocytes are the critical cellular mediator of hippocampal injury during acute picornavirus infection of the brain. PMID:22848791

  7. The central role of hypothalamic inflammation in the acute illness response and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Michaelis, Katherine A; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    When challenged with a variety of inflammatory threats, multiple systems across the body undergo physiological responses to promote defense and survival. The constellation of fever, anorexia, and fatigue is known as the acute illness response, and represents an adaptive behavioral and physiological reaction to stimuli such as infection. On the other end of the spectrum, cachexia is a deadly and clinically challenging syndrome involving anorexia, fatigue, and muscle wasting. Both of these processes are governed by inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and immune cells. Though the effects of cachexia can be partially explained by direct effects of disease processes on wasting tissues, a growing body of evidence shows the central nervous system (CNS) also plays an essential mechanistic role in cachexia. In the context of inflammatory stress, the hypothalamus integrates signals from peripheral systems, which it translates into neuroendocrine perturbations, altered neuronal signaling, and global metabolic derangements. Therefore, we will discuss how hypothalamic inflammation is an essential driver of both the acute illness response and cachexia, and why this organ is uniquely equipped to generate and maintain chronic inflammation. First, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in acute responses to dietary and infectious stimuli. Next, we will discuss the role of cytokines in driving homeostatic disequilibrium, resulting in muscle wasting, anorexia, and weight loss. Finally, we will address mechanisms and mediators of chronic hypothalamic inflammation, including endothelial cells, chemokines, and peripheral leukocytes. PMID:26541482

  8. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key points

  9. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key

  10. [Role of the immune response in atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes].

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Giuseppina

    2004-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent one of the most important causes of death in the world. The underlying pathogenetic process is atherosclerosis which leads to the progressive reduction of the arterial lumen and therefore to the ischemia of the perfused organs. Atherogenesis results from the interaction between the biology of the arterial wall and the various stress stimuli present in the circulating blood. The first steps of atherogenesis occur very early, already during the fetal life. Those arterial segments that are subjected to the initiating causes (including hemodynamic stress) show altered endothelial permeability and allow the infiltration of macromolecules, like lipoproteins, in the subintimal space. At the same time, the smooth muscle cells that are subjected to the same local factors produce proteoglycans able to bind lipoproteins and to promote their oxidation. Oxidized lipoproteins induce the expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules on the luminal surface of the endothelium, which then allow the local recruitment of monocytes-macrophages and T lymphocytes. This is a local inflammatory process that, in theory, should contribute to reestablish the homeostasis of the vascular wall by promoting the elimination of injured tissue and its repair. Unfortunately, for unknown reasons, the immuno-inflammatory reaction persists and autoamplifies, the various components of the immune response finally contributing to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis as well as of atherosclerotic complications. PMID:14997437

  11. A hemodynamic model for layered BOLD signals.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Jakob; Koopmans, Peter J; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Raman, Sudhir; Stephan, Klaas Enno

    2016-01-15

    High-resolution blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at the sub-millimeter scale has become feasible with recent advances in MR technology. In principle, this would enable the study of layered cortical circuits, one of the fundaments of cortical computation. However, the spatial layout of cortical blood supply may become an important confound at such high resolution. In particular, venous blood draining back to the cortical surface perpendicularly to the layered structure is expected to influence the measured responses in different layers. Here, we present an extension of a hemodynamic model commonly used for analyzing fMRI data (in dynamic causal models or biophysical network models) that accounts for such blood draining effects by coupling local hemodynamics across layers. We illustrate the properties of the model and its inversion by a series of simulations and show that it successfully captures layered fMRI data obtained during a simple visual experiment. We conclude that for future studies of the dynamics of layered neuronal circuits with high-resolution fMRI, it will be pivotal to include effects of blood draining, particularly when trying to infer on the layer-specific connections in cortex--a theme of key relevance for brain disorders like schizophrenia and for theories of brain function such as predictive coding. PMID:26484827

  12. Are Hemodynamics Surrogate Endpoints in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Fritz, Jason S.; Smith, K. Akaya; Palevsky, Harold I.; Klinger, James R.; Halpern, Scott D.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background While frequently assessed in trials and clinical practice, hemodynamic response to therapy has never been validated as a surrogate endpoint for clinical events in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods and Results We performed a patient-level pooled analysis of four randomized placebo-controlled trials to determine if treatment-induced changes in hemodynamic values at 12 weeks accounted for the relationship between treatment assignment and the probability of early clinical events (death, lung transplantation, atrial septostomy, PAH hospitalization, withdrawal for clinical worsening, escalation in PAH therapy). We included 1119 subjects with PAH. The median (interquartile range) age was 48 (37 – 59), and 23% were men. 656 (59%) received active therapy (101 [15%] iloprost, 118 [18%] sitaxsentan, 204 [31%] sildenafil, and 233 [36%] subcutaneous treprostinil). Active treatment significantly lowered right atrial pressure (RAP), mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output and index (p < 0.01 for all). Changes in hemodynamic values (except for RAP and mPAP) were significantly associated with the risk of a clinical event (p ≤ 0.01 for all). While active treatment approximately halved the odds of a clinical event compared to placebo (p < 0.001), changes in hemodynamics accounted for only 1.2 – 13.9% of the overall treatment effect. Conclusions Treatment-induced changes in hemodynamics at 12 weeks only partially explain the impact of therapy on the probability of early clinical events in PAH. These findings suggest that resting hemodynamics are not valid surrogate endpoints for short-term events in PAH clinical trials. PMID:24951771

  13. Modulation of the sympathetic response to acute hypoxia by the caudal ventrolateral medulla in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Daniel A; Schreihofer, Ann M

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia elevates splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with differential effects during inspiration and expiration by unresolved central mechanisms. We examined the hypothesis that cardiovascular-related neurones in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) contribute to the complex sympathetic response to hypoxia. In chloralose-anaesthetized, ventilated, vagotomized rats, acute hypoxia (10% O2, 60 s) evoked an increase in SNA (103 ± 12%) that was characterized by a decrease in activity during early inspiration followed by a prominent rise during expiration. Some recorded baro-activated CVLM neurones (n= 13) were activated by hypoxia, and most of these neurones displayed peak activity during inspiration that was enhanced during hypoxia. In contrast, other baro-activated CVLM neurones were inhibited during hypoxia (n= 6), and most of these neurones showed peak activity during expiration prior to the onset of hypoxia. Microinjection of the glutamate antagonist kynurenate into the CVLM eliminated the respiratory-related fluctuations in SNA during hypoxia and exaggerated the magnitude of the sympathetic response. In contrast, microinjection of a GABAA antagonist (bicuculline or gabazine) into the CVLM dramatically attenuated the sympathetic response to hypoxia. These data suggest the response to hypoxia in baro-activated CVLM neurones is related to their basal pattern of respiratory-related activity, and changes in the activity of these neurones is consistent with a contribution to the respiratory-related sympathetic responses to hypoxia. Furthermore, both glutamate and GABA in the CVLM contribute to the complex sympathetic response to acute hypoxia. PMID:19047207

  14. Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to acute hypoxia following exposure to intermittent hypoxia in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Glen E; Brugniaux, Julien V; Pialoux, Vincent; Duggan, Cailean T C; Hanly, Patrick J; Ahmed, Sofia B; Poulin, Marc J

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is thought to be responsible for many of the long-term cardiovascular consequences associated with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Experimental human models of IH can aid in investigating the pathophysiology of these cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of IH on the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular response to acute hypoxia and hypercapnia in an experimental human model that simulates the hypoxaemia experienced by OSA patients. We exposed 10 healthy, male subjects to IH for 4 consecutive days. The IH profile involved 2 min of hypoxia (nadir = 45.0 mmHg) alternating with 2 min of normoxia (peak = 88.0 mmHg) for 6 h. The cerebral blood flow response and the pressor responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia were assessed after 2 days of sham exposure, after each day of IH, and 4 days following the discontinuation of IH. Nitric oxide derivatives were measured at baseline and following the last exposure to IH. After 4 days of IH, mean arterial pressure increased by 4 mmHg (P < 0.01), nitric oxide derivatives were reduced by 55% (P < 0.05), the pressor response to acute hypoxia increased (P < 0.01), and the cerebral vascular resistance response to hypoxia increased (P < 0.01). IH alters blood pressure and cerebrovascular regulation, which is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease in patients with OSA. PMID:19417094

  15. Dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Saito, Akatsuki; Katakai, Yuko; Iwasaki, Yuki; Kurosawa, Terue; Hamano, Masataka; Higashino, Atsunori; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Kurane, Ichiro; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examined the dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus (DENV) infection in a marmoset model. Here, we found that DENV infection in marmosets greatly induced responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. Interestingly, the strength of the immune response was greater in animals infected with a dengue fever strain than in those infected with a dengue hemorrhagic fever strain of DENV. In contrast, when animals were re-challenged with the same DENV strain used for primary infection, the neutralizing antibody induced appeared to play a critical role in sterilizing inhibition against viral replication, resulting in strong but delayed responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. The results in this study may help to better understand the dynamics of cellular and humoral immune responses in the control of DENV infection. PMID:23381396

  16. Plamsa leptin response to acute fasting and refeeding in untreated women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, P; Bortolotti, F; Fabrazzo, M; La Rocca, A; Fuschino, A; Maj, M

    2000-07-01

    Leptin is known to regulate body weight, energy balance, and reproduction. Therefore, investigation of its physiology is of obvious interest in bulimia nervosa (BN), an eating disorder characterized by body weight-related psychopathology, acute changes in the energy balance, and reproductive alterations. To date, the few studies that have assessed leptin production in BN have had several limitations, including the measurement of blood leptin levels in treated patients and the lack of normal weight healthy controls, so that the information they provide is not conclusive. As the investigation of leptin dynamics is likely to be more informative, we decided to assess leptin response to acute fasting and refeeding in both untreated patients with BN and healthy controls. Twelve women meeting the diagnostic criteria for BN of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and 10 healthy women of the same age range participated in a 3-day study. At 1800 h on day 1, they received a meal of 1088 Cal, with 53% carbohydrates, 17% protein, and 30% fat. Then, they fasted until 1800 h on day 2, when they received the same meal. On day 3, they received a standard hospital diet of 2600 Cal, divided into 3 meals, with the same percentages of nutrients as described above. Blood samples were collected at different time points for plasma leptin, glucose, and insulin measurements. In bulimic patients, plasma leptin values were significantly lower than in healthy women (P < 0.0001) and were positively related to body weight, expressed as body mass index (r = 0.86; P < 0.0001). The leptin response to the fasting/refeeding paradigm significantly differed between patients and controls (time x group interaction, P < 0.0001). In fact, in healthy subjects, acute fasting induced a 58% decline in the plasma leptin concentration, whereas such a decrease was only 7% in bulimic women (P < 0.001). After acute refeeding, plasma leptin increased in both groups, although in the patients it

  17. Freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint: adaptationist perspectives on the acute stress response spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia). In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed. Specifically, that fear-induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival response to an inescapable threat. The article suggests that faintness evolved in response to middle paleolithic intra-group and inter-group violence (of con-specifics) rather than as a pan-mammalian defense response, as is presently assumed. Based on recent literature, freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint provides a more complete description of the human acute stress response sequence than current descriptions. Faintness, one of three primary physiological reactions involved in BIITS phobia, is extremely rare in other phobias. Since heritability estimates are higher for faintness than for fears or phobias, the author suggests that trait-faintness may be a useful complement to trait-anxiety as an endophenotype in research on the human fear circuitry. Some implications for the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as well as for clinical, health services, and transcriptomic research are briefly discussed. PMID:15337864

  18. Hemodynamic and Light-Scattering Changes of Rat Spinal Cord and Primary Somatosensory Cortex in Response to Innocuous and Noxious Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    He, Ji-Wei; Liu, Hanli; Peng, Yuan Bo

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies with an exceptional spatial resolution and noninvasiveness have become a powerful tool for assessing neural activity in both animals and humans. However, the effectiveness of neuroimaging for pain remains unclear partly because the neurovascular coupling during pain processing is not completely characterized. Our current work aims to unravel patterns of neurovascular parameters in pain processing. A novel fiber-optic method was used to acquire absolute values of regional oxy- (HbO) and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, oxygen saturation rates (SO2), and the light-scattering coefficients from the spinal cord and primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in 10 rats. Brief mechanical and electrical stimuli (ranging from innocuous to noxious intensities) as well as a long-lasting noxious stimulus (formalin injection) were applied to the hindlimb under pentobarbital anesthesia. Interhemispheric comparisons in the spinal cord and SI were used to confirm functional activation during sensory processing. We found that all neurovascular parameters showed stimulation-induced changes; however, patterns of changes varied with regions and stimuli. Particularly, transient increases in HbO and SO2 were more reliably attributed to brief stimuli, whereas a sustained decrease in SO2 was more reliably attributed to formalin. Only the ipsilateral SI showed delayed responses to brief stimuli. In conclusion, innocuous and noxious stimuli induced significant neurovascular responses at critical centers (e.g., the spinal cord and SI) along the somatosensory pathway; however, there was no single response pattern (as measured by amplitude, duration, lateralization, decrease or increase) that was able to consistently differentiate noxious stimuli. Our results strongly suggested that the neurovascular response patterns differ between brief and long-lasting noxious stimuli, and can also differ between the spinal cord and SI. Therefore, a use of multiple-parameter strategy

  19. Hemodynamic and Light-Scattering Changes of Rat Spinal Cord and Primary Somatosensory Cortex in Response to Innocuous and Noxious Stimuli.

    PubMed

    He, Ji-Wei; Liu, Hanli; Peng, Yuan Bo

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies with an exceptional spatial resolution and noninvasiveness have become a powerful tool for assessing neural activity in both animals and humans. However, the effectiveness of neuroimaging for pain remains unclear partly because the neurovascular coupling during pain processing is not completely characterized. Our current work aims to unravel patterns of neurovascular parameters in pain processing. A novel fiber-optic method was used to acquire absolute values of regional oxy- (HbO) and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, oxygen saturation rates (SO₂), and the light-scattering coefficients from the spinal cord and primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in 10 rats. Brief mechanical and electrical stimuli (ranging from innocuous to noxious intensities) as well as a long-lasting noxious stimulus (formalin injection) were applied to the hindlimb under pentobarbital anesthesia. Interhemispheric comparisons in the spinal cord and SI were used to confirm functional activation during sensory processing. We found that all neurovascular parameters showed stimulation-induced changes; however, patterns of changes varied with regions and stimuli. Particularly, transient increases in HbO and SO₂ were more reliably attributed to brief stimuli, whereas a sustained decrease in SO₂ was more reliably attributed to formalin. Only the ipsilateral SI showed delayed responses to brief stimuli. In conclusion, innocuous and noxious stimuli induced significant neurovascular responses at critical centers (e.g., the spinal cord and SI) along the somatosensory pathway; however, there was no single response pattern (as measured by amplitude, duration, lateralization, decrease or increase) that was able to consistently differentiate noxious stimuli. Our results strongly suggested that the neurovascular response patterns differ between brief and long-lasting noxious stimuli, and can also differ between the spinal cord and SI. Therefore, a use of multiple-parameter strategy

  20. Exercise capacity and cardiac hemodynamic response in female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice: a paradox of preserved V'O2max and exercise capacity despite coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wojewoda, M; Tyrankiewicz, U; Gwozdz, P; Skorka, T; Jablonska, M; Orzylowska, A; Jasinski, K; Jasztal, A; Przyborowski, K; Kostogrys, R B; Zoladz, J A; Chlopicki, S

    2016-01-01

    We assessed exercise performance, coronary blood flow and cardiac reserve of female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice with advanced atherosclerosis compared with age-matched, wild-type C57BL6/J mice. Exercise capacity was assessed as whole body maximal oxygen consumption (V'O2max), maximum running velocity (vmax) and maximum distance (DISTmax) during treadmill exercise. Cardiac systolic and diastolic function in basal conditions and in response to dobutamine (mimicking exercise-induced cardiac stress) were assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in vivo. Function of coronary circulation was assessed in isolated perfused hearts. In female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice V'O2max, vmax and DISTmax were not impaired as compared with C57BL6/J mice. Cardiac function at rest and systolic and diastolic cardiac reserve were also preserved in female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice as evidenced by preserved fractional area change and similar fall in systolic and end diastolic area after dobutamine. Moreover, endothelium-dependent responses of coronary circulation induced by bradykinin (Bk) and acetylcholine (ACh) were preserved, while endothelium-independent responses induced by NO-donors were augmented in female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice. Basal COX-2-dependent production of 6-keto-PGF1α was increased. Concluding, we suggest that robust compensatory mechanisms in coronary circulation involving PGI2- and NO-pathways may efficiently counterbalance coronary atherosclerosis-induced impairment in V'O2max and exercise capacity. PMID:27108697

  1. Multiplexed Component Analysis to Identify Genes Contributing to the Immune Response during Acute SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Iraj; Gama, Lucio; Mac Gabhann, Feilim

    2015-01-01

    Immune response genes play an important role during acute HIV and SIV infection. Using an SIV macaque model of AIDS and CNS disease, our overall goal was to assess how the expression of genes associated with immune and inflammatory responses are longitudinally changed in different organs or cells during SIV infection. To compare RNA expression of a panel of 88 immune-related genes across time points and among three tissues – spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) – we designed a set of Nanostring probes. To identify significant genes during acute SIV infection and to investigate whether these genes are tissue-specific or have global roles, we introduce a novel multiplexed component analysis (MCA) method. This combines multivariate analysis methods with multiple preprocessing methods to create a set of 12 “judges”; each judge emphasizes particular types of change in gene expression to which cells could respond, for example, the absolute or relative size of expression change from baseline. Compared to bivariate analysis methods, our MCA method improved classification rates. This analysis allows us to identify three categories of genes: (a) consensus genes likely to contribute highly to the immune response; (b) genes that would contribute highly to the immune response only if certain assumptions are met – e.g. that the cell responds to relative expression change rather than absolute expression change; and (c) genes whose contribution to immune response appears to be modest. We then compared the results across the three tissues of interest; some genes are consistently highly-contributing in all tissues, while others are specific for certain tissues. Our analysis identified CCL8, CXCL10, CXCL11, MxA, OAS2, and OAS1 as top contributing genes, all of which are stimulated by type I interferon. This suggests that the cytokine storm during acute SIV infection is a systemic innate immune response against viral replication

  2. Acute Phase Proteins in Response to Dictyocaulus viviparus Infection in Calves

    PubMed Central

    Gånheim, C; Höglund, J; Waller, K Persson

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments were carried out to examine the acute phase response, as measured by the acute phase proteins (APP) haptoglobin, serum amyloid A (SAA) and fibrinogen, in calves infected with lungworm, Dictyocaulus vivparus. In addition, eosinophil counts were analysed. Three different dose models were used in 3 separate experiments: I) 250 D. viviparus infective third stage larvae (L3) once daily for 2 consecutive days, II) 100 D. viviparus L3 once daily for 5 consecutive days, and III) 2000 L3 once. All 3 dose regimes induced elevated levels of haptoglobin, SAA and fibrinogen, although there was considerable variation both between and within experiments. A significant increase was observed in all 3 APP at one or several time points in experiment I and III, whereas in experiment II, the only significant elevation was observed for fibrinogen at one occasion. The eosinophil numbers were significantly elevated in all 3 experiments. The results show that lungworm infection can induce an acute phase response, which can be monitored by the selected APP. Elevated APP levels in combination with high numbers of eosinophils in an animal with respiratory disease may be used as an indicator of lung worm infection, and help the clinician to decide on treatment. However, high numbers of eosinophils and low levels of APP do not exclude a diagnosis of lungworm. Thus, lungworm infection may not be detected if measurements of APP are used to assess calf health in herds or individual animals. PMID:15535088

  3. Acute hormonal responses before and after 2 weeks of HIT in well trained junior triathletes.

    PubMed

    Zinner, C; Wahl, P; Achtzehn, S; Reed, J L; Mester, J

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to compare the acute hormonal response to a single HIT session at the beginning and end of a HIT shock microcycle. 13 male junior triathletes (15.8±1.8 yrs.) performed 16 HIT sessions within a 2 week period. Venous blood samples were collected before and after the first and last HIT session. Significant increases in cortisol (first session +89.7%; last session +70.3%) and hGH (first session +435.1%; last session +314.6%) concentrations were observed after both training sessions (P<0.05). The acute responses of cortisol, hGH, T3, and fT3 were not different between the first and last HIT sessions (P=1.00). Although no acute changes in testosterone were detected after the training sessions, testosterone concentrations were significantly higher at all time points (62.6-80.1%) during the last compared to first training session (P≤0.001). Findings from the present study reveal that 16 sessions of HIT led to significant increases in baseline concentrations of serum testosterone. This might indicate a heightened anabolic state even in junior triathletes. Based on the hormonal data, we conclude that at the end of this 2 week microcycle no familiarization effect was evident and that the training stimulus produced by HIT was still great enough to "stress" the athletes and induce positive training adaptations. PMID:24081622

  4. The implicit affiliation motive moderates cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress in high school students.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Mirko; Schüler, Julia; Budde, Henning

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously shown that the implicit affiliation motive - the need to establish and maintain friendly relationships with others - leads to chronic health benefits. The underlying assumption for the present research was that the implicit affiliation motive also moderates the salivary cortisol response to acute psychological stress when some aspects of social evaluation and uncontrollability are involved. By contrast we did not expect similar effects in response to exercise as a physical stressor. Fifty-nine high school students aged M=14.8 years were randomly assigned to a psychosocial stress (publishing the results of an intelligence test performed), a physical stress (exercise intensity of 65-75% of HRmax), and a control condition (normal school lesson) each lasting 15min. Participants' affiliation motives were assessed using the Operant Motive Test and salivary cortisol samples were taken pre and post stressor. We found that the strength of the affiliation motive negatively predicted cortisol reactions to acute psychosocial but not to physical stress when compared to a control group. The results suggest that the affiliation motive buffers the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the HPA axis. PMID:25016451

  5. Pulmonary response of Fischer 344 rats to acute nose-only inhalation of indium trichloride.

    PubMed

    Blazka, M E; Tepper, J S; Dixon, D; Winsett, D W; O'Connor, R W; Luster, M I

    1994-10-01

    We have previously shown that rats dosed intratracheally with indium trichloride (InCl3) develop severe lung damage and fibrosis. However, it is not clear what pulmonary effects would result following accidental occupational exposure to low concentrations of indium by inhalation. The present study uses a model of acute lung injury based on single 1-hr nose-only exposures to 0.2, 2.0, or 20 mg InCl3/m3. Exposure to 0.2 mg InCl3/m3 was capable of initiating an inflammatory response. Seven days following inhalation of 20 mg InCl3/m3 the total cell number, fibronectin, and TNF alpha levels in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid were 8, 40, and 5 times higher than the control, respectively. Commensurate with the level of lung injury 7 days after exposure, an acute restrictive lung lesion and increased airway responsiveness to acetylcholine were observed. Forty-two days after exposure a compensatory increase in lung volume and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in the 20 mg InCl3/m3 group suggested recovery from the lung injury. Lung collagen levels were increased in a concentration-dependent manner 42 days postexposure. These data indicate that inhalation of InCl3/m3 causes acute inflammatory changes in the lung. PMID:7925195

  6. Bronchodilator response following methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction predicts acute asthma exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Park, Heung-Woo; Song, Woo-Jung; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Cho, Sang-Heon; Datta, Soma; Weiss, Scott T; Tantisira, Kelan G

    2016-07-01

    Methacholine bronchial provocation test provides the concentrati