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Sample records for acute hemodynamic response

  1. Acute hemodynamic responses to weightlessness in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Elton, K. F.; Holt, T. A.; Mukai, C.; Bennett, B. S.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    As NASA designs space flights requiring prolonged periods of weightlessness for a broader segment of the population, it will be important to know the acute and sustained effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular system since this information will contribute to understanding of the clinical pharmacology of drugs administered in space. Due to operational constraints on space flights, earliest effects of weightlessness have not been documented. We examined hemodynamic responses of humans to transitions from acceleration to weightlessness during parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Impedance cardiography data were collected over four sets of 8-10 parabolas, with a brief rest period between sets. Each parabola included a period of 1.8 Gz, then approximately 20 seconds of weightlessness, and finally a period of 1.6 Gz; the cycle repeated almost immediately for the remainder of the set. Subjects were semi-supine (Shuttle launch posture) for the first set, then randomly supine, sitting and standing for each subsequent set. Transition to weightlessness while standing produced decreased heart rate, increased thoracic fluid content, and increased stroke index. Surprisingly, the onset of weightlessness in the semi-supine posture produced little evidence of a headward fluid shift. Heart rate, stroke index, and cardiac index are virtually unchanged after 20 seconds of weightlessness, and thoracic fluid content is slightly decreased. Semi-supine responses run counter to Shuttle crewmember reports of noticeable fluid shift after minutes to hours in orbit. Apparently, the headward fluid shift commences in the semi-supine posture before launch. is augmented by launch acceleration, but briefly interrupted immediately in orbit, then resumes and is completed over the next hours.

  2. Acute hemodynamic response to weightlessness during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Chiaki N.; Lathers, Claire M.; Charles, John B.; Bennett, Barbara S.; Igarashi, Makoto; Patel, Saumil

    1991-01-01

    The effect of a short exposure to weightlessness on hemodynamic parameters of humans was investigated in seven subjects flown aboard the KC-135 aircraft. Particular attention is given to the relationships among various hemodynamic responses to hypergravic and hypogravic states, observed for four different postures: semisupine, supine, standing, and sitting. Results are presented on changes in the thoracic fluid index, heart rate, cardiac index, and the coefficient of variation of the R-R intervals. High values of the coefficient of variation were found at the onset of 0-G, suggesting that vagal cardiac neural activity increases in all positions except supine (where a small decrease was registered).

  3. Central hemodynamic responses during acute high-intensity interval exercise and moderate continuous exercise in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Mathieu; Normandin, Eve; Meyer, Philippe; Juneau, Martin; Haykowsky, Mark; Nigam, Anil

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the acute hemodynamic responses during high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) session compared with moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE) session in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). Thirteen patients with HFREF (age, 59 ± 6 years; left ventricular ejection fraction, 27% ± 6%; New York Heart Association class I to III) were randomly assigned to a single session of HIIE (2 × 8 min) corresponding to 30 s at 100% of peak power output (PPO) and 30 s passive recovery intervals or to a MICE (22 min) at 60% of PPO. Gas exchange and central hemodynamic parameters (cardiac bioimpedance) were measured continuously during exercise. Oxygen uptake, stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and arterio-venous difference (C(a-v)O(2)) were compared. Mean oxygen uptake and ventilation were lower during HIIE vs. MICE. CO, SV, and C(a-v)O(2)) were not different between MICE and HIIE. Optimized HIIE was well tolerated (similar perceived exertion) and no significant ventricular arrhythmias and (or) abnormal blood pressure responses occurred during HIEE session. Compared with MICE, optimized HIIE elicited similar central hemodynamic and C(a-v)O(2) responses in HFREF patients with lower oxygen uptake and ventilation. HIIE may be an efficient exercise training modality in patients with HFREF.

  4. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  5. Spatiotemporal hemodynamic response functions derived from physiology.

    PubMed

    Aquino, K M; Robinson, P A; Drysdale, P M

    2014-04-21

    Probing neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) relies upon understanding the hemodynamic response to changes in neural activity. Although existing studies have extensively characterized the temporal hemodynamic response, less is understood about the spatial and spatiotemporal hemodynamic responses. This study systematically characterizes the spatiotemporal response by deriving the hemodynamic response due to a short localized neural drive, i.e., the spatiotemporal hemodynamic response function (stHRF) from a physiological model of hemodynamics based on a poroelastic model of cortical tissue. In this study, the model's boundary conditions are clarified and a resulting nonlinear hemodynamic wave equation is derived. From this wave equation, damped linear hemodynamic waves are predicted from the stHRF. The main features of these waves depend on two physiological parameters: wave propagation speed, which depends on mean cortical stiffness, and damping which depends on effective viscosity. Some of these predictions were applied and validated in a companion study (Aquino et al., 2012). The advantages of having such a theory for the stHRF include improving the interpretation of spatiotemporal dynamics in fMRI data; improving estimates of neural activity with fMRI spatiotemporal deconvolution; and enabling wave interactions between hemodynamic waves to be predicted and exploited to improve the signal to noise ratio of fMRI. PMID:24398024

  6. The acute effects of the thermogenic supplement Meltdown on energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and hemodynamic responses in young, healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Jitomir, Jean; Nassar, Erika; Culbertson, Julie; Moreillon, Jen; Buford, Thomas; Hudson, Geoffrey; Cooke, Matt; Kreider, Richard; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2008-01-01

    -exercise states without any adverse hemodynamic responses associated with maximal exercise. PMID:19087290

  7. The impact of beat-to-beat variability in optimising the acute hemodynamic response in cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Steven; Walker, Cameron; Crozier, Andrew; Hyde, Eoin R.; Blazevic, Bojan; Behar, Jonathan M.; Claridge, Simon; Sohal, Manav; Shetty, Anoop; Jackson, Tom; Rinaldi, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute indicators of response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) are critical for developing lead optimisation algorithms and evaluating novel multi-polar, multi-lead and endocardial pacing protocols. Accounting for beat-to-beat variability in measures of acute haemodynamic response (AHR) may help clinicians understand the link between acute measurements of cardiac function and long term clinical outcome. Methods and results A retrospective study of invasive pressure tracings from 38 patients receiving an acute pacing and electrophysiological study was performed. 602 pacing protocols for left ventricle (LV) (n = 38), atria–ventricle (AV) (n = 9), ventricle–ventricle (VV) (n = 12) and endocardial (ENDO) (n = 8) optimisation were performed. AHR was measured as the maximal rate of LV pressure development (dP/dtMx) for each beat. The range of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of mean AHR was ~ 7% across all optimisation protocols compared with the reported CRT response cut off value of 10%. A single clear optimal protocol was identifiable in 61%, 22%, 25% and 50% for LV, AV, VV and ENDO optimisation cases, respectively. A level of service (LOS) optimisation that aimed to maximise the expected AHR 5th percentile, minimising variability and maximising AHR, led to distinct optimal protocols from conventional mean AHR optimisation in 34%, 78%, 67% and 12.5% of LV, AV, VV and ENDO optimisation cases, respectively. Conclusion The beat-to-beat variation in AHR is significant in the context of CRT cut off values. A LOS optimisation offers a novel index to identify the optimal pacing site that accounts for both the mean and variation of the baseline measurement and pacing protocol. PMID:26844303

  8. Review: hemodynamic response to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    Historically, and at present, carbon monoxide is a major gaseous poison responsible for widespread morbidity and mortality. From threshold to maximal nonlethal levels, a variety of cardiovascular changes occur, both immediately and in the long term, whose homeostatic function it is to renormalize tissue oxygen delivery. However, notwithstanding numerous studies over the past century, the literature remains equivocal regarding the hemodynamic responses in animals and humans, although CO hypoxia is clearly different in several respects from hypoxic hypoxia. Factors complicating interpretation of experimental findings include species, CO dose level and rate, route of CO delivery, duration, level of exertion, state of consciousness, and anesthetic agent used. Augmented cardiac output usually observed with moderate COHb may be compromised in more sever poisoning for the same reasons, such that regional or global ischemia result. The hypotension usually seen in most animal studies is thought to be a primary cause of CNS damage resulting from acute CO poisoning, yet the exact mechanism(s) remains unproven in both animals and humans, as does the way in which CO produces hypotension. This review briefly summarizes the literature relevant to the short- and long-term hemodynamic responses reported in animals and humans. It concludes by presenting an overview using data from a single species in which the most complete work has been done to date.

  9. Hemodynamic evaluation of a chronically implanted, electrically powered left ventricular assist system: responses to acute circulatory stress.

    PubMed

    McKay, R G; Penny, W F; Wyman, R M; Clay, W; Carr, J G; Bernhard, W F; Grossman, W

    1991-12-01

    Hemodynamic stress testing was performed in four calves with a chronically implanted left ventricular assist device consisting of a double-valved pump interposed between the left ventricular apex and the descending thoracic aorta. The device was powered either pneumatically (n = 1) or with a transcutaneous energy transmission system (n = 3). Hemodynamic evaluation (cardiac output and right and left ventricular and pulmonary and carotid artery pressures) was carried out at baseline and during all hemodynamically stressed states. Atrial pacing and ventricular pacing to a heart rate of 140 beats/min resulted in no significant change in right or left heart filling pressures or cardiac output. Preload reduction with nitroprusside or transient inferior vena cava balloon occlusion resulted in a marked decrease in left ventricular pressure with preservation of mean arterial pressure. Phenylephrine administration resulted in a marked rise in mean arterial pressure with no change in cardiac output or filling pressure. Induction of ventricular fibrillation resulted in a decrease of mean left ventricular pressure to 11 +/- 8 mm Hg, but mean arterial pressure was maintained at greater than or equal to 50 mm Hg. It is concluded that a multicomponent, implantable, electrically powered assist system is capable of maintaining a normal cardiac output under a wide range of loading conditions and chronotropic states. Although this device is clearly preload dependent, it is capable of maintaining normal systemic pressures during conditions of severe left ventricular dysfunction and circulatory collapse. PMID:1960330

  10. Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose on the pharmacokinetics of fructose and acute metabolic and hemodynamic responses in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Le, Myphuong T; Frye, Reginald F; Rivard, Christopher J; Cheng, Jing; McFann, Kim K; Segal, Mark S; Johnson, Richard J; Johnson, Julie A

    2012-05-01

    It is unclear whether high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which contains a higher amount of fructose and provides an immediate source of free fructose, induces greater systemic concentrations of fructose as compared with sucrose. It is also unclear whether exposure to higher levels of fructose leads to increased fructose-induced adverse effects. The objective was to prospectively compare the effects of HFCS- vs sucrose-sweetened soft drinks on acute metabolic and hemodynamic effects. Forty men and women consumed 24 oz of HFCS- or sucrose-sweetened beverages in a randomized crossover design study. Blood and urine samples were collected over 6 hours. Blood pressure, heart rate, fructose, and a variety of other metabolic biomarkers were measured. Fructose area under the curve and maximum concentration, dose-normalized glucose area under the curve and maximum concentration, relative bioavailability of glucose, changes in postprandial concentrations of serum uric acid, and systolic blood pressure maximum levels were higher when HFCS-sweetened beverages were consumed as compared with sucrose-sweetened beverages. Compared with sucrose, HFCS leads to greater fructose systemic exposure and significantly different acute metabolic effects.

  11. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  12. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  13. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics.

  14. In Heart Failure Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block Single Lead MultiSpot Left Ventricular Pacing Does Not Improve Acute Hemodynamic Response To Conventional Biventricular Pacing. A Multicenter Prospective, Interventional, Non-Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterliński, Maciej; Sokal, Adam; Lenarczyk, Radosław; Van Heuverswyn, Frederic; Rinaldi, C. Aldo; Vanderheyden, Marc; Khalameizer, Vladimir; Francis, Darrel; Heynens, Joeri; Stegemann, Berthold; Cornelussen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent efforts to increase CRT response by multiSPOT pacing (MSP) from multiple bipols on the same left ventricular lead are still inconclusive. Aim The Left Ventricular (LV) MultiSPOTpacing for CRT (iSPOT) study compared the acute hemodynamic response of MSP pacing by using 3 electrodes on a quadripolar lead compared with conventional biventricular pacing (BiV). Methods Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent an acute hemodynamic study to determine the %change in LV+dP/dtmax from baseline atrial pacing compared to the following configurations: BiV pacing with the LV lead in a one of lateral veins, while pacing from the distal, mid, or proximal electrode and all 3 electrodes together (i.e. MSP). All measurements were repeated 4 times at 5 different atrioventricular delays. We also measured QRS-width and individual Q-LV durations. Results Protocol was completed in 24 patients, all with LBBB (QRS width 171±20 ms) and 58% ischemic aetiology. The percentage change in LV+dP/dtmax for MSP pacing was 31.0±3.3% (Mean±SE), which was not significantly superior to any BiV pacing configuration: 28.9±3.2% (LV-distal), 28.3±2.7% (LV-mid), and 29.5±3.0% (LV-prox), respectively. Correlation between LV+dP/dtmax and either QRS-width or Q-LV ratio was poor. Conclusions In patients with LBBB MultiSPOT LV pacing demonstrated comparable improvement in contractility to best conventional BiV pacing. Optimization of atrioventricular delay is important for the best performance for both BiV and MultiSPOT pacing configurations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01883141 PMID:27124724

  15. Resolution and outcome of acute circulatory failure does not correlate with hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Suistomaa, Matti; Uusaro, Ari; Parviainen, Ilkka; Ruokonen, Esko

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Hemodynamic goals in the treatment of acute circulatory failure (ACF) are controversial. In critical care, organ failures can be assessed using Sequential Organ Failure Assessment and its refinement, total maximal Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (TMS). We studied the associations between resolution of ACF and hemodynamics in the early (< 24 hours) phase of intensive care unit care and their relation to TMS and mortality. Patients and methods Eighty-three patients with ACF (defined as arterial lactate > 2 mmol/l and/or base deficit > 4) who had pulmonary artery catheters and stayed for longer than 24 hours in the intensive care unit were included. Hemodynamics, oxygen transport, vasoactive drugs and TMS scores were recorded. Normalisation of hyperlactatemia and metabolic acidosis in less than 24 hours after admission was defined as a positive response to hemodynamic resuscitation. Results Fifty-two patients responded to resuscitation. Nonresponders had higher mortality than responders (52% versus 33%, P = 0.044). Hospital mortality was highest (63%) among nonresponders who received vasoactive drugs. The TMS scores of nonresponders (median [interquartile range], 12 [9-16]) were higher than the scores of responders (10 [7-12], P = 0.019). Late accumulation of TMS scores was associated with increasing mortality, and if the TMS score increase occurred > 5 days after admission then the mortality was 77%. Responders had higher mean arterial pressure at 24 hours, but it was no different between survivors and nonsurvivors. No other hemodynamic and oxygen transport variables were associated with the success of resuscitation or with mortality. Conclusions Except for the mean arterial pressure at 24 hours, invasively derived hemodynamic and oxygen transport variables are not associated with the response to resuscitation or with mortality. Positive response to resuscitation in ACF is associated with less severe organ failures as judged by TMS scores. Late

  16. Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Timothy W

    2016-04-01

    A review is presented of the physical principles governing the distribution of blood flow and blood pressure in the vascular system. The main factors involved are the pulsatile driving pressure generated by the heart, the flow characteristics of blood, and the geometric structure and mechanical properties of the vessels. The relationship between driving pressure and flow in a given vessel can be understood by considering the viscous and inertial forces acting on the blood. Depending on the vessel diameter and other physical parameters, a wide variety of flow phenomena can occur. In large arteries, the propagation of the pressure pulse depends on the elastic properties of the artery walls. In the microcirculation, the fact that blood is a suspension of cells strongly influences its flow properties and leads to a nonuniform distribution of hematocrit among microvessels. The forces acting on vessel walls include shear stress resulting from blood flow and circumferential stress resulting from blood pressure. Biological responses to these forces are important in the control of blood flow and the structural remodeling of vessels, and also play a role in major disease processes including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Consideration of hemodynamics is essential for a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of the circulatory system. PMID:27065172

  17. Acutely altered hemodynamics following venous obstruction in the early chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Stekelenburg-de Vos, Sandra; Ursem, Nicolette T C; Hop, Wim C J; Wladimiroff, Juriy W; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Poelmann, Robert E

    2003-03-01

    In the venous clip model specific cardiac malformations are induced in the chick embryo by obstructing the right lateral vitelline vein with a microclip. Clipping alters venous return and intracardiac laminar blood flow patterns, with secondary effects on the mechanical load of the embryonic myocardium. We investigated the instantaneous effects of clipping the right lateral vitelline vein on hemodynamics in the stage-17 chick embryo. 32 chick embryos HH 17 were subdivided into venous clipped (N=16) and matched control embryos (N=16). Dorsal aortic blood flow velocity was measured with a 20 MHz pulsed Doppler meter. A time series of eight successive measurements per embryo was made starting just before clipping and ending 5h after clipping. Heart rate, peak systolic velocity, time-averaged velocity, peak blood flow, mean blood flow, peak acceleration and stroke volume were determined. All hemodynamic parameters decreased acutely after venous clipping and only three out of seven parameters (heart rate, time-averaged velocity and mean blood flow) showed a recovery to baseline values during the 5h study period. We conclude that the experimental alteration of venous return has major acute effects on hemodynamics in the chick embryo. These effects may be responsible for the observed cardiac malformations after clipping.

  18. Hemodynamic and symptomatic effects of acute interventions on tilt in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, V. M.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Novak, V.; Low, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to alleviate symptoms in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Drugs reported to be of benefit include midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, and phenobarbital. Other measures used include volume expansion and physical countermaneuvers. These treatments may influence pathophysiologic mechanisms of POTS such as alpha-receptor dysfunction, beta-receptor supersensitivity, venous pooling, and brainstem center dysfunction. The authors prospectively studied hemodynamic indices and symptom scores in patients with POTS who were acutely treated with a variety of interventions. Twenty-one subjects who met the criteria for POTS were studied (20 women, 1 man; mean age, 28.7 +/- 6.8 y; age range, 14-39 y). Patients were studied with a 5-minute head-up tilt protocol, ECG monitoring, and noninvasive beat-to-beat blood pressure monitoring, all before and after the administration of an intervention (intravenous saline, midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, or phenobarbital). The hemodynamic indices studied were heart rate (ECG) and systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressure. Patients used a balanced verbal scale to record any change in their symptoms between the tilts. Symptom scores improved significantly after the patients received midodrine and saline. Midodrine and propranolol reduced the resting heart rate response to tilt (p <0.005) and the immediate and 5-minute heart rate responses to tilt (p <0.002). Clonidine accentuated the immediate decrease in blood pressure on tilt up (p <0.05). It was concluded that midodrine and intravenous saline are effective in decreasing symptoms on tilt in patients with POTS when given acutely. Effects of treatments on heart rate and blood pressure responses generally reflected the known pharmacologic mechanisms of the agents.

  19. Hemodynamic and cellular response feedback in calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sarah T; Srigunapalan, Suthan; Simmons, Craig A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-07-01

    This review highlights aspects of calcific aortic valve disease that encompass the entire range of aortic valve disease progression from initial cellular changes to aortic valve sclerosis and stenosis, which can be initiated by changes in blood flow (hemodynamics) and pressure across the aortic valve. Appropriate hemodynamics is important for normal valve function and maintenance, but pathological blood velocities and pressure can have profound consequences at the macroscopic to microscopic scales. At the macroscopic scale, hemodynamic forces impart shear stresses on the surface of the valve leaflets and cause deformation of the leaflet tissue. As discussed in this review, these macroscale forces are transduced to the microscale, where they influence the functions of the valvular endothelial cells that line the leaflet surface and the valvular interstitial cells that populate the valve extracellular matrix. For example, pathological changes in blood flow-induced shear stress can cause dysfunction, impairing their homeostatic functions, and pathological stretching of valve tissue caused by elevated transvalvular pressure can activate valvular interstitial cells and latent paracrine signaling cytokines (eg, transforming growth factor-β1) to promote maladaptive tissue remodeling. Collectively, these coordinated and complex interactions adversely impact bulk valve tissue properties, feeding back to further deteriorate valve function and propagate valve cell pathological responses. Here, we review the role of hemodynamic forces in calcific aortic valve disease initiation and progression, with focus on cellular responses and how they feed back to exacerbate aortic valve dysfunction.

  20. Theoretical Analysis of the Relative Impact of Obesity on Hemodynamic Stability During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Jones, Alan E.; Coleman, Thomas G.; Summers, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that morbid obesity may be an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries. Objectives: In this study, a theoretic analysis using a derivation of the Guyton model of cardiovascular physiology examines the expected impact of obesity on hemodynamic changes in Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) and Cardiac Output (CO) during Hemorrhagic Shock (HS). Patients and Methods: Computer simulation studies were used to predict the relative impact of increasing Body Mass Index (BMI) on global hemodynamic parameters during HS. The analytic procedure involved recreating physiologic conditions associated with changing BMI for a virtual subject in an In Silico environment. The model was validated for the known effect of a BMI of 30 on iliofemoral venous pressures. Then, the relative effect of changing BMI on the outcome of target cardiovascular parameters was examined during simulated acute loss of blood volume in class II hemorrhage. The percent changes in these parameters were compared between the virtual nonobese and obese subjects. Model parameter values are derived from known population distributions, producing simulation outputs that can be used in a deductive systems analysis assessment rather than traditional frequentist statistical methodologies. Results: In hemorrhage simulation, moderate increases in BMI were found to produce greater decreases in MAP and CO compared to the normal subject. During HS, the virtual obese subject had 42% and 44% greater falls in CO and MAP, respectively, compared to the nonobese subject. Systems analysis of the model revealed that an increase in resistance to venous return due to changes in intra-abdominal pressure resulting from obesity was the critical mechanism responsible for the differences. Conclusions: This study suggests that obese patients in HS may have a higher risk of hemodynamic instability compared to their nonobese counterparts primarily due to obesity

  1. Hemodynamic Responses to Speech and Music in Preverbal Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Baumbauer, Kyle; Bortfeld, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided clues about the ontogeny of lateralization of auditory processing in humans, but most have employed specific subtypes of stimuli and/or have assessed responses in discrete temporal windows. The present study used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to establish changes in hemodynamic activity in the neocortex of preverbal infants (aged 4-11 months) while they were exposed to two distinct types of complex auditory stimuli (full sentences and musical phrases). Measurements were taken from bilateral temporal regions, including both anterior and posterior superior temporal gyri. When the infant sample was treated as a homogenous group, no significant effects emerged for stimulus type. However, when infants' hemodynamic responses were categorized according to their overall changes in volume, two very clear neurophysiological patterns emerged. A high responder group, showed a pattern of early and increasing activation, primarily in the left hemisphere, similar to that observed in comparable studies with adults. In contrast, a low responder group showed a pattern of gradual decreases inactivation over time. Although age did track with responder type, no significant differences between these groups emerged for stimulus type, suggesting that the high versus low responder characterization generalizes across classes of auditory stimuli. These results highlight a new way to conceptualize the variable cortical blood flow patterns that are frequently observed across infants and stimuli, with hemodynamic response volumes potentially serving as an early indicator of developmental changes in auditory processing sensitivity. PMID:23777481

  2. Hemodynamic responses to speech and music in preverbal infants.

    PubMed

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Baumbauer, Kyle; Bortfeld, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided clues about the ontogeny of lateralization of auditory processing in humans, but most have employed specific subtypes of stimuli and/or have assessed responses in discrete temporal windows. The present study used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to establish changes in hemodynamic activity in the neocortex of preverbal infants (aged 4-11 months) while they were exposed to two distinct types of complex auditory stimuli (full sentences and musical phrases). Measurements were taken from bilateral temporal regions, including both anterior and posterior superior temporal gyri. When the infant sample was treated as a homogenous group, no significant effects emerged for stimulus type. However, when infants' hemodynamic responses were categorized according to their overall changes in volume, two very clear neurophysiological patterns emerged. A high-responder group showed a pattern of early and increasing activation, primarily in the left hemisphere, similar to that observed in comparable studies with adults. In contrast, a low-responder group showed a pattern of gradual decreases in activation over time. Although age did track with responder type, no significant differences between these groups emerged for stimulus type, suggesting that the high- versus low-responder characterization generalizes across classes of auditory stimuli. These results highlight a new way to conceptualize the variable cortical blood flow patterns that are frequently observed across infants and stimuli, with hemodynamic response volumes potentially serving as an early indicator of developmental changes in auditory-processing sensitivity.

  3. Immediate hemodynamic response to furosemide in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, R E; Messerli, F H; deCarvalho, J G; Husserl, F E

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of furosemide on cardiovascular hemodynamics in patients with end-stage renal failure, we studied ten patients undergoing hemodialysis three times a week. Arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output (indocyanine green dye) were measured in triplicate; total peripheral resistance and central blood volume were calculated by standard formulas. Hemodynamics were determined at baseline and 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes after intravenous (IV) bolus injection of furosemide 60 mg. Furosemide produced a decrease in central blood volume of -13% +/- 2.2% from pretreatment values (P less than .01) that was most pronounced five minutes after injection, together with a fall in cardiac output (from 6.76 +/- 0.59 to 6.17 +/- 0.52 L/min, P less than .10). Stroke volume decreased with a maximum fall occurring after 15 minutes (from 84 +/- 7 to 79 +/- 7 mL/min, P less than .05), and total peripheral resistance increased (from 15.8 +/- 2.1 to 17.8 +/- 2.3 units, P less than .05) after furosemide. Arterial pressure and heart rate did not change. The decrease in central blood volume reflects a shift of the total blood volume from the cardiopulmonary circulation to the periphery, suggesting dilation of the peripheral venous bed. Thus, even in patients undergoing hemodialysis, furosemide acutely decreases left ventricular preload by venous dilation and should therefore prove to be beneficial in acute volume overload.

  4. Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

  5. Effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Raven, Peter B; Rebuffat, Thomas; Denise, Pierre; Lericollais, Romain; Sugawara, Jun; Normand, Hervé

    2015-10-15

    Systemic blood distribution is an important factor involved in regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, the effect of an acute change in central blood volume (CBV) on CBF regulation remains unclear. To address our question, we sought to examine the CBF and systemic hemodynamic responses to microgravity during parabolic flight. Twelve healthy subjects were seated upright and exposed to microgravity during parabolic flight. During the brief periods of microgravity, mean arterial pressure was decreased (-26 ± 1%, P < 0.001), despite an increase in cardiac output (+21 ± 6%, P < 0.001). During microgravity, central arterial pulse pressure and estimated carotid sinus pressure increased rapidly. In addition, this increase in central arterial pulse pressure was associated with an arterial baroreflex-mediated decrease in heart rate (r = -0.888, P < 0.0001) and an increase in total vascular conductance (r = 0.711, P < 0.001). The middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) remained unchanged throughout parabolic flight (P = 0.30). During microgravity the contribution of cardiac output to MCA Vmean was gradually reduced (P < 0.05), and its contribution was negatively correlated with an increase in total vascular conductance (r = -0.683, P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the acute loading of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors by increases in CBV during microgravity results in acute and marked systemic vasodilation. Furthermore, we conclude that this marked systemic vasodilation decreases the contribution of cardiac output to CBF. These findings suggest that the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex-mediated peripheral vasodilation along with dynamic cerebral autoregulation counteracts a cerebral overperfusion, which otherwise would occur during acute increases in CBV. PMID:26310936

  6. Biochemical and hemodynamic changes in normal subjects during acute and rigorous bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Afonin, Victor B.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Rigorous bed rest (RBR) induces significant biochemical and circulatory changes. However, little is known about acute rigorous bed rest (ARBR). Measuring biochemical and circulatory variables during ARBR and RBR the aim of this study was to establish the significance of ARBR effect. Studies were done during 3 days of a pre-bed rest (BR) period and during 7 days of ARBR and RBR period. Thirty normal male individuals aged, 24.1±6.3 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided equally into three groups: 10 subjects placed under active control conditions served as unrestricted ambulatory control subjects (UACS), 10 subjects submitted to an acute rigorous bed rest served as acute rigorous bed rested subjects (ARBRS) and 10 subjects submitted to a rigorous bed rest served as rigorous bed rested subjects (RBRS). The UACS were maintained under an average running distance of 9.7 km day -1. For the ARBR effect simulation, ARBRS were submitted abruptly to BR for 7 days. They did not have any prior knowledge of the exact date and time when they would be asked to confine to RBR. For the RBR effect simulation, RBRS were subjected to BR for 7 days on a predetermined date and time known to them right away from the start of the study. Plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma cortisol (PC), plasma aldosterone (PA), plasma and urinary sodium (Na) and potassium (K) levels, heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and arterial blood pressure (ABP) increased significantly, and urinary aldosterone (UA), stroke volume (SV) and plasma volume (PV) decreased significantly ( p<0.05) in ARBRS and RBRS as compared with their pre-BR values and the values in UACS. Electrolyte, hormonal and hemodynamic responses were significantly ( p<0.05) greater and occurred significantly faster ( p<0.05) during ARBR than RBR. Parameters change insignificantly ( p>0.05) in UACS compared with pre-BR control values. It was concluded that, the more abruptly muscular activity is restricted in experimental subjects

  7. Hemodynamic responses to amygdaloid stimulation in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Galeno, T M; Brody, M J

    1983-08-01

    Our studies were done to determine 1) the regional hemodynamic effects of stimulating the central amygdaloid nucleus in conscious and anesthetized rats and 2) whether these effects differ between normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Flow was recorded with miniaturized pulsed Doppler probes placed on the renal and superior mesenteric arteries and the lower abdominal aorta. In rats anesthetized with Dialurethane, electrical stimulation elicited a depressor response accompanied by a decrease in hindquarter vascular resistance, with little or no change in heart rate or renal or mesenteric resistance in both SHR and WKY. By contrast, in conscious rats, stimulation was accompanied by a pressor response, tachycardia, and renal and mesenteric vasoconstriction in both groups. Hindquarter vascular resistance was unchanged in WKY and decreased at higher frequencies in SHR. There were no significant differences between SHR and WKY, whether anesthetized or awake, in hemodynamic responses to amygdaloid stimulation. Despite previous evidence indicating that the central amygdaloid nucleus contributes to the development of spontaneous hypertension, our results show that stimulation of this region does not elicit exaggerated cardiovascular responses in SHR.

  8. Estimating Hemodynamic Responses to the Wingate Test Using Thoracic Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Bovee, Curtis; DeBoe, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Techniques including direct Fick and Doppler echocardiography are frequently used to assess hemodynamic responses to exercise. Thoracic impedance has been shown to be a noninvasive alternative to these methods for assessing these responses during graded exercise to exhaustion, yet its feasibility during supramaximal bouts of exercise is relatively unknown. We used thoracic impedance to estimate stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) during the Wingate test (WAnT) and compared these values to those from graded exercise testing (GXT). Active men (n = 9) and women (n = 7) (mean age = 24.8 ± 5.9 yr) completed two Wingate tests and two graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. During exercise, heart rate (HR), SV, and CO were continuously estimated using thoracic impedance. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to identify potential differences in hemodynamic responses across protocols. Results: Maximal SV (138.6 ± 37.4 mL vs. 135.6 ± 26.9 mL) and CO (24.5 ± 6.1 L·min-1 vs. 23.7 ± 5.1 L·min-1) were similar (p > 0.05) between repeated Wingate tests. Mean maximal HR was higher (p < 0.01) for GXT (185 ± 7 b·min-1) versus WAnT (177 ± 11 b·min-1), and mean SV was higher in response to WAnT (137.1 ± 32.1 mL) versus GXT (123.0 ± 32.0 mL), leading to similar maximal cardiac output between WAnT and GXT (23.9 ± 5.6 L·min-1 vs. 22.5 ± 6.0 L·min-1). Our data show no difference in hemodynamic responses in response to repeated administrations of the Wingate test. In addition, the Wingate test elicits similar cardiac output compared to progressive cycling to VO2max. Key points Measurement of cardiac output (CO), the rate of oxygen transport delivered by the heart to skeletal muscle, is not widely-employed in Exercise Physiology due to the level of difficulty and invasiveness characteristic of most techniques used to measure this variable. Nevertheless, thoracic impedance has been shown to provide a noninvasive and simpler approach to continuously

  9. Phonocardiographic Assessment of Hemodynamic Response to Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Howard S.; Ferguson, James J.

    1990-01-01

    The time to systolic murmur peak is a clinical index that is useful in assessing the severity of valvular aortic stenosis. To determine whether phonocardiography could be used to detect a change in the timing of the murmur and thus to measure hemodynamic improvements in elderly balloon aortic valvuloplasty patients, we retrospectively reviewed phonocardiographic tracings of 18 patients taken before and after the procedure. Ten men and 8 women were included in the study; the mean age was 80.7 ± 11.2 years (range, 64 to 90). Phonocardiographic signals were digitized, and the R-wave to murmur peak interval (R-MP) was measured. In 11 patients, the R-MP decreased (mean decrease, 16% ± 11%): of these, 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in mean gradient; 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in peak-to-peak gradient; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 38%. Seven patients had an increase in R-MP (mean increase, 10% ± 9%): of these, 6 had a decrease in mean gradient of less than 25%; 6 had a decrease in peak-to-peak gradient of less than 25%; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 21%. Pre- and post-balloon aortic valvuloplasty heart rates were not significantly different (71 ± 8 beats/min versus 73 ± 5 beats/min). In this study, hemodynamic improvements after valvuloplasty were manifested by a reduction in the R-MP interval. We conclude that phonocardiography may be a practical, noninvasive method of assessing the hemodynamic response to balloon aortic valvuloplasty. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:42-7) PMID:15227188

  10. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  11. Optimal hemodynamic response model for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Muhammad A.; Jeong, Myung Yung; Mannan, Malik M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging non-invasive brain imaging technique and measures brain activities by means of near-infrared light of 650–950 nm wavelengths. The cortical hemodynamic response (HR) differs in attributes at different brain regions and on repetition of trials, even if the experimental paradigm is kept exactly the same. Therefore, an HR model that can estimate such variations in the response is the objective of this research. The canonical hemodynamic response function (cHRF) is modeled by two Gamma functions with six unknown parameters (four of them to model the shape and other two to scale and baseline respectively). The HRF model is supposed to be a linear combination of HRF, baseline, and physiological noises (amplitudes and frequencies of physiological noises are supposed to be unknown). An objective function is developed as a square of the residuals with constraints on 12 free parameters. The formulated problem is solved by using an iterative optimization algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters in the model. Inter-subject variations in HRF and physiological noises have been estimated for better cortical functional maps. The accuracy of the algorithm has been verified using 10 real and 15 simulated data sets. Ten healthy subjects participated in the experiment and their HRF for finger-tapping tasks have been estimated and analyzed. The statistical significance of the estimated activity strength parameters has been verified by employing statistical analysis (i.e., t-value > tcritical and p-value < 0.05). PMID:26136668

  12. Hemodynamic responses during and after multiple sets of stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Tainah P.; Farinatti, Paulo T.V.; Rubini, Ercole C.; Silva, Elirez B.; Monteiro, Walace D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the acute hemodynamic responses to multiple sets of passive stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. METHODS: Fifteen healthy men aged 21 to 29 years with poor flexibility performed stretching protocols comprising 10 sets of maximal passive unilateral hip flexion, sustained for 30 seconds with equal intervals between sets. Protocols without and with the Valsalva maneuver were applied in a random counterbalanced order, separated by 48-hour intervals. Hemodynamic responses were measured by photoplethysmography pre-exercise, during the stretching sets, and post-exercise. RESULTS: The effects of stretching sets on systolic and diastolic blood pressure were cumulative until the fourth set in protocols performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. The heart rate and rate pressure product increased in both protocols, but no additive effect was observed due to the number of sets. Hemodynamic responses were always higher when stretching was performed with the Valsalva maneuver, causing an additional elevation in the rate pressure product. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sets of unilateral hip flexion stretching significantly increased blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product values. A cumulative effect of the number of sets occurred only for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, at least in the initial sets of the stretching protocols. The performance of the Valsalva maneuver intensified all hemodynamic responses, which resulted in significant increases in cardiac work during stretching exercises. PMID:26039949

  13. Central amygdaloid nucleus lesion attenuates exaggerated hemodynamic responses to noise stress in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Galeno, T M; Van Hoesen, G W; Brody, M J

    1984-01-23

    The regional hemodynamic basis of the cardiovascular response to acute noise stress in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and the role of the central amygdaloid nucleus in mediating this response was investigated. Using the pulsed Doppler flow probe technique it was determined that in response to noise, SHR exhibit a significantly greater percent increase in renal and mesenteric vascular resistance than WKY. Vascular responses in the hindquarter were similar in both groups. Bilateral lesion of the central amygdaloid nucleus or its output pathways to the brainstem decreased the cardiovascular response to noise in both SHR and WKY, with SHR and WKY lesion rats responding similarly. The central amygdaloid nucleus appears to participate in the cardiovascular response to acute noise stress in SHR and WKY. Although other structures in the limbic system network may contribute to integration of responses that involve the amygdala the present data suggest that this structure may play a central role in mediating the exaggerated cardiovascular responsiveness of SHR to environmental stress.

  14. Clinical predictive factors of sildenafil response: a penile hemodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Elhanbly, S M; Elkholy, A A-M; Alghobary, M; Abou Al-Ghar, M

    2015-03-01

    Phosphodiestrase-5 inhibitors are an important line of treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED). To detect the clinical and hemodynamic predictors of sildenafil response, we conducted this study on 124 Egyptian men with ED. All patients were evaluated by thorough history and clinical assessment with measurement of the abridged international index of erectile function-5 (IIEF-5) score. All patients were then subjected to intracavernosal injection (ICI) of trimix and pharmaco-penile duplex ultrasonography (PPDU). Patients were then classified into sildenafil responders and non-responders after six consecutive doses of 100 mg sildenafil. On doing the binary logistic stepwise regression analysis, only ED duration, IIEF-5 score, and response to ICI were the significant independent predictors of sildenafil response. These three parameters together correctly predicted the sildenafil response by 81.5% (p value <0.001). With the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis, the cut-off value of ED duration was 2.5 years and it was 14 for the IIEF-5 score. These findings indicate that ED duration, the IIEF-5 score and response to ICI are more significant predictors of sildenafil response than the more expensive and time-consuming PPDU testing. PMID:25644869

  15. Hemodynamic Changes during a Deep Inspiration Maneuver Predict Fluid Responsiveness in Spontaneously Breathing Patients

    PubMed Central

    Préau, Sébastien; Dewavrin, Florent; Soland, Vincent; Bortolotti, Perrine; Colling, Delphine; Chagnon, Jean-luc; Durocher, Alain; Saulnier, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We hypothesized that the hemodynamic response to a deep inspiration maneuver (DIM) indicates fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing (SB) patients. Design. Prospective study. Setting. ICU of a general hospital. Patients. Consecutive nonintubated patients without mechanical ventilation, considered for volume expansion (VE). Intervention. We assessed hemodynamic status at baseline and after VE. Measurements and Main Results. We measured radial pulse pressure (PP) using an arterial catheter and peak velocity of femoral artery flow (VF) using continuous Doppler. Changes in PP and VF induced by a DIM (ΔPPdim and ΔVFdim) were calculated in 23 patients. ΔPPdim and ΔVFdim ≥12% predicted responders to VE with sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100%. Conclusions. In a restricted population of SB patients with severe sepsis or acute pancreatitis, ΔPPdim and ΔVFdim are accurate indices for predicting fluid responsiveness. These results should be confirmed in a larger population before validating their use in current practice. PMID:22195286

  16. Hemodynamic Responses and Perceived Exertion During Continuous and Discontinuous Resistance Exercise.

    PubMed

    Massaferri, R; Matos-Santos, L; Farinatti, P; Monteiro, W D

    2015-11-01

    This study compared acute responses of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), total peripheral resistance (TPR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during resistance exercise performed continuously and discontinuously. Hemodynamic responses and RPE were assessed in the last of 4 sets of 12 repetitions of the knee extension with load corresponding to 70% of 12 repetition maximum, performed continuously (C) or discontinuously, with pauses of 5 s (D5) or 10 s (D10) interspersed in the middle of sets. The increase in SBP was higher for D10 (34.0±8.4%) and D5 (34.1±13.2%) vs. C (19.8±10.3%; P<0.001), while no difference was detected for DBP. Q (P=0.03) and SV (P=0.02) were higher, but HR was lower (P=0.04) in discontinuous vs. continuous. TPR remained stable during continuous, but significant decreases occurred during the pauses in the discontinuous protocols (P<0.001). The BP was higher in discontinuous than in continuous protocols, but the RPE was attenuated in discontinuous compared to continuous exercise. In conclusion, hemodynamic responses were exacerbated during resistance exercise performed discontinuously, but the perceived exertion was lowered.

  17. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, U.; Burke, E. J.; Butler, B. D.; Davis, K. L.; Katz, J.; Melamed, E.; Morris, W. P.; Allen, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 yr ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 degrees down (LLR-10 degrees; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  18. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, Uwe; Burke, Edward J.; Butler, Bruce D.; Davis, Karen L.; Katz, Jeffrey; Melamed, Evan; Morris, William P.; Allen, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 years ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 deg down (LLR-10 deg; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  19. Hemodynamic and adrenergic responses of bevantolol and propranolol in hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Snedden, W; Fernandez, P G; Vasdev, S; Bolli, P

    1989-01-01

    The hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses of 21 thiazide-resistant hypertensives receiving sequential chronic therapy with propranolol and bevantolol, a new cardioselective beta-1 blocker, were studied and compared with their responses to placebo. The objective was to determine to what extent decreased circulation levels of catecholamines and renin activity contributed to the hypotensive action of bevantolol and whether it demonstrated a significant sparing effect on vascular resistance. Both propranolol and bevantolol lowered supine and erect blood pressures to a comparable extent but the response of diastolic pressure to upright posture was maintained. Resting heart rates were lowered and postural tachycardia was attenuated. Propranolol induced a greater decrease in forearm blood flow and greater increase in vascular resistance than bevantolol. Both drug therapies were associated with lowered plasma concentrations of noradrenaline and adrenaline, while the decrease in noradrenaline levels was linearly related to the fall of mean arterial pressure for both drugs. Plasma renin activity was lowered only to a marginal extent by either drug but aldosterone concentrations were significantly reduced to a comparable extent by both drugs. The results suggest that a negative chronotropic action on the heart and an overall reduction in sympathetic nervous tone both contribute to the hypotensive effects of bevantolol and propranolol, but reduction of plasma renin activity may be of lesser importance. Bevantolol demonstrated a significant vascular sparing effect in this patient group compared with propranolol.

  20. Gender affects sympathetic and hemodynamic response to postural stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Khan, M.; Kimmerly, D. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in sympathetic reflex responses to head-up tilt (HUT) between males (n = 9) and females (n = 8) were associated with decrements in postural vasomotor responses in women. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography), heart rate, stroke volume (SV; Doppler), and blood pressure (Finapres) were measured during a progressive HUT protocol (5 min at each of supine, 20 degrees, 40 degrees, and 60 degrees ). MSNA and hemodynamic responses were also measured during the cold pressor test (CPT) to examine nonbaroreflex neurovascular control. SV was normalized to body surface area (SV(i)) to calculate the index of cardiac output (Q(i)), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). During HUT, heart rate increased more in females versus males (P < 0.001) and SV(i) and Q(i) decreased similarly in both groups. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased to a lesser extent in females versus males in the HUT (P < 0.01) but increases in TPR during HUT were similar. MSNA burst frequency was lower in females versus males in supine (P < 0.03) but increased similarly during HUT. Average amplitude/burst increased in 60 degrees HUT for males but not females. Both males and females demonstrated an increase in MAP as well as MSNA burst frequency, mean burst amplitude, and total MSNA during the CPT. However, compared with females, males demonstrated a greater neural response (DeltaTotal MSNA) due to a larger increase in mean burst amplitude (P < 0.05). Therefore, these data point to gender-specific autonomic responses to cardiovascular stress. The different MSNA response to postural stress between genders may contribute importantly to decrements in blood pressure control during HUT in females.

  1. Gender affects sympathetic and hemodynamic response to postural stress.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, J K; Hogeman, C S; Khan, M; Kimmerly, D S; Sinoway, L I

    2001-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in sympathetic reflex responses to head-up tilt (HUT) between males (n = 9) and females (n = 8) were associated with decrements in postural vasomotor responses in women. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography), heart rate, stroke volume (SV; Doppler), and blood pressure (Finapres) were measured during a progressive HUT protocol (5 min at each of supine, 20 degrees, 40 degrees, and 60 degrees ). MSNA and hemodynamic responses were also measured during the cold pressor test (CPT) to examine nonbaroreflex neurovascular control. SV was normalized to body surface area (SV(i)) to calculate the index of cardiac output (Q(i)), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). During HUT, heart rate increased more in females versus males (P < 0.001) and SV(i) and Q(i) decreased similarly in both groups. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased to a lesser extent in females versus males in the HUT (P < 0.01) but increases in TPR during HUT were similar. MSNA burst frequency was lower in females versus males in supine (P < 0.03) but increased similarly during HUT. Average amplitude/burst increased in 60 degrees HUT for males but not females. Both males and females demonstrated an increase in MAP as well as MSNA burst frequency, mean burst amplitude, and total MSNA during the CPT. However, compared with females, males demonstrated a greater neural response (DeltaTotal MSNA) due to a larger increase in mean burst amplitude (P < 0.05). Therefore, these data point to gender-specific autonomic responses to cardiovascular stress. The different MSNA response to postural stress between genders may contribute importantly to decrements in blood pressure control during HUT in females. PMID:11668064

  2. [Peculiarities of face regional hemodynamics in treatment of acute purulent jaw odontogenic periostitis].

    PubMed

    Fedotov, S N; Sukhanov, A E; Konkina, M A; Iakovlev, V E

    2010-01-01

    53 patients were under observation with acute purulent jaw odontogenic periostitis. In 27 out of them after operation as drainage material strips of napkin were used, containing as the active components metronidazol, dimexide and sodium alginate. Curative process efficacy evaluation was done according to the data of hemodynamic study (determination of the artery's diameter, maximal systolic speed and index of circulatory resistance) of the magistral face arteries. It was established that in the group of patients with rational treatment blood circulation in face arterial vessels was restored most actively than in the control group with the use of traditional treatment scheme.

  3. Glomerular hemodynamic alterations during acute hyperinsulinemia in normal and diabetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, B. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Thies, R. S.; Collins, R. C.; Blantz, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of insulin dependent diabetes invariably requires exogenous insulin to control blood glucose. Insulin treatment, independent of other factors associated with insulin dependent diabetes, may induce changes that affect glomerular function. Due to exogenous delivery of insulin in insulin dependent diabetes entering systemic circulation prior to the portal vein, plasma levels of insulin are often in excess of that observed in non-diabetics. The specific effects of hyperinsulinemia on glomerular hemodynamics have not been previously examined. Micropuncture studies were performed in control (non-diabetic), untreated diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats 7 to 10 days after administration of 65 mg/kg body weight streptozotocin. After the first period micropuncture measurements were obtained, 5 U of regular insulin (Humulin-R) was infused i.v., and glucose clamped at euglycemic values (80 to 120 mg/dl). Blood glucose concentration in non-diabetic controls was 99 +/- 6 mg/dl. In control rats, insulin infusion and glucose clamp increased nephron filtration rate due to decreases in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance (afferent greater than efferent) resulting in increased plasma flow and increased glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient. However, insulin infusion and glucose clamp produced the opposite effect in both untreated and insulin-treated diabetic rats with afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction resulting in decreases in plasma flow, glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient and nephron filtration rate. Thromboxane A2 (TX) synthetase inhibition partially decreased the vasoconstrictive response due to acute insulin infusion in diabetic rats preventing the decrease in nephron filtration rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  4. Bayesian estimation of the hemodynamic response function in functional MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrelec, G.; Benali, H.; Ciuciu, P.; Poline, J.-B.

    2002-05-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a recent, non-invasive technique allowing for the evolution of brain processes to be dynamically followed in various cognitive or behavioral tasks. In BOLD fMRI, what is actually measured is only indirectly related to neuronal activity through a process that is still under investigation. A convenient way to analyze BOLD fMRI data consists of considering the whole brain as a system characterized by a transfer response function, called the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF). Precise and robust estimation of the HRF has not been achieved yet: parametric methods tend to be robust but require too strong constraints on the shape of the HRF, whereas non-parametric models are not reliable since the problem is badly conditioned. We therefore propose a full Bayesian, non-parametric method that makes use of basic but relevant a priori knowledge about the underlying physiological process to make robust inference about the HRF. We show that this model is very robust to decreasing signal-to-noise ratio and to the actual noise sampling distribution. We finally apply the method to real data, revealing a wide variety of HRF shapes.

  5. Insulin sensitivity and hemodynamic responses to insulin in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pître, M; Nadeau, A; Bachelard, H

    1996-10-01

    The insulin-mediated vasodilator effect has been proposed as an important physiological determinant of insulin action on glucose disposal in normotensive humans. The present study was designed to further examine the acute regional hemodynamic effects of insulin in different vascular beds and to explore the relationships between insulin vascular effects and insulin sensitivity during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps in conscious normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The rats were instrumented with intravascular catheters and pulsed Doppler flow probes to measure blood pressure, heart rate, and regional blood flows. In WKY rats, the euglycemic infusion of insulin (4 and 16 mU.kg-1.min-1) causes vasodilations in renal and hindquarter vascular beds but no changes in mean blood pressure, heart rate, or superior mesenteric vascular conductance. In contrast, in SHR, the same doses of insulin produce vasoconstrictions in superior mesenteric and hindquarter vascular beds and, at high doses, increase blood pressure. Moreover, at the lower dose of insulin tested, we found a reduction in the insulin sensitivity index in the SHR compared with the WKY rats. The present findings provide further evidence for an association between insulin sensitivity and insulin-mediated hemodynamic responses.

  6. Acute effect of cycling intervention on carotid arterial hemodynamics: basketball athletes versus sedentary controls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the acute effects of a cycling intervention on carotid arterial hemodynamics between basketball athletes and sedentary controls. Methods Ten young long-term trained male basketball athletes (BA) and nine age-matched male sedentary controls (SC) successively underwent four bouts of exercise on a bicycle ergometer at the same workload. Hemodynamic variables at right common carotid artery were determined at rest and immediately following each bout of exercise. An ANCOVA was used to compare differences between the BA and SC groups at rest and immediately following the cycling intervention. The repeated ANOVA was used to assess differences between baseline and each bout of exercise within the BA or SC group. Results In both groups, carotid hemodynamic variables showed significant differences at rest and immediately after the cycling intervention. At rest, carotid arterial stiffness was significantly decreased and carotid arterial diameter was significantly increased in the BA group as compared to the SC group. Immediately following the cycling intervention, carotid arterial stiffness showed no obvious changes in the BA group but significantly increased in the SC group. It is worth noting that while arterial stiffness was lower in the BA group than in the SC group, the oscillatory shear index (OSI) was significantly higher in the BA group than in the SC group both at rest and immediately following the cycling intervention. Conclusion Long-term basketball exercise had a significant impact on common carotid arterial hemodynamic variables not only at rest but also after a cycling intervention. The role of OSI in the remodeling of arterial structure and function in the BA group at rest and after cycling requires clarification. PMID:25602805

  7. ACUTE IMPROVEMENT IN HEMODYNAMIC CONTROL AFTER OSTEOPATHIC MANIPULATIVE TREATMENT IN THE THIRD TRIMESTER OF PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Kendi L.; Pacchia, Christina F.; Smith, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The physiological changes that occur during pregnancy, including increased blood volume and cardiac output, can affect hemodynamic control, most profoundly with positional changes that affect venous return to the heart. By using Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT), a body-based modality theorized to affect somatic structures related to nervous and circulatory systems, we hypothesized that OMT acutely improves both autonomic and hemodynamic control during head-up tilt and heel raise in women at 30 weeks gestation. Design One hundred subjects were recruited at 30 weeks gestation. Setting The obstetric clinics of UNTHealth in Fort Worth, Texas. Intervention Subjects were randomized into one of three treatment groups: OMT, placebo ultrasound, or time control. Ninety subjects had complete data (N=25, 31 and 34 in each group respectively). Main outcome measures Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded during 5 min of head-up tilt followed by 4 min of intermittent heel raising. Results No significant differences in blood pressure, heart rate or heart rate variability were observed between groups with tilt before or after treatment (p>0.36), and heart rate variability was not different between treatment groups (p>0.55). However, blood pressure increased significantly (p=0.02) and heart rate decreased (p<0.01) during heel raise after OMT compared to placebo or time control. Conclusions These data suggest that OMT can acutely improve hemodynamic control during engagement of the skeletal muscle pump and this was most likely due to improvement of structural restrictions to venous return. PMID:24280470

  8. Acute hemodynamic effects and blood pool kinetics of polystyrene microspheres following intravenous administration

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, J.D.; Kanke, M.; Simmons, G.H.; DeLuca, P.P.

    1981-06-01

    The acute hemodynamic effect of intravenous administration of polystyrene microspheres was investigated and correlated with their distribution pattern and kinetics. Microspheres of three diameters (3.4, 7.4, and 11.6 micrometer) were administered. The 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres were filtered by the pulmonary capillary network following intravenous administration, the majority during the first pass. There was no significant hemodynamic effect following administrations of the 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres in doses as high as 3.0 X 10(9) and 6.1 X 10(8) respectively (total cross-sectional area of 1.3 X 10(11) and 6.4 X 10(10) micrometer2, respectively). Intravenous administration of 3.4-micrometer diameter microspheres produced significant dose-dependent systemic hypotension and depression of myocardial performance at dosages as slow as 1.0 X 10(10) (cross-sectional area of 9.1 X 10(10) micrometer2). These differences in acute hemodynamic effect from the 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres may be due to the differences in distribution kinetics and fate of the 3.4-micrometer diameter microspheres, which readily pass through the lungs to the spleen. Although elimination of the smaller spheres from the blood during the first 6-8 min was rapid, i.e., t 1/2 . 1.62 and 1.72 min from the venous and arterial blood circulation, respectively, levels of 10(3) spheres/g of blood were present in the circulation for greater than 1 hr. These findings must be considered in the planning of intravenous administration of microspheres as a drug delivery system to target organs.

  9. [Hemodynamics after prindolol and digitalis in acute myocardial infarction (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bachour, G; Bender, F; Hochrein, H

    1976-03-01

    In 20 patients with acute myocardial infarction hemodynamic controls were performed after digitalisation and following i.v. injection of 0,4 mg of Prindolol. Circulatory changes were most pronounced 5-15 min after Prindolol injection and consisted of decrease in heart rate of 7%, mean arterial blood pressure of 6%, cardiac output of 10,5%, stroke volume index of 5,1% and left ventricular work of 18%. An increase of pulmonary wedge pressure of 17%, pulmonary pressure of 9%, mean right atrial pressure of 16% and peripheral arterial resistance of 6% were calculated. In 5 cases a favourable effect on extrasystoles and in 2 cases on sinus tachycardia were observed. Not infrequently, during the initial phase of acute myocardial infarction, a hyperadrenergic state may be noted. Prindolol may be indicated, when circulatory changes or arrhythmias are suspect to be the result of this hyperadrenergic stimulation. A simultaneous digitalisation may inhibit a more intensive cardiodepression. PMID:57564

  10. Saturation thresholds of evoked neural and hemodynamic responses in awake and asleep rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schei, Jennifer L.; Van Nortwick, Amy S.; Meighan, Peter C.; Rector, David M.

    2011-03-01

    Neural activation generates a hemodynamic response to the localized region replenishing nutrients to the area. Changes in vigilance state have been shown to alter the vascular response where the vascular response is muted during wake compared to quiet sleep. We tested the saturation thresholds of the neurovascular response in the auditory cortex during wake and sleep by chronically implanting rats with an EEG electrode, a light emitting diode (LED, 600 nm), and photodiode to simultaneously measure evoked response potentials (ERPs) and evoked hemodynamic responses. We stimulated the cortex with a single speaker click delivered at random intervals 2-13 s at varied stimulus intensities ranging from 45-80 dB. To further test the potential for activity related saturation, we sleep deprived animals for 2, 4, or 6 hours and recorded evoked responses during the first hour recovery period. With increasing stimulus intensity, integrated ERPs and evoked hemodynamic responses increased; however the hemodynamic response approached saturation limits at a lower stimulus intensity than the ERP. With longer periods of sleep deprivation, the integrated ERPs did not change but evoked hemodynamic responses decreased. There may be physical limits in cortical blood delivery and vascular compliance, and with extended periods of neural activity during wake, vessels may approach these limits.

  11. Self-reported tolerance influences prefrontal cortex hemodynamics and affective responses.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between cognitive and sensory processes in the brain contributes to the regulation of affective responses (pleasure-displeasure). Exercise can be used to manipulate sensory processes (by increasing physiological demand) in order to examine the role of dispositional traits that may influence an individual's ability to cognitively regulate these responses. With the use of near infrared spectroscopy, in this study we examined the influence of self-reported tolerance upon prefrontal cortex (PFC) hemodynamics and affective responses. The hemodynamic response was measured in individuals with high or low tolerance during an incremental exercise test. Sensory manipulation was standardized against metabolic processes (ventilatory threshold [VT] and respiratory compensation point [RCP]), and affective responses were recorded. The results showed that the high-tolerance group displayed a larger hemodynamic response within the right PFC above VT (which increased above RCP). The low-tolerance group showed a larger hemodynamic response within the left PFC above VT. The high-tolerance group reported a more positive/less negative affective response above VT. These findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence of differential hemodynamic responses within the PFC that are associated with tolerance in the presence of increased physiological demands. This study supports the role of dispositional traits and previous theorizing into the underlying mechanisms (cognitive vs. sensory processes) of affective responses. PMID:26337703

  12. Clinical Implications of Cluster Analysis-Based Classification of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Correlation with Bedside Hemodynamic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tariq; Desai, Nihar; Wilson, Francis; Schulte, Phillip; Dunning, Allison; Jacoby, Daniel; Allen, Larry; Fiuzat, Mona; Rogers, Joseph; Felker, G. Michael; O’Connor, Christopher; Patel, Chetan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Classification of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is based on subjective criteria that crudely capture disease heterogeneity. Improved phenotyping of the syndrome may help improve therapeutic strategies. Objective To derive cluster analysis-based groupings for patients hospitalized with ADHF, and compare their prognostic performance to hemodynamic classifications derived at the bedside. Methods We performed a cluster analysis on baseline clinical variables and PAC measurements of 172 ADHF patients from the ESCAPE trial. Employing regression techniques, we examined associations between clusters and clinically determined hemodynamic profiles (warm/cold/wet/dry). We assessed association with clinical outcomes using Cox proportional hazards models. Likelihood ratio tests were used to compare the prognostic value of cluster data to that of hemodynamic data. Results We identified four advanced HF clusters: 1) male Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, multiple comorbidities, lowest B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels; 2) females with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, few comorbidities, most favorable hemodynamics; 3) young African American males with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, most adverse hemodynamics, advanced disease; and 4) older Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, concomitant renal insufficiency, highest BNP levels. There was no association between clusters and bedside-derived hemodynamic profiles (p = 0.70). For all adverse clinical outcomes, Cluster 4 had the highest risk, and Cluster 2, the lowest. Compared to Cluster 4, Clusters 1–3 had 45–70% lower risk of all-cause mortality. Clusters were significantly associated with clinical outcomes, whereas hemodynamic profiles were not. Conclusions By clustering patients with similar objective variables, we identified four clinically relevant phenotypes of ADHF patients, with no discernable relationship to hemodynamic profiles, but distinct associations with adverse outcomes. Our analysis

  13. Hemodynamic responses to continuous versus pulsatile mechanical unloading of the failing left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Carlo R; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Litwak, Kenneth N; Sobieski, Michael; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C

    2010-01-01

    Debate exists regarding the merits and limitations of continuous versus pulsatile flow mechanical circulatory support. To characterize the hemodynamic differences between each mode of support, we investigated the acute effects of continuous versus pulsatile unloading of the failing left ventricle in a bovine model. Heart failure was induced in male calves (n = 14). During an acute study, animals were instrumented through thoracotomy for hemodynamic measurement. A continuous flow (n = 8) and/or pulsatile flow (n = 8) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) was implanted and studied during maximum support ( approximately 5 L/min) and moderate support ( approximately 2-3 L/min) modes. Pulse pressure (PP), surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE), and (energy equivalent pressure [EEP]/mean aortic pressure (MAP) - 1) x 100% were derived to characterize hemodynamic energy profiles during the different support modes. Standard hemodynamic parameters of cardiac performance were also derived. Data were analyzed by repeated measures one-way analysis of variance within groups and unpaired Student's t-tests across groups. During maximum and moderate continuous unloading, PP, SHE, and (EEP/MAP - 1) x 100% were significantly decreased compared with baseline and compared with pulsatile unloading. As a result, continuous unloading significantly altered left ventricular peak systolic pressure, aortic systolic and diastolic pressure, +/-dP/dt, and rate x pressure product, whereas pulsatile unloading preserved a normal profile of physiologic values. As continuous unloading increased, the pressure-volume relationship collapsed, and the aortic valve remained closed. In contrast, as pulsatile unloading increased, a comparable decrease in left ventricular volumes was noted. However, a normal range of left ventricular pressures was preserved. Continuous unloading deranged the physiologic profile of myocardial and vascular hemodynamic energy utilization, whereas pulsatile unloading preserved more

  14. Mayer waves reduce the accuracy of estimated hemodynamic response functions in functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino; Boas, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of cerebral hemodynamics reveals a wide spectrum of oscillations ranging from 0.0095 to 2 Hz. While most of these oscillations can be filtered out during analysis of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals when estimating stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses, oscillations around 0.1 Hz are an exception. This is due to the fact that they share a common spectral range with typical stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses from the brain. Here we investigate the effect of hemodynamic oscillations around 0.1 Hz on the estimation of hemodynamic response functions from fNIRS data. Our results show that for an expected response of ~1 µM in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), Mayer wave oscillations with an amplitude > ~1 µM at 0.1 Hz reduce the accuracy of the estimated response as quantified by a 3 fold increase in the mean squared error and decrease in correlation (R2 below 0.78) when compared to the true HRF. These results indicate that the amplitude of oscillations at 0.1 Hz can serve as an objective metric of the expected HRF estimation accuracy. In addition, we investigated the effect of short separation regression on the recovered HRF, and found that this improves the recovered HRF when large amplitude 0.1 Hz oscillations are present in fNIRS data. We suspect that the development of other filtering strategies may provide even further improvement. PMID:27570699

  15. Mayer waves reduce the accuracy of estimated hemodynamic response functions in functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Meryem A; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M; Lin, Pei-Yi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino; Boas, David A

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of cerebral hemodynamics reveals a wide spectrum of oscillations ranging from 0.0095 to 2 Hz. While most of these oscillations can be filtered out during analysis of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals when estimating stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses, oscillations around 0.1 Hz are an exception. This is due to the fact that they share a common spectral range with typical stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses from the brain. Here we investigate the effect of hemodynamic oscillations around 0.1 Hz on the estimation of hemodynamic response functions from fNIRS data. Our results show that for an expected response of ~1 µM in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), Mayer wave oscillations with an amplitude > ~1 µM at 0.1 Hz reduce the accuracy of the estimated response as quantified by a 3 fold increase in the mean squared error and decrease in correlation (R(2) below 0.78) when compared to the true HRF. These results indicate that the amplitude of oscillations at 0.1 Hz can serve as an objective metric of the expected HRF estimation accuracy. In addition, we investigated the effect of short separation regression on the recovered HRF, and found that this improves the recovered HRF when large amplitude 0.1 Hz oscillations are present in fNIRS data. We suspect that the development of other filtering strategies may provide even further improvement. PMID:27570699

  16. “Reverse McConnell’s Sign”: Interpreting Interventricular Hemodynamic Dependency and Guiding the Management of Acute Heart Failure during Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kan; Sun, Zhongxia; Wei, Tiemin

    2015-01-01

    Although most patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) have benign clinical course and prognosis, TTC can induce acute heart failure and hemodynamic instability. TTC mimics the clinical features of acute anterior wall myocardial infarction (AMI). Bedside clinicians often have a diagnostic dilemma when cardiac catheterization and angiography are either contraindicated or can cause potential adverse consequences. Misdiagnosing TTC as AMI will lead to initiation of harmful pharmacological or device-based treatment, which worsens hemodynamic compromise. Therefore, understanding and interpreting the unique pathophysiological and hemodynamic features of TTC in a better manner becomes crucial to guide effective clinical management of acute heart failure/cardiogenic shock during TTC. We review recent advances in echocardiographic diagnosis of TTC and its role in guiding bedside management of acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock, with specific focus on the interpretation of discrepant, but reciprocally dependent, left and right ventricular hemodynamics during acute stages of TTC. PMID:25861229

  17. [Piretanide in chronic and acute decompensated heart failure. Effect on hemodynamics and vasoactive hormones].

    PubMed

    Sievert, H; Hopf, R; Vens-Cappell, F; Kirsten, R; Nelson, K; Pooth, R; Kaltenbach, M

    1989-06-15

    Eight patients with chronic heart failure classified as NYHA class II to III (group 1) and nine patients with acute decompensated heart failure classified as NYHA class IV (group 2) were treated with piretanide at a dosage of 12 mg administered intravenously. In both groups the level of prostaglandine PGE2 as well as plasma renine activity significantly increased prior to the onset of diuresis. The percentage increase was more pronounced in group 1 which had lower baseline values. With a time-lag, the norepinephrine plasma level also increased significantly. During the first 30 minutes there was only little effect on blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac output in patients with chronic heart failure (group 1). Only after 60 minutes there was a significant decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 39 +/- 17 to 33 +/- 18 mm Hg; p less than 0.05). In patients with acute decompensated heart failure (group 2) piretanide led to a significant reduction in mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 42 +/- 13 to 37 +/- 12 mm Hg; p less than 0.05) within 15 minutes after administration, i.e. even prior to the onset of diuresis. Thus, the administration of piretanide had a positive effect on hemodynamics in patients with chronic as well as in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Significant improvement prior to diuresis onset, however, was only found in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These effects may be explained by a stimulation of prostaglandines which promote vasodilation. They are increased by the diuresis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The acute effect of maximal exercise on central and peripheral arterial stiffness indices and hemodynamics in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Melo, Xavier; Fernhall, Bo; Santos, Diana A; Pinto, Rita; Pimenta, Nuno M; Sardinha, Luís B; Santa-Clara, Helena

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the effects of a bout of maximal running exercise on arterial stiffness in children and adults. Right carotid blood pressure and artery stiffness indices measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index α and β (echo-tracking), contralateral carotid blood pressure, and upper and lower limb and central/aortic PWV (applanation tonometry) were taken at rest and 10 min after a bout of maximal treadmill running in 34 children (7.38 ± 0.38 years) and 45 young adults (25.22 ± 0.91 years) having similar aerobic potential. Two-by-two repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were used to detect differences with exercise between groups. Carotid pulse pressure (PP; η(2) = 0.394) increased more in adults after exercise (p < 0.05). Compliance (η(2) = 0.385) decreased in particular in adults and in those with high changes in distending pressure, similarly to stiffness index α and β. Carotid PWV increased more in adults and was related to local changes in PP but not mean arterial pressure (MAP). Stiffness in the lower limbs decreased (η(2) = 0.115) but apparently only in those with small MAP changes (η(2) = 0.111). No significant exercise or group interaction effects were found when variables were adjusted to height. An acute bout of maximal exercise can alter arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in the carotid artery and within the active muscle beds. Arterial stiffness and hemodynamic response to metabolic demands during exercise in children simply reflect their smaller body size and may not indicate a particular physiological difference compared with adults. PMID:26842667

  19. Effects of prostaglandin inhibition on intrarenal hemodynamics in acutely saline-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Düsing, R; Melder, B; Kramer, H J

    1977-09-01

    We studied the effect of inhibition of the prostaglandin (PG)-synthesizing enzyme system in female Sprague-Dawley rats following acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume (ECV). In 57 conscious rats expansion of the ECV with isotonic saline corresponding to an increase in body weight of 10% was induced. Prior to ECV expansion 31 rats received indomethacin (10 mg/kg of body wt) by stomach tube. In six non-ECV-expanded rats indomethacin had no effect on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF). In ECV-expanded rats pretreated with indomethacin, GFR was unaltered but 125I-hippuran clearance decreased, and filtration fraction significantly increased. Intrarenal 86Rb distribution was similar in control and ECV-expanded rats. Indomethacin caused a slight increase in relative cortical 86 RB activity in non-ECV-expanded rats, but had no effect on intrarenal 86Rb distribution in ECV-expanded rats. No difference in intracortical glomerular perfusion was noted between control and ECV-expanded rats. In indomethacin-treated ECV-expanded rats an increase in relative inner cortical perfusion was observed. Absolute perfusion remained unaltered. Thus the decrease in total RPF was entirely due to decreased perfusion of outer cortical nephrons. Renal prostaglandins therefore may play a permissive role for physical factors to promote renal sodium excretion in acute ECV expansion via changes in intrarenal hemodynamics. PMID:890884

  20. Augmentation of sensory-evoked hemodynamic response in an early Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Based on enlarged blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in cognitively normal subjects at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), compensatory neuronal hyperactivation has been proposed as an early marker for diagnosis of AD. The BOLD response results from neurovascular coupling, i.e., hemodynamic response induced by neuronal activity. However, there has been no evidence of task-induced increases in hemodynamic response in animal models of AD. Here, we observed an augmented hemodynamic response pattern in a transgenic AβPP(SWE)/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD using three in vivo imaging methods: intrinsic optical signal imaging, multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, and laser Doppler flowmetry. Sensory stimulation resulted in augmented and prolonged hemodynamic responses in transgenic mice evidenced by changes in total, oxygenated, and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This difference between transgenic and wild-type mice was significant at 7 months of age when amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy had developed but not at younger or older ages. Correspondingly, sensory stimulation-induced pial arteriole diameter was also augmented and prolonged in transgenic mice at 7 months of age. Cerebral blood flow response in transgenic mice was augmented but not prolonged. These results are consistent with the existence of BOLD signal hyperactivation in non-demented AD-risk human subjects, supporting its potential use as an early diagnostic marker of AD.

  1. Intraoperative brain hemodynamic response assessment with real-time hyperspectral optical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurence, Audrey; Pichette, Julien; Angulo-Rodríguez, Leticia M.; Saint Pierre, Catherine; Lesage, Frédéric; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Leblond, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Following normal neuronal activity, there is an increase in cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume to provide oxygenated hemoglobin to active neurons. For abnormal activity such as epileptiform discharges, this hemodynamic response may be inadequate to meet the high metabolic demands. To verify this hypothesis, we developed a novel hyperspectral imaging system able to monitor real-time cortical hemodynamic changes during brain surgery. The imaging system is directly integrated into a surgical microscope, using the white-light source for illumination. A snapshot hyperspectral camera is used for detection (4x4 mosaic filter array detecting 16 wavelengths simultaneously). We present calibration experiments where phantoms made of intralipid and food dyes were imaged. Relative concentrations of three dyes were recovered at a video rate of 30 frames per second. We also present hyperspectral recordings during brain surgery of epileptic patients with concurrent electrocorticography recordings. Relative concentration maps of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin were extracted from the data, allowing real-time studies of hemodynamic changes with a good spatial resolution. Finally, we present preliminary results on phantoms obtained with an integrated spatial frequency domain imaging system to recover tissue optical properties. This additional module, used together with the hyperspectral imaging system, will allow quantification of hemoglobin concentrations maps. Our hyperspectral imaging system offers a new tool to analyze hemodynamic changes, especially in the case of epileptiform discharges. It also offers an opportunity to study brain connectivity by analyzing correlations between hemodynamic responses of different tissue regions.

  2. Hemodynamic and ADH responses to central blood volume shifts in cardiac-denervated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Thompson, C. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Savin, W. M.; Gordon, E. P.; Haskell, W. L.; Schroeder, J. S.; Sandler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes designed to induce blood volume shifts in ten cardiac transplant recipients to assess the contribution of cardiac and vascular volume receptors in the control of ADH secretion. Each subject underwent 15 min of a control period in the seated posture, then assumed a lying posture for 30 min at 6 deg head down tilt (HDT) followed by 20 min of seated recovery. Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions (echocardiography) were taken at 0 and 15 min before HDT, 5, 15, and 30 min of HDT, and 5, 15, and 30 min of seated recovery. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Resting plasma volume (PV) was measured by Evans blue dye and percent changes in PV during posture changes were calculated from changes in hematocrit. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded every 2 min. Results indicate that cardiac volume receptors are not the only mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute blood volume shifts in man.

  3. Depth-resolved optical imaging of hemodynamic response in mouse brain with microcirculatory beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Nettleton, Rosemary; Rosenberg, Mara; Boudreau, Eilis; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    Optical hemodynamic imaging employed in pre-clinical studies with high spatial and temporal resolution is significant to unveil the functional activities of brain and the mechanism of internal or external stimulus effects in diverse pathological conditions and treatments. Most current optical systems only resolve hemodynamic changes within superficial macrocirculatory beds, such as laser speckle contrast imaging; or only provide vascular structural information within microcirculatory beds, such as multi-photon microscopy. In this study, we introduce a hemodynamic imaging system based on Optical Micro-angiography (OMAG) which is capable of resolving and quantifying 3D dynamic blood perfusion down to microcirculatory level. This system can measure the optical phase shifts caused by moving blood cells in microcirculation. Here, the utility of OMAG was demonstrated by monitoring the hemodynamic response to alcohol administration in mouse prefrontal cortex. Our preliminary results suggest that the spatiotemporal tracking of cerebral micro-hemodynamic using OMAG can be successfully applied to the mouse brain and reliably distinguish between vehicle and alcohol stimulation experiment.

  4. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (‑17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution.

  5. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (-17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution. PMID:27503416

  6. Flexibly combined optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle system for comprehensive imaging of hemodynamic and metabolic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Qin, Jia; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    We have proposed and developed a multi-modal non-invasive biomedical optical imager. It was combined from the subsystems of optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging. The system was designed to maintain the performances of both subsystems. It was capable of simultaneously imaging the hemodynamic and metabolic responses in tissue environment in vivo. To achieve such requirements, we utilized unique optical setup, such as paired dichroic mirrors to compensate dispersion, additional relay lens to increase working distance and translational sample probe to freely select imaging area and focal plane. The multi-functionality of the system was demonstrated in an investigation of hemodynamic and metabolic responses on an acute wound healing model in mouse pinna in vivo. The microvasculature, blood flow and hemoglobin concentration from millimeter down to capillary level were comprehensively visualized. The captured instantaneous responses to wound onset differed greatly between localized areas; after that blood flow had a rebalance tendency, and hemoglobin concentration dynamically recovered to baseline situation.

  7. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-shan; Li, Su-zhi; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (−17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution. PMID:27503416

  8. Optical coherence tomography angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers.

    PubMed

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Thapa, Damber; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-08-01

    Blood flow changes are highly related to neural activities in the retina. It has been reported that neural activity increases when flickering light stimulation of the retina is used. It is known that blood flow changes with flickering light stimulation can be altered in patients with vascular disease and that measurement of flicker-induced vasodilatation is an easily applied tool for monitoring functional microvascular alterations. However, details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood due to the limitation of existing techniques. In this study, flickering light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to investigate stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography imaging system was developed to provide dynamic mapping of hemodynamic responses in the ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, outer plexiform layer and choroid layer before, during and after flickering light stimulation. Experimental results showed hemodynamic responses with different magnitudes and time courses in individual retinal layers. We anticipate that the dynamic OCT angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses can greatly foster the study of neurovascular coupling mechanisms in the retina, promising new biomarkers for retinal disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:27570706

  9. Hemodynamic Responses Associated with Post-exercise Hypotension in Normotensive Black Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headley, Samuel A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the hemodynamic responses during recovery from moderate intensity exercise in young Black normotensive males. Nineteen normotensive men (age 24-26 years) walked continuously on a treadmill for 40 minutes at 50-60 percent heart rate reserve. Following exercise, blood pressure (by auscultation) and…

  10. Optical coherence tomography angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers

    PubMed Central

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Thapa, Damber; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow changes are highly related to neural activities in the retina. It has been reported that neural activity increases when flickering light stimulation of the retina is used. It is known that blood flow changes with flickering light stimulation can be altered in patients with vascular disease and that measurement of flicker-induced vasodilatation is an easily applied tool for monitoring functional microvascular alterations. However, details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood due to the limitation of existing techniques. In this study, flickering light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to investigate stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography imaging system was developed to provide dynamic mapping of hemodynamic responses in the ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, outer plexiform layer and choroid layer before, during and after flickering light stimulation. Experimental results showed hemodynamic responses with different magnitudes and time courses in individual retinal layers. We anticipate that the dynamic OCT angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses can greatly foster the study of neurovascular coupling mechanisms in the retina, promising new biomarkers for retinal disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:27570706

  11. Hemodynamic response of children with attention-deficit and hyperactive disorder (ADHD) to emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroko; Nakato, Emi; Kanazawa, So; Shimamura, Keiichi; Sakuta, Yuiko; Sakuta, Ryoichi; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2014-10-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have difficulty recognizing facial expressions. They identify angry expressions less accurately than typically developing (TD) children, yet little is known about their atypical neural basis for the recognition of facial expressions. Here, we used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to examine the distinctive cerebral hemodynamics of ADHD and TD children while they viewed happy and angry expressions. We measured the hemodynamic responses of 13 ADHD boys and 13 TD boys to happy and angry expressions at their bilateral temporal areas, which are sensitive to face processing. The ADHD children showed an increased concentration of oxy-Hb for happy faces but not for angry faces, while TD children showed increased oxy-Hb for both faces. Moreover, the individual peak latency of hemodynamic response in the right temporal area showed significantly greater variance in the ADHD group than in the TD group. Such atypical brain activity observed in ADHD boys may relate to their preserved ability to recognize a happy expression and their difficulty recognizing an angry expression. We firstly demonstrated that NIRS can be used to detect atypical hemodynamic response to facial expressions in ADHD children.

  12. Ethanol consumption impairs the hemodynamic response to hemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Toshiko; Kasai, Kentaro

    2013-02-01

    Alcohol intoxication can exacerbate hemodynamic instability following hemorrhagic shock. Impairment of hormonal, neurohumoral, and immune responses can contribute to such instability; however, the relationship between blood alcohol levels and the progression of hemorrhagic shock accompanied with these responses has not been clearly demonstrated. Herein, we examined this relationship in rats treated with various dose of alcohol. After oral administration of alcohol and then hemorrhage, the recovery of mean blood pressure (MBP); increase in plasma level of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and vasopressin; and survival interval decreased in a dose-dependent manner as the blood alcohol level increased. There were no significant differences in the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β among the groups. The present results demonstrated alcohol aggravates hemorrhagic shock in a dose-dependent manner not by alerting the immune response, but by suppressing hormonal and neurohumoral responses, thereby inhibiting hemodynamic autoregulation and shortening the survival interval.

  13. Physiological responses to environmental factors related to space flight. [hemodynamic and metabolic responses to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    Physiological base line data are established, and physiological procedures and instrumentation necessary for the automatic measurement of hemodynamic and metabolic parameters during prolonged periods of weightlessness are developed.

  14. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on pulmonary hemodynamics after acute lung injury in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Romand, J.A.; Pinsky, M.R.; Firestone, L.; Zar, H.A.; Lancaster, J.R. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mismatch in ventilation-to-perfusion ratio characterize acute lung injury (ALI). Pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) decreases when nitric oxide (NO) is inhaled during hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV); thus NO inhalation may reduce PVR and improve gas exchange in ALI. The authors studied the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of NO inhalation during HPV and then ALI in eight anesthetized open-chest mechanically ventilated dogs. Right atrial pressure, Ppa, and left ventricular and arterial pressures were measured, and cardiac output was estimated by an aortic flow probe. Shunt and dead space were also estimated. The effect of 5-min exposures to 0, 17, 28, 47, and 0 ppm inhaled NO was recorded during hyperoxia, hypoxia, and oleic acid-induced ALI. During ALI, partial [beta]-adrenergic blockage (propanolol, 0.15 mg/kg iv) was induced and 74 ppm NO was inhaled. Nitrosylhemoglobin (NO-Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) levels were measured. During hyperoxia, NO inhalation had no measurable effects. Hypoxia increased Ppa and calculated PVR, both of which decreased with 17 ppm NO. ALI decreased arterial Po[sub 2] and increased airway pressure, shunt, and dead space ventilation. Ppa and PVR were greater during ALI than during hyperoxia. NO inhalation had no measurable effect during ALI before or after [beta]-adrenergic blockage. MetHb remained low, and NO-Hb was unmeasurable. Bolus infusion of nitroglycerin (15 [mu]g) induced an immediate decrease in Ppa and PVR during ALI. Short-term NO inhalation does not affect PVR or gas exchange in dogs with oleic acid-induced ALI, nor does it increase NO-Hb or MetHb. In contrast, NO can diminish hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary vascular tone. These data suggest that NO inhalation selectively dilates the pulmonary circulation and specifically reduces HPV but not oleic acid-induced increases in pulmonary vasomotor tone. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Hemodynamic results of acute thoracic aortomyoplasty in a canine model: comparison of stimulation regimens.

    PubMed

    Dumcius, Arimantas; Bavarskis, Egidijus; Bytautas, Algimantas; Chekanov, Valeri

    2003-01-01

    Our previous investigations in a sheep model demonstrated that when electrical stimulation (ES) was applied to a newly mobilized latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) in a work-rest regimen and at a rate of 15 contractions per minute, it did not damage this muscle. This regimen was used twice during a 60 minute period, once a day for 16 days, with no LDM damage. The goal of our current investigation was to apply this regimen in studies of acute thoracic aortomyoplasty. In two experimental groups, we mobilized the LDM but left it in situ. Two hours later, contractile force (CF) testing (20 g/kg preload, six impulses per burst) was performed until CF dropped to 50% of baseline. Recovery time needed to completely restore CF was calculated. In one group (six sheep), we applied continuous ES; in another (six sheep), we applied ES in a work-rest regimen (1 min work, 1 min rest). In two other groups of six dogs each, aortomyoplasty was performed; the LDM flap was subjected to ES immediately postoperatively (six impulses per burst; ventricular-LDM delay, 290 ms). Again, one group received continuous ES, and the other received work-rest ES. In the mobilized LDM under continuous ES, CF decreased to 50% of baseline values after 52 +/- 8 minutes, and returned to baseline after 84 +/- 16 minutes of rest. Under the work-rest regimen, this decrease took 105 +/- 8 minutes, and the return to baseline took 25 +/- 6 minutes (p < 0.05). In LDM subjected to work-rest ES, light microscopy revealed no additional damage to LDM tissue than was seen immediately after mobilization. However, LDM subjected to continuous ES had evidence of increased basophilic degeneration and wavy fibers. After acute thoracic aortomyoplasty, assisted hemodynamic values under the continuous ES exceeded unassisted values for only 40 minutes, compared with 100 minutes for work-rest ES (p < 0.05). When counterpulsation was completed, for continuous ES, recovery time to baseline was 96 +/- 9 minutes; for work-rest ES, it

  16. Abnormal hemodynamic response to forepaw stimulation in rat brain after cocaine injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Park, Kicheon; Choi, Jeonghun; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous measurement of hemodynamics is of great importance to evaluate the brain functional changes induced by brain diseases such as drug addiction. Previously, we developed a multimodal-imaging platform (OFI) which combined laser speckle contrast imaging with multi-wavelength imaging to simultaneously characterize the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygenated- and deoxygenated- hemoglobin (HbO and HbR) from animal brain. Recently, we upgraded our OFI system that enables detection of hemodynamic changes in response to forepaw electrical stimulation to study potential brain activity changes elicited by cocaine. The improvement includes 1) high sensitivity to detect the cortical response to single forepaw electrical stimulation; 2) high temporal resolution (i.e., 16Hz/channel) to resolve dynamic variations in drug-delivery study; 3) high spatial resolution to separate the stimulation-evoked hemodynamic changes in vascular compartments from those in tissue. The system was validated by imaging the hemodynamic responses to the forepaw-stimulations in the somatosensory cortex of cocaine-treated rats. The stimulations and acquisitions were conducted every 2min over 40min, i.e., from 10min before (baseline) to 30min after cocaine challenge. Our results show that the HbO response decreased first (at ~4min) followed by the decrease of HbR response (at ~6min) after cocaine, and both did not fully recovered for over 30min. Interestingly, while CBF decreased at 4min, it partially recovered at 18min after cocaine administration. The results indicate the heterogeneity of cocaine's effects on vasculature and tissue metabolism, demonstrating the unique capability of optical imaging for brain functional studies.

  17. Imaging hemodynamic response after ischemic stroke in mouse cortex using visible-light optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siyu; Liu, Qi; Shu, Xiao; Soetikno, Brian; Tong, Shanbao; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Visible-light optical coherence tomography (Vis-OCT) is an emerging technology that can image hemodynamic response in microvasculature. Vis-OCT can retrieve blood oxygen saturation (sO2) mapping using intrinsic optical absorption contrast while providing high-resolution anatomical vascular structures at the same time. To improve the accuracy of Vis-OCT oximetry on vessels embedded in highly scattering medium, i.e., brain cortex, we developed and formulated a novel dual-depth sampling and normalization strategy that allowed us to minimize the detrimental effect of ubiquitous tissue scattering. We applied our newly developed approach to monitor the hemodynamic response in mouse cortex after focal photothrombosis. We observed vessel dilatation, which was negatively correlated with the original vessel diameter, in the penumbra region. The sO2 of vessels in the penumbra region also dropped below normal range after focal ischemia.

  18. Imaging hemodynamic response after ischemic stroke in mouse cortex using visible-light optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siyu; Liu, Qi; Shu, Xiao; Soetikno, Brian; Tong, Shanbao; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Visible-light optical coherence tomography (Vis-OCT) is an emerging technology that can image hemodynamic response in microvasculature. Vis-OCT can retrieve blood oxygen saturation (sO2) mapping using intrinsic optical absorption contrast while providing high-resolution anatomical vascular structures at the same time. To improve the accuracy of Vis-OCT oximetry on vessels embedded in highly scattering medium, i.e., brain cortex, we developed and formulated a novel dual-depth sampling and normalization strategy that allowed us to minimize the detrimental effect of ubiquitous tissue scattering. We applied our newly developed approach to monitor the hemodynamic response in mouse cortex after focal photothrombosis. We observed vessel dilatation, which was negatively correlated with the original vessel diameter, in the penumbra region. The sO2 of vessels in the penumbra region also dropped below normal range after focal ischemia. PMID:27699105

  19. Acute hemodynamic effects of inhaled sodium nitrite in pulmonary hypertension associated with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marc A.; Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Nouraie, Mehdi; Bachman, Timothy N.; White, Pamela M.; Sugahara, Masataka; Gorcsan, John; Parsley, Ed L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with poor outcomes, yet specific treatments only exist for a small subset of patients. The most common form of PH is that associated with left heart disease (Group 2), for which there is no approved therapy. Nitrite has shown efficacy in preclinical animal models of Group 1 and 2 PH, as well as in patients with left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a potentially novel inhaled formulation of nitrite in PH-HFpEF patients as compared with Group 1 and 3 PH. METHODS. Cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were recorded after acute administration of inhaled nitrite at 2 doses, 45 and 90 mg. Safety endpoints included change in systemic blood pressure and methemoglobin levels. Responses were also compared with those administered inhaled nitric oxide. RESULTS. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (10 PH-HFpEF, 20 Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension patients on background PH-specific therapy, and 6 Group 3 PH). Drug administration was well tolerated. Nitrite inhalation significantly lowered pulmonary, right atrial, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. There was a modest decrease in cardiac output and systemic blood pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance decreased only in Group 3 PH patients. There was substantial increase in pulmonary artery compliance, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. CONCLUSIONS. Inhaled nitrite is safe in PH patients and may be efficacious in PH-HFpEF and Group 3 PH primarily via improvements in left and right ventricular filling pressures and pulmonary artery compliance. The lack of change in pulmonary vascular resistance likely may limit efficacy for Group 1 patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01431313 FUNDING. This work was supported in part by the NIH grants P01HL103455 (to MAS and MTG), R01HL098032 (to MTG), and R01HL096973 (to MTG), and Mast Therapeutics, Inc. PMID

  20. GSK-3α directly regulates β-adrenergic signaling and the response of the heart to hemodynamic stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jibin; Lal, Hind; Chen, Xiongwen; Shang, Xiying; Song, Jianliang; Li, Yingxin; Kerkela, Risto; Doble, Bradley W.; MacAulay, Katrina; DeCaul, Morgan; Koch, Walter J.; Farber, John; Woodgett, James; Gao, Erhe; Force, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) family of serine/threonine kinases consists of 2 highly related isoforms, α and β. Although GSK-3β has an important role in cardiac development, much remains unknown about the function of either GSK-3 isoform in the postnatal heart. Herein, we present what we believe to be the first studies defining the role of GSK-3α in the mouse heart using gene targeting. Gsk3a–/– mice over 2 months of age developed progressive cardiomyocyte and cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction. Following thoracic aortic constriction in young mice, we observed enhanced hypertrophy that rapidly transitioned to ventricular dilatation and contractile dysfunction. Surprisingly, markedly impaired β-adrenergic responsiveness was found at both the organ and cellular level. This phenotype was reproduced by acute treatment of WT cardiomyocytes with a small molecule GSK-3 inhibitor, confirming that the response was not due to a chronic adaptation to LV dysfunction. Thus, GSK-3α appears to be the central regulator of a striking range of essential processes, including acute and direct positive regulation of β-adrenergic responsiveness. In the absence of GSK-3α, the heart cannot respond effectively to hemodynamic stress and rapidly fails. Our findings identify what we believe to be a new paradigm of regulation of β-adrenergic signaling and raise concerns given the rapid expansion of drug development targeting GSK-3. PMID:20516643

  1. Renal hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to urapidil in hypertensive man

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, P.W.; van Es, P.N.; de Bruyn, H.A.; Birkenhaeger, W.H.D.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the acute effects of urapidil on renal vascular tone and on pressor systems we performed a randomized placebo-controlled crossover study in 8 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension. Each subject received, on two separate days one week apart, an intravenous injection of either placebo or urapidil (25 mg, to be increased to 50 mg if blood pressure did not fall within 5 minutes). Before and following this injection we measured blood pressure and heart rate (Dinamap), renal plasma flow (/sup 125/I-hippuran), renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and catecholamines. The results show that urapidil, when compared to placebo, significantly reduced blood pressure, while increasing heart rate, renal blood flow, noradrenaline and adrenaline. Dopamine levels, on the other hand, were suppressed. While renin and angiotensin II were only mildly stimulated, aldosterone levels increased markedly. It is concluded that urapidil, given intravenously, has an immediate blood pressure lowering effect associated with a fall in renal vascular tone and an increase in renal perfusion. As a consequence both the sympathetic system and the renin-angiotensin system are stimulated, although the latter only to a mild degree. The rise in aldosterone may be related to withdrawal of dopaminergic tone.

  2. Exploring diazepam's effect on hemodynamic responses of mouse brain tissue by optical spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple duel-optical spectroscopic imaging apparatus capable of simultaneously determining relative changes in brain oxy-and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations was used following administration of the anxiolytic compound diazepam in mice with strong dominant (Dom) and submissive (Sub) behavioral traits. Three month old mice (n = 30) were anesthetized and after 10 min of baseline imaging, diazepam (1.5 mg/kg) was administered and measurements were taken for 80 min. The mouse head was illuminated by white light based LED's and diffused reflected light passing through different channels, consisting of a bandpass filter and a CCD camera, respectively, was collected and analyzed to measure the hemodynamic response. This work's major findings are threefold: first, Dom and Sub animals showed statistically significant differences in hemodynamic response to diazepam administration. Secondly, diazepam was found to more strongly affect the Sub group. Thirdly, different time-series profiles were observed post-injection, which can serve as a possible marker for the groups' differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the effects of an anxiolytic drug on brain hemodynamic responses in mice using diffused light optical imaging. PMID:25071958

  3. Reduced Prefrontal Cortex Hemodynamic Response in Adults with Methamphetamine Induced Psychosis: Relevance for Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Naoko; Nakanishi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shohei; Ota, Toyosaku; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with methamphetamine abuse/dependence often exhibit high levels of impulsivity, which may be associated with the structural abnormalities and functional hypoactivities observed in the frontal cortex of these subjects. Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a simple and non-invasive method for characterizing the clinical features of various psychiatric illnesses, few studies have used NIRS to directly investigate the association between prefrontal cortical activity and inhibitory control in patients with methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MAP). Using a 24-channel NIRS system, we compared hemodynamic responses during the Stroop color-word task in 14 patients with MAP and 21 healthy controls matched for age, sex and premorbid IQ. In addition, we used the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11) to assess impulsivity between subject groups. The MAP group exhibited significantly less activation in the anterior and frontopolar prefrontal cortex accompanied by lower Stroop color-word task performance, compared with controls. Moreover, BIS-11 scores were significantly higher in the MAP group, and were negatively correlated with the hemodynamic responses in prefrontal cortex. Our data suggest that reduced hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might reflect higher levels of impulsivity in patients with MAP, providing new insights into disrupted inhibitory control observed in MAP. PMID:27050450

  4. Social cognition and prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a working memory task in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Itakura, Masashi; Yamanashi, Takehiko; Yamada, Sayaka; Masai, Mieko; Miura, Akihiko; Yamauchi, Takahira; Satake, Takahiro; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Roberts, David L.; Kaneko, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Social cognition is an important determinant of functional impairment in schizophrenia, but its relationship with the prefrontal functional abnormalities associated with the condition is still unclear. The present study aimed to explore the relationship between social cognition and prefrontal function in patients with schizophrenia using 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty-six patients with schizophrenia and 26 age-, gender-, and intelligence quotient-matched healthy controls (HCs) participated in the study. Hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal and superior temporal cortical regions were assessed during a working memory task using NIRS. Social cognition was assessed using the Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire (SCSQ). The observed hemodynamic responses were significantly reduced in the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), the frontopolar cortex, and temporal regions in subjects with schizophrenia compared to HCs. Additionally, lateral PFC hemodynamic responses assessed during the working memory task demonstrated a strong positive correlation with the SCSQ theory of mind (ToM) subscale score even after controlling for working memory performance. These results suggest that ToM integrity is closely related to lateral PFC functional abnormalities found in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, this study provides evidence to suggest that NIRS could be used to identify biomarkers of social cognition function in subjects with schizophrenia. PMID:26928254

  5. Hemodynamic responses can modulate the brain oscillations in low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Wang, Yi-Feng; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have showed that the steady-state responses were able to be used as an effective index for modulating the neural oscillations in the high frequency ranges (> 1 Hz). However, the neural oscillations in low frequency ranges (<1 Hz) remain unknown. In this study, a series of fNIRS experimental tests were conducted to validate if the low frequency bands (0.1 Hz - 0.8 Hz) steady-state hemoglobin responses (SSHbRs) could be evoked and modulate the neural oscillation during a serial reaction time (SRT) task.

  6. [Implantable hemodynamic monitoring devices].

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Butter, C

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure is one of the most frequent diagnoses in hospital admissions in Germany. In the majority of these admissions acute decompensation of an already existing chronic heart failure is responsible. New mostly wireless and remote strategies for monitoring, titration, adaptation and optimization are the focus for improvement of the treatment of heart failure patients and the poor prognosis. The implantation of hemodynamic monitoring devices follows the hypothesis that significant changes in hemodynamic parameters occur before the occurrence of acute decompensation requiring readmission. Three different hemodynamic monitoring devices have so far been investigated in clinical trials employing right ventricular pressure, left atrial pressure and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. Only one of these systems, the CardioMENS™ HF monitoring system, demonstrated a significant reduction of hospitalization due to heart failure over 6 months in the CHAMPION trial. The systematic adaptation of medication in the CHAMPION trial significantly differed from the usual care of the control arm over 6 months. This direct day to day management of diuretics is currently under intensive investigation; however, further studies demonstrating a positive effect on mortality are needed before translation of this approach into guidelines. Without this evidence a further implementation of pressure monitoring into currently used devices and justification of the substantial technical and personnel demands are not warranted.

  7. Empirical Evaluation of Visual Fatigue from Display Alignment Errors Using Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wiyor, Hanniebey D.; Ntuen, Celestine A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of stereoscopic display alignment errors on visual fatigue and prefrontal cortical tissue hemodynamic responses. We collected hemodynamic data and perceptual ratings of visual fatigue while participants performed visual display tasks on 8 ft × 6 ft NEC LT silver screen with NEC LT 245 DLP projectors. There was statistical significant difference between subjective measures of visual fatigue before air traffic control task (BATC) and after air traffic control task (ATC 3), (P < 0.05). Statistical significance was observed between left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex oxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-HbO2), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-Hbb), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (r DLPFC-Hbb) on stereoscopic alignment errors (P < 0.05). Thus, cortical tissue oxygenation requirement in the left hemisphere indicates that the effect of visual fatigue is more pronounced in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:27006917

  8. Hemodynamic responses to seated and supine lower body negative pressure - Comparison with +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polese, Alvese; Sandler, Harold; Montgomery, Leslie D.

    1992-01-01

    The hemodynamic responses to LBNP in seated subjects and in subjects in supine body positions were compared and were correlated with hemodynamic changes which occurred during a simulated (by centrifugation) Shuttle reentry acceleration with a slow onset rate of 0.002 G/s and during gradual onset exposures to +3 Gz and +4 Gz. Results demonstrate that seated LBNP at a level of -40 mm Hg can serve as a static simulator for changes in the heart rate and in mean blood pressure induced by gradual onset acceleration stress occurring during Shuttle reentry. The findings also provide a rationale for using LBNP during weightlessness as a means of imposing G-loading on the circulation prior to reentry.

  9. Hemodynamic and neurohormonal responses to extreme orthostatic stress in physically fit young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, E. K.; Goswami, N.; Rössler, A.; Vrecko, K.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    2009-04-01

    Blood pressure stability may be jeopardized in astronauts experiencing orthostatic stress. There is disagreement about cardiovascular and endocrine stress responses that emerge when a critical (presyncopal) state is reached. We studied hemodynamic and neurohormonal changes as induced by an orthostatic stress paradigm (head-up tilt combined with lower body negative pressure) that leads to a syncopal endpoint. From supine control to presyncope, heart rate increased by 78% and thoracic impedance by 12%. There was a 49% fall in stroke volume index, 19% in mean arterial blood pressure, 14% in total peripheral resistance index and 11% in plasma volume. Plasma norepinephrine rose by 107, epinephrine by 491, plasma renin activity by 167, and cortisol by 25%. Hemodynamic and hormonal changes of clearly different magnitude emerge in presyncope as compared to supine rest. Additional studies are warranted to reveal the exact time course of orthostatic changes up to syncopal levels.

  10. Functional imaging of hemodynamic stimulus response in the rat retina with ultrahigh-speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Baumann, Bernhard; Clermont, Allen C.; Feener, Edward P.; Boas, David A.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-03-01

    Measuring retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus is important for investigating pathophysiology in small animal models of diabetic retinopathy, because a reduction in the hyperemic response is thought to be one of the earliest changes in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we investigated functional imaging of retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus in the rat retina using an ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT system at 840nm with an axial scan rate of 244kHz. At 244kHz the nominal axial velocity range that could be measured without phase wrapping was +/-37.7mm/s. Pulsatile total retinal arterial blood flow as a function of time was measured using an en face Doppler approach where a 200μm × 200μm area centered at the central retinal artery was repeatedly raster scanned at a volume acquisition rate of 55Hz. Three-dimensional capillary imaging was performed using speckle decorrelation which has minimal angle dependency compared to other angiography techniques based on OCT phase information. During OCT imaging, a flicker stimulus could be applied to the retina synchronously by inserting a dichroic mirror in the imaging interface. An acute transient increase in total retinal blood flow could be detected. At the capillary level, an increase in the degree of speckle decorrelation in capillary OCT angiography images could also be observed, which indicates an increase in the velocity of blood at the capillary level. This method promises to be useful for the investigation of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  11. fNIRS derived hemodynamic signals and electrodermal responses in a sequential risk-taking task.

    PubMed

    Holper, Lisa; ten Brincke, Robert H W; Wolf, Martin; Murphy, Ryan O

    2014-04-01

    The study measured cortical hemodynamic signals and peripheral correlates of decision makers during a dynamic risky task, the Just One More task (JOM), in which the risky decision entails choosing whether to incrementally increase accumulated earnings at the risk of ruin (going bust ending up with nothing). Twenty subjects participated in multiple instantiations of this task in which the probability of ruin and size of the stakes varied. Physiological correlates were simultaneously quantified by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and electrodermal activity (EDA). First, in the task decision phase (i.e., when subjects are contemplating options before making a choice) probability of ruin had a dissociating effect on fNIRS and EDA. fNIRS derived DLPFC hemodynamic signals reflected a subjective value signal, correlating positively with individual risk attitude. Contrary, EDA reflected the probability of ruin in terms of a common affective measure, irrespective of individuals׳ risk attitude. Second, during the task outcome phase (i.e., the time after subjects have made a choice and observed the outcomes) fNIRS and EDA revealed opposite patterns. While fNIRS derived DLPFC hemodynamic signals were larger in response to gains, EDA signals were larger in response to losses; both patterns were statistically independent of individual risk attitude. Lastly, fNIRS derived DLPFC hemodynamic signals in the decision phase correlated positively with the mean round earnings, providing a measure of the quality of the individual decision-making performance. Together with the positive correlation with individual risk attitude, our findings indicate that fNIRS signals, but not EDA, could be taken as a useful method for studying individual risk attitude and task performance in dynamic risky decision-making. PMID:24530267

  12. Feasibility of In-Vivo Simulation of Acute Hemodynamics in Human Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sramko, Marek; Wichterle, Dan; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated hemodynamic feasibility and reproducibility of a new method for in vivo simulation of human atrial fibrillation (AF). The method was tested during sinus rhythm in 10 patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF. A simple electronic device was assembled that allowed triggering a cardiac stimulator by predefined series of RR intervals. Irregular RR interval sequences with a mean heart rate of 90/min and 130/min were obtained from ECG recordings of another patients with AF. Simultaneous atrioventricular pacing was delivered by catheters placed inside the coronary sinus and at the His bundle region. Hemodynamic effect of the simulated AF was assessed by invasive measurement of the left ventricular (LV) pressure, dP/dt, and Tau. Compared to regular pacing at the same mean heart rate, the simulated AF significantly impaired the LV both systolic and diastolic function. Repeated AF pacing in the same patients generated similar LV hemodynamics. The proposed method provides a realistic and reproducible in-vivo model of AF. It can be exploited for investigation of the hemodynamic consequences of AF in various patient populations. PMID:27764240

  13. Acute effects of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cantow, Kathleen; Pohlmann, Andreas; Flemming, Bert; Ferrara, Fabienne; Waiczies, Sonia; Grosenick, Dirk; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol is increasingly used as intravascular contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study details the impact of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. In 10 anesthetized rats, a single intravenous injection of isotonic saline (used as volume control) was followed by three consecutive injections of ferumoxytol to achieve cumulative doses of 6, 10, and 41 mg Fe/kg body mass. Arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygen tension were continuously measured. Regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was characterized by dedicated interventions: brief periods of suprarenal aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. None of the three doses of ferumoxytol resulted in significant changes in any of the measured parameters as compared to saline. Ferumoxytol did not significantly alter regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation as studied by aortic occlusion and hypoxia. The only significant effect of ferumoxytol at the highest dose was a blunting of the hyperoxia-induced increase in arterial pressure. Taken together, ferumoxytol has only marginal effects on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. This makes ferumoxytol a prime candidate as contrast agent for renal MRI including the assessment of renal blood volume fraction. PMID:27436132

  14. Effect of Lower Body Compression Garments on Hemodynamics in Response to Running Session

    PubMed Central

    Venckūnas, Tomas; Trinkūnas, Eugenijus; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Poderys, Jonas; Grūnovas, Albinas; Brazaitis, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Compression garments are often worn during exercise and allegedly have ergogenic and/or physiological effects. In this study, we compared hemodynamics and running performance while wearing compression and loose-fit breeches. We hypothesized that in neutral-warm environment compression breeches impair performance by diminishing body cooling via evaporative sweat loss and redistributing blood from active musculature to skin leading to a larger rise in body temperature and prolonging recovery of hemodynamics after exercise. Methods. Changes in hemodynamics (leg blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure during orthoclinostatic test), calf muscle tissue oxygenation, and skin and core temperatures were measured in response to 30 min running (simulation of aerobic training session) followed by maximal 400 m sprint (evaluation of running performance) in recreationally active females (25.1 ± 4.2 yrs; 63.0 ± 8.6 kg) wearing compression or loose-fit breeches in randomized fashion. Results. Wearing compression breeches resulted in larger skin temperature rise under the garment during exercise and recovery (by about 1°C, P < 0.05; statistical power > 85%), while core temperature dynamics and other measured parameters including circulation, running performance, and sensations were similar compared to wearing loose-fit breeches (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Compared with loose-fit breeches, compression breeches have neither positive nor negative physiological and performance effects for females running in thermoneutral environment. PMID:25202721

  15. Hemodynamic Flow-Induced Mechanotransduction Signaling Influences the Radiation Response of the Vascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Mohan; Aravindan, Natarajan; Sprague, Eugene A; Mohan, Sumathy

    2016-08-01

    Hemodynamic shear stress is defined as the physical force exerted by the continuous flow of blood in the vascular system. Endothelial cells, which line the inner layer of blood vessels, sense this physiological force through mechanotransduction signaling and adapt to maintain structural and functional homeostasis. Hemodynamic flow, shear stress and mechanotransduction signaling are, therefore, an integral part of endothelial pathophysiology. Although this is a well-established concept in the cardiovascular field, it is largely dismissed in studies aimed at understanding radiation injury to the endothelium and subsequent cardiovascular complications. We and others have reported on the differential response of the endothelium when the cells are under hemodynamic flow shear compared with static culture. Further, we have demonstrated significant differences in the gene expression of static versus shear-stressed irradiated cells in four key pathways, reinforcing the importance of shear stress in understanding radiation injury of the endothelium. This article further emphasizes the influence of hemodynamic shear stress and the associated mechanotransduction signaling on physiological functioning of the vascular endothelium and underscores its significance in understanding radiation injury to the vasculature and associated cardiac complications. Studies of radiation effect on endothelial biology and its implication on cardiotoxicity and vascular complications thus far have failed to highlight the significance of these factors. Factoring in these integral parts of the endothelium will enhance our understanding of the contribution of the endothelium to radiation biology. Without such information, the current approaches to studying radiation-induced injury to the endothelium and its consequences in health and disease are limited. PMID:27387860

  16. Visually evoked hemodynamical response and assessment of neurovascular coupling in the optic nerve and retina.

    PubMed

    Riva, Charles E; Logean, Eric; Falsini, Benedetto

    2005-03-01

    The retina and optic nerve are both optically accessible parts of the central nervous system. They represent, therefore, highly valuable tissues for studies of the intrinsic physiological mechanism postulated more than 100 years ago by Roy and Sherrington, by which neural activity is coupled to blood flow and metabolism. This article describes a series of animal and human studies that explored the changes in hemodynamics and oxygenation in the retina and optic nerve in response to increased neural activity, as well as the mechanisms underlying these changes. It starts with a brief review of techniques used to assess changes in neural activity, hemodynamics, metabolism and tissue concentration of various potential mediators and modulators of the coupling. We then review: (a) the characteristics of the flicker-induced hemodynamical response in different regions of the eye, starting with the optic nerve, the region predominantly studied; (b) the effect of varying the stimulus parameters, such as modulation depth, frequency, luminance, color ratio, area of stimulation, site of measurement and others, on this response; (c) data on activity-induced intrinsic reflectance and functional magnetic resonance imaging signals from the optic nerve and retina. The data undeniably demonstrate that visual stimulation is a powerful modulator of retinal and optic nerve blood flow. Exploring the relationship between vasoactivity and metabolic changes on one side and corresponding neural activity changes on the other confirms the existence of a neurovascular/neurometabolic coupling in the neural tissue of the eye fundus and reveals that the mechanism underlying this coupling is complex and multi-factorial. The importance of fully exploiting the potential of the activity-induced vascular changes in the assessment of the pathophysiology of ocular diseases motivated studies aimed at identifying potential mediators and modulators of the functional hyperemia, as well as conditions

  17. Hemodynamic Response Alteration As a Function of Task Complexity and Expertise—An fNIRS Study in Jugglers

    PubMed Central

    Carius, Daniel; Andrä, Christian; Clauß, Martina; Ragert, Patrick; Bunk, Michael; Mehnert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Detailed knowledge about online brain processing during the execution of complex motor tasks with a high motion range still remains elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hemodynamic responses within sensorimotor networks as well as in visual motion area during the execution of a complex visuomotor task such as juggling. More specifically, we were interested in how far the hemodynamic response as measured with functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) adapts as a function of task complexity and the level of the juggling expertise. We asked expert jugglers to perform different juggling tasks with different levels of complexity such as a 2-ball juggling, 3- and 5-ball juggling cascades. We here demonstrate that expert jugglers show an altered neurovascular response with increasing task complexity, since a 5-ball juggling cascade showed enhanced hemodynamic responses for oxygenated hemoglobin as compared to less complex tasks such as a 3- or 2-ball juggling pattern. Moreover, correlations between the hemodynamic response and the level of the juggling expertise during the 5-ball juggling cascade, acquired by cinematographic video analysis, revealed only a non-significant trend in primary motor cortex, indicating that a higher level of expertise might be associated with lower hemodynamic responses. PMID:27064925

  18. [Treatment of acute myocardial infarction with betareceptor blocking agents. I. Hemodynamic effects of Propranolol in combination with digitalis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Oeff, M; Lehmann, H U; Witt, E; Hochrein, H

    1981-06-01

    In the acute stage of transmural myocardial infarction, 22 patients ranging in age from 34 to 76 (mean 61.6) were given propranolol- because of its alleged myocardium-protecting properties - intravenously at a dosage of 0.03 to 0.1 mg/kg body weight under conditions of continuous hemodynamic control. Subsequently, the influence of digoxin, administered i. v. at a dosage of 0.01 my/kg body weight, on the negative-inotropic propranolol effects was examined. A hemodynamic comparison was made of the effects of propranolol before and after digitalis administration. In patients with compensated cardiac function (group 1, 16 patients), the propranolol-induced drop in the left ventricular stroke-work-index and rise in the left-ventricular filling pressure was completely compensated again by digitalis. The frequency-decreasing propranolol effect was nor influenced by digitalis. In patients with cardiac decompensation (group 2, 6 patients) digitalis only led to a renewed compensation of the left-ventricular stroke-work-index, the rise of the left-ventricular filling pressure remained unaffected. It follows from that, in cases of myocardial infarction without cardial decompensation, propranolol requires concomitant digitalisation. In cases of already existent myocardial insufficiency, propranolol can produce an unfavorable increase of the decompensation signs. PMID:7257499

  19. Hypertrophic response to hemodynamic overload: role of load vs. renin-angiotensin system activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Carabello, B. A.; Conrad, C. C.; Buckley, J. M.; DeFreyte, G.; Barnes, M.; Tomanek, R. J.; Wei, C. C.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is one of the basic mechanisms by which the heart compensates for hemodynamic overload. The mechanisms by which hemodynamic overload is transduced by the cardiac muscle cell and translated into cardiac hypertrophy are not completely understood. Candidates include activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin II receptor (AT1) stimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that load, independent of the RAS, is sufficient to stimulate cardiac growth. Four groups of cats were studied: 14 normal controls, 20 pulmonary artery-banded (PAB) cats, 7 PAB cats in whom the AT1 was concomitantly and continuously blocked with losartan, and 8 PAB cats in whom the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was concomitantly and continuously blocked with captopril. Losartan cats had at least a one-log order increase in the ED50 of the blood pressure response to angiotensin II infusion. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy was assessed using the RV mass-to-body weight ratio and ventricular cardiocyte size. RV hemodynamic overload was assessed by measuring RV systolic and diastolic pressures. Neither the extent of RV pressure overload nor RV hypertrophy that resulted from PAB was affected by AT1 blockade with losartan or ACE inhibition with captopril. RV systolic pressure was increased from 21 +/- 3 mmHg in normals to 68 +/- 4 mmHg in PAB, 65 +/- 5 mmHg in PAB plus losartan and 62 +/- 3 mmHg in PAB plus captopril. RV-to-body weight ratio increased from 0.52 +/- 0.04 g/kg in normals to 1.11 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB, 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus losartan and 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus captopril. Thus 1) pharmacological modulation of the RAS with losartan and captopril did not change the extent of the hemodynamic overload or the hypertrophic response induced by PAB; 2) neither RAS activation nor angiotensin II receptor stimulation is an obligatory and necessary component of the signaling pathway that acts as an intermediary coupling load to the

  20. Relationship between prefrontal hemodynamic responses and quality of life differs between melancholia and non-melancholic depression.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Noa; Mikawa, Wakako; Tsujimoto, Emi; Akashi, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Toru; Kirime, Eiji; Shirakawa, Osamu

    2016-07-30

    This study aimed to determine whether quality of life (QOL) reflects specific functional abnormalities of frontotemporal hemodynamic responses in melancholia. We recruited 30 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with melancholic features (MDD-MF), 52 with non-melancholic features (MDD-NMF), and 68 healthy control subjects who were matched for age, sex ratio, and years of education. QOL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and regional hemodynamic responses during a verbal fluency task were monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Patients with MDD-MF scored significantly lower than those with MDD-NMF on the role emotional domain of SF-36. Both MDD patient groups exhibited lower hemodynamic responses in the frontotemporal regions than the control group. Hemodynamic responses in the frontotemporal regions were significantly smaller in patients with MDD-MF than in those with MDD-NMF. The role emotional domain of patients with MDD-MF was significantly and positively correlated with hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal region, whereas that of patients with MDD-NMF revealed no significant correlation. In conclusion, our results indicate that patients with MDD-MF exhibit qualitatively distinct prefrontal dysfunction patterns associated with emotional role functioning compared with patients with MDD-NMF. PMID:27259838

  1. Renal extraction and acute effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on central and renal hemodynamics in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Ali; Simonsen, Lene; Asmar, Meena; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J; Frandsen, Erik; Moro, Cedric; Jonassen, Thomas; Bülow, Jens

    2015-04-15

    The present experiments were performed to elucidate the acute effects of intravenous infusion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 on central and renal hemodynamics in healthy men. Seven healthy middle-aged men were examined on two different occasions in random order. During a 3-h infusion of either GLP-1 (1.5 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) or saline, cardiac output was estimated noninvasively, and intraarterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured continuously. Renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, and uptake/release of hormones and ions were measured by Fick's Principle after catheterization of a renal vein. Subjects remained supine during the experiments. During GLP-1 infusion, both systolic blood pressure and arterial pulse pressure increased by 5±1 mmHg (P=0.015 and P=0.002, respectively). Heart rate increased by 5±1 beats/min (P=0.005), and cardiac output increased by 18% (P=0.016). Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate as well as the clearance of Na⁺ and Li⁺ were not affected by GLP-1. However, plasma renin activity decreased (P=0.037), whereas plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide were unaffected. Renal extraction of intact GLP-1 was 43% (P<0.001), whereas 60% of the primary metabolite GLP-1 9-36amide was extracted (P=0.017). In humans, an acute intravenous administration of GLP-1 leads to increased cardiac output due to a simultaneous increase in stroke volume and heart rate, whereas no effect on renal hemodynamics could be demonstrated despite significant extraction of both the intact hormone and its primary metabolite. PMID:25670826

  2. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation: Propacetamol versus Lidocaine—A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Nabavian, Omid; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Kord, Hadi; Vafainejad, Hossein; Kord Valeshabad, Reza; Reza Feili, Ali; Rezaei, Mehdi; Darabi, Hamed; Koohkan, Mohammad; Golbinimofrad, Poorya; Jafari, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of propacetamol on attenuating hemodynamic responses subsequent laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation compared to lidocaine. In this randomized clinical trial, 62 patients with the American Anesthesiologists Society (ASA) class I/II who required laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g/I.V./infusion (group P) or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg (group L) prior to laryngoscopy. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, before laryngoscopy and within nine minutes after intubation. In both groups P and L, MAP increased after laryngoscopy and the changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were significant changes of HR in both groups after intubation (P < 0.02), but the trend of changes was different between two groups (P < 0.001). In group L, HR increased after intubation and its change was statistically significant within 9 minutes after intubation (P < 0.001), while in group P, HR remained stable after intubation (P = 0.8). Propacetamol 2 gr one hour prior intubation attenuates heart rate responses after laryngoscopy but is not effective to prevent acute alterations in blood pressure after intubation. PMID:24822063

  3. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation: Propacetamol versus Lidocaine-A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Nabavian, Omid; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Kord, Hadi; Vafainejad, Hossein; Kord Valeshabad, Reza; Reza Feili, Ali; Rezaei, Mehdi; Darabi, Hamed; Koohkan, Mohammad; Golbinimofrad, Poorya; Jafari, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of propacetamol on attenuating hemodynamic responses subsequent laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation compared to lidocaine. In this randomized clinical trial, 62 patients with the American Anesthesiologists Society (ASA) class I/II who required laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g/I.V./infusion (group P) or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg (group L) prior to laryngoscopy. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, before laryngoscopy and within nine minutes after intubation. In both groups P and L, MAP increased after laryngoscopy and the changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were significant changes of HR in both groups after intubation (P < 0.02), but the trend of changes was different between two groups (P < 0.001). In group L, HR increased after intubation and its change was statistically significant within 9 minutes after intubation (P < 0.001), while in group P, HR remained stable after intubation (P = 0.8). Propacetamol 2 gr one hour prior intubation attenuates heart rate responses after laryngoscopy but is not effective to prevent acute alterations in blood pressure after intubation. PMID:24822063

  4. Multi-parametric imaging of cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic response followed by ischemic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    We use rodent parietal cortex as a model system and utilize a synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging (SDW-LSCI) technique to explore the hemodynamic response of infarct and penumbra to a brain injury (middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model). The SDW-LSCI system is able to take snapshots rapidly (maximum 500 Hz) over the entire brain surface, providing key information about the hemodynamic response, in terms of which it may be used to elucidate evolution of penumbra region from onsite to 90 min of MCAO. Changes in flow are quantified as to the flow experiencing physical occlusions of the MCA normalized to that of baseline. Furthermore, the system is capable of providing information as to the changes of the concentration of oxygenated, (HbO) deoxygenated (Hb), and total hemoglobin (HbT) in the cortex based on the spectral characteristics of HbO and Hb. We observe that the oxygenation variations in the four regions are detectable and distinct. Combining the useful information, four regions of interest (ROI), infarct, penumbra, reduced flow and contralateral portions in the brain upon ischemic injury may be differentiated. Implications of our results are discussed with respect to current understanding of the mechanisms underlying MCAO. We anticipate that SDW-LSCI holds promise for rapid and large field of view localization of ischemic injury.

  5. A numerical framework to investigate hemodynamics during endovascular mechanical recanalization in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Neidlin, Michael; Büsen, Martin; Brockmann, Carolin; Wiesmann, Martin; Sonntag, Simon J; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Kaufmann, Tim A S

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic stroke, caused by embolism of cerebral vessels, inflicts high morbidity and mortality. Endovascular aspiration of the blood clot is an interventional technique for the recanalization of the occluded arteries. However, the hemodynamics in the Circle of Willis (CoW) are not completely understood, which results in medical misjudgment and complications during surgeries. In this study we establish a multiscale description of cerebral hemodynamics during aspiration thrombectomy. First, the CoW is modeled as a 1D pipe network on the basis of computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans. Afterwards, a vascular occlusion is placed in the middle cerebral artery and the relevant section of the CoW is transferred to a 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) domain. A suction catheter in different positions is included in the CFD simulations. The boundary conditions of the 3D domain are taken from the 1D domain to ensure system coupling. A Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase simulation describes the process of thrombus aspiration. The physiological blood flow in the 1D and 3D domains is validated with literature data. Further on, it is proved that domain reduction and pressure coupling at the boundaries are an appropriate method to reduce computational costs. Future work will apply the developed framework to various clinical questions.

  6. A numerical framework to investigate hemodynamics during endovascular mechanical recanalization in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Neidlin, Michael; Büsen, Martin; Brockmann, Carolin; Wiesmann, Martin; Sonntag, Simon J; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Kaufmann, Tim A S

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic stroke, caused by embolism of cerebral vessels, inflicts high morbidity and mortality. Endovascular aspiration of the blood clot is an interventional technique for the recanalization of the occluded arteries. However, the hemodynamics in the Circle of Willis (CoW) are not completely understood, which results in medical misjudgment and complications during surgeries. In this study we establish a multiscale description of cerebral hemodynamics during aspiration thrombectomy. First, the CoW is modeled as a 1D pipe network on the basis of computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans. Afterwards, a vascular occlusion is placed in the middle cerebral artery and the relevant section of the CoW is transferred to a 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) domain. A suction catheter in different positions is included in the CFD simulations. The boundary conditions of the 3D domain are taken from the 1D domain to ensure system coupling. A Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase simulation describes the process of thrombus aspiration. The physiological blood flow in the 1D and 3D domains is validated with literature data. Further on, it is proved that domain reduction and pressure coupling at the boundaries are an appropriate method to reduce computational costs. Future work will apply the developed framework to various clinical questions. PMID:26420012

  7. Glomerular hemodynamics in established glycerol-induced acute renal failure in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfert, A I; Oken, D E

    1989-01-01

    The glomerular dynamic correlates of failed filtration were studied in volume replete rats with established glycerol-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Over one-half of all nephrons formed virtually no filtrate, while the single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) of fluid-filled nephrons, measured at the glomerulotubular junction to preclude the possibility of covert tubular leakage, averaged one-sixth of control (P less than 0.001). Even that low mean value was elevated by a few nephrons with a near normal SNGFR. Renal failure thus reflected both total filtration failure in the majority of nephrons and massively reduced filtration in most of the remainder. Glomerular capillary pressure (Pg) averaged some 14 mmHg below control (P less than 0.001), whereas the arterial colloid osmotic and Bowman's space pressures were not significantly altered. Renocortical and whole kidney blood flow were also unchanged. Marked internephron functional heterogeneity precluded estimates of the ultrafiltration coefficient. However, the fall in SNGFR correlated well with the markedly depressed Pg and afferent net filtration pressure (delta PnetA, P less than 0.001), which in turn were caused by increased preglomerular resistance and a reciprocal fall in efferent arteriolar resistance. This complex change in intrarenal resistances was largely, if not entirely, responsible for failed filtration in this ARF model. PMID:2592568

  8. Interrelation between Alterations in Pulmonary Mechanics and hemodynamics in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Interiano, Benjamin; Hyde, Richard W.; Hodges, Morrison; Yu, Paul N.

    1973-01-01

    Pulmonary mechanics were evaluated in 30 patients with acute myocardial infarction by measuring forced expiratory flow rates and total pulmonary resistance (RT) with the oscillometric method at the resonant frequency of the chest (6-8) cycle/s). During the first 3 days after infarction, forced expiratory volume (FEV) and forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF25-75%) were 69% and 60% of predicted values, respectively. 10 or more wk later these values were 95% and 91%. Initially, RT was 52% greater than predicted, but was only 4% greater 10 or more wk later. In 11 patients RT was measured at both resonant frequency and at 3 cycle/s. Five of these patients had no clinical signs of heart failure, but nine had abnormally high values of pulmonary artery pressure, “wedge” pressure and pulmonary extravascular water volume. All of these patients recovered. Initially, RT at resonance was 50% and RT at 3 cycle/s was 130% greater than predicted values. 2-3 wk later these figures were -3% and +6% of those predicted, respectively. At 10 wk or more, significant frequency dependence of RT had disappeared (RT at 3 cycle/s was 7% greater than RT at resonance). Isoproterenol inhalation in six patients caused no change in flow rates, RT at resonance, or RT at 3 cycle/s. RT at resonance and at 3 cycle/s, FEV, and FEF25-75% correlated significantly with the pulmonary vascular pressures. Patients with more marked arterial hypoxia and larger values for extravascular water volume had greater elevations of RT and depression of FEF25-75%, but linear correlations were not significant. Clinical signs of congestive heart failure significantly correlated with a fall in FEV and FEF25-75%, the development of frequency dependence of RT, and elevation of the pulmonary wedge pressure. The initial elevation of RT and low flow rates indicate a modest degree of airway obstruction in acute myocardial infarction. Lack of response to isoproterenol suggests that bronchial muscular constriction is not a

  9. Stimulus-induced and state-dependent sustained gamma activity is tightly coupled to the hemodynamic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Koch, Stefan P; Werner, Peter; Steinbrink, Jens; Fries, Pascal; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2009-11-01

    A prompt behavioral response to a stimulus depends both on the salience of the stimulus as well as the subject's preparedness. Thus, both stimulus properties and cognitive factors, such as attention, may determine the strength of neuronal synchronization in the gamma range. For a comprehensive investigation of stimulus-response processing through noninvasive imaging, it is, however, a crucial issue whether both kinds of gamma modulation elicit a hemodynamic response. Here, we show that, in the human visual cortex, stimulus strength and internal state modulate sustained gamma activity and hemodynamic response in close correspondence. When participants reported velocity changes of gratings varying in contrast, gamma activity (35-70 Hz) increased systematically with contrast. For stimuli of constant contrast, the amplitude of gamma activity before the behaviorally relevant velocity change was inversely correlated to the behavioral response latency. This indicates that gamma activity also reflects an overall attentive state. For both sources of variance, gamma activity was tightly coupled to the hemodynamic response measured through optical topography. Because of the close relationship between high-frequency neuronal activity and the hemodynamic signal, we conclude that both stimulus-induced and state-dependent gamma activity trigger a metabolic demand and are amenable to vascular-based imaging. PMID:19890006

  10. Non-parametric temporal modeling of the hemodynamic response function via a liquid state machine.

    PubMed

    Avesani, Paolo; Hazan, Hananel; Koilis, Ester; Manevitz, Larry M; Sona, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Standard methods for the analysis of functional MRI data strongly rely on prior implicit and explicit hypotheses made to simplify the analysis. In this work the attention is focused on two such commonly accepted hypotheses: (i) the hemodynamic response function (HRF) to be searched in the BOLD signal can be described by a specific parametric model e.g., double-gamma; (ii) the effect of stimuli on the signal is taken to be linearly additive. While these assumptions have been empirically proven to generate high sensitivity for statistical methods, they also limit the identification of relevant voxels to what is already postulated in the signal, thus not allowing the discovery of unknown correlates in the data due to the presence of unexpected hemodynamics. This paper tries to overcome these limitations by proposing a method wherein the HRF is learned directly from data rather than induced from its basic form assumed in advance. This approach produces a set of voxel-wise models of HRF and, as a result, relevant voxels are filterable according to the accuracy of their prediction in a machine learning framework. This approach is instantiated using a temporal architecture based on the paradigm of Reservoir Computing wherein a Liquid State Machine is combined with a decoding Feed-Forward Neural Network. This splits the modeling into two parts: first a representation of the complex temporal reactivity of the hemodynamic response is determined by a universal global "reservoir" which is essentially temporal; second an interpretation of the encoded representation is determined by a standard feed-forward neural network, which is trained by the data. Thus the reservoir models the temporal state of information during and following temporal stimuli in a feed-back system, while the neural network "translates" this data to fit the specific HRF response as given, e.g. by BOLD signal measurements in fMRI. An empirical analysis on synthetic datasets shows that the learning process can

  11. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42±36.69% and 130.58±31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17±14.65%, 24.52±20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62±18.56% and 59±18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52±22.42% and 54.24±11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  12. Acute effect of nitric oxide supplement on blood nitrate/nitrite and hemodynamic variables in resistance trained men.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Richard J; Williams, Sara A; Canale, Robert E; Farney, Tyler M; Kabir, Mohammad M

    2010-10-01

    Nitric oxide dietary supplements are extremely popular within the sport and bodybuilding community. Most products contain l-arginine, for which there is no direct evidence that oral L-arginine increases circulating nitric oxide or blood flow. A new molecule (2-[nitrooxy]thyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate) is being marketed as a sport supplement for purposes of delivering "real nitric oxide" to the circulation. In the present study, we measured the acute effects of this supplement on blood nitrate/nitrite and hemodynamic variables. Ten resistance trained men (26 ± 4 years old; 8 ± 6 years of resistance exercise training) reported to the laboratory in random order after a 10-hour overnight fast on 2 occasions separated by 1 week and were provided the supplement (2-[nitrooxy]ethyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate) or placebo. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded, and venous blood samples were collected before and at 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after complete breakdown of the supplement (5 minutes post intake) or placebo. Blood samples were assayed for plasma nitrate/nitrite. No interaction (p = 0.99), condition (p = 0.18), or time (p = 0.98) effects were noted for plasma nitrate/nitrite, with values remaining nearly identical across time for placebo (∼27 μmol·L(-1)) and increasing a maximum of ∼6.7% (from 32.9 to 35.1 μmol·L(-1)) at the 15-minute collection period for the supplement. In regards to hemodynamic variables, no interaction, condition, or time effects were noted for heart rate, systolic, or diastolic blood pressure (p > 0.05), with values near identical between conditions and virtually unchanged across time. These findings indicate that 2-(nitrooxy)ethyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate has a small effect on increasing circulating nitrate/nitrite and does not cause any change in hemodynamic variables within the 1 hour postingestion period in a sample of resistance trained men.

  13. Serial measurement of Doppler hepatic hemodynamic parameters for the diagnosis of acute rejection after live donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kato, Koichi; Hirota, Masashi; Takeda, Shin; Kamei, Hideya; Nakamura, Taro; Kiuchi, Tetsuya; Nakao, Akimasa

    2009-09-01

    To elucidate the role of Doppler hepatic hemodynamic parameters as surrogate markers of acute rejection (AR) after live donor liver transplantation (LDLT), serial Doppler measurements were prospectively performed during the first 2 weeks after LDLT to compare the longitudinal hepatic hemodynamic changes between patients with histologically proven AR and patients without histologically proven AR. Forty-six patients that had undergone adult-to-adult LDLT using a right lobe graft were enrolled in this study. The portal venous maximum velocity (PVV; cm/second), portal venous flow volume, hepatic arterial peak systolic velocity, hepatic arterial pulsatility index, hepatic venous maximum velocity, hepatic venous pulsatility index, and splenic arterial pulsatility index were measured. Fourteen patients were diagnosed by biopsy to have clinically relevant AR. Markedly increased PVV was seen soon after surgery and gradually decreased in both patients with clinically relevant AR and patients without clinically relevant AR. This serial change of decreasing PVV was significantly greater in patients with clinically relevant AR (P < 0.0001). After postoperative day 6, the PVV in patients with clinically relevant AR was significantly lower than that in patients without clinically relevant AR (PVV on postoperative day 6: 35.6 +/- 21.3 versus 58.3 +/- 27.1 cm/second, respectively, P = 0.0080). A PVV cutoff value of 20.2 cm/second demonstrated the best accuracy for predicting clinically relevant AR. The sensitivity and specificity for predicting clinically relevant AR were 92.9% and 87.1%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.94. In conclusion, serial Doppler measurement of hepatic parameters in LDLT is useful for the diagnosis of clinically relevant AR. Clinically relevant AR should therefore be suspected when a marked unexpected decrease in the PVV is observed.

  14. Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease After Acute Kidney Injury: Role of Self-Perpetuating Versus Hemodynamic-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Picken, Maria; Long, Jianrui; Williamson, Geoffrey A; Polichnowski, Aaron J

    2016-10-01

    The relative contribution of self-perpetuating versus hemodynamic-induced fibrosis to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) after acute kidney injury (AKI) is unclear. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent right uninephrectomy and were instrumented with a blood pressure radiotelemeter. Two weeks later, separate groups of rats were subjected to 40 minutes renal ischemia-reperfusion or sham surgery and followed up for 4 or 16 weeks to determine the extent to which glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis as a result of the AKI-CKD transition (ie, at 4 weeks post AKI) change over time during the progression of CKD (ie, at 16 weeks post AKI). On average, tubulointerstitial fibrosis was ≈3-fold lower (P<0.05), whereas glomerulosclerosis was ≈6-fold higher (P<0.05) at 16 versus 4 weeks post AKI. At 16 weeks post AKI, marked tubulointerstitial fibrosis was only observed in rats exhibiting marked glomerulosclerosis, proteinuria, and kidney hypertrophy consistent with a hemodynamic pathogenesis of renal injury. Moreover, quantitative analysis between blood pressure and renal injury revealed a clear and modest blood pressure threshold (average 16-week systolic blood pressure of ≈127 mm Hg) for the development of glomerulosclerosis. In summary, modest levels of blood pressure may be playing a substantial role in the progression of renal disease after AKI in settings of preexisting CKD associated with 50% loss of renal mass. In contrast, these data do not support a major role of self-perpetuating tubulointerstitial fibrosis in the progression CKD after AKI in such settings. PMID:27550923

  15. Categorization of the hemodynamic response to hemodialysis: the importance of baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chesterton, Lindsay J; Selby, Nicholas M; Burton, James O; Fialova, Jana; Chan, Cian; McIntyre, Chris W

    2010-01-01

    Intradialytic hypotension (IDH) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The baroreflex arc is under autonomic control and regulates blood pressure. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) to the pathophysiology of IDH. Thirty-four chronic HD (12 IDH-prone, 22 IDH-resistant) patients underwent BRS measurement during HD with relative blood volume monitoring. During analysis, patients were separated into four age-matched groups according to resting BRS>or=4.5 ms/mmHg and hemodynamic stability. Resting BRS was extremely heterogenous (geometric mean BRS 5.78+/-1.41 [range 1.76-41.41] ms/mmHg). Relative blood volume reduction was well matched in all groups (mean reduction in relative blood volume for all patients -6.74%+/-0.86%, P>0.05). Thirty-seven episodes of IDH occurred in the IDH prone, reduced BRS group. Patients with impaired resting BRS and prone to IDH had markedly different responses to HD as compared to the preserved BRS group, but the total peripheral resistance response was significantly lower than in the IDH-resistant patients (15.9%+/-2.1% vs. 42.4%+/-3.0%, respectively, P<0.001). In those patients prone to IDH and with impaired resting BRS, percentage reduction in cardiac output at the end of HD highly correlated with reduction in relative blood volume (r=0.94, P=0.006). Hypotension during dialysis may be an important source of recurrent cardiac injury and early recognition of those patients prone to relative symptomatic and asymptomatic hypotension remains important. Impaired resting BRS and recognition of a suboptimal peripheral pressor response, appear to predict those patients most likely to undergo hemodynamic instability and may assist in the pursuit of this elusive goal.

  16. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of rat deep brain: hemodynamic responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Hosaka, Tomoya; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-03-01

    Hemodynamic responses of the brain to hypoxia or ischemia are one of the major interests in neurosurgery and neuroscience. In this study, we performed real-time transcutaneous PA imaging of the rat brain that was exposed to a hypoxic stress and investigated depth-resolved responses of the brain, including the hippocampus. A linear-array 8ch 10-MHz ultrasonic sensor (measurement length, 10 mm) was placed on the shaved scalp. Nanosecond, 570-nm and 595- nm light pulses were used to excite PA signals indicating cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood deoxygenation, respectively. Under spontaneous respiration, inhalation gas was switched from air to nitrogen, and then reswitched to oxygen, during which real-time PA imaging was performed continuously. High-contrast PA signals were observed from the depth regions corresponding to the scalp, skull, cortex and hippocampus. After starting hypoxia, PA signals at 595 nm increased immediately in both the cortex and hippocampus for about 1.5 min, showing hemoglobin deoxygenation. On the other hand, PA signals at 570 nm coming from these regions did not increase in the early phase but started to increase at about 1.5 min after starting hypoxia, indicating reactive hyperemia to hypoxia. During hypoxia, PA signals coming from the scalp decreased transiently, which is presumably due to compensatory response in the peripheral tissue to preserve blood perfusion in the brain. The reoxygenation caused a gradual recovery of these PA signals. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of PA imaging for real-time, depth-resolved observation of cerebral hemodynamics.

  17. The effect of repetitive electrical stimulation on the motor evoked hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Khaslavskaia, Svetlana; Klucharev, Vasily; Chen, Andrew C N; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of short-term repetitive electrical stimulation (rES training session) on the motor-evoked hemodynamic responses. The fMRI echo-planar images (EPI) were recorded before and after the rES training. The right median nerve (MN) was stimulated during rES. The rES training resulted in a significant increase in activity in a number of supraspinal regions, including sensorimotor and associative cortical areas. On the subcortical level, the effect was also found in the cerebellum, the midbrain, and the thalamus. Possible mechanisms of the neuronal plastic changes observed after rES, and memory processes involved in learning are discussed.

  18. Multiparametric optical coherence tomography imaging of the inner retinal hemodynamic response to visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2013-08-01

    The hemodynamic response to neuronal activation is a well-studied phenomenon in the brain, due to the prevalence of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The retina represents an optically accessible platform for studying lamina-specific neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system; however, due to methodological limitations, this has been challenging to date. We demonstrate techniques for the imaging of visual stimulus-evoked hyperemia in the rat inner retina using Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography. Volumetric imaging with three-dimensional motion correction, en face flow calculation, and normalization of dynamic signal to static signal are techniques that reduce spurious changes caused by motion. We anticipate that OCT imaging of retinal functional hyperemia may yield viable biomarkers in diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, where the neurovascular unit may be impaired.

  19. Reductions in central venous pressure by lower body negative pressure or blood loss elicit similar hemodynamic responses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Blair D.; van Helmond, Noud; Curry, Timothy B.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hemodynamic and blood analyte responses to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) and pulse pressure (PP) elicited during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to those observed during graded blood loss (BL) in conscious humans. We hypothesized that the stimulus-response relationships of CVP and PP to hemodynamic responses during LBNP would mimic those observed during BL. We assessed CVP, PP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and other hemodynamic markers in 12 men during LBNP and BL. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of catecholamines, hematocrit, hemoglobin, arginine vasopressin, and blood gases. LBNP consisted of 5-min stages at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg of suction. BL consisted of 5 min at baseline and following three stages of 333 ml of hemorrhage (1,000 ml total). Individual r2 values and linear regression slopes were calculated to determine whether the stimulus (CVP and PP)-hemodynamic response trajectories were similar between protocols. The CVP-MAP trajectory was the only CVP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (0.93 ± 0.27 vs. 0.13 ± 0.26; P = 0.037). The PP-heart rate trajectory was the only PP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (−1.85 ± 0.45 vs. −0.46 ± 0.27; P = 0.024). Norepinephrine, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were all lower at termination in the BL protocol compared with LBNP (P < 0.05). Consistent with our hypothesis, LBNP mimics the hemodynamic stimulus-response trajectories observed during BL across a significant range of CVP in humans. PMID:24876357

  20. Acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock: pharmacologic and mechanical hemodynamic support pathways.

    PubMed

    Graf, Tobias; Desch, Steffen; Eitel, Ingo; Thiele, Holger

    2015-09-01

    Cardiogenic shock (CS) is still the predominant cause of in-hospital death in patients with acute myocardial infarction, although mortality has been reduced in recent years. Early percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting are causal therapies implemented in CS, supported by catecholamines, fluids, intra-aortic balloon pumping, and also active percutaneous assist devices. There is only limited evidence from randomized studies of any of these treatments in CS, except for early revascularization and the relative ineffectiveness of intra-aortic balloon pumping. This review will present treatment pathways of CS complicating acute myocardial infarction, with a major focus on revascularization, intensive care unit treatment, and mechanical support devices.

  1. Mephedrone, a new designer drug of abuse, produces acute hemodynamic effects in the rat.

    PubMed

    Meng, Harry; Cao, James; Kang, Jiesheng; Ying, Xiaoyou; Ji, Junzhi; Reynolds, William; Rampe, David

    2012-01-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a new and popular drug of abuse widely available on the Internet and still legal in some parts of the world. Clinical reports are now emerging suggesting that the drug displays sympathomimetic toxicity on the cardiovascular system but no studies have yet explored its cardiovascular effects. Therefore we examined the effects of mephedrone on the cardiovascular system using a combination of in vitro electrophysiology and in vivo hemodynamic and echocardiographic measurements. Patch clamp studies revealed that mephedrone, up to 30 μM, had little effect on the major voltage-dependent ion channels of the heart or on action potentials recorded in guinea pig myocytes. Subcutaneous administration of mephedrone (3 and 15 mg/kg) to conscious telemetry-implanted rats produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate and blood pressure which persisted after pre-treatment with reserpine. Echocardiographic analysis demonstrated that intravenous injection of mephedrone (0.3 and 1mg/kg) increased cardiac function, including cardiac output, ejection fraction, and stroke volume, similar to methamphetamine (0.3mg/kg). We conclude that mephedrone is not directly pro-arrhythmic, but induces substantial increases in heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac contractility and this activity contributes to the cardiovascular toxicity in people who abuse the drug.

  2. Acute effect of caffeine intake on hemodynamics after resistance exercise in young non-hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Souza, Diego; Casonatto, Juliano; Poton, Roberto; Willardson, Jeffrey; Polito, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of caffeine on hemodynamics after a resistance exercise session. Fifteen subjects completed two randomly ordered experimental resistance exercise sessions 45 min after the ingestion of either caffeine (4 mg.kg(-1)) or placebo. Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MAP) blood pressures were measured before consuming caffeine; SBP, DBP, MAP, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) were measured immediately before and after each of the sessions; SBP, DBP and MAP were measured for 9 hours after sessions. Caffeine increased (p < 0.05) pre-exercise DBP and MAP. In caffeine and placebo conditions significant decreases (p < 0.05) were noted in SBP, MAP, and PVR between the pre- and post-exercise time points. Notwithstanding, the mean values for SBP, DBP and MAP during the 9 h of post-exercise monitoring were increased (p < 0.05) for the caffeine. In conclusion, the cardiovascular effects of caffeine are different over the post-exercise period after resistance exercise in normotensive young adults. PMID:24950113

  3. Acute effect of caffeine intake on hemodynamics after resistance exercise in young non-hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Souza, Diego; Casonatto, Juliano; Poton, Roberto; Willardson, Jeffrey; Polito, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of caffeine on hemodynamics after a resistance exercise session. Fifteen subjects completed two randomly ordered experimental resistance exercise sessions 45 min after the ingestion of either caffeine (4 mg.kg(-1)) or placebo. Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MAP) blood pressures were measured before consuming caffeine; SBP, DBP, MAP, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) were measured immediately before and after each of the sessions; SBP, DBP and MAP were measured for 9 hours after sessions. Caffeine increased (p < 0.05) pre-exercise DBP and MAP. In caffeine and placebo conditions significant decreases (p < 0.05) were noted in SBP, MAP, and PVR between the pre- and post-exercise time points. Notwithstanding, the mean values for SBP, DBP and MAP during the 9 h of post-exercise monitoring were increased (p < 0.05) for the caffeine. In conclusion, the cardiovascular effects of caffeine are different over the post-exercise period after resistance exercise in normotensive young adults.

  4. Converting enzyme inhibition and the glomerular hemodynamic response to glycine in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Slomowitz, L A; Peterson, O W; Thomson, S C

    1999-07-01

    GFR normally increases during glycine infusion. This response is absent in humans and rats with established diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) restores the effect of glycine on GFR. To ascertain the glomerular hemodynamic basis for this effect of ACEI, micropuncture studies were performed in male Wistar-Froemter rats after 5 to 6 wk of insulin-treated streptozotocin diabetes. The determinants of single-nephron GFR (SNGFR) were assessed in each rat before and during glycine infusion. Studies were performed in diabetics, diabetics after 5 d of ACEI (enalapril in the drinking water), and weight-matched controls. Diabetic rats manifest renal hypertrophy and glomerular hyperfiltration but not glomerular capillary hypertension. ACEI reduced glomerular capillary pressure, increased glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient, and did not mitigate hyperfiltration. In controls, glycine increased SNGFR by 30% due to increased nephron plasma flow. In diabetics, glycine had no effect on any determinant of SNGFR. In ACEI-treated diabetics, the SNGFR response to glycine was indistinguishable from nondiabetics, but the effect of glycine was mediated by greater ultrafiltration pressure rather than by greater plasma flow. These findings demonstrate that: (1) The absent response to glycine in established diabetes does not indicate that renal functional reserve is exhausted by hyperfiltration; and (2) ACEI restores the GFR response to glycine in established diabetes, but this response is mediated by increased ultrafiltration pressure rather than by increased nephron plasma flow.

  5. Progressive improvement in hemodynamic response to muscle metaboreflex in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo; Milia, Raffaele; Angius, Luca; Pinna, Marco; Olla, Sergio; Roberto, Silvana; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Porcu, Maurizio; Concu, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Exercise capacity remains lower in heart transplant recipients (HTRs) following transplant compared with normal subjects, despite improved cardiac function. Moreover, metaboreceptor activity in the muscle has been reported to increase. The aim of the present investigation was to assess exercise capacity together with metaboreflex activity in HTR patients for 1 yr following heart transplant, to test the hypothesis that recovery in exercise capacity was paralleled by improvements in response to metaboreflex. A cardiopulmonary test for exercise capacity and Vo(2max) and hemodynamic response to metaboreflex activation obtained by postexercise ischemia were gathered in six HTRs and nine healthy controls (CTL) four times: at the beginning of the study (T0, 42 ± 6 days after transplant), at the 3rd, 6th, and 12th month after TO (T1, T2, and T3). The main results were: 1) exercise capacity and Vo(2max) were seen to progressively increase in HTRs; 2) at T0 and T1, HTRs achieved a higher blood pressure response in response to metaboreflex compared with CTL, and this difference disappeared at T2 and T3; and 3) this exaggerated blood pressure response was the result of a systemic vascular resistance increment. This study demonstrates that exercise capacity progressively improves in HTRs after transplant and that this phenomenon is accompanied by a progressive reduction of the metaboreflex-induced increase in blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. These facts indicate that, despite improved cardiac function, resetting of cardiovascular regulation in HTRs requires months. PMID:23195627

  6. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  7. Cerebral hemodynamic response in Chinese (first) and English (second) language processing revealed by event-related functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Pu, Y; Liu, H L; Spinks, J A; Mahankali, S; Xiong, J; Feng, C M; Tan, L H; Fox, P T; Gao, J H

    2001-06-01

    Comparative functional neuroimaging studies using the block design paradigm have previously demonstrated that there are no significant differences in the location of areas of cerebral activation when native Chinese speakers independently process single words or sentences in both the Chinese (first) and English (second) languages. While it has also been documented that significant domains of brain response include the inferior to middle left frontal lobe, the latency, amplitude and duration of the associated hemodynamic changes during isolated neural processing of Chinese and English languages still remain unknown. The aim of this study, therefore, was to examine the characteristics of the hemodynamic alterations in the above-mentioned regions with event-related functional MRI (ER-fMRI) when native Chinese speakers performed verb generation tasks in both the Chinese (first) and English (second) languages. Our results demonstrate the presence of a similar neural activity-induced hemodynamic response in the inferior to middle left frontal lobe during both tasks. Further, there were also no statistically significant differences among the variables that described the hemodynamic response curves. These findings strongly imply that the underlying neural mechanism for Chinese (first) and English (second) language processing may be similar in native Chinese speakers.

  8. Hemodynamic and organ blood flow responses to halothane and sevoflurane anesthesia during spontaneous ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M W; Lerman, J; Saldivia, V; Carmichael, F J

    1992-12-01

    This study compared systemic hemodynamic and organ blood flow responses to equipotent concentrations of halothane and sevoflurane during spontaneous ventilation in the rat. The MAC values for halothane and sevoflurane were determined. Cardiac output and organ blood flows were measured using radiolabeled microspheres. Measurements were obtained in awake rats (control values) and at 1.0 MAC halothane or sevoflurane. The MAC values (mean +/- SEM) for halothane and sevoflurane were 1.10% +/- 0.05% and 2.40% +/- 0.05%, respectively. The PaCO2 increased to a similar extent in both groups compared with control values. During halothane anesthesia, heart rate decreased by 12% (P < 0.01), cardiac index by 26% (P < 0.01), and mean arterial blood pressure by 18% (P < 0.01) compared with control values. Stroke volume index and systemic vascular resistance did not change. During sevoflurane anesthesia, hemodynamic variables remained unchanged compared with control values. Coronary blood flow decreased by 21% (P < 0.01) and renal blood flow by 18% (P < 0.01) at 1.0 MAC halothane, whereas both remained unchanged at 1.0 MAC sevoflurane. Cerebral blood flow increased to a greater extent with halothane (63%; P < 0.01) than with sevoflurane (35%; P < 0.05). During halothane anesthesia, hepatic arterial blood flow increased by 48% (P < 0.01), whereas portal tributary blood flow decreased by 28% (P < 0.01). During sevoflurane anesthesia, hepatic arterial blood flow increased by 70% (P < 0.01) without a concomitant reduction in portal tributary blood flow. Total liver blood flow decreased only with halothane (16%; P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Modeling the Hemodynamic Response Function in fMRI: Efficiency, Bias and Mis-modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Martin A.; Loh, Ji Meng; Atlas, Lauren Y.; Wager, Tor D.

    2012-01-01

    Most brain research to date has focused on studying the amplitude of evoked fMRI responses, though there has recently been an increased interest in measuring onset, peak latency and duration of the responses as well. A number of modeling procedures provide measures of the latency and duration of fMRI responses. In this work we compare several techniques that vary in their assumptions, model complexity, and interpretation. For each method, we introduce methods for estimating amplitude, peak latency, and duration and for performing inference in a multi-subject fMRI setting. We then assess the techniques’ relative sensitivity and their propensity for mis-attributing task effects on one parameter (e.g., duration) to another (e.g., amplitude). Finally, we introduce methods for quantifying model misspecification and assessing bias and power-loss related to the choice of model. Overall, the results show that it is surprisingly difficult to accurately recover true task-evoked changes in BOLD signal and that there are substantial differences among models in terms of power, bias and parameter confusability. Because virtually all fMRI studies in cognitive and affective neuroscience employ these models, the results bear on the interpretation of hemodynamic response estimates across a wide variety of psychological and neuroscientific studies. PMID:19084070

  10. The hemodynamic effects of acute aortic regurgitation into a stiffened left ventricle resulting from chronic aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Raghav, Vrishank; Midha, Prem; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) post-chronic aortic stenosis is a prevalent phenomenon occurring in patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of left ventricular diastolic stiffness (LVDS) and AR severity on LV performance. Three LVDS models were inserted into a physiological left heart simulator. AR severity was parametrically varied through four levels (ranging from trace to moderate) and compared with a competent aortic valve. Hemodynamic metrics such as average diastolic pressures (DP) and reduction in transmitral flow were measured. AR index was calculated as a function of AR severity and LVDS, and the work required to make up for lost volume due to AR was estimated. In the presence of trace AR, higher LVDS had up to a threefold reduction in transmitral flow (13% compared with 3.5%) and a significant increase in DP (2-fold). The AR index ranged from ∼42 to 16 (no AR to moderate AR), with stiffer LVs having lower values. To compensate for lost volume due to AR, the low, medium, and high LVDS models were found to require 5.1, 5.5, and 6.6 times more work, respectively. This work shows that the LVDS has a significant effect on the LV performance in the presence of AR. Therefore, the LVDS of potential TAVR patients should be assessed to gain an initial indication of their ability to tolerate post-procedural AR. PMID:27106040

  11. Acute Hemodynamic Effects of a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: A Randomized, Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Philip L; Raj, Vidya; Black, Bonnie K; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Dupont, William D; Robertson, David; Raj, Satish R

    2014-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are often prescribed in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), and act at synaptic terminals to increase monoamine neurotransmitters. We hypothesized that they act to increase blood pressure (BP) and attenuate reflex tachycardia, thereby improving symptoms. Acute hemodynamic profiles after SSRI administration in POTS patients have not previously been reported. Methods Patients with POTS (n=39; F=37, 39 ±9 years) underwent a randomized crossover trial with sertraline 50mg and placebo. Heart rate (HR), systolic, diastolic, and mean BP were measured with the patient seated and standing for 10 minutes prior to drug or placebo administration, and then hourly for 4 hours. The primary endpoint was standing HR at 4 hours. Results At 4 hours, standing HR and systolic BP were not significantly different between sertraline and placebo. Seated systolic (106±12 mmHg vs. 101±8 mmHg; P=0.041), diastolic (72±8 mmHg vs. 69±8 mmHg; P=0.022), and mean BP (86±9 mmHg vs. 81±9 mmHg; P=0.007) were significantly higher after sertraline administration than placebo. At 4 hours, symptoms were worse with sertraline than placebo. Conclusions Sertraline had a modest pressor effect in POTS patients, but this did not translate into a reduced HR or improved symptoms. PMID:24227635

  12. Evaluation of the Hemodynamic Response to Endotracheal Intubation Comparing the Airtraq® with Macintosh Laryngoscopes in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilovska-Brzanov, Aleksandra; Jarallah, Mohhamed Al; Cogliati, Andrea; Mojsova-Mijovska, Maja; Mijuskovic, Dragan; Slaveski, Dimce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac patients are more prone to develop hemodynamic instability on induction of anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. The Airtraq® optical laryngoscope is a single-use rigid video laryngoscope that has been developed to facilitate tracheal intubation. There are limited studies comparing differences in the circulatory responses to Airtraq® and direct Macintosh larynngoscopy in cardiac patients. Aim: The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether there was clinically significant difference between the hemodynamic response to orotracheal intubation guided by either of the two devices (Airtraq® and Macintosh laryngoscopes) in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Material and methods: In this clinical study we analyzed the hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation performed with Airtraq® or Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery under general anesthesia. Results: We analyzed: blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, mean), heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation (all notified before induction in anesthesia, immediately after induction, at the time of intubation and thereafter one and five minutes after intubation). We also recorded the maximal values of blood pressure and heart rate, as well as calculated the product of heart rate and systolic blood pressure. There were statistically significant differences in the hemodynamic response between the groups. At the time of intubation, there was significant inter-group difference in heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure. Endotracheal intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope was accompanied by significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate compared to Airtraq® group. Conclusion: The Airtraq® laryngoscope performed better than the Macintosh laryngoscope in terms of hemodynamic to the patient undergoing routine coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:26635435

  13. Hemodynamics of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Burkhoff, Daniel; Sayer, Gabriel; Doshi, Darshan; Uriel, Nir

    2015-12-15

    An increasing number of devices can provide mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to patients with acute hemodynamic compromise and chronic end-stage heart failure. These devices work by different pumping mechanisms, have various flow capacities, are inserted by different techniques, and have different sites from which blood is withdrawn and returned to the body. These factors result in different primary hemodynamic effects and secondary responses of the body. However, these are not generally taken into account when choosing a device for a particular patient or while managing a patient undergoing MCS. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of cardiac, vascular, and pump mechanics and illustrate how they provide a broad foundation for understanding the complex interactions between the heart, vasculature, and device, and how they may help guide future research to improve patient outcomes.

  14. Neural physiological modeling towards a hemodynamic response function for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Afonso, David M; Sanches, João M; Lauterbach, Martin H

    2007-01-01

    The BOLD signal provided by the functional MRI medical modality measures the ratio of oxy- to deoxyhaemoglobin at each location inside the brain. The detection of activated regions upon the application of an external stimulus, e.g., visual or auditive, is based on the comparison of the mentioned ratios of a rest condition (pre-stimulus) and of a stimulated condition (post-stimulus). Therefore, an accurate knowledge of the impulse response of the BOLD signal to neural stimulus in a given region is needed to design robust detectors that discriminate, with a high level of confidence activated from non activated regions. Usually, in the literature, the hemodynamic response has been modeled by known functions, e.g., gamma functions, fitting them, or not, to the experimental data. In this paper we present a different approach based on the physiologic behavior of the vascular and neural tissues. Here, a linear model based on reasonable physiological assumptions about oxygen consumption and vasodilatation processes are used to design a linear model from which a transfer function is derived. The estimation of the model parameters is performed by using the minimum square error (MSE) by forcing the adjustment of the stimulus response to the observations. Experimental results using real data have shown that the proposed model successfully explains the observations allowing to achieve small values for the fitting error.

  15. Insulin mediated hemodynamic responses in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs): effect of chromosome 4 gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sumangala P; McRae, Crystal; Lapanowski, Karen; Churchill, Monique; Kurtz, Theodore W; Dunbar, Joseph C

    2003-02-01

    The spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) is a widely studied model of essential hypertension and has been reported to exhibit alterations in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Genetic linkage studies implicated that SHR carries deletion variant of Cd36 gene of chromosome 4, the gene that encodes fatty acid transporter. Thus it could be possible that primary genetic defect in SHR is compromised tissue utilization of fatty acid that would form the basis for the pathogenesis of hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and insulin-mediated responses. We measured both the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to insulin in SHR in comparison with the chromosome congenic spontaneous hypertensive rats (cSHRs) (rats in which piece of chromosome 4 containing wild type Cd36 was integrated into the SHR genome). A bolus infusion of insulin increased iliac conductance and decreased blood pressure in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. However, in SHR insulin did not reduce blood pressure as in WKY but after about 15 min it significantly enhanced blood pressure and reduced iliac conductance. Whereas in cSHR insulin did not reduce blood pressure as in WKY rats. However, pressor responses to insulin were eliminated by chromosome 4 gene transfer. Glucose clearance was significantly slower in both SHR and cSHR. Glucose tolerance test revealed that SHR are hyperinsulinemic and insulin resistant. These findings indicate that transfer of segment of chromosome 4 from Brown Norway rats onto spontaneous hypertensive background eliminates hyperinsulinemia and pressor effects of insulin.

  16. Cerebral hemodynamic responses to seizure in the mouse brain: simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy-electroencephalography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungduk; Lee, Mina; Koh, Dalkwon; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2010-05-01

    We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) simultaneously on the mouse brain and investigated the hemodynamic response to epileptic episodes under pharmacologically driven seizure. γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were applied to induce absence and tonic-clonic seizures, respectively. The epileptic episodes were identified from the single-channel EEG, and the corresponding hemodynamic changes in different regions of the brain were characterized by multichannel frequency-domain NIRS. Our results are the following: (i) the oxyhemoglobin level increases in the case of GBL-treated mice but not 4-AP-treated mice compared to the predrug state; (ii) the dominant response to each absence seizure is a decrease in deoxyhemolobin; (iii) the phase shift between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin reduces in GBL-treated mice but no 4-AP-treated mice; and (iv) the spatial correlation of hemodynamics increased significantly in 4-AP-treated mice but not in GBL-treated mice. Our results shows that spatiotemporal tracking of cerebral hemodynamics using NIRS can be successfully applied to the mouse brain in conjunction with electrophysiological recording, which will support the study of molecular, cellular, and network origin of neurovascular coupling in vivo.

  17. Acute impact of intermittent pneumatic leg compression frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression in humans.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Ryan D; Roseguini, Bruno T; Thyfault, John P; Crist, Brett D; Laughlin, M H; Newcomer, Sean C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms by which intermittent pneumatic leg compression (IPC) treatment effectively treats symptoms associated with peripheral artery disease remain speculative. With the aim of gaining mechanistic insight into IPC treatment, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of IPC frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression. In this two study investigation, healthy male subjects underwent an hour of either high-frequency (HF; 2-s inflation/3-s deflation) or low-frequency (LF; 4-s inflation/16-s deflation) IPC treatment of the foot and calf. In study 1 (n = 11; 23.5 ± 4.7 yr), subjects underwent both HF and LF treatment on separate days. Doppler/ultrasonography was used to measure popliteal artery diameter and blood velocity at baseline and during IPC treatment. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and peak reactive hyperemia blood flow (RHBF) were determined before and after IPC treatment. In study 2 (n = 19; 22.0 ± 4.6 yr), skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from the lateral gastrocnemius of the treated and control limb at baseline and at 30- and 150-min posttreatment. Quantitative PCR was used to assess mRNA concentrations of genes associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. No treatment effect on vascular function was observed. Cuff deflation resulted in increased blood flow (BF) and shear rate (SR) in both treatments at the onset of treatment compared with baseline (P < 0.01). BF and SR significantly diminished by 45 min of HF treatment only (P < 0.01). Both treatments reduced BF and SR and elevated oscillatory shear index compared with baseline (P < 0.01) during cuff inflation. IPC decreased the mRNA expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 from baseline and controls (P <0 .01) and connective tissue growth factor from baseline (P < 0.05) in a frequency-dependent manner. In conclusion, a single session of IPC acutely impacts limb hemodynamics and skeletal muscle gene expression in a frequency

  18. Bifactor Item Response Theory Model of Acute Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Yuan; Tang, Jingjing; Zhu, Xia; Miao, Danmin

    2013-01-01

    Background Better understanding of acute stress responses is important for revision of DSM-5. However, the latent structure and relationship between different aspects of acute stress responses haven’t been clarified comprehensively. Bifactor item response model may help resolve this problem. Objective The purpose of this study is to develop a statistical model of acute stress responses, based on data from earthquake rescuers using Acute Stress Response Scale (ASRS). Through this model, we could better understand acute stress responses comprehensively, and provide preliminary information for computerized adaptive testing of stress responses. Methods Acute stress responses of earthquake rescuers were evaluated using ASRS, and state/trait anxiety were assessed using State-trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). A hierarchical item response model (bifactor model) was used to analyze the data. Additionally, we tested this hierarchical model with model fit comparisons with one-dimensional and five-dimensional models. The correlations among acute stress responses and state/trait anxiety were compared, based on both the five-dimensional and bifactor models. Results Model fit comparisons showed bifactor model fit the data best. Item loadings on general and specific factors varied greatly between different aspects of stress responses. Many symptoms (40%) of physiological responses had positive loadings on general factor, and negative loadings on specific factor of physiological responses, while other stress responses had positive loadings on both general and specific factors. After extracting general factor of stress responses using bifactor analysis, significant positive correlations between physiological responses and state/trait anxiety (r = 0.185/0.112, p<0.01) changed into negative ones (r = −0.177/−0.38, p<0.01). Conclusion Our results demonstrated bifactor structure of acute stress responses, and positive and negative correlations between physiological responses

  19. Effect of hemorrhage rate on early hemodynamic responses in conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Daluwatte, Chathuri; Marques, Nicole R; Khan, Muzna; Salter, Michael; Wolf, Jordan; Nelson, Christina; Salsbury, John; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Kinsky, Michael; Kramer, George C; Strauss, David G

    2016-04-01

    Physiological compensatory mechanisms can mask the extent of hemorrhage in conscious mammals, which can be further complicated by individual tolerance and variations in hemorrhage onset and duration. We assessed the effect of hemorrhage rate on tolerance and early physiologic responses to hemorrhage in conscious sheep. Eight Merino ewes (37.4 ± 1.1 kg) were subjected to fast (1.25 mL/kg/min) and slow (0.25 mL/kg/min) hemorrhages separated by at least 3 days. Blood was withdrawn until a drop in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >30 mmHg and returned at the end of the experiment. Continuous monitoring includedMAP, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulse oximetry, and tissue oximetry. Cardiac output by thermodilution and arterial blood samples were also measured. The effects of fast versus slow hemorrhage rates were compared for total volume of blood removed and stoppage time (whenMAP < 30 mmHg of baseline) and physiological responses during and after the hemorrhage. Estimated blood volume removed whenMAPdropped 30 mmHg was 27.0 ± 4.2% (mean ± standard error) in the slow and 27.3 ± 3.2% in the fast hemorrhage (P = 0.47, pairedttest between rates). Pressure and tissue oximetry responses were similar between hemorrhage rates. Heart rate increased at earlier levels of blood loss during the fast hemorrhage, but hemorrhage rate was not a significant factor for individual hemorrhage tolerance or hemodynamic responses. In 5/16 hemorrhages MAP stopping criteria was reached with <25% of blood volume removed. This study presents the physiological responses leading up to a significant drop in blood pressure in a large conscious animal model and how they are altered by the rate of hemorrhage. PMID:27044850

  20. Subfornical organ mediates sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to blood-borne proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2013-07-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in regulating autonomic and cardiovascular function in hypertension and heart failure. Peripherally administered proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), act on the brain to increase blood pressure, heart rate, and sympathetic nerve activity. These molecules are too large to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, and so the mechanisms by which they elicit these responses remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain circumventricular organ that lacks a blood-brain barrier, plays a major role in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to circulating proinflammatory cytokines. Intracarotid artery injection of TNF-α (200 ng) or IL-1β (200 ng) dramatically increased mean blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with sham lesions of the SFO (SFO-s). These excitatory responses to intracarotid artery TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly attenuated in SFO-lesioned (SFO-x) rats. Similarly, the increases in mean blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in response to intravenous injections of TNF-α (500 ng) or IL-1β (500 ng) in SFO-s rats were significantly reduced in the SFO-x rats. Immunofluorescent staining revealed a dense distribution of the p55 TNF-α receptor and the IL-1 receptor accessory protein, a subunit of the IL-1 receptor, in the SFO. These data suggest that SFO is a predominant site in the brain at which circulating proinflammatory cytokines act to elicit cardiovascular and sympathetic responses.

  1. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  2. Firefighting acutely increases airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C B; Barnhart, S; Miller, M F; Segal, M R; Aitken, M; Schoene, R; Daniell, W; Rosenstock, L

    1989-07-01

    The acute effects of the products of combustion and pyrolysis on airway responsiveness among firefighters are poorly documented. To study this relationship, spirometry and methacholine challenge testing (MCT) were performed on 18 active Seattle firefighters before and 5 to 24 h after firefighting. Body plethysmography was used to measure changes in specific airway conductance (SGaw), and results of MCT were analyzed using PD35-SGaw, the cumulative dose causing a 35% decrease in SGaw. Subjects who did not react by the end of the protocol were assigned a value of 640 inhalational units, the largest cumulative dose. Fire exposure was defined as the total time (hours) spent without a self-contained breathing apparatus at the firesite and was categorized as mild (less than 1 h, n = 7), moderate (1 to 2 h, n = 5), or severe (greater than 2 h, n = 6). Mean age of the 18 firefighters was 36.7 +/- 6.7 yr (range, 25 to 51), with a mean of 9.1 +/- 7.9 active years in the trade (range, zero to 22). None was known to be asthmatic. After firefighting, FEV1 % predicted (%pred) and FEF25-75 %pred significantly decreased by means of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and 5.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively. The mean decline in PD35-SGaw after firefighting was 184.5 +/- 53.2 units (p = 0.003). This observed decline in PD35-SGaw could not be explained by decrements in prechallenge SGaw, FEV1, or FVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Dried-bonito aroma components enhance salivary hemodynamic responses to broth tastes detected by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomona; Saito, Kana; Nakamura, Akio; Saito, Tsukasa; Nammoku, Takashi; Ishikawa, Masashi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-01-25

    To elucidate the effects of aroma from dried bonito (katsuo-bushi) on broth tastes caused by the central integration of flavor, optical imaging of salivary hemodynamic responses was conducted using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A reconstituted dried bonito flavored broth produced a significantly larger hemodynamic response than the odorless broth taste solutions for 5 of the 10 panelists, who felt that the combination of the aroma with the tastes was congruent. In the remaining 5 panelists who felt the combination incongruent, the flavored broth did not cause the enhancement of response. Moreover, when the odor-active smoky parts were removed from the flavoring, the reconstituted flavoring did not enhance the response in the former five panelists. These results indicate that NIRS offers a sensitive method to detect the effect of specific congruent aroma components from dried-bonito broth on the taste-related salivary hemodynamic responses, dependent on the perceptual experience of the combination of aromas and tastes. PMID:22224859

  4. Left ventricular assist device weaning: hemodynamic response and relationship to stroke volume and rate reduction protocols.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Mark S; Sobieski, Michael A; Koenig, Steven C; Pappas, Patrokolos S; Tatooles, Antone J; Silver, Marc A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical evidence of myocardial recovery in a small cohort of patients supported with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has been reported. Development of an optimal LVAD weaning protocol is needed for these patients to sustain recovery after device explant. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that LVAD stroke volume reduction produces a steady-state mechanical reloading of left ventricular (LV) pressures and volumes compared with LVAD rate reduction that results in transient mechanical reloading of the heart due to beat-to-beat variation in LV pressures and volumes. The relationship of LVAD flow to LVAD stroke volume and systolic interval over a range of LVAD rates (60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 bpm) was validated in a mock circulatory flow loop. In six acute experiments, calves were implanted with a pneumatic paracorporeal LVAD (PVAD, Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA). The PVAD was operated asynchronously in the auto volume mode (full decompression) for 30 minutes to establish a baseline control condition. The calf hearts were then mechanically reloaded by LVAD rate reduction (80, 60, and 40 bpm) or LVAD stroke volume reduction (100, 120, and 140 bpm) protocols consisting of 30 minutes of support at each LVAD beat rate. The order of weaning protocols was randomized with a 30-minute recovery period (LVAD volume mode to fully decompress heart allowing it to rest) between protocols to enable return to baseline control state. Aortic pressure and flow, LV pressure and volume, pulmonary artery flow, and LVAD flow waveforms were recorded for each test condition. The LVAD stroke volume reduction protocol produced steady-state mechanical reloading compared with VAD rate reduction that resulted in transient LV mechanical reloading. This distinction is due to differences in their temporal relationships between LVAD and LV filling and emptying cycles. The acute hemodynamic benefit of LVAD stroke volume reduction was greater reduction in LV end-diastolic pressure and increase in

  5. Sympathetic Neural and Hemodynamic Responses During Cold Pressor Test in Elderly Blacks and Whites.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Jarvis, Sara S; Best, Stuart A; Edwards, Jeffrey G; Hendrix, Joseph M; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2016-05-01

    The sympathetic response during the cold pressor test (CPT) has been reported to be greater in young blacks than whites, especially in those with a family history of hypertension. Because blood pressure (BP) increases with age, we evaluated whether elderly blacks have greater sympathetic activation during CPT than age-matched whites. BP, heart rate, cardiac output, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity were measured during supine baseline, 2-minute CPT, and 3-minute recovery in 47 elderly (68 ± 7 [SD] years) volunteers (12 blacks and 35 whites). Baseline BP, heart rate, cardiac output, or muscle sympathetic nerve activity did not differ between races. Systolic and diastolic BP and heart rate increased during CPT (all P<0.001) with no racial differences (all P > 0.05). Cardiac output increased during CPT and ≤ 30 s of recovery in both groups, but was lower in blacks than whites. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity increased during CPT in both groups (both P<0.001); the increase in burst frequency was similar between groups, whereas the increase in total activity was smaller in blacks (P=0.030 for interaction). Peak change (Δ) in diastolic BP was correlated with Δ total activity at 1 minute into CPT in both blacks (r=0.78,P=0.003) and whites (r=0.43,P=0.009), whereas the slope was significantly greater in blacks (P=0.007). Thus, elderly blacks have smaller sympathetic and central hemodynamic (eg, cardiac output) responses, but a greater pressor response for a given sympathetic activation during CPT than elderly whites. This response may stem from augmented sympathetic vascular transduction, greater sympathetic activation to other vascular bed(s), or enhanced nonadrenergically mediated vasoconstriction in elderly blacks. PMID:27021009

  6. Hemodynamic Nonlinearities Affect BOLD fMRI Response Timing and Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    de Zwart, Jacco A; van Gelderen, Peter; Jansma, J Martijn; Fukunaga, Masaki; Bianciardi, Marta; Duyn, Jeff H

    2009-01-01

    The interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies based on Blood Oxygen-Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast generally relies on the assumption of a linear relationship between evoked neuronal activity and fMRI response. While nonlinearities in this relationship have been suggested by a number of studies, it remains unclear to what extent they relate to the neurovascular response and are therefore inherent to BOLD-fMRI. Full characterization of potential vascular nonlinearities is required for accurate inferences about the neuronal system under study. To investigate the extent of vascular nonlinearities, evoked activity was studied in humans with BOLD-fMRI (n=28) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) (n=5). Brief (600-800 ms) rapidly repeated (1 Hz) visual stimuli were delivered using a stimulation paradigm that minimized neuronal nonlinearities. Nevertheless, BOLD-fMRI experiments showed substantial remaining nonlinearities. The smallest stimulus separation (200-400 ms) resulted in significant response broadening (15-20% amplitude decrease; 10-12% latency increase; 6-14% duration increase) with respect to a linear prediction. The substantial slowing and widening of the response in the presence of preceding stimuli suggests a vascular rather than neuronal origin to the observed non-linearity. This was confirmed by the MEG data, which showed no significant neuro-electric nonlinear interactions between stimuli as little as 200 ms apart. The presence of substantial vascular nonlinearities has important implications for rapid event-related studies by fMRI and other imaging modalities that infer neuronal activity from hemodynamic parameters. PMID:19520175

  7. Applying dynamic parameters to predict hemodynamic response to volume expansion in spontaneously breathing patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Lanspa, Michael J; Grissom, Colin K; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Jones, Jason P; Brown, Samuel M

    2013-02-01

    Volume expansion is a mainstay of therapy in septic shock, although its effect is difficult to predict using conventional measurements. Dynamic parameters, which vary with respiratory changes, appear to predict hemodynamic response to fluid challenge in mechanically ventilated, paralyzed patients. Whether they predict response in patients who are free from mechanical ventilation is unknown. We hypothesized that dynamic parameters would be predictive in patients not receiving mechanical ventilation. This is a prospective, observational, pilot study. Patients with early septic shock and who were not receiving mechanical ventilation received 10-mL/kg volume expansion (VE) at their treating physician's discretion after initial resuscitation in the emergency department. We used transthoracic echocardiography to measure vena cava collapsibility index and aortic velocity variation before VE. We used a pulse contour analysis device to measure stroke volume variation (SVV). Cardiac index was measured immediately before and after VE using transthoracic echocardiography. Hemodynamic response was defined as an increase in cardiac index 15% or greater. Fourteen patients received VE, five of whom demonstrated a hemodynamic response. Vena cava collapsibility index and SVV were predictive (area under the curve = 0.83, 0.92, respectively). Optimal thresholds were calculated: vena cava collapsibility index, 15% or greater (positive predictive value, 62%; negative predictive value, 100%; P = 0.03); SVV, 17% or greater (positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 82%, P = 0.03). Aortic velocity variation was not predictive. Vena cava collapsibility index and SVV predict hemodynamic response to fluid challenge patients with septic shock who are not mechanically ventilated. Optimal thresholds differ from those described in mechanically ventilated patients.

  8. Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses During Dynamic Posturography: Analysis with a Multichannel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Hiromasa; Nishijo, Hisao; Ishikawa, Akihiro; Shojaku, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate cortical roles in standing balance, cortical hemodynamic activity was recorded from the right hemisphere using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while subjects underwent the sensory organization test (SOT) protocol that systematically disrupts sensory integration processes (i.e., somatosensory or visual inputs or both). Eleven healthy men underwent the SOT during NIRS recording. Group statistical analyses were performed based on changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in 10 different cortical regions of interest and on a general linear analysis with NIRS statistical parametric mapping. The statistical analyses indicated significant activation in the right frontal operculum (f-Op), right parietal operculum (p-Op), and right superior temporal gyrus (STG), right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), right dorsal and ventral premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) under various conditions. The activation patterns in response to specific combinations of SOT conditions suggested that (1) f-Op, p-Op, and STG are essential for sensory integration when standing balance is perturbed; (2) the SMA is involved in the execution of volitional action and establishment of new motor programs to maintain postural balance; and (3) the PPC and PMC are involved in the updating and computation of spatial reference frames during instances of sensory conflict between vestibular and visual information. PMID:26635574

  9. Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses During Dynamic Posturography: Analysis with a Multichannel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hiromasa; Nishijo, Hisao; Ishikawa, Akihiro; Shojaku, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate cortical roles in standing balance, cortical hemodynamic activity was recorded from the right hemisphere using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while subjects underwent the sensory organization test (SOT) protocol that systematically disrupts sensory integration processes (i.e., somatosensory or visual inputs or both). Eleven healthy men underwent the SOT during NIRS recording. Group statistical analyses were performed based on changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in 10 different cortical regions of interest and on a general linear analysis with NIRS statistical parametric mapping. The statistical analyses indicated significant activation in the right frontal operculum (f-Op), right parietal operculum (p-Op), and right superior temporal gyrus (STG), right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), right dorsal and ventral premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) under various conditions. The activation patterns in response to specific combinations of SOT conditions suggested that (1) f-Op, p-Op, and STG are essential for sensory integration when standing balance is perturbed; (2) the SMA is involved in the execution of volitional action and establishment of new motor programs to maintain postural balance; and (3) the PPC and PMC are involved in the updating and computation of spatial reference frames during instances of sensory conflict between vestibular and visual information. PMID:26635574

  10. Specificity of Hemodynamic Brain Responses to Painful Stimuli: A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Aasted, Christopher M.; Petkov, Mihayl P.; Borsook, David; Boas, David A.; Becerra, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Assessing pain in individuals not able to communicate (e.g. infants, under surgery, or following stroke) is difficult due to the lack of non-verbal objective measures of pain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) being a portable, non-invasive and inexpensive method of monitoring cerebral hemodynamic activity has the potential to provide such a measure. Here we used functional NIRS to evaluate brain activation to an innocuous and a noxious electrical stimulus on healthy human subjects (n = 11). For both innocuous and noxious stimuli, we observed a signal change in the primary somatosensory cortex contralateral to the stimulus. The painful and non-painful stimuli can be differentiated based on their signal size and profile. We also observed that repetitive noxious stimuli resulted in adaptation of the signal. Furthermore, the signal was distinguishable from a skin sympathetic response to pain that tended to mask it. Our results support the notion that functional NIRS has a potential utility as an objective measure of pain. PMID:25820289

  11. Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses During Dynamic Posturography: Analysis with a Multichannel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hiromasa; Nishijo, Hisao; Ishikawa, Akihiro; Shojaku, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate cortical roles in standing balance, cortical hemodynamic activity was recorded from the right hemisphere using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while subjects underwent the sensory organization test (SOT) protocol that systematically disrupts sensory integration processes (i.e., somatosensory or visual inputs or both). Eleven healthy men underwent the SOT during NIRS recording. Group statistical analyses were performed based on changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in 10 different cortical regions of interest and on a general linear analysis with NIRS statistical parametric mapping. The statistical analyses indicated significant activation in the right frontal operculum (f-Op), right parietal operculum (p-Op), and right superior temporal gyrus (STG), right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), right dorsal and ventral premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) under various conditions. The activation patterns in response to specific combinations of SOT conditions suggested that (1) f-Op, p-Op, and STG are essential for sensory integration when standing balance is perturbed; (2) the SMA is involved in the execution of volitional action and establishment of new motor programs to maintain postural balance; and (3) the PPC and PMC are involved in the updating and computation of spatial reference frames during instances of sensory conflict between vestibular and visual information.

  12. [Effects of hot water bath or sauna on patients with congestive heart failure: acute hemodynamic improvement by thermal vasodilation].

    PubMed

    Tei, C; Horikiri, Y; Park, J C; Jeong, J W; Chang, K S; Tanaka, N; Toyama, Y

    1994-01-01

    The acute hemodynamic effects of thermal vasodilation caused by exposure to hot water bath or sauna in chronic congestive heart failure were investigated in 32 patients (mean age 57 +/- 15 years old) with dilated cardiomyopathy (25 idiopathic and 7 ischemic). The clinical symptoms were New York Heart Association Class II in 2 patients, III in 17 and IV in 13, and the mean ejection fraction was 25 +/- 9% (9-44%). Exposure to hot water bath was for 10 minutes at 41 degrees C in a semi-sitting position, and to sauna for 15 minutes at 60 degrees C in a supine position using a special far infrared ray sauna chamber. Blood pressure, electrocardiogram, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiograms, expiration gas, and intracardiac pressure tracings were recorded before (control), during, and 30 minutes after hot water bath or sauna. 1. The increase in oxygen consumption was only 0.3 Mets during hot water bath or sauna, and returned to the control level 30 minutes later. 2. The deep temperature in the main pulmonary artery increased by 1.0-1.2 degrees C on average at the end of hot water bath or sauna. 3. Heart rate increased significantly (p < 0.01) by 20-25/min during bathing and still increased 30 min later. 4. Systolic blood pressure did not change significantly during and after hot water bath or sauna, while, diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly during (p < 0.05) and after sauna (p < 0.01), and after hot water bath (p < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Effects of high doses of dexamethasone on hemodynamic and immunohistochemical characteristics of acute paraquat intoxication in rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Ekerbicer, N; Gurpinar, T; Tarakci, F; Turkoz Uluer, E; İnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium) (PQ), is a nonselective contact herbicide that is highly toxic to humans. The kidney is affected during PQ intoxication. Dexamethasone (Dexa) has anti-inflammatory effects and is used to treat cases of PQ poisoning. We investigated in rat kidney hemodynamic effects and immunohistochemical characteristics of Dexa treatment in acute PQ poisoning. Adult male rats were divided into four groups: 1, untreated control; 2, treated with 100 mg/kg Dexa; 3, treated with 25 mg/kg PQ; 4, treated with PQ + Dexa. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded during the experimental period (2 h). Tissues were removed after 2 h and immunohistochemistry was performed after 24 h. Paraffin sections of kidney were prepared and anti-cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1), anti-cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), anti-angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), anti-aquaporin-1 (AQU-1), anti-vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) primary antibodies were used for immunohistochemical examination. Immunoreactivities were scored as: (1) minimal, (2) weak, (3) mild, (4) moderate, (5) strong and (6) very strong. MAP and HR were measured at 10 min, 20 min, 1 h and 2 h. MAP at 10 and 20 min and 1 h was increased in the Dexa group. HR also was increased in all groups compared to controls at 2 h. Compared to groups 2 and 4, MAP values decreased significantly in group 3 at 1 h. The intensity of all of immunoreactivities was decreased in group 2. In group 3, immunoreactivities of COX-1, COX-2 and ACE were decreased compared to the control and the other groups, whereas AQU-1 and VCAM immunoreactivities were the same as the control group. ACE and VCAM immunoreactivities were decreased in group 4 compared to the control group, while COX-1, COX-2 and AQU-1 immunoreactivities were close to those of the control group. Dexa appears to be useful for treating PQ intoxication. PMID:26796020

  14. Implantable self-reset CMOS image sensor and its application to hemodynamic response detection in living mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takehara, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A self-reset pixel of 15 × 15 µm2 with high signal-to-noise ratio (effective peak SNR ≃64 dB) for an implantable image sensor has been developed for intrinsic signal detection arising from hemodynamic responses in a living mouse brain. For detecting local conversion between oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) in brain tissues, an implantable imaging device was fabricated with our newly designed self-reset image sensor and orange light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ = 605 nm). We demonstrated imaging of hemodynamic responses in the sensory cortical area accompanied by forelimb stimulation of a living mouse. The implantable imaging device for intrinsic signal detection is expected to be a powerful tool to measure brain activities in living animals used in behavioral analysis.

  15. Acute changes of left ventricular hemodynamics and function during percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Mi; Ahn, Chul-Min; Hong, Soon-Jun; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Shim, Wan-Joo; Lim, Do-Sun

    2015-07-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) are increasingly being used to treat unprotected left main coronary artery (ULMCA) lesions. However, research is sparse on the acute changes of left ventricular (LV) hemodynamics and function during PCI in patients with ULMCA stenosis. We aimed to assess the acute changes of LV function using speckle-tracking imaging during PCI in these patients. Fifteen consecutive patients who underwent elective PCI for ULMCA stenosis were enrolled. Echocardiographic studies and pressure measurement were performed at baseline, during PCI and after PCI. LMCA occlusion with a first balloon inflation induced a marked reduction in the peak positive derivative of LV pressure (dP/dt max), LV global longitudinal strain (GLS), and systolic and diastolic strain rates, and a marked increase in LV end-diastolic pressure (EDP) (all P < 0.01). During the second inflation, the degrees of LV hemodynamic and functional changes were similar to those of the first inflation, even with a higher inflation pressure. During the third inflation, the values of GLS and dP/dt max were higher than those of the second inflation (P = 0.03 and P = 0.05, respectively). After optimal PCI, dP/dt max, LVEDP, and strain parameters were improved to baseline values. LV hemodynamics and function were considerably impaired with the first ballooning during PCI for ULMCA stenosis. However, the degrees of LV hemodynamic and functional changes decreased with each successive balloon inflation, which can be explained by ischemic preconditioning. After all procedures were safely completed, LV systolic function was improved without LV diastolic stunning.

  16. Hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Lee, Joshua F.; Berbert, Amanda; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for exercise intolerance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the present study sought to evaluate the hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in this cohort. In 25 HFrEF patients (64 ± 2 yr) and 17 healthy, age-matched control subjects (64 ± 2 yr), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and limb blood flow were examined during graded static-intermittent handgrip (HG) and dynamic single-leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise. During HG exercise, MAP increased similarly between groups. CO increased significantly (+1.3 ± 0.3 l/min) in the control group, but it remained unchanged across workloads in HFrEF patients. At 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), forearm blood flow was similar between groups, while HFrEF patients exhibited an attenuated increase at the two highest intensities compared with controls, with the greatest difference at the highest workload (352 ± 22 vs. 492 ± 48 ml/min, HFrEF vs. control, 45% MVC). During KE exercise, MAP and CO increased similarly across work rates between groups. However, HFrEF patients exhibited a diminished leg hyperemic response across all work rates, with the most substantial decrement at the highest intensity (1,842 ± 64 vs. 2,675 ± 81 ml/min; HFrEF vs. control, 15 W). Together, these findings indicate a marked attenuation in exercising limb perfusion attributable to impairments in peripheral vasodilatory capacity during both arm and leg exercise in patients with HFrEF, which likely plays a role in limiting exercise capacity in this patient population. PMID:25260608

  17. Fentanyl infusion anesthesia for aortocoronary bypass surgery: plasma levels and hemodynamic response.

    PubMed

    Sprigge, J S; Wynands, J E; Whalley, D G; Bevan, D R; Townsend, G E; Nathan, H; Patel, Y C; Srikant, C B

    1982-12-01

    Plasma fentanyl concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay in patients during aortocoronary bypass surgery and correlated with hemodynamic responses to surgical stimulation. Thirty patients scheduled for aortocoronary bypass surgery were divided into three groups of 10. Patients in group 1 received fentanyl, 30 micrograms/kg, as a loading dose followed by an infusion of 0.3 microgram/kg/min; those in group 2 received 40 micrograms/kg as a loading dose followed by an infusion of 0.4 microgram/kg/min; and those in group 3 received 50 micrograms/kg as the loading dose followed by an infusion of 0.5 microgram/kg/min. The total dose of fentanyl administered to each group up to the time of rewarming on cardiopulmonary bypass was 60 micrograms/kg, 90 micrograms/kg, respectively. Each of the dose regimens produced stable plasma concentrations starting approximately 20 minutes after induction and continuing until the infusion was discontinued. Patients in group 1 had a mean plasma concentration of 10 to 12 ng/ml in the stable period compared with 12 to 14 ng/ml in group 2 and 15 to 18 ng/ml in group 3. Fewer patients in group 3 responded to intubation and surgical stimulation than in the other groups, although the differences between groups were not statistically significant. Response to stimulation was treated by the administration of droperidol or volatile anesthetic agents. At a plasma concentration of 15 ng/ml, 50% of patients had an increase in systolic blood pressure which required treatment. This minimal intra-arterial concentration, analogous to MAC, can be achieved by the administration of fentanyl as a loading dose of 50 micrograms/kg followed by an infusion of 0.5 microgram/kg/min.

  18. Hemodynamic Response to Interictal Epileptiform Discharges Addressed by Personalized EEG-fNIRS Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Giovanni; Machado, Alexis; von Ellenrieder, Nicolas; Watanabe, Satsuki; Hall, Jeffery A.; Lina, Jean-Marc; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed at studying the hemodynamic response (HR) to Interictal Epileptic Discharges (IEDs) using patient-specific and prolonged simultaneous ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) and functional Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (fNIRS) recordings. Methods: The epileptic generator was localized using Magnetoencephalography source imaging. fNIRS montage was tailored for each patient, using an algorithm to optimize the sensitivity to the epileptic generator. Optodes were glued using collodion to achieve prolonged acquisition with high quality signal. fNIRS data analysis was handled with no a priori constraint on HR time course, averaging fNIRS signals to similar IEDs. Cluster-permutation analysis was performed on 3D reconstructed fNIRS data to identify significant spatio-temporal HR clusters. Standard (GLM with fixed HRF) and cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analyses were performed for comparison purposes. Results: fNIRS detected HR to IEDs for 8/9 patients. It mainly consisted oxy-hemoglobin increases (seven patients), followed by oxy-hemoglobin decreases (six patients). HR was lateralized in six patients and lasted from 8.5 to 30 s. Standard EEG-fMRI analysis detected an HR in 4/9 patients (4/9 without enough IEDs, 1/9 unreliable result). The cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analysis restricted to the region investigated by fNIRS showed additional strong and non-canonical BOLD responses starting earlier than the IEDs and lasting up to 30 s. Conclusions: (i) EEG-fNIRS is suitable to detect the HR to IEDs and can outperform EEG-fMRI because of prolonged recordings and greater chance to detect IEDs; (ii) cluster-permutation analysis unveils additional HR features underestimated when imposing a canonical HR function (iii) the HR is often bilateral and lasts up to 30 s. PMID:27047325

  19. Detecting the subtle shape differences in hemodynamic responses at the group level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Cox, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the hemodynamic response (HDR) is still not fully understood due to the multifaceted processes involved. Aside from the overall amplitude, the response may vary across cognitive states, tasks, brain regions, and subjects with respect to characteristics such as rise and fall speed, peak duration, undershoot shape, and overall duration. Here we demonstrate that the fixed-shape (FSM) or adjusted-shape (ASM) methods may fail to detect some shape subtleties (e.g., speed of rise or recovery, or undershoot). In contrast, the estimated-shape method (ESM) through multiple basis functions can provide the opportunity to identify some subtle shape differences and achieve higher statistical power at both individual and group levels. Previously, some dimension reduction approaches focused on the peak magnitude, or made inferences based on the area under the curve (AUC) or interaction, which can lead to potential misidentifications. By adopting a generic framework of multivariate modeling (MVM), we showcase a hybrid approach that is validated by simulations and real data. With the whole HDR shape integrity maintained as input at the group level, the approach allows the investigator to substantiate these more nuanced effects through the unique HDR shape features. Unlike the few analyses that were limited to main effect, two- or three-way interactions, we extend the modeling approach to an inclusive platform that is more adaptable than the conventional GLM. With multiple effect estimates from ESM for each condition, linear mixed-effects (LME) modeling should be used at the group level when there is only one group of subjects without any other explanatory variables. Under other situations, an approximate approach through dimension reduction within the MVM framework can be adopted to achieve a practical equipoise among representation, false positive control, statistical power, and modeling flexibility. The associated program 3dMVM is publicly available as part of the

  20. Ketamine modulates fetal hemodynamic and endocrine responses to umbilical cord occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Miguel A; Chang, Eileen I; Antolic, Andrew; Wood, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    Umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) is a hypoxic insult that has been used to model birth asphyxia and umbilical cord compression in utero. UCO triggers vigorous neural and endocrine responses that include increased plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations, increased blood pressure (BP), and decreased heart rate (HR). We have previously reported that ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, can modify the fetal hemodynamic and ACTH responses to ventilatory hypoxia and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. We performed the present experiments to test the hypothesis that ketamine has similar effects on the neuroendocrine and cardiovascular responses to UCO Fetal sheep were chronically catheterized at gestational day 125. Ketamine (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously to the fetus 10 min prior to the insult. UCO was induced for 30 min by reducing the umbilical vein blood flow until fetal PaO2 levels were reduced from 17 ± 1 to 11 ± 1 mm Hg. UCO produced an initial increase on fetal BP in both control and ketamine groups (P = 0.018 time), followed by a decrease in the control group, but values remained higher with ketamine. HR decreased after UCO (P = 0.041 stimulus*time) in both groups, but the reduction was greater initially in control compared to ketamine groups. Fetal PaCO2 levels increased after UCO (P < 0.01 stimulus*time), but values were higher in the control versus ketamine groups. UCO significantly decreased fetal pH values (P < 0.01 stimulus*time) with a greater effect on the control versus ketamine group. Ketamine delayed the cortisol responses to UCO (P < 0.001 stimulus*time), and UCO produced a robust increase in ACTH levels from 19 ± 2 to 280 ± 27 pg/mL (P < 0.001 stimulus*time), but there were no differences in ACTH levels between UCO groups. We conclude that ketamine augmented the cardiovascular response to UCO, but did not alter the ACTH response to UCO. PMID:27597770

  1. Central circulatory hemodynamics as a function of gravitational stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, Rick D.; White, C. D.; Fanton, J. W.; Owens, R. W.; Barber, J. F.; Lewkowski, B. E.; Goff, O. T.

    1991-01-01

    This study focuses on an evaluation of the central hemodynamics in a nonhuman primate model to variations in gravitational states. The baboon, phylogenectically close to man, was chosen as the human surrogate. The study environments selected are head-down and head-up tilt in the physiology laboratory, centrifugation to test hypergravic stress, and parabolic flights to test transient acute responses to microgravity.

  2. Differences in the Pulsatile Component of the Skin Hemodynamic Response to Verbal Fluency Tasks in the Forehead and the Fingertip

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Takikawa, Yoriko; Kawagoe, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have claimed that hemodynamic signals measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the forehead exhibit different patterns during a verbal fluency task (VFT) in various psychiatric disorders, whereas many studies have noted that NIRS signals can reflect task-related changes in skin blood flow. If such a task-related skin hemodynamic response is also observed in the fingertip, a simpler biomarker may be developed. Furthermore, determining the difference in the response pattern may provide physiological insights into the condition. We found that the magnitude of the pulsatile component in skin hemodynamic signals increased on the forehead (p < 0.001 for N = 50, p = 0.073 for N = 8) but decreased on the fingertip (p < 0.001, N = 8) during the VFT, whereas the rate in both areas increased (p < 0.02, N = 8). We also did not find a repetition effect in both the rate and the magnitude on the fingertip, whereas the effect was present in the magnitude (p < 0.02, N = 8) but not in the rate on the forehead. These results suggest that the skin vasomotor system in the forehead could have a different vessel mechanism to psychological tasks compared to the fingertip. PMID:26905432

  3. Hemodynamic, Functional, and Clinical Responses to Pulmonary Artery Denervation in Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension of Different Causes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Xie, Du-Jiang; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Ling; Rothman, Alexander M.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background— The mechanisms underlying pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are multifactorial. The efficacy of pulmonary artery denervation (PADN) for idiopathic PAH treatment has been evaluated. This study aimed to analyze the hemodynamic, functional, and clinical responses to PADN in patients with PAH of different causes. Methods and Results— Between April 2012 and April 2014, 66 consecutive patients with a resting mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mm Hg treated with PADN were prospectively followed up. Target drugs were discontinued after the PADN procedure. Hemodynamic response and 6-minute walk distance were repeatedly measured within the 1 year post PADN follow-up. The clinical end point was the occurrence of PAH-related events at the 1-year follow-up. There were no PADN-related complications. Hemodynamic success (defined as the reduction in mean pulmonary arterial pressure by a minimal 10% post PADN) was achieved in 94% of all patients, with a mean absolute reduction in systolic pulmonary arterial pressure and mean pulmonary arterial pressure within 24 hours of −10 mm Hg and −7 mm Hg, respectively. The average increment in 6-minute walk distance after PADN was 94 m. Worse PAH-related events occurred in 10 patients (15%), mostly driven by the worsening of PAH (12%). There were 8 (12%) all-cause deaths, with 6 (9%) PAH-related deaths. Conclusions— PADN was safe and feasible for the treatment of PAH. The PADN procedure was associated with significant improvements in hemodynamic function, exercise capacity, and cardiac function and with less frequent PAH-related events and death at 1 year after PADN treatment. Further randomized studies are required to confirm the efficacy of PADN for PAH. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.chictr.trc.com.cn. Unique identifier: chiCTR-ONC-12002085. PMID:26553699

  4. Cerebral Hemodynamic Changes of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Hardik; Wiseman, Natalie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wentao; Welch, Robert D.; O’Neil, Brian J.; Zuk, Conor; Wang, Xiao; Mika, Valerie; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Haacke, E. Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL). We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively). We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both). mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25659079

  5. A comparative study of esmolol and dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic responses to carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Dhurjoti Prosad; Saha, Sauvik; Paul, Sanjib; Roychowdhary, Shibsankar; Mondal, Shirsendu; Paul, Suhrita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery increases arterial pressures, heart rate (HR), and systemic vascular resistance. In this randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, we investigated and compared the efficacy of esmolol and dexmedetomidine to provide perioperative hemodynamic stability in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Sixty patients, of either sex undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, were randomly allocated into three groups containing twenty patients each. Group E received bolus dose of 500 μg/kg intravenous (IV) esmolol before pneumoperitoneum followed by an infusion of 100 μg/kg/min. Group D received bolus dose of 1 μg/kg IV dexmedetomidine before pneumoperitoneum followed by infusion of 0.2 μg/kg/h. Group S (control) received saline 0.9%. Results: Mean arterial pressure and HR in Group E and D were significantly less throughout the period of pneumoperitoneum in comparison to Group S. IV nitroglycerine was required in 45% (9 out of 20) patients in Group S to control intraoperative hypertension, and it was clinically significant in comparison to Group E and D. Conclusion: Both esmolol and dexmedetomidine attenuate the adverse hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum and provide hemodynamic stability during laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27746555

  6. Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Saba; Schudlo, Larissa; Chau, Tom; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes.

  7. Variability in Prefrontal Hemodynamic Response during Exposure to Repeated Self-Selected Music Excerpts, a Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Saba; Schudlo, Larissa; Chau, Tom; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes. PMID:25837268

  8. Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Saba; Schudlo, Larissa; Chau, Tom; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes. PMID:25837268

  9. Hemodynamic and respiratory responses to microinjection of ATP into the intermediate and caudal NTS of awake rats.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Vagner R; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Machado, Benedito H

    2005-01-25

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is the site of integration of the peripheral chemoreceptor afferents in the brainstem. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that microinjection of ATP into the intermediate NTS produced increases in arterial pressure and bradycardia. In the present study, we evaluated the hemodynamic and respiratory responses to microinjection of ATP into the intermediate and caudal commissural NTS. In the same group of rats the responses were compared with cardiorespiratory responses to chemoreflex activation (KCN, i.v.). The data show that microinjection of ATP into the intermediate NTS produced pressor and bradycardic responses similar to those observed in response to chemoreflex activation but apnoea instead of tachypnoea. Microinjection of ATP into caudal commissural NTS produced increase in arterial pressure and tachypnoea similar to the chemoreflex but a minor bradycardia. The data show that microinjection of ATP into different sub-regions of the NTS produces a diverse pattern of hemodynamic and respiratory responses and suggest the involvement of this purine in the neurotransmission of the cardiovascular reflex in the NTS.

  10. Hemodynamic and hormonal responses to lower body negative pressure in men with varying profiles of strength and aerobic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Mathes, K. L.; Lasley, M. L.; Tomaselli, C. M.; Frey, M. A.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    Hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were examined in 24 healthy men to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of reflex control of blood pressure during orthostatic challenge is associated with interactions between strength and aerobic power. Subjects underwent treadmill tests to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2max) and isokinetic dynamometer tests to determine knee extensor strength. Based on predetermined criteria, subjects were classified into one of four fitness profiles of six subjects each, matched for age, height, and body mass: (a) low strength/average aerobic fitness, (b) low strength/high aerobic fitness, (c) high strength/average aerobic fitness, and (d) high strength/high aerobic fitness. Following 90 min of 0.11 rad (6 degrees) head-down tilt (HDT), each subject underwent graded LBNP to -6.7 kPa or presyncope, with maximal duration 15 min, while hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses were measured. All groups exhibited typical hemodynamic, hormonal, and fluid shift responses during LBNP, with no intergroup differences between high and low strength characteristics. Subjects with high aerobic power exhibited greater (P < 0.05) stroke volume and lower (P < 0.05) heart rate, vascular peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure during rest, HDT, and LBNP. Seven subjects, distributed among the four fitness profiles, became presyncopal. These subjects showed greatest reduction in mean arterial pressure during LBNP, had greater elevations in vasopressin, and lesser increases in heart rate and peripheral resistance. Neither VO2max nor leg strength were associated with fall in arterial pressure or with syncopal episodes. We conclude that interactions between aerobic and strength fitness characteristics do not influence responses to LBNP challenge.

  11. Influence of Spinal and General Anesthesia on the Metabolic, Hormonal, and Hemodynamic Response in Elective Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Snezana B.; Pavlovic, Aleksandar P.; Trpkovic, Sladjana V.; Ilić, Aleksandra N.; Sekulic, Ana D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the significance of spinal anesthesia in the suppression of the metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic response to surgical stress in elective surgical patients compared to general anesthesia. Material/Methods The study was clinical, prospective, and controlled and it involved 2 groups of patients (the spinal and the general anesthesia group) who underwent the same surgery. We monitored the metabolic and hormonal response to perioperative stress based on serum cortisol level and glycemia. We also examined how the different techniques of anesthesia affect these hemodynamic parameters: systolic arterial pressure (AP), diastolic AP, heart rate (HR), and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). These parameters were measured before induction on anesthesia (T1), 30 min after the surgical incisions (T2), 1 h postoperatively (T3) and 24 h after surgery (T4). Results Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in the general anesthesia group compared to the spinal anesthesia group (p<0.01). Glycemia was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.05). There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between serum cortisol levels and glycemia at all times observed (p<0.01). Systolic and diastolic AP did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.191, p=0.101). The HR was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.01). SpO2 values did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.081). Conclusions Based on metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses, spinal anesthesia proved more effective than general anesthesia in suppressing stress response in elective surgical patients. PMID:25284266

  12. Pros and Cons of Using the Informed Basis Set to Account for Hemodynamic Response Variability with Developmental Data

    PubMed Central

    Cignetti, Fabien; Salvia, Emilie; Anton, Jean-Luc; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Assaiante, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Conventional analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using the general linear model (GLM) employs a neural model convolved with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF) peaking 5 s after stimulation. Incorporation of a further basis function, namely the canonical HRF temporal derivative, accounts for delays in the hemodynamic response to neural activity. A population that may benefit from this flexible approach is children whose hemodynamic response is not yet mature. Here, we examined the effects of using the set based on the canonical HRF plus its temporal derivative on both first- and second-level GLM analyses, through simulations and using developmental data (an fMRI dataset on proprioceptive mapping in children and adults). Simulations of delayed fMRI first-level data emphasized the benefit of carrying forward to the second-level a derivative boost that combines derivative and nonderivative beta estimates. In the experimental data, second-level analysis using a paired t-test showed increased mean amplitude estimate (i.e., increased group contrast mean) in several brain regions related to proprioceptive processing when using the derivative boost compared to using only the nonderivative term. This was true especially in children. However, carrying forward to the second-level the individual derivative boosts had adverse consequences on random-effects analysis that implemented one-sample t-test, yielding increased between-subject variance, thus affecting group-level statistic. Boosted data also presented a lower level of smoothness that had implication for the detection of group average activation. Imposing soft constraints on the derivative boost by limiting the time-to-peak range of the modeled response within a specified range (i.e., 4–6 s) mitigated these issues. These findings support the notion that there are pros and cons to using the informed basis set with developmental data. PMID:27471441

  13. Pros and Cons of Using the Informed Basis Set to Account for Hemodynamic Response Variability with Developmental Data.

    PubMed

    Cignetti, Fabien; Salvia, Emilie; Anton, Jean-Luc; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Assaiante, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Conventional analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using the general linear model (GLM) employs a neural model convolved with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF) peaking 5 s after stimulation. Incorporation of a further basis function, namely the canonical HRF temporal derivative, accounts for delays in the hemodynamic response to neural activity. A population that may benefit from this flexible approach is children whose hemodynamic response is not yet mature. Here, we examined the effects of using the set based on the canonical HRF plus its temporal derivative on both first- and second-level GLM analyses, through simulations and using developmental data (an fMRI dataset on proprioceptive mapping in children and adults). Simulations of delayed fMRI first-level data emphasized the benefit of carrying forward to the second-level a derivative boost that combines derivative and nonderivative beta estimates. In the experimental data, second-level analysis using a paired t-test showed increased mean amplitude estimate (i.e., increased group contrast mean) in several brain regions related to proprioceptive processing when using the derivative boost compared to using only the nonderivative term. This was true especially in children. However, carrying forward to the second-level the individual derivative boosts had adverse consequences on random-effects analysis that implemented one-sample t-test, yielding increased between-subject variance, thus affecting group-level statistic. Boosted data also presented a lower level of smoothness that had implication for the detection of group average activation. Imposing soft constraints on the derivative boost by limiting the time-to-peak range of the modeled response within a specified range (i.e., 4-6 s) mitigated these issues. These findings support the notion that there are pros and cons to using the informed basis set with developmental data.

  14. Short separation regression improves statistical significance and better localizes the hemodynamic response obtained by near-infrared spectroscopy for tasks with differing autonomic responses

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M.; Petkov, Mike P.; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David; Boas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Autonomic nervous system response is known to be highly task-dependent. The sensitivity of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements to superficial layers, particularly to the scalp, makes it highly susceptible to systemic physiological changes. Thus, one critical step in NIRS data processing is to remove the contribution of superficial layers to the NIRS signal and to obtain the actual brain response. This can be achieved using short separation channels that are sensitive only to the hemodynamics in the scalp. We investigated the contribution of hemodynamic fluctuations due to autonomous nervous system activation during various tasks. Our results provide clear demonstrations of the critical role of using short separation channels in NIRS measurements to disentangle differing autonomic responses from the brain activation signal of interest. PMID:26835480

  15. Pharmacologic agents for acute hemodynamic instability: Recent advances in the management of perioperative shock- A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morozowich, Steven T.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of evidence evaluating the efficacy of vasoactive agents in the management of hemodynamic instability and circulatory shock, it appears no agent is superior. This is becoming increasingly accepted as current guidelines are moving away from detailed algorithms for the management of shock, and instead succinctly state that vasoactive agents should be individualized and guided by invasive hemodynamic monitoring. This extends to the perioperative period, where vasoactive agent selection and use may still be left to the discretion of the treating physician with a goal-directed approach, consisting of close hemodynamic monitoring and administration of the lowest effective dose to achieve the hemodynamic goals. Successful therapy depends on the ability to rapidly diagnose the etiology of circulatory shock and thoroughly understand its pathophysiology as well as the pharmacology of vasoactive agents. This review focuses on the physiology and resuscitation goals in perioperative shock, as well as the pharmacology and recent advances in vasoactive agent use in its management. PMID:26440241

  16. Exercise training improves renal excretory responses to acute volume expansion in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Li, Yi-Fan; Zucker, Irving H; Patel, Kaushik P

    2006-12-01

    Experiments were performed to test the postulate that exercise training (ExT) improves the blunted renal excretory response to acute volume expansion (VE), in part, by normalizing the neural component of the volume reflex typically observed in chronic heart failure (HF). Diuretic and natriuretic responses to acute VE were examined in sedentary and ExT groups of rats with either HF or sham-operated controls. Experiments were performed in anesthetized (Inactin) rats 6 wk after coronary ligation surgery. Histological data indicated that there was a 34.9 +/- 3.0% outer and 42.5 +/- 3.2% inner infarct of the myocardium in the HF group. Sham rats had no observable damage to the myocardium. In sedentary rats with HF, VE produced a blunted diuresis (46% of sham) and natriuresis (35% of sham) compared with sham-operated control rats. However, acute VE-induced diuresis and natriuresis in ExT rats with HF were comparable to sham rats and significantly higher than sedentary HF rats. Renal denervation abolished the salutary effects of ExT on renal excretory response to acute VE in HF. Since glomerular filtration rates were not significantly different between the groups, renal hemodynamic changes may not account for the blunted renal responses in rats with HF. Additional experiments confirmed that renal sympathetic nerve activity responses to acute VE were blunted in sedentary HF rats; however, ExT normalized the renal sympathoinhibition in HF rats. These results confirm an impairment of neurally mediated excretory responses to acute VE in rats with HF. ExT restored the blunted excretory responses as well as the renal sympathoinhibitory response to acute VE in HF rats. Thus the beneficial effects of ExT on cardiovascular regulation in HF may be partly due to improvement of the neural component of volume reflex.

  17. Differences in the hemodynamic response to event-related motor and visual paradigms as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasdzewski, G.; Strangman, G.; Wagner, J.; Kwong, K. K.; Poldrack, R. A.; Boas, D. A.; Sutton, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Several current brain imaging techniques rest on the assumption of a tight coupling between neural activity and hemodynamic response. The nature of this neurovascular coupling, however, is not completely understood. There is some evidence for a decoupling of these processes at the onset of neural activity, which manifests itself as a momentary increase in the relative concentration of deoxyhemoglobin (HbR). The existence of this early component of the hemodynamic response function, however, is controversial, as it is inconsistently found. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows quantification of levels of oxyhemoglobin (HbO(2)) and HbR during task performance in humans. We acquired NIRS data during performance of simple motor and visual tasks, using rapid-presentation event-related paradigms. Our results demonstrate that rapid, event-related NIRS can provide robust estimates of the hemodynamic response without artifacts due to low-frequency signal components, unlike data from blocked designs. In both the motor and visual data the onset of the increase in HbO(2) occurs before HbR decreases, and there is a poststimulus undershoot. Our results also show that total blood volume (HbT) drops before HbO(2) and undershoots baseline, raising a new issue for neurovascular models. We did not find early deoxygenation in the motor data using physiologically plausible values for the differential pathlength factor, but did find one in the visual data. We suggest that this difference, which is consistent with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, may be attributable to different capillary transit times in these cortices.

  18. Hemodynamic Responses of Unfit Healthy Women at a Training Session with Nintendo Wii: A Possible Impact on the General Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato S; Figueiredo, Luiz F; Conceição, Isabel; Carvalho, Carolina; Lattari, Eduardo; Mura, Gioia; Machado, Sérgio; da Silva, Elirez B

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was assess the effect of a training session with Nintendo Wii® on the hemodynamic responses of healthy women not involved in regular physical exercise. Method: Twenty-five healthy unfit women aged 28 ± 6 years played for 10 minutes the game Free Run (Wii Fit Plus). The resting heart rate (RHR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP), and double (rate-pressure) product (DP) were measured before and after activity. The HR during the activity (exercise heart rate, EHR) was measured every minute. Results: A statistically significant difference was observed between the RHR (75 ± 9 bpm) and the mean EHR (176 ± 15 bpm) (P < 0.001). The EHR remained in the target zone for aerobic exercise until the fifth minute of activity, which coincided with the upper limit of the aerobic zone (80% heart rate reserve (HRR) + RHR) from the sixth to tenth minute. The initial (110 ± 8 mmHg) and final (145 ± 17 mmHg) SBP (P < 0.01) were significantly different, as were the initial (71 ± 8 mmHg) and final (79 ± 9 mmHg) DBP (P < 0.01). A statistically significant difference was observed between the pre- (8.233 ± 1.141 bpm-mmHg) and post-activity (25.590 ± 4.117 bpm-mmHg) DP (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Physical exercise while playing Free Run sufficed to trigger acute hemodynamic changes in healthy women who were not engaged in regular physical exercise. PMID:25614754

  19. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-06-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 + 81 to 350 + 77 ml (p < 0.01) and from 52 + 26 to 43 + 20 volume units (p < 0.01), respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 + 10 to 17 + 9 mm Hg and 10 + 5 to and + 5 mm Hg (both p < 0.01). Altough stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 + 6% to 22 + 5% and from 25 + 9% to 29 + 11%, respectively (both p < 0.01). During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. Thus, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured.

  20. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-06-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 +/- 81 to 350 +/- 77 ml and from 52 +/- 26 to 43 +/- 20 volume units, respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 +/- 10 to 17 +/- 9 mm Hg and 10 +/- 5 to 6 +/- 5 mm Hg. Although stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 +/- 6% to 22+/- 5% and from 25 +/- 9% to 29 +/- 11%, respectively. During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. This, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured.

  1. Attenuation of the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation with fentanyl, lignocaine nebulization, and a combination of both: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhyuday; Seth, Anita; Prakash, Smita; Deganwa, Mangilal; Gogia, Anoop Raj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) fentanyl and lignocaine airway nebulization and a combination of both in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six patients of either sex aged between 18 and 65 years of age, belonging to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) health status Classes I and II, undergoing elective surgery requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were included in the study. Patients were randomly divided into three groups. Group F received IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg, Group L received nebulization with 3 mg/kg of 4% lignocaine, and Group FL received both nebulization with 3 mg/kg of 4% lignocaine and IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg before intubation. Hemodynamic parameters were noted before and immediately after induction, 1 min after intubation, and every minute after intubation for 10 min. Results: Hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation was not completely abolished in any of the groups. Nebulized lignocaine was least effective in attenuating hemodynamic response to intubation, and hemodynamic parameters were significantly high after intubation as compared to other groups. Fentanyl alone or in combination with nebulized lignocaine was most effective, and Group F and Group FL were comparable. The maximum increase in mean blood pressure after intubation from baseline in Groups F, L, and FL was 7.4%, 14.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: In our study, IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg administered 5 min before induction was found to be the most effective in attenuating the hemodynamic response. There was no advantage to the use of nebulized lignocaine in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. PMID:27746569

  2. Hemodynamic responses in amygdala and hippocampus distinguish between aversive and neutral cues during Pavlovian fear conditioning in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Stephen B; Marques-Smith, Andre; Li, Jennifer; Rawlins, J N P; Lowry, John; Conway, Michael; Gilmour, Gary; Tricklebank, Mark; Bannerman, David M

    2013-02-01

    Lesion and electrophysiological studies in rodents have identified the amygdala and hippocampus (HPC) as key structures for Pavlovian fear conditioning, but human functional neuroimaging studies have not consistently found activation of these structures. This could be because hemodynamic responses cannot detect the sparse neuronal activity proposed to underlie conditioned fear. Alternatively, differences in experimental design or fear levels could account for the discrepant findings between rodents and humans. To help distinguish between these alternatives, we used tissue oxygen amperometry to record hemodynamic responses from the basolateral amygdala (BLA), dorsal HPC (dHPC) and ventral HPC (vHPC) in freely-moving rats during the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear. To enable specific comparison with human studies we used a discriminative paradigm, with one auditory cue [conditioned stimulus (CS)+] that was always followed by footshock, and another auditory cue (CS-) that was never followed by footshock. BLA tissue oxygen signals were significantly higher during CS+ than CS- trials during training and early extinction. In contrast, they were lower during CS+ than CS- trials by the end of extinction. dHPC and vHPC tissue oxygen signals were significantly lower during CS+ than CS- trials throughout extinction. Thus, hemodynamic signals in the amygdala and HPC can detect the different patterns of neuronal activity evoked by threatening vs. neutral stimuli during fear conditioning. Discrepant neuroimaging findings may be due to differences in experimental design and/or fear levels evoked in participants. Our methodology offers a way to improve translation between rodent models and human neuroimaging.

  3. Imagery use and affective responses during exercise: an examination of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2013-10-01

    Imagery, as a cognitive strategy, can improve affective responses during moderate-intensity exercise. The effects of imagery at higher intensities of exercise have not been examined. Further, the effect of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise is unknown. Using a crossover design (imagery and control), activity of the frontal cortex (reflected by changes in cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy) and affective responses were measured during exercise at intensities 5% above the ventilatory threshold (VT) and the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Results indicated that imagery use influenced activity of the frontal cortex and was associated with a more positive affective response at intensities above VT, but not RCP to exhaustion (p < .05). These findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise at intensities above VT that positively impact affective responses. PMID:24197718

  4. Imagery use and affective responses during exercise: an examination of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2013-10-01

    Imagery, as a cognitive strategy, can improve affective responses during moderate-intensity exercise. The effects of imagery at higher intensities of exercise have not been examined. Further, the effect of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise is unknown. Using a crossover design (imagery and control), activity of the frontal cortex (reflected by changes in cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy) and affective responses were measured during exercise at intensities 5% above the ventilatory threshold (VT) and the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Results indicated that imagery use influenced activity of the frontal cortex and was associated with a more positive affective response at intensities above VT, but not RCP to exhaustion (p < .05). These findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise at intensities above VT that positively impact affective responses.

  5. Hemodynamic variables and progression of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: data from the prospective observational FINNAKI study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Knowledge of the association of hemodynamics with progression of septic acute kidney injury (AKI) is limited. However, some recent data suggest that mean arterial pressure (MAP) exceeding current guidelines (60–65 mmHg) may be needed to prevent AKI. We hypothesized that higher MAP during the first 24 hours in the intensive care unit (ICU), would be associated with a lower risk of progression of AKI in patients with severe sepsis. Methods We identified 423 patients with severe sepsis and electronically recorded continuous hemodynamic data in the prospective observational FINNAKI study. The primary endpoint was progression of AKI within the first 5 days of ICU admission defined as new onset or worsening of AKI by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. We evaluated the association of hemodynamic variables with this endpoint. We included 53724 10-minute medians of MAP in the analysis. We analysed the ability of time-adjusted MAP to predict progression of AKI by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Of 423 patients, 153 (36.2%) had progression of AKI. Patients with progression of AKI had significantly lower time-adjusted MAP, 74.4 mmHg [68.3-80.8], than those without progression, 78.6 mmHg [72.9-85.4], P < 0.001. A cut-off value of 73 mmHg for time-adjusted MAP best predicted the progression of AKI. Chronic kidney disease, higher lactate, higher dose of furosemide, use of dobutamine and time-adjusted MAP below 73 mmHg were independent predictors of progression of AKI. Conclusions The findings of this large prospective multicenter observational study suggest that hypotensive episodes (MAP under 73 mmHg) are associated with progression of AKI in critically ill patients with severe sepsis. PMID:24330815

  6. Multiclass classification of hemodynamic responses for performance improvement of functional near-infrared spectroscopy-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeyoung; Jeong, Jichai

    2014-06-01

    We improved the performance of a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based brain-computer interface based on relatively short task duration and multiclass classification. A custom-built eight-channel fNIRS system was used over the motor cortex areas in both hemispheres to measure the hemodynamic responses evoked by four different motor tasks (overt execution of arm lifting and knee extension for both sides) instead of finger tapping. The hemodynamic responses were classified using the naive Bayes classifier. Among the mean, max, slope, variance, and median of the signal amplitude and the time lag of the signal, several signal features are chosen to obtain highest classification accuracy. Ten runs of threefold cross-validation were conducted, which yielded classification accuracies of 87.1%±2.4% to 95.5%±2.4%, 77.5%±1.9% to 92.4%±3.2%, and 73.8%±3.5% to 91.5%±1.4% for the binary, ternary, and quaternary classifications, respectively. Eight seconds of task duration for obtaining sufficient quaternary classification accuracy was suggested. The bit transfer rate per minute (BPM) based on the quaternary classification accuracy was investigated. A BPM can be achieved from 2.81 to 5.40 bits/min.

  7. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Intubation by Gabapentin in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Marashi, Seyed Mojtaba; Saeedinia, Seyed Mostafa; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Movafegh, Ali; Marashi, Shaqayeq

    2015-12-01

    A varieties of medications have been suggested to prevent hemodynamic instabilities following laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. This study was conducted to determine the beneficial effects of gabapentin on preventing hemodynamic instabilities associated with intubation in patients who were a candidate for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). This double blinded randomized, parallel group clinical trial was carried out on 58 normotensive patients scheduled for elective CABG under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in Shariati Hospital. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups of 29 patients that received 1200 mg of gabapentin in two dosages (600 mg, 8 hours before anesthesia induction and 600 mg, 2 hours before anesthesia induction) as gabapentin group or received talc powder as placebo (placebo group). Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured immediately before intubation, during intubation, immediately after intubation, 1 and 2 minutes after tracheal intubation. Inter-group comparisons significantly showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and heart rate immediately before intubation, during intubation, immediately after intubation, 1 and 2 minutes after tracheal intubation in the placebo group in comparison to gabapentin group. The median of anxiety verbal analog scale (VAS) at the pre-induction room in gabapentin and placebo groups were 2 and 4, respectively that was significantly lower in the former group (P. value =0.04 ); however, regarding median of pain score no difference was observed between them (P. value =0.07). Gabapentin (1200 mg) given preoperatively can effectively attenuate the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy, intubation and also reduce preoperative related anxiety in patients who were a candidate for CABG.

  8. Adrenoceptor hyporeactivity is responsible for Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute vascular dysfunction in humans.

    PubMed

    Pleiner, Johannes; Heere-Ress, Elisabeth; Langenberger, Herbert; Sieder, Anna E; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Mittermayer, Fritz; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Böhm, Johannes; Jansen, Burkhard; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Impaired response to catecholamines contributes to the altered hemodynamics in sepsis, which has been attributed to excessive NO formation. We have studied the systemic hemodynamic and local forearm responses and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression during experimental endotoxemia in humans. Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) was administered at doses of 1 or 2 ng/kg to healthy volunteers. In 10 subjects, the systemic pressor effect of phenylephrine was assessed before and after the administration of LPS. In 9 further subjects, forearm blood flow responses to intra-arterial noradrenaline, acetylcholine, glyceryl trinitrate, and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) were studied at baseline and after LPS administration. Peripheral blood was collected and analyzed for iNOS mRNA and protein. Four hours after LPS, the response of systolic blood pressure (P<0.0005) and heart rate (P<0.05) to phenylephrine was significantly reduced. In the forearm, noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction was also reduced by approximately 50% (P<0.01), but L-NMMA responsiveness was unchanged. iNOS mRNA or protein was not increased. Marked vascular adrenoceptor hyporeactivity is detectable in the absence of increased NO activity or iNOS expression in endotoxemia, arguing against major involvement of vascular iNOS activity in the acute systemic vasodilation to LPS.

  9. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  10. Gender differences in response to acute and chronic angiotensin II infusion: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Toering, Tsjitske J; van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Visser, Folkert W; Buikema, Hendrik; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M; Lely, A Titia

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease progress at a slower rate to end stage renal disease than men. As angiotensin II has both hemodynamic and direct renal effects, we hypothesized that the female protection may result from gender differences in responses to angiotensin II. Therefore, we studied gender differences in response to angiotensin II, during acute (human) and chronic (rats) angiotensin II administration. In young healthy men (n = 18) and women (n = 18) we studied the responses of renal hemodynamics (125I-iothalamate and 131I-Hippuran) and blood pressure to graded angiotensin II infusion (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 ng/kg/min for 1 h). Men had increased responses of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05), and a more pronounced decrease in effective renal plasma flow (P = 0.009) than women. We measured the changes in proteinuria and blood pressure in response to chronic administration (200 ng/kg/min for 3 weeks) of angiotensin II in rats. Male rats had an increased response of proteinuria compared with females (GEE analysis, P = 0.001). Male, but not female, angiotensin II-treated rats had increased numbers of renal interstitial macrophages compared to sham-treated rats (P < 0.001). In conclusion, gender differences are present in the response to acute and chronic infusion of angiotensin II. Difference in angiotensin II sensitivity could play a role in gender differences in progression of renal disease. PMID:26149279

  11. Cerebral hemodynamic response to unpleasant odors in the preterm newborn measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bartocci, M; Winberg, J; Papendieck, G; Mustica, T; Serra, G; Lagercrantz, H

    2001-09-01

    Newborn infants in intensive care units are exposed to several unfamiliar smells, mostly related to the nosocomial environment. How the preterm baby perceives these olfactory stimulations remains unclear. Near-infrared spectroscopy can be performed noninvasively above the olfactory cortex to monitor changes of cerebral blood flow as an indicator of cortical activation. The aim of this study was to explore by near-infrared spectroscopy how odorous substances routinely used in the neonatal intensive care unit influence bilateral cortical hemodynamics in the olfactory region of the brains of preterm infants. Specifically, a detergent (Neomidil) and an adhesive remover (Remove) have been tested. Twenty preterm neonates of gestational age 30-37 wk (mean 33.7 +/- 2.3 SD) and postconceptional age 32-37.3 wk (mean 35.5 +/- 2.75 SD) were monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy. Two optode pairs were placed above the anterior orbitofrontal gyri, which is involved in olfactory processing, on each side of the skull. Fifteen babies were exposed to the smell of a disinfectant and five babies to that of a detergent, both applied to small cotton pads. Changes of oxygenated Hb and deoxygenated Hb were recorded before, during, and after a 10-s stimulus. In 17 out of 20 babies, there was a decrease in oxygenated Hb and total Hb after the exposure to the substances. The decrease was significantly greater in the right side than in the left side. This change was different from that observed in our previous study after exposure to colostrum and the pleasant smell of vanilla, which elicited an increase in blood oxygenation in the same region. The biologic significance of this finding is unknown. We conclude that cortical hemodynamic modifications occur in the preterm newborn after exposure to preparations commonly used in the neonatal intensive care unit. A lateralization seems to occur in processing unpleasant olfactory cues.

  12. Effects of chronic dietary nitrate supplementation on the hemodynamic response to dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Seok; Stebbins, Charles L; Jung, Eunji; Nho, Hosung; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Chang, Myoung-Jei; Choi, Hyun-Min

    2015-09-01

    While acute treatment with beetroot juice (BRJ) containing nitrate (NO3 (-)) can lower systolic blood pressure (SBP), afterload, and myocardial O2 demand during submaximal exercise, effects of chronic supplementation with BRJ (containing a relatively low dose of NO3 (-), 400 mg) on cardiac output (CO), SBP, total peripheral resistance (TPR), and the work of the heart in response to dynamic exercise are not known. Thus, in 14 healthy males (22 ± 1 yr), we compared effects of 15 days of both BRJ and nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (NDBRJ) supplementation on plasma concentrations of NOx (NO3 (-)/NO2 (-)), SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), CO, TPR, and rate pressure product (RPP) at rest and during progressive cycling exercise. Endothelial function was also assessed via flow-mediated dilation (FMD). BRJ supplementation increased plasma NOx from 83.8 ± 13.8 to 167.6 ± 13.2 μM. Compared with NDBRJ, BRJ reduced SBP, DBP, MAP, and TPR at rest and during exercise (P < 0.05). In addition, RPP was decreased during exercise, while CO was increased, but only at rest and the 30% workload (P < 0.05). BRJ enhanced FMD-induced increases in brachial artery diameter (pre: 12.3 ± 1.6%; post: 17.8 ± 1.9%). We conclude that 1) chronic supplementation with BRJ lowers blood pressure and vascular resistance at rest and during exercise and attenuates RPP during exercise and 2) these effects may be due, in part, to enhanced endothelium-induced vasodilation in contracting skeletal muscle. Findings suggest that BRJ can act as a dietary nutraceutical capable of enhancing O2 delivery and reducing work of the heart, such that exercise can be performed at a given workload for a longer period of time before the onset of fatigue.

  13. Effects of chronic dietary nitrate supplementation on the hemodynamic response to dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Seok; Stebbins, Charles L; Jung, Eunji; Nho, Hosung; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Chang, Myoung-Jei; Choi, Hyun-Min

    2015-09-01

    While acute treatment with beetroot juice (BRJ) containing nitrate (NO3 (-)) can lower systolic blood pressure (SBP), afterload, and myocardial O2 demand during submaximal exercise, effects of chronic supplementation with BRJ (containing a relatively low dose of NO3 (-), 400 mg) on cardiac output (CO), SBP, total peripheral resistance (TPR), and the work of the heart in response to dynamic exercise are not known. Thus, in 14 healthy males (22 ± 1 yr), we compared effects of 15 days of both BRJ and nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (NDBRJ) supplementation on plasma concentrations of NOx (NO3 (-)/NO2 (-)), SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), CO, TPR, and rate pressure product (RPP) at rest and during progressive cycling exercise. Endothelial function was also assessed via flow-mediated dilation (FMD). BRJ supplementation increased plasma NOx from 83.8 ± 13.8 to 167.6 ± 13.2 μM. Compared with NDBRJ, BRJ reduced SBP, DBP, MAP, and TPR at rest and during exercise (P < 0.05). In addition, RPP was decreased during exercise, while CO was increased, but only at rest and the 30% workload (P < 0.05). BRJ enhanced FMD-induced increases in brachial artery diameter (pre: 12.3 ± 1.6%; post: 17.8 ± 1.9%). We conclude that 1) chronic supplementation with BRJ lowers blood pressure and vascular resistance at rest and during exercise and attenuates RPP during exercise and 2) these effects may be due, in part, to enhanced endothelium-induced vasodilation in contracting skeletal muscle. Findings suggest that BRJ can act as a dietary nutraceutical capable of enhancing O2 delivery and reducing work of the heart, such that exercise can be performed at a given workload for a longer period of time before the onset of fatigue. PMID:26084693

  14. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  15. Hemodynamic findings in patients with brain stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Janusz; Molisz, Andrzej; Trzeciak, Bartosz; Nyka, Walenty

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Standard procedures carried out at a stroke department in patients after a cerebral event may prove insufficient for monitoring hemodynamic indices. Impedance cardiography enables hemodynamic changes to be monitored non-invasively. The aim of the work was to describe hemodynamic parameters in patients with acute phase of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and to analyse the correlation between the type of hemodynamic response and long-term prognosis. Material and methods The 45 consecutive subjects with ischemic stroke and 16 with a hemorrhagic stroke were examined additionally with impedance cardiography during the first day of hospitalization. The heart contractility, pump performance, afterload and preload indices were recorded and calculated automatically and the data analyzed in terms of 6-month mortality. Results We found a significant association between the systemic vascular resistance index, Heather index, stroke index, heart rate, systolic and diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and mortality in patients with ischemic stroke (p = 0.002, p = 0.008, p = 0.012, p = 0.005, p = 0.007, p = 0.009, p = 0.002 respectively). Logistic regression analysis identified the thoracic fluid content as the most significant variable correlating with the non-survival of the patients with ischemic stroke and in the whole group (ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke). The significant parameters were also mean arterial pressure and stroke index in ischemic stroke (the correct answer ratio was 86.67%) and heart rate in the whole group (the correct answer ratio was 80.33%). There were no significant associations in hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions The hemodynamic parameters correlate with long term prognosis in patients with ischemic brain stroke. PMID:22662014

  16. Reduced prefrontal hemodynamic response in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Sawada, Masayuki; Suehiro, Yuko; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shohei; Kishimoto, Naoko; Negoro, Hideki; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2013-04-01

    Recent developments in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) have enabled non-invasive clarification of brain functions in psychiatric disorders. Functional neuroimaging studies of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have suggested that the frontal cortex and subcortical structures may play a role in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Twelve treatment-naïve children with OCD and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects participated in the present study after giving consent. The relative concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) were measured with prefrontal probes every 0.1 s during the Stroop color-word task, using 24-channel NIRS machines. During the Stroop color-word task, the oxy-Hb changes in the OCD group were significantly smaller than those in the control group in the prefrontal cortex, especially in the frontopolar cortex. The present study suggests that children with OCD have reduced prefrontal hemodynamic response as measured by NIRS.

  17. Comparison of the efficacy of lornoxicam and fentanyl in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation

    PubMed Central

    Swarnamba, U. N.; Veena, K.; Shaikh, Safiya I.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laryngoscopy and intubation elicits huge spectrum of stress response which is hazardous in high-risk patients. Many drugs and techniques have been used to attenuate the stress response. Lornoxicam 16 mg is a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug agent with analgesic potency equivalent to morphine 10 mg, fentanyl 100 μg and tramadol 100 mg. Lornoxicam has been found to attenuate stress response in some studies. We compared the lornoxicam with fentanyl in attenuating stress response. Materials and Methods: A double blind randomized controlled study was conducted on 60 adult patients of American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status 1 and 2. Group L (n = 30) receives injection lornoxicam 16 mg intravenous 30 min before induction, Group F (n = 30) receives injection fentanyl 2 μg/kg during induction. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded baseline (BL), before induction, every minute up to 5 min and at 10 min after intubation. Results: After intubation, there is a gradual decrease in SBP and DBP in both groups. The MAP was also comparable between the two groups except at 5 min and 10 min during which MAP recovered toward BL in Group L where as it remained low in Group F which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Both the drugs have successfully attenuated the HR response. Conclusion: Lornoxicam successfully attenuated the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation and is equally efficacious as fentanyl. PMID:27746536

  18. The acute phase response in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Herrán, Andrés; Sierra-Biddle, Deirdre; García-Unzueta, Maria Teresa; Puente, Jesús; Vázquez-Barquero, José Luis; Antonio Amado, José

    2005-12-01

    An acute-phase response (APR), manifested as an increase of acute-phase proteins has been shown in major depression. Panic disorder (PD) may share some aetiopathogenic mechanisms with depression, but APR has not been studied in this disorder. Forty-one panic patients in the first stages of their illness were compared with 32 healthy subjects of comparable sex, age, and body mass index. Clinical diagnosis was established with the mini international neuropsychiatric interview, and severity with the panic disorder severity scale and the CGI scale. Laboratory determinations included four acute phase proteins (APPs) [albumin, gammaglobulins, fibrinogen, C-reactive-protein (CRP)] and basal cortisol level. Patients were studied after 8-wk follow-up taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to assess the evolution of the APPs. Gammaglobulin levels were lower, and both cortisol and CRP levels were higher in PD patients than in controls. APP did not differ between patients with or without agoraphobia. At follow-up, patients who responded to SSRIs presented a decrease in albumin levels, and a trend towards a decrease in cortisol and CRP compared with levels at intake. The conclusions of this study are that there is an APR in patients suffering from PD, and this APR tends to diminish after a successful treatment with SSRIs. PMID:15927091

  19. Effect of Etomidate Versus Combination of Propofol-Ketamine and Thiopental-Ketamine on Hemodynamic Response to Laryngoscopy and Intubation: A Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Firouzian, Abolfazl; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Emadi, Seyed Abdollah; Davanlou, Ali; Motamed, Nima; Yousefi Abdolmaleki, Ensieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and intubation frequently used for airway management during general anesthesia, is frequently associated with undesirable hemodynamic disturbances. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of etomidate, combination of propofol-ketamine and thiopental-ketamine as induction agents on hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Patients and Methods: In a double blind, randomized clinical trial a total of 120 adult patients of both sexes, aged 18 - 45 years, scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned into three equally sized groups. Patients in group A received etomidate (0.3 mg/kg) plus normal saline as placebo. Patients in group B and C received propofol (1.5 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) and thiopental sodium (3 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), respectively for anesthesia induction. Before laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, immediately after, and also one and three minutes after the procedures, hemodynamic values (SBP, DBP, MAP and HR) were measured. Results: A repeated measurement ANOVA showed significant changes in mean SBP and DBP between the time points (P < 0.05). In addition, the main effect of MAP and HR were statistically significant during the course of study (P < 0.05). Furthermore, after induction of anesthesia, the three study groups had significantly different SBP, DBP and MAP changes overtime (P < 0.05). However, HR changes over time were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Combination of propofol-ketamine had superior hemodynamic stability compared to other induction agents. Conclusions: Combination of propofol-ketamine may be recommended as an effective and safe induction agent for attenuating hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and intubation with better hemodynamic stability. Although, further well-designed randomized clinical trials to confirm the safety and efficacy of this combination, especially in critically ill patients or patients with

  20. Hemodynamic responses on prefrontal cortex related to meditation and attentional task

    PubMed Central

    Deepeshwar, Singh; Vinchurkar, Suhas Ashok; Visweswaraiah, Naveen Kalkuni; Nagendra, Hongasandra RamaRao

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies state that meditation increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The present study employed functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to evaluate the relative hemodynamic changes in PFC during a cognitive task. Twenty-two healthy male volunteers with ages between 18 and 30 years (group mean age ± SD; 22.9 ± 4.6 years) performed a color-word stroop task before and after 20 min of meditation and random thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed followed by a post hoc analysis with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons between the mean values of “During” and “Post” with “Pre” state. During meditation there was an increased in oxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbO) and total hemoglobin (ΔTHC) concentration with reduced deoxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbR) concentration over the right prefrontal cortex (rPFC), whereas in random thinking there was increased ΔHbR with reduced total hemoglobin concentration on the rPFC. The mean reaction time (RT) was shorter during stroop color word task with concomitant reduction in ΔTHC after meditation, suggestive of improved performance and efficiency in task related to attention. Our findings demonstrated that meditation increased cerebral oxygenation and enhanced performance, which was associated with activation of the PFC. PMID:25741245

  1. Hemodynamic response characteristics of healthy people to changes in meteorological and geomagnetic factors in the north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenchenko, T. A.; Varlamova, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of variations in meteorological and geomagnetic factors on hemodynamic parameters (HP) in 27 healthy volunteers who are residents of Syktyvkar (daily monitoring of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) and stroke and cardiac output for the period from December 1, 2003, to December 31, 2004). It is shown that temperature variations and geomagnetic activity level (GMA) make the greatest impact on HP changes (85 and 48% cases, respectively). The BP level increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing levels of GMA. The sensitivity of systolic and diastolic blood pressure to the meteorological and geomagnetic factors is approximately twice as high as the sensitivity of other HP to them. The individual values of seasonal changes in BP parameters are 4-9 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 3-6 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The estimates of the characteristics of meteorological and geomagnetic sensitivity in residents of northern latitudes are in good agreement with the results obtained by us earlier for other climatic zones and geomagnetic conditions, logically complementing and enhancing the common space-time picture of the reactions of the human body to external impacts.

  2. Role of Chemoreceptor Activation in Hemodynamic Responses to Electrical Stimulation of the Carotid Sinus in Conscious Rats.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Pedro L; Castania, Jaci A; Dias, Daniel P M; Patel, Kaushik P; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2015-09-01

    Electric carotid baroreflex activation has been used to treat patients with resistant hypertension. It is hypothesized that, in conscious rats, combined activation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors afferences attenuates the reflex hypotension. Rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, with unilateral denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors; (2) chemoreceptor denervation group, with bilateral ligation of the carotid body artery; (3) baroreceptor denervation group, with unilateral denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and right carotid chemoreceptors; and (4) carotid bifurcation denervation group, with denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors, plus denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors. Animals were subjected to 4 rounds of electric stimulation (5 V, 1 ms), with 15, 30, 60, and 90 Hz applied randomly for 20 s. Electric stimulation caused greater hypotensive responses in the chemoreceptor denervation group than in the control group, at 60 Hz (-37 versus -19 mm Hg) and 90 Hz (-33 versus -19 mm Hg). The baroreceptor denervation group showed hypertensive responses at all frequencies of stimulation. In contrast, the carotid sinus denervation group showed no hemodynamic responses. The control group presented no changes in heart rate, whereas the chemoreceptor denervation group and the baroreceptor denervation group showed bradycardic responses. These data demonstrate that carotid chemoreceptor activation attenuates the reflex hypotension caused by combined electric stimulation of the carotid sinus and the carotid sinus nerve in conscious rats. These findings may provide useful insight for clinical studies using baroreflex activation therapy in resistant hypertension and heart failure.

  3. Modeling hemodynamic responses in auditory cortex at 1.5 T using variable duration imaging acoustic noise.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuowen; Olulade, Olumide; Castillo, Javier Gonzalez; Santos, Joseph; Kim, Sungeun; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2010-02-15

    A confound for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially for auditory studies, is the presence of imaging acoustic noise generated mainly as a byproduct of rapid gradient switching during volume acquisition and, to a lesser extent, the radiofrequency transmit. This work utilized a novel pulse sequence to present actual imaging acoustic noise for characterization of the induced hemodynamic responses and assessment of linearity in the primary auditory cortex with respect to noise duration. Results show that responses to brief duration (46 ms) imaging acoustic noise is highly nonlinear while responses to longer duration (>1 s) imaging acoustic noise becomes approximately linear, with the right primary auditory cortex exhibiting a higher degree of nonlinearity than the left for the investigated noise durations. This study also assessed the spatial extent of activation induced by imaging acoustic noise, showing that the use of modeled responses (specific to imaging acoustic noise) as the reference waveform revealed additional activations in the auditory cortex not observed with a canonical gamma variate reference waveform, suggesting an improvement in detection sensitivity for imaging acoustic noise-induced activity. Longer duration (1.5 s) imaging acoustic noise was observed to induce activity that expanded outwards from Heschl's gyrus to cover the superior temporal gyrus as well as parts of the middle temporal gyrus and insula, potentially affecting higher level acoustic processing.

  4. Computer program for analysis of hemodynamic response to head-up tilt test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świątek, Eliza; Cybulski, Gerard; Koźluk, Edward; Piątkowska, Agnieszka; Niewiadomski, Wiktor

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to create a computer program, written in the MATLAB environment, which enables the visualization and analysis of hemodynamic parameters recorded during a passive tilt test using the CNS Task Force Monitor System. The application was created to help in the assessment of the relationship between the values and dynamics of changes of the selected parameters and the risk of orthostatic syncope. The signal analysis included: R-R intervals (RRI), heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (sBP), diastolic blood pressure (dBP), mean blood pressure (mBP), stroke volume (SV), stroke index (SI), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), total peripheral resistance (TPR), total peripheral resistance index (TPRI), ventricular ejection time (LVET) and thoracic fluid content (TFC). The program enables the user to visualize waveforms for a selected parameter and to perform smoothing with selected moving average parameters. It allows one to construct the graph of means for any range, and the Poincare plot for a selected time range. The program automatically determines the average value of the parameter before tilt, its minimum and maximum value immediately after changing positions and the times of their occurrence. It is possible to correct the automatically detected points manually. For the RR interval, it determines the acceleration index (AI) and the brake index (BI). It is possible to save calculated values to an XLS with a name specified by user. The application has a user-friendly graphical interface and can run on a computer that has no MATLAB software.

  5. Functional Hemodynamic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic monitoring is the assessment of the dynamic interactions of hemodynamic variables in response to a defined perturbation. Dynamic tissue O2 saturation (StO2) responses to complete stop flow conditions (vascular occlusion test), which can be created by measuring hand StO2 and occluding flow with a blood pressure cuff, assesses cardiovascular sufficiency and microcirculatory blood flow distribution. Recent interest in functional hemodynamic monitoring for the bedside assessment of cardiovascular insufficiency has heightened with the documentation of its accuracy in predicting volume responsiveness using a wide variety of monitoring devices both invasive and non-invasive and across multiple patient groups and clinical conditions. Accordingly, fluid responsiveness can be predicted in a quantities fashion by measuring as arterial pulse pressure variation, left ventricular stroke volume variation or their surrogates during positive pressure breathing or the change in cardiac output response to a passive leg raising maneuver. However, volume responsiveness, though important, reflects only part of the overall spectrum of functional physiological variables that can be measured to define physiologic state and monitor response to therapy. PMID:25435480

  6. Hemodynamic Response of the Supplementary Motor Area during Locomotor Tasks with Upright versus Horizontal Postures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakajima, Katsumi; Hara, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    To understand cortical mechanisms related to truncal posture control during human locomotion, we investigated hemodynamic responses in the supplementary motor area (SMA) with quadrupedal and bipedal gaits using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in 10 healthy adults. The subjects performed three locomotor tasks where the degree of postural instability varied biomechanically, namely, hand-knee quadrupedal crawling (HKQuad task), upright quadrupedalism using bilateral Lofstrand crutches (UpQuad task), and typical upright bipedalism (UpBi task), on a treadmill. We measured the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) during the tasks. The oxy-Hb significantly decreased in the SMA during the HKQuad task, whereas it increased during the UpQuad task. No significant responses were observed during the UpBi task. Based on the degree of oxy-Hb responses, we ranked these locomotor tasks as UpQuad > UpBi > HKQuad. The order of the different tasks did not correspond with postural instability of the tasks. However, qualitative inspection of oxy-Hb time courses showed that oxy-Hb waveform patterns differed between upright posture tasks (peak-plateau-trough pattern for the UpQuad and UpBi tasks) and horizontal posture task (downhill pattern for the HKQuad task). Thus, the SMA may contribute to the control of truncal posture accompanying locomotor movements in humans. PMID:27413555

  7. Comparison of i-gel™ and laryngeal mask airway Classic™ in terms of ease of insertion and hemodynamic response: A randomized observational study

    PubMed Central

    Pratheeba, N.; Ramya, G. S.; Ranjan, R. V.; Remadevi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) Classic™ has an inflatable cuff while i-gel™ has a noninflatable cuff made of thermoplastic elastomer. Aims: To compare ease of insertion, number, and duration of insertion attempts among the two device. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the hemodynamic response and SpO2 during device insertion and during maintenance of general anesthesia. Settings and Design: This study was conducted as randomized observational study in a teaching hospital. Subjects and Methods: One hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II, patients posted for surgery under general anesthesia were divided in two groups of fifty each. LMA Classic™ and i-gel™. Ease of insertion, duration of insertion, hemodynamic data, and episodes of hypoxia during insertion, 1, 3 and 5 min for 30 min, during removal and 1 min after removal. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analyses were expressed as a mean ± standard deviation. Independent t-test used for parametric data, Chi-square test for nonparametric data and hemodynamic data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA to find statistical difference within the groups. Results: Devices were easy to insert, the mean duration of insertion attempts was 15.92 ± 1.62 s in the i-gel™ group, while it was 26.06 ± 5.12 s in the LMA Classic™ group, was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Successful and shorter duration of insertion, with less hemodynamic response makes i-gel™ a suitable alternative to LMA Classic™ during general anesthesia.

  8. Influence of endurance and resistance exercise order on the postexercise hemodynamic responses in hypertensive women.

    PubMed

    Menêses, Annelise Lins; Forjaz, Cláudia Lúcia de Moraes; de Lima, Paulo Fernando Marinho; Batista, Rafael Marinho Falcão; Monteiro, Maria de Fátima; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes

    2015-03-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of the order of endurance and resistance exercises on postexercise blood pressure (BP) and hemodynamics in hypertensive women. Nineteen hypertensive women underwent 3 sessions: control (50 minutes rest), endurance (50-60% of heart rate reserve) followed by resistance exercise (50% of 1 repetition maximum) (E + R), and resistance followed by endurance exercise (R + E). Before and 30 minutes after each session, BP, peripheral vascular resistance, cardiac output, stroke volume, and heart rate were measured. Postexercise increases in systolic (E + R: +1 ± 3 mm Hg and R + E: +3 ± 3 mm Hg), diastolic (E + R: +3 ± 1 mm Hg and R + E: +3 ± 2 mm Hg), and mean BP (E + R: +3 ± 1 mm Hg and R + E: +3 ± 2 mm Hg) were significantly lower after the exercise sessions compared with the control session (p ≤ 0.05). The exercise sessions abolished the increases in peripheral vascular resistance (E + R: +0.00 ± 0.04 mm Hg·min·L and R + E: +0.05 ± 0.05 mm Hg·min·L) and the decreases in cardiac output (E + R: +0.04 ± 0.28 L·min and R + E: -0.26 ± 0.28 L·min) observed after the control session (p ≤ 0.05). After the exercise sessions, stroke volume decreased (E + R: -14 ± 3 ml and R + E: -9 ± 4 ml) and heart rate increased (E + R: +5 ± 1 b·min and R + E: +4 ± 1 b·min) in comparison with the control session (p ≤ 0.05). For all the variables, there were no significant differences between the exercise sessions. Regardless of the order of endurance and resistance exercises, combined exercise sessions abolished increases in BP observed in a control condition due to a reduction in peripheral vascular resistance and increases in cardiac output. Thus, combined exercises should be prescribed to individuals with hypertension to control their BP, regardless of the order they are accomplished. PMID:25264665

  9. Voluntary Modulation of Hemodynamic Responses in Swallowing Related Motor Areas: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Based Neurofeedback Study

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Silvia Erika; Gressenberger, Bettina; Kurzmann, Jürgen; Neuper, Christa; Wood, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we show for the first time that motor imagery of swallowing, which is defined as the mental imagination of a specific motor act without overt movements by muscular activity, can be successfully used as mental strategy in a neurofeedback training paradigm. Furthermore, we demonstrate its effects on cortical correlates of swallowing function. Therefore, N = 20 healthy young adults were trained to voluntarily increase their hemodynamic response in swallowing related brain areas as assessed with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). During seven training sessions, participants received either feedback of concentration changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb group, N = 10) or deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxy-Hb group, N = 10) over the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) during motor imagery of swallowing. Before and after the training, we assessed cortical activation patterns during motor execution and imagery of swallowing. The deoxy-Hb group was able to voluntarily increase deoxy-Hb over the IFG during imagery of swallowing. Furthermore, swallowing related cortical activation patterns were more pronounced during motor execution and imagery after the training compared to the pre-test, indicating cortical reorganization due to neurofeedback training. The oxy-Hb group could neither control oxy-Hb during neurofeedback training nor showed any cortical changes. Hence, successful modulation of deoxy-Hb over swallowing related brain areas led to cortical reorganization and might be useful for future treatments of swallowing dysfunction. PMID:26575032

  10. Voluntary Modulation of Hemodynamic Responses in Swallowing Related Motor Areas: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Based Neurofeedback Study.

    PubMed

    Kober, Silvia Erika; Gressenberger, Bettina; Kurzmann, Jürgen; Neuper, Christa; Wood, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we show for the first time that motor imagery of swallowing, which is defined as the mental imagination of a specific motor act without overt movements by muscular activity, can be successfully used as mental strategy in a neurofeedback training paradigm. Furthermore, we demonstrate its effects on cortical correlates of swallowing function. Therefore, N = 20 healthy young adults were trained to voluntarily increase their hemodynamic response in swallowing related brain areas as assessed with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). During seven training sessions, participants received either feedback of concentration changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb group, N = 10) or deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxy-Hb group, N = 10) over the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) during motor imagery of swallowing. Before and after the training, we assessed cortical activation patterns during motor execution and imagery of swallowing. The deoxy-Hb group was able to voluntarily increase deoxy-Hb over the IFG during imagery of swallowing. Furthermore, swallowing related cortical activation patterns were more pronounced during motor execution and imagery after the training compared to the pre-test, indicating cortical reorganization due to neurofeedback training. The oxy-Hb group could neither control oxy-Hb during neurofeedback training nor showed any cortical changes. Hence, successful modulation of deoxy-Hb over swallowing related brain areas led to cortical reorganization and might be useful for future treatments of swallowing dysfunction.

  11. Inter-Subject Correlation of Brain Hemodynamic Responses During Watching a Movie: Localization in Space and Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Sams, Mikko; Tohka, Jussi

    2009-01-01

    Cinema is a promising naturalistic stimulus that enables, for instance, elicitation of robust emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Inter-subject correlation (ISC) has been used as a model-free analysis method to map the highly complex hemodynamic responses that are evoked during watching a movie. Here, we extended the ISC analysis to frequency domain using wavelet analysis combined with non-parametric permutation methods for making voxel-wise statistical inferences about frequency-band specific ISC. We applied these novel analysis methods to a dataset collected in our previous study where 12 subjects watched an emotionally engaging movie “Crash” during fMRI scanning. Our results suggest that several regions within the frontal and temporal lobes show ISC predominantly at low frequency bands, whereas visual cortical areas exhibit ISC also at higher frequencies. It is possible that these findings relate to recent observations of a cortical hierarchy of temporal receptive windows, or that the types of events processed in temporal and prefrontal cortical areas (e.g., social interactions) occur over longer time periods than the stimulus features processed in the visual areas. Software tools to perform frequency-specific ISC analysis, together with a visualization application, are available as open source Matlab code. PMID:20428497

  12. Inter-subject correlation of brain hemodynamic responses during watching a movie: localization in space and frequency.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Sams, Mikko; Tohka, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    Cinema is a promising naturalistic stimulus that enables, for instance, elicitation of robust emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Inter-subject correlation (ISC) has been used as a model-free analysis method to map the highly complex hemodynamic responses that are evoked during watching a movie. Here, we extended the ISC analysis to frequency domain using wavelet analysis combined with non-parametric permutation methods for making voxel-wise statistical inferences about frequency-band specific ISC. We applied these novel analysis methods to a dataset collected in our previous study where 12 subjects watched an emotionally engaging movie "Crash" during fMRI scanning. Our results suggest that several regions within the frontal and temporal lobes show ISC predominantly at low frequency bands, whereas visual cortical areas exhibit ISC also at higher frequencies. It is possible that these findings relate to recent observations of a cortical hierarchy of temporal receptive windows, or that the types of events processed in temporal and prefrontal cortical areas (e.g., social interactions) occur over longer time periods than the stimulus features processed in the visual areas. Software tools to perform frequency-specific ISC analysis, together with a visualization application, are available as open source Matlab code.

  13. Optimizing the general linear model for functional near-infrared spectroscopy: an adaptive hemodynamic response function approach

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Minako; Dan, Ippeita; Sano, Toshifumi; Dan, Haruka; Watanabe, Eiju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies utilize a general linear model (GLM) approach, which serves as a standard statistical method for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analysis. While fMRI solely measures the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal, fNIRS measures the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxy-hemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) signals at a temporal resolution severalfold higher. This suggests the necessity of adjusting the temporal parameters of a GLM for fNIRS signals. Thus, we devised a GLM-based method utilizing an adaptive hemodynamic response function (HRF). We sought the optimum temporal parameters to best explain the observed time series data during verbal fluency and naming tasks. The peak delay of the HRF was systematically changed to achieve the best-fit model for the observed oxy- and deoxy-Hb time series data. The optimized peak delay showed different values for each Hb signal and task. When the optimized peak delays were adopted, the deoxy-Hb data yielded comparable activations with similar statistical power and spatial patterns to oxy-Hb data. The adaptive HRF method could suitably explain the behaviors of both Hb parameters during tasks with the different cognitive loads during a time course, and thus would serve as an objective method to fully utilize the temporal structures of all fNIRS data. PMID:26157973

  14. Acute apnea swimming: metabolic responses and performance.

    PubMed

    Guimard, Alexandre; Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgati, Houssem; Morin, David; Lasne, Françoise; Collomp, Katia

    2014-04-01

    Competitive swimmers regularly perform apnea series with or without fins as part of their training, but the ergogenic and metabolic repercussions of acute and chronic apnea have not been examined. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the cardiovascular, lactate, arterial oxygen saturation and hormonal responses to acute apnea in relation to performance in male swimmers. According to a randomized protocol, 15 national or regional competitive swimmers were monitored while performing four 100-m freestyle trials, each consisting of four 25-m segments with departure every 30 seconds at maximal speed in the following conditions: with normal frequency breathing with fins (F) and without fins (S) and with complete apnea for the four 25-m segments with (FAp) and without fins (SAp). Heart rate (HR) was measured continuously and arterial oxygen saturation, blood, and saliva samples were assessed after 30 seconds, 3 minutes, and 10 minutes of recovery, respectively. Swimming performance was better with fins than without both with normal frequency breathing and apnea (p < 0.001). Apnea induced no change in lactatemia, but a decrease in arterial oxygen saturation in both SAp and FAp (p < 0.001) was noted and a decrease in HR and swimming performance in SAp (p < 0.01). During apnea without fins, performance alteration was correlated with bradycardia (r = 0.63) and arterial oxygen desaturation (r = -0.57). Saliva dehydroepiandrosterone was increased compared with basal values whatever the trial (p ≤ 0.05), whereas no change was found in saliva cortisol or testosterone. Further studies are necessary to clarify the fin effect on HR and performance during apnea swimming.

  15. Effect of age on the hemodynamic and sympathetic responses at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Sophie; Sawicki, Carolyn P; Baker, Jacquie R; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2014-01-15

    Cardiac and peripheral vasomotor factors contribute to the rapid pressor response at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise. We tested the hypothesis that age enhances the sympathetic and vasoconstrictor response at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise so that the pressor response is maintained, despite a diminished cardiac function. Twelve young and twelve older (24 ± 3 and 63 ± 8 yr) individuals performed 20-s isometric handgrip exercise at 30, 40, or 50% of maximal voluntary contraction force. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was measured using microneurography. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (Q) were assessed continuously by finger plethysmography and total peripheral resistance was calculated. MAP increased with the onset of handgrip; this increase was associated with handgrip intensity and was similar in both groups. Heart rate and Q increased with increasing handgrip intensity in both groups, but increases were greater in young vs. older individuals (age × handgrip intensity interaction, P < 0.05). MSNA burst frequency increased (P < 0.01), while MSNA burst incidence tended to increase (P = 0.06) with increasing handgrip intensity in both groups. The change in MSNA between baseline and handgrip, for both frequency and incidence, increased with increasing handgrip intensity for both groups. There was no effect of handgrip intensity or age on total peripheral resistance. The smaller heart rate and Q response during the first 20 s of handgrip exercise in older individuals was not accompanied by a greater sympathetic activation or vasoconstrictor response. However, increases in MAP were similar between groups, indicating that the pressor response at the onset of handgrip exercise is preserved with aging.

  16. Lagrangian postprocessing of computational hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Arzani, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging, modeling and computing have rapidly expanded our capabilities to model hemodynamics in the large vessels (heart, arteries and veins). This data encodes a wealth of information that is often under-utilized. Modeling (and measuring) blood flow in the large vessels typically amounts to solving for the time-varying velocity field in a region of interest. Flow in the heart and larger arteries is often complex, and velocity field data provides a starting point for investigating the hemodynamics. This data can be used to perform Lagrangian particle tracking, and other Lagrangian-based postprocessing. As described herein, Lagrangian methods are necessary to understand inherently transient hemodynamic conditions from the fluid mechanics perspective, and to properly understand the biomechanical factors that lead to acute and gradual changes of vascular function and health. The goal of the present paper is to review Lagrangian methods that have been used in post-processing velocity data of cardiovascular flows. PMID:25059889

  17. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function. PMID:26997623

  18. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function.

  19. Effect of extracorporeal CO2 removal on right ventricular and hemodynamic parameters in a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cherpanath, Thomas G V; Landburg, Pearl P; Lagrand, Wim K; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2016-09-01

    We present a female patient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) necessitating intubation and mechanical ventilation on the intensive care unit (ICU). High ventilatory pressures were needed because of hypoxia and severe hypercapnia with respiratory acidosis, resulting in right ventricular dysfunction with impaired haemodynamic stability. A veno-venous extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) circuit was initiated, effectively eliminating carbon dioxide while improving oxygenation and enabling a reduction in applied ventilatory pressures. We noted a marked improvement of right ventricular function with restoration of haemodynamic stability. Within one week, the patient was weaned from both ECCO2R and mechanical ventilation. Besides providing adequate gas exchange, extracorporeal assist devices may be helpful in ameliorating right ventricular dysfunction during ARDS.

  20. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-01-01

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm2 at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay. PMID:23851277

  1. Endothelial Msx1 transduces hemodynamic changes into an arteriogenic remodeling response

    PubMed Central

    Vandersmissen, Ine; Craps, Sander; Depypere, Maarten; Coppiello, Giulia; van Gastel, Nick; Maes, Frederik; Carmeliet, Geert; Schrooten, Jan; Jones, Elizabeth A.V.; Umans, Lieve; Devlieger, Roland; Koole, Michel; Gheysens, Olivier; Zwijsen, An; Aranguren, Xabier L.

    2015-01-01

    Collateral remodeling is critical for blood flow restoration in peripheral arterial disease and is triggered by increasing fluid shear stress in preexisting collateral arteries. So far, no arterial-specific mediators of this mechanotransduction response have been identified. We show that muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1) acts exclusively in collateral arterial endothelium to transduce the extrinsic shear stimulus into an arteriogenic remodeling response. MSX1 was specifically up-regulated in remodeling collateral arteries. MSX1 induction in collateral endothelial cells (ECs) was shear stress driven and downstream of canonical bone morphogenetic protein–SMAD signaling. Flow recovery and collateral remodeling were significantly blunted in EC-specific Msx1/2 knockout mice. Mechanistically, MSX1 linked the arterial shear stimulus to arteriogenic remodeling by activating the endothelial but not medial layer to a proinflammatory state because EC but not smooth muscle cellMsx1/2 knockout mice had reduced leukocyte recruitment to remodeling collateral arteries. This reduced leukocyte infiltration in EC Msx1/2 knockout mice originated from decreased levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1)/vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), whose expression was also in vitro driven by promoter binding of MSX1. PMID:26391659

  2. Effects of forearm bier block with bretylium on the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to handgrip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F.; Shoemaker, J. K.; McQuillan, P. M.; Kunselman, A. R.; Smith, M. B.; Yang, Q. X.; Smith, H.; Gray, K.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a reduction in sympathetic tone to exercising forearm muscle would increase blood flow, reduce muscle acidosis, and attenuate reflex responses. Subjects performed a progressive, four-stage rhythmic handgrip protocol before and after forearm bier block with bretylium as forearm blood flow (Doppler) and metabolic (venous effluent metabolite concentration and (31)P-NMR indexes) and autonomic reflex responses (heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathetic nerve traffic) were measured. Bretylium inhibits the release of norepinephrine at the neurovascular junction. Bier block increased blood flow as well as oxygen consumption in the exercising forearm (P < 0.03 and P < 0.02, respectively). However, despite this increase in flow, venous K(+) release and H(+) release were both increased during exercise (P < 0.002 for both indexes). Additionally, minimal muscle pH measured during the first minute of recovery with NMR was lower after bier block (6.41 +/- 0.08 vs. 6.20 +/- 0.06; P < 0.036, simple effects). Meanwhile, reflex effects were unaffected by the bretylium bier block. The results support the conclusion that sympathetic stimulation to muscle during exercise not only limits muscle blood flow but also appears to limit anaerobiosis and H(+) release, presumably through a preferential recruitment of oxidative fibers.

  3. Endothelial Msx1 transduces hemodynamic changes into an arteriogenic remodeling response.

    PubMed

    Vandersmissen, Ine; Craps, Sander; Depypere, Maarten; Coppiello, Giulia; van Gastel, Nick; Maes, Frederik; Carmeliet, Geert; Schrooten, Jan; Jones, Elizabeth A V; Umans, Lieve; Devlieger, Roland; Koole, Michel; Gheysens, Olivier; Zwijsen, An; Aranguren, Xabier L; Luttun, Aernout

    2015-09-28

    Collateral remodeling is critical for blood flow restoration in peripheral arterial disease and is triggered by increasing fluid shear stress in preexisting collateral arteries. So far, no arterial-specific mediators of this mechanotransduction response have been identified. We show that muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1) acts exclusively in collateral arterial endothelium to transduce the extrinsic shear stimulus into an arteriogenic remodeling response. MSX1 was specifically up-regulated in remodeling collateral arteries. MSX1 induction in collateral endothelial cells (ECs) was shear stress driven and downstream of canonical bone morphogenetic protein-SMAD signaling. Flow recovery and collateral remodeling were significantly blunted in EC-specific Msx1/2 knockout mice. Mechanistically, MSX1 linked the arterial shear stimulus to arteriogenic remodeling by activating the endothelial but not medial layer to a proinflammatory state because EC but not smooth muscle cellMsx1/2 knockout mice had reduced leukocyte recruitment to remodeling collateral arteries. This reduced leukocyte infiltration in EC Msx1/2 knockout mice originated from decreased levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1)/vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), whose expression was also in vitro driven by promoter binding of MSX1. PMID:26391659

  4. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  5. Intravenous lipid emulsion alters the hemodynamic response to epinephrine in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Carreiro, Stephanie; Blum, Jared; Jay, Gregory; Hack, Jason B

    2013-09-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) is an adjunctive antidote used in selected critically ill poisoned patients. These patients may also require administration of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) drugs. Limited data is available to describe interactions of ILE with standard ACLS drugs, specifically epinephrine. Twenty rats with intra-arterial and intravenous access were sedated with isoflurane and split into ILE or normal saline (NS) pretreatment groups. All received epinephrine 15 μm/kg intravenously (IV). Continuous mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored until both indices returned to baseline. Standardized t tests were used to compare peak MAP, time to peak MAP, maximum change in HR, time to maximum change in HR, and time to return to baseline MAP/HR. There was a significant difference (p = 0.023) in time to peak MAP in the ILE group (54 s, 95 % CI 44-64) versus the NS group (40 s, 95 % CI 32-48) and a significant difference (p = 0.004) in time to return to baseline MAP in ILE group (171 s, 95 % CI 148-194) versus NS group (130 s, 95 % CI 113-147). There were no significant differences in the peak change in MAP, peak change in HR, time to minimum HR, or time to return to baseline HR between groups. ILE-pretreated rats had a significant difference in MAP response to epinephrine; ILE delayed the peak effect and prolonged the duration of effect of epinephrine on MAP, but did not alter the peak increase in MAP or the HR response.

  6. Hemodynamic and regional blood flow distribution responses to dextran, hydralazine, isoproterenol and amrinone during experimental cardiac tamponade

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, R.W.; Fowler, N.O.; Gabel, M.

    1983-06-01

    Four different interventions were examined in dogs with cardiac tamponade. Infusion of 216 to 288 ml saline solution into the pericardium reduced cardiac output from 3.5 +/- 0.3 to 1.7 +/- 0.2 liters/min as systemic vascular resistance increased from 4,110 +/- 281 to 6,370 +/- 424 dynes . s . cm-5. Left ventricular epicardial and endocardial blood flows were 178 +/- 13 and 220 +/- 12 ml/min per 100 g, respectively, and decreased to 72 +/- 14 and 78 +/- 11 ml/min per 100 g with tamponade. Reductions of 25 to 65% occurred in visceral and brain blood flows and in a composite brain sample. Cardiac output during tamponade was significantly increased by isoproterenol, 0.5 microgram/kg per min intravenously; hydralazine, 40 mg intravenously; dextran infusion or combined hydralazine and dextran, but not by amrinone. Total systemic vascular resistance was reduced by all interventions. Left ventricular epicardial flow was increased by isoproterenol, hydralazine and the hydralazine-dextran combination. Endocardial flow was increased by amrinone and the combination of hydralazine and dextran. Right ventricular myocardial blood flow increased with all interventions except dextran. Kidney cortical and composite brain blood flows were increased by both dextran alone and by the hydralazine-dextran combinations. Blood flow to small intestine was increased by all interventions as was that to large intestine by all except amrinone and hydralazine. Liver blood flow response was variable. The most pronounced hemodynamic and tissue perfusion improvements during cardiac tamponade were effected by combined vasodilation-blood volume expansion with a hydralazine-dextran combination. Isoproterenol had as dramatic an effect but it was short-lived. Amrinone was the least effective intervention.

  7. Deficiency of heme oxygenase-1 impairs renal hemodynamics and exaggerates systemic inflammatory responses to renal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Tracz, MJ; Juncos, JP; Croatt, AJ; Ackerman, AW; Grande, JP; Knutson, KL; Kane, GC; Terzic, A; Griffin, MD; Nath, KA

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 may exert cytoprotective effects. In this study we examined the sensitivity of heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1−/−) mice to renal ischemia by assessing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and cytokine expression in the kidney, and inflammatory responses in the systemic circulation and in vital extrarenal organs. Four hours after renal ischemia, the GFR of HO-1−/− mice was much lower than that of wild-type mice in the absence of changes in renal blood flow or cardiac output. Eight hours after renal ischemia, there was a marked induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and its downstream signaling effector, phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3), in the kidney, lung, and heart in HO-1−/− mice. Systemic levels of IL-6 were markedly and uniquely increased in HO-1−/− mice after ischemia as compared to wild-type mice. The administration of an antibody to IL-6 protected against the renal dysfunction and mortality observed in HO-1−/− mice following ischemia. We suggest that the exaggerated production of IL-6, occurring regionally and systemically following localized renal ischemia, in an HO-1-deficient state may underlie the heightened sensitivity observed in this setting. PMID:17728706

  8. Neonatal hemodynamic response to visual cortex activity: high-density near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Steve M.; Gregg, Nick M.; White, Brian R.; Zeff, Benjamin W.; Bjerkaas, Katelin A.; Inder, Terrie E.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2010-03-01

    The neurodevelopmental outcome of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants is a major clinical concern with many infants displaying neurobehavioral deficits in childhood. Functional neuroimaging may provide early recognition of neural deficits in high-risk infants. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has the advantage of providing functional neuroimaging in infants at the bedside. However, limitations in traditional NIRS have included contamination from superficial vascular dynamics in the scalp. Furthermore, controversy exists over the nature of normal vascular, responses in infants. To address these issues, we extend the use of novel high-density NIRS arrays with multiple source-detector distances and a superficial signal regression technique to infants. Evaluations of healthy term-born infants within the first three days of life are performed without sedation using a visual stimulus. We find that the regression technique significantly improves brain activation signal quality. Furthermore, in six out of eight infants, both oxy- and total hemoglobin increases while deoxyhemoglobin decreases, suggesting that, at term, the neurovascular coupling in the visual cortex is similar to that found in healthy adults. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using high-density NIRS arrays in infants to improve signal quality through superficial signal regression, and provide a foundation for further development of high-density NIRS as a clinical tool.

  9. Hemodynamic responses to psychological stress: Comparison of normotensive and hypertensive persons using an ambulatory ventricular function monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.Z.; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Newell, J.; McKusick, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1985-05-01

    The development of a portable device for measuring ventricular function allows assessment of hemodynamic responses under a wide range of circumstances. The authors compared the effects of standardized psychological stress (PS) on an index of left ventricular ejection fraction (EFI), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and plasma norepinephrine level (NE) in 6 normotensive (N, mean BP = 121/77 +- 12/8) and six hypertensive (H, mean BP = 137/95 +- 6/6) subjects. PS included 4 minutes of mental arithmetic and a 16 minute psychiatric interview. The interview focused on life stresses such as marital and family discord, job dissatisfaction, monetary insufficiency, health concerns, and bereavement. Changes in EFI, SBP, and NE (..delta.. EFI, ..delta.. SBP, ..delta.. NE) and in their log transformed variances (..delta.. log(var)) were compared to those occurring during a 20 minute period of standarized rest (R) which consisted on listening to relaxing music. Compared to R, all 12 subjects had a significant pressor response to PS (p less than or equal to .05, range = 6 to 29mmHg). There was an increase in mean EFI in 3 N (p less than or equal to .05, range = 0.5 to 2.7) and 3 H (p less than or equal to .05, range = 1.7 to 4.4) and a decrease in 1 N (p less than or equal to .05, -2.3) and 1 H (p less than or equal to .05, -2.3). Mean NE increased in 4 N (p less than or equal to .05, range 110 to 563 pg/ml) and 6 H (p less than or equal to .05, range = 136 to 525 pg/ml). The authors conclude that (1) in both N and H, PS induces significant responses in EFI which varies in direction despite near uniform increases in SBP and NE, and (2) hypertensive persons have a greater change in variability in EFI during PS than do normotensive persons despite equivalent changes in SBP and NE.

  10. Hemodynamic responses of the caudal artery to toxic tall fescue in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Aiken, G E; Kirch, B H; Strickland, J R; Bush, L P; Looper, M L; Schrick, F N

    2007-09-01

    Color Doppler ultrasonography was used to compare blood flow characteristics in the caudal artery of heifers fed diets with endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) infected (E+) or noninfected (E-) tall fescue seed. Eighteen crossbred (Angus x Brangus) heifers were assigned to 6 pens and were fed chopped alfalfa hay for 5 d and chopped alfalfa hay plus a concentrate that contained E-tall fescue seed for 9 d during an adjustment period. An 11-d experimental period followed, with animals in 3 pens fed chopped alfalfa hay plus a concentrate with E+ seed and those in the other 3 pens fed chopped hay plus concentrate with E E- seed. Color Doppler ultrasound measurements (caudal artery area, peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, mean velocity, heart rate, stroke volume, and flow rate) and serum prolactin were monitored during the adjustment (baseline measures) and during the experimental period. Three baseline measures were collected on d 3, 5, and 6 during the adjustment period for comparison to post E+ seed exposure. Statistical analyses compared the proportionate differences between baseline and response at 4, 28, 52, 76, 100, 172, and 268 h from initial feeding of E+ seed. Serum prolactin concentrations on both diets were lower (P <0.001) than baseline beginning at 4 h from the start of the experimental period. However, trends in serum prolactin concentrations for heifers on the E- diet suggested ambient temperature was affecting these concentrations. Caudal artery area in E+ heifers had declined (P <0.10) from baseline by 4 h and was consistently lower (P <0.05) for the remainder of the period. Heart rates for E+ heifers were lower than the baseline rate from 4 (P <0.10) to 100 (P <0.001) h, but were similar (P >0.10) to the baseline for 172 and 268 h measures. Blood flow in E+ heifers was consistently lower than the baseline from 4 (P <0.05) to 172 (P <0.001) h, but was similar to the baseline at 268 h when heart rate was similar to the baseline rate

  11. Clinical evaluation of the effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine on the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing thyroid surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi, H. D.; Komala, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The procedures in anesthesia such as laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation are the most important skills to be mastered by an anesthesiologist. However, they produce marked cardiovascular responses such as hypertension and tachycardia. Various drugs have been used to suppress this response. One of those is a novel centrally acting α2 agonist - dexmedetomidine. It has numerous uses in anesthesia as it is having sedative, analgesic, hypnotic, and opioid sparing effects. It is also known to suppress the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Aims: This study is aimed to know the effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg body weight on hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing thyroid surgeries. Setting and Design: Sixty patients of American Society of Anaesthesiologist health status class I and II scheduled for thyroid surgery under general anesthesia were considered in this prospective randomized controlled double-blind study. The study population was randomly divided into two groups with 30 patients in each group using sealed envelopes containing the name of the group and patient is asked to pick up the envelope. Materials and Methods: Sixty euthyroid patients, scheduled for thyroid surgeries was randomly divided into two groups with 30 patients in each group. Group A (n = 30) received injection dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg body weight and Group B (n = 30) received 10 ml of normal saline. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded at regular intervals after intubation. Results: Statistically significant decrease in HR, SBP, DBP, and MAP were observed in Group A after intubation when compared to Group B. Conclusion: We conclude that dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg body weight obtunds the hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation in patients undergoing thyroid surgeries. PMID:27746537

  12. Computational simulations of hemodynamic changes within thoracic, coronary, and cerebral arteries following early wall remodeling in response to distal aortic coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Jessica S.; Humphrey, Jay D.; Figueroa, C. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pulsatile character of blood pressure and flow within large arteries plays a particularly important role as a mechano-biological stimulus for wall growth and remodeling. Nevertheless, understanding better the highly coupled interactions between evolving wall geometry, structure, and properties and the hemodynamics will require significantly more experimental data. Computational fluid–solid-growth models promise to aid in the design and interpretation of such experiments and to identify candidate mechanobiological mechanisms for the observed arterial adaptations. Motivated by recent aortic coarctation models in animals, we used a computational fluid–solid interaction model to study possible local and systemic effects on the hemodynamics within the thoracic aorta and coronary, carotid, and cerebral arteries due to a distal aortic coarctation and subsequent spatial variations in wall adaptation. In particular, we studied an initial stage of acute cardiac compensation (i.e., maintenance of cardiac output) followed by early arterial wall remodeling (i.e., spatially varying wall thickening and stiffening). Results suggested, for example, that while coarctation increased both the mean and pulse pressure in the proximal vessels, the locations nearest to the coarctation experienced the greatest changes in pulse pressure. In addition, after introducing a spatially varying wall adaptation, pressure, left ventricular work, and wave speed all increased. Finally, vessel wall strain similarly experienced spatial variations consistent with the degree of vascular wall adaptation. PMID:22415052

  13. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability.

  14. SvO(2)-guided resuscitation for experimental septic shock: effects of fluid infusion and dobutamine on hemodynamics, inflammatory response, and cardiovascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rosário, André Loureiro; Park, Marcelo; Brunialti, Milena Karina; Mendes, Marialice; Rapozo, Marjorie; Fernandes, Denise; Salomão, Reinaldo; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael; Schettino, Guilherme Paula; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar P

    2011-12-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms associated to the beneficial effects of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2))-guided resuscitation during sepsis are unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of an algorithm of SvO(2)-driven resuscitation including fluids, norepinephrine and dobutamine on hemodynamics, inflammatory response, and cardiovascular oxidative stress during a clinically resembling experimental model of septic shock. Eighteen anesthetized and catheterized pigs (35-45 kg) were submitted to peritonitis by fecal inoculation (0.75 g/kg). After hypotension, antibiotics were administered, and the animals were randomized to two groups: control (n = 9), with hemodynamic support aiming central venous pressure 8 to 12 mmHg, urinary output 0.5 mL/kg per hour, and mean arterial pressure greater than 65 mmHg; and SvO(2) (n = 9), with the goals above, plus SvO(2) greater than 65%. The interventions lasted 12 h, and lactated Ringer's and norepinephrine (both groups) and dobutamine (SvO(2) group) were administered. Inflammatory response was evaluated by plasma concentration of cytokines, neutrophil CD14 expression, oxidant generation, and apoptosis. Oxidative stress was evaluated by plasma and myocardial nitrate concentrations, myocardial and vascular NADP(H) oxidase activity, myocardial glutathione content, and nitrotyrosine expression. Mixed venous oxygen saturation-driven resuscitation was associated with improved systolic index, oxygen delivery, and diuresis. Sepsis induced in both groups a significant increase on IL-6 concentrations and plasma nitrate concentrations and a persistent decrease in neutrophil CD14 expression. Apoptosis rate and neutrophil oxidant generation were not different between groups. Treatment strategies did not significantly modify oxidative stress parameters. Thus, an approach aiming SvO(2) during sepsis improves hemodynamics, without any significant effect on inflammatory response and oxidative stress. The beneficial effects associated

  15. Premedication effect of dexmedetomidine and alfentanil on seizure time, recovery duration, and hemodynamic responses in electroconvulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Esmail; Modir, Hesameddin; Bagheri, Niknam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Jamilian, Hamidreza; Eshrati, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for many mental disorders, especially severe and persistent depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine and alfentanil on agitation, satisfaction, seizure duration, and patients hemodynamic after ECT. Materials and Methods: In a three phase crossover randomized clinical trial, 75 patients aged between 18 and 50 years and candidate for ECT were enrolled and assigned into three groups (25 patients in each group). All patients, respectively, took premedication of dexmedetomidine, alfentanil, or saline in three consecutive phases. Patients received 0.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, 10 μg/kg alfentanil or normal saline intravenously, 10 min before induction. Finally, seizure and recovery duration, satisfaction and agitation score, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference about seizure duration, agitation score, and hemodynamic parameters between groups but recovery duration was significantly lower in the control group than dexmedetomidine (P = 0.016) and alfentanil group (P = 0.0001). Patients’ satisfaction was significantly higher in intervention groups (alfentanil and dexmedetomidine groups) (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Given the equal effects of alfentanil and dexmedetomidine, it seems that choosing one of these two drugs for premedication of patients undergoing ECT is appropriate. Drug choice is influenced by numerous factors such as accessibility of each drug and the dominance of anesthesiologist and psychiatrist. PMID:27052067

  16. Gonadotropin response to gonadotropin releasing hormone in acute schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cantalamessa, L; Catania, A; Silva, A; Orsatti, A; Baldini, M; Mosca, G; Zanussi, C; Cazzullo, C L

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in acute schizophrenia, plasma FSH and LH concentrations were estimated both in basal conditions and after stimulation with gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH, 200 micrograms i.v.) in 14 young male patients with acute schizophrenia and in a age-matched group of 14 healthy male controls. Basal plasma PRL and testosterone levels were also measured. The mean basal levels of LH and FSH were slightly lower in schizophrenics, while the mean testosterone and prolactin levels were similar in the two groups. The FSH response to GnRH was significantly reduced in patients with acute schizophrenia, while the response of LH was similar in schizophrenics and in the controls. The possible significance of these findings is discussed in the contest of the complex neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion and the overactivity of dopaminergic systems in acute schizophrenia.

  17. Hemodynamic Responses to Etomidate Versus Ketamine-Thiopental Sodium Combination for Anesthetic Induction in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Patients with Low Ejection Fraction: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohammad Reza; Soleimani, Aria; Zeydi, Amir Emami; Nia, Hamid Sharif; Habibi, Ali; Onagh, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Background: During induction of anesthesia and intubation, hemodynamic changes are very important; especially in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and left ventricular dysfunction. A little information is available on the hemodynamic effects of a combination of ketamine-thiopental for induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, with impaired ventricular function. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic responses to etomidate versus ketamine-thiopental sodium combination for anesthetic induction in CABG surgery patients with low ejection fraction (EF<45%). Materials and Methods: In a double blind randomized clinical trial, a total of 100 patients, scheduled for elective CABG surgery were randomly assigned into two groups. These patients received either etomidate or ketamine-thiopental sodium combination at induction of anesthesia. Hemodynamics variable were measured and recorded at baseline, immediately before and after laryngoscopy and intubation, one, two and three minutes after intubation. Also, muscle twitching incidence among patients in two groups was evaluated. Results: No significant differences between the two groups regarding the changes of hemodynamic variables including systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and heart rate, were notice (p>0.05). Muscle twitching was not observed in the two groups. Conclusion: Hemodynamic stability after administration of ketamine-thiopental sodium combination for induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing CABG surgery, with impaired ventricular function, supports the clinical impression that this combination is safe in CABG surgery patients with low EF. PMID:25478364

  18. Evaluating the hemodynamical response of a cardiovascular system under support of a continuous flow left ventricular assist device via numerical modeling and simulations.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Selim; Safak, Koray K

    2013-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common type of the heart failure which can be characterized by impaired ventricular contractility. Mechanical circulatory support devices were introduced into practice for the heart failure patients to bridge the time between the decision to transplant and the actual transplantation which is not sufficient due to the state of donor organ supply. In this study, the hemodynamic response of a cardiovascular system that includes a dilated cardiomyopathic heart under support of a newly developed continuous flow left ventricular assist device--Heart Turcica Axial--was evaluated employing computer simulations. For the evaluation, a numerical model which describes the pressure-flow rate relations of Heart Turcica Axial, a cardiovascular system model describing the healthy and pathological hemodynamics, and a baroreflex model regulating the heart rate were used. Heart Turcica Axial was operated between 8000 rpm and 11,000 rpm speeds with 1000 rpm increments for assessing the pump performance and response of the cardiovascular system. The results also give an insight about the range of the possible operating speeds of Heart Turcica Axial in a clinical application. Based on the findings, operating speed of Heart Turcica Axial should be between 10,000 rpm and 11,000 rpm.

  19. Dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging for monitoring brain metabolic and hemodynamic response to closed head traumatic brain injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, Itamar; Abookasis, David

    2015-10-01

    ) monitor brain hemodynamic and metabolic response to neuroprotective drug treatment.

  20. Dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging for monitoring brain metabolic and hemodynamic response to closed head traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kofman, Itamar; Abookasis, David

    2015-10-01

    LDF measurements, and (3) monitor brain hemodynamic and metabolic response to neuroprotective drug treatment.

  1. Variations in the pre-ejection period induced by deep breathing do not predict the hemodynamic response to early haemorrhage in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vistisen, Simon Tilma; Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring that can predict fluid responsiveness is an unsettled matter for spontaneously breathing patients. Mechanical ventilation induces cyclic variations in blood pressure, e.g. pulse pressure variation, whose magnitude predicts fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. In this study, we hypothesised that a deep breathing manoeuvre with its effect on heart rate variability (HRV) could induce similar cyclic variations in blood pressure in spontaneously breathing healthy subjects and that the magnitude of these variations could predict the hemodynamic response to controlled haemorrhage. 37 blood donors were instructed to perform two simple deep breathing manoeuvres prior to blood donation; one manoeuvre with a respiratory cycle every 10 s (0.1 Hz) and one every 6 s (0.167 Hz). The variation in the pre-ejection period (∆PEP) was captured with the electrocardiographic and plethysmographic curves, while the hemodynamic response to haemorrhage was estimated with the cardiac output change assessed with ultrasonography. Respiratory HRV was estimated with root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD). Deep breathing induced cyclic changes in ∆PEP magnitude was significantly correlated to RMSSD (p < 0.005). ∆PEP indexed to RMSSD increased significantly following haemorrhage at the 0.167 Hz respiratory frequency (p = 0.01). At none of the respiratory manoeuvres was ∆PEP nor ∆PEP/RMSSD prior to haemorrhage correlated to changes in cardiac output following haemorrhage. Deep breathing induces cyclic changes in blood pressure that are strongly dependent on HRV. These blood pressure variations do, however, not predict the cardiac output response to controlled haemorrhage. PMID:24165897

  2. Understanding critically ill patients hemodynamic response to mobilization: using the evidence to make it safe and feasible.

    PubMed

    Vollman, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    In today's critical care environment, we face a difficult but essential task. We must provide comprehensive, compassionate, complex, technological care without causing harm to our patients. To foster a patient-safe environment, we must examine care practices and processes to reduce the chance of error. Successful early mobilization of critically ill patients can reduce several complications including atelectasis and ventilator-associated pneumonia and shorten ventilator time along with cognitive and functional limitations that linger 1 to 5 years after discharge from the intensive care unit. A long-standing challenge to successful mobilization of critically ill patients is the safety concern of hemodynamic instability. An in-depth exploration of what happens to a critically ill patient physiology during mobilization was done to foster a better understanding of strategies that promote adaptation. The article examines the evidence supporting the need to assess readiness for mobilization to reduce the risk of adverse events. Evidence-based tools and techniques to help clinicians prevent hemodynamic instability before, during, and after in-bed or out-of-bed mobilization are discussed. With safety serving as the overriding goal, we can overcome the barriers and succeed in creating and sustaining a culture of early progressive mobility programs within the intensive care unit.

  3. Bidirectional interactions between neuronal and hemodynamic responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): challenges for brain-state dependent tDCS

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical neural activity. During neural activity, the electric currents from excitable membranes of brain tissue superimpose in the extracellular medium and generate a potential at scalp, which is referred as the electroencephalogram (EEG). Respective neural activity (energy demand) has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF) that supplies glucose (energy supply) via neurovascular coupling. The hemodynamic response can be captured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which enables continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume. This neurovascular coupling phenomenon led to the concept of neurovascular unit (NVU) that consists of the endothelium, glia, neurons, pericytes, and the basal lamina. Here, recent works suggest NVU as an integrated system working in concert using feedback mechanisms to enable proper brain homeostasis and function where the challenge remains in capturing these mostly nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions within NVU for brain-state dependent tDCS. In principal accordance, we propose EEG-NIRS-based whole-head monitoring of tDCS-induced neuronal and hemodynamic alterations during tDCS. PMID:26321925

  4. Bidirectional interactions between neuronal and hemodynamic responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): challenges for brain-state dependent tDCS.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical neural activity. During neural activity, the electric currents from excitable membranes of brain tissue superimpose in the extracellular medium and generate a potential at scalp, which is referred as the electroencephalogram (EEG). Respective neural activity (energy demand) has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF) that supplies glucose (energy supply) via neurovascular coupling. The hemodynamic response can be captured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which enables continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume. This neurovascular coupling phenomenon led to the concept of neurovascular unit (NVU) that consists of the endothelium, glia, neurons, pericytes, and the basal lamina. Here, recent works suggest NVU as an integrated system working in concert using feedback mechanisms to enable proper brain homeostasis and function where the challenge remains in capturing these mostly nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions within NVU for brain-state dependent tDCS. In principal accordance, we propose EEG-NIRS-based whole-head monitoring of tDCS-induced neuronal and hemodynamic alterations during tDCS.

  5. Bidirectional interactions between neuronal and hemodynamic responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): challenges for brain-state dependent tDCS.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical neural activity. During neural activity, the electric currents from excitable membranes of brain tissue superimpose in the extracellular medium and generate a potential at scalp, which is referred as the electroencephalogram (EEG). Respective neural activity (energy demand) has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF) that supplies glucose (energy supply) via neurovascular coupling. The hemodynamic response can be captured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which enables continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume. This neurovascular coupling phenomenon led to the concept of neurovascular unit (NVU) that consists of the endothelium, glia, neurons, pericytes, and the basal lamina. Here, recent works suggest NVU as an integrated system working in concert using feedback mechanisms to enable proper brain homeostasis and function where the challenge remains in capturing these mostly nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions within NVU for brain-state dependent tDCS. In principal accordance, we propose EEG-NIRS-based whole-head monitoring of tDCS-induced neuronal and hemodynamic alterations during tDCS. PMID:26321925

  6. Imaging Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Dominique; Raghunand, Natarajan; Gillies, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular permeability is a pharmacologic indicator of tumor response to therapy, and it is expected that this biomarker will evolve into a clinical surrogate endpoint and be integrated into protocols for determining patient response to antiangiogenic or antivascular therapies. This review discusses the physiological context of vessel permeability in an imaging setting, how it is affected by active and passive transport mechanisms, and how it is described mathematically for both theoretical and complex dynamic microvessel membranes. Many research groups have established dynamic-enhanced imaging protocols for estimating this important parameter. This review discusses those imaging modalities, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and how they compare in terms of their ability to deliver information about therapy-associated changes in microvessel permeability in humans. Finally, this review discusses future directions and improvements needed in these areas. PMID:18506397

  7. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease: the UIP consensus according to scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung B; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth; Meissner, Mark; Kalodiki, Evi; Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier L; Bækgaard, Niels; Beach, Kirk; Belcaro, Giovanni; Black, Stephen; Blomgren, Lena; Bouskela, Eliete; Cappelli, Massimo; Caprini, Joseph; Carpentier, Patrick; Cavezzi, Attilio; Chastanet, Sylvain; Christenson, Jan T; Christopoulos, Demetris; Clarke, Heather; Davies, Alun; Demaeseneer, Marianne; Eklöf, Bo; Ermini, Stefano; Fernández, Fidel; Franceschi, Claude; Gasparis, Antonios; Geroulakos, George; Sergio, Gianesini; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Gloviczki, Peter; Huang, Ying; Ibegbuna, Veronica; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kistner, Robert; Kölbel, Tilo; Kurstjens, Ralph L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Laredo, James; Lattimer, Christopher R; Lugli, Marzia; Lurie, Fedor; Maleti, Oscar; Markovic, Jovan; Mendoza, Erika; Monedero, Javier L; Moneta, Gregory; Moore, Hayley; Morrison, Nick; Mosti, Giovanni; Nelzén, Olle; Obermayer, Alfred; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Parsi, Kurosh; Partsch, Hugo; Passariello, Fausto; Perrin, Michel L; Pittaluga, Paul; Raju, Seshadri; Ricci, Stefano; Rosales, Antonio; Scuderi, Angelo; Slagsvold, Carl E; Thurin, Anders; Urbanek, Tomasz; M VAN Rij, Andre; Vasquez, Michael; Wittens, Cees H; Zamboni, Paolo; Zimmet, Steven; Ezpeleta, Santiago Z

    2016-06-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due to emergence of new diagnostic techniques. Duplex ultrasound scanning and other imaging techniques which evolved in the latter part of the 20th century have dominated investigation. They have greatly improved our understanding of the anatomical patterns of venous reflux and obstruction. However, they do not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all aspects of management for venous disease by evidence-based principles. These included experts from various member societies including the European Venous Forum (EVF), American Venous Forum (AVF), American College of Phlebology (ACP) and Cardiovascular Disease Educational and Research Trust (CDERT). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various forms of treatment. Chapter 1 is devoted to basic hemodynamic concepts and normal venous physiology. Chapter 2 presents the mechanism and magnitude of hemodynamic changes in acute deep vein

  8. Fibrin(ogen) mediates acute inflammatory responses to biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Although "biocompatible" polymeric elastomers are generally nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and chemically inert, implants made of these materials may trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Early interactions between implants and inflammatory cells are probably mediated by a layer of host proteins on the material surface. To evaluate the importance of this protein layer, we studied acute inflammatory responses of mice to samples of polyester terephthalate film (PET) that were implanted intraperitoneally for short periods. Material preincubated with albumin is "passivated," accumulating very few adherent neutrophils or macrophages, whereas uncoated or plasma- coated PET attracts large numbers of phagocytes. Neither IgG adsorption nor surface complement activation is necessary for this acute inflammation; phagocyte accumulation on uncoated implants is normal in hypogammaglobulinemic mice and in severely hypocomplementemic mice. Rather, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to be critical: (a) PET coated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma attracts as few phagocytes as does albumin-coated material; (b) in contrast, PET preincubated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma containing physiologic amounts of fibrinogen elicits "normal" phagocyte recruitment; (c) most importantly, hypofibrinogenemic mice do not mount an inflammatory response to implanted PET unless the material is coated with fibrinogen or the animals are injected with fibrinogen before implantation. Thus, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to initiate the acute inflammatory response to an implanted polymer, suggesting an interesting nexus between two major iatrogenic effects of biomaterials: clotting and inflammation. PMID:8245787

  9. THE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE INDUCED BY BRONCHOSCOPY WITH LAVAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoscopy has been used to evaluate the inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. The procedure may affect acute inflammation in the lower respiratory tract. We reviewed consecutive bronchoscopies done in normal healthy non-smokers between April, 1998 and April, 2004. The...

  10. Acute khat use reduces response conflict in habitual users

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Sellaro, Roberta; Ruiz, Manuel J.; Sikora, Katarzyna; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Khat consumption has become a worldwide phenomenon broadening from Eastern Africa and the south west of the Arabian Peninsula to ethnic communities in the rest of the world. So far, the cognitive effects of khat use are poorly understood and no studies have looked into the relation between acute khat use and cognitive control functions, the way we control our thoughts and goal directed behavior. We studied how acute khat use affects the emergence and the resolution of response conflict, a central cognitive control function. Khat users (n = 11) and khat-free controls (n = 18) were matched in terms of education, sex, alcohol, and cannabis consumption. Groups were tested on response conflict, as measured by the Simon task. In one single session, participants worked through two task blocks: the khat group chewed exclusively khat whereas the khat-free group chewed solely a gum. Results showed that in the second block, which reflects the acute impact of khat, the khat group was better than controls in resolving stimulus-induced response conflict as indexed by a smaller Simon effect. These results suggest that the acute intake of khat may improve participants' ability of handling response conflict. PMID:23801952

  11. Exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension in a patient with compensated cardiac disease: hemodynamic and functional response to sildenafil therapy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Memon, Nabeel; O'Murchu, Brian

    2015-02-01

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with exertional dyspnea and fatigue that had worsened over the preceding 2 years, despite a normally functioning bioprosthetic aortic valve and stable, mild left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction, 0.45). His symptoms could not be explained by physical examination, an extensive biochemical profile, or multiple cardiac and pulmonary investigations. However, abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise test results and a right heart catheterization-combined with the use of a symptom-limited, bedside bicycle ergometer-revealed that the patient's exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension was out of proportion to his compensated left heart disease. A trial of sildenafil therapy resulted in objective improvements in hemodynamic values and functional class.

  12. EATING BEHAVIOR IN RESPONSE TO ACUTE STRESS.

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Veronica; Bontea, Amalia; Anton-Păduraru, Dana-teodora

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a medical and social problem with a dramatically increasing prevalence. It is important to take action since childhood to prevent and treat obesity and metabolic syndrome. Infantile obesity affects all body systems starting in childhood and continuing to adulthood. Understanding the impact of stressors on weight status may be especially important for preventing obesity. The relationship between stress, eating behavior and obesity is not fully understood. However, there is evidence that stress causes disorders in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, system that regulates both stress and feeding responses. Also, the response is different depending on the type of stressors. Chronic stress, especially when people live in a palatable food environment, induces HPA stimulation, excess glucocorticoids, insulin resistance, which lead to inhibition of lipid mobilization, accumulation of triglyceride and retention of abdominal fat. PMID:27483696

  13. Reconsideration of Hemodynamic Cerebral Ischemia Using Recent PET/SPECT Studies.

    PubMed

    Nakagawara, Jyoji

    2016-01-01

    Hemodynamic cerebral ischemia has been conceptually confirmed by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and misery perfusion could be compensated with both vascular and metabolic reserve; however, these compensatory reserve capacities do not always respond in the same manner from short-term to long-term compromise of hemodynamic cerebral ischemia.In patients with acute misery perfusion, CMRO2 is immediately compensated by a marked increase of OEF combined with a limited increase of CBV. In patients with chronic misery perfusion, a moderate increase of OEF is compatible with a moderate increase of CBV, which could correlate with a moderate decrease of vascular reserve (VR). In moyamoya disease with long-standing misery perfusion, hemodynamic cerebral ischemia is initially compensated with a great deal of vasodilation, and can then be followed with an increased OEF in response to the degree of progression.The stage of hemodynamic cerebral ischemia has been defined by an increase of OEF, but could be reconsidered from different patterns of the engagement of compensatory reserve capacities, and misery perfusion could be classified into three subtypes, such as acute, chronic, and long-standing misery perfusion. PMID:27637635

  14. Acute In Vivo Response to an Alternative Implant for Urogynecology

    PubMed Central

    Roman Regueros, Sabiniano; Albersen, Maarten; Zia, Silvia; Osman, Nadir I.; Bullock, Anthony J.; Chapple, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate in vivo the acute host response to an alternative implant designed for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Methods. A biodegradable scaffold was produced from poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) using the electrospinning technique. Human and rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were isolated and characterized by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and differentiation assays. PLA scaffolds were seeded and cultured for 2 weeks with human or rat ADSCs. Scaffolds with and without human or rat ADSCs were implanted subcutaneously on the abdominal wall of rats. After 3 and 7 days, 6 animals from each group were sacrificed. Sections from each sample were analyzed by Haematoxylin and Eosin staining, Sirius red staining, and immunohistochemistry for CD68, PECAM-1, and collagen I and III. Results. Animals responded to the scaffolds with an acute macrophage response. After 7 days of implantation, there was extensive host cell penetration, new blood vessel formation, and new collagen deposition throughout the full thickness of the samples without obvious differences between cell-containing and cell-free scaffolds. Conclusions. The acute in vivo response to an alternative implant (both with and without cells) for the treatment of SUI and POP showed good acute integration into the host tissues. PMID:25136633

  15. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease: event-related desynchronization/synchronization and hemodynamic response analysis.

    PubMed

    Visani, Elisa; Minati, Ludovico; Canafoglia, Laura; Gilioli, Isabella; Salvatoni, Lucia; Varotto, Giulia; Fazio, Patrik; Aquino, Domenico; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Franceschetti, Silvana; Panzica, Ferruccio

    2010-01-01

    We performed simultaneous acquisition of EEG-fMRI in seven patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) and in six healthy controls using self-paced finger extension as a motor task. The event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) analysis showed a greater and more diffuse alpha desynchronization in central regions and a strongly reduced post-movement beta-ERS in patients compared with controls, suggesting a significant dysfunction of the mechanisms regulating active movement and movement end. The event-related hemodynamic response obtained from fMRI showed delayed BOLD peak latency in the contralateral primary motor area suggesting a less efficient activity of the neuronal populations driving fine movements, which are specifically impaired in ULD. PMID:20111730

  16. The hemodynamic response to somatosensory stimulation in mice depends on the anesthetic used: Implications on analysis of mouse fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Felix; Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the number of functional MRI (fMRI) studies in mice has been rapidly increasing. Technological improvements provide the sensitivity required to match the high demands on spatial and temporal resolution and to analyze fast and small signal components of the fMRI response. Yet, the interpretation of mouse fMRI data largely relies on assumptions that were uncritically adopted from previous research in humans or rats. Here, we show based on a large dataset employing an innocuous electrical stimulation paradigm, that (1) the shape of the HRF shapes comprises significant transient signal components; correspondingly analysis procedures have to account for this dynamic nature and allow for variable response functions. (2) The effects of the anesthetics are crucial in determining the shape of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) and also influence the spatial specificity of BOLD signal. (3) The dominant systemic confounding contributions elicited by stimulus-evoked cardiovascular responses observed in mouse fMRI when applying block stimuli may be largely avoided by a milder event-related design applying a randomly spaced single pulse train (RSSPT). Thereby the spatial specificity of the fMRI response is largely retained. We conclude that the sensitivity, specificity and interpretability of stimulus-evoked BOLD signals in mice can be improved by combining appropriate stimulation paradigms with analysis procedures that include adapted HRFs.

  17. Acute phase protein and antioxidant responses in dogs with experimental acute monocytic ehrlichiosis treated with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Karnezi, Dimitra; Ceron, Jose J; Theodorou, Konstantina; Leontides, Leonidas; Siarkou, Victoria I; Martinez, Silvia; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Harrus, Shimon; Koutinas, Christos K; Pardali, Dimitra; Mylonakis, Mathios E

    2016-02-29

    There is currently lack of information on the changes of acute phase proteins (APP) and antioxidant markers and their clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). The objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), ferritin and paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) during treatment of dogs with acute CME with rifampicin. Blood serum samples from ten Beagle dogs with experimental acute CME were retrospectively examined. Five dogs (Group A) were treated with rifampicin (10mg/Kg/24h), per os, for 3 weeks and 5 dogs (Group B) received no treatment (infected controls). Two Beagle dogs served as uninfected controls. Blood serum samples were serially examined prior to Ehrlichia canis inoculation and on post-inoculation days 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. Significant changes of CRP, Hp, ferritin and PON-1 values were found in the majority of infected dogs. However, their concentrations did not differ between the two groups during the treatment observation period. The results of this study indicate that although several APP and PON-1 tend to significantly change in the majority of dogs with acute CME, they were of limited clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in this experimental setting.

  18. Acute phase protein and antioxidant responses in dogs with experimental acute monocytic ehrlichiosis treated with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Karnezi, Dimitra; Ceron, Jose J; Theodorou, Konstantina; Leontides, Leonidas; Siarkou, Victoria I; Martinez, Silvia; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Harrus, Shimon; Koutinas, Christos K; Pardali, Dimitra; Mylonakis, Mathios E

    2016-02-29

    There is currently lack of information on the changes of acute phase proteins (APP) and antioxidant markers and their clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). The objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), ferritin and paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) during treatment of dogs with acute CME with rifampicin. Blood serum samples from ten Beagle dogs with experimental acute CME were retrospectively examined. Five dogs (Group A) were treated with rifampicin (10mg/Kg/24h), per os, for 3 weeks and 5 dogs (Group B) received no treatment (infected controls). Two Beagle dogs served as uninfected controls. Blood serum samples were serially examined prior to Ehrlichia canis inoculation and on post-inoculation days 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. Significant changes of CRP, Hp, ferritin and PON-1 values were found in the majority of infected dogs. However, their concentrations did not differ between the two groups during the treatment observation period. The results of this study indicate that although several APP and PON-1 tend to significantly change in the majority of dogs with acute CME, they were of limited clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in this experimental setting. PMID:26854345

  19. Physiological responses to an acute bout of sprint interval cycling.

    PubMed

    Freese, Eric C; Gist, Nicholas H; Cureton, Kirk J

    2013-10-01

    Sprint interval training has been shown to improve skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and health outcomes. However, the acute physiological responses to 4-7 maximal effort intervals have not been determined. To determine the V[Combining Dot Above]O2, cardiorespiratory responses, and energy expenditure during an acute bout of sprint interval cycling (SIC), health, college-aged subjects, 6 men and 6 women, completed 2 SIC sessions with at least 7 days between trials. Sprint interval cycling was performed on a cycle ergometer and involved a 5-minute warm-up followed by four 30-second all-out sprints with 4-minute active recovery. Peak oxygen uptake (ml·kg·min) during the 4 sprints were 35.3 ± 8.2, 38.8 ± 10.1, 38.8 ± 10.6, and 36.8 ± 9.3, and peak heart rate (b·min) were 164 ± 17, 172 ± 10, 177 ± 12, and 175 ± 22. We conclude that an acute bout of SIC elicits submaximal V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and cardiorespiratory responses during each interval that are above 80% of estimated maximal values. Although the duration of exercise in SIC is very short, the high level of V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and cardiorespiratory responses are sufficient to potentially elicit adaptations to training associated with elevated aerobic energy demand.

  20. BOLD effect: new aspects of the hemodynamic response through combination of fMRI and optical recording in the barrel cortex of the gerbil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Andreas; Stiller, Detelf; Scheich, Henning

    2000-04-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique widely used to map brain-functions. Nevertheless, its hemodynamic basis and spatial precision with which fMRI reflects sites of neuronal activity are not completely understood. We therefore combined fMRI, based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, with optical recording of intrinsic signals (ORIS), a technique, which has a better spatial and temporal resolution. Furthermore, ORIS can distinguish between localized changes in deoxyhemoglobin, and more widespread changes in cerebral blood volume/flow. In gerbils hemodynamic responses over the contralateral barrel cortex were studied with both methods, using identical stimulation of a single vibrissae and identical integration and correlation analysis strategies. Analysis of integration maps and of the spatial distribution and temporal correlation with the block-design of vibrissal stimulation revealed that the BOLD signal, at the site of neuronal activation, does not reflect a depletion of deoxyhemoglobin, as generally assumed. Instead, its positive polarity is likely due to an increase in cerebral blood volume (CBV) whose highly dynamic effect on the BOLD signal exceeds that of the increase in deoxyhemoglobin remaining elevated during prolonged stimulation. This is so, because we show, that blood flow does wash out deoxyhemoglobin but at a rate which is to decrease the deoxyhemoglobin concentration in the voxel below resting level. The wash out causes an accumulation of deoxyhemoglobin in the draining venous side, but at a time window which can be clearly distinguished from the specific activity by applying an analysis strategy based on correlation functions. Therefore, draining veins do not appear as confounding problem. This knowledge could be useful to model the BOLD effect more accurately and improve the spatial resolution of fMRI.

  1. Individual classification of ADHD children by right prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a go/no-go task as assessed by fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yukifumi; Dan, Ippeita; Nagashima, Masako; Dan, Haruka; Uga, Minako; Ikeda, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Gunji, Yuji; Hirano, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Takamichi; Shimoizumi, Hideo; Watanabe, Eiju; Yamagata, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    While a growing body of neurocognitive research has explored the neural substrates associated with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), an objective biomarker for diagnosis has not been established. The advent of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which is a noninvasive and unrestrictive method of functional neuroimaging, raised the possibility of introducing functional neuroimaging diagnosis in young ADHD children. Previously, our fNIRS-based measurements successfully visualized the hypoactivation pattern in the right prefrontal cortex during a go/no-go task in ADHD children compared with typically developing control children at a group level. The current study aimed to explore a method of individual differentiation between ADHD and typically developing control children using multichannel fNIRS, emphasizing how spatial distribution and amplitude of hemodynamic response are associated with inhibition-related right prefrontal dysfunction. Thirty ADHD and thirty typically developing control children underwent a go/no-go task, and their cortical hemodynamics were assessed using fNIRS. We explored specific regions of interest (ROIs) and cut-off amplitudes for cortical activation to distinguish ADHD children from control children. The ROI located on the border of inferior and middle frontal gyri yielded the most accurate discrimination. Furthermore, we adapted well-formed formulae for the constituent channels of the optimized ROI, leading to improved classification accuracy with an area under the curve value of 85% and with 90% sensitivity. Thus, the right prefrontal hypoactivation assessed by fNIRS would serve as a potentially effective biomarker for classifying ADHD children at the individual level. PMID:26266096

  2. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology.

  3. Acute Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Responses to Resistance Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A.; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T.; Zois, Christos E.; Douda, Helen T.; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key points Acute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD. Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses. With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  4. Acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses to resistance exercise in patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T; Zois, Christos E; Douda, Helen T; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key pointsAcute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD.Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses.With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  5. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  6. Human Physiological Responses to Acute and Chronic Cold Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Jodie M.; Taylor, Nigel A. S.; Tipton, Michael J.; Greenleaf, John E.

    2001-01-01

    When inadequately protected humans are exposed to acute cold, excessive body heat is lost to the environment and unless heat production is increased and heat loss attenuated, body temperature will decrease. The primary physiological responses to counter the reduction in body temperature include marked cutaneous vasoconstriction and increased metabolism. These responses, and the hazards associated with such exposure, are mediated by a number of factors which contribute to heat production and loss. These include the severity and duration of the cold stimulus; exercise intensity; the magnitude of the metabolic response; and individual characteristics such as body composition, age, and gender. Chronic exposure to a cold environment, both natural and artificial, results in physiological alterations leading to adaptation. Three quite different, but not necessarily exclusive, patterns of human cold adaptation have been reported: metabolic, hypothermic, and insulative. Cold adaptation has also been associated with an habituation response, in which there is a desensitization, or damping, of the normal response to a cold stress. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the human physiological and pathological responses to cold exposure. Particular attention is directed to the factors contributing to heat production and heat loss during acute cold stress, and the ability of humans to adapt to cold environments.

  7. Impaired regional hemodynamic response in schizophrenia during multiple prefrontal activation tasks: a two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ikezawa, Koji; Iwase, Masao; Ishii, Ryouhei; Azechi, Michiyo; Canuet, Leonides; Ohi, Kazutaka; Yasuda, Yuka; Iike, Naomi; Kurimoto, Ryu; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nakahachi, Takayuki; Sekiyama, Ryuji; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko; Kazui, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Ryota; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2009-03-01

    In schizophrenia, dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), regarded as a core feature of the disease, has been investigated by different neuroimaging methods. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a novel neurophysiological method, is being increasingly used in the investigation of frontal dysfunction in schizophrenia. However, NIRS measurements during multiple frontal activation tasks have been rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to compare hemodynamic changes in the PFC between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls during four different types of frontal lobe tasks using a 2-channel NIRS system. Thirty patients with schizophrenia and thirty age- and gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. In both groups, changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Delta[oxyHb]) at the bilateral forehead were measured during Verbal fluency test letter version (VFT-letter), VFT category version, Tower of Hanoi (TOH), the Sternberg and Stroop tasks. Regarding Delta[oxyHb] in PFC, a diagnosis group effect was found for VFT-letter and TOH. Significant negative correlation was found between left Delta[oxyHb] during TOH and negative and cognitive symptom scores in schizophrenia patients. Right Delta[oxyHb] during TOH also showed significant negative correlation with cognitive symptoms scores. No significant correlation between Delta[oxyHb] and clinical characteristics were observed during VFT-letter. These findings suggest that among a battery of frontal lobe tasks administered to schizophrenia patients, VFT-letter and TOH are more sensitive to detect PFC activation, as indicated by Delta[oxyHb] using a 2-channel NIRS. Taken together, these findings and those of previous neuroimaging studies suggest that VFT-letter and TOH might represent possible candidate physiological markers of prefrontal dysfunction in schizophrenia, though extensive testing in clinical settings will be necessary. PMID:19157786

  8. Sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, T S; Young, J B; Landsberg, L

    1983-01-01

    The sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxic exposure at 10.5 and 7.5% oxygen were determined in the rat. Cardiac norepinephrine (NE) turnover was used to assess sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, and urinary excretion of epinephrine (E) was measured as an index of adrenal medullary activity. The responses of the adrenal medulla and SNS were distinct and dependent upon the degree and duration of hypoxic exposure. Chronic hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen increased cardiac NE turnover by 130% after 3, 7, and 14 d of hypoxic exposure. Urinary excretion of NE was similarly increased over this time interval, while urinary E excretion was marginally elevated. In contrast, acute exposure to moderate hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen was not associated with an increase in SNS activity; in fact, decreased SNS activity was suggested by diminished cardiac NE turnover and urinary NE excretion over the first 12 h of hypoxic exposure, and by a rebound increase in NE turnover after reexposure to normal oxygen tension. Adrenal medullary activity, on the other hand, increased substantially during acute exposure to moderate hypoxia (2-fold increase in urinary E excretion) and severe hypoxia (greater than 10-fold). In distinction to the lack of effect of acute hypoxic exposure (10.5% oxygen), the SNS was markedly stimulated during the first day of hypoxia exposure at 7.5% oxygen, an increase that was sustained throughout at least 7 d at 7.5% oxygen. These results demonstrate that chronic exposure to moderate and severe hypoxia increases the activity of the SNS and adrenal medulla, the effect being greater in severe hypoxic exposure. The response to acute hypoxic exposure is more complicated; during the first 12 h of exposure at 10.5% oxygen, the SNS is not stimulated and appears to be restrained, while adrenal medullary activity is enhanced. Acute exposure to a more severe degree of hypoxia (7.5% oxygen), however, is associated with stimulation of both the SNS and adrenal medulla

  9. Mast cells mediate acute inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liping; Jennings, Timothy A.; Eaton, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Implanted biomaterials trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in such acute inflammatory responses can be arbitrarily divided into phagocyte transmigration, chemotaxis, and adhesion to implant surfaces. We earlier observed that two chemokines—macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1—and the phagocyte integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)/surface fibrinogen interaction are, respectively, required for phagocyte chemotaxis and adherence to biomaterial surfaces. However, it is still not clear how the initial transmigration of phagocytes through the endothelial barrier into the area of the implant is triggered. Because implanted biomaterials elicit histaminic responses in the surrounding tissue, and histamine release is known to promote rapid diapedesis of inflammatory cells, we evaluated the possible role of histamine and mast cells in the recruitment of phagocytes to biomaterial implants. Using i.p. and s.c. implantation of polyethylene terephthalate disks in mice we find: (i) Extensive degranulation of mast cells, accompanied by histamine release, occurs adjacent to short-term i.p. implants. (ii) Simultaneous administration of H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists (pyrilamine and famotidine, respectively) greatly diminishes recruitment and adhesion of both neutrophils (<20% of control) and monocytes/macrophages (<30% of control) to implants. (iii) Congenitally mast cell-deficient mice also exhibit markedly reduced accumulation of phagocytes on both i.p. and s.c implants. (iv) Finally, mast cell reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice restores “normal” inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants. We conclude that mast cells and their granular products, especially histamine, are important in recruitment of inflammatory cells to biomaterial implants. Improved knowledge of such responses may permit purposeful modulation of both acute and chronic inflammation affecting implanted biomaterials. PMID

  10. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  11. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration.

  12. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration. PMID:26924539

  13. Cortisol modulates men's affiliative responses to acute social stress.

    PubMed

    Berger, Justus; Heinrichs, Markus; von Dawans, Bernadette; Way, Baldwin M; Chen, Frances S

    2016-01-01

    The dominant characterization of the physiological and behavioral human stress reaction is the fight-or-flight response. On the other hand, it has been suggested that social affiliation during stressful times ("tend-and-befriend") also represents a common adaptive response to stress, particularly for women. In the current study, we investigate the extent to which men may also show affiliative responses following acute stress. In addition, we examine a potential neuroendocrine modulator of the hypothesized affiliative response. Eighty male students (forty dyads) were recruited to undergo either the Trier Social Stress Test for Groups (TSST-G) or a non-stressful control situation. Subsequently, participants completed a dyadic interaction task and were then asked to report their feelings of psychological closeness to their interaction partner. Although participants assigned to the stress condition did not differ overall on psychological closeness from participants assigned to the control condition, participants with high cortisol responses to the stressor showed significantly higher ratings of psychological closeness to their interaction partner than participants with low cortisol responses. Our findings suggest that men may form closer temporary bonds following stressful situations that are accompanied by a significant cortisol response. We suggest that the traditional characterization of the male stress response in terms of "fight-or-flight" may be incomplete, and that social affiliation may in fact represent a common, adaptive response to stress in men.

  14. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  15. PARP1 activation/expression modulates regional-specific neuronal and glial responses to seizure in a hemodynamic-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Kim, Y-J; Kim, J Y; Kang, T-C

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) plays a regulatory role in apoptosis, necrosis and other cellular processes after injury. Status epilepticus (SE) induces neuronal and astroglial death that show regional-specific patterns in the rat hippocampus and piriform cortex (PC). Thus, we investigated whether PARP1 regulates the differential neuronal/glial responses to pilocarpine (PILO)-induced SE in the distinct brain regions. In the present study, both CA1 and CA3 neurons showed PARP1 hyperactivation-dependent neuronal death pathway, whereas PC neurons exhibited PARP1 degradation-mediated neurodegeneration following SE. PARP1 degradation was also observed in astrocytes within the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. PARP1 induction was detected in CA1-3-reactive astrocytes, as well as in reactive microglia within the PC. Although PARP1 inhibitors attenuated CA1-3 neuronal death and reactive gliosis in the CA1 region, they deteriorated the astroglial death in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region. Ex vivo study showed the similar regional and cellular patterns of PARP1 activation/degradation. Taken together, our findings suggest that the cellular-specific PARP1 activation/degradation may distinctly involve regional-specific neuronal damage, astroglial death and reactive gliosis in response to SE independently of hemodynamics.

  16. Salivary Markers of Inflammation in Response to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Slavish, Danica C.; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Engeland, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the ability to detect inflammatory markers in response to stress within naturally occurring social contexts and/or across multiple time points per day within individuals. Salivary collection is a less invasive process than current methods of blood collection and enables intensive naturalistic methodologies, such as those involving extensive repeated measures per day over time. Yet the reliability and validity of saliva-based to blood-based inflammatory biomarkers in response to stress remains unclear. We review and synthesize the published studies that have examined salivary markers of inflammation following exposure to an acute laboratory stressor. Results from each study are reviewed by analyte (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, CRP) and stress type (social-cognitive and exercise-physical), after which methodological issues and limitations are addressed. Although the literature is limited, several inflammatory markers (including IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6) have been reliably determined from saliva and have increased significantly in response to stress across multiple studies, with effect sizes ranging from very small to very large. Although CRP from saliva has been associated with CRP in circulating blood more consistently than other biomarkers have been associated with their counterparts in blood, evidence demonstrating it reliably responds to acute stress is absent. Although the current literature is presently too limited to allow broad assertion that inflammatory biomarkers determined from saliva are valuable for examining acute stress responses, this review suggests that specific targets may be valid and highlights specific areas of need for future research. PMID:25205395

  17. Computations of uncertainty mediate acute stress responses in humans.

    PubMed

    de Berker, Archy O; Rutledge, Robb B; Mathys, Christoph; Marshall, Louise; Cross, Gemma F; Dolan, Raymond J; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-03-29

    The effects of stress are frequently studied, yet its proximal causes remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that subjective estimates of uncertainty predict the dynamics of subjective and physiological stress responses. Subjects learned a probabilistic mapping between visual stimuli and electric shocks. Salivary cortisol confirmed that our stressor elicited changes in endocrine activity. Using a hierarchical Bayesian learning model, we quantified the relationship between the different forms of subjective task uncertainty and acute stress responses. Subjective stress, pupil diameter and skin conductance all tracked the evolution of irreducible uncertainty. We observed a coupling between emotional and somatic state, with subjective and physiological tuning to uncertainty tightly correlated. Furthermore, the uncertainty tuning of subjective and physiological stress predicted individual task performance, consistent with an adaptive role for stress in learning under uncertain threat. Our finding that stress responses are tuned to environmental uncertainty provides new insight into their generation and likely adaptive function.

  18. Computations of uncertainty mediate acute stress responses in humans.

    PubMed

    de Berker, Archy O; Rutledge, Robb B; Mathys, Christoph; Marshall, Louise; Cross, Gemma F; Dolan, Raymond J; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stress are frequently studied, yet its proximal causes remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that subjective estimates of uncertainty predict the dynamics of subjective and physiological stress responses. Subjects learned a probabilistic mapping between visual stimuli and electric shocks. Salivary cortisol confirmed that our stressor elicited changes in endocrine activity. Using a hierarchical Bayesian learning model, we quantified the relationship between the different forms of subjective task uncertainty and acute stress responses. Subjective stress, pupil diameter and skin conductance all tracked the evolution of irreducible uncertainty. We observed a coupling between emotional and somatic state, with subjective and physiological tuning to uncertainty tightly correlated. Furthermore, the uncertainty tuning of subjective and physiological stress predicted individual task performance, consistent with an adaptive role for stress in learning under uncertain threat. Our finding that stress responses are tuned to environmental uncertainty provides new insight into their generation and likely adaptive function. PMID:27020312

  19. Reduced Acute Inflammatory Responses to Microgel Conformal Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Amanda W.; Singh, Neetu; Burns, Kellie L.; Babensee, Julia E.; Lyon, L. Andrew; García, Andrés J.

    2008-01-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into the body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. This inflammatory cascade involves protein adsorption, leukocyte recruitment and activation, cytokine release, and fibrous encapsulation of the implant. We present a coating strategy based on thin films of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel microparticles (i.e. microgels) cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. These particles were grafted onto a clinically relevant polymeric material to generate conformal coatings that significantly reduced in vitro fibrinogen adsorption and primary human monocytes/macrophage adhesion and spreading. These microgel coatings also reduced leukocyte adhesion and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1) in response to materials implanted acutely in the murine intraperitoneal space. These microgel coatings can be applied to biomedical implants as a protective coating to attenuate biofouling, leukocyte adhesion and activation, and adverse host responses for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:18804859

  20. Computations of uncertainty mediate acute stress responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    de Berker, Archy O.; Rutledge, Robb B.; Mathys, Christoph; Marshall, Louise; Cross, Gemma F.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stress are frequently studied, yet its proximal causes remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that subjective estimates of uncertainty predict the dynamics of subjective and physiological stress responses. Subjects learned a probabilistic mapping between visual stimuli and electric shocks. Salivary cortisol confirmed that our stressor elicited changes in endocrine activity. Using a hierarchical Bayesian learning model, we quantified the relationship between the different forms of subjective task uncertainty and acute stress responses. Subjective stress, pupil diameter and skin conductance all tracked the evolution of irreducible uncertainty. We observed a coupling between emotional and somatic state, with subjective and physiological tuning to uncertainty tightly correlated. Furthermore, the uncertainty tuning of subjective and physiological stress predicted individual task performance, consistent with an adaptive role for stress in learning under uncertain threat. Our finding that stress responses are tuned to environmental uncertainty provides new insight into their generation and likely adaptive function. PMID:27020312

  1. [Role of the serotonergic nervous system in hemodynamic and vasopressin responses to centrally administrated angiotensin-II in spontaneously hypertensive rats].

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Y; Kushiro, T; Kurumatani, H; Kajiwara, N

    1990-07-20

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the role of the serotonergic nervous system in centrally administrated angiotensin II (A-II) mediated hemodynamic as well as vasopressin (AVP) responses. Eight-week-old male SHR and age-matched Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) were used and the experiment was performed in the conscious state. In protocol 1, after resting observation of 30 minutes 10ng of A-II was given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). This was followed by i.c.v. injection of 1 microgram of 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, xylamidine, 50 minutes later; then 10ng of i.c.v. A-II was repeated after 10 minutes (SHR: n = 7, WKY: n = 10). In protocol 2, plasma vasopressin (AVP) was measured in the following groups. In one group, 1.3ml of blood was sampled from the carotid cannula after resting observation, and the same amount of blood from an age-matched donor rat of the same strain was transfused immediately. Two hours later, 10ng of A-II was given i.c.v., and blood was sampled again after 1 minute (SHR: n = 7, WKY: n = 12). In another group, 1 microgram of xylamidine was given i.c.v. and was followed by 10ng of A-II 10 minutes later; then blood was collected after 1 minute (SHR: n = 8, WKY: n = 13). In protocol 1, resting MAP were 144 +/- 6mmHg in SHR and 99 +/- 2mmHg in WKY. I.c.v. A-II elicited a consistent pressor response in both SHR and WKY, but the response was significantly larger in SHR than that in WKY, +45 +/- 3 and +37 +/- 1mmHg, respectively. Xylamidine had no effect on MAP, and repeated A-II produced significant pressor responses. However, the responses were significantly smaller in both SHR (+36 +/- 3mmHg) and WKY (+25 +/- 1mmHg) as compared with those to initial A-II injection. In protocol 2, resting AVP were similar in SHR (1.5 +/- 0.2pg/ml) and in WKY (1.6 +/- 0.1pg/ml). However, after i.c.v. A-II injection, AVP became higher in SHR (131 +/- 14pg/ml) than in WKY (64 +/- 6pg/ml). AVP after A-II injection with xylamidine pretreatment were similar in SHR (48

  2. Acute Stress Reduces Reward Responsiveness: Implications for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Ryan; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Stress, one of the strongest risk factors for depression, has been linked to “anhedonic” behavior and dysfunctional reward-related neural circuitry in preclinical models. Methods To test if acute stress reduces reward responsiveness (i.e., the ability to modulate behavior as a function of past reward), a signal-detection task coupled with a differential reinforcement schedule was utilized. Eighty female participants completed the task under both a stress condition, either threat-of-shock (n = 38) or negative performance feedback (n = 42), and a no-stress condition. Results Stress increased negative affect and anxiety. As hypothesized based on preclinical findings, stress, particularly the threat-of-shock condition, impaired reward responsiveness. Regression analyses indicate that self-report measures of anhedonia predicted stress-induced hedonic deficits even after controlling for anxiety symptoms. Conclusions These findings indicate that acute stress reduces reward responsiveness, particularly in individuals with anhedonic symptoms. Stress-induced hedonic deficit is a promising candidate mechanism linking stressful experiences to depression. PMID:16806107

  3. Lymphocyte aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness in acute leukemia of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Blumer, J.L.; Dunn, R.; Esterhay, M.D.; Yamashita, T.S.; Gross, S.

    1981-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity and inducibility were examined in mitogen-stimulated cultured lymphocytes from children with acute leukemia in remission, with nonleukemic malignancies, and with no family or personal history of malignant disease. Neither morphological differences nor differences in mitogen responsivelness were observed among the three sources of cells studied. Levels of constitutive and dibenzanthracene-induced AHH activity were found to be similar among the three groups by analysis of variance. However, when results were analyzed in terms of inducibility ratios, it was found that cells from leukemic children were significantly less inducible (p < 0.005) than cells from unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancies. The reason for this difference became apparent when statistical criteria were employed for the phenotypic separation of individuals who were highly aromatic hydrocarbon responsive and minimally responsive. A significantly larger proportion (p < 0.001) of leukemic children than unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancy were found to be minimally aromatic hydrocarbon responsive. Moreover, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsing while on therapy, longer durations of the first remission were correlated (r = 0.63, p < 0.05) with the highly inducible AHH phenotype.

  4. Acute phase protein response in the capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Bernal, Luis; Feser, Mariane; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; García-Martínez, Juan D; Cerón, José J; Tecles, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the acute phase protein response in capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). Three animal groups were used: 1) healthy animals (n=30), 2) a group in which experimental inflammation with turpentine was induced (n=6), and 3) a group affected with sarcoptic scabies (n=14) in which 10 animals were treated with ivermectin. Haptoglobin (Hp), acid-soluble glycoprotein (ASG) and albumin were analyzed in all animals. In those treated with turpentine, Hp reached its maximum value at 2 wk with a 2.7-fold increase, whereas ASG increased 1.75-fold and albumin decreased 0.87-fold 1 wk after the induction of inflammation. Capybaras affected with sarcoptic scabies presented increases in Hp and ASG of 4.98- and 3.18-fold, respectively, and a 0.87-fold decrease in albumin, compared with healthy animals. Haptoglobin and ASG can be considered as moderate, positive acute phase proteins in capybaras because they showed less than 10-fold increases after an inflammatory process and reached their peak concentrations 1 wk after the induction of inflammation. Conversely, albumin can be considered a negative acute phase protein in capybaras because it showed a reduction in concentration after inflammatory stimulus.

  5. Profiling biochemical and hemodynamic markers using chronically instrumented, conscious and unrestrained rats undergoing severe, acute controlled hemorrhagic hypovolemic shock as an integrated in-vivo model system to assess new blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Daull, P; Blouin, A; Cayer, J; Beaudoin, M; Belleville, K; Sirois, P; Nantel, F; Chang, T M S; Battistini, B

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess several biochemical and physiological endpoint parameters alongside controlled hemorrhagic and recovery phases of chronically instrumented, conscious and unrestrained healthy rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (12-14 weeks; 430+/-20 g; n=22-18) were instrumented with a saline-perfused femoral arterial catheter and placed individually in a metabolic cage for up to 20 days, allowing instant assessments of the hemodynamic profile and blood and urine sampling for hematological profile and biochemical measurements to assess hepatic, renal and metabolic functions. In addition, body weight, food and water intake, and diuresis were monitored daily. After a 7-day stabilization period, the rats underwent severe and acute hemorrhagic shock (HS) (removal of 50% of total circulating blood volume), kept in hypovolemic shock for an ischemic period of 50 min and then resuscitated over 10 min. Gr. 1 was re-infused with autologous shed blood (AB; n=10) whereas Gr. 2 was infused 1:1 with a solution of sterile saline-albumin (SA; 7% w/v) (n=8-12). Ischemic rats recovered much more rapidly following AB re-infusion than those receiving SA. Normal hemodynamic and biochemical profiles were re-established after 24 h. Depressed blood pressure lasted 4-5 days in SA rats. The hematological profile in the SA resuscitated rats was even more drastically affected. Circulating plasma concentrations of hemoglobin (-40%), hematocrit (-50%), RBC (-40%) and platelets (-41%) counts were still severely decreased 24 h after the acute ischemic event whereas WBC counts increased 2.2-fold by day 4. It took 5-9 days for these profiles to normalize after ischemia-reperfusion with SA. Diuresis increased in both groups (by 45+/-7% on day 1) but presented distinct electrolytic profiles. Hepatic and renal functions were normal in AB rats whereas altered in SA rats. The present set of experiments enabled us to validate a model of HS in conscious rats and the use of an

  6. Advanced hemodynamic monitoring: principles and practice in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos

    2012-02-01

    Advanced hemodynamic monitoring is necessary for many patients with acute brain and/or spinal cord injury. Optimizing cerebral and systemic physiology requires multi-organ system function monitoring. Hemodynamic manipulations are cardinal among interventions to regulate cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebral blood flow. The pulmonary artery catheter is not any more the sole tool available; less invasive and potentially more accurate methodologies have been developed and employed in the operating room and among diverse critically ill populations. These include transpulmonary thermodilution, arterial pressure pulse contour, and waveform analysis and bedside critical care ultrasound. A thorough understanding of hemodynamics and of the available monitoring modalities is an essential skill for the neurointensivist.

  7. Hemodynamic and metabolic response during dynamic and resistance exercise in different intensities: a cross-sectional study on implications of intensity on safety and symptoms in patients with coronary disease

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Flavia Rossi; Junior, Jose Carlos Bonjorno; Mendes, Renata G; Sperling, Milena Pelosi; Arakelian, Vivian M; Bassi, Daniela; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Resistance (RE) and aerobic exercise (AE) can promote hemodynamic, physiologic and clinical modifications in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The aim of the study is to assess key physiologic and clinical responses during RE at 30% and 60% of 1-RM on a 45° leg press and to compare responses during AE. We evaluated fifteen male subjects with coronary artery disease (60.8±4.7 years) that performed the following tests: (1) incremental AE test on cycle ergometer; (2) 1-RM test on a leg press at 45°; (3) and RE at 30% and 60% of 1-RM for 24 repetitions. Peak cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and the minute ventilation (VE, L/min)/VCO2 ration were measured. We found that both AE and RE at 60% of aerobic and resistance capacity elicited similar hemodynamic and ventilatory responses (p>0.05). However, RE at 30% 1-RM showed more attenuated responses of VO2, VE/VCO2, HR and CO when compared with 60% of aerobic and resistance capacity. Interestingly, the number, percentage and the severity of arrhythmias were higher at 60% 1-RM (P<0.05). Our data suggest that high repetition sets of RE at 60% 1-RM appears to result in hemodynamic, ventilatory, and metabolic changes equivalent to those observed during AE at a comparable intensity. PMID:27335689

  8. Fixation-related FMRI analysis in the domain of reading research: using self-paced eye movements as markers for hemodynamic brain responses during visual letter string processing.

    PubMed

    Richlan, Fabio; Gagl, Benjamin; Hawelka, Stefan; Braun, Mario; Schurz, Matthias; Kronbichler, Martin; Hutzler, Florian

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of using self-paced eye movements during reading (measured by an eye tracker) as markers for calculating hemodynamic brain responses measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Specifically, we were interested in whether the fixation-related fMRI analysis approach was sensitive enough to detect activation differences between reading material (words and pseudowords) and nonreading material (line and unfamiliar Hebrew strings). Reliable reading-related activation was identified in left hemisphere superior temporal, middle temporal, and occipito-temporal regions including the visual word form area (VWFA). The results of the present study are encouraging insofar as fixation-related analysis could be used in future fMRI studies to clarify some of the inconsistent findings in the literature regarding the VWFA. Our study is the first step in investigating specific visual word recognition processes during self-paced natural sentence reading via simultaneous eye tracking and fMRI, thus aiming at an ecologically valid measurement of reading processes. We provided the proof of concept and methodological framework for the analysis of fixation-related fMRI activation in the domain of reading research.

  9. Angiotensin II and CRF Receptors in the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala Mediate Hemodynamic Response Variability to Cocaine in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mari A.; Kucenas, Sarah; Bowman, Tamara A.; Ruhlman, Melissa; Knuepfer, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Stress or cocaine evokes either a large increase in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) or a smaller increase in SVR accompanied by an increase in cardiac output (designated vascular and mixed responders, respectively) in Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) mediates this variability. Conscious, freely-moving rats, instrumented for measurement of arterial pressure and cardiac output and for drug delivery into the CeA, were given cocaine (5 mg/kg, iv, 4-6 times) and characterized as vascular (n=15) or mixed responders (n=10). Subsequently, we administered cocaine after bilateral microinjections (100 nl) of saline or selective agents in the CeA. Muscimol (80 pmol), a GABAA agonist, or losartan (43.4 pmol), an AT1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the cocaine-induced increase in SVR in vascular responders, selectively, such that vascular responders were no longer different from mixed responders. The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) antagonist, α-helical CRF9-41 (15.7 pmol), abolished the difference between cardiac output and SVR in mixed and vascular responders. We conclude that greater increases in SVR observed in vascular responders are dependent on AT1 receptor activation and, to a lesser extent on CRF receptors. Therefore, AT1 and CRF receptors in the CeA contribute to hemodynamic response variability to intravenous cocaine. PMID:19879859

  10. Predictors of individual differences in acute response to ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Muller, K.E.; Bromberg, P.A.; Shy, C.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify personal characteristics that predict individual differences in acute FEV1 response to ozone exposure. Response and predictor data were collected on 290 white male volunteers 18 to 32 yr of age who were each exposed to one of six concentrations of ozone between 0.0 and 0.40 part per million. The sample was divided into an exploratory sample of 96 and a confirmatory sample of 194 subjects. Exploratory analysis indicated that ozone, age, and several other variables explained a significant proportion of the variance in response. In the confirmatory sample, only age and ozone concentration predicted FEV1 decrement. For the combined sample ozone explained 31% of the variance, with age accounting for an additional 4%. The model predicted a decreasing response with increasing age for all nonzero ozone concentrations. For exposure to 0.40 ppm, the model predicts decrements in FEV1 of 1.07 and 0.47 L for 18- and 30-yr-old subjects, respectively. We concluded that for white male subjects age was a significant predictor of response, with older subjects being less responsive to ozone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exploratory analysis without control of type I statistical error rates may result in apparent findings that cannot be replicated.

  11. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro- reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationships of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venotis Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). Altered vascular volume had no effect on response relations of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex but did alter the gain of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex (-7.93 q 1.71, -4.36 q 1.38, and -2.56 q 1.59 peripheral resistance units/mmHg for hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic, respectively) independent of shifts in baseline FVR and PVP. These results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulnionary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  12. Amplitude variability over trials in hemodynamic responses in adolescents with ADHD: The role of the anterior default mode network and the non-specific role of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, L; Eichele, T; van Wageningen, H; Plessen, K J; Stevens, M C

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that intra-individual variability (IIV) in performance on attention and other cognitive tasks might be a cognitive endophenotype in individuals with ADHD. Despite robust IIV findings in behavioral data, only sparse data exist on how what type of brain dysfunction underlies variable response times. In this study, we asked whether ADHD IIV in reaction time on a commonly-used test of attention might be related to variation in hemodynamic responses (HRs) observed trial-to-trial. Based on previous studies linking IIV to regions within the "default mode" network (DMN), we predicted that adolescents with ADHD would have higher HR variability in the DMN compared with controls, and this in turn would be related to behavioral IIV. We also explored the influence of social anxiety on HR variability in ADHD as means to test whether higher arousal associated with high trait anxiety would affect the neural abnormalities. We assessed single-trial variability of HRs, estimated from fMRI event-related responses elicited during an auditory oddball paradigm in adolescents with ADHD and healthy controls (11-18 years old; N = 46). Adolescents with ADHD had higher HR variability compared with controls in anterior regions of the DMN. This effect was specific to ADHD and not associated with traits of age, IQ and anxiety. However, an ADHD effect of higher HR variability also appeared in a basal ganglia network, but for these brain regions the relationships of HR variability and social anxiety levels were more complex. Performance IIV correlated significantly with variability of HRs in both networks. These results suggest that assessment of trial-to-trial HR variability in ADHD provides information beyond that detectable through analysis of behavioral data and average brain activation levels, revealing specific neural correlates of a possible ADHD IIV endophenotype. PMID:27622136

  13. Acute stress responses: A review and synthesis of ASD, ASR, and CSR.

    PubMed

    Isserlin, Leanna; Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2008-10-01

    Toward the development of a unifying diagnosis for acute stress responses this article attempts to find a place for combat stress reaction (CSR) within the spectrum of other defined acute stress responses. This article critically compares the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder (ASD), acute stress reaction (ASR), and CSR. Prospective studies concerning the predictive value of ASD, ASR, and CSR are reviewed. Questions, recommendations, and implications for clinical practice are raised concerning the completeness of the current acute stress response diagnoses, the heterogeneity of different stressors, the scope of expected outcomes, and the importance of decline in function as an indicator of future psychological, psychiatric, and somatic distress.

  14. Acute stress responses: A review and synthesis of ASD, ASR, and CSR.

    PubMed

    Isserlin, Leanna; Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2008-10-01

    Toward the development of a unifying diagnosis for acute stress responses this article attempts to find a place for combat stress reaction (CSR) within the spectrum of other defined acute stress responses. This article critically compares the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder (ASD), acute stress reaction (ASR), and CSR. Prospective studies concerning the predictive value of ASD, ASR, and CSR are reviewed. Questions, recommendations, and implications for clinical practice are raised concerning the completeness of the current acute stress response diagnoses, the heterogeneity of different stressors, the scope of expected outcomes, and the importance of decline in function as an indicator of future psychological, psychiatric, and somatic distress. PMID:19123763

  15. Polyphasic innate immune responses to acute and chronic LCMV infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Brian A.; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Price, Aryn A.; Grakoui, Arash; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Summary Resolution of acute and chronic viral infections requires activation of innate cells to initiate and maintain adaptive immune responses. Here we report that infection with acute Armstrong (ARM) or chronic Clone 13 (C13) strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) led to two distinct phases of innate immune response. During the first 72hr of infection, dendritic cells upregulated activation markers, and stimulated anti-viral CD8+ T cells, independent of viral strain. Seven days after infection, there was an increase in Ly6Chi monocytic and Gr-1hi neutrophilic cells in lymphoid organs and blood. This expansion in cell numbers was enhanced and sustained in C13 infection, whereas it occurred only transiently with ARM infection. These cells resembled myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and potently suppressed T cell proliferation. The reduction of monocytic cells in Ccr2−/− mice or after Gr-1 antibody depletion enhanced anti-viral T cell function. Thus, innate cells have an important immunomodulatory role throughout chronic infection. PMID:23438822

  16. Relatively spared central multifocal electroretinogram responses in acute quinine toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Muhammad Usman; Noonan, Carmel; Hagan, Richard; Brown, Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was investigated with electrodiagnostic testing 4 months after a deliberate quinine overdose. Initially he was admitted to intensive care unit with visual acuity (VA) of perception of light in both eyes. VA recovered to 6/6 right eye and 6/12 left eye, though severely constricted fields were noted. Slow stimulus (base period of 83 ms) multifocal electroretinogram (ERG) showed electronegative responses outside the inner 5 degrees, with a reduced but electropositive response seen in this central area. It appears that in this case of bilaterally negative ERGs that the macula/fovea (which has a vascular supply through the choroid) is relatively spared as is seen in bilateral vascular electronegative ERGs. This may indicate that quinine toxicity to the retina may be secondary to effects similar to vascular occlusion or severe ischemia during the acute phase of quinine poisoning. PMID:22693278

  17. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific.

  18. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific. PMID:26476140

  19. Enhanced vagal baroreflex response during 24 h after acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Adams, W. C.

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated carotid-cardiac baroreflex responses in eight normotensive men (25-41 yr) on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h after graded supine cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, this 24-h protocol was repeated with no exercise (control). Beat-to-beat R-R intervals were measured during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses from 40 to -65 mmHg; changes of R-R intervals were plotted against carotid pressure (systolic pressure minus neck chamber pressure). The maximum slope of the response relationship increased (P less than 0.05) from preexercise to 12 h (3.7 +/- 0.4 to 7.1 +/- 0.7 ms/mmHg) and remained significantly elevated through 24 h. The range of the R-R response was also increased from 217 +/- 24 to 274 +/- 32 ms (P less than 0.05). No significant differences were observed during the control 24-h period. An acute bout of graded exercise designed to elicit exhaustion increases the sensitivity and range of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response for 24 h and enhances its capacity to buffer against hypotension by increasing heart rate. These results may represent an underlying mechanism that contributes to blood pressure stability after intense exercise.

  20. The Heat Shock Response and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Derek S.; Wong, Hector R.

    2006-01-01

    All cells respond to stress through the activation of primitive, evolutionarily conserved genetic programs that maintain homeostasis and assure cell survival. Stress adaptation, which is known in the literature by a myriad of terms, including tolerance, desensitization, conditioning, and reprogramming, is a common paradigm found throughout nature, in which a primary exposure of a cell or organism to a stressful stimulus (e.g., heat) results in an adaptive response by which a second exposure to the same stimulus produces a minimal response. More interesting is the phenomenon of cross-tolerance, by which a primary exposure to a stressful stimulus results in an adaptive response whereby the cell or organism is resistant to a subsequent stress that is different from the initial stress (i.e. exposure to heat stress leading to resistance to oxidant stress). The heat shock response is one of the more commonly described examples of stress adaptation and is characterized by the rapid expression of a unique group of proteins collectively known as heat shock proteins (also commonly referred to as stress proteins). The expression of heat shock proteins is well described in both whole lungs and in specific lung cells from a variety of species and in response to a variety of stressors. More importantly, in vitro data, as well as data from various animal models of acute lung injury, demonstrate that heat shock proteins, especially Hsp27, Hsp32, Hsp60, and Hsp70 have an important cytoprotective role during lung inflammation and injury. PMID:17157189

  1. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro-reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationship, of the cardio-pulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venous Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). The results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  2. Imaging cortical absorption, scattering, and hemodynamic response during ischemic stroke using spatially modulated near-infrared illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Lay, Christopher C.; Mathews, Marlon S.; Linskey, Mark E.; Frostig, Ron D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2009-03-01

    We describe a technique that uses spatially modulated near-infrared (NIR) illumination to detect and map changes in both optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering parameters) and tissue composition (oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation) during acute ischemic injury in the rat barrel cortex. Cerebral ischemia is induced using an open vascular occlusion technique of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Diffuse reflected NIR light (680 to 980 nm) from the left parietal somatosensory cortex is detected by a CCD camera before and after MCA occlusion. Monte Carlo simulations are used to analyze the spatial frequency dependence of the reflected light to predict spatiotemporal changes in the distribution of tissue absorption and scattering properties in the brain. Experimental results from seven rats show a 17+/-4.7% increase in tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin and a 45+/-3.1, 23+/-5.4, and 21+/-2.2% decrease in oxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin concentration and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation levels, respectively, 45 min following induction of cerebral ischemia. An ischemic index (Iisch=ctHHb/ctO2Hb) reveals an average of more then twofold contrast after MCAo. The wavelength-dependence of the reduced scattering (i.e., scatter power) decreased by 35+/-10.3% after MCA occlusion. Compared to conventional CCD-based intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI), the use of structured illumination and model-based analysis allows for generation of separate maps of light absorption and scattering properties as well as tissue hemoglobin concentration. This potentially provides a powerful approach for quantitative monitoring and imaging of neurophysiology and metabolism with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  3. Electrocardiographic, hemodynamic, and biochemical responses to acute particulate matter (PM) exposure in aged heart failure-prone rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient PM from fossil-fuel emissions is linked to cardiovascular disease and death. This association strengthens in people with preexisting cardiac disease-especially heart failure (HF). The mechanisms explaining PM-induced exacerbation ofHF are unclear. Some o...

  4. Acute phase proteins response to feed deprivation in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Najafi, P; Zulkifli, I; Soleimani, A F; Goh, Y M

    2016-04-01

    Feed deprivation in poultry farming imposes some degree of stress to the birds, and adversely affects their well -being. Serum levels of acute phase proteins (APP) are potential physiological indicators of stress attributed to feed deprivation. However, it has not been determined how long it takes for a measurable APP response to stressors to occur in avian species. An experiment was designed to delineate the APP and circulating levels of corticosterone responses in commercial broiler chickens to feed deprivation for 30 h. It was hypothesized that feed deprivation would elicit both APP and corticosterone (CORT) reactions within 30 h that is probably associated with stress of hunger. Twenty-one day old birds were subjected to one of 5 feed deprivation periods: 0 (ad libitum, AL), 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 h. Upon completion of the deprivation period, blood samples were collected to determine serum CORT, ovotransferrin (OVT), α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), and ceruloplasmin (CP) concentrations. Results showed that feed deprivation for 24 h or more caused a marked elevation in CORT (P=0.002 and P<0.0001, respectively) when compared to AL. However, increases in AGP (P=0.0005), CP (P=0.0002), and OVT (P=0.0003) were only noted following 30 h of feed deprivation. It is concluded that elicitation of AGP, CP, and OVT response may represent a more chronic stressful condition than CORT response in assessing the well-being of broiler chickens.

  5. How acute is the acute stress response? Baseline corticosterone and corticosteroid-binding globulin levels change 24h after an acute stressor in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Malisch, Jessica L; Satterlee, Daniel G; Cockrem, John F; Wada, Haruka; Breuner, Creagh W

    2010-01-15

    Changes in plasma corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) capacity can alter free plasma concentration and tissue availability of glucocorticoids (GC) and hence alter the organismal response to stress. However, CBG change in response to stress has not been extensively studied. While it is clear that chronic stress can causes CBG decline and in some species acute stressors can reduce CBG during the 30-60 min of the stressor, more long-term changes in CBG following an acute stressor has received less attention. Here we investigated corticosterone (CORT: the primary GC in birds) and CBG levels 24h after an acute stressor in a unique study system: Japanese quail divergently selected for CORT reactivity to acute stress. Using this model, we examined the interaction of selected CORT reactivity with CBG response to determine if CBG shows a delayed decline in response to an acute stressor and if that decline varies by selected genetic background. We found lowered CBG capacity, elevated total CORT and free CORT 24h after acute stress in all three quail groups. These results demonstrate for the first time in an avian species that exposure to an acute stressor can affect CBG and CORT 24h later.

  6. [The use of a vitamin and metabolite complex for correcting the disorders in systemic and organ hemodynamics during liver resection under conditions of acute blood loss].

    PubMed

    Shcherban', A N; Korkhov, S I; Nazarov, N V; Krivitskiĭ, N M; Kislukhin, V V; Kopytov, S V; Kholodov, I G

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of some infusion media, vitamins, and metabolites in resection of the liver in acute blood loss was studied in experiments on dogs. Inclusion of vitamins B1, B2, and B6, lipoic acid, calcium pantothenate, nicotinamide, solution of alpha-glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (aminalone) in the infusion led to a sharp increase of myocardial contractility, increase of cardiac output and total hepatic blood flow, normalization of biochemical blood values, and restoration of the activity of hepatocyte enzymes. PMID:2080080

  7. Understanding exercise-induced hyperemia: central and peripheral hemodynamic responses to passive limb movement in heart transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Melissa A.; Nativi, Jose N.; Stehlik, Josef; McDaniel, John; Fjeldstad, Anette S.; Ives, Stephen J.; Walter Wray, D.; Bader, Feras; Gilbert, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize the contribution of both central and peripheral mechanisms to passive limb movement-induced hyperemia, we studied nine recent (<2 yr) heart transplant (HTx) recipients (56 ± 4 yr) and nine healthy controls (58 ± 5 yr). Measurements of heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and femoral artery blood flow were recorded during passive knee extension. Peripheral vascular function was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). During passive limb movement, the HTx recipients lacked an HR response (0 ± 0 beats/min, Δ0%) but displayed a significant increase in CO (0.4 ± 0.1 l/min, Δ5%) although attenuated compared with controls (1.0 ± 0.2 l/min, Δ18%). Therefore, the rise in CO in the HTx recipients was solely dependent on increased SV (5 ± 1 ml, Δ5%) in contrast with the controls who displayed significant increases in both HR (6 ± 2 beats/min, Δ11%) and SV (5 ± 2 ml, Δ7%). The transient increase in femoral blood volume entering the leg during the first 40 s of passive movement was attenuated in the HTx recipients (24 ± 8 ml) compared with controls (93 ± 7 ml), whereas peripheral vascular function (FMD) appeared similar between HTx recipients (8 ± 2%) and controls (6 ± 1%). These data reveal that the absence of an HR increase in HTx recipients significantly impacts the peripheral vascular response to passive movement in this population and supports the concept that an increase in CO is a major contributor to exercise-induced hyperemia. PMID:20833963

  8. Sympathetic skin response in acute sensory ataxic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Arunodaya, G R; Taly, A B; Swamy, H S

    1995-05-01

    Sympathetic skin response (SSR) is a recently described objective method of studying sudomotor sympathetic nerve function and has been studied in a variety of peripheral neuropathies. We report SSR changes in nine patients with acute sensory ataxic neuropathy (ASAN). All had severe sensory and mild motor nerve conduction abnormalities; five had dysautonomia. SSR, elicited by electric shock and cough stimuli, was absent in three patients. Latency was normal in all when SSR was present. Two patients had SSR amplitude of 0.2 mV or less. Absence of SSR did not correlate with dysautonomia, absence of sensory nerve action potential or motor nerve conduction abnormalities. Follow up SSR studies revealed return of absent SSR in one patient over a period of 3 months, despite persistence of ataxia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of SSR changes in ASAN.

  9. Acute physiological responses of squirrel monkeys exposed to hyperdynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and behavioral responses to a hyperdynamic environment were examined in four adult male squirrel monkeys. After baseline monitoring at 1 G, monkeys were exposed to one of three conditions: (1) +2 Gz for 60 minutes, (2) +2.9 Gz max for 8 minutes (simulating Space Shuttle launch), or (3) +1.7 Gz max for 19 minutes (simulating Space Shuttle reentry). During all experimental conditions, heart rate rose, and colonic temperature began to decline within the first ten minutes of centrifugation and decreased by as much as 2 C in some instances. Behaviorally, during centrifugation, the monkeys seemed to exhibit drowsiness and fall asleep, an observation not made during the control period. It is concluded that primates are susceptible to acute hyperdynamic field exposure.

  10. Hemodynamic responses to heat stress in the resting and exercising human leg: insight into the effect of temperature on skeletal muscle blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, James; Low, David A.; Stöhr, Eric; Kalsi, Kameljit; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace

    2011-01-01

    Heat stress increases limb blood flow and cardiac output (Q̇) in humans, presumably in sole response to an augmented thermoregulatory demand of the skin circulation. Here we tested the hypothesis that local hyperthermia also increases skeletal muscle blood flow at rest and during exercise. Hemodynamics, blood and tissue oxygenation, and muscle, skin, and core temperatures were measured at rest and during exercise in 11 males across four conditions of progressive whole body heat stress and at rest during isolated leg heat stress. During whole body heat stress, leg blood flow (LBF), Q̇, and leg (LVC) and systemic vascular conductance increased gradually with elevations in muscle temperature both at rest and during exercise (r2 = 0.86–0.99; P < 0.05). Enhanced LBF and LVC were accompanied by reductions in leg arteriovenous oxygen (a-vO2) difference and increases in deep femoral venous O2 content and quadriceps tissue oxygenation, reflecting elevations in muscle and skin perfusion. The increase in LVC occurred despite an augmented plasma norepinephrine (P < 0.05) and was associated with elevations in muscle temperature (r2 = 0.85; P = 0.001) and arterial plasma ATP (r2 = 0.87; P < 0.001). Isolated leg heat stress accounted for one-half of the increase in LBF with severe whole body heat stress. Our findings suggest that local hyperthermia also induces vasodilatation of the skeletal muscle microvasculature, thereby contributing to heat stress and exercise hyperemia. The increased limb muscle vasodilatation in these conditions of elevated muscle sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity is closely related to the rise in arterial plasma ATP and local tissue temperature. PMID:21178127

  11. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  12. Effects of high-sucrose feeding on insulin resistance and hemodynamic responses to insulin in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Mélançon, Sébastien; Bachelard, Hélène; Badeau, Mylène; Bourgoin, Frédéric; Pitre, Maryse; Larivière, Richard; Nadeau, André

    2006-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of a sucrose diet on vascular and metabolic actions of insulin in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Male SHR were randomized to receive a sucrose or regular chow diet for 4 wk. Age-matched, chow-fed Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were used as normotensive control. In a first series of experiments, the three groups of rats had pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters implanted to determine blood pressure, heart rate, and blood flows. Insulin sensitivity was assessed during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp performed in conscious rats. In a second series of experiments, new groups of rats were used to examine glucose transport activity in isolated muscles and to determine endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression in muscles and endothelin content in vascular tissues. Sucrose feeding was shown to markedly enhance the pressor response to insulin and its hindquarter vasoconstrictor effect when compared with chow-fed SHR. A reduction in eNOS protein content in muscle, but no change in vascular endothelin-1 protein, was noted in sucrose-fed SHR when compared with WKY rats, but these changes were not different from those noted in chow-fed SHR. Similar reductions in insulin-stimulated glucose transport were observed in soleus muscles from both groups of SHR when compared with WKY rats. In extensor digitorum longus muscles, a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose transport was only seen in sucrose-fed rats when compared with the other two groups. Environmental factors, that is, high intake of simple sugars, could possibly potentiate the genetic predisposition in SHR to endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance.

  13. Hemodynamic and autonomic nervous system responses to mixed meal ingestion in healthy young and old subjects and dysautonomic patients with postprandial hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Ryan, S. M.; Parker, J. A.; Freeman, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although postprandial hypotension is a common cause of falls and syncope in elderly persons and in patients with autonomic insufficiency, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS. We examined the hemodynamic, splanchnic blood pool, plasma norepinephrine (NE), and heart rate (HR) power spectra responses to a standardized 400-kcal mixed meal in 11 healthy young (age, 26 +/- 5 years) and nine healthy elderly (age, 80 +/- 5 years) subjects and 10 dysautonomic patients with symptomatic postprandial hypotension (age, 65 +/- 16 years). Cardiac and splanchnic blood pools were determined noninvasively by radionuclide scans, and forearm vascular resistance was determined using venous occlusion plethysmography. In healthy young and old subjects, splanchnic blood volume increased, but supine blood pressure remained unchanged after the meal. In both groups, HR increased and systemic vascular resistance remained stable. Forearm vascular resistance and cardiac index increased after the meal in elderly subjects, whereas these responses were highly variable and of smaller magnitude in the young. Young subjects demonstrated postprandial increases in low-frequency HR spectral power, representing cardiac sympatho-excitation, but plasma NE remained unchanged. In elderly subjects, plasma NE increased after the meal but without changes in the HR power spectrum. Patients with dysautonomia had a large postprandial decline in blood pressure associated with no change in forearm vascular resistance, a fall in systemic vascular resistance, and reduction in left ventricular end diastolic volume index. HR increased in these patients but without changes in plasma NE or the HR power spectrum. CONCLUSIONS. 1) In healthy elderly subjects, the maintenance of blood pressure homeostasis after food ingestion is associated with an increase in HR, forearm vascular resistance, cardiac index, and plasma NE. In both young and old, systemic vascular resistance is

  14. Tenascin C protects aorta from acute dissection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Taizo; Shiraishi, Kozoh; Furusho, Aya; Ito, Sohei; Hirakata, Saki; Nishida, Norifumi; Yoshimura, Koichi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Takanobu; Ueno, Takafumi; Hamano, Kimikazu; Hiroe, Michiaki; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Aoki, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is caused by the disruption of intimomedial layer of the aortic walls, which is immediately life-threatening. Although recent studies indicate the importance of proinflammatory response in pathogenesis of AAD, the mechanism to keep the destructive inflammatory response in check is unknown. Here, we report that induction of tenascin-C (TNC) is a stress-evoked protective mechanism against the acute hemodynamic and humoral stress in aorta. Periaortic application of CaCl2 caused stiffening of abdominal aorta, which augmented the hemodynamic stress and TNC induction in suprarenal aorta by angiotensin II infusion. Deletion of Tnc gene rendered mice susceptible to AAD development upon the aortic stress, which was accompanied by impaired TGFβ signaling, insufficient induction of extracellular matrix proteins and exaggerated proinflammatory response. Thus, TNC works as a stress-evoked molecular damper to maintain the aortic integrity under the acute stress.

  15. In-vivo optical imaging and spectroscopy of cerebral hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao

    Functional optical imaging techniques, such as diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy and laser speckle imaging (LSI), were used in research and clinical settings to measure cerebral hemodynamics. In this thesis, theoretical and experimental developments of the techniques and their in-vivo applications ranging from small animals to adult humans are demonstrated. Near infrared diffuse optical techniques non-invasively measure hemoglobin concentrations, blood oxygen saturation (diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, DRS) and blood flow (diffuse correlation spectroscopy, DCS) in deep tissues, e.g. brain. A noise model was derived for DCS measurements. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured with DCS was validated with arterial-spin-labeling MRI. Three-dimensional CBF tomography was obtained during cortical spreading depression from a rat using the optimized diffuse correlation tomographic method. Cerebral hemodynamics in newborn piglets after traumatic brain injury were continuously monitored optically for six hours to demonstrate the feasibility of using diffuse optical techniques as bedside patient monitors. Cerebral autoregulation in piglets and human stroke patients was demonstrated to be non-invasively assessable via the continuous DCS measurement. Significant differences of CBF responses to head-of-bead maneuvers were observed between the peri- and contra-infarct hemispheres in human stroke patients. A significant portion of patient population showed paradoxical CBF responses, indicating the importance of individualized stroke management. The development of a speckle noise model revealed the source of noise for LSI. LSI was then applied to study the acute functional recovery of the rat brain following transient brain ischemia. The spatial and temporal cerebral blood flow responses to functional stimulation were statistically quantified. The area of activation, and the temporal response to stimulation were found significantly altered by the ischemic insult, while the

  16. Acute and delayed thermoregulatory response of mice exposed to brevetoxin.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Kimm-Brinson, K L; Padnos, B; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-09-01

    Thermal dysthesia, characterized by a painful sensation of warm and cool surfaces, is one of many ailments in humans exposed to various marine algal toxins such as brevetoxin (PbTx). There is no animal model to study thermal dysthesia and little is known of the mechanism of action. There is also little known on the acute and delayed thermoregulatory effects of PbTx. In this study, we developed a behavioral system to assess the possible development of thermal dysthesia in mice exposed to PbTx. Female mice were implanted with radiotransmitters to monitor core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). In one experiment, mice were dosed with the control vehicle or 180 microg/kg PbTx and placed on a floor temperature gradient to measure the selected foot temperature (SFT) while air temperature was kept constant. PbTx-treated mice underwent a 10 degrees C reduction in SFT concomitant with a 3 degrees C reduction in Tc within 30 min after exposure. In another study, Tc and MA were monitored in mice maintained in their home cages after dosing with 180 microg/kg PbTx. Tc but not MA increased for 2-5 days after exposure. SFT was unaffected by PbTx when tested 1-12 days after exposure. However, PbTx-treated mice underwent an increase in Tc when placed in the temperature gradient for up to 12 days after exposure. This suggests that PbTx augments the stress-induced hyperthermia from being placed in a novel environment. Overall, acute PbTx exposure leads to a regulated reduction in Tc as characterized by a preference for cooler SFTs and a reduced Tc. Thermal dysthesia was not apparent, but the exaggerated hyperthermic response with a normal SFT in the temperature gradient may suggest an altered processing of thermal stimuli in mice treated with PbTx.

  17. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs. PMID:24714543

  18. Acute and delayed thermoregulatory response of mice exposed to brevetoxin.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Kimm-Brinson, K L; Padnos, B; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-09-01

    Thermal dysthesia, characterized by a painful sensation of warm and cool surfaces, is one of many ailments in humans exposed to various marine algal toxins such as brevetoxin (PbTx). There is no animal model to study thermal dysthesia and little is known of the mechanism of action. There is also little known on the acute and delayed thermoregulatory effects of PbTx. In this study, we developed a behavioral system to assess the possible development of thermal dysthesia in mice exposed to PbTx. Female mice were implanted with radiotransmitters to monitor core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). In one experiment, mice were dosed with the control vehicle or 180 microg/kg PbTx and placed on a floor temperature gradient to measure the selected foot temperature (SFT) while air temperature was kept constant. PbTx-treated mice underwent a 10 degrees C reduction in SFT concomitant with a 3 degrees C reduction in Tc within 30 min after exposure. In another study, Tc and MA were monitored in mice maintained in their home cages after dosing with 180 microg/kg PbTx. Tc but not MA increased for 2-5 days after exposure. SFT was unaffected by PbTx when tested 1-12 days after exposure. However, PbTx-treated mice underwent an increase in Tc when placed in the temperature gradient for up to 12 days after exposure. This suggests that PbTx augments the stress-induced hyperthermia from being placed in a novel environment. Overall, acute PbTx exposure leads to a regulated reduction in Tc as characterized by a preference for cooler SFTs and a reduced Tc. Thermal dysthesia was not apparent, but the exaggerated hyperthermic response with a normal SFT in the temperature gradient may suggest an altered processing of thermal stimuli in mice treated with PbTx. PMID:11384725

  19. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs.

  20. Local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity in mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pisauro, M. Andrea; Benucci, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging seek to estimate neural signals in local brain regions through measurements of hemodynamic activity. However, hemodynamic activity is accompanied by large vascular fluctuations of unclear significance. To characterize these fluctuations and their impact on estimates of neural signals, we used optical imaging in visual cortex of awake mice. We found that hemodynamic activity can be expressed as the sum of two components, one local and one global. The local component reflected presumed neural signals driven by visual stimuli in the appropriate retinotopic region. The global component constituted large fluctuations shared by larger cortical regions, which extend beyond visual cortex. These fluctuations varied from trial to trial, but they did not constitute noise; they correlated with pupil diameter, suggesting that they reflect variations in arousal or alertness. Distinguishing local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity may help understand neurovascular coupling and interpret measurements of hemodynamic responses. PMID:26984421

  1. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children.

  2. Tail docking in pigs: acute physiological and behavioural responses.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, M A; Bryer, P J; Krebs, N; McGlone, J J

    2008-02-01

    Tail docking of piglets is a routine procedure on farms to control tail-biting behaviour; however, docking can cause an acute stress response. The objectives of this research were to determine the stress responses to tail docking in piglets and to compare two methods of tail docking; cautery iron (CAUT) and the more commonly used blunt trauma cutters (BT). At approximately 6 days of age, piglets were tail docked using CAUT (n = 20), BT (n = 20) or sham tail docked with their tails remaining intact (CON; n = 40). Blood samples were taken prior to tail docking and at 30, 60 and 90 min after tail docking to evaluate the effect of tail docking on white blood cell (WBC) measures and cortisol concentrations. The above experiment was repeated to observe behaviour without the periodic blood sampling, so as not to confound the effects of blood sampling on piglet behaviour. Piglet behaviour was recorded in the farrowing crate using 1 min scan-samples via live observations for 60 min prior to and 90 min after tail docking. Total WBC counts were reduced (P > 0.05) among BT and CAUT compared with CON piglets 30 min after tail docking. Cortisol concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) among BT compared with CON and CAUT piglets 60 min after tail docking. Cautery and BT-docked piglets spent more (P < 0.05) time posterior scooting compared with CON piglets between 0 and 15 min, and 31 and 45 min after tail docking. Piglets tail docked using CAUT and BT tended to spend more (P < 0.07) time sitting than CON piglets between 0 and 15 min post tail docking. Elevated blood cortisol can be reduced by the use of the CAUT rather than the BT method of tail docking. Although the tail docking-induced rise in cortisol was prevented by using CAUT, the behavioural response to BT and CAUT docking methods was similar. PMID:22445023

  3. Effect of fluid ingestion on orthostatic responses following acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is impaired following an acute bout of exercise. This study examined the effect of fluid ingestion following treadmill exercise in restoring the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic stress. Five men (age, 29.6 +/- 3.4 yrs) were exposed to a graded lower body negative (LBNP) pressure protocol (0 to -50 mmHg) during euhydration without exercise (C), 20 minutes after exercise dehydration (D), 20 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI20), and 60 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI60). Fluid ingestion (mean +/- SE) consisted of water-ingestion equivalent to 50% of the body weight lost during exercise (520 +/- 15 ml). Exercise dehydration resulted in significantly higher heart rates (119 +/- 8 vs 82 +/- 7 bpm), lower systolic blood pressures (95 +/- 1.7 vs 108 +/- 2.3 mmHg), a smaller increase in leg circumference (3.7 +/- 4 vs 6.9 +/- 1.0 mm), and an attenuated increase in total peripheral resistance (2.58 +/- 1.2 vs 4.28 +/- 0.9 mmHg/L/min) at -50 mmHg LBNP compared to the C condition. Fluid ingestion (both 20 and 60), partially restored the heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance responses to LBNP, but did not influence the change in leg circumference during LBNP (4 +/- 0.3 for R20 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 mm for R60). These data illustrate the effectiveness of fluid ingestion on improving orthostatic responses following exercise, and suggest that dehydration is a contributing factor to orthostatic intolerance following exercise.

  4. Cardiac power index, mean arterial pressure, and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II are strong predictors of survival and response to revascularization in cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Batric; Fay, Renaud; Cravoisy-Popovic, Aurelie; Levy, Bruno

    2014-07-01

    Short-term prognostic factors in patients with cardiogenic shock (CS) have previously been established using only hemodynamic parameters without taking into account classic intensive care unit (ICU) severity score or organ failure/support. The aim of this study was to assess early predictors of in-hospital mortality of a monocentric cohort of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by early CS. We retrospectively studied 85 consecutive patients with CS complicating acute myocardial infarction and Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 3 after percutaneous coronary revascularization. All patients were managed according to the following algorithm: initial resuscitation by a mobile medical unit or in-hospital critical care physician unit followed by percutaneous coronary revascularization and CS management in the ICU. Prehospital CS was diagnosed in 69% of cases, initially complicated by an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in 64% of cases. All patients were treated with vasopressors, 82% were ventilated, and 22% underwent extrarenal epuration. The 28-day mortality rate was 39%. Under multivariate analysis, initial cardiac power index, mean arterial pressure of less than 75 mmHg at hour 6 of ICU management, and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II were independent predictive factors of in-hospital mortality. In conclusion, parameters directly related to cardiac performance and vascular response to vasopressors and admission Simplified Acute Physiology Score II are strong predictors of in-hospital mortality.

  5. Achilles tendon biomechanics in response to acute intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael F; Lillie, Kurtis R; Bergeron, Daniel J; Cota, Kevin C; Yoon, Joseph S; Kraemer, William J; Denegar, Craig R

    2014-05-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common disorder and is more prevalent in men. Although differences in tendon mechanics between men and women have been reported, understanding of tendon mechanics in young active people is limited. Moreover, there is limited understanding of changes in tendon mechanics in response to acute exercise. Our purpose was to compare Achilles tendon mechanics in active young adult men and women at rest and after light and strenuous activity in the form of repeated jumping with an added load. Participants consisted of 17 men and 14 women (18-30 years) who were classified as being at least moderately physically active as defined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Tendon force/elongation measures were obtained during an isometric plantarflexion contraction on an isokinetic dynamometer with simultaneous ultrasound imaging of the Achilles tendon approximate to the soleus myotendinous junction. Data were collected at rest, after a 10-minute treadmill walk, and after a fatigue protocol of 100 toe jumps performed in a Smith machine, with a load equaling 20% of body mass. We found greater tendon elongation, decreased stiffness, and lower Young's modulus only in women after the jumping exercise. Force and stress were not different between groups but decreased subsequent to the jumping exercise bout. In general, women had greater elongation and strain, less stiffness, and a lower Young's modulus during plantarflexor contraction. These data demonstrate differences in tendon mechanics between men and women and suggest a potential protective mechanism explaining the lower incidence of Achilles tendinopathy in women.

  6. Acute sun damage and photoprotective responses in whales.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Gendron, Diane; Knell, Rob J; O'Toole, Edel A; Singh, Manuraj; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2011-05-22

    Rising levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) secondary to ozone depletion are an issue of concern for public health. Skin cancers and intraepidermal dysplasia are increasingly observed in individuals that undergo chronic or excessive sun exposure. Such alterations of skin integrity and function are well established for humans and laboratory animals, but remain unexplored for mammalian wildlife. However, effects are unlikely to be negligible, particularly for species such as whales, whose anatomical or life-history traits force them to experience continuous sun exposure. We conducted photographic and histological surveys of three seasonally sympatric whale species to investigate sunburn and photoprotection. We find that lesions commonly associated with acute severe sun damage in humans are widespread and that individuals with fewer melanocytes have more lesions and less apoptotic cells. This suggests that the pathways used to limit and resolve UVR-induced damage in humans are shared by whales and that darker pigmentation is advantageous to them. Furthermore, lesions increased significantly in time, as would be expected under increasing UV irradiance. Apoptosis and melanocyte proliferation mirror this trend, suggesting that whales are capable of quick photoprotective responses. We conclude that the thinning ozone layer may pose a risk to the health of whales and other vulnerable wildlife.

  7. Carbohydrate supplementation and immune responses after acute exhaustive resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lara A; Headley, Samuel; DeBruin, Jason; Tuckow, Alex T; Koch, Alexander J; Kenefick, Robert W

    2008-06-01

    This investigation sought to study changes in leukocyte subsets after an acute bout of resistance exercise (ARE) and to determine whether ingestion of carbohydrate (CHO) could attenuate those immune responses. Nine male track-and-field athletes (21.1 +/- 1.4 yr, 177.2 +/- 5.5 cm, 80.9 +/- 9.7 kg, 8.7% +/- 3.8% fat) and 10 male ice hockey athletes (21.0 +/- 2.2 yr, 174.3 +/- 6.2 cm, 79.6 +/-11.1 kg, 13.9% +/- 3.73% fat) participated in 2 different ARE protocols. Both experiments employed a counterbalanced double-blind research design, wherein participants consumed either a CHO (1 g/kg body weight) or placebo beverage before, during, and after a weight-lifting session. Serum cortisol decreased (p < .05) at 90 min into recovery compared with immediately postexercise. Plasma lactate, total leukocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte concentrations increased (p < .05) from baseline to immediately postexercise. Lymphocytes decreased significantly (p < .05) from baseline to 90 min postexercise. Lymphocytes were lower (p < .05) for the CHO condition than for placebo. The findings of this study indicate the following: ARE appears to evoke changes in immune cells similar to those previously reported during endurance exercise, and CHO ingestion attenuates lymphocytosis after ARE. PMID:18562773

  8. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Slone, William L.; Moses, Blake S.; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F.

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  9. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  10. Comparative effects of enalapril and nifedipine on renal hemodynamics in hypertensive renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Abu-Romeh, S H; el-Khatib, D; Rashid, A; Patel, M; Osman, N; Fayyad, M; Scheikhoni, A; Higazi, A S

    1992-04-01

    The comparative effects of enalapril (E) and nifedipine (N) on renal hemodynamics were assessed in twenty-two moderately hypertensive, cadaveric renal transplant patients who were maintaining stable renal function. Fourteen patients were on cyclosporin (CSA) and eight were receiving azathioprine with prednisolone (AZA). In each patient effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) was determined four times, first baseline, second with E, third as another baseline after a washout period, and fourth with N; and renal vascular resistance (RVR) was derived in each. ERPF and RVR were significantly compromised in the CSA group (202 +/- 55 ml/min and 65 +/- 18 mmHg/ml/min) compared to the AZA group (302 +/- 99 and 43 +/- 15 respectively). During E therapy, RVR further increased in the CSA group to 82 +/- 37 while it decreased in the AZA group to 31 +/- 7 (both changes were significant when compared to their respective baseline values). N, on the other hand, only significantly lowered RVR in the AZA group. Furthermore, two patients, one from each group, developed acute reversible renal failure shortly after E therapy. However, both agents were effective in lowering blood pressure to a comparable degree in both groups. In conclusion, our data showed a somewhat less favourable renal hemodynamic response to short-term enalapril therapy in hypertensive renal transplant patients maintained on CSA. However, the significance of such hemodynamic changes for long-term renal function remains uncertain.

  11. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  12. Evaluation of acute cardiorespiratory responses to hydraulic resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Katch, F I; Freedson, P S; Jones, C A

    1985-02-01

    Accurate evaluation of the acute responses to resistance exercise training depends on the stability of the criterion measures. This is particularly true for maximal effort exercise where continuous "all-out" effort for each repetition is encouraged. The present study evaluated reliability of repetition number (repN), respiratory gas parameters (VO2, VCO2, VE), and heart rate (HR) for shoulder (SE), chest (CE), and leg (LE) exercise performed maximally on a single-unit, 3-station hydraulic resistance exercise machine (Hydra-Fitness, Belton, TX). On 2 separate days, 20 college men completed three 20-s bouts of SE, CE, and LE with a 20-s rest between bouts and 5 min between exercise modes. There were no significant differences between bouts or test days for repN, gas measures, or HR. Subjects performed 17, 19, and 21 reps during SE, LE, and CE. VO2 was 1.7 l . min-1 (24.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1) for SE, 1.87 l . min-1 (25.5 ml . kg-1 . min-1) for CE, and 2.1 l . min-1 (28.6 ml . kg-1 . min-1) for LE. These values, averaged, represented 52.8% of the max VO2 determined on a continuous cycle ergometer test. The corresponding HR's during hydraulic exercise averaged 84.6% of HR max. Test-retest reliability coefficients ranged from r = .67 to .87 for repN, r = .41 to .83 for gas measures, and r = .72 to .89 for HR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  14. Circulatory response to hyperthermia during acute normovolaemic haemodilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Anita; Fahim, M.

    Cats anaesthetized with a mixture of chloralose and urethane were exposed to heat stress in two groups. In the first group (n=10) of control animals, the effect of heat stress on haemodynamic variables was recorded at control haematocrit (HCT) of 42.0+/-1.0%. In a second group, the effect of heat stress was studied after induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution (HCT of 13.0+/-1.0%). Haemodilution was induced to a maximum of 60% replacement of blood with dextran (mol.wt. 150000). Heat stress was induced by surface heating and core body temperature was raised from 37° C to 42° C. The effect of heat stress and haemodilution on various haemodynamic variables, viz. left ventricular pressure (LVP), left ventricular contractility (LVdP/dtmax), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), arterial blood pressure (ABP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and arterial blood PO2, PCO2 and pH was examined. Haemodilution produced significant (P<0.05) increases in HR and CO but there were no significant (P>0.05) changes in ABP, RAP, LVdP/dtmax and total peripherial resistance (TPR). Hyperthermia caused a significant fall (P<0.05) in TPR. However, the percentage fall in TPR was higher in the control group. On exposure to heat stress, there were significant (P<0.05I increases in HR and CO in both the groups; however, HR and CO values were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the haemodiluted group compared to the control. The latter findings could be due either to the higher basal values of these variables with the fall in HCT or to inefficient cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The lack of efficient regulatory control under such severe stress conditions makes the cardiovascular system of anaemic animals more vulnerable to heat stress. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed deleterious effects of heat stress in both the groups. The higher values of HR and CO in the haemodiluted group may be responsible for circulatory failure at low HCT values, indicating a higher risk

  15. Acute and chronic response of skeletal muscle to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, P J; Jürimäe, J; Logan, P A; Taylor, A W; Thayer, R E

    1994-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is sensitive to the acute and chronic stresses associated with resistance training. These responses are influenced by the structure of resistance activity (i.e. frequency, load and recovery) as well as the training history of the individuals involved. There are histochemical and biochemical data which suggest that resistance training alters the expression of myosin heavy chains (MHCs). Specifically, chronic exposure to bodybuilding and power lifting type activity produces shifts towards the MHC I and IIb isoforms, respectively. However, it is not yet clear which training parameters trigger these differential expressions of MHC isoforms. Interestingly, many programmes undertaken by athletes appear to cause a shift towards the MHC I isoform. Increments in the cross-sectional area of muscle after resistance training can be primarily attributed to fibre hypertrophy. However, there may be an upper limit to this hypertrophy. Furthermore, significant fibre hypertrophy appears to follow the sequence of fast twitch fibre hypertrophy preceding slow twitch fibre hypertrophy. Whilst some indirect measures of fibre number in living humans suggest that there is no interindividual variation, postmortem evidence suggests that there is. There are also animal data arising from investigations using resistance training protocols which suggest that chronic exercise can increase fibre number. Furthermore, satellite cell activity has been linked to myotube formation in the human. However, other animal models (i.e. compensatory hypertrophy) do not support the notion of fibre hyperplasia. Even if hyperplasia does occur, its effect on the cross-sectional area of muscle appears to be small. Phosphagen and glycogen metabolism, whilst important during resistance activity appear not to normally limit the performance of resistance activity. Phosphagen and related enzyme adaptations are affected by the type, structure and duration of resistance training. Whilst endogenous

  16. Endogenous pain inhibition is unrelated to autonomic responses in acute whiplash-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    De Kooning, Margot; Daenen, Liesbeth; Roussel, Nathalie; Cras, Patrick; Buyl, Ronald; Ickmans, Kelly; Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) demonstrate an inefficient endogenous pain inhibition and may experience a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system reactivity to pain. This study compared the autonomic response to painful stimuli between patients with acute and chronic WAD and healthy controls. In addition, the role of the autonomic nervous system for explaining inefficient endogenous pain inhibition was examined in acute WAD. Seventeen patients with acute WAD, 30 patients with chronic WAD, and 31 healthy controls participated in an experiment evaluating the autonomic nervous system at rest and during painful stimuli. Skin conductance and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were monitored continuously during conditioned pain modulation. A significant autonomic response to pain was present for skin conductance and two HRV parameters in all experimental groups. There was an interaction effect in the skin conductance response to pain but not in HRV responses in any of the groups. In patients with acute WAD, no significant correlations were present between pain, pressure pain thresholds, pain inhibition, and any of the autonomic parameters. This study refutes autonomic dysfunction at rest and in response to pain in acute WAD. The dysfunctional conditioned pain modulation appears unrelated to autonomic responses to pain. PMID:26348457

  17. Endogenous pain inhibition is unrelated to autonomic responses in acute whiplash-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    De Kooning, Margot; Daenen, Liesbeth; Roussel, Nathalie; Cras, Patrick; Buyl, Ronald; Ickmans, Kelly; Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) demonstrate an inefficient endogenous pain inhibition and may experience a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system reactivity to pain. This study compared the autonomic response to painful stimuli between patients with acute and chronic WAD and healthy controls. In addition, the role of the autonomic nervous system for explaining inefficient endogenous pain inhibition was examined in acute WAD. Seventeen patients with acute WAD, 30 patients with chronic WAD, and 31 healthy controls participated in an experiment evaluating the autonomic nervous system at rest and during painful stimuli. Skin conductance and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were monitored continuously during conditioned pain modulation. A significant autonomic response to pain was present for skin conductance and two HRV parameters in all experimental groups. There was an interaction effect in the skin conductance response to pain but not in HRV responses in any of the groups. In patients with acute WAD, no significant correlations were present between pain, pressure pain thresholds, pain inhibition, and any of the autonomic parameters. This study refutes autonomic dysfunction at rest and in response to pain in acute WAD. The dysfunctional conditioned pain modulation appears unrelated to autonomic responses to pain.

  18. Acute pulmonary function response to ozone in young adults as a function of body mass index

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown enhanced responsiveness to ozone in obese mice. Adiposity has not been examined as a possible modulator of ozone response in humans. We therefore examined the relationship between body mass index and the acute spirometric response to ozone (O(3)) exposur...

  19. Multi-Agent Simulations of the Immune Response to Hiv during the Acute Stage of Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walshe, R.; Ruskin, H. J.; Callaghan, A.

    Results of multi-agent based simulations of the immune response to HIV during the acute phase of infection are presented here. The model successfully recreates the viral dynamics associated with the acute phase of infection, i.e., a rapid rise in viral load followed by a sharp decline to what is often referred to as a "set point", a result of T-cell response and emergence of HIV neutralizing antibodies. The results indicate that sufficient T Killer cell response is the key factor in controlling viral growth during this phase with antibody levels of critical importance only in the absence of a sufficient T Killer response.

  20. Executive function and endocrinological responses to acute resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Wang, Chun-Hao; Pan, Chien-Yu; Chen, Fu-Chen; Huang, Tsang-Hai; Chou, Feng-Ying

    2014-01-01

    This study had the following two aims: First, to explore the effects of acute resistance exercise (RE, i.e., using exercise machines to contract and stretch muscles) on behavioral and electrophysiological performance when performing a cognitive task involving executive functioning in young male adults; Second, to investigate the potential biochemical mechanisms of such facilitative effects using two neurotrophic factors [i.e., growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)] and the cortisol levels elicited by such an exercise intervention mode with two different exercise intensities. Sixty young male adults were recruited and randomly assigned to a high-intensity (HI) exercise group, moderate-intensity (MI) exercise group, and non-exercise-intervention (NEI) group. Blood samples were taken, and the behavioral and electrophysiological indices were simultaneously measured when individuals performed a Go/No-Go task combined with the Erikson Flanker paradigm at baseline and after either an acute bout of 30 min of moderate- or high-intensity RE or a control period. The results showed that the acute RE could not only benefit the subjects' behavioral (i.e., RTs and accuracy) performance, as found in previous studies, but also increase the P3 amplitude. Although the serum GH and IGF-1 levels were significantly increased via moderate or high intensity RE in both the MI and HI groups, the increased serum levels of neurotrophic factors were significantly decreased about 20 min after exercise. In addition, such changes were not correlated with the changes in cognitive (i.e., behavioral and electrophysiological) performance. In contrast, the serum levels of cortisol in the HI and MI groups were significantly lower after acute RE, and the changes in cortisol levels were significantly associated with the changes in electrophysiological (i.e., P3 amplitude) performance. The findings suggest the beneficial effects of acute RE on executive functioning could be due to

  1. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  2. Young children's behavioural responses to acute pain: strategies for getting better.

    PubMed

    Woodgate, R; Kristjanson, L J

    1995-08-01

    Behavioural responses of hospitalized young children in acute pain were examined and described. Eleven children, aged 24-79 months, who experienced acute pain in response to surgical intervention, and their parents, participated in the study. A qualitative, naturalistic methodology was used. Participant observation and child and parent interviews were the primary data collection methods. The constant comparative method of data analysis was employed to identify beginning behavioural response categories. Findings revealed that the children used the process of 'getting better' in response to pain. This process involved three strategies: 'hiding away', 'fighting it' and 'making it good'. Each of these strategies was characterized by specific behaviours. The more pain the children experienced, the more frequently these strategies were employed. Recommendations specific to assessing behavioural responses in young children experiencing acute pain are offered.

  3. Metabolic responses of intact myocardium to acute hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Ligeti, L.; Subramanian, H.; Leigh, J.S.; Chance, B.

    1986-03-05

    Myocardial metabolism was studied in 6 closed chest dogs with /sup 31/P NMR (using a cardiac window model and an external surface coil) before, during and after production of acute hypertension with catecholamines. As heart work (defined as heart rate X mean arterial blood pressure product, HR x MABP) was increased, inorganic phosphate/phosphocreatine (Pi/PCr) ratio increased. The Pi/PCr vs. workload relationship is an indicator of the rate of oxidative-phosphorylation. These data indicate that under conditions of acute hypertension, heart muscle responds to increased work loads in a manner similar to skeletal muscle. The possibility of obtaining this type of data from an intact closed chest animal has implications for use of this technique to evaluate clinical heart disease.

  4. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Pérez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Sánchez-Payá, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  5. A preliminary study on T-786C endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and renal hemodynamic and blood pressure responses to dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Dengel, D R; Brown, M D; Ferrell, R E; Reynolds, T H; Supiano, M A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of the T-786C endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphism on changes in renal hemodynamics and blood pressure due to Na(+) loading. Twenty-eight older (63+/-1 years), moderately obese (39+/-2 % fat) hypertensives had their glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), blood pressure (BP) and plasma nitric oxide (NO(x)) levels determined after eight days of low (20 mEq) and high (200 mEq) Na(+) diets. The two Na(+) diets were separated by a 1-week washout period. Subjects were genotyped for the eNOS-786 site and were grouped on whether they were homozygous or heterozygous for the C allele (TC+CC, n=13) or only homozygous for the T allele (TT, n=15). The TC+CC genotype group had a significantly greater increase in diastolic (P=0.021) and mean arterial (P=0.018) BP and a significant decline in both RPF (P=0.007) and GFR (P=0.029) compared to the TT genotype group with Na(+) loading. Furthermore, Na(+) loading resulted in a significant (P=0.036) increase in plasma NO(x) in the TT, but not in the TC+CC genotype group as well as a trend (P=0.051) for an increase in urine NO(x) in TC+CC, but not in the TT genotype group. The increase in BP during Na(+) loading in older hypertensives was associated with the eNOS genotype and may be related to changes in renal hemodynamics due to changes in NO metabolism.

  6. Monitoring hemodynamic and morphologic responses to closed head injury in a mouse model using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2013-04-01

    The authors' aim is to assess and quantitatively measure brain hemodynamic and morphological variations during closed-head injury (CHI) in mice using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (o-DRS). CHI is a type of injury to the head that does not penetrate the skull. Usually, it is caused by mechanical blows to the head and frequently occurs in traffic accidents, falls, and assaults. Measurements of brain optical properties, namely absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000 nm were carried out by employing different source-detector distance and locations to provide depth sensitivity on an intact scalp over the duration of the whole experiment. Furthermore, alteration in both cortical hemodynamics and morphologic markers, i.e., scattering power and amplitude properties were derived. CHI was induced in anesthetized male mice by a weight-drop model using ˜50 g cylindrical metal falling from a height of 90 cm onto the intact scalp producing an impact of 4500 g cm. With respect to baseline, difference in brain physiological properties was observed following injury up to 1 h post-trauma. Additionally, the reduced scattering spectral shapes followed Mie scattering theory was quantified and clearly shows changes in both scattering amplitude and power from baseline indicating structural variations likely from evolving cerebral edema during CHI. We further demonstrate high correlation between scattering amplitude and scattering power, with more than 20% difference in slope in comparison to preinjury. This result indicates the possibility of using the slope also as a marker for detection of structural changes. Finally, experiments investigating brain function during the first 20 min postinjury were conducted and changes in chromophore concentrations and scattering were observed. Overall, our experiments demonstrate the potential of using the proposed technique as a valuable quantitative noninvasive tool for

  7. Prenatal and acute cocaine exposure affects neural responses and habituation to visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Riley, Elizabeth; Kopotiyenko, Konstantin; Zhdanova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants have many effects on visual function, from adverse following acute and prenatal exposure to therapeutic on attention deficit. To determine the impact of prenatal and acute cocaine exposure on visual processing, we studied neuronal responses to visual stimuli in two brain regions of a transgenic larval zebrafish expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP-HS. We found that both red light (LF) and dark (DF) flashes elicited similar responses in the optic tectum neuropil (TOn), while the dorsal telencephalon (dTe) responded only to LF. Acute cocaine (0.5 μM) reduced neuronal responses to LF in both brain regions but did not affect responses to DF. Repeated stimulus presentation (RSP) led to habituation of dTe neurons to LF. Acute cocaine prevented habituation. TOn habituated to DF, but not LF, and DF habituation was not modified by cocaine. Remarkably, prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) prevented the effects of acute cocaine on LF response amplitude and habituation later in development in both brain regions, but did not affect DF responses. We discovered that, in spite of similar neural responses to LF and DF in the TO (superior colliculus in mammals), responses to LF are more complex, involving dTe (homologous to the cerebral cortex), and are more vulnerable to cocaine. Our results demonstrate that acute cocaine exposure affects visual processing differentially by brain region, and that PCE modifies zebrafish visual processing in multiple structures in a stimulus-dependent manner. These findings are in accordance with the major role that the optic tectum and cerebral cortex play in sustaining visual attention, and support the hypothesis that modification of these areas by PCE may be responsible for visual deficits noted in humans. This model offers new methodological approaches for studying the adverse and therapeutic effects of psychostimulants on attention, and for the development of new pharmacological interventions.

  8. Computational Hemodynamics Framework for the Analysis of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mut, Fernando; Löhner, Rainald; Chien, Aichi; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Putman, Christopher; Cebral, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms is important for clinicians because the natural rupture risk can be exceeded by the small but significant risk carried by current treatments. To this end numerous investigators have used image-based computational fluid dynamics models to extract patient-specific hemodynamics information, but there is no consensus on which variables or hemodynamic characteristics are the most important. This paper describes a computational framework to study and characterize the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms in order to relate it to clinical events such as growth or rupture. In particular, a number of hemodynamic quantities are proposed to describe the most salient features of these hemodynamic environments. Application to a patient population indicates that ruptured aneurysms tend to have concentrated inflows, concentrated wall shear stress distributions, high maximal wall shear stress and smaller viscous dissipation ratios than unruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, these statistical associations are largely unaffected by the choice of physiologic flow conditions. This confirms the notion that hemodynamic information derived from image-based computational models can be used to assess aneurysm rupture risk, to test hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for aneurysm formation, progression and rupture, and to answer specific clinical questions. PMID:21643491

  9. Responses to acute pain and the nursing implications.

    PubMed

    Wells, N

    1984-01-01

    Management of acute pain offers many techniques--peripherally, to reduce the sensory input from the nociceptors and ascending fibres, and centrally by altering cognition, evaluation and emotional arousal to the sensory input. Scientifically-based nursing intervention is imperative. Therefore, nurses needed a better understanding of recent research regarding pain. As well, recognition that all individuals express and cope with pain in different ways, and therefore exhibit different pain behaviours, is necessary if effective nursing care is to be given. Finally, with all the interacting variables and methods of intervention available, pain medication should never be the only intervention used for the patient with pain. PMID:6142910

  10. Time-Varying Modeling of Cerebral Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Shin, Dae C.; Orme, Melissa; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    The scientific and clinical importance of cerebral hemodynamics has generated considerable interest in their quantitative understanding via computational modeling. In particular, two aspects of cerebral hemodynamics, Cerebral Flow Autoregulation (CFA) and CO2 Vasomotor Reactivity (CVR), have attracted much attention because they are implicated in many important clinical conditions and pathologies (orthostatic intolerance, syncope, hypertension, stroke, vascular dementia, MCI, Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases with cerebrovascular components). Both CFA and CVR are dynamic physiological processes by which cerebral blood flow is regulated in response to fluctuations in cerebral perfusion pressure and blood CO2 tension. Several modeling studies to date have analyzed beat-to-beat hemodynamic data in order to advance our quantitative understanding of CFA-CVR dynamics. A confounding factor in these studies is the fact that the dynamics of the CFA-CVR processes appear to vary with time (i.e. changes in cerebrovascular characteristics) due to neural, endocrine and metabolic effects. This paper seeks to address this issue by tracking the changes in linear time-invariant models obtained from short successive segments of data from 10 healthy human subjects. The results suggest that systemic variations exist but have stationary statistics and, therefore, the use of time-invariant modeling yields “time-averaged models” of physiological and clinical utility. PMID:24184697

  11. Time-varying modeling of cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Shin, Dae C; Orme, Melissa; Rong Zhang

    2014-03-01

    The scientific and clinical importance of cerebral hemodynamics has generated considerable interest in their quantitative understanding via computational modeling. In particular, two aspects of cerebral hemodynamics, cerebral flow autoregulation (CFA) and CO2 vasomotor reactivity (CVR), have attracted much attention because they are implicated in many important clinical conditions and pathologies (orthostatic intolerance, syncope, hypertension, stroke, vascular dementia, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases with cerebrovascular components). Both CFA and CVR are dynamic physiological processes by which cerebral blood flow is regulated in response to fluctuations in cerebral perfusion pressure and blood CO2 tension. Several modeling studies to date have analyzed beat-to-beat hemodynamic data in order to advance our quantitative understanding of CFA-CVR dynamics. A confounding factor in these studies is the fact that the dynamics of the CFA-CVR processes appear to vary with time (i.e., changes in cerebrovascular characteristics) due to neural, endocrine, and metabolic effects. This paper seeks to address this issue by tracking the changes in linear time-invariant models obtained from short successive segments of data from ten healthy human subjects. The results suggest that systemic variations exist but have stationary statistics and, therefore, the use of time-invariant modeling yields "time-averaged models" of physiological and clinical utility.

  12. Comparative analysis of the acute response of zebrafish Danio rerio skin to two different bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Lü, Aijun; Hu, Xiucai; Wang, Yi; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Aihua; Shen, Lulu; Ming, Qinglei; Feng, Zhaojun

    2013-12-01

    Skin is an important innate immune organ in fish; however, little is known about the skin's immune response to infectious pathogens. We conducted a comparative analysis of the acute immune response of Zebrafish Danio rerio skin against gram-positive (Staphylococcus chromogenes) and gram-negative (Citrobacter freundii) bacterial infections. Gene expression profiles induced from the two different infections were identified by microarray hybridization, with many genes demonstrating an acute immune response in the skin. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in response to stress and stimulus, complement activation, acute-phase response, and defense and immune response. Compared with transcription patterns of skin from the two infections, a similar innate immunity (e.g., transferrin, coagulation factor, complements, and lectins) was observed but with different acute-phase genes (e.g., ceruloplasmin, alpha-1-microglobulin, vitellogenin, and heat shock protein). These results suggest that the skin of fish plays an important role in the innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:24341765

  13. Effects of acute stressors on nociception, adrenocortical responses and behavior of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Herskin, Mette S; Munksgaard, Lene; Ladewig, Jan

    2004-12-15

    Effects of acute stressors on behavioral, adrenocortical and nociceptive responses were examined in 24 dairy cows kept in tie stalls, using 15 min of social isolation in novel surroundings (ISOL), fixation by the head in the home stall (FIX) and the provision of novel neighbors/stall (NEIGH) as acute stressors as well as a control treatment (CON). Each cow was exposed to one treatment daily in a balanced order. All stressors led to signs of hypoalgesia as indicated by slower (P=0.01) and reduced responses (P<0.10) toward nociceptive laser stimulation after exposure to the acute stressors. ISOL, however, had stronger effects than FIX or NEIGH. ISOL or FIX led to increased plasma concentration of cortisol (P<0.001), whereas NEIGH or CON did not. The behavioral responses were affected by treatments as well, as shown by decreased rumination for all stressors (P<0.001) and a gradual increase in active avoidance from CON to NEIGH to FIX (P<0.001). Furthermore, exposure to NEIGH led to increased exploration (P<0.001), aggression (P<0.10) and self-grooming behavior (P<0.10) compared with the CON treatment. The results suggest that nociceptive changes are part of responses toward acute stress in dairy cows. The nociceptive changes, however, were not direct reflections of the adrenocortical or behavioral responses toward the acute stressors. Therefore, quantification of nociceptive changes, in combination with behavioral and physiological registrations, can be one way to broaden the range of biological systems, considered for the study of animals under stress, and thereby extend the understanding of responses toward acute stress in dairy cows. PMID:15581663

  14. Acute and chronic responses of denitrifying culture to diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Gamze; Aydin, Egemen; Topuz, Emel; Yangin-Gomec, Cigdem; Okutman Tas, Didem

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic effect as well as biodegradation potential at different sludge retention times (SRTs) of a priority pollutant, diclofenac on denitrification process was assessed. The continuous amendment of the culture for 6months with 1μg/L diclofenac resulted in 30% decrease in gas production. The average diclofenac removal observed in the diclofenac-acclimated culture was less than 15%. Batch tests showed that nitrate was removed in diclofenac free-control reactor at a higher rate compared to diclofenac amended reactor. Although, SRT did not have any progressive effect on diclofenac degradation, the system operated at low SRT was more sensitive to diclofenac and resulted in an increase in N2O emission. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operated at higher SRTs may tolerate and recover from the adverse effects of such micropollutants. The study can lead to other researchers to understand the fate and effect of other emerging pollutants in the anoxic unit of WWTPs.

  15. Acute and chronic responses of denitrifying culture to diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Gamze; Aydin, Egemen; Topuz, Emel; Yangin-Gomec, Cigdem; Okutman Tas, Didem

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic effect as well as biodegradation potential at different sludge retention times (SRTs) of a priority pollutant, diclofenac on denitrification process was assessed. The continuous amendment of the culture for 6months with 1μg/L diclofenac resulted in 30% decrease in gas production. The average diclofenac removal observed in the diclofenac-acclimated culture was less than 15%. Batch tests showed that nitrate was removed in diclofenac free-control reactor at a higher rate compared to diclofenac amended reactor. Although, SRT did not have any progressive effect on diclofenac degradation, the system operated at low SRT was more sensitive to diclofenac and resulted in an increase in N2O emission. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operated at higher SRTs may tolerate and recover from the adverse effects of such micropollutants. The study can lead to other researchers to understand the fate and effect of other emerging pollutants in the anoxic unit of WWTPs. PMID:25460991

  16. Characterization of the Leukocyte Response in Acute Vocal Fold Injury

    PubMed Central

    King, Suzanne N.; Guille, Jeremy; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages location in the superficial layer of the vocal fold (VF) is not only at the first line of defense, but in a place of physiologic importance to voice quality. This study characterizes and compares macrophage function in two models of acute injury. Porcine VF injuries were created bilaterally by either surgical biopsy or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1.5μg/kg) injection. Animals were sacrificed at 1- or 5-day post LPS or 3-, 7-, or 23-days post-surgical injury (n = 3/time/ injury). Flow cytometry characterized immunophenotypes and RT-PCR quantified cytokine gene expression. Uninjured VF were used as controls. Post-surgical and LPS injury, SWC9+/SWC3- cells identified as hi SLA-DR+ (p<0.05) compared to controls along with hi CD16+ expression at 1-day and 3-days respectively compared to all other time points (p<0.05). Surgical injuries, SWC9+/SWC3- cells exhibited hi CD163+ (p<0.05) at 3-days along with upregulation in TNFα and TGFβ1 mRNA compared to 23-days (p<0.05). No measurable changes to IL–12, IFNγ, IL–10, IL–4 mRNA post-surgery. LPS injuries induced upregulation of TNFα, IL–12, IFNγ, IL–10, and IL–4 mRNA at 1- and 5-days compared to controls (p<0.05). Higher levels of IL–10 mRNA were found 1-day post-LPS compared to 5-days (p<0.05). No changes to CD163 or CD80/86 post-LPS were measured. Acute VF injuries revealed a paradigm of markers that appear to associate with each injury. LPS induced a regulatory phenotype indicated by prominent IL–10 mRNA expression. Surgical injury elicited a complex phenotype with early TNFα mRNA and CD163+ and persistent TGFβ1 transcript expression. PMID:26430970

  17. Responses of Hyalella azteca to acute and chronic microplastic exposures.

    PubMed

    Au, Sarah Y; Bruce, Terri F; Bridges, William C; Klaine, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    Limited information is available on the presence of microplastics in freshwater systems, and even less is known about the toxicological implications of the exposure of aquatic organisms to plastic particles. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of microplastic ingestion on the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. Hyalella azteca was exposed to fluorescent polyethylene microplastic particles and polypropylene microplastic fibers in individual 250-mL chambers to determine 10-d mortality. In acute bioassays, polypropylene microplastic fibers were significantly more toxic than polyethylene microplastic particles; 10-d lethal concentration 50% values for polyethylene microplastic particles and polypropylene microplastic fibers were 4.64 × 10(4) microplastics/mL and 71.43 microplastics/mL, respectively. A 42-d chronic bioassay using polyethylene microplastic particles was conducted to quantify effects on reproduction, growth, and egestion. Chronic exposure to polyethylene microplastic particles significantly decreased growth and reproduction at the low and intermediate exposure concentrations. During acute exposures to polyethylene microplastic particles, the egestion times did not significantly differ from the egestion of normal food materials in the control; egestion times for polypropylene microplastic fibers were significantly slower than the egestion of food materials in the control. Amphipods exposed to polypropylene microplastic fibers also had significantly less growth. The greater toxicity of microplastic fibers than microplastic particles corresponded with longer residence times for the fibers in the gut. The difference in residence time might have affected the ability to process food, resulting in an energetic effect reflected in sublethal endpoints.

  18. Swimming exercise changes hemodynamic responses evoked by blockade of excitatory amino receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Cristiana A; Schoorlemmer, Gerhardus H M; Lazari, Maria de Fátima M; Giannocco, Gisele; Lopes, Oswaldo U; Colombari, Eduardo; Sato, Monica A

    2014-01-01

    Exercise training reduces sympathetic activity in hypertensive humans and rats. We hypothesized that the swimming exercise would change the neurotransmission in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a key region involved in sympathetic outflow, and hemodynamic control in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Bilateral injections of kynurenic acid (KYN) were carried out in the RVLM in sedentary- (S-) or exercised- (E-) SHR and WKY rats submitted to swimming for 6 weeks. Rats were α-chloralose anesthetized and artificially ventilated, with Doppler flow probes around the lower abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Injections into the RVLM were made before and after i.v. L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase, NOS, inhibitor). Injections of KYN into the RVLM elicited a major vasodilation in the hindlimb more than in the mesenteric artery in E-SHR compared to S-SHR, but similar decrease in arterial pressure was observed in both groups. Injections of KYN into the RVLM after i.v. L-NAME attenuated the hindlimb vasodilation evoked by KYN and increased the mesenteric vasodilation in E-SHR. Swimming exercise can enhance the hindlimb vasodilation mediated by peripheral NO release, reducing the activation of neurons with EAA receptors in the RVLM in SHR. PMID:24696852

  19. The acute phase response in parasite infection. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, L R; Gauldie, J; Befus, A D; McAdam, K P; Baltz, M L; Pepys, M B

    1984-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory reactions are a prominent feature of many parasitic infections and the cellular and humoral components of the acute phase reaction may have an impact on the host-parasite relationship. We examined serum changes of four acute phase reactants: alpha 1-proteinase inhibition (alpha 1Pi); complement C3; serum amyloid A protein (SAA); and serum amyloid P component (SAP), in mice undergoing a primary infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. SAA and SAP showed changes within the first 2 days of infection indicating the presence of an acute phase response associated with inflammation in the lung. Alpha 1Pi and C3 serum levels were not altered. However, all four acute phase reactants were synthesized in greater amounts by primary cultures of hepatocytes taken from infected animals at this time. Subsequently, as parasite-mediated inflammatory changes occur in the gut, both serum and hepatocyte cultures demonstrate an acute inflammatory response in all four reactants. It is proposed that the early reaction between parasites and macrophage/monocyte lead to the release of a mediator of inflammation which initiates the hepatocyte response. In this infection, at least one of the APR is shown to localize to the site of inflammation influencing the host-parasite relationship. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6204934

  20. Hemodynamic consequences of continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Lauer, A; Alvis, R; Avram, M

    1988-08-01

    Continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration (CAVH) is an extracorporeal treatment in which fluid, electrolytes, and low and middle molecular weight solutes are removed from the blood by ultrafiltration. It is efficacious in the management of acute or chronic renal failure complicated by fluid overload, and following surgery. In this study, cardiac filling pressures, cardiac indices, and BP were monitored in nine patients. A mean of 7 kg of fluid was removed in ten treatments without the induction of hypotension. In nine of ten treatments, cardiac index increased following fluid removal. An increment in myocardial pump function was noted even in patients with low output heart failure. This treatment differs from dialysis in its ability to remove large fluid volumes without compromising cardiac hemodynamics. In addition, CAVH may have a role in treating volume overload patients with renal insufficiency and heart failure resistant to pharmacologic intervention. PMID:3400631

  1. Endocrine responses in the rhesus monkey during acute cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, W.G.; Saxton, J.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors studied five young male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), 3.4 to 6.7 kg, to determine the relationship between fluid balance hormones and urine production during acute, dry cold exposure. Each monkey served as its own control in duplicate experimental sessions at 6C or 26C. A 6-h experimental session consisted of 120 min equilibration at 26C, 120 min experimental exposure, and 120 min recovery at 26C. Urinary and venous catheters were inserted on the morning of a session. Rectal (Tre) and skin temperatures were monitored continuously. Blood samples were taken at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min of exposure, and at 60 min postexposure. Plasma was analyzed for arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone (PA), and osmolality. Urine samples were analyzed for osmolality, electrolytes, and creatinine. Mean Tre was 1.6C lower after 120 min at 6C than at 26C. Urine volume and osmolality were not altered by cold exposure, as they are in humans and rats. Vasopressin and PA increased sharply, with mean plasma levels in monkeys exposed to cold more than threefold and tenfold, respectively, the levels in monkeys exposed at 26C. In contrast, ANF, PRA, and plasma osmolality were not significantly changed by cold exposure. The absence of a cold-induced diuresis in the monkey may be related to the marked increase in plasma AVP level.

  2. Determinants to optimize response to clopidogrel in acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Gori, Anna Maria; Marcucci, Rossella; Saracini, Claudia; Vestrini, Anna; Abbate, Rosanna

    2010-01-01

    The inhibition of platelet function by antiplatelet therapy determines the improvement of the survival of patients with clinically evident cardiovascular disease. Clopidogrel in combination with aspirin is the recommended standard of care for reducing the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, major adverse cardiovascular events including stent thrombosis occur in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that high post-treatment platelet reactivity on antiplatelet treatment is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical events. Clopidogrel requires conversion to active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. The active metabolite inhibits ADP-stimulated platelet activation by irreversibly binding to P2Y12 receptors. Recently, the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 allele has been associated with decreased metabolization of clopidogrel, poor antiaggregant effect, and increased cardiovascular events. In high risk vascular patients, the CYP2C19*2 polymorphism is a strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events and particularly of stent thrombosis. Prospective studies evaluating if an antiplatelet treatment tailored on individual characteristics of patients, CYP2C19*2 genotypes, platelet phenotype, drug–drug interaction, as well as traditional and procedural risk factors, are now urgently needed for the identification of therapeutic strategies providing the best benefit for the single subject. PMID:23226041

  3. Hemodynamic management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Treggiari, Miriam M

    2011-09-01

    Hemodynamic augmentation therapy is considered standard treatment to help prevent and treat vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. Standard triple-H therapy combines volume expansion (hypervolemia), blood pressure augmentation (hypertension), and hemodilution. An electronic literature search was conducted of English-language papers published between 2000 and October 2010 that focused on hemodynamic augmentation therapies in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the eligible reports identified, 11 addressed volume expansion, 10 blood pressure management, 4 inotropic therapy, and 12 hemodynamic augmentation in patients with unsecured aneurysms. While hypovolemia should be avoided, hypervolemia did not appear to confer additional benefits over normovolemic therapy, with an excess of side effects occurring in patients treated with hypervolemic targets. Overall, hypertension was associated with higher cerebral blood flow, regardless of volume status (normo- or hypervolemia), with neurological symptom reversal seen in two-thirds of treated patients. Limited data were available for evaluating inotropic agents or hemodynamic augmentation in patients with additional unsecured aneurysms. In the context of sparse data, no incremental risk of aneurysmal rupture has been reported with the induction of hemodynamic augmentation. PMID:21786046

  4. Hemodynamic and neurochemical determinates of renal function in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Cameron; Cherney, David Z I; Parker, Andrea B; Mak, Susanna; Floras, John S; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Parker, John D

    2016-01-15

    Abnormal renal function is common in acute and chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) and is related to the severity of congestion. However, treatment of congestion often leads to worsening renal function. Our objective was to explore basal determinants of renal function and their response to hemodynamic interventions. Thirty-seven patients without CHF and 59 patients with chronic CHF (ejection fraction; 23 ± 8%) underwent right heart catheterization, measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR; inulin) and renal plasma flow (RPF; para-aminohippurate), and radiotracer estimates of renal sympathetic activity. A subset (26 without, 36 with CHF) underwent acute pharmacological intervention with dobutamine or nitroprusside. We explored the relationship between baseline and drug-induced hemodynamic changes and changes in renal function. In CHF, there was an inverse relationship among right atrial mean pressure (RAM) pressure, RPF, and GFR. By contrast, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI), and measures of renal sympathetic activity were not significant predictors. In those with CHF there was also an inverse relationship among the drug-induced changes in RAM as well as pulmonary artery mean pressure and the change in GFR. Changes in MAP and CI did not predict the change in GFR in those with CHF. Baseline values and changes in RAM pressure did not correlate with GFR in those without CHF. In the CHF group there was a positive correlation between RAM pressure and renal sympathetic activity. There was also an inverse relationship among RAM pressure, GFR, and RPF in patients with chronic CHF. The observation that acute reductions in RAM pressure is associated with an increase in GFR in patients with CHF has important clinical implications.

  5. Acute Hypotensive Response to Continuous and Accumulated Isocaloric Aerobic Bouts.

    PubMed

    Cunha, F; Midgley, A W; Pescatello, L; Soares, P P; Farinatti, P

    2016-10-01

    Evidence indicates that chronic reductions in blood pressure (BP) due to aerobic exercise depend on the ability to induce post-exercise hypotension (PEH) after each training bout. The purpose of this study was to investigate PEH after isocaloric bouts of continuous and accumulated running. 10 healthy pre-hypertensive men (aged 27.6±3.5 years) performed the following bouts of exercise: a) A continuous bout (CONT) expending a total of 400 kcal; and b) An accumulated bout split into 2×200 kcal (INTER1 and INTER2) to total 400 kcal at 75% of oxygen uptake reserve. BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate variability were monitored 10 min before and 60 min after control and all exercise conditions. The decrease in MAP over time after continuous (400 kcal) and accumulated (2×200 kcal) bouts of exercise was more pronounced than during control (mean diff between 1.6 and 5.4 mmHg, P≤0.01), although the magnitude of change was similar between continuous and accumulated bouts (mean diff=0.1 mmHg, P=0.79). Concomitant to the PEH, sympathovagal balance was inversely related to changes in MAP after isocaloric bouts performed continuously and cumulatively (r=- 0.72 and-0.85, P=0.019 and 0.002, respectively). In conclusion, BP decreased to similar levels after continuous and accumulated acute aerobic exercise matched for total energy expenditure. Our findings also indicate that the recovery pattern of cardiac autonomic activity may have an important role in eliciting PEH. PMID:27551937

  6. Social support and response to AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Arijit; Tracy, Melissa; Aiello, Allison; Des Jarlais, Don C; Galea, Sandro

    2008-05-01

    Negative public reactions to emerging infectious diseases can adversely affect population health. We assessed whether social support was associated with knowledge of, worry about, and attitudes towards AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome. Our findings suggest that social support may be central to our understanding of public responses to emerging infectious diseases.

  7. Case Comparison of Response To Aquatic Exercise: Acute versus Chronic Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobily, Kenneth E.; Mobily, Paula R.; Lessard, Kerry A.; Berkenpas, Molly S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the effects of individualized aquatic exercise programs on people with knee impairments. An adolescent athlete with an acute injury demonstrated significant functional improvement. A 33-year-old with arthritis demonstrated only marginal progress. Comparison of cases relative to valid data collection methods and response to aquatic…

  8. Acute inflammation stimulates a regenerative response in the neonatal mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunyong; Nie, Yu; Lian, Hong; Liu, Rui; He, Feng; Huang, Huihui; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac injury in neonatal 1-day-old mice stimulates a regenerative response characterized by reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation, which is distinguished from the fibrotic repair process in adults. Acute inflammation occurs immediately after heart injury and has generally been believed to exert a negative effect on heart regeneration by promoting scar formation in adults; however, little is known about the role of acute inflammation in the cardiac regenerative response in neonatal mice. Here, we show that acute inflammation induced cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical intramyocardial microinjection of immunogenic zymosan A particles into the neonatal mouse heart. We also found that cardiac injury-induced regenerative response was suspended after immunosuppression in neonatal mice, and that cardiomyocytes could not be reactivated to proliferate after neonatal heart injury in the absence of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the major downstream effector of IL-6 signaling, decreased reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical resection. Our results indicate that acute inflammation stimulates the regenerative response in neonatal mouse heart, and suggest that modulation of inflammatory signals might have important implications in cardiac regenerative medicine.

  9. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  10. Lay Public's Knowledge and Decisions in Response to Symptoms of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cytryn, Kayla N.; Yoskowitz, Nicole A.; Cimino, James J.; Patel, Vimla L.

    2009-01-01

    Despite public health initiatives targeting rapid action in response to symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI), people continue to delay in going to a hospital when experiencing these symptoms due to lack of recognition as cardiac-related. The objective of this research was to characterize lay individuals' knowledge of symptoms of acute myocardial…

  11. Altered postnatal acute phase response in heifers exposed to lipopolysachcharide in utero

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to LPS challenge in heifer calves. Pregnant crossbred cows (n=50) were separated into prenatal stress (PNS; n=25; administered 0.1 microgram per kilogram...

  12. Modulation of the acute phase response in feedlot steers supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1079 (SC) on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 266 ± 4 kilograms body weight) were separated into three treatment groups (n = 6/treatm...

  13. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  14. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator in stress responsivity during acute cocaine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Maiya, Rajani; Norris, Erin H; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2010-11-01

    There is evidence that increased release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) contributes to stress responsivity during cocaine withdrawal (WD). Recent studies suggest that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the CeA is a downstream effector protein for CRF after acute "binge" cocaine administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if tPA modulates cocaine WD-induced stress responsivity. Wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA - / - ) mice were subjected to chronic (14 days) "binge" cocaine (45 mg/kg per day) or its acute (1 day) WD. Extracellular tPA activity, CRF mRNA levels, and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured in tPA - / -  and WT mice. Extracellular tPA activity was reduced by 50% in the CeA and medial amygdala of WT mice after chronic cocaine and returned to basal levels after acute WD. Unlike WT mice, tPA - / -  mice did not display elevated amygdalar CRF mRNA levels during cocaine WD. In comparison to WT mice, tPA - / -  mice showed a blunted plasma CORT response during acute WD. These results demonstrate that tPA activity in the amygdala (Amy) is altered by chronic cocaine exposure, and further suggest an involvement of tPA in modulating amygdalar CRF stress responsive system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to acute cocaine WD.

  15. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator in stress responsivity during acute cocaine withdrawal in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Maiya, Rajani; Norris, Erin H.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that increased release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) contributes to stress responsivity during cocaine withdrawal (WD). Recent studies suggest that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the CeA is a downstream effector protein for CRF after acute “binge” cocaine administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if tPA modulates cocaine WD-induced stress responsivity. Wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA −/−) mice were subjected to chronic (14 days) “binge” cocaine (45 mg/kg per day) or its acute (1 day) WD. Extracellular tPA activity, CRF mRNA levels, and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured in tPA −/− and WT mice. Extracellular tPA activity was reduced by 50% in the CeA and medial amygdala of WT mice after chronic cocaine and returned to basal levels after acute WD. Unlike WT mice, tPA −/− mice did not display elevated amygdalar CRF mRNA levels during cocaine WD. In comparison to WT mice, tPA −/− mice showed a blunted plasma CORT response during acute WD. These results demonstrate that tPA activity in the amygdala (Amy) is altered by chronic cocaine exposure, and further suggest an involvement of tPA in modulating amygdalar CRF stress responsive system and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis in response to acute cocaine WD. PMID:20666641

  16. Nonlinear extension of a hemodynamic linear model for coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sassaroli, Angelo; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we are proposing an extension of a recent hemodynamic model (Fantini, 2014a), which was developed within the framework of a novel approach to the study of tissue hemodynamics, named coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS). The previous hemodynamic model, from a signal processing viewpoint, treats the tissue microvasculature as a linear time-invariant system, and considers changes of blood volume, capillary blood flow velocity and the rate of oxygen diffusion as inputs, and the changes of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations (measured in near infrared spectroscopy) as outputs. The model has been used also as a forward solver in an inversion procedure to retrieve quantitative parameters that assess physiological and biological processes such as microcirculation, cerebral autoregulation, tissue metabolic rate of oxygen, and oxygen extraction fraction. Within the assumption of "small" capillary blood flow velocity oscillations the model showed that the capillary and venous compartments "respond" to this input as low pass filters, characterized by two distinct impulse response functions. In this work, we do not make the assumption of "small" perturbations of capillary blood flow velocity by solving without approximations the partial differential equation that governs the spatio-temporal behavior of hemoglobin saturation in capillary and venous blood. Preliminary comparison between the linear time-invariant model and the extended model (here identified as nonlinear model) are shown for the relevant parameters measured in CHS as a function of the oscillation frequency (CHS spectra). We have found that for capillary blood flow velocity oscillations with amplitudes up to 10% of the baseline value (which reflect typical scenarios in CHS), the discrepancies between CHS spectra obtained with the linear and nonlinear models are negligible. For larger oscillations (~50%) the linear and nonlinear models yield CHS spectra with differences within typical

  17. Leg Vascular Responsiveness During Acute Orthostasis Following Simulated Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blamick, Cynthia A.; Goldwater, Danielle J.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1988-01-01

    Ten men (35-49 years old) underwent lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exposures before and offer 10 d of continuous 6 degrees head-down bedrest in order to predict the effect of weightlessness on the responsiveness of leg vasculature to an orthostatic stress. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and Impedance rheographic indices of arterial pulse volume (APV) of the legs were measured during rest and at 1 min at -30 mm Hg LBNP. Bedrest-induced deconditioning was manifested by decreases (p less than 0.06) in plasma volume (17%), peak oxygen uptake (16%), and LBNP tolerance (17%). Resting HR was unchanged after bedrest, but HR was higher (p less than 0.05) at 1 min of -30 mm Hg LBNP after, compared with before bedrest. Responses of MAP to -30 mm Hg LBNP were not altered by bodrest. Resting APV was decreased (p less than 0.05) by simulated weightlessness. However, APV was reduced (p less than 0.05) from rest to 1 min -30 mm Hg LBNP by the same relative magnitude before and after bodrest (-21.4 +/- 3.4% and -20.5 +/- 2.7%, respectively). We conclude that peripheral arterial vasoconstriction, as indicated by reductions in APV during LBNP, was not affected by bedrest. These results suggest that there was no apparent alteration in responsiveness of the leg vasculature following simulated weightlessness. Therefore, it appears unlikely that control mechanisms of peripheral resistance contribute significantly to reduced orthostatic tolerance following space-flight.

  18. Models and Methods to Investigate Acute Stress Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Arsenault, Ryan; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation within the livestock industry and throughout society that animal stress is an important issue that must be addressed. With implications for animal health, well-being, and productivity, minimizing animal stress through improved animal management procedures and/or selective breeding is becoming a priority. Effective management of stress, however, depends on the ability to identify and quantify the effects of various stressors and determine if individual or combined stressors have distinct biological effects. Furthermore, it is critical to determine the duration of stress-induced biological effects if we are to understand how stress alters animal production and disease susceptibility. Common stress models used to evaluate both psychological and physical stressors in cattle are reviewed. We identify some of the major gaps in our knowledge regarding responses to specific stressors and propose more integrated methodologies and approaches to measuring these responses. These approaches are based on an increased knowledge of both the metabolic and immune effects of stress. Finally, we speculate on how these findings may impact animal agriculture, as well as the potential application of large animal models to understanding human stress. PMID:26633525

  19. Models and Methods to Investigate Acute Stress Responses in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Arsenault, Ryan; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation within the livestock industry and throughout society that animal stress is an important issue that must be addressed. With implications for animal health, well-being, and productivity, minimizing animal stress through improved animal management procedures and/or selective breeding is becoming a priority. Effective management of stress, however, depends on the ability to identify and quantify the effects of various stressors and determine if individual or combined stressors have distinct biological effects. Furthermore, it is critical to determine the duration of stress-induced biological effects if we are to understand how stress alters animal production and disease susceptibility. Common stress models used to evaluate both psychological and physical stressors in cattle are reviewed. We identify some of the major gaps in our knowledge regarding responses to specific stressors and propose more integrated methodologies and approaches to measuring these responses. These approaches are based on an increased knowledge of both the metabolic and immune effects of stress. Finally, we speculate on how these findings may impact animal agriculture, as well as the potential application of large animal models to understanding human stress. PMID:26633525

  20. Cumulative exposure to prior collective trauma and acute stress responses to the Boston marathon bombings.

    PubMed

    Garfin, Dana Rose; Holman, E Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2015-06-01

    The role of repeated exposure to collective trauma in explaining response to subsequent community-wide trauma is poorly understood. We examined the relationship between acute stress response to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings and prior direct and indirect media-based exposure to three collective traumatic events: the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Representative samples of residents of metropolitan Boston (n = 846) and New York City (n = 941) completed Internet-based surveys shortly after the Boston Marathon bombings. Cumulative direct exposure and indirect exposure to prior community trauma and acute stress symptoms were assessed. Acute stress levels did not differ between Boston and New York metropolitan residents. Cumulative direct and indirect, live-media-based exposure to 9/11, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook shooting were positively associated with acute stress responses in the covariate-adjusted model. People who experience multiple community-based traumas may be sensitized to the negative impact of subsequent events, especially in communities previously exposed to similar disasters. PMID:25896419

  1. Acute and sub-lethal response to mercury in Arctic and boreal calanoid copepods.

    PubMed

    Overjordet, Ida Beathe; Altin, Dag; Berg, Torunn; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Acute lethal toxicity, expressed as LC50 values, is a widely used parameter in risk assessment of chemicals, and has been proposed as a tool to assess differences in species sensitivities to chemicals between climatic regions. Arctic Calanus glacialis and boreal Calanus finmarchicus were exposed to mercury (Hg(2+)) under natural environmental conditions including sea temperatures of 2° and 10°C, respectively. Acute lethal toxicity (96 h LC50) and sub-lethal molecular response (GST expression; in this article gene expression is used as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression is also regulated, e.g., at translation and protein stability level) were studied. The acute lethal toxicity was monitored for 96 h using seven different Hg concentrations. The sub-lethal experiment was set up on the basis of nominal LC50 values for each species using concentrations equivalent to 50, 5 and 0.5% of their 96 h LC50 value. No significant differences were found in acute lethal toxicity between the two species. The sub-lethal molecular response revealed large differences both in response time and the fold induction of GST, where the Arctic species responded both faster and with higher mRNA levels of GST after 48 h exposure. Under the natural exposure conditions applied in the present study, the Arctic species C. glacialis may potentially be more susceptible to mercury exposure on the sub-lethal level.

  2. A Revised Hemodynamic Theory of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Bradley D; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) afflicts one out of every 40 individuals worldwide, causing irreversible central blindness in millions. The transformation of various tissue layers within the macula in the retina has led to competing conceptual models of the molecular pathways, cell types, and tissues responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A model that has persisted for over 6 decades is the hemodynamic, or vascular theory of AMD progression, which states that vascular dysfunction of the choroid underlies AMD pathogenesis. Here, we re-evaluate this hypothesis in light of recent advances on molecular, anatomic, and hemodynamic changes underlying choroidal dysfunction in AMD. We propose an updated, detailed model of hemodynamic dysfunction as a mechanism of AMD development and progression. PMID:27423265

  3. Treatment of acute schizophrenia with paliperidone ER: predictors for treatment response and benzodiazepine use.

    PubMed

    Heres, Stephan; Don, Liana; Herceg, Miroslav; Bidzan, Leszek; Blanc, Michel; Siracusano, Alberto; Maciulis, Valentinas; Lahaye, Marjolein; Schreiner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The Paliperidone ER Treatment in Acute Intervention (PERTAIN) study was designed to explore treatment response, tolerability, and safety of flexible doses of paliperidone ER in patients with schizophrenia admitted for an acute exacerbation. This paper addresses a secondary analysis of PERTAIN data designed to explore predictors for treatment response, flexible dosing, and concomitant benzodiazepine use. This prospective, multicenter, phase 3b, open-label, single-arm, 6-week study used flexible doses of paliperidone ER (3 to 12mg once daily) to treat patients hospitalized for an acute exacerbation of schizophrenia, reflecting more closely daily clinical practice. Predictive models were evaluated for paliperidone ER flexible dosing, treatment response, and concomitant treatment with benzodiazepines as distinct independent variables. For the analysis of explanatory variables, a stepwise logistic regression was used, taking into account patient age, gender, body mass index, diagnosis and duration of schizophrenia, number of prior hospitalizations, psychotic symptoms (PANSS), disease severity (CGI-S), and patient functioning (PSP) at baseline. Early response (defined as response within 2weeks of treatment initiation) was also used as a predictor. Clinical response (defined as ≥30% decrease in PANSS total score and ≥1 point decrease in CGI-S from baseline to endpoint) was predicted by early clinical response (p<0.001) and there was a trend for the diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia vs. other types of schizophrenia to predict clinical response (p=0.0525). High response (defined as ≥50% decrease in PANSS total score and ≥2 points decrease in CGI-S from baseline to endpoint) was predicted by early high response, higher baseline CGI-S, or female gender. More severely ill patients with a higher baseline CGI-S were twice likely to be treated concomitantly with a benzodiazepine. PMID:24096139

  4. Heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures in acute posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Anke; Suendermann, Oliver; Boellinghaus, Inga; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna; Gamer, Matthias; Briddon, Emma; Martin, Melanie Walwyn; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-10-01

    Physiological responses to trauma reminders are one of the core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nevertheless, screening measures for PTSD largely rely on symptom self-reports. It has been suggested that psychophysiological assessments may be useful in identifying trauma survivors with PTSD (Orr and Roth, 2000). This study investigated whether heart rate (HR) responses to standardized trauma-related pictures distinguish between trauma survivors with and without acute PTSD. Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N=162) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post-trauma while their ECG was recorded. At 1 and 6 months, structured clinical interviews assessed PTSD diagnoses. Participants completed self-report measures of PTSD severity and depression, peritraumatic responses, coping behaviors and appraisals. Trauma survivors with acute PTSD showed greater HR responses to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, as indicated by a less pronounced mean deceleration, greater peak responses, and a greater proportion showing HR acceleration of greater than 1 beat per minute. There were no group differences in HR responses to generally threatening or neutral pictures. HR responses to trauma-related pictures contributed to the prediction of PTSD diagnosis over and above what could be predicted from self-reports of PTSD and depression. HR responses to trauma-related pictures were related to fear and data-driven processing during the trauma, safety behaviors, suppression of trauma memories, and overgeneralized appraisals of danger. The results suggest that HR responses to standardized trauma-related pictures may help identify a subgroup of patients with acute PTSD who show generalized fear responses to trauma reminders. The early generalization of triggers of reexperiencing symptoms observed in this study is consistent with associative learning and cognitive models of PTSD.

  5. Heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures in acute posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke; Suendermann, Oliver; Boellinghaus, Inga; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna; Gamer, Matthias; Briddon, Emma; Martin, Melanie Walwyn; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Physiological responses to trauma reminders are one of the core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nevertheless, screening measures for PTSD largely rely on symptom self-reports. It has been suggested that psychophysiological assessments may be useful in identifying trauma survivors with PTSD (Orr and Roth, 2000). This study investigated whether heart rate (HR) responses to standardized trauma-related pictures distinguish between trauma survivors with and without acute PTSD. Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N = 162) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post-trauma while their ECG was recorded. At 1 and 6 months, structured clinical interviews assessed PTSD diagnoses. Participants completed self-report measures of PTSD severity and depression, peritraumatic responses, coping behaviors and appraisals. Trauma survivors with acute PTSD showed greater HR responses to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, as indicated by a less pronounced mean deceleration, greater peak responses, and a greater proportion showing HR acceleration of greater than 1 beat per minute. There were no group differences in HR responses to generally threatening or neutral pictures. HR responses to trauma-related pictures contributed to the prediction of PTSD diagnosis over and above what could be predicted from self-reports of PTSD and depression. HR responses to trauma-related pictures were related to fear and data-driven processing during the trauma, safety behaviors, suppression of trauma memories, and overgeneralized appraisals of danger. The results suggest that HR responses to standardized trauma-related pictures may help identify a subgroup of patients with acute PTSD who show generalized fear responses to trauma reminders. The early generalization of triggers of reexperiencing symptoms observed in this study is consistent with associative learning and cognitive models of PTSD. PMID

  6. Acute marijuana effects on response-reinforcer relations under multiple variable-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Lane, S D; Cherek, D R; Pietras, C J; Tcheremissine, O V

    2004-07-01

    Acute marijuana administration may alter response-reinforcer relationships via a change in reinforcer efficacy, but may also impair coordination and motor function. One approach to evaluating drug effects on both motor function and reinforcer efficacy involves fitting the matching law equation to data obtained under multiple variable interval (VI) schedules. The present report describes an experiment that examined the effects of acute marijuana on response properties using this approach. Six human subjects responded under a multiple VI schedule for monetary reinforcers after smoking placebo and two active doses of marijuana. The low marijuana dose produced unsystematic changes in responding. As measured by the matching law equation parameters (k and rB), at the high dose five subjects showed a decrease-motor-related properties of response rate and four subjects' responding indicated a decrease in reinforcer efficacy. These data raise the possibility that, at high doses, marijuana administration alters both motor function and reinforcer efficacy.

  7. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant holstein heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor–mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial...

  8. Hemodynamic aspects of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Ken; Sato, Mika; Satoh, Yuichi; Watahiki, Yasuhito; Kondoh, Yasushi; Sugawara, Maki; Box, Georgia; Wright, David; Leung, Sumie; Yuya, Hiromichi; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2002-11-01

    Neuroradiological functional imaging techniques demonstrate the patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism that are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from other dementing disorders. Besides the distribution patterns of perfusion or energy metabolism, vascular transit time (VTT), vascular reactivity (VR), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which can be measured with positron emission tomography (PET), provide hemodynamic aspects of brain pathophysiology. In order to evaluate the hemodynamic features of AD, PET studies were carried out in 20 patients with probable AD and 20 patients with vascular dementia (VaD). The PET findings were not included in their diagnostic process of AD. Using oxygen-15-labeled compounds, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), OEF, cerebral blood volume, and VTT were measured quantitatively during resting state. To evaluate VR, CBF was also measured during CO(2) inhalation. There was a significant increase in OEF in and around the parietotemporal cortices, but both VTT and VR were well preserved in patients with AD. By contrast, VR was markedly depressed and VTT was mildly prolonged in patients with VaD. Thus, from the hemodynamic point of view, the preservation of vascular reserve may be a distinct difference between AD and VaD. Furthermore, this indicates a hemodynamic integrity of the vasculature in the level of arterioles in AD.

  9. Acute inflammatory responses of nanoparticles in an intra-tracheal instillation rat model.

    PubMed

    Armstead, Andrea L; Minarchick, Valerie C; Porter, Dale W; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Li, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hard metal tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) "dusts" in enclosed industrial environments is known to contribute to the development of hard metal lung disease and an increased risk for lung cancer. Currently, the influence of local and systemic inflammation on disease progression following WC-Co exposure remains unclear. To better understand the relationship between WC-Co nanoparticle (NP) exposure and its resultant effects, the acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses caused by WC-Co NPs were explored using an intra-tracheal instillation (IT) model and compared to those of CeO2 (another occupational hazard) NP exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IT dose (0-500 μg per rat) of WC-Co or CeO2 NPs. Following 24-hr exposure, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and whole blood were collected and analyzed. A consistent lack of acute local pulmonary inflammation was observed in terms of the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid parameters examined (i.e. LDH, albumin, and macrophage activation) in animals exposed to WC-Co NP; however, significant acute pulmonary inflammation was observed in the CeO2 NP group. The lack of acute inflammation following WC-Co NP exposure contrasts with earlier in vivo reports regarding WC-Co toxicity in rats, illuminating the critical role of NP dose and exposure time and bringing into question the potential role of impurities in particle samples. Further, we demonstrated that WC-Co NP exposure does not induce acute systemic effects since no significant increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines were observed. Taken together, the results of this in vivo study illustrate the distinct differences in acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to NPs composed of WC-Co and CeO2; therefore, it is important that the outcomes of pulmonary exposure to one type of NPs may not be implicitly extrapolated to other types of NPs.

  10. Acute Inflammatory Responses of Nanoparticles in an Intra-Tracheal Instillation Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Armstead, Andrea L.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Porter, Dale W.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Li, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hard metal tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) “dusts” in enclosed industrial environments is known to contribute to the development of hard metal lung disease and an increased risk for lung cancer. Currently, the influence of local and systemic inflammation on disease progression following WC-Co exposure remains unclear. To better understand the relationship between WC-Co nanoparticle (NP) exposure and its resultant effects, the acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses caused by WC-Co NPs were explored using an intra-tracheal instillation (IT) model and compared to those of CeO2 (another occupational hazard) NP exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IT dose (0-500 μg per rat) of WC-Co or CeO2 NPs. Following 24-hr exposure, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and whole blood were collected and analyzed. A consistent lack of acute local pulmonary inflammation was observed in terms of the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid parameters examined (i.e. LDH, albumin, and macrophage activation) in animals exposed to WC-Co NP; however, significant acute pulmonary inflammation was observed in the CeO2 NP group. The lack of acute inflammation following WC-Co NP exposure contrasts with earlier in vivo reports regarding WC-Co toxicity in rats, illuminating the critical role of NP dose and exposure time and bringing into question the potential role of impurities in particle samples. Further, we demonstrated that WC-Co NP exposure does not induce acute systemic effects since no significant increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines were observed. Taken together, the results of this in vivo study illustrate the distinct differences in acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to NPs composed of WC-Co and CeO2; therefore, it is important that the outcomes of pulmonary exposure to one type of NPs may not be implicitly extrapolated to other types of NPs. PMID:25738830

  11. The acute immune response to exercise: what does it mean?

    PubMed

    Gabriel, H; Kindermann, W

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information about the exercise-induced alterations of cellular immune parameters depending on the intensity related to the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT) and duration of exercise. Immunological parameters were differential blood counts (CD14, CD45), monocyte subpopulations (CD14, CD16), lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CD19, CD16, CD56, HLA-DR) and natural killer cells (CD3, CD16, CD56), oxidative burst activity of neutrophils, and phagocytosis of neutrophils (flow cytometry). The main results were: (a) "Moderate" exercise (duration < 2h at about 85% of the IAT corresponding to a lactate steady state at about 2 mmol.l-1, < 30 min at the IAT corresponding to a lactate steady state of 4 mmol.l-1) elicits lower changes in cell concentrations and hormonal responses than strenuous exercise [exhaustive exercise at 100% IAT or above; (exhaustive) long-term (> 2-3h) endurance exercise]. Similar investigations about cell functions to decide about the positive or negative nature of these observations will have to follow in the future. (b) The neutrocytosis following exercise is more dependent on the duration than on the intensity of exercise. Especially exercise sessions that lead to a strong incline of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, beta-endorphin and cortisol are associated with this neutrocytosis. (c) Neutrophils' function during the exercise-induced neutrocytosis indicated by phagocytosis and oxidative burst activity is unchanged or reduced following strenuous endurance exercise, whereas bacterial URTI leads to similar neutrophil counts but significantly increased cell activities indicating the diverse meaning of the leukocytosis in infections (primed cells, enhanced cell activity, stimulated defense mechanism) and following exercise (impaired cell function, suppressed defense mechanism). (d) Regular monocytes (early differentiation stage) are strongly recruited into the circulation during long

  12. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices.

  13. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices. PMID:27445229

  14. Acute responses of American kestrels to methyl parathion and fenvalerate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Franson, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and toxicological effects of p.o, methyl parathion (0.375-3.0 mg/kg) or fenvalerate (1000-4000 mg/kg) were examined over a 10 h period in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) maintained in thermoneutral (22?.C) and cold (-5?.C) environments. Methyl parathion was highly toxic (LD50=3.08 mg/kg, 95% confidence limits=2.29-4.l4 mg/kg, producing overt intoxication (abnormal posture, ataxia, paresis), dose-dependent inhibition (26-67%) of brain acetylcholinesterase activity, hyperglycemia, and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration. Transient but pronounced hypothermia was associated with plasma cholinesterase inhibition in excess of 50% (2 h after intubation), although this response was highly variable (plasma ChE inhibition vs. A cloacal temperature, r=-0.60). Fenvalerate, at doses far exceeding those encountered in the environment, caused mild intoxication (irregular head movement) and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, but did not alter cloacal temperature, plasma activities of CK, U-HBDH, and LDK, or concentrations of corticosterone, glucose, triiodothyronine, and uric acid. Cold exposure intensified methyl parathion toxicity, but did not affect that of fenvalerate. It would thus appear that the organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion poses far greater hazard than the pyrethroid fenvalerate to raptorial birds.

  15. Stress and adaptation responses to repeated acute acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which groups of adult male chickens (single-comb white leghorn) were exposed daily to acceleration (centrifugation) of 2 or 3 G for 10 min, 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hr (continuously), or 0 time (controls). After approximately five months of this intermittent treatment (training), the birds were exposed to continuous accelerations of the same G force (intensity). The degree of stress and adaptation of each bird was determined by survival and relative lymphocyte count criteria. Intermittent training exposures of 2 G developed levels of adaptation in birds directly proportional to the duration of their daily exposure. Intermittent training periods at 3 G, however, produced a physiological deterioration in birds receiving daily exposures of 8 hr or more. Adaptive benefits were found only in the 1- and 4-hr-daily intermittent 3-G exposure groups. Exposure to 3 G produced an immediate stress response as indicated by a low relative lymphocyte count which returned to control (preexposed) values prior to the next daily acceleration period in the 10-min, 1-hr, and 4-hr groups. This daily recovery period from stress appeared to be necessary for adaptation as opposed to deterioration for the more severe environmental (3 G) alteration.

  16. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices.Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a

  17. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  18. Social stress modulates the cortisol response to an acute stressor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, J D; Gollock, M J; Gilmour, K M

    2014-01-15

    In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) of subordinate social status, circulating cortisol concentrations were elevated under resting conditions but the plasma cortisol and glucose responses to an acute stressor (confinement in a net) were attenuated relative to those of dominant trout. An in vitro head kidney preparation, and analysis of the expression of key genes in the stress axis prior to and following confinement in a net were then used to examine the mechanisms underlying suppression of the acute cortisol stress response in trout experiencing chronic social stress. With porcine adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) as the secretagogue, ACTH-stimulated cortisol production was significantly lower for head kidney preparations from subordinate trout than for those from dominant trout. Dominant and subordinate fish did not, however, differ in the relative mRNA abundance of melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) or cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) within the head kidney, although the relative mRNA abundance of these genes was significantly higher in both dominant and subordinate fish than in sham trout (trout that did not experience social interactions but were otherwise treated identically to the dominant and subordinate fish). The relative mRNA abundance of all three genes was significantly higher in trout exposed to an acute net stressor than under control conditions. Upstream of cortisol production in the stress axis, plasma ACTH concentrations were not affected by social stress, nor was the relative mRNA abundance of the binding protein for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-BP). The relative mRNA abundance of CRF in the pre-optic area of subordinate fish was significantly higher than that of dominant or sham fish 1h after exposure to the stressor. Collectively, the results indicate that chronic social stress modulates cortisol production at the level of the interrenal cells, resulting in an attenuated

  19. Hippocampal protection in mice with an attenuated inflammatory monocyte response to acute CNS picornavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Charles L.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Sundsbak, Rhianna S.; Sauer, Brian M.; LaFrance, Stephanie J.; Buenz, Eric J.; Schmalstieg, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury during acute viral infection of the brain is associated with the development of persistent cognitive deficits and seizures in humans. In C57BL/6 mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, hippocampal CA1 neurons are injured by a rapid innate immune response, resulting in profound memory deficits. In contrast, infected SJL and B6xSJL F1 hybrid mice exhibit essentially complete hippocampal and memory preservation. Analysis of brain-infiltrating leukocytes revealed that SJL mice mount a sharply attenuated inflammatory monocyte response as compared to B6 mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments isolated the attenuation to the SJL immune system. Adoptive transfer of B6 inflammatory monocytes into acutely infected B6xSJL hosts converted these mice to a hippocampal damage phenotype and induced a cognitive deficit marked by failure to recognize a novel object. These findings show that inflammatory monocytes are the critical cellular mediator of hippocampal injury during acute picornavirus infection of the brain. PMID:22848791

  20. Sex steroid levels temporarily increase in response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Lennartsson, Anna-Karin; Kushnir, Mark M; Bergquist, Jonas; Billig, Håkan; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that acute psychosocial stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). However, the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and levels of sex steroids are less known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute psychosocial stress on serum concentrations of sex steroids in healthy men and women. Twenty men and 19 women (age 30-50 years) underwent Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a tool for investigating psychobiological stress responses in a laboratory setting. Blood samples were collected before, directly after the stress test, and after 30 min of recovery. Concentrations of androgens were measured with high specificity LC-MS/MS method; concentrations of cortisol, estradiol and sex hormone-binding globulin were determined using immunoassays. In both men and women we observed significantly elevated levels of testosterone, estradiol, androstenedione and sex hormone binding globulin along with significantly increased adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum cortisol, heart rate, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) as a response to the stressor. Thus, even though the HPG axis and the production of sex steroids may be inhibited during prolonged periods of stress, the sex steroid levels may increase in the initial phase of acute psychosocial stress.

  1. Variations of physiological and innate immunological responses in goldfish (Carassius auratus) subjected to recurrent acute stress.

    PubMed

    Eslamloo, Khalil; Akhavan, Sobhan R; Fallah, Farzin Jamalzad; Henry, Morgane A

    2014-03-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of repeated acute stress on the physiological status and non-specific immune response of goldfish, Carassius auratus. The acute stress was a succession of a 3 min-chasing period followed by a 2 min-air exposure. The goldfish in triplicate tanks were subjected 3 times daily to this stress for one (S3) or three (S9) days. A separate group of unstressed fish was used as control for each sampling time. Blood samples were collected 12, 48 and 120 h after the last stress procedure. Variations of globulin levels, plasma anti-protease and bactericidal activities were not significant in the present study. The haematological parameters and plasma total protein and albumin strongly declined in S9 fish 12 h post-stress compared to control fish. However, plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels in both S3 and S9 transiently increased compared to the control fish. Similarly, plasma peroxidase activity transiently increased in both stressed groups 12 h after stress. An increase in plasma lysozyme and complement activities suggested a hormesis-like effect with one-day acute stress improving the immunological response of goldfish while an extension of the stress period to three days impaired physiology and immunity for up to 5 days. This study revealed that recurrent acute stress could immunosuppress goldfish as usually expected of chronic stress.

  2. The central role of hypothalamic inflammation in the acute illness response and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Michaelis, Katherine A; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    When challenged with a variety of inflammatory threats, multiple systems across the body undergo physiological responses to promote defense and survival. The constellation of fever, anorexia, and fatigue is known as the acute illness response, and represents an adaptive behavioral and physiological reaction to stimuli such as infection. On the other end of the spectrum, cachexia is a deadly and clinically challenging syndrome involving anorexia, fatigue, and muscle wasting. Both of these processes are governed by inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and immune cells. Though the effects of cachexia can be partially explained by direct effects of disease processes on wasting tissues, a growing body of evidence shows the central nervous system (CNS) also plays an essential mechanistic role in cachexia. In the context of inflammatory stress, the hypothalamus integrates signals from peripheral systems, which it translates into neuroendocrine perturbations, altered neuronal signaling, and global metabolic derangements. Therefore, we will discuss how hypothalamic inflammation is an essential driver of both the acute illness response and cachexia, and why this organ is uniquely equipped to generate and maintain chronic inflammation. First, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in acute responses to dietary and infectious stimuli. Next, we will discuss the role of cytokines in driving homeostatic disequilibrium, resulting in muscle wasting, anorexia, and weight loss. Finally, we will address mechanisms and mediators of chronic hypothalamic inflammation, including endothelial cells, chemokines, and peripheral leukocytes. PMID:26541482

  3. The central role of hypothalamic inflammation in the acute illness response and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Michaelis, Katherine A; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    When challenged with a variety of inflammatory threats, multiple systems across the body undergo physiological responses to promote defense and survival. The constellation of fever, anorexia, and fatigue is known as the acute illness response, and represents an adaptive behavioral and physiological reaction to stimuli such as infection. On the other end of the spectrum, cachexia is a deadly and clinically challenging syndrome involving anorexia, fatigue, and muscle wasting. Both of these processes are governed by inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and immune cells. Though the effects of cachexia can be partially explained by direct effects of disease processes on wasting tissues, a growing body of evidence shows the central nervous system (CNS) also plays an essential mechanistic role in cachexia. In the context of inflammatory stress, the hypothalamus integrates signals from peripheral systems, which it translates into neuroendocrine perturbations, altered neuronal signaling, and global metabolic derangements. Therefore, we will discuss how hypothalamic inflammation is an essential driver of both the acute illness response and cachexia, and why this organ is uniquely equipped to generate and maintain chronic inflammation. First, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in acute responses to dietary and infectious stimuli. Next, we will discuss the role of cytokines in driving homeostatic disequilibrium, resulting in muscle wasting, anorexia, and weight loss. Finally, we will address mechanisms and mediators of chronic hypothalamic inflammation, including endothelial cells, chemokines, and peripheral leukocytes.

  4. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key points

  5. Fixation-Related fMRI Analysis in the Domain of Reading Research: Using Self-Paced Eye Movements as Markers for Hemodynamic Brain Responses During Visual Letter String Processing

    PubMed Central

    Richlan, Fabio; Gagl, Benjamin; Hawelka, Stefan; Braun, Mario; Schurz, Matthias; Kronbichler, Martin; Hutzler, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of using self-paced eye movements during reading (measured by an eye tracker) as markers for calculating hemodynamic brain responses measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Specifically, we were interested in whether the fixation-related fMRI analysis approach was sensitive enough to detect activation differences between reading material (words and pseudowords) and nonreading material (line and unfamiliar Hebrew strings). Reliable reading-related activation was identified in left hemisphere superior temporal, middle temporal, and occipito-temporal regions including the visual word form area (VWFA). The results of the present study are encouraging insofar as fixation-related analysis could be used in future fMRI studies to clarify some of the inconsistent findings in the literature regarding the VWFA. Our study is the first step in investigating specific visual word recognition processes during self-paced natural sentence reading via simultaneous eye tracking and fMRI, thus aiming at an ecologically valid measurement of reading processes. We provided the proof of concept and methodological framework for the analysis of fixation-related fMRI activation in the domain of reading research. PMID:23645718

  6. [Influence of pilot's professional activity on the adaptive character of hemodynamic reactions to the tilt test].

    PubMed

    Batishcheva, G A; Chernov, Iu N; Soldatov, S K; Goncharova, N Iu; Khomenko, M N

    2010-01-01

    The comparative study of blood circulation reaction to the tilt test was performed with three groups of essentially healthy subjects: AF pilots (n = 72), locomen (n = 44) and students of Military Institute of Radio Electronics (n = 32). In each group, adequate adaptive reactions were due to the eukinetic hemodynamics with steady minute volume and blood pressure values combined with heart rate increase by 10-12%. Hypokinetic hemodynamics caused 20% growth in minute volume during the initial 5 minutes of tilting in pilots versus 8-12% growth in non-flyers. Hyperkinetic hemodynamics was responsible for the minute volume growth in pilots but not in the other groups of subjects. Parasympathetic system activation was peculiar of hypokinetic hemodynamics, while sympathetic system activation was associated with hyperkinetic hemodynamics. These results point to a larger body functional reserve in pilots compared with the other subjects as a by-effect of the profession.

  7. Adrenal response to acute stress in mammillary medial nuclei lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Suarez, M; Perassi, N I

    1993-01-01

    In view of the inhibitory influence of Mammillary Medial Nuclei, pars lateralis (MMN) on corticoadrenal activity, experiments were conducted in order to determine whether these nuclei are involved in the control of adrenal response to ether stress. In bilateral MMN lesioned rats, prestress plasma corticosterone concentration (C) is significantly higher than that in sham lesioned animals. Acute stress produced a significant C increase in both, sham and lesioned rats, being this increase lower in lesioned animals. After exposure to ether vapors. adrenal concentration of norepinephrine was similar in lesioned and control animals. Whereas, adrenal epinephrine concentration was significantly higher in lesioned rats than that found in the sham lesioned ones. This study demonstrates that the integrity of MMN is not essential for adrenal response to acute stress.

  8. Divergent responses of inflammatory mediators within the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex to acute psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Vecchiarelli, Haley A; Gandhi, Chaitanya P; Gray, J Megan; Morena, Maria; Hassan, Kowther I; Hill, Matthew N

    2016-01-01

    There is now a growing body of literature that indicates that stress can initiate inflammatory processes, both in the periphery and brain; however, the spatiotemporal nature of this response is not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an acute psychological stress on changes in mRNA and protein levels of a wide range of inflammatory mediators across a broad temporal range, in key corticolimbic brain regions involved in the regulation of the stress response (amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, medial prefrontal cortex). mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators were analyzed immediately following 30min or 120min of acute restraint stress and protein levels were examined 0h through 24h post-termination of 120min of acute restraint stress using both multiplex and ELISA methods. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that exposure to acute psychological stress results in an increase in the protein level of several inflammatory mediators in the amygdala while concomitantly producing a decrease in the protein level of multiple inflammatory mediators within the medial prefrontal cortex. This pattern of changes seemed largely restricted to the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, with stress producing few changes in the mRNA or protein levels of inflammatory mediators within the hippocampus or hypothalamus. Consistent with previous research, stress resulted in a general elevation in multiple inflammatory mediators within the circulation. These data indicate that neuroinflammatory responses to stress do not appear to be generalized across brain structures and exhibit a high degree of spatiotemporal specificity. Given the impact of inflammatory signaling on neural excitability and emotional behavior, these data may provide a platform with which to explore the importance of inflammatory signaling within the prefrontocortical-amygdala circuit in the regulation of the neurobehavioral responses to stress.

  9. Hepatic Steatosis in Response to Acute Alcohol Exposure in Zebrafish requires Srebp Activation

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Michael J.; Cinaroglu, Ayca; Gao, Chuan; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2008-01-01

    Steatosis is the most common consequence of acute alcohol abuse and may predispose to more severe hepatic disease. Increased lipogenesis driven by the sterol response element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors is essential for steatosis associated with chronic alcohol ingestion, but the mechanisms underlying steatosis following acute alcohol exposure are unknown. Zebrafish larvae represent an attractive vertebrate model for studying alcoholic liver disease (ALD), because they possess the pathways to metabolize alcohol, the liver is mature by 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), and alcohol can be simply added to their water. Exposing 4 dpf zebrafish larvae to 2% ethanol (EtOH) for 32 hours achieves ∼80 mM intracellular EtOH and upregulation of hepatic cyp2e1, sod and bip, indicating that EtOH is metabolized and provokes oxidant stress. EtOH-treated larvae develop hepatomegaly and steatosis accompanied by changes in the expression of genes required for hepatic lipid metabolism. Based on the importance of SREPBs in chronic ALD, we explored the role of Srebps in this model of acute ALD. Srebp activation was prevented in gonzo larvae, which harbor a mutation in the membrane bound transcription factor protease 1 (mbtps1) gene, and in embryos injected with a morpholino to knock-down Srebp cleavage activating protein (scap). Both gonzo mutants and scap morphants were resistant to steatosis in response to 2% EtOH, and the expression of many Srebp target genes are down regulated in gonzo mutant livers. Conclusion Zebrafish larvae develop signs of acute ALD, including steatosis. Srebp activation is required for steatosis in this model. The tractability of zebrafish genetics provides a valuable tool for dissecting the molecular pathogenesis of acute ALD. PMID:19127516

  10. Novel Role for Aldose Reductase in Mediating Acute Inflammatory Responses in the Lung1

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Thyyar M.; Mong, Phyllus Y.; Ananthakrishnan, Radha; Li, Qing; Quadri, Nosirudeen; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Wang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    Exaggerated inflammatory responses and the resultant increases in alveolar-capillary permeability underlie the pathogenesis of acute lung injury during sepsis. This study examined the functions of aldose reductase (AR) in mediating acute lung inflammation. Transgenic mice expressing human AR (ARTg) were used to study the functions of AR since mice have low intrinsic AR activity. In a mild cecal ligation and puncture model, ARTg mice demonstrated an enhanced AR activity and a greater inflammatory response as evaluated by circulating cytokine levels, neutrophil accumulation in the lungs, and activation of Rho kinase in lung endothelial cells (ECs). Compared with WT lung cells, ARTg lung cells produced more IL-6 and showed augmented JNK activation in response to LPS stimulation ex vivo. In human neutrophils, AR activity was required for fMLP-included CD11b activation and up-regulation, respiratory burst, and shape changes. In human pulmonary microvascular ECs, AR activity was required for TNF-α-induced activation of the Rho kinase/MKK4/JNK pathway and IL-6 production, but not p38 activation or ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, AR activity in both human neutrophils and ECs was required for neutrophil adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated ECs. These data demonstrate a novel role for AR in regulating the signaling pathways leading to neutrophil-EC adhesion during acute lung inflammation. PMID:20007578

  11. Event-related cerebral hemodynamics reveal target-specific resource allocation for both "go" and "no-go" response-based vigilance tasks.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Tyler H; Funke, Matthew E; Dillard, Michael; Funke, Gregory J; Warm, Joel S; Parasuraman, Raja

    2013-08-01

    Transcranial Doppler sonography was used to measure cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the right and left cerebral hemispheres during the performance of a 50-min visual vigilance session. Observers monitored a simulated flight of unmanned aerial vehicles for cases in which one of the vehicles was flying in an inappropriate direction relative to its cohorts. Two types of vigilance tasks were employed: a traditional task in which observers made button press ("go") responses to critical signals, and a modification of the traditional task called the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) in which "go" responses acknowledged nonsignal events and response withholding ("no-go") signified signal detection. Signal detections and global CBFV scores declined over time. In addition, fine-grained event-related analyses revealed that the detection of signals was accompanied by an elevation of CBFV that was not present with missed signals. As was the case with the global scores, the magnitude of the transient CBFV increments associated with signal detection also declined over time, and these findings were independent of task type. The results support the view of CBFV as an index of the cognitive evaluation of stimulus significance, and a resource model of vigilance in which the need for continuous attention produces a depletion of information-processing assets that are not replenished as the task progresses. Further, temporal declines in the magnitude of event-related CBFV in response to critical signals only is evidence that the decrement function in vigilance is due to attentional processing and not specific task elements such as the required response format.

  12. Loss of appetite in acutely ill medical inpatients: physiological response or therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Schütz, Philipp; Bally, Martina; Stanga, Zeno; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Loss of appetite and ensuing weight loss is a key feature of severe illnesses. Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) contributes significantly to the adverse outcome of these conditions. Pharmacological interventions to target appetite stimulation have little efficacy but considerable side effects. Therefore nutritional therapy appears to be the logical step to combat inadequate nutrition. However, clinical trial data demonstrating benefits are sparse and there is no current established standard algorithm for use of nutritional support in malnourished, acutely ill medical inpatients. Recent high-quality evidence from critical care demonstrating harmful effects when parenteral nutritional support is used indiscriminately has led to speculation that loss of appetite in the acute phase of illness is indeed an adaptive, protective response that improves cell recycling (autophagy) and detoxification. Outside critical care, there is an important gap in high quality clinical trial data shedding further light on these important issues. The selection, timing, and doses of nutrition should be evaluated as carefully as with any other therapeutic intervention, with the aim of maximising efficacy and minimising adverse effects and costs. In light of the current controversy, a reappraisal of how nutritional support should be used in acutely ill medical inpatients outside critical care is urgently required. The aim of this review is to discuss current pathophysiological concepts of PEM and to review the current evidence for the efficacy of nutritional support regarding patient outcomes when used in an acutely ill medical patient population outside critical care. PMID:24782139

  13. Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, W.A.; Wike, J.; Tucker, S.L.

    1995-07-30

    To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediated plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when averaged high dose-rate SF2 values and telangiectasia scores were compared. There was no significant correlation between average SF2 values and acute responses or between individual SF2 measurements and either the acute or late clinical response. The results of this study suggest that the degree of late telangiectasia is at least partially dependent upon the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity of normal fibroblasts, but the relationship is not clear cut. Multiple replicate assays are necessary to obtain reliable estimates of fibroblast SF2 values using current techniques. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Vasopressin V1 receptors contribute to hemodynamic and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors in NTS.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Activation of adenosine A2a receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas increases in preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) occur, a pattern similar to that observed during hypotensive hemorrhage. Central vasopressin V1 receptors may contribute to posthemorrhagic hypotension and bradycardia. Both V1 and A2a receptors are densely expressed in the NTS, and both of these receptors are involved in cardiovascular control; thus they may interact. The responses elicited by NTS A2a receptors are mediated mostly via nonglutamatergic mechanisms, possibly via release of vasopressin. Therefore, we investigated whether blockade of NTS V1 receptors alters the autonomic response patterns evoked by stimulation of NTS A2a receptors (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) in alpha-chloralose-urethane anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, we compared the regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of vasopressin (0.1-100 ng/50 nl) into the NTS. Blockade of V1 receptors reversed the normal decreases in MAP into increases (-95.6 +/- 28.3 vs. 51.4 +/- 15.7 integralDelta%), virtually abolished the decreases in HR (-258.3 +/- 54.0 vs. 18.9 +/- 57.8 integralDeltabeats/min) and RSNA (-239.3 +/- 47.4 vs. 15.9 +/- 36.1 integralDelta%), and did not affect the increases in pre-ASNA (279.7 +/- 48.3 vs. 233.1 +/- 54.1 integralDelta%) evoked by A2a receptor stimulation. The responses partially returned toward normal values approximately 90 min after the blockade. Microinjections of vasopressin into the NTS evoked dose-dependent decreases in HR and RSNA and variable MAP and pre-ASNA responses with a tendency toward increases. We conclude that the decreases in MAP, HR, and RSNA in response to NTS A2a receptor stimulation may be mediated via release of vasopressin from neural terminals in the NTS. The differential effects of NTS V1 and A2a receptors on

  15. Plamsa leptin response to acute fasting and refeeding in untreated women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, P; Bortolotti, F; Fabrazzo, M; La Rocca, A; Fuschino, A; Maj, M

    2000-07-01

    Leptin is known to regulate body weight, energy balance, and reproduction. Therefore, investigation of its physiology is of obvious interest in bulimia nervosa (BN), an eating disorder characterized by body weight-related psychopathology, acute changes in the energy balance, and reproductive alterations. To date, the few studies that have assessed leptin production in BN have had several limitations, including the measurement of blood leptin levels in treated patients and the lack of normal weight healthy controls, so that the information they provide is not conclusive. As the investigation of leptin dynamics is likely to be more informative, we decided to assess leptin response to acute fasting and refeeding in both untreated patients with BN and healthy controls. Twelve women meeting the diagnostic criteria for BN of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and 10 healthy women of the same age range participated in a 3-day study. At 1800 h on day 1, they received a meal of 1088 Cal, with 53% carbohydrates, 17% protein, and 30% fat. Then, they fasted until 1800 h on day 2, when they received the same meal. On day 3, they received a standard hospital diet of 2600 Cal, divided into 3 meals, with the same percentages of nutrients as described above. Blood samples were collected at different time points for plasma leptin, glucose, and insulin measurements. In bulimic patients, plasma leptin values were significantly lower than in healthy women (P < 0.0001) and were positively related to body weight, expressed as body mass index (r = 0.86; P < 0.0001). The leptin response to the fasting/refeeding paradigm significantly differed between patients and controls (time x group interaction, P < 0.0001). In fact, in healthy subjects, acute fasting induced a 58% decline in the plasma leptin concentration, whereas such a decrease was only 7% in bulimic women (P < 0.001). After acute refeeding, plasma leptin increased in both groups, although in the patients it

  16. Liver receptor homolog 1 is a negative regulator of the hepatic acute-phase response.

    PubMed

    Venteclef, Nicolas; Smith, Jason C; Goodwin, Bryan; Delerive, Philippe

    2006-09-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) has been reported to play an important role in bile acid biosynthesis and reverse cholesterol transport. Here, we show that LRH-1 is a key player in the control of the hepatic acute-phase response. Ectopic expression of LRH-1 with adenovirus resulted in strong inhibition of both interleukin-6 (IL-6)- and IL-1beta-stimulated haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, and fibrinogen beta gene expression in hepatocytes. Furthermore, induction of the hepatic inflammatory response was significantly exacerbated in HepG2 cells expressing short hairpin RNA targeting LRH-1 expression. Moreover, transient-transfection experiments and electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that LRH-1 regulates this cytokine-elicited inflammatory response by, at least in part, antagonizing the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta signaling pathway. Finally, we show, by using LRH-1 heterozygous mice, that LRH-1 is involved in the control of the inflammatory response at the hepatic level in vivo. Taken together, our results outline an unexpected role for LRH-1 in the modulation of the hepatic acute-phase response.

  17. Contribution of infralimbic cortex in the cardiovascular response to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ribeiro, Flávia Camargos de Figueirêdo; Zaretsky, Dmitry V; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Santos, Robson A S; DiMicco, Joseph A; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2012-09-15

    The infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (IL) modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine function via projections to subcortical structures involved in the response to stress. We evaluated the contribution of the IL to the cardiovascular response evoked by acute stress. Under anesthesia (80 mg/kg ketamine-11.5 mg/kg xylazine), rats were implanted with telemetry probes or arterial lines for recording heart rate and blood pressure. Guide cannulas were implanted to target the IL for microinjection of muscimol (100 pmol/100 nl), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) (6 pmol/100 nl), or vehicle (100 nl). Microinjection of muscimol, an agonist of GABA(A) receptors, into the IL had no effect on stress-evoked cardiovascular and thermogenic changes in any of the paradigms evaluated (cage switch, restraint plus air-jet noise, or air-jet stress). However, microinjection of the excitatory amino acid NMDA into the IL attenuated the pressor and tachycardic response to air-jet stress. Pretreatment with the selective NMDA antagonist dl-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5, 100 pmol/100 nl) blocked the effect of NMDA on the cardiovascular response to air-jet stress. We conclude that 1) the IL region is not tonically involved in cardiovascular or thermogenic control during stress or under baseline conditions, and 2) activation of NMDA receptors in the IL can suppress the cardiovascular response to acute stress exposure.

  18. Freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint: adaptationist perspectives on the acute stress response spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia). In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed. Specifically, that fear-induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival response to an inescapable threat. The article suggests that faintness evolved in response to middle paleolithic intra-group and inter-group violence (of con-specifics) rather than as a pan-mammalian defense response, as is presently assumed. Based on recent literature, freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint provides a more complete description of the human acute stress response sequence than current descriptions. Faintness, one of three primary physiological reactions involved in BIITS phobia, is extremely rare in other phobias. Since heritability estimates are higher for faintness than for fears or phobias, the author suggests that trait-faintness may be a useful complement to trait-anxiety as an endophenotype in research on the human fear circuitry. Some implications for the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as well as for clinical, health services, and transcriptomic research are briefly discussed.

  19. Undernutrition, the Acute Phase Response to Infection, and Its Effects on Micronutrient Status Indicators12

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Kara A.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection and undernutrition are prevalent in developing countries and demonstrate a synergistic relation. Undernutrition increases infection-related morbidity and mortality. The acute phase response (APR) is an innate, systemic inflammatory reaction to a wide array of disruptions in a host’s homeostasis, including infection. Released from immune cells in response to deleterious stimuli, proinflammatory cytokines act on distant tissues to induce behavioral (e.g., anorexia, weakness, and fatigue) and systemic effects of the APR. Cytokines act to increase energy and protein requirements to manifest fever and support hepatic acute phase protein (APP) production. Blood concentrations of glucose and lipid are augmented to provide energy to immune cells in response to cytokines. Additionally, infection decreases intestinal absorption of nutrients and can cause direct loss of micronutrients. Traditional indicators of iron, zinc, and vitamin A status are altered during the APR, leading to inaccurate estimations of deficiency in populations with a high or unknown prevalence of infection. Blood concentrations of APPs can be measured in nutrition interventions to assess the time stage and severity of infection and correct for the APR; however, standardized cutoffs for nutrition applications are needed. Protein-energy malnutrition leads to increased gut permeability to pathogens, abnormal immune cell populations, and impaired APP response. Micronutrient deficiencies cause specific immune impairments that affect both innate and adaptive responses. This review describes the antagonistic interaction between the APR and nutritional status and emphasizes the need for integrated interventions to address undernutrition and to reduce disease burden in developing countries. PMID:25398733

  20. Exercise capacity and cardiac hemodynamic response in female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice: a paradox of preserved V'O2max and exercise capacity despite coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wojewoda, M; Tyrankiewicz, U; Gwozdz, P; Skorka, T; Jablonska, M; Orzylowska, A; Jasinski, K; Jasztal, A; Przyborowski, K; Kostogrys, R B; Zoladz, J A; Chlopicki, S

    2016-01-01

    We assessed exercise performance, coronary blood flow and cardiac reserve of female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice with advanced atherosclerosis compared with age-matched, wild-type C57BL6/J mice. Exercise capacity was assessed as whole body maximal oxygen consumption (V'O2max), maximum running velocity (vmax) and maximum distance (DISTmax) during treadmill exercise. Cardiac systolic and diastolic function in basal conditions and in response to dobutamine (mimicking exercise-induced cardiac stress) were assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in vivo. Function of coronary circulation was assessed in isolated perfused hearts. In female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice V'O2max, vmax and DISTmax were not impaired as compared with C57BL6/J mice. Cardiac function at rest and systolic and diastolic cardiac reserve were also preserved in female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice as evidenced by preserved fractional area change and similar fall in systolic and end diastolic area after dobutamine. Moreover, endothelium-dependent responses of coronary circulation induced by bradykinin (Bk) and acetylcholine (ACh) were preserved, while endothelium-independent responses induced by NO-donors were augmented in female ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice. Basal COX-2-dependent production of 6-keto-PGF1α was increased. Concluding, we suggest that robust compensatory mechanisms in coronary circulation involving PGI2- and NO-pathways may efficiently counterbalance coronary atherosclerosis-induced impairment in V'O2max and exercise capacity. PMID:27108697

  1. Flight performance of western sandpipers, Calidris mauri, remains uncompromised when mounting an acute phase immune response.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Silke; Buehler, Deborah M; MacMillan, Alexander; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2013-07-15

    Migratory birds have been implicated in the spread of some zoonotic diseases, but how well infected individuals can fly remains poorly understood. We used western sandpipers, Calidris mauri, to experimentally test whether flight is affected when long-distance migrants are mounting an immune response and whether migrants maintain immune defences during a flight in a wind tunnel. We measured five indicators of innate immunity in 'flown-healthy' birds (flying in a wind tunnel without mounting an immune response), 'flown-sick' birds (flying while mounting an acute phase response, which is part of induced innate immunity), and a non-flying control group ('not-flown'). Voluntary flight duration did not differ between flown-healthy and flown-sick birds, indicating that mounting an acute phase response to simulated infection did not hamper an individual's ability to fly for up to 3 h. However, in comparison to not-flown birds, bacterial killing ability of plasma was significantly reduced after flight in flown-sick birds. In flown-healthy birds, voluntary flight duration was positively correlated with bacterial killing ability and baseline haptoglobin concentration of the blood plasma measured 1-3 weeks before experimental flights, suggesting that high quality birds had strong immune systems and greater flight capacity. Our findings indicate that flight performance is not diminished by prior immune challenge, but that flight while mounting an acute phase response negatively affects other aspects of immune function. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the transmission of avian diseases, as they suggest that birds can still migrate while fighting an infection.

  2. The implicit affiliation motive moderates cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress in high school students.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Mirko; Schüler, Julia; Budde, Henning

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously shown that the implicit affiliation motive - the need to establish and maintain friendly relationships with others - leads to chronic health benefits. The underlying assumption for the present research was that the implicit affiliation motive also moderates the salivary cortisol response to acute psychological stress when some aspects of social evaluation and uncontrollability are involved. By contrast we did not expect similar effects in response to exercise as a physical stressor. Fifty-nine high school students aged M=14.8 years were randomly assigned to a psychosocial stress (publishing the results of an intelligence test performed), a physical stress (exercise intensity of 65-75% of HRmax), and a control condition (normal school lesson) each lasting 15min. Participants' affiliation motives were assessed using the Operant Motive Test and salivary cortisol samples were taken pre and post stressor. We found that the strength of the affiliation motive negatively predicted cortisol reactions to acute psychosocial but not to physical stress when compared to a control group. The results suggest that the affiliation motive buffers the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the HPA axis. PMID:25016451

  3. The implicit affiliation motive moderates cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress in high school students.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Mirko; Schüler, Julia; Budde, Henning

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously shown that the implicit affiliation motive - the need to establish and maintain friendly relationships with others - leads to chronic health benefits. The underlying assumption for the present research was that the implicit affiliation motive also moderates the salivary cortisol response to acute psychological stress when some aspects of social evaluation and uncontrollability are involved. By contrast we did not expect similar effects in response to exercise as a physical stressor. Fifty-nine high school students aged M=14.8 years were randomly assigned to a psychosocial stress (publishing the results of an intelligence test performed), a physical stress (exercise intensity of 65-75% of HRmax), and a control condition (normal school lesson) each lasting 15min. Participants' affiliation motives were assessed using the Operant Motive Test and salivary cortisol samples were taken pre and post stressor. We found that the strength of the affiliation motive negatively predicted cortisol reactions to acute psychosocial but not to physical stress when compared to a control group. The results suggest that the affiliation motive buffers the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the HPA axis.

  4. Modification of Hemodynamic and Immune Responses to Exposure with a Weak Antigen by the Expression of a Hypomorphic BMPR2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Hoffman, Carol; Marsh, Leigh M.; West, James; Grunig, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypomorphic mutations in the bone morphogenic protein receptor (BMPR2) confer a much greater risk for developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, not all carriers of a mutation in the BMPR2 gene suffer from PAH. We have previously shown that prolonged T helper 2 (Th2) responses in the lungs to a mild antigen delivered via the airways induce severe pulmonary arterial remodeling, but no pulmonary hypertension. The current studies were designed to test the idea that Th2 responses to a mild antigen together with the expression of a hypomorphic BMPR2 gene would trigger pulmonary hypertension. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice that expressed a hypomorphic BMPR2 transgene (transgene-positive) and transgene-negative mice were either exposed to saline, or primed and exposed to a mild antigen (Ovalbumin) over a prolonged period of time. Only transgene-positive but not transgene-negative mice exposed to antigen developed significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressures, while both groups showed pulmonary artery remodeling with severe muscularization and airway inflammation to a similar degree. Antigen exposure resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of Interleukin (IL)-13 positive T cells in the lymph nodes, and in a smaller increase in resistin-like-molecule (RELM)α expression and a decreased ratio of expression of IL-33 relative to its receptor (IL-1-receptor-like 1, IL1RL1-ST2) in the right ventricles of transgene-positive mice compared to transgene-negative animals. Furthermore, only antigen-challenged transgene-positive mice showed a significant increase in Interferon (IFN)γ positive T cells over saline-exposed controls. Conclusions/Significance Our study suggests that exposure with a mild Th2 antigen can trigger pulmonary hypertension on the background of the expression of a hypomorphic BMPR2 gene and that conversely, the expression of the hypomorphic BMPR2 gene can alter the immune response to a mild, inhaled antigen

  5. Susceptibility to ozone-induced inflammation. II. Separate loci control responses to acute and subacute exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that inbred strains of mice are differentially susceptible to acute (3 h) and subacute (48 h) exposures to 2 parts per million (ppm) ozone (O3) and 0.30 ppm O3, respectively. Genetic studies with O3-resistant C3H/HeJ and O3-susceptible C57BL/6J strains have indicated that susceptibility to each of these O3 exposures is under Mendelian (single gene) control. In the present study, we hypothesized that the same gene controls susceptibility to the airway inflammatory responses to 2 ppm and 0.30 ppm O3 exposures. To test this hypothesis, airway inflammation was induced in 10 BXH and 16 BXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains of mice by acute as well as subacute O3 exposures. Airway inflammation was assessed by counting the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) returns obtained immediately after 48-h subacute exposure to 0.30 ppm O3, or 6 h after 3 h acute exposure to 2 ppm O3. Each RI strain was classified as susceptible or resistant to each exposure, based on a comparison of mean numbers of PMNs with those of the respective progenitor strains. For each RI set, a phenotypic strain distribution pattern (SDP) was thus derived for each exposure regimen, and the SDPs were then compared for concordance. Among the BXH RI strains, 4 of 10 responded discordantly to the two exposures: 3 were susceptible to acute exposure and resistant to subacute exposure, whereas 1 was conversely susceptible. Among the BXD RI strains, 4 of 16 were discordant: 1 was susceptible to acute exposure, and resistant to subacute exposure, whereas 3 were conversely susceptible.

  6. Examining the association between adult attachment style and cortisol responses to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Tara; Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    The quality of social relationships may contribute to variations in biological stress responses, thereby affecting health risk. The association between an important indicator of social relationships, adult attachment style, and cortisol has been relatively unexplored. The present study examined adult romantic attachment style and cortisol responses to acute laboratory stress. Salivary cortisol was measured in response to two behavioural tasks, a colour/word interference task and mirror tracing task, in 498 healthy men and women from the Heart Scan study, a subsample of the Whitehall II cohort. Participants were classified as secure, fearful, preoccupied or dismissive on the basis of responses to the Relationship Questionnaire. Cortisol output was lowest in the fearful group, followed by the preoccupied group, with both secure and dismissive groups having higher levels. The results from this study tentatively support the proposition that attachment style is a factor in determining the manifestation of HPA dysregulation. PMID:21106296

  7. Acute responses to exercise training and relationship with exercise adherence in moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Amanda K; Wardini, Rima; Chan-Thim, Emilie; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L; Pepin, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to (i) compare, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, acute responses to continuous training at high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at ventilatory threshold (CTVT) and interval training (IT); (ii) examine associations between acute responses and 12-week adherence; and (iii) investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated/moderated by affect/vigour. Thirty-five COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 60.2 ± 15.8% predicted), underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT or IT, were monitored throughout about before training, and underwent 12 weeks of exercise training during which adherence was tracked. Compared with CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate and respiratory rate (RR), while IT induced higher [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]maximal voluntary ventilation, RR and lower pulse oxygen saturation. From pre- to post-exercise, positive affect increased (F = 9.74, p < 0.001) and negative affect decreased (F = 6.43, p = 0.005) across groups. CTVT reported greater end-exercise vigour compared to CTHI (p = 0.01) and IT (p = 0.02). IT exhibited lowest post-exercise vigour (p = 0.04 versus CTHI, p = 0.02 versus CTVT) and adherence rate (F = 6.69, p = 0.004). Mean [Formula: see text] (r = -0.466, p = 0.007) and end-exercise vigour (r = 0.420, p = 0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. End-exercise vigour moderated the relationship between [Formula: see text] and adherence (β = 2.74, t(32) = 2.32, p = 0.03). In summary, CTHI, CTVT and IT improved affective valence from rest to post-exercise and induced a significant 12-week exercise training effect. However, they elicited different acute physiological responses, which in turn were associated with differences in 12-week adherence to the target training intensity. This association was moderated by acute end-exercise vigour.

  8. Acute coronary care: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 58 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radionuclide Techniques for Diagnosing and Sizing of Myocardial Infarction; The Use of Serial Radionuclide Angiography for Monitoring Function during Acute Myocardial Infarction; Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Myocardial Infarction; and The Valve of Radionuclide Angiography for Risk Assessment of Patients following Acute Myocardial Infarction.

  9. Pharmacogenetics predictive of response and toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Ontiveros, Evelena P.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Wetzler, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease in adults accounting for no more than 20% of all cases of acute leukemia. By contrast with the pediatric population, in whom significant improvements in long term survival and even cure have been achieved over the last 30 years, adult ALL remains a significant challenge. Overall survival in this group remains a relatively poor 20–40%. Modern research has focused on improved pharmacokinetics, novel pharmacogenetics and personalized principles to optimize the efficacy of the treatment while reducing toxicity. Here we review the pharmacogenetics of medications used in the management of patients with ALL, including L-asparaginase, glucocorticoids, 6-mercaptopruine, methotrexate, vincristine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Incorporating recent pharmacogenetic data, mainly from pediatric ALL, will provide novel perspective of predicting response and toxicity in both pediatric and adult ALL therapy. PMID:25614322

  10. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi), and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun) to 35% (ileum) at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum) or IgM (duodenum) plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses to other pathogens and

  11. Adrenergic and vasopressinergic contributions to the cardiovascular response to acute hypoxaemia in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Giussani, D A; Riquelme, R A; Sanhueza, E M; Hanson, M A; Blanco, C E; Llanos, A J

    1999-01-01

    The effects of fetal intravenous treatment with phentolamine or a vasopressinergic V1-receptor antagonist on the fetal cardiovascular responses to acute hypoxaemia in the llama were investigated. Six llama fetuses were surgically prepared between 60 and 70% of gestation under general halothane anaesthesia with vascular catheters and transit-time ultrasonic flow probes around a carotid artery and a femoral artery. At least 4 days after surgery all fetuses were subjected to a 3 h experiment: 1 h of normoxia, 1 h of hypoxaemia and 1 h of recovery while on slow i.v. infusion with saline. On separate days this experiment was repeated with fetal i.v. treatment with either phentolamine or a V1-receptor antagonist dissolved in saline. During saline infusion all llama fetuses responded to acute hypoxaemia with intense femoral vasoconstriction. Phentolamine during normoxia produced hypotension, tachycardia and vasodilatation in both the carotid and the femoral circulations. During hypoxaemia, fetuses treated with phentolamine did not elicit the pronounced femoral vasoconstriction and all died within 20 min of the onset of hypoxaemia. A V1-receptor antagonist produced a femoral vasodilatation during normoxia but did not affect the fetal cardiovascular responses to acute hypoxaemia. In conclusion, α-adrenergic and V1-vasopressinergic mechanisms contribute to a basal vasoconstrictor tone in the femoral circulation in the llama fetus. The enhanced femoral vasoconstriction during acute hypoxaemia in the llama fetus is not mediated by stimulation of V1-vasopressin receptors, but is dependent on α-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Such α-adrenergic efferent mechanisms are indispensable to fetal survival during hypoxaemia in the llama since their abolition leads to cardiovascular collapse and death. PMID:9925892

  12. Effects of dark chocolate consumption on the prothrombotic response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men.

    PubMed

    von Känel, R; Meister, R E; Stutz, M; Kummer, P; Arpagaus, A; Huber, S; Ehlert, U; Wirtz, P H

    2014-12-01

    Flavanoid-rich dark chocolate consumption benefits cardiovascular health, but underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated the acute effect of dark chocolate on the reactivity of prothrombotic measures to psychosocial stress. Healthy men aged 20-50 years (mean ± SD: 35.7 ± 8.8) were assigned to a single serving of either 50 g of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate (n=31) or 50 g of optically identical flavonoid-free placebo chocolate (n=34). Two hours after chocolate consumption, both groups underwent an acute standardised psychosocial stress task combining public speaking and mental arithmetic. We determined plasma levels of four stress-responsive prothrombotic measures (i. e., fibrinogen, clotting factor VIII activity, von Willebrand Factor antigen, fibrin D-dimer) prior to chocolate consumption, immediately before and after stress, and at 10 minutes and 20 minutes after stress cessation. We also measured the flavonoid epicatechin, and the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine in plasma. The dark chocolate group showed a significantly attenuated stress reactivity of the hypercoagulability marker D-dimer (F=3.87, p=0.017) relative to the placebo chocolate group. Moreover, the blunted D-dimer stress reactivity related to higher plasma levels of the flavonoid epicatechin assessed before stress (F=3.32, p = 0.031) but not to stress-induced changes in catecholamines (p's=0.35). There were no significant group differences in the other coagulation measures (p's≥0.87). Adjustments for covariates did not alter these findings. In conclusion, our findings indicate that a single consumption of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate blunted the acute prothrombotic response to psychosocial stress, thereby perhaps mitigating the risk of acute coronary syndromes triggered by emotional stress.

  13. Acute Effects of Normobaric Hypoxia on Hand-Temperature Responses During and After Local Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kölegård, Roger; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Eiken, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Keramidas, Michail E, Roger Kölegård, Igor B. Mekjavic, and Ola Eiken. Acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after local cold stress. High Alt Med Biol. 15:183–191, 2014.—The purpose was to investigate acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after a cold-water hand immersion test. Fifteen males performed two right-hand immersion tests in 8°C water, during which they were inspiring either room air (Fio2: 0.21; AIR), or a hypoxic gas mixture (Fio2: 0.14; HYPO). The tests were conducted in a counterbalanced order and separated by a 1-hour interval. Throughout the 30-min cold-water immersion (CWI) and the 15-min spontaneous rewarming (RW) phases, finger-skin temperatures were measured continuously with thermocouple probes; infrared thermography was also employed during the RW phase to map all segments of the hand. During the CWI phase, the average skin temperature (Tavg) of the fingers did not differ between the conditions (AIR: 10.2±0.5°C, HYPO: 10.0±0.5°C; p=0.67). However, Tavg was lower in the HYPO than the AIR RW phase (AIR: 24.5±3.4°C; HYPO: 22.0±3.8°C; p=0.002); a response that was alike in all regions of the immersed hand. Accordingly, present findings suggest that acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia does not aggravate the cold-induced drop in hand temperature of normothermic males. Still, hypoxia markedly impairs the rewarming responses of the hand. PMID:24666109

  14. Rac1 modulates acute and subacute genotoxin-induced hepatic stress responses, fibrosis and liver aging

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, A; Wartlick, F; Henninger, C; Kaina, B; Fritz, G

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the importance of the Ras-homologous GTPase Rac1 for the hepatic response to genotoxic insults and liver aging, rac1 was deleted in liver of mice by Mx1-Cre-based recombination. Knockout of rac1 caused complex changes in basal as well as doxorubicin and ionizing radiation-induced mRNA expression of various genotoxic stress response-related genes, including hspa1b, rad51, wrn and xpc. Rac1 deletion protected the liver from acute toxicity following doxorubicin treatment. Moreover, the level of S139 phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which is indicative of DNA damage, and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-6) and pro-fibrotic (CTGF, TGFβ, αSMA) factors were mitigated in rac1 knockout animals. By contrast, lack of rac1 promoted subacute hepatotoxicity, which was determined 3 weeks after injection of multiple low doses of doxorubicin by assaying the γH2AX level, mitotic index and pro-fibrotic gene expression. Regarding ionizing radiation, rac1 deficiency had no major effects on DNA damage induction or acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic stress responses. Mice lacking hepatic rac1 for extended period of time (15 months) revealed increased mRNA expression of fibrosis-related factors (CTGF, TGFβ, collagen, MMP1) and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In addition, protein expression of the senescence marker p16 was enhanced in the absence of rac1. Taken together, the data provide evidence that Rac1 is required for doxorubicin-induced DNA damage induction. It is also involved in both the acute and delayed inflammatory and fibrotic stress response in the liver following doxorubicin, but not ionizing radiation, treatment and, furthermore, protects against endogenous liver aging. PMID:23519127

  15. Hemodynamic Traveling Waves in Human Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Kevin M.; Schira, Mark M.; Robinson, P. A.; Drysdale, Peter M.; Breakspear, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) experiments rely on precise characterization of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. As the spatial resolution of fMRI reaches the sub-millimeter range, the need for quantitative modelling of spatiotemporal properties of this hemodynamic signal has become pressing. Here, we find that a detailed physiologically-based model of spatiotemporal BOLD responses predicts traveling waves with velocities and spatial ranges in empirically observable ranges. Two measurable parameters, related to physiology, characterize these waves: wave velocity and damping rate. To test these predictions, high-resolution fMRI data are acquired from subjects viewing discrete visual stimuli. Predictions and experiment show strong agreement, in particular confirming BOLD waves propagating for at least 5–10 mm across the cortical surface at speeds of 2–12 mm s-1. These observations enable fundamentally new approaches to fMRI analysis, crucial for fMRI data acquired at high spatial resolution. PMID:22457612

  16. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Alzate, Oscar; Winnik, Witold M.; Andrews, Debora; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Ghio, Andrew J.; Gavett, Stephen H.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2012-04-15

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA. -- Highlights: ► Biomarkers of asbestos exposure are required for disease diagnosis. ► Libby amphibole exposure is associated with increased human mortality. ► Libby amphibole increases circulating proteins involved

  17. Investigation of neural correlates between perception of pain and hemodynamic response measured in the pre-frontal cortex using functional near infra-red spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Venkatagiri

    Perception of pain is multi-dimensional, comprising three major psychological dimensions: sensory-discriminative, motivational-affective and cognitive-evaluative. This dissertation study investigates the cognitive evaluation of pain, by acquiring functional Near Infra-Red Spectroscopic (fNIRS) measurements from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas, during mechanical and thermal pain stimulation induced on the subject's volar forearm. Clustered-wise analysis on the oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) response from specific PFC areas was followed by categorizing the resulting HbO response into early (0.1--12sec) and late (12.1--25sec) phases. For each respective phase, regression analysis was carried between the HbO-derived parameters and behaviorally measured pain rating. The major findings of this study include: (1) across both 41°C and 48°C thermal stimulation, significant DeltaHbO deactivation was observed during the late phase, in the left hemispheric (LH) anterior PFC (aPFC) or Brodmann area 10 (BA 10). (2) Significant correlates of pain rating were observed in the LH prefrontal areas: (a) under mechanical stimulation, early phase HbO-derived peak intensity (PI) from LH aPFC correlated with the pain rating. (b) Under both 41°C and 48°C thermal stimulation, late phase HbO-derived PI from the LH dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC or BA 46) showed correlation with the pain rating. (3) The significant correlates observed from the right hemispheric (RH) PFC were: (a) under mechanical stimulation, early phase HbO-derived FWHM from the RH aPFC correlated with the pain rating. (b) Under 41°C thermal stimulation, late phase HbO-derived PI from the RH DLPFC area correlated with the pain rating. (4) The late phase HbO-derived time to peak from LH aPFC reflected cognitive discrimination of two different pain levels (41°C and 48°C). The observed trend for DeltaHbO activation and deactivation could possibly be due to synaptic-induced vasodilation and vasoconstriction leading to increased or

  18. Celebral, Splanchnic and Lower Limb Hemodynamic Response to LBNP after a 60 Day Bedrest With and Without Counter-Measures (WISE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeille, P.; Kerbeci, P.; Mattar, L.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Hughson, R.

    2008-06-01

    Objective: quantified the impact of a 60-day head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) with countermeasures on the arterial response to LBNP. Method: 24 women (25-40y) divided into 3 groups [Control (Con), Exercise+LBNP (Ex-Lb) and Nutrition (Nut)] were studied during LBNP (0 to -45mmHg) pre and at HDBR day 55. A 10-min post- HDBR tilt test identified the finishers (F) or non-finishers (NF). Result: Left ventricle volume & myocardium, Portal flow were decreased from pre HDBR (p<0.05) in Con and Nut only. At post-HDBR LBNP: (1) HR increased more while Vao decreased more in all groups (2) Leg resistance increased less while the increase in MSNA was not different from pre HDBR in Con, Nut and NF (p<0.05) (3) both Femoral and Portal flow reduced less (less vasoconstriction) in 11 of 13 NF while in 10 of 11 F one of them at least reduced as pre HDBR (4) the [cerebral flow/(Fem + Portal flow)] ratio was higher or slightly reduced (<15%) in 10 of 11 F, but decreased >15% in 12 of 13 NF. Abnormal flow redistribution and orthostatic intolerance was partially prevented by Ex-LB.

  19. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hemodynamic and cytokine response in a porcine model of Pseudomonas sepsis.

    PubMed

    Haberstroh, J; Breuer, H; Lücke, I; Massarrat, K; Früh, R; Mand, U; Hagedorn, P; Brunnberg, L; von Specht, B U

    1995-09-01

    To investigate the effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on sepsis, chronically catheterized conscious pigs were challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8 x 10(7) colony-forming units kg-1 h-1) for 84 h (Group A, n = 8). Group B (n = 7) also received rhG-CSF at 5 micrograms kg-1 d-1, the first dose being given 30 min before starting bacterial infusion. Two of the animals in Group A died from pulmonary failure, whereas all those treated with rh-GCSF survived. Fever, severe pulmonary hypertension and systemic hypotension--the latter accompanied at first by a transient hypodynamic, and later a hyperdynamic response--were observed in all of the animals. In Group B, however, the rise in temperature, mean pulmonary arterial pressure (at a later stage of the observation), plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor, and endotoxin were significantly less than in Group A. In the rhG-CSF-treated pigs, an initial leukopenia completely recovered within 24 h (p < .05 vs. Group A). These data suggest that rhG-CSF might be beneficial in the treatment of sepsis.

  20. Hemodynamic and neural responses to renal denervation of the nerve to the clipped kidney by cryoablation in two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Noreen F; Pajewski, Russell; Chen, Haiping; Littrup, Peter J; Maliszewska-Scislo, Maria

    2016-01-15

    Renal artery stenosis is increasing in prevalence. Angioplasty plus stenting has not proven to be better than medical management. There has been a reluctance to use available denervation methodologies in this condition. We studied conscious, chronically instrumented, two-kidney, one-clip (2K-1C) Goldblatt rats, a model of renovascular hypertension, to test the hypothesis that renal denervation by cryoablation (cryo-DNX) of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma and tissue ANG II, and contralateral renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham (ShC) or right renal artery clipping (2K-1C), placement of telemetry transmitters, and pair-feeding with a 0.4% NaCl diet. After 6 wk, rats were randomly assigned to cryo-DNX or sham cryotreatment (sham DNX) of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney. MAP was elevated in 2K-1C and decreased significantly in both ShC cryo-DNX and 2K-1C cryo-DNX. Tissue norepinephrine was ∼85% lower in cryo-DNX kidneys. Plasma ANG II was higher in 2K-1C sham DNX but not in 2K-1C cryo-DNX vs ShC. Renal tissue ANG II in the clipped kidney decreased after cryo-DNX. Baseline integrated RSNA of the unclipped kidney was threefold higher in 2K-1C versus ShC and decreased in 2K-1C cryo-DNX to values similar to ShC. Maximum reflex response of RSNA to baroreceptor unloading in 2K-1C was lower after cryo-DNX. Thus, denervation by cryoablation of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney decreases not only MAP but also plasma and renal tissue ANG II levels and RSNA to the contralateral kidney in conscious, freely moving 2K-1C rats.

  1. Hemodynamic and neural responses to renal denervation of the nerve to the clipped kidney by cryoablation in two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Noreen F; Pajewski, Russell; Chen, Haiping; Littrup, Peter J; Maliszewska-Scislo, Maria

    2016-01-15

    Renal artery stenosis is increasing in prevalence. Angioplasty plus stenting has not proven to be better than medical management. There has been a reluctance to use available denervation methodologies in this condition. We studied conscious, chronically instrumented, two-kidney, one-clip (2K-1C) Goldblatt rats, a model of renovascular hypertension, to test the hypothesis that renal denervation by cryoablation (cryo-DNX) of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma and tissue ANG II, and contralateral renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham (ShC) or right renal artery clipping (2K-1C), placement of telemetry transmitters, and pair-feeding with a 0.4% NaCl diet. After 6 wk, rats were randomly assigned to cryo-DNX or sham cryotreatment (sham DNX) of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney. MAP was elevated in 2K-1C and decreased significantly in both ShC cryo-DNX and 2K-1C cryo-DNX. Tissue norepinephrine was ∼85% lower in cryo-DNX kidneys. Plasma ANG II was higher in 2K-1C sham DNX but not in 2K-1C cryo-DNX vs ShC. Renal tissue ANG II in the clipped kidney decreased after cryo-DNX. Baseline integrated RSNA of the unclipped kidney was threefold higher in 2K-1C versus ShC and decreased in 2K-1C cryo-DNX to values similar to ShC. Maximum reflex response of RSNA to baroreceptor unloading in 2K-1C was lower after cryo-DNX. Thus, denervation by cryoablation of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney decreases not only MAP but also plasma and renal tissue ANG II levels and RSNA to the contralateral kidney in conscious, freely moving 2K-1C rats. PMID:26582638

  2. Acute Exercise-Induced Mitochondrial Stress Triggers an Inflammatory Response in the Myocardium via NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation with Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiying; Miao, Weiguo; Ma, Jingfen; Xv, Zhen; Bo, Hai; Li, Jianyu; Zhang, Yong; Ji, Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that acute strenuous exercise can induce a range of adverse reactions including oxidative stress and tissue inflammation. However, little is currently known regarding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of the inflammatory response in the myocardium during acute heavy exercise. This study evaluated the mitochondrial function, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins to investigate the regulation and mechanism of mitochondrial stress regarding the inflammatory response of the rat myocardium during acute heavy exercise. The results indicated that the mitochondrial function of the myocardium was adaptively regulated to meet the challenge of stress during acute exercise. The exercise-induced mitochondrial stress also enhanced ROS generation and triggered an inflammatory reaction via the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, the mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins including Beclin1, LC3, and Bnip3 were all significantly upregulated during acute exercise, which suggests that mitophagy was stimulated in response to the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the myocardium. Taken together, our data suggest that, during acute exercise, mitochondrial stress triggers the rat myocardial inflammatory response via NLRP3 inflammasome activation and activates mitophagy to minimize myocardial injury.

  3. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  4. Adipocytokine and ghrelin responses to acute exercise and sport training in children during growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, Jaak

    2014-11-01

    Physical exercise is known to regulate energy balance. Important to this regulatory system is the existence of several peptides that communicate the status of body energy stores to the brain and are related to the body fatness including leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin. These hormones assist in regulating energy balance as well as somatic and pubertal growth in children. It appears that rather few studies have investigated the responses of leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin to acute exercise and these studies have demonstrated no changes in these peptides as a result of exercise. Leptin levels are decreased and may remain unchanged advancing from prepuberty to pubertal maturation in young male and female athletes. A limited number of studies indicate that adiponectin levels are not different between prepubertal and pubertal athletes and untrained controls. However, in certain circumstances circulating adiponectin could be increased in young athletes after onset of puberty as a result of heavily increased energy expenditure. Ghrelin levels are elevated in young sportsmen. However, pubertal onset decreases ghrelin levels in boys and girls even in the presence of chronically elevated energy expenditure as seen in young athletes. Ghrelin may also be used as an indicator of energy imbalance across the menstrual cycle in adolescent athletes. There are no studies with high-molecular-weight adiponectin and only very few studies with acylated ghrelin responses to acute exercise and chronic training have been performed in young athletes. Since these forms of adiponectin and ghrelin have been thought to be bioactive forms, further studies with these specific forms of adiponectin and ghrelin are needed. In conclusion, further studies should be conducted to investigate the response of these hormones to acute and chronic negative energy balance to better understand their role in regulating energy balance during growth and maturation in young athletes.

  5. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Heather M; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9-12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  6. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Heather M.; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L.; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9–12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors. PMID:24575039

  7. Sleep quality but not sleep quantity effects on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sarah M; Lupis, Sarah B; Gianferante, Danielle; Rohleder, Nicolas; Wolf, Jutta M

    2015-01-01

    Given the well-documented deleterious health effects, poor sleep has become a serious public health concern and increasing efforts are directed toward understanding underlying pathways. One potential mechanism may be stress and its biological correlates; however, studies investigating the effects of poor sleep on a body's capacity to deal with challenges are lacking. The current study thus aimed at testing the effects of sleep quality and quantity on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress. A total of 73 college-aged adults (44 females) were investigated. Self-reported sleep behavior was assessed via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and salivary cortisol responses to the Trier Social Stress Test were measured. In terms of sleep quality, we found a significant three-way interaction, such that relative to bad sleep quality, men who reported fairly good or very good sleep quality showed blunted or exaggerated cortisol responses, respectively, while women's stress responses were less dependent on their self-reported sleep quality. Contrarily, average sleep duration did not appear to impact cortisol stress responses. Lastly, participants who reported daytime dysfunctions (i.e. having trouble staying awake or keeping up enthusiasm) also showed a trend to blunted cortisol stress responses compared to participants who did not experience these types of daytime dysfunctions. Overall, the current study suggests gender-specific stress reactivity dysfunctions as one mechanism linking poor sleep with detrimental physical health outcomes. Furthermore, the observed differential sleep effects may indicate that while the body may be unable to maintain normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal functioning in an acute psychosocial stress situation after falling prey to low sleep quality, it may retain capacities to deal with challenges during extended times of sleep deprivation. PMID:26414625

  8. Decreased reaction time variability is associated with greater cardiovascular responses to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew; Endrighi, Romano

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) responses to mental stress are prospectively associated with poor CV outcomes. The association between CV responses to mental stress and reaction times (RTs) in aging individuals may be important but warrants further investigation. The present study assessed RTs to examine associations with CV responses to mental stress in healthy, older individuals using robust regression techniques. Participants were 262 men and women (mean age = 63.3 ± 5.5 years) from the Whitehall II cohort who completed a RT task (Stroop) and underwent acute mental stress (mirror tracing) to elicit CV responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, during acute stress, and through a 75-min recovery. RT measures were generated from an ex-Gaussian distribution that yielded three predictors: mu-RT, sigma-RT, and tau-RT, the mean, standard deviation, and mean of the exponential component of the normal distribution, respectively. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was marginally associated with greater systolic (B = -.009, SE = .005, p = .09) and diastolic (B = -.004, SE = .002, p = .08) blood pressure reactivity. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was associated with impaired systolic blood pressure recovery (B = -.007, SE = .003, p = .03) and impaired vagal tone (B = -.0047, SE = .0024, p = .045). Study findings offer tentative support for an association between RTs and CV responses. Despite small effect sizes and associations not consistent across predictors, these data may point to a li