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Sample records for acute hemorrhagic stroke

  1. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  2. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  3. Occult infarct with acute hemorrhagic stroke in juvenile diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Wong, Alex Mun-Ching; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the common complications of type I insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Neurological deterioration during an episode of DKA is usually assumed to be caused by cerebral edema and cerebral vascular accidents. However, hemorrhagic stroke is a very rare complication of juvenile DKA. We describe a girl who had newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with juvenile DKA developed intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:17629647

  4. Early treatment of hypertension in acute ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke: progress achieved, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of stroke. Additionally, high blood pressure (BP) in the acute cerebrovascular event is associated with poor outcome, and a high percentage of stroke survivors have inadequate control of hypertension. The present is a systematic review of prospective, randomized, and controlled trials carried out on safety and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of both subtypes of acute stroke. Six trials involving 7512 patients were included, which revealed controversies on the speed and the goals of treatment. These controversies could be due at least in part, from the fact that some studies analyzed the results of antihypertensive treatment in ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of acute stroke together, and from a different prevalence of past-stroke in the randomized groups. Further research is necessary to establish whether standard antihypertensive treatment provides greater benefit than simple observation in patients with ischemic acute stroke and Stage 2 hypertension of JNC 7, albeit they were not candidates for acute reperfusion. In that case, the target reduction in BP could be 10% to 15% within 24 hours. The recently published INTERACT 2 has provided evidence that patients with hemorrhagic stroke may receive intensive antihypertensive treatment safely with the goal of reducing systolic BP to levels no lower than 130 mm Hg. It is important to take into account that marked BP lowering in acute stroke increases the risk of poor outcome by worsening cerebral ischemia from deterioration of cerebral blood flow autoregulation. PMID:24220549

  5. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research and potential therapies are also discussed. PMID:17275656

  6. [Influence of cortical neurotrophic factors on the neurocytokine production system in acute hemorrhagic stroke].

    PubMed

    Kul'chikov, A E; Kositsyn, N S; Svinov, M M; Vasil'eva, I G; Makarenko, A N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of therapeutic action of cortical neurotropic factors (CNTF) was studied in hemorrhagic stroke. In intracerebral hemorrhage, CNTFs were shown to elevate the level of nerve growth factor mRNA and at the same time, produce no effect on its level in intact animals. The neuroactivating action of CNTF in the acute phase of hemorrhagic stroke was achieved by intranasal administration due to the retrograde axon transport of CNTF molecules along the olfactory nerve fibers to the brain, by passing the blood-brain barrier. It was ascertained that the molecules of tritium-labeled CHTF accumulated in the central nervous system following 20 minutes and the level of label accumulation is proportionally increased after 120 minutes. The pattern of accumulation of the intranasally administered label in the olfactory tract and olfactory bulb proves CNTF transportation along these structures of the nervous system. Therefore, when intranasally administered, CNTFs are able to transport to the central nervous system along the olfactory tract and to enhance the expression of nerve growth factor mRNA in hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:19919011

  7. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  8. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces apoptosis and protects against neurological injury after acute hemorrhagic stroke in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cecilia M. P.; Solá, Susana; Nan, Zhenhong; Castro, Rui E.; Ribeiro, Paulo S.; Low, Walter C.; Steer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), an endogenous bile acid, modulates cell death by interrupting classic pathways of apoptosis. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating acute neurological disorder, without effective treatment, in which a significant loss of neuronal cells is thought to occur by apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated whether TUDCA can reduce brain injury and improve neurological function after ICH in rats. Administration of TUDCA before or up to 6 h after stereotaxic collagenase injection into the striatum reduced lesion volumes at 2 days by as much as 50%. Apoptosis was ≈50% decreased in the area immediately surrounding the hematoma and was associated with a similar inhibition of caspase activity. These changes were also associated with improved neurobehavioral deficits as assessed by rotational asymmetry, limb placement, and stepping ability. Furthermore, TUDCA treatment modulated expression of certain Bcl-2 family members, as well as NF-κB activity. In addition to its protective action at the mitochondrial membrane, TUDCA also activated the Akt-1/protein kinase Bα survival pathway and induced Bad phosphorylation at Ser-136. In conclusion, reduction of brain injury underlies the wide-range neuroprotective effects of TUDCA after ICH. Thus, given its clinical safety, TUDCA may provide a potentially useful treatment in patients with hemorrhagic stroke and perhaps other acute brain injuries associated with cell death by apoptosis. PMID:12721362

  9. Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) Rehabilitation in Patients with Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    OGATA, Toshiyasu; ABE, Hiroshi; SAMURA, Kazuhiro; HAMADA, Omi; NONAKA, Masani; IWAASA, Mitsutoshi; HIGASHI, Toshio; FUKUDA, Hiroyuki; SHIOTA, Etsuji; TSUBOI, Yoshio; INOUE, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of hybrid assistive limb (HAL) rehabilitation in the acute phase of stroke remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients with acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) who were treated with or without HAL rehabilitation. Among 270 patients with acute ICH from 2009 to 2014, 91 patients with supratentorial ICH were included in this retrospective study. Of these, 14 patients (HAL group) received HAL rehabilitation at approximately 1 week after ICH occurrence, while the remaining 77 patients received usual rehabilitation without HAL (N-HAL group). We obtained various patient data from the hospitals where the patients were moved to for further rehabilitation. Statistical comparisons were performed for the characteristics of the ICH patients, and outcomes between the HAL and N-HAL groups. There were no differences in outcomes between the HAL and N-HAL groups. However, patients with right ICH in the HAL group exhibited a significant association with a functional independence measure (FIM) score of ≥ 110 compared with patients in the N-HAL group (HAL group: 81.8%, N-HAL group: 43.9%, P = 0.04). In patients with right ICH, HAL rehabilitation was associated with improved outcomes as evaluated by the FIM score. Thus, HAL rehabilitation may improve outcomes of acute ICH in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26511112

  10. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  11. Increased Risk of Post-Thrombolysis Intracranial Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients with Leukoaraiosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qianqian; Li, Zhong; Wei, Rui; Lei, Qingfeng; Liu, Yunyun; Cai, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukoaraiosis is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The results from many studies investigating the association between leukoaraiosis and intracranial hemorrhage after thrombolysis remain conflicting. Methods A meta-analysis was performed to compare the risk of post-thrombolytic intracranial hemorrhage in patients with and without leukoaraiosis. Relevant reports were identified by searching PubMed, EmBase, Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science through December 2015 using a combination of subjective and random terms. Eligible studies that were original articles with a clear definition of leukoaraiosis and intracranial hemorrhage were selected and analyzed. Funnel plots, Egger’s test, and Begg’s test were conducted to assess the publication bias. Sensitivity analysis was also performed to evaluate the influence of each individual study. Results Eleven trials that enrolled 6912 participants were included. There was a significantly increased risk for acute ischemic stroke patients with leukoaraiosis (odds ratio: 1.89, 95% confidence interval 1.51–2.37, P<0.001). Low heterogeneity and less publication bias was detected among these studies. The results of both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging performed on the subgroups of leukoaraiosis were significant. Furthermore, an association between leukoaraiosis and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was also confirmed. The odds ratios remained stable with no obvious variations on the sensitivity analysis. The limitations consisted of types of including trials and not matching some baseline variables. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that leukoaraiosis approximately doubles the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage after thrombolytic therapy. However, it does not critically affect decision making regarding thrombolysis for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Additional investigations are required. PMID:27096292

  12. Fish Oil Diet Associated with Acute Reperfusion Related Hemorrhage, and with Reduced Stroke-Related Sickness Behaviors and Motor Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, Michaela C.; Howells, David W.; Crewther, David P.; Constantinou, Nicki; Carey, Leeanne M.; Rewell, Sarah S.; Turchini, Giovanni M.; Kaur, Gunveen; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is associated with motor impairment and increased incidence of affective disorders such as anxiety/clinical depression. In non-stroke populations, successful management of such disorders and symptoms has been reported following diet supplementation with long chain omega-3-polyunsaturated-fatty-acids (PUFAs). However, the potential protective effects of PUFA supplementation on affective behaviors after experimentally induced stroke and sham surgery have not been examined previously. This study investigated the behavioral effects of PUFA supplementation over a 6-week period following either middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery in the hooded-Wistar rat. The PUFA diet supplied during the acclimation period prior to surgery was found to be associated with an increased risk of acute hemorrhage following the reperfusion component of the surgery. In surviving animals, PUFA supplementation did not influence infarct size as determined 6 weeks after surgery, but did decrease omega-6-fatty-acid levels, moderate sickness behaviors, acute motor impairment, and longer-term locomotor hyperactivity and depression/anxiety-like behavior. PMID:24567728

  13. Fish oil diet associated with acute reperfusion related hemorrhage, and with reduced stroke-related sickness behaviors and motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Constantinou, Nicki; Carey, Leeanne M; Rewell, Sarah S; Turchini, Giovanni M; Kaur, Gunveen; Crewther, Sheila G

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is associated with motor impairment and increased incidence of affective disorders such as anxiety/clinical depression. In non-stroke populations, successful management of such disorders and symptoms has been reported following diet supplementation with long chain omega-3-polyunsaturated-fatty-acids (PUFAs). However, the potential protective effects of PUFA supplementation on affective behaviors after experimentally induced stroke and sham surgery have not been examined previously. This study investigated the behavioral effects of PUFA supplementation over a 6-week period following either middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery in the hooded-Wistar rat. The PUFA diet supplied during the acclimation period prior to surgery was found to be associated with an increased risk of acute hemorrhage following the reperfusion component of the surgery. In surviving animals, PUFA supplementation did not influence infarct size as determined 6 weeks after surgery, but did decrease omega-6-fatty-acid levels, moderate sickness behaviors, acute motor impairment, and longer-term locomotor hyperactivity and depression/anxiety-like behavior. PMID:24567728

  14. [Hemorrhagic stroke associated to neurocysticercosis].

    PubMed

    Tellez-Zenteno, J F; Negrete-Pulido, O; Cantú, C; Márquez, C; Vega-Boada, F; García Ramos, G

    2003-06-01

    A well-known complication of neurocysticercosis is cerebral arteritis, which is usually manifested by cerebral ischemia. Only anecdotal cases of hemorrhagic stroke associated to this parasitosis have been described. Previously there are only two reported cases of this association. One of these cases had an intracystic hemorrhage confirmed by autopsy without cerebrovascular risk factors. Autopsy revealed an inflammatory arteriopathy adjacent to the cyst intracystic hemorrhage. The second case had a subarachnoidal hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of an aneurysm in the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery. At surgery, the aneurysm was found to be surrounded by a thickened-leptomeninges, which histologically showed the presence of cysticercous with dense inflammation. Our first patient was a 32 year-old female developed a lenticulo-capsular hemorrhage around a cysticercotic lesion. The second patient was a 34 year-old male developed an intracystic hemorrhage. As cerebral angiography was normal in both patients, cerebral hemorrhages were considered to be related to cysticercotic arteritis of small penetrating vessels. We conclude that cysticercosis is associated with differenttypes of intracranial hemorrhage, as documented the present cases. In neurocysticercosis endemic areas, cysticercotic arteritis should be added to the list of causes of intracranial hemorrhage in young people. PMID:12768515

  15. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  16. Mismatch of Low Perfusion and High Permeability Predicts Hemorrhagic Transformation Region in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Treated with Intra-arterial Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Nan; Li, Ying; Wintermark, Max; Jackson, Alan; Wu, Bing; Su, Zihua; Chen, Fei; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yongwei; Zhu, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether the permeability related parameter K(trans), derived from computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging, can predict hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke who receive intra-arterial thrombolysis. Data from patients meeting the criterion were examined. CTP was performed and K(trans) maps were used to assess the permeability values in HT and non-HT regions. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated, showing the sensitivity and specificity of K(trans) for predicting HT risk. Composite images were produced to illustrate the spatial correlations among perfusion, permeability changes and HT. This study examined 41 patients. Twenty-six patients had hemorrhagic infarction and 15 had parenchymal hemorrhage. The mean K(trans) value in HT regions was significantly lower than that in the non-HT regions (0.26 ± 0.21/min vs. 0.78 ± 0.64/min; P < 0.001). The ROC curve analysis identified an optimal cutoff value of 0.334/min for K(trans) to predict HT risk. Composite images suggested ischemic regions with low permeability, or the mismatch area of low perfusion and high permeability, more likely have HT. HT regions after intra-arterial thrombolysis had lower permeability values on K(trans) maps. The mismatch area of lower perfusion and higher permeability are more likely to develop HT. PMID:27302077

  17. Mismatch of Low Perfusion and High Permeability Predicts Hemorrhagic Transformation Region in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Treated with Intra-arterial Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Nan; Li, Ying; Wintermark, Max; Jackson, Alan; Wu, Bing; Su, Zihua; Chen, Fei; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yongwei; Zhu, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether the permeability related parameter Ktrans, derived from computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging, can predict hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke who receive intra-arterial thrombolysis. Data from patients meeting the criterion were examined. CTP was performed and Ktrans maps were used to assess the permeability values in HT and non-HT regions. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated, showing the sensitivity and specificity of Ktrans for predicting HT risk. Composite images were produced to illustrate the spatial correlations among perfusion, permeability changes and HT. This study examined 41 patients. Twenty-six patients had hemorrhagic infarction and 15 had parenchymal hemorrhage. The mean Ktrans value in HT regions was significantly lower than that in the non-HT regions (0.26 ± 0.21/min vs. 0.78 ± 0.64/min; P < 0.001). The ROC curve analysis identified an optimal cutoff value of 0.334/min for Ktrans to predict HT risk. Composite images suggested ischemic regions with low permeability, or the mismatch area of low perfusion and high permeability, more likely have HT. HT regions after intra-arterial thrombolysis had lower permeability values on Ktrans maps. The mismatch area of lower perfusion and higher permeability are more likely to develop HT. PMID:27302077

  18. [Histostructural changes of rat cerebral cortex during hemorrhagic stroke modeling].

    PubMed

    Savos'ko, S I; Chaĭkovs'kyĭ, Iu B; Pogoriela, N Kh; Makarenko, O M

    2012-01-01

    Pathological changes during modeling of primary and secondary acute hemorrhagic stroke were studied in rats. We revealed differences in the activity of pharmacological action of medications under condition of acute stroke. The action of medications increased viability of neurons in both hemispheres of rat cerebrum at a right-side primary and secondary hemorrhagic stroke. Following secondary stroke, the amount of degenerative neurons amounted 25.5 +/- 0.8 cells/mm2, following the action ofcerebrolysin this value was 17.6 +/- 1.7 cells/ mm2 and after the action of cortexine and cerebral this value amounted 18.0 +/- 0.9 cells/mm2 and 10.7 +/- 0.4 cells/ mm2, respectively. In control animals the number of degenerative neurons did not exceed 2% and averaged 1.5 +/- 0.1 cells/mm2. Analysis of the morphological and statistical data showed that the most effective remedies under the primary and secondary hemorrhagic insult are cortexine and cerebral. Cerebral was found to be more effective. PMID:23233944

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Kubal, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the management of patients with acute stroke syndrome, with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. A multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in the emergency setting can address both primary goals of neuroimaging (ie, detection of infarction and exclusion of hemorrhage) and secondary goals of neuroimaging (ie, identifying the site of arterial occlusion, tissue characterization for defining infarct core and penumbra, and determining stroke cause/mechanism). MR imaging provides accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and can differentiate AIS from other potential differential diagnoses. PMID:27150320

  20. Radiological strategy in acute stroke in children.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Amalia; Limbucci, Nicola; Tozzi, Elisabetta; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the preponderance of patterns of pediatric stroke, ischemic or hemorrhagic, their etiologies and the correct diagnostic protocol for acute management. Forty-one consecutive pediatric patients (age range 5-16 years) with an acute stroke observed in acute phase during a 10-year period, were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-three patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 3 cases were studied by computed tomography (CT) without MRI, and 15 underwent both CT and MRI studies. In 9 cases, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed after non-invasive preliminary assessment. Seventeen hemorrhagic (41%) and 24 ischemic (59%) strokes were found. Among hemorrhagic forms, 5 cases were due to arteriovenous malformation (AVM), 7 to cavernoma, and 2 to aneurysm. Among ischemic forms, 2 were due to sickle-cell disease, 1 to hyperomocysteinemia, 1 to moyamoya syndrome, 1 to pseudoxantoma elasticum, 3 to prothrombotic state, 1 to Fabry's disease, 1 concomitant with CO intoxication, 5 to venous sinus thrombosis, and 4 to cardio-embolic state. Etiology remains unknown in 8 cases (20.5%). This study shows a moderate prevalence of ischemic over hemorrhagic strokes. Moreover, personal experience suggests that MRI is always more informative than CT and in selected cases should be the first-choice examination in the acute phase. PMID:19216043

  1. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Subgroup Analysis of the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa; Adami, Alessandro; Becker, Jennifer L.; Cala, Lesley A.; Casado, Ana M.; Chen, Christopher; Dineen, Robert A.; Gommans, John; Koumellis, Panos; Christensen, Hanna; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Lees, Kennedy R.; Ntaios, George; Ozturk, Serefnur; Phillips, Stephen J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Szatmari, Szabolcs; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH remains unclear, a question that was addressed in the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. Methods ENOS was an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded endpoint trial. Among 629 patients with ICH and systolic blood pressure between 140 and 220 mmHg, 246 patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs were assigned to continue (n = 119) or to stop (n = 127) taking drugs temporarily for 7 days. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin Score at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included death, length of stay in hospital, discharge destination, activities of daily living, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Results Blood pressure level (baseline 171/92 mmHg) fell in both groups but was significantly lower at 7 days in those patients assigned to continue antihypertensive drugs (difference 9.4/3.5 mmHg, P < .01). At 90 days, the primary outcome did not differ between the groups; the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with continue versus stop drugs was .92 (95% confidence interval, .45-1.89; P = .83). There was no difference between the treatment groups for any secondary outcome measure, or rates of death or serious adverse events. Conclusions Among patients with acute ICH, immediate continuation of antihypertensive drugs during the first week did not reduce death or major disability in comparison to stopping treatment temporarily. PMID:26853137

  2. Microglial Cells Prevent Hemorrhage in Neonatal Focal Arterial Stroke.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, David; Faustino, Joel; Klibanov, Alexander L; Derugin, Nikita; Blanchard, Elodie; Simon, Franziska; Leib, Stephen L; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2016-03-01

    Perinatal stroke leads to significant morbidity and long-term neurological and cognitive deficits. The pathophysiological mechanisms of brain damage depend on brain maturation at the time of stroke. To understand whether microglial cells limit injury after neonatal stroke by preserving neurovascular integrity, we subjected postnatal day 7 (P7) rats depleted of microglial cells, rats with inhibited microglial TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling, and corresponding controls, to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Microglial depletion by intracerebral injection of liposome-encapsulated clodronate at P5 significantly reduced vessel coverage and triggered hemorrhages in injured regions 24 h after tMCAO. Lack of microglia did not alter expression or intracellular redistribution of several tight junction proteins, did not affect degradation of collagen IV induced by the tMCAO, but altered cell types producing TGFβ1 and the phosphorylation and intracellular distribution of SMAD2/3. Selective inhibition of TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling in microglia via intracerebral liposome-encapsulated SB-431542 delivery triggered hemorrhages after tMCAO, demonstrating that TGFβ1/TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling in microglia protects from hemorrhages. Consistent with observations in neonatal rats, depletion of microglia before tMCAO in P9 Cx3cr1(GFP/+)/Ccr2(RFP/+) mice exacerbated injury and induced hemorrhages at 24 h. The effects were independent of infiltration of Ccr2(RFP/+) monocytes into injured regions. Cumulatively, in two species, we show that microglial cells protect neonatal brain from hemorrhage after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26961944

  3. Acute Ischemic Stroke Intervention.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Yavagal, Dileep R; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and among the leading causes of mortality. Although intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) was approved nearly 2 decades ago for treatment of AIS, only a minority of patients receive it due to a narrow time window for administration and several contraindications to its use. Endovascular approaches to recanalization in AIS developed in the 1980s, and recently, 5 major randomized trials showed an overwhelming superior benefit of combining endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with IV-rtPA over IV-rtPA alone. In this paper, we discuss the evolution of catheter-based treatment from first-generation thrombectomy devices to the game-changing stent retrievers, results from recent trials, and the evolving stroke systems of care to provide timely access to acute stroke intervention to patients in the United States. PMID:27256835

  4. Acute suprachoroidal hemorrhage during phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, A K; Fox, P D

    2000-06-01

    We present a case of acute suprachoroidal hemorrhage that developed during routine phacoemulsification in an 85-year-old patient after uneventful administration of periocular anesthesia. Pre-existing risk factors included advanced age, glaucoma, myopia, and hypertension. The scleral tunnel prevented major expulsion of intraocular contents; however, raised intraocular pressure prevented intraocular lens implantation. The rarity of this condition raises questions regarding the further management and precautions related to it. PMID:10889443

  5. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke. PMID:26802767

  6. Does computed tomography permeability predict hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Peggy; Cobb, Allison; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use perfusion-derived permeability-surface area product maps to predict hemorrhagic transformation following thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed our prospectively kept acute stroke database over five consecutive months for patients with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) who had computed tomography (CT) perfusion (CTP) done at arrival. Patients included in the analyses also had to have a follow-up CT. The permeability-surface area product maps (PS) was calculated for the side of the ischemia and/or infarction and for the contralateral unaffected side at the same level. The cerebral blood flow map was used to delineate the ischemic territory. Next, a region of interest was drawn at the centre of this territory on the PS parametric map. Finally, a mirror region of interest was created on the contralateral side at the same level. The relative permeability-surface area product maps (rPS) provided an internal control and was calculated as the ratio of the PS on the side of the AIS to the PS on the contralateral side. A student t-test was performed after log conversion of rPS between patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation. Log conversion was used to convert the data into normal distribution to use t-test. For the group of patients who experienced intracranial bleed, a student t-test was performed between those with only petechial hemorrhage and those with more severe parenchymal hematoma with subarachnoid haemorrhage. RESULTS: Of 84 patients with AIS and CTP at admission, only 42 patients had a follow-up CT. The rPS derived using the normal side as the internal control was significantly higher (P = 0.003) for the 15 cases of hemorrhagic transformation (1.71 + 1.64) compared to 27 cases that did not have any (1.07 + 1.30). Patients with values above the overall mean rPS of 1.3 had an increased likelihood of subsequent hemorrhagic transformation. The sensitivity of using this score to predict

  7. Clinical features of recurrent stroke after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Taizen; Yoshioka, Shotaroh; Sasaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2012-06-14

    There have been many reports about the prognosis and risk factors of stroke recurrence following brain infarction (BI). However, little is known about the stroke recurrence after primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Therefore, we explored the recurrent stroke patients after initial PICH retrospectively, to reveal the critical factors of stroke recurrence. Acute BI (n=4013) and acute PICH patients (n=1067) admitted to the hospital between April 2000 and March 2009 were consecutively screened. PICH patients with a history of ICH and BI patients with a history of ICH were then classified into the ICH-ICH group (n=64, age 70.8±9.5 years) and ICH-BI group (n=52, age 72.8±9.7years), respectively. ICH lesions were categorized into ganglionic and lober types according to the brain magnetic resonance imaging. Subtypes of BI were classified into cardioembolism, large-artery atherosclerosis, small-artery occlusion and others. There was no difference in incidence of risk factors between ICH-ICH and ICH-BI groups. Distribution of initial PICH lesions was significantly abundant in the lobar type in the ICH-ICH group (P<0.01) and in ganglionic type in the ICH-BI group (P<0.02). Age of onset was significantly older in recurrent lobar ICH compared with recurrent ganglionic ICH (P<0.01: 73.6±10.0 and 59.1±9.0 years, respectively). In conclusion, ganglionic ICH patients may have a chance of recurrent stroke in both brain infarction and ganglionic ICH, suggesting the participation of atherosclerosis in intracranial arteries. Lobar ICH patients were older and prone to recurrent lobar ICH, suggesting the participation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy as a risk of stroke recurrence. PMID:23139848

  8. Intersegmental coordination of gait after hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chow, John W; Stokic, Dobrivoje S

    2015-01-01

    We compared gait using the planar law of intersegmental coordination between 14 hemorrhagic stroke subjects walking at a self-selected normal speed (56 ± 21 cm/s) and 15 age-matched healthy controls walking at a very slow speed (56 ± 19 cm/s). Sagittal plane elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot segments were submitted to principal component analysis. Additional outcome measures included the range of elevation angle and timing of peak elevation angle of the thigh, shank, and foot segments. The range of elevation angles at the shank and foot was significantly smaller in the paretic leg than non-paretic and control legs. Also, the peak elevation angle at the thigh occurred significantly later in the gait cycle in the paretic than control leg. Gait of both stroke and control subjects followed the planar law with the first two principal components explaining approximately 99% of the variance. However, the three-dimensional trajectory of elevation angles (gait loop) in stroke subjects deviated from the typical teardrop shape bilaterally, which was more exaggerated in the paretic leg. Compared to the non-paretic and control legs, the paretic leg showed significantly increased absolute loading of the thigh elevation angle and decreased absolute loadings of the shank and foot elevation angles on the first principal component, whereas the opposite was observed for the second principal component. Despite following the planar law, the gait of chronic stroke subjects is characterized by atypical timing of the thigh motion and disrupted intersegmental coordination of both legs. PMID:25224705

  9. Glibenclamide for the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Caffes, Nicholas; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1-transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1-Trpm4) channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1-Kir6.2) channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25749474

  10. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23805635

  11. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  12. [Therapy of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Sobesky, J

    2009-11-01

    New diagnostic and therapeutic developments have led to an innovative approach to stroke therapy. The slogan "time is brain" emphasizes that stroke is a medical emergency comparable to myocardial infarction. The stroke unit conception is an evidence based therapy for all stroke patients and improves outcome significantly. The monitoring of vital signs and the management of stroke specific complications are highly effective. Early secondary prophylaxis reduces the risk of recurrence. The effect of CT based thrombolysis within the time window of 4,5 h has been substantiated by current data. Stroke MRI holds the promise for an improved therapy by patient stratification and by opening the time window. Interventional recanalisation, vascular interventions and hemicraniectomy complement the therapeutic options in the acute phase of stroke. PMID:19838656

  13. What are the next breakthroughs in the management of acute intracerebral hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi; Sato, Shoichiro

    2016-06-01

    The impact of acute therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage is far behind that for acute ischemic stroke. Potential breakthroughs in the management of acute intracerebral hemorrhage are presented. To prevent early hematoma growth, acute blood pressure lowering, emergent hemostatic therapy, and minimally invasive surgery with topical thrombolysis have been attempted. Anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective pharmacotherapies may attenuate perihematomal edema as a surrogate marker for the inflammatory response and improve clinical outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage. Hyperacute modification of vital parameters, early seizure control, early rehabilitation, and neuroregenerative therapy are other promising strategies in the foreseeable future. PMID:26912534

  14. Effects of iodinated contrast on various magnetic resonance imaging sequences and field strength: Implications for characterization of hemorrhagic transformation in acute stroke therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Humberto; Lemen, Lisa; Samaratunga, Ranasinghage; Nguyen, Peter; Tomsick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the effects of iodinated contrast material (ICM) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) comparing different sequences and magnetic fields, with emphasis to similarities/differences with well-known signal characteristics of hemorrhage in the brain. METHODS: Aliquots of iopamidol and iodixanol mixed with normal saline were scanned at 1.5T and 3T. Signal intensity (SI) was measured using similar spin-echo (SE)-T1, SE-T2, gradient-echo (GRE) and fluid-attenuation-inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequences at both magnets. Contrast to noise ratio (CNR) (SI contrast-SI saline/SD noise) for each aliquot were calculated and Kruskall-wallis test and graphic analysis was used to compare different pulse sequences and ICMs. RESULTS: Both ICM showed increased SI on SE-T1 and decreased SI on SE-T2, GRE and FLAIR at both 1.5T and 3T, as the concentration was increased. By CNR measurements, SE-T2 had the greatest conspicuity at 3T with undiluted iopamidol (92.6 ± 0.3, P < 0.00) followed by iodixanol (77.5 ± 0.9, P < 0.00) as compared with other sequences (CNR range: 15-40). While SE-T2 had greatest conspicuity at 1.5T with iopamidol (49.3 ± 1, P < 0.01), SE-T1 showed similar or slightly better conspicuity (20.8 ± 4) than SE-T2 with iodixanol (23 ± 1.7). In all cases, hypo-intensity on GRE was less conspicuous than on SE-T2. CONCLUSION: Iodixanol and iopamidol shorten T1 and T2 relaxation times at both 1.5T and 3T. Hypo-intensity due to shortened T2 relaxation time is significantly more conspicuous than signal changes on T1-WI, FLAIR or GRE. Variations in signal conspicuity according to pulse sequence and to type of ICM are exaggerated at 3T. We postulate T2 hypointensity with less GRE conspicuity differentiates ICM from hemorrhage; given the well-known GRE hypointensity of hemorrhage. Described signal changes may be relevant in the setting of recent intra-arterial or intravenous ICM administration in translational research and/or human stroke therapy. PMID

  15. Animal Stroke Model: Ischemia-Reperfusion and Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changhong; Sy, Christopher; Gao, Jinhuan; Ding, Yuchuan; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major health issue worldwide-one with serious financial and public health implications. As a result, ongoing clinical research on novel and improved stroke therapies is not only pertinent but also paramount. Due to the complexity of a stroke-like event and its many sequelae, devising usable methods and experimental models are necessary to study and better understand the pathophysiological processes that ensue. As it stands, animal models that simulate stroke-like events have proven to be the most logical and effective options in regards to experimental studies. A number of animal stroke models exist and have been demonstrated in previous studies on ischemic as well as hemorrhagic stroke. Considering the efficiency and reproducibility of animal models, here, we introduce an ischemic stroke model induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and an intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke model induced by collagenase injection. The models outlined here have been proven to demonstrate the clinical relevance desired for use in continued research on stroke pathophysiology and the study of future therapeutic options. PMID:27604729

  16. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010-2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006-08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  17. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010–2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006–08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  18. Effect and Safety of Rosuvastatin in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ji Hoe; Song, Dongbeom; Nam, Hyo Suk; Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Kyung-Yul; Lee, Ki-Jeong; Yoo, Joonsang; Kim, Youn Nam; Lee, Byung Chul; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The benefit of statins in acute stroke remains uncertain. Statins may prevent stroke recurrence during the acute stage of stroke via pleiotropic effects. However, statins may increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. We investigated the effect and safety of rosuvastatin in acute stroke patients. Methods This randomized, double-blind, multi-center trial compared rosuvastatin 20 mg and placebo in statin-naïve stroke patients who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) within 48 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was occurrence of new ischemic lesions on DWI at 5 or 14 days. Results This trial was stopped early after randomization of 316 patients due to slow enrollment. Among 289 patients with at least one follow-up imaging, the frequency of new ischemic lesions on DWI was not different between groups (rosuvastatin: 27/137, 19.7% vs. placebo: 36/152, 23.6%) (relative risk 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.53–1.30). Infarct volume growth at 5 days (log-transformed volume change, rosuvastatin: 0.2±1.0 mm3 vs. placebo: 0.3±1.3 mm3; P=0.784) was not different, either. However, hemorrhagic infarction or parenchymal/subarachnoid hemorrhage on gradient-recalled echo magnetic resonance imaging occurred less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (6/137, 4.4%) than the placebo group (22/152, 14.5%, P=0.007). Among 314 patients with at least one dose of study medication, progression or clinical recurrence of stroke tended to occur less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (1/155, 0.6% vs. 7/159, 4.4%, P=0.067). Adverse events did not differ between groups. Conclusions The efficacy of rosuvastatin in reducing recurrence in acute stroke was inconclusive. However, statin use was safe and reduced hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:26846760

  19. Duration of delirium in the acute stage of stroke.

    PubMed

    Dostović, Zikrija; Smajlović, Dzevdet; Sinanović, Osman; Vidović, Mirjana

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine duration of delirium in patients with acute stroke according to sex, age, type and localization of lesion. We assessed delirium prospectively in a sample of 233 consecutive patients with an acute (< or =4 days) stroke using the Delirium Rating Scale (DRS-R-98) and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV). The average duration of delirium was 4 days in patients with ischemic stroke and 3 days in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. There was no statistically significant difference in delirium duration between these two patient groups. A longer duration of delirium was recorded in women and in patients older than 65. The period of delirium was longer in patients with right hemispheric lesions. Patients did not differ according to delirium duration, sex, age, type and localization of stroke. In two thirds of patients, the symptoms of delirium completely disappeared on medicamentous treatment, while in the remaining one third of patients certain symptoms of delirium persisted at discharge (p=0.003). Mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with delirium in the acute phase of stroke than in those without delirium (p=0.009). In conclusion, delirium is a temporary manifestation in two thirds of patients in the acute phase of stroke. Patient sex and age, and type and stroke localization have no influence on delirium duration. PMID:19623866

  20. Retrosternal mass: An interesting allergic reaction to intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Badi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA,) is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:24250917

  1. Retrosternal mass: An interesting allergic reaction to intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Badi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA,) is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:24250917

  2. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blockages that lead to ischemic strokes. A hemorrhagic stroke occurs if an artery in the brain leaks ... risms) are examples of conditions that can cause hemorrhagic strokes. (Aneurysms are balloon-like bulges in an artery ...

  3. Circadian variation in stroke onset: identical temporal pattern in ischemic and hemorrhagic events.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Roberto; Boari, Benedetta; Smolensky, Michael H; Salmi, Raffaella; la Cecilia, Olga; Maria Malagoni, Anna; Haus, Erhard; Manfredini, Fabio

    2005-01-01

    Stroke is the culmination of a heterogeneous group of cerebrovascular diseases that is manifested as ischemia or hemorrhage of one or more blood vessels of the brain. The occurrence of many acute cardiovascular events--such as myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, pulmonary embolism, critical limb ischemia, and aortic aneurysm rupture--exhibits prominent 24 h patterning, with a major morning peak and secondary early evening peak. The incidence of stroke exhibits the same 24 h pattern. Although ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are different entities and are characterized by different pathophysiological mechanisms, they share an identical double-peak 24 h pattern. A constellation of endogenous circadian rhythms and exogenous cyclic factors are involved. The staging of the circadian rhythms in vascular tone, coagulative balance, and blood pressure plus temporal patterns in posture, physical activity, emotional stress, and medication effects play central and/or triggering roles. Features of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, in terms of their chronic and acute effects on cerebral vessels, and of coagulation are especially important. Clinical medicine has been most concerned with the prevention of stroke in the morning, when population-based studies show it is of greatest risk during the 24 h; however, improved protection of at-risk patients against stroke in the early evening, the second most vulnerable time of cerebrovascular accidents, has received relatively little attention thus far. PMID:16076646

  4. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Andrea; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Caso, Valeria; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Early seizure (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke. Patients and methods A total of 638 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke (543 ischemic, 95 hemorrhagic), admitted to our Stroke Unit, were included in this prospective study. ES were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. Results Thirty-one patients (4.8%) had ES. Seizures were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke. ES was not associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). After multivariate analysis, hemorrhagic transformation resulted as an independent predictive factor for ES (OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 1.95–22.61; p = 0.003). Conclusion ES occur in about 5% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES does not seem to be associated with an adverse outcome at hospital discharge after acute stroke. PMID:18827922

  5. Clinical and morphological correlations in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Slujitoru, Anca Stefania; Enache, Andreea Lorena; Pintea, Irina Lavinia; Rolea, Elisabeta; Stocheci, Cristina Mariana; Pop, O T; Predescu, Anca

    2012-01-01

    We studied the clinical and histopathological changes in twenty-seven cases of acute ischemic stroke, aged between 65 and 75 years. All deaths occurred within 30 days after stroke. The aim of our study was to establish the clinical and histological correlations in acute ischemic stroke to detect prognostic factors. Brain lesions after acute stroke were observed in all regions. Our study describes the heterogeneity of brain injury after acute ischemic stroke with the participation of all brain components and the chronology in which these lesions develop and evolve. By histological and immunohistochemical studies, we identified neuronal, glial and vascular damage. The neurons had undergone in the area of lesion a process of necrosis, ballooning or condensation process. In the ischemic penumbra, we observed the presence of red neurons. Vascular lesions were represented by the discontinuity of capillaries, always associated with a marked perivascular edema. The following clinical and morphological correlations were established: liquefactive necrosis, astrocyte gliosis, phagocytosis phenomena are the more intense the later the death of the patient; apoptosis phenomena are the more intense the faster the death of the patient; the entire cerebral microcirculation presented microscopic modifications following the ischemic strokes, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made; the major neurological complications of the ischemic stroke - the hemorrhagic transformation phenomena, cerebral edema, were microscopically objectified, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made. PMID:23303014

  6. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Rabinov, James; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular thrombectomy is an effective treatment for major acute ischemic stroke syndromes caused by major anterior circulation artery occlusions (commonly referred to as large vessel occlusion) and is superior to intravenous thrombolysis and medical management. Treatment should occur as quickly as is reasonably possible. All patients with moderate to severe symptoms (National Institutes of Health stroke scale >8) and a treatable occlusion should be considered. The use of neuroimaging is critical to exclude hemorrhage and large ischemic cores. Very shortly after stroke onset (<3 hours) computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography provide sufficient information to proceed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is less reliable during this early stage. After 3 hours from onset diffusion MRI is the most reliable method to define ischemic core size and should be used in centers that can offer it rapidly. Recanalization is highly effective with a stentriever or using a direct aspiration technique, with the patient awake or under conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, if it may be performed safely. After thrombectomy the patient should be admitted to an intensive care setting and inpatient rehabilitation undertaken as soon as feasible. Patient outcomes should be assessed at 3 months, preferably using the modified Rankin score. PMID:27430469

  7. Recovery Potential After Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Rüdiger J.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    In acute stroke, the major factor for recovery is the early use of thrombolysis aimed at arterial recanalization and reperfusion of ischemic brain tissue. Subsequently, neurorehabilitative training critically improves clinical recovery due to augmention of postlesional plasticity. Neuroimaging and electrophysiology studies have revealed that the location and volume of the stroke lesion, the affection of nerve fiber tracts, as well as functional and structural changes in the perilesional tissue and in large-scale bihemispheric networks are relevant biomarkers of post-stroke recovery. However, associated disorders, such as mood disorders, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases, may induce secondary cerebral changes or aggravate the functional deficits and, thereby, compromise the potential for recovery. PMID:26617568

  8. Rivaroxaban does not increase hemorrhage after thrombolysis in experimental ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ploen, Robert; Sun, Li; Zhou, Wei; Heitmeier, Stefan; Zorn, Markus; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The management of acute ischemic stroke during anticoagulation with a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) is challenging because intravenous thrombolysis is contraindicated because of a putative increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhagic complications. We examined the risk of secondary postischemic hemorrhage after thrombolysis in rodents pretreated with rivaroxaban or warfarin. Mice were pretreated with either rivaroxaban (30 mg/kg), warfarin (target international normalized ratio 2 to 3) or vehicle. After 2 or 3 hours, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), mice received 9 mg/kg recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Twenty-four hours after MCAO, secondary hemorrhage was quantified using a macroscopic hemorrhage score and hemoglobin spectrophotometry. Blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability was measured by Evans Blue spectrofluorometry. To increase the validity of our findings, experiments were also performed using a thromboembolic model in anticoagulated rats. Infarct size did not differ among groups. Pretreatment with warfarin led to significantly more secondary hemorrhage compared with rivaroxaban and nonanticoagulated controls after 2- and 3-hour ischemia in mice as well as in rats. Blood–brain barrier permeability was significantly higher in the warfarin group compared with rivaroxaban and control. Thus, rivaroxaban in contrast to warfarin does not increase secondary hemorrhage after thrombolysis in experimental cerebral ischemia. Less effects of rivaroxaban on postischemic BBB permeability may account for this difference. PMID:24346690

  9. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis with atypical features.

    PubMed

    Catalan, Mauro; Naccarato, Marcello; Grandi, Fabio Chiodo; Capozzoli, Francesca; Koscica, Nadia; Pizzolato, Gilberto

    2009-02-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHL) is a rare demyelinating disease mainly affecting children, characterized by acute onset, progressive course and high mortality. A 62-year-old man was admitted to our Unit for diplopia and ataxia ensuing 2 weeks after the onset of pneumonia. MRI T2-weighted images showed signal hyperintensities in the brainstem. Antibodies against Mycoplasma Pneumoniae and cold agglutinins were found. Two weeks later the patient had a worsening of his conditions: he developed left hemiplegia with motor focal seizures and the day after he was deeply comatose (GCS = 4). A second MRI scan showed extensive hyperintensities involving the whole right hemisphere white matter with a small parietal hemorrhagic area. The clinical and neuroimaging features suggested the diagnosis of AHL, Aciclovir in association with steroid therapy were administered and then plasmapheresis was started. After 30 days of coma, the patient gradually reacquired consciousness and motor functions; anyway a left hemiplegia persisted. PMID:19145402

  10. Microscopic polyangiitis presenting with hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Estíbaliz; Eleftheriou, Despina; Mankad, Kshitij; Prabhakar, Prab; Brogan, Paul A

    2014-08-01

    Microscopic polyangiitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies directed against myeloperoxidase rarely affects the central nervous system, and this is common in the presence of other organ involvement. The authors report the case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with multiple acute parieto-occipital hematomas as the only manifestation of presumed microscopic polyangiitis. Early treatment with immunosuppression resulted in complete recovery and a favorable outcome. PMID:23690295

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven; Kang, Dong-Wha

    2014-09-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  13. [Thrombolytic treatment of acute stroke].

    PubMed

    Amiri, H; Hacke, W; Bösel, J

    2011-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is a medical emergency and must be treated as quickly as possible according to the "time-is-brain" concept. At present, intravenous administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within the first 4.5 h from stroke onset is the only effective treatment but is currently still only approved within the first 3 h from onset of symptoms (0.9 mg/kg body weight, maximum dose 90 mg, 10% of the cumulative dose as bolus, remaining 90% subsequently infused within 60 min). The therapeutic effect of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based thrombolytic therapy beyond the 4.5 h time window remains to be proven. Proximal occlusions of the middle cerebral artery can be treated successfully within the first 6 h from stroke onset by catheter-based intra-arterial administration of plasminogen activator leading to a significant improvement of outcome. Acute basilar artery occlusion should be treated in specialized centres using intra-arterial application of urokinase, rt-PA or mechanical recanalization but intravenous thrombolysis beyond the 3 h window is an acceptable alternative. PMID:21922224

  14. Acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke due to electric injury.

    PubMed

    Singh Jain, Rajendra; Kumar, Sunil; Suresh, Desai Tushar; Agarwal, Rakesh

    2015-07-01

    Electrical injuries are most commonly due to household accidents.Various factors determine the severity of electric injury, including type of current, amperage, voltage, tissue resistance, pathway of current,and duration of contact with the body. Various types of neurologic damage due to electrical injury have been described in literature. It may manifest as peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord damage, seizures, cerebellarataxia, hypoxic encephalopathy, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Acute ischemic stroke is an infrequent complication of electrical injury. Herein,we report a case of middle-aged man, who accidentally sustained high voltage electrical injury followed by acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute infarctin bilateral cerebellar and medial occipital regions. Computed tomographic angiogram of the brain and neck vessels was normal. Possibly,in our patient, the mechanism could be related to direct vascular injury due to electric current. PMID:25684743

  15. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  16. MMP-2/MMP-9 plasma level and brain expression in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-associated hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Guillamon, Mar; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Delgado, Pilar; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie; Boada, Cristina; Penalba, Anna; Boada, Mercè; Pagola, Jorge; Maisterra, Olga; Rodriguez-Luna, David; Molina, Carlos A; Rovira, Alex; Alvarez-Sabin, José; Ortega-Aznar, Arantxa; Montaner, Joan

    2012-03-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is one of the main causes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the elderly. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in blood-brain barrier disruption and ICH pathogenesis. In this study, we determined the levels MMP-2 and MMP-9 in plasma and their brain expression in CAA-associated hemorrhagic stroke. Although MMP-2 and MMP-9 plasma levels did not differ among patients and controls, their brain expression was increased in perihematoma areas of CAA-related hemorrhagic strokes compared with contralateral areas and nonhemorrhagic brains. In addition, MMP-2 reactivity was found in β-amyloid (Aβ)-damaged vessels located far from the acute ICH and in chronic microbleeds. MMP-2 expression was associated to endothelial cells, histiocytes and reactive astrocytes, whereas MMP-9 expression was restricted to inflammatory cells. In summary, MMP-2 expression within and around Aβ-compromised vessels might contribute to the vasculature fatal fate, triggering an eventual bleeding. PMID:21707819

  17. Benchmarks for acute stroke care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ruth E.; Khan, Ferhana; Bayley, Mark T.; Asllani, Eriola; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D.; O'Callaghan, Christina; Silver, Frank L.; Kapral, Moira K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread interest in many jurisdictions in monitoring and improving the quality of stroke care delivery, benchmarks for most stroke performance indicators have not been established. The objective of this study was to develop data-derived benchmarks for acute stroke quality indicators. Design Nine key acute stroke quality indicators were selected from the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Performance Measures Manual. Participants A population-based retrospective sample of patients discharged from 142 hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 (N = 3191) was used to calculate hospital rates of performance and benchmarks. Intervention The Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology was used to create benchmarks based on the performance of the upper 15% of patients in the top-performing hospitals. Main Outcome Measures Benchmarks were calculated for rates of neuroimaging, carotid imaging, stroke unit admission, dysphasia screening and administration of stroke-related medications. Results The following benchmarks were derived: neuroimaging within 24 h, 98%; admission to a stroke unit, 77%; thrombolysis among patients arriving within 2.5 h, 59%; carotid imaging, 93%; dysphagia screening, 88%; antithrombotic therapy, 98%; anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, 94%; antihypertensive therapy, 92% and lipid-lowering therapy, 77%. ABC™ acute stroke care benchmarks achieve or exceed the consensus-based targets required by Accreditation Canada, with the exception of dysphagia screening. Conclusions Benchmarks for nine hospital-based acute stroke care quality indicators have been established. These can be used in the development of standards for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24141011

  18. Neuropsychological impairment after hemorrhagic stroke in basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Su, Chwen-Yng; Chen, Hui-Mei; Kwan, Aij-Lie; Lin, Yueh-Hsieh; Guo, Nai-Wen

    2007-05-01

    We aimed to determine the severity and pattern of cognitive dysfunction in patients with basal ganglia (BG) hemorrhage within the first 6 months after stroke and to identify its clinical correlates. The study samples consisted of 30 patients with BG hemorrhage and 37 healthy controls. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery including tests of attention, memory, language, visuospatial function, and executive function was administered to all participants. Relative to healthy controls, BG patients performed significantly worse across different cognitive domains after controlling for age, sex, and education. 96.7% of patients displayed defective performance on at least three neuropsychological tests. Discriminant function analysis showed that visuospatial function and memory were the best predictors of group membership (patient/control), with an overall classification rate of 95.5%. Only side of stroke and admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score correlated significantly with some of the cognitive domains. The widespread pattern of cognitive deficits seen in BG patients provides evidence for the substantial involvement of the BG in many neuronal pathways connecting cortical and subcortical brain areas responsible for various cognitive functions. PMID:17336034

  19. Acute Arthritis in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ahmeti, Salih; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Halili, Bahrije; Shala, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a severe viral disease caused by a Nairovirus. An atypical manifestation in the form of acute arthritis was found in a confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Kosova-Hoti strain positive patient. Acute arthritis in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) may be as a result of immune mechanisms or the bleeding disorder underlying CCHF. PMID:24926169

  20. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27126651

  1. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed. PMID:27556667

  2. [Enteroviruses responsible for acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis].

    PubMed

    Lévêque, N; Huguet, P; Norder, H; Chomel, J-J

    2010-04-01

    Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is an epidemic form of highly contagious conjunctivitis, characterized by conjunctival hemorrhages. The first AHC outbreak was described in 1969 in Ghana, West Africa, and was called Apollo disease, from the Apollo landing on the moon. This outbreak was caused by Enterovirus 70 (EV70) together with a Coxsackievirus A24 (CVA24v) variant, which are the major etiological agents involved in AHC outbreaks worldwide. AHC is known to be directly transmitted by close person-to-person contact or indirectly through soiled ophthalmological materials or unsafe recreational water. Recently, a possible airborne virus spread was suggested which could explain the high transmission rate of the disease. In the absence of a specific antiviral therapy, a rapid diagnosis of the causative agent is required to distinguish AHC due to enteroviruses from other ocular infectious diseases, for there are active drugs, or to quickly implement proper public health measures to limit the extension of the outbreak. However, virus identification remains difficult and time-consuming. Moreover, virological diagnosis is difficult to implement in developing countries where AHC has recently become a major problem for public health. PMID:19836177

  3. MR Perfusion Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Wu, Ona

    2011-01-01

    MR perfusion imaging offers the potential for measuring brain perfusion in acute stroke patients, at a time when treatment decisions based upon these measurements may affect outcomes dramatically. Rapid advancements in both acute stroke therapy and perfusion imaging techniques have resulted in continuing redefinition of the role that perfusion imaging should play in patient management. This review first discusses the basic pathophysiology of acute stroke, with specific attention to alterations in the various perfusion-related parameters that can be studied by MR perfusion imaging. Although these parameters are sometimes treated as somewhat interchangeable, they reveal greatly different information about brain perfusion. Therefore, subsequent discussion of the utility of different kinds of perfusion images focuses on the differences between them, as well as important artifacts that can complicate their interpretation. Finally, research on the continually evolving role of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke care is summarized. PMID:21640299

  4. Physiologic imaging in acute stroke: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Clinton D; Stephens, Marcus; Zuckerman, Scott L; Waitara, Magarya S; Morone, Peter J; Dewan, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is changing, as endovascular intervention becomes an important adjunct to tissue plasminogen activator. An increasing number of sophisticated physiologic imaging techniques have unique advantages and applications in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment-decision making of acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we first highlight the strengths, weaknesses, and possible indications for various stroke imaging techniques. How acute imaging findings in each modality have been used to predict functional outcome is discussed. Furthermore, there is an increasing emphasis on using these state-of-the-art imaging modalities to offer maximal patient benefit through IV therapy, endovascular thrombolytics, and clot retrieval. We review the burgeoning literature in the determination of stroke treatment based on acute, physiologic imaging findings. PMID:26063695

  5. Variation in mortality of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in relation to high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Kim, Ho; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor temperature has been reported to have a significant influence on the seasonal variations of stroke mortality, but few studies have investigated the effect of high temperature on the mortality of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. The main study goal was to examine the effect of temperature, particularly high temperature, on ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. We investigated the association between outdoor temperature and stroke mortality in four metropolitan cities in Korea during 1992-2007. We used time series analysis of the age-adjusted mortality rate for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke deaths by using generalized additive and generalized linear models, and estimated the percentage change of mortality rate associated with a 1°C increase of mean temperature. The temperature-responses for the hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality differed, particularly in the range of high temperature. The estimated percentage change of ischemic stroke mortality above a threshold temperature was 5.4 % (95 % CI, 3.9-6.9 %) in Seoul, 4.1 % (95 % CI, 1.6-6.6 %) in Incheon, 2.3 % (-0.2 to 5.0 %) in Daegu and 3.6 % (0.7-6.6 %) in Busan, after controlling for daily mean humidity, mean air pressure, day of the week, season, and year. Additional adjustment of air pollution concentrations in the model did not change the effects. Hemorrhagic stroke mortality risk significantly decreased with increasing temperature without a threshold in the four cities after adjusting for confounders. These findings suggest that the mortality of hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes show different patterns in relation to outdoor temperature. High temperature was harmful for ischemic stroke but not for hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of high temperature to ischemic stroke did not differ by age or gender.

  6. Hematoma expansion following acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H Bart; Greenberg, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the most devastating form of stroke, has no specific therapy proven to improve outcome by randomized controlled trial. Location and baseline hematoma volume are strong predictors of mortality, but are nonmodifiable by the time of diagnosis. Expansion of the initial hematoma is a further marker of poor prognosis that may be at least partly preventable. Several risk factors for hematoma expansion have been identified, including baseline ICH volume, early presentation after symptom onset, anticoagulation, and the CT angiography spot sign. Although the biological mechanisms of hematoma expansion remain unclear, accumulating evidence supports a model of ongoing secondary bleeding from ruptured adjacent vessels surrounding the initial bleeding site. Several large clinical trials testing therapies aimed at preventing hematoma expansion are in progress, including aggressive blood pressure reduction, treatment with recombinant factor VIIa guided by CT angiography findings, and surgical intervention for superficial hematomas without intraventricular extension. Hematoma expansion is so far the only marker of outcome that is amenable to treatment and thus a potentially important therapeutic target. PMID:23466430

  7. Contrast staining on CT after DSA in ischemic stroke patients progresses to infarction and rarely hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Amans, Matthew R; Cooke, Daniel L; Vella, Maya; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V; Higashida, Randall T; Hetts, Steven W

    2014-01-01

    Contrast staining of brain parenchyma identified on non-contrast CT performed after DSA in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is an incompletely understood imaging finding. We hypothesize contrast staining to be an indicator of brain injury and suspect the fate of involved parenchyma to be cerebral infarction. Seventeen years of AIS data were retrospectively analyzed for contrast staining. Charts were reviewed and outcomes of the stained parenchyma were identified on subsequent CT and MRI. Thirty-six of 67 patients meeting inclusion criteria (53.7%) had contrast staining on CT obtained within 72 hours after DSA. Brain parenchyma with contrast staining in patients with AIS most often evolved into cerebral infarction (81%). Hemorrhagic transformation was less likely in cases with staining compared with hemorrhagic transformation in the cohort that did not have contrast staining of the parenchyma on post DSA CT (6% versus 25%, respectively, OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.017 - 0.98, p = 0.02). Brain parenchyma with contrast staining on CT after DSA in AIS patients was likely to infarct and unlikely to hemorrhage. PMID:24556308

  8. Contrast Staining on CT after DSA in Ischemic Stroke Patients Progresses to Infarction and Rarely Hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Amans, Matthew R.; Cooke, Daniel L.; Vella, Maya; Dowd, Christopher F.; Halbach, Van V.; Higashida, Randall T.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Contrast staining of brain parenchyma identified on non-contrast CT performed after DSA in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is an incompletely understood imaging finding. We hypothesize contrast staining to be an indicator of brain injury and suspect the fate of involved parenchyma to be cerebral infarction. Seventeen years of AIS data were retrospectively analyzed for contrast staining. Charts were reviewed and outcomes of the stained parenchyma were identified on subsequent CT and MRI. Thirty-six of 67 patients meeting inclusion criteria (53.7%) had contrast staining on CT obtained within 72 hours after DSA. Brain parenchyma with contrast staining in patients with AIS most often evolved into cerebral infarction (81%). Hemorrhagic transformation was less likely in cases with staining compared with hemorrhagic transformation in the cohort that did not have contrast staining of the parenchyma on post DSA CT (6% versus 25%, respectively, OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.017 – 0.98, p = 0.02). Brain parenchyma with contrast staining on CT after DSA in AIS patients was likely to infarct and unlikely to hemorrhage. PMID:24556308

  9. Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Antonio; Montoya, Mariano J; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Serrano, Andrés; Molina, Joaquín; Parrilla, Pascual

    2005-05-01

    Age is a risk factor in acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages (LGIH). The objectives here were to analyze: (1) diagnostic and therapeutic handling, (2) related morbidity and mortality, (3) the indications for surgery, and (4) the evolution of acute LGIH in patients > or =80 years. Forty-three patients >80 years with acute LGIH were reviewed retrospectively. In 86% (n = 37) related comorbidities were found, in 9% (n = 4) there had been prior colorectal surgery, 19% (n = 8) were antiaggregated, and 7% (n = 3) were anticoagulated. One hundred thirty-two cases of acute LGIH in patients <80 years were used as a control group. Student's t test and the chi-square test were applied. On arrival at the emergency ward 11 cases (26%) had hemodynamic instability and 8 of these were stabilized using conservative measures. In 39 cases an endoscopy was performed, allowing for an etiological diagnosis in 59% (n = 23) of cases, above all in those carried out in an urgent or semiurgent way. The arteriography permitted an etiological diagnosis in two of the four cases in which it was carried out. In seven patients (16%) urgent surgery was indicated: three were hemorrhoidectomies, three were subtotal colectomies, and one was a resection of the small intestine. The morbidity rate was 10% (n = 4) in the patients who were not treated and 14% (n = 1) in those treated, with a mortality rate of 8% (n = 3) and 14% (n = 1), respectively. The rate of relapse of bleeding after discharge from hospital was 42% (n = 18), with nine of these needing to be readmitted into hospital. In comparison with the control group, they present a different bleeding etiology (diverticulosis as opposed to the benign anal-rectal and small intestinal pathology in the younger population; P = 0.017), surgery is indicated with less frequency (9 versus 33%; P = 0.007), and there is a higher relapse rate (42 versus 26%; P = 0.045). Acute LGIH in geriatric patients relents in most cases with the use of conservative

  10. [Promising new treatment for acute ischemic stroke--Sonothrombolysis can enhance the effect of intravenous thrombolysis].

    PubMed

    Gu, Thomas; Wester, Per; Johansson, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis has been a break-through for treatment of acute ischemic stroke. However, total recanalization is only achieved in 18%. Sonothrombolysis aims at enhancing the recanalization effect by adding continuous transcranial ultrasound. Sonothrombolysis may facilitate the recanalization rate without increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. This further results in decreased risk of disability compared with only intravenous thrombolysis. Intravenously applied micro-bubbles is an additive treatment to sonothrombolysis which might further increase the recanalization rate but perhaps at the expense of increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. In a case-series at Umeå Stroke Center, we report the results of the first 20 ischemic stroke patients treated with sonothrombolysis in Sweden. Our initial results look promising with recanalization rates similar to earlier published data. No intracerebral hemorrhage occurred among our sonothrombolysed patients. PMID:25647105

  11. First aid in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Reitmayer, Michael; Raschick, Marlitt; Erbguth, Frank; Neundörfer, Bernhard; Babjar, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Objective First aid training is well established to teach the public how to recognize a medical emergency and take appropriate action. Though it is now handled as a high priority emergency stroke is not among the main topics of first aid. We investigated if first aid training may be useful for enhancing stroke awareness. Methods We developed a 15–20 minute teaching session about stroke as an emergency including signs and symptoms and first hands-on measures. The session was integrated in standard first aid training of the St John Ambulance of Germany and participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their knowledge about stroke. Subjects were questioned before the stroke lesson and again at the end of the training. Results 532 participants of the training responded to the questionnaire (mean age 28.6 years, 53.6% male). There was a significant increase in proportion of subjects correctly defining what stroke is (28.4% vs. 69.9%, p < 0,001) and in the mean number of stroke symptoms listed (1.52 vs. 3.35, p < 0,001) by the participants. The number of participants unable to list at least 1 symptom decreased significantly (12.8 vs. 3.6%, p<0.001). Conclusions In our study a teaching lesson integrated in first aid training was effective in improving stroke knowledge of participants. First aid training should be used for stroke information complementary to other activities like mass media campaigns as it is effective, could reach younger people that are not primarily interested in stroke and provides connections to other health topics. PMID:16896518

  12. Trans-sodium crocetinate improves outcomes in rodent models of occlusive and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yoshimura, Ryo; Manabe, Hiroaki; Schretter, Catherine; Clarke, Ryon; Cai, Yu; Fitzgerald, Mark; Lee, Kevin S

    2014-10-01

    Trans-sodium crocetinate (TSC) is a novel carotenoid compound capable of enhancing the diffusion of small molecules in aqueous solutions. TSC improves the diffusion of oxygen and glucose, and increases oxygenation in ischemic brain tissue. TSC also dampens the intensity of an ischemic challenge during an ongoing ischemic event. The current study examined the impact of TSC in rat models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Rat three vessel occlusion (3VO), and combined 3VO and one vessel occlusion (3VO/1VO) models of ischemic stroke were evaluated for structural and behavioral outcomes. The effects of TSC were also tested in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Delayed treatment with TSC reduced infarct volume in a rodent model of transient focal ischemia involving either 2 or 6h of ischemia. Neurological outcomes, based on a multi-scale assessment and automated gait analysis, also were improved by TSC treatment. Additionally, TSC reduced edema and hemorrhagic volume in a rat model of ICH. An optimal therapeutic candidate for early intervention in ischemic stroke should be effective when administered on a delayed basis and should not aggravate outcomes associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The current findings demonstrate that delayed TSC treatment improves outcomes in experimental models of both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Together, these findings suggest that TSC may be a safe and beneficial therapeutic modality for early stroke intervention, irrespective of the type of stroke involved. PMID:25128603

  13. Safety and feasibility of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in Iranian patients with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Motamed, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombolytic therapy is the only approved treatment for acute cerebral ischemia. The hemorrhagictransformation is the greatest complication of this treatment, which may occur after recanalization of occludedartery. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with clinical improvement and worseningin patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. Methods Thirty seven patients who were treated with intravenous thrombolysis between August 2010 andAugust 2012 who had the inclusion criteria were studied. In this prospective study, all of the admitted patients instroke unit, monitored for at least 48 hours. We registered all patients’ information in a stroke data registry andfollowed them for at least 6 months. Results Thirty seven patients with acute ischemic stroke who treated with recombinant tissue plasminogenactivator (r-TPA) were studied. There were hemorrhagic transformations in 9 (24%) patients. Seven of them(18%) revealed intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) within the control brain CT after 24 hours without any deteriorationof neurologic symptoms (asymptomatic ICH). Although outcomes of patients with symptomatic post r-TPA hemorrhages were worse than non-hemorrhagic post r-TPA patients, there were no significant differencesbetween asymptomatic post r-TPA hemorrhages and non-hemorrhagic post r-TPA patients, according to theNational Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission (p = 0.2), after 24 hours (p= 0.07) and after 7days (p= 0.06) post treatment. Conclusion If the r-TPA protocol is followed carefully, the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage is low (about7%). Taking r-TPA was feasible and safe in our study population; thus, it can be applied for other Iranian patients. PMID:24791120

  14. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  15. [Angiographically documented hemorrhagic transformation of embolic stroke: A case report].

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Soichiro; Watanabe, Masaki; Inoue, Yasuteru; Ando, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    A 81-year-old man with rheumatoid vasculitis presented with total aphasia followed by right hemiplegia. The NIHSS score was 24. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) demonstrated an acute infarct in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory, and magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) revealed left MCA M1 occlusion. We administrated recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) at 132 min after symptom onset, but symptom was not improved. Emergency neuroendovascular recanalization was conducted with Penumbra(®) system. After MCA was recanalized partially, extravasations appeared on left lenticulostriate arteries territory at 376 min from symptom onset. Multiple extravasations spread over perforating branches, and ventricular rupture recognized angiographically. After the procedure, head CT demonstrated hematoma on left basal ganglia territory with intraventricular bleeding. Rheumatoid vasculitis might affect hemorrhagic infarction in emergency neuroendovascular recanalization procedure, and careful choice of treatment would be required. PMID:26004258

  16. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lambrinos, Anna; Schaink, Alexis K; Dhalla, Irfan; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K; Sikich, Nancy; Lum, Cheemun; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kelloway, Linda; Xie, Xuanqian; Hill, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    Although intravenous thrombolysis increases the probability of a good functional outcome in carefully selected patients with acute ischemic stroke, a substantial proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis do not have a good outcome. Several recent trials of mechanical thrombectomy appear to indicate that this treatment may be superior to thrombolysis. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) compared with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. We systematically searched seven databases for randomized controlled trials published between January 2005 and March 2015 comparing stent retrievers or thromboaspiration devices with best medical therapy (with or without intravenous thrombolysis) in adults with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the included trials. We combined the data using a fixed or random effects meta-analysis, where appropriate. We identified 1579 studies; of these, we evaluated 122 full-text papers and included five randomized control trials (n=1287). Compared with patients treated medically, patients who received mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to be functionally independent as measured by a modified Rankin score of 0-2 (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-3.04; I2=0%). This finding was robust to subgroup analysis. Mortality and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different between the two groups. Mechanical thrombectomy significantly improves functional independence in appropriately selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27071728

  17. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. PMID:25475112

  18. Experimental animal models and inflammatory cellular changes in cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tao; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2015-01-01

    Stroke, including cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, is the leading cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Animal models have greatly contributed to our understanding of the risk factors and the pathophysiology of stroke, as well as the development of therapeutic strategies for its treatment. Further development and investigation of experimental models, however, are needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of stroke and to enhance and expand novel therapeutic targets. In this article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of commonly-used animal models of stroke and focus on the inflammatory responses to cerebral stroke, which may provide insights into a framework for developing effective therapies for stroke in humans. PMID:26625873

  19. Targets of vascular protection in acute ischemic stroke differ in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Cobbs, Aisha I; Prakash, Roshini; Li, Weiguo; Pillai, Bindu; Hafez, Sherif; Coucha, Maha; Johnson, Maribeth H; Ogbi, Safia N; Fagan, Susan C; Ergul, Adviye

    2013-03-15

    Hemorrhagic transformation is an important complication of acute ischemic stroke, particularly in diabetic patients receiving thrombolytic treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, the only approved drug for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of acute manipulation of potential targets for vascular protection [i.e., NF-κB, peroxynitrite, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)] on vascular injury and functional outcome in a diabetic model of cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in control and type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. Treatment groups received a single dose of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)prophyrinato iron (III), the nonspecific NF-κB inhibitor curcumin, or the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor minocycline at reperfusion. Poststroke infarct volume, edema, hemorrhage, neurological deficits, and MMP-9 activity were evaluated. All acute treatments reduced MMP-9 and hemorrhagic transformation in diabetic groups. In addition, acute curcumin and minocycline therapy reduced edema in these animals. Improved neurological function was observed in varying degrees with treatment, as indicated by beam-walk performance, modified Bederson scores, and grip strength; however, infarct size was similar to untreated diabetic animals. In control animals, all treatments reduced MMP-9 activity, yet bleeding was not improved. Neuroprotection was only conferred by curcumin and minocycline. Uncovering the underlying mechanisms contributing to the success of acute therapy in diabetes will advance tailored stroke therapies. PMID:23335797

  20. Assessment of Serum UCH-L1 and GFAP in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changhong; Kobeissy, Firas; Alawieh, Ali; Li, Na; Li, Ning; Zibara, Kazem; Zoltewicz, Susie; Guingab-Cagmat, Joy; Larner, Stephen F.; Ding, Yuchuan; Hayes, Ronald L.; Ji, Xunming; Mondello, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and reliable diagnostic test to distinguish ischemic from hemorrhagic stroke in patients presenting with stroke-like symptoms is essential to optimize management and triage for thrombolytic therapy. The present study measured serum concentrations of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH-L1) and glial fibrillary astrocytic protein (GFAP) in acute stroke patients and healthy controls and investigated their relation to stroke severity and patient characteristics. We also assessed the diagnostic performance of these markers for the differentiation of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from ischemic stroke (IS). Both UCH-L1 and GFAP concentrations were significantly greater in ICH patients than in controls (p < 0.0001). However, exclusively GFAP differed in ICH compared with IS (p < 0.0001). GFAP yielded an AUC of 0.86 for differentiating between ICH and IS within 4.5hrs of symptom onset with a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 96% using a cut-off of 0.34ng/ml. Higher GFAP levels were associated with stroke severity and history of prior stroke. Our results demonstrate that blood UCH-L1 and GFAP are increased early after stroke and distinct biomarker-specific release profiles are associated with stroke characteristics and type. We also confirmed the potential of GFAP as a tool for early rule-in of ICH, while UCH-L1 was not clinically useful. PMID:27074724

  1. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  2. Differentiating the effects of characteristics of PM pollution on mortality from ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hualiang; Tao, Jun; Du, Yaodong; Liu, Tao; Qian, Zhengmin; Tian, Linwei; Di, Qian; Zeng, Weilin; Xiao, Jianpeng; Guo, Lingchuan; Li, Xing; Xu, Yanjun; Ma, Wenjun

    2016-03-01

    Though increasing evidence supports significant association between particulate matter (PM) air pollution and stroke, it remains unclear what characteristics, such as particle size and chemical constituents, are responsible for this association. A time-series model with quasi-Poisson function was applied to assess the association of PM pollution with different particle sizes and chemical constituents with mortalities from ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in Guangzhou, China, we controlled for potential confounding factors in the model, such as temporal trends, day of the week, public holidays, meteorological factors and influenza epidemic. We found significant association between stroke mortality and various PM fractions, such as PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, with generally larger magnitudes for smaller particles. For the PM2.5 chemical constituents, we found that organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), sulfate, nitrate and ammonium were significantly associated with stroke mortality. The analysis for specific types of stroke suggested that it was hemorrhagic stroke, rather than ischemic stroke, that was significantly associated with PM pollution. Our study shows that various PM pollution fractions are associated with stroke mortality, and constituents primarily from combustion and secondary aerosols might be the harmful components of PM2.5 in Guangzhou, and this study suggests that PM pollution is more relevant to hemorrhagic stroke in the study area, however, more studies are warranted due to the underlying limitations of this study. PMID:26652230

  3. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Froehler, Michael T; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator remains the only US FDA-approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, the very limited time window for its administration restricts its usefulness. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that, given the numerous pathways via which cerebral ischemia causes cell death, the capacity to inhibit multiple mechanisms simultaneously may provide additive or synergistic beneficial clinical effects for stroke patients. Although no clinical trials have yet investigated the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia in focal cerebral ischemia, its pleiotropic neuroprotective actions, positive results in preclinical studies, as well as proven enhancement of neurologic outcomes in survivors of cardiac arrest and newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, make this neuroprotective strategy highly promising. This review presents an overview of the potential role of hypothermia in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke and discusses ischemic cell death pathophysiology, neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, methodologies employed for the induction of hypothermia, results from animal models of cerebral ischemia, and finally, currently available clinical trial data. Two valuable lessons learned thus far are that first, rapid induction of hypothermia is key and is best accomplished with a combination of ice-cold saline infusion and the use of endovascular cooling devices, and second, that shivering can be overcome with aggressive anti-shivering protocols including meperidine, buspirone and surface warming. We await the results of clinical trials to determine the utility of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke. If proven efficacious, hypothermia would be a welcome complement to established reperfusion therapies for ischemic stroke patients. PMID:20397832

  4. Assessment of Basilar Artery Reactivity in Stroke and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Wire Myograph.

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Crystal M; Azrak, Zeina; Rahman, Farah Abdel; Itani, Hana A; Zeidan, Asad

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow regulation of normal cerebral arteries is a critical and important factor to supply the brain tissue with nutrients and oxygen. Stroke insult results in a disruption or reduction in cerebral arteries' blood flow with subsequent brain tissue damage. Hemorrhagic stroke is one type of stroke and accounts for about 13 % of all of stroke insults. In this type of stroke, the cerebral artery breaks open and causes bleeding in or surrounding the brain. Subsequently, this bleeding causes blood vessels to constrict in a process called vasospasm, in which the vessels narrow and impede the blood flow to brain tissue. Hemorrhagic stroke is the major cause of prolonged constriction of cerebral arteries. This leads to partial brain damage and sometimes death in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the key delicate techniques to assess small blood vessel functionality is the wire myograph, which can be utilized in several cerebral injury models including stroke. The wire myograph is a device that provides information about the reactivity, stiffness, and elasticity of small blood vessels under isometric conditions. In this book chapter, we describe the techniques involved in wire myography assessment and the different measures and parameters recorded; we describe the utility of this technique in evaluating the effects of subarachnoid hemorrhage on basilar artery sensitivity to different agonists. PMID:27604742

  5. Early prediction of death in acute hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, GUOFANG; PING, LEI; ZHOU, SHENGKUI; LIU, WEIWEI; LIU, LEIJING; ZHANG, DONGMEI; LI, ZAILI; TIAN, YONGFANG; CHEN, ZHEN

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HICH) has been on the decline. However, mortality at long-term follow up is on the increase. The aim of the present study was to investigate early warning signals of death in patients with acute HICH. The medical records of 128 patients with acute HICH within 6 h of onset were retrospectively analyzed. For these patients, systolic blood pressure (BP) was recorded at different time points (emergency, admission, every 6 h within 24 h and twice daily after 24 h) within 1 week. Computed tomography scanning was performed at emergency and the following 24±3 h to assess the hematoma volume. Neurological impairment was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Outcomes were death, defined as a modified Rankin scale score 6, at 90 days. The results showed that at 90 days, 15 HICH patients succumbed (mortality of 11.7%). Of the 15 patients, 1 patient (6.7%) sucumbed within 24 h and 6 patients (40%) within 1 week. HICH mortality was closely associated with age (P<0.001) but not with gender. A significant association was detected between mortality and high BP taken at 30 min, 45 min and 6 h after admission (P=0.003), albeit not at emergency and admission (P>0.05). Death was also correlated with hematoma volume at 24 h but not with the site. Results from the multivariate binary logistic regression analysis showed that age and hematoma volume were independent risk factors of death of HICH. In conclusion, age and hematoma volume may be important early predictors of death in HICH. Proactive control and management of hematoma may reduce the mortality of HICH. PMID:26889222

  6. Noninvasive ventilatory correction as an adjunct to an experimental systemic reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Barlinn, Kristian; Balucani, Clotilde; Palazzo, Paola; Zhao, Limin; Sisson, April; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2010-01-01

    Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition in patients with acute ischemic stroke and associated with early clinical deterioration and poor functional outcome. However, noninvasive ventilatory correction is hardly considered as a complementary treatment option during the treatment phase of acute ischemic stroke. Summary of Case. A 55-year-old woman with an acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and enrolled into a thrombolytic research study. During tPA infusion, she became drowsy, developed apnea episodes, desaturated and neurologically deteriorated without recanalization, re-occlusion or intracerebral hemorrhage. Urgent noninvasive ventilatory correction with biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP) reversed neurological fluctuation. Her MCA completely recanalized 24 hours later. Conclusions. Noninvasive ventilatory correction should be considered more aggressively as a complementary treatment option in selected acute stroke patients. Early initiation of BiPAP can stabilize cerebral hemodynamics and may unmask the true potential of other therapies. PMID:21052540

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Kirchgessner, Annette; Tepper, Deborah; Leonard, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke continues to be one of the most challenging diseases in translational neurology. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use is limited to the first hours after stroke onset due to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation over time resulting in enhanced brain injury. In this review we discuss the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption as a consequence of ischemic stroke. MMP-9 in particular appears to play an important role in tPA-associated hemorrhagic complications. Reactive oxygen species can enhance the effects of tPA on MMP activation through the loss of caveolin-1 (cav-1), a protein encoded in the cav-1 gene that serves as a critical determinant of BBB permeability. This review provides an overview of MMPs’ role in BBB breakdown during acute ischemic stroke. The possible role of MMPs in combination treatment of acute ischemic stroke is also examined. PMID:23565108

  8. [Massive bilateral subconjunctival hemorrhage revealing acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Taamallah-Malek, I; Chebbi, A; Bouladi, M; Nacef, L; Bouguila, H; Ayed, S

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of 20-year-old patient who presented in emergency with bilateral massive, spontaneous subconjunctival hemorrhage. Clinical findings suggested a blood dyscrasia, which was confirmed by blood cell count. The patient was urgently referred to hematology where the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was made. This case highlights the importance of working up any unusual subconjunctival hemorrhage, as it may reveal, in certain cases, a severe life-threatening disease. PMID:23122838

  9. Race, Ethnicity, and State-by-State Geographic Variation in Hemorrhagic Stroke in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Milind A.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Rigler, Sally K.; Zhou, Xinhua; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Geographic variation in stroke rates is well established in the general population, with higher rates in the South than in other areas of the United States. A similar pattern of geographic variation in ischemic strokes has also recently been reported in patients undergoing long-term dialysis, but whether this is also the case for hemorrhagic stroke is unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Medicare claims from 2000 to 2005 were used to ascertain hemorrhagic stroke events in a large cohort of incident dialysis patients. A Poisson generalized linear mixed model was generated to determine factors associated with stroke and to ascertain state-by-state geographic variability in stroke rates by generating observed-to-expected (O/E) adjusted rate ratios (ARRs) for stroke. Results A total of 265,685 Medicare-eligible incident dialysis patients were studied. During a median follow-up of 15.5 months, 2397 (0.9%) patients sustained a hemorrhagic stroke. African Americans (ARR, 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30 to 1.57), Hispanics (ARR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.57 to 2.03), and individuals of other races (ARR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.26 to 1.80) had a significantly higher risk for hemorrhagic stroke compared with whites. In models adjusted for age and sex, four states had O/E ARRs for hemorrhagic stroke that were significantly greater than 1.0 (California, 1.15; Maryland, 1.25; North Carolina, 1.25; Texas, 1.19), while only 1 had an ARR less than 1.0 (Wisconsin, 0.79). However, after adjustment for race and ethnicity, no states had ARRs that varied significantly from 1.0. Conclusion Race and ethnicity, or other factors that covary with these, appear to explain a substantial portion of state-by-state geographic variation in hemorrhagic stroke. This finding suggests that the factors underlying the high rate of hemorrhagic strokes in dialysis patients are likely to be system-wide and that further investigations into regional variations in clinical

  10. Endothelial progenitor cells in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Crespo, Javier; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Martínez-Ramírez, Sergi; Peña, Esther; Marín, Rebeca; Dinia, Lavinia; Jiménez-Xarrié, Elena; Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Pérez-Pérez, Jesús; Querol, Luis; Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Badimon, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in ischemic stroke have not been studied extensively and reported results are inconsistent. We aimed to investigate the time course, the prognostic relevance, and the variables associated with EPC counts in patients with ischemic stroke at different time points. Material and methods We studied prospectively 146 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke within the first 48 h from the onset of symptoms (baseline). We evaluated demographic data, classical vascular risk factors, treatment with thrombolysis and statins, stroke etiology, National Institute of Health and Stroke Scale score and outcome (favorable when Rankin scale score 0–2). Blood samples were collected at baseline, at day 7 after stroke (n = 121) and at 3 months (n = 92). The EPC were measured by flow cytometry. Results We included 146 patients with a mean age of 70.8 ± 12.2 years. The circulating EPC levels were higher on day 7 than at baseline or at 3 months (P = 0.045). Pretreatment with statins (odds ratio [OR] 3.11, P = 0.008) and stroke etiology (P = 0.032) were predictive of EPC counts in the baseline sample. EPC counts were not associated with stroke severity or functional outcome in all the patients. However, using multivariate analyses, a better functional outcome was found in patients with higher EPC counts in large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease etiologic subtypes. Conclusions After acute ischemic stroke, circulating EPC counts peaked at day 7. Pretreatment with statins increased the levels of EPC. In patients with large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease subtypes, higher counts were related to better outcome at 3 months. PMID:24363968

  11. Emergency Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Renal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Liang; Xu, Chun Yang; Wang, Hong Hui; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to identify arteriographic manifestations of acute renal hemorrhage and to evaluate the efficacy of emergency embolization. Emergency renal artery angiography was performed on 83 patients with acute renal hemorrhage. As soon as bleeding arteries were identified, emergency embolization was performed using gelatin sponge, polyvinyl alcohol particles, and coils. The arteriographic presentation and the effect of the treatment for acute renal hemorrhage were analyzed retrospectively. Contrast extravasation was observed in 41 patients. Renal arteriovenous fistulas were found in 12 of the 41 patients. In all, 8 other patients had a renal pseudoaneurysm, 5 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal arteriovenous fistula, and 1 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal artery-calyceal fistula. Another 16 patients had tumor vasculature seen on arteriography. Before the procedure, 35 patients underwent renal artery computed tomography angiography (CTA). Following emergency embolization, complete hemostasis was achieved in 80 patients, although persistent hematuria was present in 3 renal trauma patients and 1 patient who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (justifying surgical removal of the ipsilateral kidney in this patient). Two-year follow-up revealed an overall effective rate of 95.18 % (79/83) for emergency embolization. There were no serious complications. Emergency embolization is a safe, effective, minimally invasive treatment for renal hemorrhage. Because of the diversified arteriographic presentation of acute renal hemorrhage, proper selection of the embolic agent is a key to successful hemostasis. Preoperative renal CTA plays an important role in diagnosing and localizing the bleeding artery. PMID:26496273

  12. Serum C-reactive protein level as a biomarker for differentiation of ischemic from hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Roudbary, Seyed Ali; Saadat, Farshid; Forghanparast, Kambiz; Sohrabnejad, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents rank first in the frequency and importance among all neurological disease. Although a number of studies had shown increased level of the high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with ischemic stroke, the association of increased hs-CRP with various type of stroke especially the assessment hs-CRP level in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke have not been investigated. In the present study, we assessed the concentration of hs-CRP in patients with documented ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the first 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. Thirty-two patients with Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were evaluated at neurology department of Poursina Hospital. The presence of baseline vascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking, was determined. The blood samples were then collected and routine hematology and biochemistry tests were done. hs-CRP levels were determined using a highly sensitive immunonephelometric method. In this cross sectional study, the age of patient varied from 45-85 years (Mean 70.9 ± 9.4). Serum level of hs-CRP in Ischemic patients were 18.92 ± 11.28 and in hemorrhagic group was 2.65 ± 1.7. This relationship was statistically significant (P<0.0001). It might be concluded that hs-CRP might be considered as a usefully adjunct method for the initial diagnosis of the type of stroke. PMID:21681701

  13. Crohn's disease presenting as acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Podugu, Amareshwar; Tandon, Kanwarpreet; Castro, Fernando J

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a rare complication of Crohn’s disease (CD). Although several surgical and non-surgical approaches have been described over the last 2 decades this complication still poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Given the relative infrequency of severe bleeding in CD, available medical literature on this topic is mostly in the form of retrospective case series and reports. In this article we review the risk factors, diagnostic modalities and treatment options for the management of CD presenting as GI hemorrhage. PMID:27122659

  14. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is ... rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment ...

  15. Microscopic aspects of macrophage system cells in hemorrhagic stroke in humans.

    PubMed

    Dahnovici, Rodica Minodora; Pintea, Irina Lavinia; Mălăescu, D Gh; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Predescu, Anca; Mogoantă, L

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is an important public health issue because it has high morbidity and mortality rates. In addition, it has one of the highest rates of disability in adults. Recent data show that macrophage system cells, especially microglial cells, are involved both in neuroprotective processes and in the neurotoxicity, depending on the type and extent of the brain damage. In our study, using histology and immunohistochemistry techniques, we evaluated the macrophage-type cell reaction in cerebral hemorrhage. We found that the number of CD68-positive cells increased 7-8 folds per square millimeter of cortical surface in the cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the hemorrhage. We identified a large number of perivascular-activated macrophages, in areas distant to the hemorrhage, showing that individuals with hemorrhagic stroke have profound and extensive alterations of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:22203930

  16. Post-stroke apathy and hypersomnia lead to worse outcomes from acute rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ari L.; Elder, Jessica; Schiff, Nicholas D.; Victor, Jonathan D.; Goldfine, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Apathy and hypersomnia occur after stroke and, by definition, reduce participation in rehabilitation, but their effect on outcome from acute rehabilitation is not known. We performed a retrospective review of 213 patients admitted to a stroke-specialized acute rehabilitation unit in the United States. All patients had ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, and no dementia or dependence on others pre-stroke. We diagnosed apathy and hypersomnia using standardized documentation by treating therapists. We used multiple regression analysis to control for overall impairment (combination of strength, cognitive and sensory measures), age, time since stroke, and stroke type (ischemic or hemorrhagic). 44 (21%) of patients had persistent apathy, and 12 (5.6%) had persistent hypersomnia. Both groups were more impaired in cognition, sustained attention, and more likely to be treated for depression. Patients with apathy were 2.4 times more likely to go to a nursing home, and had discharge FIM scores 12 points below the mean. Patients with hypersomnia were 10 times more likely to go to a nursing home, and had discharge FIM scores 16 points below the mean. These findings indicate that studies to prospectively define these clinical factors and potential confounds using standardized tools are indicated, and if confirmed, justify studies to identify these patients early and develop targeted interventions. PMID:24323716

  17. Hemorrhagic Stroke in an Adolescent Female with HIV-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanina, Natella; Wong, Edward CC; Davis, Jeremiah C; Ray, Patricio E

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection can trigger acute episodes of Idiopathic Thrombocytoponic Purpura (ITP), and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP), particularly in populations with advanced disease and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). These diseases should be distinguished because they respond to different treatments. Previous studies done in adults with HIV-TTP have recommended the prompt initiation or re-initiation of ART in parallel with plasma exchange therapy to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. Here, we describe a case of HIV-TTP resulting in an acute hemorrhagic stroke in a 16 year old female with perinatally acquired HIV infection and non-adherence to ART, who presented with severe thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and a past medical history of HIV-ITP. Both differential diagnosis and treatments for HIV-ITP and HIV-TTP were considered simultaneously. A decrease in plasma ADAMTS13 activity (<5%) without detectable inhibitory antibodies confirmed the diagnosis of HIV-TTP. Re-initiation of ART and plasma exchange resulted in a marked decrease in the HIV-RNA viral load, recovery of the platelet count, and complete recovery was achieved with sustained virologic suppression. PMID:25429351

  18. Acute hemorrhage within intradural extramedullary schwannoma in cervical spine presenting with quadriparesis

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Das, Pulin Bihari; Sarangi, Gouri Sankar; Mohanty, Sureswar

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma with acute hemorrhage is rarely seen. A 44-years-old male patient presented with complaint of neck pain and acute onset of quadriparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of his cervical spine revealed evidence of an intradural extramedullary tumor with intratumoral acute hemorrhage. He was operated in emergency and the mass was found to be schwannoma with acute hemorrhage. Post operatively the patient improved significantly. Though schwannomas show microscopic intratumoral hemorrhage and necrosis at times, schwannoma with acute hemorrhage resulting acute onset of neurological deficit is very uncommon. PMID:25972715

  19. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption and Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Renée J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB), increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke. PMID:26973468

  20. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  1. Cardiac papillary fibroelastoma presenting as acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Atif Saleem; Da Costa, Mark; Hennessy, Terry; Kiernan, Thomas John

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a young woman who was initially diagnosed with acute stroke with no obvious risk factors. Preliminary investigation with transthoracic echocardiography and subsequent advanced imaging with transoesophageal echocardiography suggested the diagnosis of a benign cardiac tumour on the anterior leaflet of mitral valve. The patient underwent urgent surgical resection. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of cardiac papillary fibroelastoma. She made complete clinical recovery with no recurrence of symptoms. PMID:23761612

  2. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  3. Epilepsy Following Neonatal Seizures Secondary to Hemorrhagic Stroke in Term Neonates.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Charu; Millichap, John J; Krueger, Jena M; Nangia, Srishti; Ritacco, David G; Stack, Cynthia; Nordli, Douglas R

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage accounts for about 50% of all pediatric stroke. Studies of term infants with intracranial hemorrhage have shown favorable motor and cognitive outcome. The goal of this study was to examine the risk of developing epilepsy in full-term infants with intracranial hemorrhage. A retrospective study was performed of term neonates (greater than or equal to 37 weeks gestation) with intracranial hemorrhage and confirmed seizures. Fifteen patients with intracranial hemorrhage and neonatal seizures were identified. Four patients did not have follow-up information beyond the neonatal period (1 death, 3 lost to follow-up after initial clinic visit). The average follow-up period for the remaining 11 patients was approximately 22 months. Ten out of the 11 patients (91%) who were followed were seizure-free and off antiepileptic medications. One patient required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and subsequently developed infantile spasms. The authors found that overall outcome was favorable with respect to development of epilepsy. PMID:26303411

  4. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  5. How Well Do Stroke Risk Scores Predict Hemorrhage in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gene R; Singer, Daniel E; Chang, Yuchiao; Go, Alan S; Borowsky, Leila H; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-09-01

    The decision to use anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation depends on comparing a patient's estimated risk of stroke to their bleeding risk. Several of the risk factors in the stroke risk schemes overlap with hemorrhage risk. We compared how well 2 stroke risk scores (CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc) and 2 hemorrhage risk scores (the ATRIA bleeding score and the HAS-BLED score) predicted major hemorrhage on and off warfarin in a cohort of 13,559 community-dwelling adults with AF. Over a cumulative 64,741 person-years of follow-up, we identified a total of 777 incident major hemorrhage events. The ATRIA bleeding score had the highest predictive ability of all the scores in patients on warfarin (c-index of 0.74 [0.72 to 0.76] compared with 0.65 [0.62 to 0.67] for CHADS2, 0.65 [0.62 to 0.67] for CHA2DS2-VASc, and 0.64 [0.61 to 0.66] for HAS-BLED) and in those off warfarin (0.77 [0.74 to 0.79] compared with 0.67 [0.64 to 0.71] for CHADS2, 0.67 [0.64 to 0.70] for CHA2DS2-VASc, and 0.68 [0.65 to 0.71] for HAS-BLED). In conclusion, although CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc stroke scores were better at predicting hemorrhage than chance alone, they were inferior to the ATRIA bleeding score. Our study supports the use of dedicated hemorrhage risk stratification tools to predict major hemorrhage in atrial fibrillation. PMID:27394408

  6. Angiographic evaluation and management of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Walker, T Gregory; Salazar, Gloria M; Waltman, Arthur C

    2012-01-01

    Although most cases of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage either spontaneously resolve or respond to medical management or endoscopic treatment, there are still a significant number of patients who require emergency angiography and transcatheter treatment. Evaluation with noninvasive imaging such as nuclear scintigraphy or computed tomography may localize the bleeding source and/or confirm active hemorrhage prior to angiography. Any angiographic evaluation should begin with selective catheterization of the artery supplying the most likely site of bleeding, as determined by the available clinical, endoscopic and imaging data. If a hemorrhage source is identified, superselective catheterization followed by transcatheter microcoil embolization is usually the most effective means of successfully controlling hemorrhage while minimizing potential complications. This is now well-recognized as a viable and safe alternative to emergency surgery. In selected situations transcatheter intra-arterial infusion of vasopressin may also be useful in controlling acute gastrointestinal bleeding. One must be aware of the various side effects and potential complications associated with this treatment, however, and recognize the high re-bleeding rate. In this article we review the current role of angiography, transcatheter arterial embolization and infusion therapy in the evaluation and management of nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:22468082

  7. Accelerated recovery from acute brain injuries: clinical efficacy of neurotrophic treatment in stroke and traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, N; Poon, W S

    2012-04-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating vascular diseases in the world as it is responsible for almost five million deaths per year. Almost 90% of all strokes are ischemic and mainly due to atherosclerosis, cardiac embolism and small-vessel disease. Intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage can lead to hemorrhagic stroke, which usually has the poorest prognosis. Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation which mimics the action of a neurotrophic factor, protecting stroke-injured neurons and promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis. Cerebrolysin has been widely studied as a therapeutic tool for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, as well as traumatic brain injury. In ischemic stroke, Cerebrolysin given as an adjuvant therapy to antiplatelet and rheologically active medication resulted in accelerated improvement in global, neurological and motor functions, cognitive performance and activities of daily living. Cerebrolysin was also safe and well tolerated when administered in patients suffering from hemorrhagic stroke. Traumatic brain injury leads to transient or chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioral functions. This is associated with deficits in the recognition of basic emotions, the capacity to interpret the mental states of others, and executive functioning. Pilot clinical studies with adjuvant Cerebrolysin in the acute and postacute phases of the injury have shown faster recovery, which translates into an earlier onset of rehabilitation and shortened hospitalization time. PMID:22514794

  8. Plasma betathromboglobulin and serum fragment E in acute partial stroke.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A C; Turpie, A G; Butt, R W; Duke, R J; Bloch, R F; Genton, E

    1982-02-01

    Plasma betathromboglobulin (BTG) and serum fragment E (FgE) were measured serially by radioimmunoassay for 7 d in 67 patients admitted with acute partial stroke. Twelve patients progressed within 7 d of admission. Plasma BTG was not different from normal in patients with acute partial stroke and did not increase significantly with stroke progression. Serum FgE was elevated in patients with acute partial stroke compared with normal values, and was significantly higher in patients who progressed compared with those who remained stable. The results indicate that fibrin formation may be more important in the process of stroke progression than activation of platelets. PMID:6174141

  9. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. Methods From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. Results In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; P<0.001), and lower mortality (0.42 [0.21-0.82]; P=0.0108). In-hospital statin use was associated with good functional outcome (1.31 [1.12-1.53]; P=0.001), and lower mortality (0.41 [0.29-0.58]; P<0.001). In contrast, statin withdrawal was associated with poor functional outcome (1.83 [1.01-3.30]; P=0.045). In patients treated with thrombolysis, statin was associated with good functional outcome (1.44 [1.10-1.89]; P=0.001), despite an increased risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). Conclusions The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence. PMID:26437994

  10. Application values of clinical nursing pathway in patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEIHUA; GAO, JIANMEI; WEI, SHUFANG; WANG, DONGHAI

    2016-01-01

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage accounts for approximately 25% of strokes for elderly patients. Consequently, treatments to improve prognosis should be identified. The aim of the present study was to examine the clinical values of the application of clinical nursing pathway for patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage. Between January 2013 and January 2015, 92 patients diagnosed with acute intracerebral hemorrhage were enrolled in the study based on the guidelines recommended for providing appropriate surgical or conservative treatment and the sequence of admission. The 92 patients were randomly divided into the control and observation groups. Patients in the control group underwent routine nursing mode prior to and after admission, and underwent clinical nursing path model (hierarchical partitioning prior to admission to hospital plus general professional program of nursing in hospital) was applied to the observation group. Barthel index scores for the observation group were significantly higher than that of the control group. The length of hospital stay for patients in the observation group was significantly lower while the average score for patients' satisfaction on nursing care while in hospital was significantly higher than that of the control group, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). The incidence of complications such as fever, infection, bedsore, gastrointestinal function, electrolyte disturbances, and malnutrition, in the observation group was significantly lower, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). The functional independence measure (FIM) and Fugl-Meyer scores after 6 months for the observation group were significantly higher, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). In conclusion, application of the clinical nursing pathway for patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage significantly improved the clinical effects and nursing satisfaction, reduced adverse reactions, and had a greater clinical application value. PMID

  11. Dysphagia Management in Acute and Sub-acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Alicia; Nonnenmacher, Jodi; Singer, Michele L.; González-Fernández, Marlís

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is common after stroke. More than 50% of the 665 thousand stroke survivors will experience dysphagia acutely of which approximately 80 thousand will experience persistent dysphagia at 6 months. The physiologic impairments that result in post-stroke dysphagia are varied. This review focuses primarily on well-established dysphagia treatments in the context of the physiologic impairments they treat. Traditional dysphagia therapies including volume and texture modifications, strategies such as chin tuck, head tilt, head turn, effortful swallow, supraglottic swallow, super-supraglottic swallow, Mendelsohn maneuver and exercises such as the Shaker exercise and Masako (tongue hold) maneuver are discussed. Other more recent treatment interventions are discussed in the context of the evidence available. PMID:26484001

  12. Current Management Strategies for Acute Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brett; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage is one of the clinical events that define decompensated cirrhosis and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Although recent treatment strategies have led to improved outcomes, variceal hemorrhage still carries a 6-week mortality rate of 15-20%. Current standards in its treatment include antibiotic prophylaxis, infusion of a vasoactive drug and endoscopic variceal ligation. The placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is considered for patients that have treatment failure or recurrent bleeding. Recurrent hemorrhage is prevented with the combination of a non-selective beta-blocker and endoscopic variceal ligation. These recommendations however assume that all patients with cirrhosis are equal. Based on a review of recent evidence, a strategy in which patients are stratified by Child class, the main predictor of outcomes, is proposed. PMID:24955303

  13. Imaging hemorrhagic stroke with magnetic induction tomography: realistic simulation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Dayu; Hamsch, Matthias; Liu, Hui; Jin, Hua; Vauhkonen, Marko; Igney, Claudia H; Kahlert, Joachim; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a noncontact method for detecting the internal conductivity distribution of an object. This technology has the potential to be used in the biomedical area to check bio-impedance change inside the human body, for example to detect hemorrhage in the human brain. In this study the hemorrhagic stroke detectability with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was evaluated. Since the conductivity distribution is changed by the hemorrhagic stroke as well as the squeezed brain tissue around the stroke, deformation of the brain tissue is also considered and simulated with the help of a FEM-based linear bio-mechanical model in this paper. To simulate the raw measurement data as realistically as possible, the noise estimated from the experimental MIT system with hypothesis testing methods at 95% confidence level is added to the simulated measurements. Stroke images of 600 noisy samples for each detection assignment are reconstructed by the one-step Tikhonov-regularized inverse eddy current solution. Under the statistical framework, the detection failure is in control of a high false negative rate which represents a large artifact visualized in the reconstruction domain. The qualitative detectability of 18 detecting assignments, with three hemorrhagic positions (shallow, medial and center of the cerebrum) and two volume values (10 ml and 20 ml), overlaid by noise with three levels (standard deviation of phase change at 5 x 10(-3) degrees , 2.5 x 10(-3) degrees , 10 x 10(-3) degrees ), are investigated. These detecting assignments are compared with each other to find out which volumes of deformed spherical hemorrhagic stroke can be detected by the modeled MIT system. PMID:20453292

  14. Sonothrombolysis in the management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rubiera, Marta; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2010-01-01

    Multiple in vitro and animal models have demonstrated the efficacy of ultrasound to enhance fibrinolysis. Mechanical pressure waves produced by ultrasound energy improve the delivery and penetration of alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [tPA]) inside the clot. In human stroke, the CLOTBUST phase II trial showed that the combination of alteplase plus 2 hours of continuous transcranial Doppler (TCD) increased recanalization rates, producing a trend toward better functional outcomes compared with alteplase alone. Other small clinical trials also showed an improvement in clot lysis when transcranial color-coded sonography was combined with alteplase. In contrast, low-frequency ultrasound increased the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rate in a clinical trial. Administration of microbubbles (MBs) may further enhance the effect of ultrasound on thrombolysis by lowering the ultrasound-energy threshold needed to induce acoustic cavitation. Initial clinical trials have been encouraging, and a multicenter international study, TUCSON, determined a dose of newly developed MBs that can be safely administered with alteplase and TCD. Even in the absence of alteplase, the ultrasound energy, with or without MBs, could increase intrinsic fibrinolysis. The intra-arterial administration of ultrasound with the EKOS NeuroWave catheter is another ultrasound application for acute stroke that is currently being studied in the IMS III trial. Operator-independent devices, different MB-related techniques, and other ultrasound parameters for improving and spreading sonothrombolysis are being tested. PMID:20104930

  15. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy and common mimics.

    PubMed

    Homme, James L; Block, Jason M

    2016-05-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare acute benign cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis affecting children younger than 24 months of age. Its presentation can be confused with those of urticaria, erythema multiforme, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, idiopathic thrombocytopenia,meningococcemia, Kawasaki disease, and drug rash. We present 2 cases of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy, discuss the characteristics of AHEI, and compare and contrast AHEI with similar dermatologic presentations. This review provides emergency physicians with the basic knowledge necessary to easily recognize AHEI as a distinct clinical entity. The patients were 19- and 23-month-old females who presented to the pediatric emergency department at St Mary's Hospital,Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, with impressive purpuric rashes and edema of the hands and feet after preceding upper respiratory tract infections. Both children had benign courses with complete resolution of clinical findings. These 2 cases typify the presentation of AHEI.Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy presents with characteristic purpuric lesions and extremity edema. The emergency physician's recognition of these presenting characteristics will help diagnose AHEI, avoid unnecessary procedures and tests, and aid in counseling the patient's parents. PMID:26774545

  16. Current knowledge on the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties of citicoline in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Martynov, Mikhail Yu; Gusev, Eugeny I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-lasting disability and death. Two main strategies have been proposed for the treatment of ischemic stroke: restoration of blood flow by thrombolysis or mechanical thrombus extraction during the first few hours of ischemic stroke, which is one of the most effective treatments and leads to a better functional and clinical outcome. The other direction of treatment, which is potentially applicable to most of the patients with ischemic stroke, is neuroprotection. Initially, neuroprotection was mainly targeted at protecting gray matter, but during the past few years there has been a transition from a neuron-oriented approach toward salvaging the whole neurovascular unit using multimodal drugs. Citicoline is a multimodal drug that exhibits neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in a variety of experimental and clinical disorders of the central nervous system, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and global cerebral hypoxia. Citicoline has a prolonged therapeutic window and is active at various temporal and biochemical stages of the ischemic cascade. In acute ischemic stroke, citicoline provides neuroprotection by attenuating glutamate exitotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In the subacute and chronic phases of ischemic stroke, citicoline exhibits neuroregenerative effects and activates neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis and enhances neurotransmitter metabolism. Acute and long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and in most clinical studies is effective and improves functional outcome. PMID:27186142

  17. Current knowledge on the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties of citicoline in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Martynov, Mikhail Yu; Gusev, Eugeny I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-lasting disability and death. Two main strategies have been proposed for the treatment of ischemic stroke: restoration of blood flow by thrombolysis or mechanical thrombus extraction during the first few hours of ischemic stroke, which is one of the most effective treatments and leads to a better functional and clinical outcome. The other direction of treatment, which is potentially applicable to most of the patients with ischemic stroke, is neuroprotection. Initially, neuroprotection was mainly targeted at protecting gray matter, but during the past few years there has been a transition from a neuron-oriented approach toward salvaging the whole neurovascular unit using multimodal drugs. Citicoline is a multimodal drug that exhibits neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in a variety of experimental and clinical disorders of the central nervous system, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and global cerebral hypoxia. Citicoline has a prolonged therapeutic window and is active at various temporal and biochemical stages of the ischemic cascade. In acute ischemic stroke, citicoline provides neuroprotection by attenuating glutamate exitotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and blood–brain barrier dysfunction. In the subacute and chronic phases of ischemic stroke, citicoline exhibits neuroregenerative effects and activates neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis and enhances neurotransmitter metabolism. Acute and long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and in most clinical studies is effective and improves functional outcome. PMID:27186142

  18. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-11-01

    Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients.A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr.The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%-9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770-0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  19. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL. PMID:24862130

  20. Tailor-made rehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb robots for acute stroke patients: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Takashi; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Saita, Kazuya; Hyakutake, Koichi; Watanabe, Junko; Shiota, Etsuji; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    This article investigated the feasibility of a tailor-made neurorehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb (HAL) robots for acute stroke patients. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent rehabilitation using the HAL robots. The Brunnstrom stage, Barthel index (BI), and functional independence measure (FIM) were evaluated at baseline and when patients were transferred to a rehabilitation facility. Scores were compared between the multiple-robot rehabilitation and single-robot rehabilitation groups. Nine hemiplegic acute stroke patients (five men and four women; mean age 59.4 ± 12.5 years; four hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using multiple types of HAL robots for 19.4 ± 12.5 days, and 14 patients (six men and eight women; mean age 63.2 ± 13.9 years; nine hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using a single type of HAL robot for 14.9 ± 8.9 days. The multiple-robot rehabilitation group showed significantly better outcomes in the Brunnstrom stage of the upper extremity, BI, and FIM scores. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first pilot study demonstrating the feasibility of rehabilitation using multiple exoskeleton robots. The tailor-made rehabilitation approach may be useful for the treatment of acute stroke. PMID:26478988

  1. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy after MMR vaccine.

    PubMed

    Binamer, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare type of leuckocytoclastic vasculitis. It affects mainly children less than two years of age. Many precipitating factors have been reported, including infectious etiology and vaccination. We are reporting a two-year-old boy with AHEI after measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. To our knowledge this is the second reported case after an MMR vaccine. PMID:26409801

  2. Dilemma in the emergency setting: hypomagnesemia mimicking acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Martinez-Rodriguez, Laura; Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke mimics may account for up to 30% of all acute stroke consultations. However, in the emergency setting, accurate diagnosis is not always possible. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with acute aphasia and right hemiparesis. The National Institute of Health Stroke Score was 21, compatible with severe stroke, so she received thrombolysis. Laboratory testing demonstrated severe hypomagnesemia. She had been taking proton pump inhibitors for years and neuroimaging did not demonstrate signs of acute ischemic disease. After correcting the metabolic alterations with intravenous and oral supplemental magnesium, the patient was discharged asymptomatic. No further episodes have been registered to date. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia might cause acute neurological symptoms that could be confused with stroke. A careful history is essential for diagnosis but suspicion of stroke mimic should not prevent tPA administration. PMID:27354832

  3. Influence of hematoma location on acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yong; King, Caroline; Stradling, Dana; Warren, Michael; Nguyen, Dennis; Lee, Johnny; Riola, Mark A.; Montoya, Ricardo; Patel, Dipika; Le, Vu H.; Welbourne, Susan J.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The current study aimed to identify predictors of acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), including voxel-wise analysis of hematoma location. Methods In 282 consecutive patients with acute ICH, clinical and radiological predictors of acute mortality were identified. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping examined spatial correlates of acute mortality, contrasting results in basal ganglia ICH and lobar ICH. Results Acute mortality was 47.9%. In bivariate analyses, one clinical (serum glucose) and two radiological (hematoma volume and intraventricular extension) measures significantly predicted mortality. The relationship was strongest for hematoma volume. Multivariable modeling identified four significant predictors of mortality (ICH volume, intraventricular extension, serum glucose, and serum hemoglobin), although this model only minimally improved the predictive value provided by ICH volume alone. Voxel-wise analysis found that for patients with lobar ICH, brain regions where acute hematoma was significantly associated with higher acute mortality included inferior parietal lobule and posterior insula; for patients with basal ganglia ICH, a large region extending from cortex to brainstem. Conclusions For patients with lobar ICH, acute mortality is related to both hematoma size and location, with findings potentially useful for therapeutic decision-making. The current findings also underscore differences between the syndromes of acute deep and lobar ICH. PMID:23279617

  4. Assessing the feasibility of detecting a hemorrhagic type stroke using a 16 channel magnetic induction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekdouk, B.; Ktistis, C.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) has been proposed as a possible method for imaging stroke in the human brain. Hemorrhagic stroke is characterized by local blood accumulation in the brain and exhibits a greater change in conductivity with frequency compared to other tissues which is observed in the frequency range of interest [1-10] MHz. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of detecting hemorrhagic stroke using absolute and frequency difference imaging. For this purpose, a model of the head originally obtained from MRI and X-ray data was used, to which a large stroke (50 ml) was added. In addition, a model of a 16 channel circular array MIT system was employed. The received coil induced voltages were computed using a custom eddy current solver, based on the finite difference method. For absolute imaging, the induced voltages at the receiver coils were calculated from various coil combinations at 10 MHz frequency together with anticipated systematic errors and biases (orientation and displacement of the coils, movement of the head). The induced voltage noise due to these systematic inaccuracies was compared with the voltage change due to the stroke. In order to decrease the impact of this noise, frequency difference was also considered, whereby measurements were performed at another frequency (1MHz) and subtracted. Comparison results are presented and a realistic picture is delivered with to regard the required mechanical stability and electronics accuracy for this particular medical application

  5. Reduction in Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) Results in an Increased Risk of Spontaneous Hemorrhagic Transformation in Patients with Large-artery Atherosclerosis Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bian; Wang, Deren; Hao, Zilong; Li, Dan; Zhang, Junhuai; Liu, Junfeng; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The association between chronic kidney disease and spontaneous hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke is seldom reported. We performed this study to identify whether reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is associated with spontaneous HT in acute ischemic stroke patients, and examine whether the association depends on stroke etiology. Patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke whose serum creatinine levels at admission were available were consecutively and prospectively enrolled in the Chengdu Stroke Registry Database. All were analyzed on admission by cranial computed tomography (CT) scanning, followed by regular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 2-3 days later and afterwards CT scan if neurological symptoms deteriorated. HT was defined based on the MRI or later CT, and eGFR was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were performed to determine whether reduced eGFR, defined as < 60 ml/min/1.73m2, was associated with spontaneous HT. The association was also assessed in subgroups of patients classified according to the criteria of the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST). Of the 1,645 patients enrolled, 123 (7.5%) developed spontaneous HT and 215 (13.1%) had reduced eGFR. Reduced eGFR was significantly associated with increased risk of spontaneous HT in all ischemic stroke patients (OR 1.821, 95% CI 1.081 to 3.06, P=0.024), and in the subgroup of large artery atherosclerosis, not in the cardio-embolism stroke group (OR 1.588, 95% CI 0.642 to 3.782, P=0.327). Reduced eGFR did not increase the risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (OR 0.937, 95%CI 0.247 to 3.577, P=0.924). In conclusion, reduced eGFR was significantly associated with increased risk of spontaneous HT in all ischemic stroke patients, and in large artery atherosclerosis, not in cardio-embolism stroke. Reduced eGFR did not increase the risk of

  6. Hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke secondary to herpes simplex virus type 2 meningitis and vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Jacobs, Claire S; Scripko, Patricia S; Klein, Joshua P; Lyons, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) meningitis dogmatically is benign and self-limited in the immune competent patient. However, we describe how left untreated HSV-2 meningitis can be complicated by vasculitis and both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. We report a 57-year-old woman with lymphocytic meningitis complicated by ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage in the setting of vasculopathy and HSV-2 DNA detected in CSF successfully treated with acyclovir and corticosteroids. Subsequent angiographic magnetic resonance imaging revealed improvement in the vasculopathy after treatment. This case demonstrates that HSV-2 meningitis may take a less benign course and further provides the first evidence of angiographic improvement in addition to clinical improvement after definitive treatment. PMID:24806272

  7. Spontaneous hemorrhagic strokes during pregnancy: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Laadioui, Meriem; Bouzoubaa, Wail; Jayi, Sofia; Fdili, Fatima Zohra; Bouguern, Hakima; Chaara, Hikmat; Melhouf, My Abdelilah

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Postpartum and pregnancy are risk period. Only urgent care in intensive care units may improve prognosis. We report the case of 22 years old's Morrocan, who presented to our department with an intense headache headset followed a few hours later by consciousness disorder. Clinical examination at admission has objectified a woman obsessed with a GCS 13, normotensive, the labstix is negative. A brain scan was performed showing left temporal intra parenchymal hematoma with ventricular flooding and subfalcine herniation. An external ventricular shunt was made. The patient was extubated on day 2 of hospitalization, with progressive neurological improvement. Concerning obstetrical care, the pregnancy has evolved harmoniously without any growth retardation or other abnormalities, with full-term vaginal delivery of a healthy 3kg200 baby. although Hemorrhagic stroke during pregnancy is rare, the prognosis is reserved. An adequate care in intensive care unit is required. PMID:25977735

  8. Spontaneous hemorrhagic strokes during pregnancy: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Laadioui, Meriem; Bouzoubaa, Wail; Jayi, Sofia; Fdili, Fatima Zohra; Bouguern, Hakima; Chaara, Hikmat; Melhouf, My Abdelilah

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Postpartum and pregnancy are risk period. Only urgent care in intensive care units may improve prognosis. We report the case of 22 years old's Morrocan, who presented to our department with an intense headache headset followed a few hours later by consciousness disorder. Clinical examination at admission has objectified a woman obsessed with a GCS 13, normotensive, the labstix is negative. A brain scan was performed showing left temporal intra parenchymal hematoma with ventricular flooding and subfalcine herniation. An external ventricular shunt was made. The patient was extubated on day 2 of hospitalization, with progressive neurological improvement. Concerning obstetrical care, the pregnancy has evolved harmoniously without any growth retardation or other abnormalities, with full-term vaginal delivery of a healthy 3kg200 baby. although Hemorrhagic stroke during pregnancy is rare, the prognosis is reserved. An adequate care in intensive care unit is required. PMID:25977735

  9. Orbital hemorrhage and eyelid ecchymosis in acute orbital myositis.

    PubMed

    Reifler, D M; Leder, D; Rexford, T

    1989-02-15

    We examined two patients with acute orbital myositis associated with orbital hemorrhage and eyelid ecchymosis. Both patients were young women (aged 22 and 30 years) who had painful proptosis, diplopia, and computed tomographic evidence of single extraocular muscle involvement with spillover of inflammatory edema into the adjacent orbital fat. Patient 1 showed contralateral preseptal eyelid inflammation and did not suffer an orbital hemorrhage until after an episode of vomiting. In Patient 2, the diagnosis of occult orbital varix was initially considered but an orbital exploration and a biopsy specimen showed no vascular anomaly. Both patients were treated successfully with high-dose systemic corticosteroids. Some cases of idiopathic orbital inflammation may be related to preexisting vascular anomalies or orbital phlebitis. PMID:2913803

  10. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif; Gupta, N D; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2013-07-01

    Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history. PMID:24174736

  11. New windows, same old house: an update on acute stroke management.

    PubMed

    Weant, Kyle A; Baker, Stephanie N

    2012-01-01

    Acute stroke is a common presentation to emergency departments and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Despite the frequency of this event, and its substantial morbidity and mortality, few therapies exist to limit the damage from this devastating diagnosis. One pharmacotherapy for ischemic stroke that has demonstrated efficacy in this setting is tissue plasminogen activator (Activase; tPA; alteplase). Current guidelines for this agent recommend its use within the first 3 hr of the onset of stroke symptoms in patients who meet specified criteria. However, more recent data have lead to recommending the extension of this time frame to 4.5 hr after onset of symptoms in specific patient populations. Although this therapy has demonstrated efficacy in improving outcomes, its use is often complicated by complex inclusion and exclusion criteria, risk of hemorrhage, requirement for intense patient monitoring, substantial cost, and the potential for devastating medication errors. PMID:22561222

  12. Experimental acute thrombotic stroke in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Del Zoppo, G.J.; Copeland, B.R.; Harker, L.A.; Waltz, T.A.; Zyroff, J.; Hanson, S.R.; Battenberg, E.

    1986-11-01

    To study the effects of antithrombotic therapy in experimental stroke, we have characterized a baboon model of acute cerebrovascular thrombosis. In this model an inflatable silastic balloon cuff has been implanted by transorbital approach around the right middle cerebral artery (MCA), proximal to the take-off of the lenticulostriate arteries (LSA). Inflation of the balloon for 3 hours in six animals produced a stereotypic sustained stroke syndrome characterized by contralateral hemiparesis. An infarction volume of 3.2 +/- 1.5 cm3 in the ipsilateral corpus striatum was documented by computerized tomographic (CT) scanning at 10 days following stroke induction and 3.9 +/- 1.9 cm3 (n = 4) at 14 days by morphometric neuropathologic determinations of brain specimens fixed in situ by pressure-perfusion with 10% buffered formalin. Immediate pressure-perfusion fixation following deflation of the balloon was performed in 16 additional animals given Evans blue dye intravenously prior to the 3 hour MCA balloon occlusion. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy consistently confirmed the presence of thrombotic material occluding microcirculatory branches of the right LSA in the region of Evans blue stain, but not those of the contralateral corpus striatum. When autologous 111In-platelets were infused intravenously in four animals from the above group prior to the transient 3 hour occlusion of the right MCA, gamma scintillation camera imaging of each perfused-fixed whole brain demonstrated the presence of a single residual focus of 111In-platelet activity involving only the Evans blue-stained right corpus striatum. Focal right hemispheric activity was equivalent to 0.55 +/- 0.49 ml of whole blood, and the occlusion score derived from histologic examination of the microcirculation of the Evans blue-stained corpus striatum averaged 34.8 +/- 2.8.

  13. The assessment of visuo-spatial neglect after acute stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, S P; Wilson, B; Wroot, A; Halligan, P W; Lange, L S; Marshall, J C; Greenwood, R J

    1991-01-01

    Forty four consecutive patients with acute hemispheric stroke and forty seven elderly controls with no neurological disease were assessed for visuo-spatial neglect, using a modified neglect test battery. Neglect was found to be equally common in patients with right hemisphere and left hemisphere stroke three days after stroke (72% versus 62%). It was more severe in those with a right hemisphere stroke and resolved more frequently in those with a left hemisphere stroke. The battery was validated against an occupational therapist's assessment of neglect on self-care tasks. The inter-observer reliability was good and it was possible to monitor changes over time with the battery. Images PMID:2056321

  14. Meta-Analysis of Local Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean A; Baerlocher, Mark O; Baerlocher, Felix; Socko, Daniel; Sacks, David; Nikolic, Boris; Wojak, Joan C; Haskal, Ziv J

    2016-03-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess randomized controlled trials comparing local endovascular therapy (with and without intravenous thrombolysis) versus standard care (intravenous thrombolysis alone when appropriate) for acute ischemic stroke. Local endovascular therapy showed a significant improvement in functional independence versus standard care (odds ratio, 1.779; 95% confidence interval, 1.262-2.507; P < .001). This benefit strengthened further on subgroup analyses of trials in which a majority of cases used stent retrievers, trials with intravenous thrombolysis use in both arms when appropriate, and trials that required preprocedural imaging of all patients. There were no significant differences between arms in terms of mortality, hemicraniectomy, intracranial hemorrhage, and cerebral edema rates (P > .05). In conclusion, in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, local endovascular therapy leads to improved functional independence compared with standard care. PMID:26803573

  15. Progress in AQP Research and New Developments in Therapeutic Approaches to Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Previch, Lauren E; Ma, Linlin; Wright, Joshua C; Singh, Sunpreet; Geng, Xiaokun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema often manifests after the development of cerebrovascular disease, particularly in the case of stroke, both ischemic and hemorrhagic. Without clinical intervention, the influx of water into brain tissues leads to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral herniation, and ultimately death. Strategies to manage the development of edema constitute a major unmet therapeutic need. However, despite its major clinical significance, the mechanisms underlying cerebral water transport and edema formation remain elusive. Aquaporins (AQPs) are a class of water channel proteins which have been implicated in the regulation of water homeostasis and cerebral edema formation, and thus represent a promising target for alleviating stroke-induced cerebral edema. This review examines the significance of relevant AQPs in stroke injury and subsequently explores neuroprotective strategies aimed at modulating AQP expression, with a particular focus on AQP4, the most abundant AQP in the central nervous system. PMID:27438832

  16. Progress in AQP Research and New Developments in Therapeutic Approaches to Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Previch, Lauren E.; Ma, Linlin; Wright, Joshua C.; Singh, Sunpreet; Geng, Xiaokun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema often manifests after the development of cerebrovascular disease, particularly in the case of stroke, both ischemic and hemorrhagic. Without clinical intervention, the influx of water into brain tissues leads to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral herniation, and ultimately death. Strategies to manage the development of edema constitute a major unmet therapeutic need. However, despite its major clinical significance, the mechanisms underlying cerebral water transport and edema formation remain elusive. Aquaporins (AQPs) are a class of water channel proteins which have been implicated in the regulation of water homeostasis and cerebral edema formation, and thus represent a promising target for alleviating stroke-induced cerebral edema. This review examines the significance of relevant AQPs in stroke injury and subsequently explores neuroprotective strategies aimed at modulating AQP expression, with a particular focus on AQP4, the most abundant AQP in the central nervous system. PMID:27438832

  17. Characterization of patients treated by rehabilitation service after establishing of an acute stroke unit in a Brazilian hospital

    PubMed Central

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Gameiro, Mônica de Oliveira Orsi; Schelp, Arthur Oscar; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Ribeiro, Priscila Watson; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study aimed to characterize patients treated by rehabilitation section after establishment of an acute stroke unit. [Subjects and Methods] Medical consultation records of individuals with ischemic stroke were studied retrospectively, excluding individuals with hemorrhagic stroke, thrombolysis, previous Modified Rankin Scale ≥ 1, prior stroke, structural bone deformities, associated neurological disease, and prior cognitive deficit. The data evaluated were age, gender, etiology, localization, treatment received, ictus onset, hospitalization time, discharge date, and date of first evaluation at the rehabilitation center. The Modified Rankin Scale in 90 days after ictus was utilized to measure functional incapacity with the individuals divided into two groups, before and after acute stroke unit implementation (2010). Functional incapacity was compared between before and after acute stroke unit implementation by the Mann-Whitney test, χ2 test and Fisher’s exact test. [Results] The medical records of 170 patients were evaluated. In the group evaluated after 2010, the patients were significantly older and presented a shorter time between hospitalization and discharge, shorter time until the first evaluation in rehabilitation, and increased percentage of mild incapacity (Modified Rankin Scale = 0 to 2). [Conclusion] After acute stroke unit implementation, the patients treated in the rehabilitation section presented a shorter hospitalization time and rehabilitation delay and less functional incapacity. PMID:26355915

  18. Hepatitis C and recurrent treatment-resistant acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tarsia, Joseph; Dunn, Casey; Aysenne, Aimee; Shah, Basil; Moore, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and thrombolysis, acute ischemic stroke has become a treatable disorder if the patient presents within the 4.5-hour time window. Typically, sporadic stroke is caused by atherosclerotic disease involving large or small cerebral arteries or secondary to a cardioembolic source often associated with atrial fibrillation. In the over-65-year age group, more rare causes of stroke, such as antiphospholipid syndromes, are unusual; such stroke etiologies are mostly seen in a younger age group (<55 years). Here we describe acute ischemic stroke in three patients >65 years with hepatitis C–associated antiphospholipid antibodies. We suggest that screening for antiphospholipid disorders in the older patient might be warranted, with potential implications for therapeutic management and secondary stroke prevention. PMID:23543984

  19. Albumin Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Safety Analysis of the ALIAS Part 2 Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Michael D.; Martin, Renee H.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Moy, Claudia S.; Tamariz, Diego; Ryckborst, Karla J.; Jones, Elizabeth B.; Weisman, David; Pettigrew, Creed; Ginsberg, Myron D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Albumin treatment of ischemic stroke was associated with cardiopulmonary adverse events in previous studies and a low incidence of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to describe the neurological and cardiopulmonary adverse events in the ALIAS Part 2 Multicenter Trial. Methods Ischemic stroke patients, aged 18–83 and a baseline NIHSS ≥ 6, were randomized to treatment with ALB or saline control within 5 hours of stroke onset. Neurological adverse events included symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, hemicraniectomy, neurological deterioration and neurological death. Cardiopulmonary adverse events included pulmonary edema/congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, atrial fibrillation, pneumonia and pulmonary thromboembolism. Results Among 830 patients, neurological and cardiopulmonary adverse events were not differentially associated with poor outcome between ALB and saline control subjects. The rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the first 24h was low overall (2.9%, 24/830) but more common in the ALB treated subjects (RR = 2.4, CI95 1.01–5.8). The rate of pulmonary edema/CHF in the first 48h was 7.9% (59/830) and was more common among ALB treated subjects (RR = 10.7, CI95 4.3–26.6); this complication was expected and was satisfactorily managed with mandated diuretic administration and intravenous fluid guidelines. Troponin elevations in the first 48h were common, occurring without ECG change or cardiac symptoms in 52 subjects (12.5%). Conclusions ALB therapy was associated with an increase in symptomatic ICH and pulmonary edema/congestive heart failure but this did not affect final outcomes. Troponin elevation occurs routinely in the first 48 hours after acute ischemic stroke. Trial Registration ClincalTrials.gov NCT00235495 PMID:26325387

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Induced Cerebral Hemorrhage Following Experimental Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Yi; Xiao, Yunqi; Hua, Zichun; Cheng, Jian; Jia, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the only approved drug for the treatment of ischemic stroke, increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we investigated whether the newly identified gaso-transmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S), when used in combination with tPA, reduced the hemorrhagic transformation following stroke. In a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), intravenous injection of tPA enhanced cerebral hemorrhage, which was significantly attenuated by the co-administration of two structurally unrelated H2S donors, ADT-OH and NaHS. By assessing extravasation of Evans blue into the ischemic hemisphere as well as brain edema following MCAO, we further showed that a tPA-exacerbated BBB disruption was significantly ameliorated by the co-administration of ADT-OH. In the mouse MCAO model, tPA upregulated Akt activation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activity in the ischemic brain, which was remarkably attenuated by ADT-OH. In the in vitro glucose-oxygen deprivation (OGD) model, ADT-OH markedly attenuated tPA-enhanced Akt activation and VEGF expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Finally, ADT-OH improved functional outcomes in mice subjected to MCAO and tPA infusion. In conclusion, H2S donors reduced tPA-induced cerebral hemorrhage by possibly inhibiting the Akt-VEGF-MMP9 cascade. Administration of H2S donors has potential as a novel modality to improve the safety of tPA following stroke. PMID:27018013

  1. Acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in a patient taking dabigatran with radiographic evidence of recanalization.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Navdeep; El Khoury, Ramy; Misra, Vivek; Lopez, George

    2012-11-01

    Dabigatran etexelate is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. A 51-year-old man with a history of atrial fibrillation who was taking dabigatran presented with an acute ischemic stroke. The patient had a normal international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, and an elevated thrombin time of 26.4 seconds. Recanalization of the middle cerebral artery with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was apparent on digital subtraction angiography, and there was no evidence of intracerebral hemorrhage on the repeat computed tomographic scan. This is the first report of a patient who was taking dabigatran etexilate and who had an ischemic stroke caused by a middle cerebral artery occlusion, with an elevated thrombin time and radiographic recanalization with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator without evidence of hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:22683118

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  3. Review of current and emerging therapies in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, R; Toth, G; Purdy, P D

    2009-07-01

    The statistics for stroke in the USA reads like a familiar ad slogan cited in most papers pertaining to acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA. While stroke ranks third among all causes of death, behind diseases of the heart and cancer, it is the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the USA.(1) Approximately 795 000 people, 87% of whom are ischemic, suffer from stroke each year in the USA.(2) That means that on average, every 40 seconds someone within the USA develops a stroke. For 2009 the combined direct and indirect cost of stroke, from hospitalization and rehabilitation to institutionalization, is estimated at $68.9 billion within the USA.(2). PMID:21994100

  4. Acute Hemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis in Children: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Gholam Reza; Aelami, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-05-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHLE) is a rare demyelinating disease characterized by an acute rapidly progressive fulminant inflammation of the white matter. In this case report, we introduce a case of AHLE in children with an interesting and lengthy process and successful treatment. A previously healthy 13-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital because of fever and loss of consciousness. After 4 days, she was referred to our pediatric intensive care unit in Mashhad, Iran. On admission, she had right-sided parotiditis. With a diagnosis of AHLE, our patient was treated with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, acyclovir, and plasmapheresis. AHLE is a rare and severe demyelinating disease, the mortality and morbidity of which can be decreased by early detection and treatment with steroid therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin, acyclovir, and plasmapheresis. PMID:27217610

  5. Acute Hemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis in Children: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Gholam Reza; Aelami, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHLE) is a rare demyelinating disease characterized by an acute rapidly progressive fulminant inflammation of the white matter. In this case report, we introduce a case of AHLE in children with an interesting and lengthy process and successful treatment. A previously healthy 13-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital because of fever and loss of consciousness. After 4 days, she was referred to our pediatric intensive care unit in Mashhad, Iran. On admission, she had right-sided parotiditis. With a diagnosis of AHLE, our patient was treated with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, acyclovir, and plasmapheresis. AHLE is a rare and severe demyelinating disease, the mortality and morbidity of which can be decreased by early detection and treatment with steroid therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin, acyclovir, and plasmapheresis. PMID:27217610

  6. [Cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Motoyama, Yasushi; Yamada, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. Japanese evidence-based stroke guidelines were published in 2015 to present the current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke. In the spontaneous ICH, topics focused on prevention, management in the acute and chronic stage, complications, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, and other pathologies of ICH. The management of ICH in pregnancy and the puerperium was newly added. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with ICH. PMID:27333758

  7. Acute hemorrhagic edema of young children: a concise narrative review.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Elisabetta; Rizzi, Mattia; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Garzoni, Luca; Bianchetti, Mario G; Bettinelli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of young children is an uncommon but likely underestimated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The condition typically affects infants 6-24 months of age with a history of recent respiratory illness with or without course of antibiotics. The diagnosis is made in children, mostly nontoxic in appearance, presenting with nonpruritic, large, round, red to purpuric plaques predominantly over the cheeks, ears, and extremities, with relative sparing of the trunk, often with a target-like appearance, and edema of the distal extremities, ears, and face that is mostly non-pitting, indurative, and tender. In boys, the lesions sometimes involve the scrotum and, more rarely, the penis. Fever, typically of low grade, is often present. Involvement of body systems other than skin is uncommon, and spontaneous recovery usually occurs within 6-21 days without sequelae. In this condition, laboratory tests are non-contributory: total blood cell count is often normal, although leukocytosis and thrombocytosis are sometimes found, clotting studies are normal, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein test are normal or slightly elevated, complement level is normal, autoantibodies are absent, and urinalysis is usually normal. Experienced physicians rapidly consider the possible diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic edema when presented with a nontoxic young child having large targetoid purpuric lesions and indurative swelling, which is non-pitting in character, and make the diagnosis either on the basis of clinical findings alone or supported by a skin biopsy study. PMID:21674141

  8. Contralateral diaphragmatic palsy in acute stroke: an interesting observation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Reddy, Rajesh; Prabhakar, Subhashini

    2009-01-01

    Diaphragmatic palsy in hemiparetic stroke is not well recognized. Further, its implications on stroke outcome have not been studied. Here, we report a patient with left-sided diaphragmatic palsy due to an acute right middle cerebral artery territory infarction. The diagnosis was suspected on finding an elevated dome of the diaphragm on the left side in a routine chest radiograph and was confirmed by finding decreased movements of the left hemidiaphragm on fluoroscopic examination. We hypothesize that this condition is probably under-recognized in clinical practice and its clinical importance not well known. The pathophysiological basis of diaphragmatic palsy in acute stroke and its possible clinical implications are discussed. PMID:19881177

  9. Association of APOE (E2, E3 and E4) gene variants and lipid levels in ischemic stroke, its subtypes and hemorrhagic stroke in a South Indian population.

    PubMed

    Das, Satrupa; Kaul, Subhash; Jyothy, Akka; Munshi, Anjana

    2016-08-15

    In the present study we evaluated the association of APOE (E2/E3/E4) polymorphism with ischemic stroke (n=620), its subtypes and hemorrhagic stroke (n=250) in a South Indian population from Telangana. The genotypes were determined using PCR-RFLP while lipid levels were measured using commercially available kits. We found significant difference in the genotypic distribution between hemorrhagic stroke patients and controls for certain genetic models [E2/E2 vs. E2/E4; E3/E3 vs. E2/E3; E3/E3 vs. E2/E4; E4/E4 vs. E2/E3; E4/E4 vs.E2/E4 and E3 vs. E4]. However, no significant difference was observed in genotypic distribution between ischemic stroke patients and controls. On analysing the genotypic distribution between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients, statistically significant difference was observed in specific genetic models [E2/E2 vs. E2/E4; E3/E3 vs. E2/E3; E3/E3 vs. E2/E4; E4/E4 vs. E2/E3 and E4/E4 vs. E2/E4]. In ischemic stroke subtypes analysing for alleles E3 vs. E2 and E3 vs. E4, we found significant association with intracranial large artery (p=0.01), cardioembolic stroke (p=0.001 and p=0.0004) and lacunar stroke (p=0.02). Analysing the association of various genotypes with different lipid levels significant association was observed for VLDL (P=0.000) and for triglyceride (P=0.000) levels with E2/E4 and E3/E4 genotypes in ischemic stroke but not in hemorrhagic stroke. In conclusion, our results suggest that APOE polymorphism does seem to play a role in hemorrhagic stroke and also in the development of specific subtypes of ischemic stroke. Further, in ischemic stroke VLDL and triglycerides levels were found to be significantly associated with E2/E4 and E3/E4 genotypes. PMID:27329241

  10. Endothelial depletion of murine SRF/MRTF provokes intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Weinl, Christine; Castaneda Vega, Salvador; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Calaminus, Carsten; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mauel, Susanne; Breithaupt, Angele; Gruber, Achim D.; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Olson, Eric N.; Adams, Ralf H.; Pichler, Bernd J.; Nordheim, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke and vascular dementia are age- and hypertension-associated manifestations of human cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Cerebral microvessels are formed by endothelial cells (ECs), which are connected through tight junctions, adherens junctions, and stabilizing basement membrane structures. These endothelial connections ensure both vessel stability and blood–brain barrier (BBB) functions, the latter enabling selective exchange of ions, bioactive molecules, and cells between the bloodstream and brain tissue. SrfiECKO mice, permitting conditional EC-specific depletion of the transcription factor Serum Response Factor (SRF), suffer from loss of BBB integrity and intracerebral hemorrhaging. Cerebral microbleeds and larger hemorrhages developed upon postnatal and adult depletion of either SRF or its cofactors Myocardin Related Transcription Factor (MRTF-A/-B), revealing essential requirements of ongoing SRF/MRTF activity for maintenance of cerebral small vessel integrity. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging allowed detection, localization, and time-resolved quantification of BBB permeability and hemorrhage formation in SrfiECKO brains. At the molecular level, direct and indirect SRF/MRTF target genes, encoding structural components of tight junctions (Claudins and ZO proteins), adherens junctions (VE-cadherin, α-Actinin), and the basement membrane (Collagen IV), were down-regulated upon SRF depletion. These results identify SRF and its MRTF cofactors as major transcriptional regulators of EC junctional stability, guaranteeing physiological functions of the cerebral microvasculature. We hypothesize that impairments in SRF/MRTF activity contribute to human SVD pathology. PMID:26221020

  11. A retrospective study of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Etiological diagnosis is an important part of the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis. Hantavirus infection is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, which is easy to ignore. There is a need to analyze clinical features of acute pancreatitis caused by Hantavirus. Methods This is a retrospective study conducted from May 1, 2006 to May 31, 2012 on patients diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome at our hospital. We reviewed these patients medical records, laboratory results and radiologic examinations to determine the prevalence and summarize clinical features of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Results A total of 218 patients were diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome during the 6-year study period. Only 2.8% (6/218) of the total hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome patients were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The first symptom for all six of the patients with acute pancreatitis was fever. All six patients experienced hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia during the disease course, which was different from general acute pancreatitis. In addition, we presented two misdiagnosed clinical cases. Conclusions Acute pancreatitis is not a frequent complication in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Clinicians should be alerted to the possibility of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome when acute pancreatitis patients with epidemiological data have high fever before abdominal pain. PMID:24345089

  12. Acute hemorrhagic shock decreases airway resistance in anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Sam; Albu, Gergely; Layachi, Skander; Portier, Flore; Fathi, Marc; Peták, Ferenc; Habre, Walid

    2011-08-01

    We studied the relation between changes in pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics to those in the airway resistance, respiratory tissue mechanics, and thoracic gas volume (TGV) following acute hemorrhage and blood reinfusion in rats. Forced oscillation technique was used to measure airway resistance (Raw), respiratory tissue damping, and elastance at baseline and after stepwise 1-ml blood withdrawals up to 5 ml total, followed by stepwise reinfusion up to full restoration. Mean systemic (Pam) and pulmonary arterial pressures and suprarenal aortic blood flow were measured at each step. In supplemental animals, plethysmographic TGV, Pam, and respiratory mechanics measurements were performed. Blood volume loss (BVL) led to proportional decreases in Raw (66.5 ± 8.8 vs. 44.8 ± 9.0 cmH(2)O·s·l(-1) with 5 ml, P < 0.001), Pam, and aortic blood flow. In contrast, tissue damping increased significantly (1,070 ± 91 vs. 1,235 ± 105 cmH(2)O/l, P = 0.009 with 5 ml BVL), whereas tissue elastance did not change significantly. TGV significantly increased with acute BVL (3.7 ± 0.2 vs. 4.2 ± 0.2 ml, P = 0.01). Stepwise reinfusions produced opposite changes in the above parameters, with Raw reaching a higher value than baseline (P = 0.001) upon full volume restoration. Both adrenalin (P = 0.015) and noradrenalin levels were elevated (P = 0.010) after 5-ml blood withdrawal. Our data suggest that the decreases in Raw following BVL may be attributed to the following: 1) an increased TGV enhancing airway parenchymal tethering forces; and 2) an increase in circulating catecholamines. The apparent beneficial effect of a reduction in Raw in acute hemorrhagic shock is counteracted by an increase in dead space and the appearance of peripheral mechanical heterogeneities due to de-recruitment of the pulmonary vasculature. PMID:21596916

  13. Imaging Oxygen Metabolism In Acute Stroke Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyu; Ford, Andria L.; Vo, Katie D.; Liu, Qingwei; Chen, Yasheng; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lin, Weili

    2014-01-01

    The ability to image the ischemic penumbra during hyper-acute stroke promises to identify patients who may benefit from treatment intervention beyond population-defined therapeutic time windows. MR blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging has been explored in ischemic stroke. This review provides an overview of several BOLD-based methods, including susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), R2, R2*, R2′, R2* under oxygen challenge, MR_OEF and MROMI approaches to assess cerebral oxygen metabolism in ischemic stroke. We will review the underlying pathophysiological basis of the imaging approaches, followed by a brief introduction of BOLD contrast. Finally, we will discuss the applications of the BOLD approaches in patients with ischemic stroke. BOLD-based methods hold promise for imaging tissue oxygenation during acute ischemia. Further technical refinement and validation studies in stroke patients against positron emission tomography (PET) measurements are needed. PMID:24707451

  14. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  15. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and T max, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  16. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  17. What have drugs to offer the patient with acute stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, D G

    1992-01-01

    1. Drug treatment for acute stroke is designed to salvage neuronal tissue, and to prevent complications of stroke, which are often non-neurological. This review addresses the areas of recent advance in treatment designed to reduce the size of the cerebral infarct. With the exception of cardiac-source embolism, for which anticoagulation in the acute phase is sometimes considered, prevention of recurrent events is not discussed. 2. It is to be hoped that pharmaceutical developments will improve the current bleak picture in which there are no proven treatments for ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage. To meet this challenge will require careful, controlled evaluation of treatment early after acute stroke in large scale clinical studies. PMID:1524958

  18. Investigation of acute stroke: what is the most effective strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Dunbabin, D. W.; Sandercock, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques of investigation of acute stroke syndromes have progressed rapidly in recent years, outpacing developments in effective stroke treatment. The clinician is thus faced with a variety of tests, each with different cost implications and each altering management to a greater or lesser extent. This review will concentrate on the basic tests which should be performed for all strokes (full blood count, ESR, biochemical screen, blood glucose, cholesterol, syphilis serology, chest X-ray and electrocardiogram). Additional tests may be required in selected cases: CT scan to diagnose 'non-stroke' lesions, to exclude cerebral haemorrhage if anti-haemostatic therapy is planned, and to detect strokes which may require emergency intervention (such as cerebellar stroke with hydrocephalus); echocardiography to detect cardiac sources of emboli; and in a few cases lumbar puncture and specialized haematological tests. Other tests, which are currently research tools, may be suitable for widespread use in the future including NMR, SPECT and PET scanning. PMID:2062773

  19. Large acute cerebral hemorrhage presenting with pure alexia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jarred J; Sanford, Janyce M

    2007-04-01

    Alexia (the acquired inability to read) is an uncommon presenting complaint in the emergency department (ED). It is usually associated with a lesion in the brain located within the dominant hemisphere near the parieto-occipital junction, with some involvement of the splenium of the corpus callosum. Our review of the literature revealed multiple distinct causes for the finding of alexia, and a majority of the cases uncovered also involved agraphia (the acquired inability to write) and frequently visual field defects. We present the case of an otherwise healthy 35-year-old white man who arrived at our ED with the chief complaint of having difficulty reading. He was, however, able to write, and he exhibited no defects in his visual fields on gross testing in our ED. The patient was found to have a large, acute, intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the right posterior/inferior parietal cortex, very near the occipital lobe. We present this case, followed by a brief discussion, to heighten awareness of the complaint of alexia with or without agraphia as a possible presenting symptom of intracranial hemorrhage, or ischemic cerebrovascular accident. PMID:17083996

  20. Risk Factors for DVT/PE in Patients with Stroke and Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, Mark; Michel, Kathleen; Antaky, Karin; Cherian, Sarah; Koyfmann, Feliks

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolus (PE) are serious problems for patients admitted to the hospital with stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and transient ischemic attack (TIA). The purpose of this paper is to further understand the factors that place certain patients at increased risk of DVT/PE. Methods: At a 600 bed hospital, a retrospective analysis of data from 2613 patients admitted with a diagnosis of stroke, SAH, ICH or TIA in the time range 1/2008 through 3/2012 was carried out. The data was taken from the hospital’s Get with the Guidelines database and included 28 variables. These included initial NIH stroke scale, length of stay, heart failure, ambulatory by day 2 after admission, altered mental status,and renal failure among others. Multiple analyses were carried out to determine whether there were univariable or multivariable effects of any of the factors on the risk for DVT/PE. Results: The risk of DVT/PE was highest in patients with SAH and ICH and smallest with TIA. Multivariable analyses were performed and revealed only altered level of consciousness or heart failure as significant risks for DVT/PE. With the limited available data, administration of subcutaneous heparin or other chemoprophylaxis did not reduce the risk of DVT/PE. Conclusion: Although many of the variables used to describe the stroke patient are correlated, in multivariable analyses only heart failure and altered level of consciousness were important risk factors for DVT/PE. The risk of DVT/PE was 7 fold greater in patients in patients with both of these risk factors. PMID:24847389

  1. Anesthesia for Endovascular Approaches to Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Avitsian, Rafi; Machado, Sandra B

    2016-09-01

    Involvement of the Anesthesiologist in the early stages of care for acute ischemic stroke patient undergoing endovascular treatment is essential. Anesthetic management includes the anesthetic technique (general anesthesia vs sedation), a matter of much debate and an area in need of well-designed prospective studies. The large numbers of confounding factors make the design of such studies a difficult process. A universally agreed point in the endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke is the importance of decreasing the time to revascularization. Hemodynamic and ventilatory management and implementation of neuroprotective modalities and treatment of acute procedural complications are important components of the anesthetic plan. PMID:27521194

  2. Carotid Plaque Hemorrhage on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Strongly Predicts Recurrent Ischemia and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Akram A; Kandiyil, Neghal; MacSweeney, Shane T S; Altaf, Nishath; Auer, Dorothee P

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is a recognized need to improve selection of patients with carotid artery stenosis for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). We assessed the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined carotid plaque hemorrhage (MRIPH) to predict recurrent ipsilateral cerebral ischemic events, and stroke in symptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods One hundred seventy-nine symptomatic patients with ≥50% stenosis were prospectively recruited, underwent carotid MRI, and were clinically followed up until CEA, death, or ischemic event. MRIPH was diagnosed if the plaque signal intensity was >150% that of the adjacent muscle. Event-free survival analysis was done using Kaplan–Meier plots and Cox regression models controlling for known vascular risk factors. We also undertook a meta-analysis of reported data on MRIPH and recurrent events. Results One hundred fourteen patients (63.7%) showed MRIPH, suffering 92% (57 of 62) of all recurrent ipsilateral events and all but 1 (25 of 26) future strokes. Patients without MRIPH had an estimated annual absolute stroke risk of only 0.6%. Cox multivariate regression analysis proved MRIPH as a strong predictor of recurrent ischemic events (hazard ratio [HR] = 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.8–30.1, p < 0.001) and stroke alone (HR = 35.0, 95% CI = 4.7–261.6, p = 0.001). Meta-analysis of published data confirmed this association between MRIPH and recurrent cerebral ischemic events in symptomatic carotid artery stenosis (odds ratio = 12.2, 95% CI = 5.5–27.1, p < 0.00001). Interpretation MRIPH independently and strongly predicts recurrent ipsilateral ischemic events, and stroke alone, in symptomatic ≥50% carotid artery stenosis. The very low stroke risk in patients without MRIPH puts into question current risk–benefit assessment for CEA in this subgroup. ANN NEUROL 2013;73:774–784 PMID:23463579

  3. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  4. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit. PMID:24739589

  5. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (Weston-Hurst syndrome) in a patient with relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Özlem; Pul, Refik; Raab, Peter; Hartmann, Christian; Skripuletz, Thomas; Stangel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis is a fulminant demyelinating disease and commonly considered as a rare and severe variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Here, we report the clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and brain biopsy findings of a 35-year-old female with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, who developed acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed symmetrical hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia including the thalami. Disease progression was consistent with acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis with rapid deterioration of consciousness and seizures. Besides hemorrhage, infiltration of neutrophils was detected in brain biopsy.Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, also known as Weston-Hurst syndrome, is an excessive immunological response of unknown etiology. So far, an association with multiple sclerosis has not been reported. The present case raises the question, whether acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis is a specific hyperacute form of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, a severe and unspecific form of an immune response in the central nervous system, or belongs to the spectrum of tumefactive multiple sclerosis. PMID:26376717

  6. Optical monitoring of stress-related changes in the brain tissues and vessels associated with hemorrhagic stroke in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana; Pavlov, Alexey; Kurths, Jürgen; Borisova, Ekaterina; Gisbrecht, Alexander; Sindeeva, Olga; Abdurashitov, Arkady; Shirokov, Alexander; Navolokin, Nikita; Zinchenko, Ekaterina; Gekalyuk, Artem; Ulanova, Maria; Zhu, Dan; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-10-01

    Stress is a major factor for a risk of cerebrovascular catastrophes. Studying of mechanisms underlying stress-related brain-injures in neonates is crucial for development of strategy to prevent of neonatal stroke. Here, using a model of sound-stress-induced intracranial hemorrhages in newborn rats and optical methods, we found that cerebral veins are more sensitive to the deleterious effect of stress than arteries and microvessels. The development of venous insufficiency with decreased blood outflow from the brain accompanied by hypoxia, reduction of complexity of venous blood flow and high production of beta-arrestin-1 are possible mechanisms responsible for a risk of neonatal hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:26504656

  7. Comparison of Performance Achievement Award Recognition With Primary Stroke Center Certification for Acute Ischemic Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Fonarow, Gregg C.; Liang, Li; Smith, Eric E.; Reeves, Mathew J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Peterson, Eric D.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospital certification and recognition programs represent 2 independent but commonly used systems to distinguish hospitals, yet they have not been directly compared. This study assessed acute ischemic stroke quality of care measure conformity by hospitals receiving Primary Stroke Center (PSC) certification and those receiving the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines‐Stroke (GWTG‐Stroke) Performance Achievement Award (PAA) recognition. Methods and Results The patient and hospital characteristics as well as performance/quality measures for acute ischemic stroke from 1356 hospitals participating in the GWTG‐Stroke Program 2010–2012 were compared. Hospitals were classified as PAA+/PSC+ (hospitals n=410, patients n=169 302), PAA+/PSC− (n=415, n=129 454), PAA−/PSC+ (n=88, n=26 386), and PAA−/PSC− (n=443, n=75 565). A comprehensive set of stroke measures were compared with adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics. Patient characteristics were similar by PAA and PSC status but PAA−/PSC− hospitals were more likely to be smaller and nonteaching. Measure conformity was highest for PAA+/PSC+ and PAA+/PSC− hospitals, intermediate for PAA−/PSC+ hospitals, and lowest for PAA−/PSC− hospitals (all‐or‐none care measure 91.2%, 91.2%, 84.3%, and 76.9%, respectively). After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, PAA+/PSC+, PAA+/PSC−, and PAA−/PSC+ hospitals had 3.15 (95% CIs 2.86 to 3.47); 3.23 (2.93 to 3.56) and 1.72 (1.47 to 2.00), higher odds for providing all indicated stroke performance measures to patients compared with PAA−/PSC− hospitals. Conclusions While both PSC certification and GWTG‐Stroke PAA recognition identified hospitals providing higher conformity with care measures for patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke, PAA recognition was a more robust identifier of hospitals with better performance. PMID:24125846

  8. Potential microRNA biomarkers for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Jing-Xia; Yan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Xing-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2015-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a significant cause of high morbidity and mortality in the aging population globally. However, current therapeutic strategies for acute ischemic stroke are limited. Atherosclerotic plaque is considered an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke. To identify biomarkers for carotid atheromatous plaque, bioinformatics analysis of the gene microarray data of plaque and intact tissue from individuals was performed. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the Multtest and Limma packages of R language, including 56 downregulated and 69 upregulated DEGs. Enriched microRNA (miRNA or miR) DEGs networks were generated using WebGestalt software and the STRING databases, and the miRNAs were validated using serum from acute ischemic stroke patients with reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT‑qPCR). Four confirmed differentially expressed miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑22, ‑23 and ‑125) were associated with 28 upregulated DEGs, and 7 miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑30, ‑33, ‑124, ‑181, ‑218 and ‑330) were associated with 25 downregulated DEGs. Gene ontology (GO) function suggested that the confirmed miRNA‑targeted DEGs predominantly associated with signal transduction, the circulatory system, biological adhesion, striated muscle contraction, wound healing and the immune system. The confirmed miRNA‑targeted genes identified serve as potential therapeutic targets for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26459744

  9. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability is a Novel Risk Factor for Rebleeding in Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing-Song; Ping-Chen; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Yu, Liang-Hong; Dai, Lin-Sun; Kang, De-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rebleeding of an aneurysm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated predictors of rebleeding and effect of systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) on stroke, few data on the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Here, we sought to identify the effect of SBPV on rebleeding in acute aneurysmal SAH. Case–control study. From January 2010 to June 2015, 612 patients with aneurysmal SAH were enrolled in our tertiary care medical center. Main outcome measures: Consecutive patients with acute (<3 days from ictus) aneurismal rebleeding or repair or death were retrospectively included. Antihypertensive therapy based on a predefined standardized protocol was prescribed to lower and maintain SBP between 120 and 160 mm Hg. SBP was measured hourly until a censoring event occurred. SBPV was determined as standard deviation (SD) and successive variation (SV). Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Rebleeding occurred in 61 (10.0%) of the 612 patients. We identified 47 acute rebleeding as cases and 382 early repair or early death as controls. On binary logistic regression analysis, rebleeding was associated with the SD of SBP (odds ratio [OR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.131–1.391; P < 0.001) and the SV of SBP (OR, 1.131; 95% CI, 1.039–1.231; P = 0.004). No significant difference was seen between rebleeding and mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP). SBPV is associated with increased rates of acute aneurysmal rebleeding. Further prospective research is warranted to confirm that SBP stability prevents acute aneurysm rebleeding. PMID:26986118

  10. Endovascular Acute Stroke Treatment Performed by Vascular Interventional Radiologists: Is It Safe and Efficacious?

    SciTech Connect

    Fjetland, Lars Roy, Sumit; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Larsen, Jan Petter; Kurz, Martin W.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of neurointerventional procedures in acute stroke patients performed by a team of vascular interventional radiologists in close cooperation with diagnostic neuroradiologists and stroke neurologists and to compare the results with those of previous reports from centres with specialised interventional neuroradiologists. Material and Methods: A total of 39 patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion not responding to or not eligible for intravenous thrombolysis were treated with either intra-arterial thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy (Penumbra System or solitaire FR thrombectomy system, respectively) and included in our prospective study. Outcomes were measured using the modified Rankin scale after 90 days, and recanalization was assessed by thrombolysis using the myocardial infarction score. Results: Mean patient age was 68.3 {+-} 14.2 years; the average National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at hospital admission was 17.2 (SD = 6.2 [n = 38]). Successful recanalization was achieved in 74.4 % of patients. Median time from clinical onset to recanalization was 5 h 11 min. Procedure-related complications occurred in 5 % of patients, and 7.5 % had a symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Of the patients, 22.5 % died within the first 90 postprocedural days, 5 % of these from cerebral causes. Patients who were successfully recanalized had a clinical better outcome at follow-up than those in whom treatment failed. Of the patients, 35.9 % had an mRS score {<=}2 after 90 days. Conclusion: Our results are in line with those in the published literature and show that a treatment strategy with general interventional radiologists performing neurointerventional procedures in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusions can be achieved to the benefit of patients.

  11. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood vessel breaks and bleeds into the brain. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. Causes include a bleeding ... to find the cause of bleeding in the brain and then control it. Surgery may be needed. ...

  12. Acute management of poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherios, Archavlis; Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno

    2007-01-01

    Poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients present a high mortality and morbidity. In this study, we reviewed the acute interventional (surgical and endovascular) management of 109 SAH-poor condition patients, who were treated as early as logistically possible after confirming stable circulation parameters. Patients over the age of 70 years, without clinical response to painful stimulation were excluded. We recognized at least 3 different postinterventional therapeutic approaches: (1) Norm- or hypovolemic, normotensive hemodilution in 30 patients with space-occupying intracranial hematomas as well as in 31 cases with acute cerebro-spinal-fluid obstruction. (2) Normovolemic, hypertensive hemodilution after unilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 surgical- and 2 endovascular-treated patients with focalized space occupying lesions and reduced cerebral perfusion. (3) Hypovolemic, normo-, or hypertensive hemodilution after bilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 cases with massive brain-swelling. We observed a reduced mortality (21%). The overall late outcome was favorable in 56% and unfavorable in 23%. Selective aggressive treatment adapted to increase the cerebral perfusion, seems to be an effective therapy to improve the survival and outcome of several poor condition SAH-patients. PMID:18200827

  13. Safe intravenous thrombolysis in acute stroke despite treatment with rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Bornkamm, Katharina; Harloff, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Data regarding intravenous thrombolysis in stroke patients receiving new oral anticoagulant drugs (nOAC) is sparse. In the near future, however, an increasing number of patients with atrial fibrillation will suffer recurrent stroke despite treatment with nOAC. This will cause a significant therapeutic dilemma as thrombolysis is contraindicated under such circumstances. We describe an 81-year-old patient presenting with acute ischemic stroke who was successfully treated with intravenous thrombolysis despite ongoing treatment with rivaroxaban. Our case report indicates that thrombolysis under nOAC may be safe under certain conditions and emphasizes the importance of establishing and performing specific anticoagulation tests for nOAC. PMID:24938385

  14. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, James E.; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke. PMID:25669199

  15. No space left for intravenous thrombolysis in acute stroke: CONS.

    PubMed

    Muir, Keith

    2016-08-01

    Recent successful clinical trials of endovascular thrombectomy for large artery ischaemic stroke have established the value of this treatment modality as an adjunct to intravenous thrombolysis, not as an alternative: thrombectomy delivery was undertaken in the context of highly efficient networks for acute thrombolysis delivery and the great majority of patients received IV thrombolytic drug treatment. Even for the minority of acute stroke patients for whom thrombectomy is potentially relevant, access will be limited by geography and service infrastructure. Developments in intravenous thrombolysis in the near future will likely produce safer and more effective intravenous treatments. Intravenous thrombolysis will remain the first line of treatment for the great majority of acute stroke patients. PMID:27084182

  16. Imaging of occlusive thrombi in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gasparian, GG; Sanossian, N; Shiroishi, MS; Liebeskind, DS

    2015-01-01

    Thrombi, or clots, often occlude proximal segments of the cerebral arterial circulation in acute ischemic stroke. Thromboembolic occlusion or thrombi superimposed on atherosclerotic plaque are the principal focus of acute stroke therapies such as thrombolysis or thrombectomy. We review the imaging characteristics of thrombi on multimodal CT and MRI, angiography and ultrasonography, summarizing recent studies that facilitate therapeutic decision-making from these noninvasive studies. Information about the location, size and imaging characteristics can be ascertained using these techniques. Imaging findings in relation to occlusive thrombus have been correlated with clot pathology, response to therapeutic interventions, and clinical outcome. Diagnostic evaluation of occlusive thrombi on noninvasive studies now constitutes an integral component of acute stroke management. PMID:25545291

  17. Current perspectives on the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sherita N; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Johansen, Michelle C; McMurry, Timothy L; Johnston, Karen C; Southerland, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    In 1995, the NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) Stroke Study Group published the results of a large multicenter clinical trial demonstrating efficacy of intravenous tPA by revealing a 30% relative risk reduction (absolute risk reduction 11%–15%) compared with placebo at 90 days in the likelihood of having minimal or no disability. Since approval in 1996, tPA remains the only drug treatment for acute ischemic stroke approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Over the years, an abundance of research and clinical data has supported the safe and efficacious use of intravenous tPA in all eligible patients. Despite such supporting data, it remains substantially underutilized. Challenges to the utilization of tPA include narrow eligibility and treatment windows, risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, perceived lack of efficacy in certain high-risk subgroups, and a limited pool of neurological and stroke expertise in the community. With recent US census data suggesting annual stroke incidence will more than double by 2050, better education and consensus among both the medical and lay public are necessary to optimize the use of tPA for all eligible stroke patients. Ongoing and future research should continue to improve upon the efficacy of tPA through more rapid stroke diagnosis and treatment, refinement of advanced neuroimaging and stroke biomarkers, and successful demonstration of alternative means of reperfusion. PMID:24591838

  18. A Rare Case of Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Secondary to Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Kunal; Zainah, Hadeel; Bhatnagar, Shubhita; Stein, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare presentation of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. While histoplasmosis has been reported to cause hemoptysis and alveolar hemorrhage in children, the English language literature lacks any adult case reports documenting this association. We report a case of pulmonary histoplasmosis where the initial presentation was pneumonia with a subsequent diagnosis of DAH. PMID:26435863

  19. Optimal achieved blood pressure in acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Hisatomi; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Wang, Xia; Woodward, Mark; Robinson, Thompson; Stapf, Christian; Parsons, Mark; Lavados, Pablo M.; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Chalmers, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of intensive blood pressure (BP) lowering according to baseline BP levels and optimal achieved BP levels in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: INTERACT2 was an open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial in 2,839 patients with ICH within 6 hours of onset and elevated systolic BP (SBP) (150–220 mm Hg) who were allocated to receive intensive (target SBP <140 mm Hg within 1 hour, with lower limit of 130 mm Hg for treatment cessation) or guideline-recommended (target SBP <180 mm Hg) BP-lowering treatment. Outcome was physical function across all 7 levels of the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. Results: Analysis of the randomized comparisons showed that intensive BP lowering produced comparable benefits on physical function at 90 days in 5 subgroups defined by baseline SBP of <160, 160–169, 170–179, 180–189, and ≥190 mm Hg (p homogeneity = 0.790). Analyses of achieved BP showed linear increases in the risk of physical dysfunction for achieved SBP above 130 mm Hg for both hyperacute (1–24 hours) and acute (2–7 days) phases while modest increases were also observed for achieved SBP below 130 mm Hg. Conclusions: Intensive BP lowering appears beneficial across a wide range of baseline SBP levels, and target SBP level of 130–139 mm Hg is likely to provide maximum benefit in acute ICH. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that the effect of intensive BP lowering on physical function is not influenced by baseline BP. PMID:25552575

  20. Current management of acute ischemic stroke. Part 2: Antithrombotics, neuroprotectives, and stroke units.

    PubMed Central

    Herd, A. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To help family physicians who care for patients with acute stroke or who are involved in planning service delivery or resource allocation to understand recent developments in acute stroke care. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search indicated that most data were derived from well designed, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, including all the largest international studies and large systematic reviews. MAIN MESSAGE: Routine anticoagulation is not recommended except for circumstances such as cardioembolic stroke or deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis. Antiplatelet therapy with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (or another antiplatelet agent if ASA is contraindicated) should be initiated within 48 hours of stroke onset, although benefit is modest. Dedicated care for stroke patients reduces morbidity and mortality and can be cost effective. Recent research into defibrinogenating and neuroprotective agents suggests some benefit, although none are currently licensed for use. Combination therapy might be the answer. CONCLUSION: Management of acute stroke is an emerging discipline; many potential therapies are still experimental. PMID:11570305

  1. Cerebral venous circulatory disturbance as an informative prognostic marker for neonatal hemorrhagic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana; Pavlov, Alexey; Navolokin, Nikita; Lychagov, Vladislav; Abdurashitov, Arkady; Zinchenko, Ekaterina; Gekaluk, Artemiy; Zhu, Dan; Shi, Rui; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal hemorrhagic stroke (NHS) is a major problem of future generation's health due to the high rate of death and cognitive disability of newborns after NHS. The incidence of NHS in neonates cannot be predicted by standard diagnostic methods. Therefore, the identification of prognostic markers of NHS is crucial. There is evidence that stress-related alterations of cerebral blood flow (CBF) may contribute to NHS. Here, we assessed the stroke-associated CBF abnormalities for high prognosis of NHS using a new model of NHS induced by sound stress in the pre- and post-stroke state. With this aim, we used interdisciplinary methods such as a histological assay of brain tissues, laser speckle contrast imaging and Doppler coherent tomography to monitor cerebral circulation. Our results suggest that the venous stasis with such symptoms as progressive relaxation of cerebral veins, decrease the velocity of blood flow in them are prognostic markers for a risk of NHS and are an informative platform for a future study of corrections of cerebral venous circulatory disturbance related to NHS.

  2. The emerging role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenxing; Wu, Guiling; Fan, Chongxi; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Shuai; Yan, Xiaolong; Di, Shouyin; Ma, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wei; Yang, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) comprise a family of cytoplasmic transcription factors that mediate intracellular signaling. This signaling is typically generated at cell surface receptors, the activation of which results in the translocation of STATs to the nucleus. STATs are involved in biological events as diverse as embryonic development, programmed cell death, organogenesis, innate immunity, adaptive immunity and cell growth regulation in organisms ranging from slime molds to insects to humans. Numerous studies have demonstrated the activation of STAT3 in neurological diseases, particularly in cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Additionally, STAT3 has also been reported to play a critical role in neuroprotective therapies. In light of the pleiotropic effects of STAT3 on the nervous system, we present the elaborate network of roles that STAT3 plays in cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage in this review. First, we introduce basic knowledge regarding STAT3 and briefly summarize the activation, inactivation, and regulation of the STAT3 pathway. Next, we describe the activation of STAT3 following cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage. Subsequently, we discuss the physiopathological roles of STAT3 in cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage. Moreover, we summarize several significant cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke treatments that target the STAT3 signaling pathway, including pharmacological and physical therapies. Finally, we highlight research progress on STAT3 in stroke. This review presents the important roles of STAT3 in the nervous system and may contribute to the promotion of STAT3 as a new therapeutic target. PMID:26738445

  3. Reversal Strategies for Vitamin K Antagonists in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Parry-Jones, Adrian R; Di Napoli, Mario; Goldstein, Joshua N; Schreuder, Floris H B M; Tetri, Sami; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Yan, Bernard; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M; Dequatre-Ponchelle, Nelly; Lee-Archer, Matthew; Horstmann, Solveig; Wilson, Duncan; Pomero, Fulvio; Masotti, Luca; Lerpiniere, Christine; Godoy, Daniel Agustin; Cohen, Abigail S; Houben, Rik; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Pennati, Paolo; Fenoglio, Luigi; Werring, David; Veltkamp, Roland; Wood, Edith; Dewey, Helen M; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Klijn, Catharina J M; Meligeni, Fabrizio; Davis, Stephen M; Huhtakangas, Juha; Staals, Julie; Rosand, Jonathan; Meretoja, Atte

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence to guide treatment strategies for intracerebral hemorrhage on vitamin K antagonists (VKA-ICH). Treatments utilized in clinical practice include fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC). Our aim was to compare case fatality with different reversal strategies. Methods We pooled individual ICH patient data from 16 stroke registries in 9 countries (n = 10 282), of whom 1,797 (17%) were on VKA. After excluding 250 patients with international normalized ratio < 1.3 and/or missing data required for analysis, we compared all-cause 30-day case fatality using Cox regression. Results We included 1,547 patients treated with FFP (n = 377, 24%), PCC (n = 585, 38%), both (n = 131, 9%), or neither (n = 454, 29%). The crude case fatality and adjusted hazard ratio (HR) were highest with no reversal (61.7%, HR = 2.540, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.784–3.616, p < 0.001), followed by FFP alone (45.6%, HR = 1.344, 95% CI = 0.934–1.934, p = 0.112), then PCC alone (37.3%, HR = 1.445, 95% CI = 1.014–2.058, p = 0.041), compared to reversal with both FFP and PCC (27.8%, reference). Outcomes with PCC versus FFP were similar (HR = 1.075, 95% CI = 0.874–1.323, p = 0.492); 4-factor PCC (n = 441) was associated with higher case fatality compared to 3-factor PCC (n = 144, HR = 1.441, 95% CI = 1.041–1.995, p = 0.027). Interpretation The combination of FFP and PCC might be associated with the lowest case fatality in reversal of VKA-ICH, and FFP may be equivalent to PCC. Randomized controlled trials with functional outcomes are needed to establish the most effective treatment. PMID:25857223

  4. From preoperative evaluation to stroke center: Management of postoperative acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Thomas; Sigaut, Stéphanie; Puybasset, Louis; Deltour, Sandrine; Clarençon, Frédéric; Degos, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Perioperative acute ischaemic stroke is a rare complication with potentially catastrophic outcomes. It has been shown that paying attention to perioperative neurological deficits and acute ischaemic stroke prevention proves to be beneficial in avoiding these catastrophic outcomes and may lead to determining early therapeutic interventions. This article reviews the perioperative management (covering diagnosis and treatment), prevention (covering surgery postponement, management with anticoagulant/antiplatelet and the growing interest in statins and beta-blockers) and intraoperative recommendations (covering anaesthetic techniques, ventilation strategies, transfusion and blood pressure management) specifically for the general surgical population. A summary of current treatments is enlightened by recently described evidence for the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy. PMID:27091105

  5. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with multiple hemorrhagic brain metastases (case report)].

    PubMed

    Halefoğlu, Ahmet M; Ertürk, Mehmet; Ozel, Alper; Calişkan, K Can

    2004-06-01

    Intracranial metastases represent 7-17% of all brain tumors. Renal cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, choriocarcinoma, melanoma, retinoblastoma, lung cancer and breast cancer have a propensity for producing hemorrhagic brain metastases. Leukemias have also been rarely reported to cause hemorrhagic brain metastases. We describe an 18-year-old girl diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with multiple hemorrhagic brain metastases. MRI demonstrated high signal intensity lesions on both T1- and T2-weighted images which were characteristic for extracellular methemoglobin and consistent with hemorrhagic metastases. PMID:15236125

  6. Alteplase Treatment in Acute Stroke: Incorporating Food and Drug Administration Prescribing Information into Existing Acute Stroke Management Guide.

    PubMed

    Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2016-08-01

    Despite strong evidence that intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) improves outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients, its use in clinical practice remains modest. Complex eligibility criteria have been postulated as barriers to greater utilization. Further complicating this has been multiple guidelines and prescribing labels that have been published since first being approved for use in 1996. In this review, several warning and exclusion criteria for tPA in acute ischemic stroke are reviewed with the goal of providing readers a nuanced understanding of historical context and available evidence to make informed decision. PMID:27363696

  7. Acute cerebrovascular incident in a young woman: Venous or arterial stroke? – Comparative analysis based on two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Katarzyna; Zimny, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edyta; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Cerebrovascular diseases are the most common neurological disorders. Most of them are arterial strokes, mainly ischemic, less often of hemorrhagic origin. Changes in the course of cerebral venous thrombosis are less common causes of acute cerebrovascular events. Clinical and radiological presentation of arterial and venous strokes (especially in emergency head CT) may pose a diagnostic problem because of great resemblance. However, the distinction between arterial and venous stroke is important from a clinical point of view, as it carries implications for the treatment and determinates patient’s prognosis. Case Report In this article, we present cases of two young women (one with an acute venous infarction, the second with an arterial stroke) who presented with similar both clinical and radiological signs of acute vascular incident in the cerebral cortex. We present main similarities and differences between arterial and venous strokes regarding the etiology, clinical symptoms and radiological appearance in various imaging techniques. Conclusions We emphasize that thorough analysis of CT (including cerebral vessels), knowledge of symptoms and additional clinical information (e.g. risk factors) may facilitate correct diagnosis and allow planning further diagnostic imaging studies. We also emphasize the importance of MRI, especially among young people, in the differential diagnosis of venous and arterial infarcts. PMID:24505227

  8. No space left for intravenous thrombolysis in acute stroke: PROS.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Kateryna; Caso, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    Five recently published RCTs (MR CLEAN, EXTEND-IA, SWIFT PRIME, REVASCAT and ESCAPE) employing mechanical thrombectomy with modern stent retriever devices clearly demonstrated the superiority of endovascular treatment compared to thrombolysis alone, which is now considered standard first-line therapy for selected patients with acute severe ischemic stroke and large vessel in the anterior circulation. RCT results led to recommendations outlined in "Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN". Moreover, endovascular procedures in the 5 RCTs to date were performed at high-volume referral centers with, in some trials, rigid requirements for the interventionalist to participate, which may have contributed substantially to the excellent results, supporting the concept of centralization of intra-arterial thrombolysis resources and expertise. Therefore, patients with suspected large-artery occlusion and deemed candidates for thrombectomy, should be treated at a Comprehensive Stroke Centre with 24/7 endovascular treatment services. There seems to be limited space left for intravenous thrombolysis alone in acute stroke patients with large-vessel occlusions as thrombectomy plus thrombolysis continues to be reported as being superior with regard to outcome. PMID:27150103

  9. Treatment of patients with mild acute ischemic stroke and associated large vessel occlusion.

    PubMed

    Cerejo, Russell; Cheng-Ching, Esteban; Hui, Ferdinand; Hussain, M Shazam; Uchino, Ken; Bullen, Jennifer; Toth, Gabor

    2016-08-01

    Several recent studies have shown that patients presenting with mild acute ischemic stroke (mAIS) symptoms may have an unfavorable natural history. The presence of associated large vessel occlusion (LVO) may lead to even worse outcomes, but most mAIS patients are still excluded from acute stroke treatment (AST). A retrospective review of patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting to our institution between 2010 and 2014 was carried out. Inclusion criteria were mAIS (initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] ⩽7) due to LVO, presenting within 6hours from onset. Demographics, treatments and short-term outcomes were analyzed. Favorable 30day outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ⩽2. Out of 2636 patients, 62 patients (median age 63years, 33 (53.2%) males) met inclusion criteria. The anterior circulation was involved in 74.1%. Median admission NIHSS and pre-admission mRS were 4 and 0, respectively. Twenty-three patients (71.8%) received AST (intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: 14, intra-arterial therapy: 4, both: 5). Favorable outcomes were 4.5 times higher in treated (78.3%) versus untreated (53.8%) patients (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.26-19.2; p=0.028). None of the treated patients had symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. We demonstrate that a significant proportion of untreated mAIS patients with LVO have an unfavorable natural history. Our results suggest better outcomes in patients who receive early therapy rather than conservative management. The detection of LVO, even with mild clinical symptoms, may prompt rapid treatment considerations. PMID:27050916

  10. Acute intracranial hemorrhage secondary to thrombocytopenia: CT appearances unaffected by absence of clot retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, J.N.; Taber, K.H.; Hayman, L.A. )

    1994-02-01

    To describe the in vivo CT appearance of acute intracerebral blood clots formed from anemic platelet-depleted blood. Three patients with intracerebral hemorrhage secondary only to thrombocytopenia were examined with CT within 2 1/2 hours after the onset of clinical symptoms. There were no unusual CT features found in the intracerebral hemorrhages of patients with only thrombocytopenia. Specifically, a hyperdense zone(s) surrounded by areas of decreased density was identified. Clot retraction (which cannot occur in patients with severe thrombocytopenia) is not necessary for the CT appearance of acute intracerebral hemorrhage. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. [Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015: overview of the chapter on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    After an interval of 6 years, the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke were revised in 2015 in accordance with recent advances in clinical knowledge. The chapter on subarachnoid hemorrhage includes new and revised recommendations for diagnosis, treatment selection, and management of vasospasm. The chapter on diagnosis recommends re-examination of vascular images at regular intervals in cases in which cerebral aneurysm was not detected on the first examination. The section dealing with treatment selection for cerebral aneurysmal emphasizes that the method for aneurysm obliteration should be selected based on consultation with both surgical and endovascular specialists. The role of triple-H therapy(i.e., induced hypertension, hypervolemia, and hemodilution) has changed from a preventive measure to a treatment option for symptomatic cerebral vasospasm. PMID:27333759

  12. Strategies to improve recovery in acute ischemic stroke patients: Iberoamerican Stroke Group Consensus.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Gutiérrez-Fernández, M; Romano, M; Cantú-Brito, C; Arauz, A; Olmos, L E; Ameriso, S F; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2014-06-01

    Stroke is not only a leading cause of death worldwide but also a main cause of disability. In developing countries, its burden is increasing as a consequence of a higher life expectancy. Whereas stroke mortality has decreased in developed countries, in Latin America, stroke mortality rates continue to rise as well as its socioeconomic dramatic consequences. Therefore, it is necessary to implement stroke care and surveillance programs to better describe the epidemiology of stroke in these countries in order to improve therapeutic strategies. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenic processes of brain ischemia have resulted in development of effective therapies during the acute phase. These include reperfusion therapies (both intravenous thrombolysis and interventional endovascular approaches) and treatment in stroke units that, through application of management protocols directed to maintain homeostasis and avoid complications, helps to exert effective brain protection that decreases further cerebral damage. Some drugs may enhance protection, and besides, there is increasing knowledge about brain plasticity and repair mechanisms that take place for longer periods beyond the acute phase. These mechanisms are responsible for recovery in certain patients and are the focus of basic and clinical research at present. This paper discusses recovery strategies that have demonstrated clinical effect, or that are promising and need further study. This rapidly evolving field needs to be carefully and critically evaluated so that investment in patient care is grounded on well-proven strategies. PMID:23802573

  13. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Hassan; Daruwalla, Vistasp; Meisel, Jeremy; Kodsi, Samir E

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy. PMID:27493976

  14. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Hassan; Daruwalla, Vistasp; Meisel, Jeremy; Kodsi, Samir E.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy. PMID:27493976

  15. Autonomic dysfunction in acute ischemic stroke: an underexplored therapeutic area?

    PubMed

    De Raedt, Sylvie; De Vos, Aurelie; De Keyser, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    Impaired autonomic function, characterized by a predominance of sympathetic activity, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This review describes methods to measure autonomic dysfunction in stroke patients. It summarizes a potential relationship between ischemic stroke-associated autonomic dysfunction and factors that have been associated with worse outcome, including cardiac complications, blood pressure variability changes, hyperglycemia, immune depression, sleep disordered breathing, thrombotic effects, and malignant edema. Involvement of the insular cortex has been suspected to play an important role in causing sympathovagal imbalance, but its exact role and that of other brain regions remain unclear. Although sympathetic overactivity in patients with ischemic stroke appears to be a negative prognostic factor, it remains to be seen whether therapeutic strategies that reduce sympathetic activity or increase parasympathetic activity might improve outcome. PMID:25541326

  16. Intra-Arterial Treatment Methods in Acute Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh N.; Babikian, Viken L.; Romero, Rafael; Pikula, Aleksandra; Kase, Carlos S.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Norbash, Alexander M.

    2011-01-01

    Acute revascularization is associated with improved outcomes in ischemic stroke patients. It is unclear which method of intra-arterial intervention, if any, is ideal. Promising approaches in acute stroke treatment are likely a combination of intravenous and endovascular revascularization efforts, combining early treatment initiation with direct clot manipulation and/or PTA/stenting. In this review, we will discuss available thrombolytic therapies and endovascular recanalization techniques, beginning with chemical thrombolytic agents, followed by mechanical devices, and a review of ongoing trials. Further randomized studies comparing medical therapy, intravenous and endovascular treatments are essential, and their implementation will require the wide support and enthusiasm from the neurologic, neuroradiologic, and neurosurgical stroke communities. PMID:21516256

  17. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  18. An acute stroke evaluation app: a practice improvement project.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mark N; Fugate, Jennifer E; Barrett, Kevin M; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D

    2015-04-01

    A point-of-care workflow checklist in the form of an iOS (iPhone Operating System) app for use by stroke providers was introduced with the objective of standardizing acute stroke evaluation and documentation at 2 affiliated academic medical centers. Providers used the app in unselected, consecutive patients undergoing acute stroke evaluation in an emergency department or hospital setting between August 2012 and January 2013 and August 2013 and February 2014. Satisfaction surveys were prospectively collected pre- and postintervention from residents, staff neurologists, and clinical data specialists. Residents (20 preintervention and 16 postintervention), staff neurologists (6 pre and 5 post), and clinical data specialists (4 pre and 4 post) participated in this study. All 16 (100%) residents had increased satisfaction with their ability to perform an acute stroke evaluation postintervention but only 9 (56%) of 16 felt the app was more help than hindrance. Historical controls aligned with preintervention results. Staff neurologists conveyed increased satisfaction with resident presentations and decision making when compared to preintervention surveys. Stroke clinical data specialists estimated a 50% decrease in data abstraction when the app data were used in the clinical note. Concomitant effect on door-to-needle (DTN) time at 1 site, although not a primary study measure, was also evaluated. At that 1 center, the mean DTN time decreased by 16 minutes when compared to the corresponding months from the year prior. The point-of-care acute stroke workflow checklist app may assist trainees in presenting findings in a standardized manner and reduce data abstraction time. The app may help reduce DTN time, but this requires further study. PMID:25829986

  19. Acute development of collateral circulation and therapeutic prospects in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, Eri; Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, collateral circulation plays an important role in maintaining blood flow to the tissue that is at risk of progressing into ischemia, and in increasing the successful recanalization rate without hemorrhagic transformation. We have reported that well-developed collateral circulation is associated with smaller infarct volume and better long-term neurological outcome, and it disappears promptly once the effective recanalization is achieved. Contrary to the belief that collateral vessels develop over time in chronic stenotic condition, there exists a phenomenon that collateral circulation develops immediately in acute stenosis or occlusion of the arteries and it seems to be triggered by fluid shear stress, which occurs between the territories of stenotic/occluded arteries and those fed by surrounding intact arteries. We believe that this acute development of collateral circulation is a target of novel therapeutics in ischemic stroke and refer our recent attempt in enhancing collateral circulation by modulating sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1, which is a known shear-stress mechanosensing protein. PMID:27127459

  20. Intracranial chordoma presenting as acute hemorrhage in a child: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kenneth A.; Bohnstedt, Bradley N.; Shah, Sanket U.; Abdulkader, Marwah M.; Bonnin, Jose M.; Ackerman, Laurie L.; Shaikh, Kashif A.; Kralik, Stephen F.; Shah, Mitesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chordomas are rare, slow-growing malignant neoplasms derived from remnants of the embryological notochord. Pediatric cases comprise only 5% of all chordomas, but more than half of the reported pediatric chordomas are intracranial. For patients of all ages, intracranial chordomas typically present with symptoms such as headaches and progressive neurological deficits occurring over several weeks to many years as they compress or invade local structures. There are only reports of these tumors presenting acutely with intracranial hemorrhage in adult patients. Case Description: A 10-year-old boy presented with acute onset of headache, emesis, and diplopia. Head computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of brain were suspicious for a hemorrhagic mass located in the left petroclival region, compressing the ventral pons. The mass was surgically resected and demonstrated acute intratumoral hemorrhage. Pathologic examination was consistent with chordoma. Conclusion: There are few previous reports of petroclival chordomas causing acute intracranial hemorrhage. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of a petroclival chordoma presenting as acute intracranial hemorrhage in a pediatric patient. Although uncommon, it is important to consider chordoma when evaluating a patient of any age presenting with a hemorrhagic lesion of the clivus. PMID:25949851

  1. Factor XIII-A subunit Val34Leu polymorphism in fatal hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Antalfi, B; Pongrácz, E; Csiki, Z; Mezei, Z A; Shemirani, A H

    2013-02-01

    Blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) plays a key role in the protection of fibrin clot against fibrinolysis, in the cross-linking of fibrin and its mechanical strength. The role of the FXIII-A subunit Val34Leu polymorphism with fatal primary intracerebral hemorrhages (PICH) has not been studied. We evaluated retrospectively the prevalence of this polymorphism in stroke patients with fatal PICH and population control matched for age and gender. The prevalence of this polymorphism was determined for patients with fatal PICH (n = 98, female/male: 41/57) and controls. DNA was obtained from peripheral white blood cells in case of controls and from paraffin-embedded tissue sections in case of fatal PICH. The odds for increasing the risk of PICH against the control group were 5.429, 3.286, and 7.661 for total, female, and male patients, respectively. The Leu34Leu homozygous variant of the FXIII Val34Leu polymorphism significantly increased the risk of fatal PICH stroke in men. PMID:22909010

  2. Early embolic events complicating intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ping Song; Lin, Chien Hung; Chao, Hai Lun; Chao, A Ching

    2012-11-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) is the only established thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, secondary embolism after IV rt-PA for acute ischemic stroke is recognized as an uncommon complication, and the pathophysiology is unclear. We describe a 72-year-old man with acute infarction in the territory of left anterior cerebral artery who developed new infarction in the territory of right middle cerebral artery and acute peripheral arterial occlusion after IV rt-PA therapy. It suggested a central embolic source. Because the patient has paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (Af), the possible embolic sources may come from fragmentation of pre-existing intra-atrial clot. Although Af and the presence of cardiac thrombus are not contraindication for IV rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke, our case and review suggested that the administration of IV rt-PA to patients with known Af and intracardiac thrombus could represent a particular risk situation and should be carefully evaluated. PMID:22205004

  3. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Confers Acute Neuroprotection After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Alleyne, Cargill H; Dhandapani, Krishnan M

    2016-04-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a stroke subtype with no effective treatment. Though ICH is known to induce severe neurological damage, the molecular mechanisms of neurological injury after ICH remain largely unclear. Given the emerging role of epigenetic mechanisms in neurodegeneration, the present study evaluated whether suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA: vorinostat), a clinically well-tolerated pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), would attenuate neurological injury and improve functional outcomes in a preclinical model of ICH. Mice were administered with SAHA or vehicle after an induction of ICH and acute neuronal death, glial activation, and neurological outcomes were assessed. SAHA-treated mice exhibited less neurodegeneration with concomitant improvement in neurological outcomes than vehicle-treated mice. Furthermore, SAHA downregulated glial activation and the expression of heme oxygenase-1, a stress-inducible enzyme that plays critical roles in neurological damage after ICH. Altogether, the data strongly suggest the role of epigenetic mechanisms in inducing neurological injury after ICH and raise the possible clinical utility of SAHA for therapeutic intervention after ICH. PMID:26338677

  4. Human Motor Cortex Functional Changes in Acute Stroke: Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Pino, Giovanni; Ranieri, Federico; Lotti, Fiorenza; Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante

    2016-01-01

    The acute phase of stroke is accompanied by functional changes in the activity and interplay of both hemispheres. In healthy subjects, gender is known to impact the functional brain organization. We investigated whether gender influences also acute stroke functional changes. In thirty-five ischemic stroke patients, we evaluated the excitability of the affected (AH) and unaffected hemisphere (UH) by measuring resting and active motor threshold (AMT) and motor-evoked potential amplitude under baseline conditions and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) of AH. We also computed an index of the excitability balance between the hemispheres, laterality indexes (LI), to evidence hemispheric asymmetry. AMT differed significantly between AH and UH only in the male group (p = 0.004), not in females (p > 0.200), and both LIAMT and LIRMT were significantly higher in males than in females (respectively p = 0.033 and p = 0.042). LTP-like activity induced by iTBS in AH was more frequent in females. Gender influences the functional excitability changes that take place after human stroke and the level of LTP that can be induced by repetitive stimulation. This knowledge is of high value in the attempt of individualizing to different genders any non-invasive stimulation strategy designed to foster stroke recovery. PMID:26858590

  5. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Jin, G.; Qin, M.X.; Wan, Z.B.; Wang, J.B.; Wang, C.; Guo, W.Y.; Xu, L.; Ning, X.; Xu, J.; Pu, X.J.; Chen, M.S.; Zhao, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH) is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. These devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions of the world, emergency departments, and emergency zones. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of ACH. The system measures the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS) between the electromagnetic signals on two coils. ACH was induced in 6 experimental rabbits and edema was induced in 4 control rabbits by stereotactic methods, and their intracranial pressure and heart rate were monitored for 1 h. Signals were continuously monitored for up to 1 h at an exciting frequency of 10.7 MHz. Autologous blood was administered to the experimental group, and saline to the control group (1 to 3 mL) by injection of 1-mL every 5 min. The results showed a significant increase in MIPS as a function of the injection volume, but the heart rate was stable. In the experimental (ACH) group, there was a statistically significant positive correlation of the intracranial pressure and MIPS. The change of MIPS was greater in the ACH group than in the control group. This high-sensitivity system could detect a 1-mL change in blood volume. The MIPS was significantly related to the intracranial pressure. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable for detecting early warning signs in emergency medicine and critical care units. PMID:24519130

  6. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  7. Adrenal dysfunction in portal hypertensive rats with acute hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fa-Yauh; Wang, Sun-Sang; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in shock and poorer portal hypotensive effect to vasoconstrictors in portal hypertension with hemorrhage, the so-called splanchnic hyposensitivity. Relative adrenal insufficiency accompanies hemorrhagic shock and is found in liver disease, the 'hepatoadrenal syndrome', but the relevant interactions remain unsettled. Portal hypertensive rats were induced by partial portal vein ligation (PVL). Experiments were performed on the 14th day post PVL: (I) ACTH stimulation test for rats without or with hemorrhage; (II) Glypressin response (mean arterial pressure, MAP; portal pressure, PP) in rats (a) without hemorrhage or with hemorrhage, injected with (b) distilled water (DW), (c) dexamethasone 3 mg/kg; (III) To survey the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid without being confounded by endogenous adrenal hormone, glypressin response was surveyed in PVL rats with adrenalectomy: (a) without hemorrhage or with hemorrhage, injected with (b) DW; (c) dexamethasone 3 mg/kg; (d) dexamethasone 5 mg/kg. Plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations and abdominal aorta (AA), superior mesenteric artery (SMA) NO synthases (NOS) mRNA expressions were determined. The results showed that ACTH induced corticosterone release similarly in PVL rats with or without hemorrhage. In bleeding PVL rats, dexamethasone (1) down-regulated AA NOS and enhanced glypressin-induced MAP elevation; (2) did not influence glypressin-induced PP reduction; (3) reduced TNF-α. In bleeding PVL and adrenalectomized rats, high-dose dexamethasone (1) down-regulated AA/SMA NOS; (2) enhanced glypressin-induced MAP elevation and PP reduction; (3) reduced TNF-α. In conclusion, bleeding portal hypertensive rats failed to enhance corticosterone release, suggesting a relative adrenal insufficiency. High-dose dexamethasone reversed systemic hypotension and splanchnic hyporesponsiveness to glypressin in adrenalectomized PVL rats accompanied by TNF-α and NOS down

  8. Adrenal Dysfunction in Portal Hypertensive Rats with Acute Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Fa-Yauh; Wang, Sun-Sang; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in shock and poorer portal hypotensive effect to vasoconstrictors in portal hypertension with hemorrhage, the so-called splanchnic hyposensitivity. Relative adrenal insufficiency accompanies hemorrhagic shock and is found in liver disease, the ‘hepatoadrenal syndrome’, but the relevant interactions remain unsettled. Portal hypertensive rats were induced by partial portal vein ligation (PVL). Experiments were performed on the 14th day post PVL: (I) ACTH stimulation test for rats without or with hemorrhage; (II) Glypressin response (mean arterial pressure, MAP; portal pressure, PP) in rats (a) without hemorrhage or with hemorrhage, injected with (b) distilled water (DW), (c) dexamethasone 3 mg/kg; (III) To survey the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid without being confounded by endogenous adrenal hormone, glypressin response was surveyed in PVL rats with adrenalectomy: (a) without hemorrhage or with hemorrhage, injected with (b) DW; (c) dexamethasone 3 mg/kg; (d) dexamethasone 5 mg/kg. Plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations and abdominal aorta (AA), superior mesenteric artery (SMA) NO synthases (NOS) mRNA expressions were determined. The results showed that ACTH induced corticosterone release similarly in PVL rats with or without hemorrhage. In bleeding PVL rats, dexamethasone (1) down-regulated AA NOS and enhanced glypressin-induced MAP elevation; (2) did not influence glypressin-induced PP reduction; (3) reduced TNF-α. In bleeding PVL and adrenalectomized rats, high-dose dexamethasone (1) down-regulated AA/SMA NOS; (2) enhanced glypressin-induced MAP elevation and PP reduction; (3) reduced TNF-α. In conclusion, bleeding portal hypertensive rats failed to enhance corticosterone release, suggesting a relative adrenal insufficiency. High-dose dexamethasone reversed systemic hypotension and splanchnic hyporesponsiveness to glypressin in adrenalectomized PVL rats accompanied by TNF-α and NOS down

  9. Prehospital Use of Magnesium Sulfate as Neuroprotection in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel J.; Pratt, Franklin D.; Hamilton, Scott; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S.; Sung, Gene; Kramer, Ian; Moreau, Gary; Goldweber, Robert; Sanossian, Nerses

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnesium sulfate is neuroprotective in preclinical models of stroke and has shown signals of potential efficacy with an acceptable safety profile when delivered early after stroke onset in humans. Delayed initiation of neuroprotective agents has hindered earlier phase 3 trials of neuroprotective agents. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with suspected stroke to receive either intravenous magnesium sulfate or placebo, beginning within 2 hours after symptom onset. A loading dose was initiated by paramedics before the patient arrived at the hospital, and a 24-hour maintenance infusion was started on the patient’s arrival at the hospital. The primary outcome was the degree of disability at 90 days, as measured by scores on the modified Rankin scale (range, 0 to 6, with higher scores indicating greater disability). RESULTS Among the 1700 enrolled patients (857 in the magnesium group and 843 in the placebo group), the mean (±SD) age was 69±13 years, 42.6% were women, and the mean pretreatment score on the Los Angeles Motor Scale of stroke severity (range, 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating greater motor deficits) was 3.7±1.3. The final diagnosis of the qualifying event was cerebral ischemia in 73.3% of patients, intracranial hemorrhage in 22.8%, and a stroke-mimicking condition in 3.9%. The median interval between the time the patient was last known to be free of stroke symptoms and the start of the study-drug infusion was 45 minutes (interquartile range, 35 to 62), and 74.3% of patients received the study-drug infusion within the first hour after symptom onset. There was no significant shift in the distribution of 90-day disability outcomes on the global modified Rankin scale between patients in the magnesium group and those in the placebo group (P = 0.28 by the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel test); mean scores at 90 days did not differ between the magnesium group and the placebo group (2.7 in each group, P = 1.00). No significant between

  10. Increased Risk of Post-Trauma Stroke after Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Liao, Kuo-Hsing; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2016-07-01

    This study determines whether acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an independent risk factor for an increased risk of post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) stroke during 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year follow-ups, respectively, after adjusting for other covariates. Clinical data for the analysis were from the National Health Insurance Database 2000, which covered a total of 2121 TBI patients and 101 patients with a diagnosis of TBI complicated with ARDS (TBI-ARDS) hospitalized between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2005. Each patient was tracked for 5 years to record stroke occurrences after discharge from the hospital. The prognostic value of TBI-ARDS was evaluated using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. The main outcome found that stroke occurred in nearly 40% of patients with TBI-ARDS, and the hazard ratio for post-TBI stroke increased fourfold during the 5-year follow-up period after adjusting for other covariates. The increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke in the ARDS group was considerably higher than in the TBI-only cohort. This is the first study to report that post-traumatic ARDS yielded an approximate fourfold increased risk of stroke in TBI-only patients. We suggest intensive and appropriate medical management and intensive follow-up of TBI-ARDS patients during the beginning of the hospital discharge. PMID:26426583

  11. Drug repurposing for immune modulation in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Amantea, Diana; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune cells play a dualistic role in the evolution of ischemic brain damage, with classic phenotypes promoting injury, and alternatively activated M2 microglia/macrophages or N2 neutrophils providing tissue remodelling and repair. Recently, a number of drugs commonly used for other indications (i.e., azithromycin, minocycline, bexarotene, rosiglitazone, metformin) was reported to provide neuroprotection in preclinical stroke models by promoting immune polarization towards non-inflammatory, protective phenotypes. Repurposing drugs with a well-established safety profile should allow a reduction in the risk of clinical trial failure that has dominated the unsuccessful development of neuroprotective drugs in stroke during the last decades. The clinical validation of the proof of concept, followed by the assessment of safety and efficacy of immune-polarizing repurposed drugs will definitively offer new opportunities for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:26657075

  12. Leptomeningeal transthyretin-type amyloidosis presenting as acute hydrocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bevers, Matthew B; McGuone, Declan; Jerath, Nivedita U; Musolino, Patricia L

    2016-07-01

    We present a report of a 47-year-old woman with developmental delay who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage and acute hydrocephalus. She did not have an aneurysm, but there was symmetric calcification and gadolinium-enhancement of the meninges within the Sylvian fissure. Biopsy and genetic testing confirmed transthyretin-type amyloidosis. It is important to consider such rare causes in atypical presentations of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26896372

  13. Carotid Artery Stenosis with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Stenting versus Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Villwock, Mark R.; Padalino, David J.; Deshaies, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Background When a patient with carotid artery stenosis presents emergently with acute ischemic stroke, the optimum treatment plan is not clearly defined. If intervention is warranted, and open surgery is prohibitive, endovascular revascularization may be performed. The use of stents places the patient at additional risk due to their thrombogenic potential. The intent of this study was to compare outcomes following endovascular approaches (angioplasty alone vs. stent) in the setting of acute stroke. Methods We extracted a population from the National Inpatient Sample (2012) and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2003–2011) composed of patients with carotid artery stenosis with infarction that were admitted nonelectively and received endovascular revascularization. Patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy or thrombolysis were excluded. Categorical variables were compared between treatment groups with Chi-squared tests. Binary logistic regression was performed to evaluate mortality and iatrogenic stroke while controlling for age, case severity, and comorbidity burden. Results About 6,333 admissions met our criteria. A majority were treated via stenting (89%, n = 5,608). The angioplasty-alone group had significantly higher mortality (9.0% vs. 3.8%, p < 0.001) and iatrogenic stroke rate (3.9% vs. 1.9%, p < 0.001) than the stent group. The adjusted odds ratios of mortality and iatrogenic stroke for patients treated with angioplasty alone were 1.953 (p < 0.001) and 1.451 (p = 0.105), respectively, in comparison to patients treated with carotid stenting. Conclusion Multivariate analysis found the risk of mortality to be elevated following angioplasty alone. This may represent selection bias, but it also may indicate that symptomatic patients with stroke suffer from severe stenosis and unstable plaques that would benefit from stent placement. These results would caution angioplasty alone as an arm of a future randomized trial involving this severely burdened patient

  14. Treating the acute stroke patient as an emergency: current practices and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S; Lees, K; Donnan, G

    2006-01-01

    Summary Developments in acute stroke therapy have followed advances in the understanding of the evolving pathophysiology in both ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). In ischaemic stroke, rapid reperfusion of the ischaemic penumbra with thrombolysis within 3 h of symptom onset is of proven benefit, but few patients currently receive therapy, mainly due to the short-time window and lack of stroke expertise. In ICH, a recent study indicated that a haemostatic agent can limit ongoing bleeding and improve outcomes when administered within 4 h of stroke onset. These advances in acute stroke therapy underlie the concept that ‘time is brain’ and that urgent intervention can limit cerebral damage. Neuroprotective therapy could offer the prospect of a greater proportion of stroke patients receiving treatment, potentially before imaging and even in the ambulance setting. Virtually all stroke patients would benefit from receiving multidisciplinary care in acute stroke units. PMID:16620351

  15. The implementation of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke--a scientific position statement from the National Stroke Foundation and the Stroke Society of Australasia.

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been licensed in Australia for thrombolysis in selected patients with acute ischaemic stroke since 2003. The use of tPA is low but is increasing across Australia and national audits indicate efficacy and safety outcomes equivalent to international benchmarks. Implementing tPA therapy in clinical practice is, however, challenging and requires a coordinated multidisciplinary approach to acute stroke care across prehospital, emergency department and inpatient care sectors. Stroke care units are an essential ingredient underpinning safe implementation of stroke thrombolysis. Support systems such as care pathways, therapy delivery protocols, and thrombolysis-experienced multidisciplinary care teams are also important enablers. Where delivery of stroke thrombolysis is being planned, health systems need to be re-configured to provide these important elements. This consensus statement provides a review of the evidence for, and implementation of, tPA in acute ischaemic stroke with specific reference to the Australian health-care system. PMID:19545242

  16. Association study of BUD13-ZNF259 gene rs964184 polymorphism and hemorrhagic stroke risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengjun; Zhao, Jikuang; Wang, Zhepei; Li, Keqin; Nie, Sheng; Gao, Feng; Sun, Jie; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association of rs964184 of BUD13-ZNF259 gene with the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (HS). A total of 138 HS cases and 587 controls were recruited for the association of rs964184 of BUD13-ZNF259 gene with the risk of HS. Tm shift PCR was used for genotyping. We were unable to find the association of rs964184 of BUD13-ZNF259 gene with the risk of HS (P>0.05). Significant difference was found in the TG level among the three genotypes (CC: 1.51±1.02; CG: 1.68±1.10; GG: 1.90±1.11, P=0.036). The TG level showed strong correlation with rs964184 genotypes (P=0.010, correlation=0.101). Significantly higher TC, HDL-C, and LDL-C levels were observed in the case group. And no difference was found in the TG, ApoA-I, ApoB. Our case-control study supported the significant association between rs964184 genotype and the blood TG concentration, although we were unable to find association between BUD13-ZNF259 rs964184 and the risk of HS in Han Chinese. PMID:26885234

  17. Is the serum ferritin level a considerable predictor for hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Mehrpour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhagic Transformation (HT) of Ischemic Stroke (IS) is a detrimental complication. This study investigated the association between serum ferritin level and HT in patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery. Methods: Thirty patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. They were divided into two groups based on the serum ferritin level, lower or greater than 164.1ng/ml at the first 24 hours after admission. To investigate the incidence of HT in the two groups, we observed them for two weeks. Results: During the two- week observation, the incidence of HT was two persons (13.3%) in the group with the serum ferritin level of lower than 164.1ng/ml, and eight persons (53.3%) in the other group. This difference was statistically significant between the two groups (p=0.02). The relative risk of HT was 4 (95% CI: 1.012- 15.8) in the patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery and the serum ferritin level greater than 164.1ng/ml. Conclusion: This study revealed that the serum ferritin level greater than 164.1ng/ml in the first 24 hours after admission is a reasonably important predictor for HT of IS. Conducting studies on factors affecting the serum ferritin level are suggested. PMID:27493907

  18. Hunting mimics and chameleons: diagnostic difficulties in atypical acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Nicholas Russell; Hari-Bhaskar, Kemparaju

    2014-01-01

    The seemingly straightforward diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke can be complicated by the presence of conditions presenting similarly to stroke, and atypical strokes presenting with confusing and non-classical signs. We present a diagnostic quest to disentangle the effects of a number of stroke mimics from those of an underlying bilateral cerebrovascular phenomena, where with appropriate treatment of the non-stroke conditions the patient was able to make a near complete neurological recovery. PMID:24891484

  19. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Connected Home » Stroke Heath and Aging Stroke What Is a Stroke? Stroke Is an Emergency. ... IGNORE THE SIGNS OF STROKE! What Is a Stroke? A stroke happens when something changes how blood ...

  20. Trends in oral anticoagulant choice for acute stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in Japan: The SAMURAI‐NVAF Study

    PubMed Central

    Arihiro, Shoji; Todo, Kenichi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kazumi; Furui, Eisuke; Terasaki, Tadashi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Kamiyama, Kenji; Takizawa, Shunya; Okuda, Satoshi; Okada, Yasushi; Kameda, Tomoaki; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Kario, Kazuomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Koga, Masatoshi; Nagatsuka, K; Minematsu, K; Nakagawara, J; Akiyama, H; Shibazaki, K; Maeda, K; Shibuya, S; Yoshimura, S; Endo, K; Miyagi, T; Osaki, M; Kobayashi, J; Okata, T; Tanaka, E; Sakamoto, Y; Takizawa, H; Takasugi, J; Tokunaga, K; Homma, K; Kinoshita, N; Matsuki, T; Higashida, K; Shiozawa, M; Kanai, H; Uehara, S

    2015-01-01

    Background Large clinical trials are lack of data on non‐vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for acute stroke patients. Aim To evaluate the choice of oral anticoagulants at acute hospital discharge in stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and clarify the underlying characteristics potentially affecting that choice using the multicenter Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk‐factor Assessment and Improvement‐NVAF registry (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01581502). Method The study included 1192 acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (527 women, 77·7 ± 9·9 years old) between September 2011 and March 2014, during which three nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant oral anticoagulants were approved for clinical use. Oral anticoagulant choice at hospital discharge (median 23‐day stay) was assessed. Results Warfarin was chosen for 650 patients, dabigatran for 203, rivaroxaban for 238, and apixaban for 25. Over the three 10‐month observation periods, patients taking warfarin gradually decreased to 46·5% and those taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants increased to 48·0%. As compared with warfarin users, patients taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants included more men, were younger, more frequently had small infarcts, and had lower scores for poststroke CHADS 2, CHA 2 DS 2‐VASc, and HAS‐BLED, admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale, and discharge modified Rankin Scale. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were started at a median of four‐days after stroke onset without early intracranial hemorrhage. Patients starting nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants earlier had smaller infarcts and lower scores for the admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale and the discharge modified Rankin Scale than those starting later. Choice of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants was independently associated with 20‐day or

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction and Procoagulant Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Arnon; Vaispapir, Vladimir; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Soboh, Soboh; Yehuda, Hila; Tamir, Snait

    2012-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilator function may be regarded as an index of inflammation. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity, and outcome. Our aim was to measure systemic vascular function directly (using forearm flow mediated dilatation) in patients with acute ischemic stroke and to clarify whether recent acute ischemic stroke is associated with impaired vascular function. Patients who were not eligible for thrombolytic therapy because of delayed arrival were randomly recruited to the study after signing a consent form. All 43 patients were conscious and had an acute ischemic stroke. Brain CT was performed on admission, and clinical evaluation was carried out by a neurologist on admission and four days later. Vascular responsiveness was evaluated by ABI and by endothelial function measurements on admission. Levels of P-selectin were measured during the first 24 hrs and on day 4. Forty-three patients (28 men and 15 women) and 23 healthy men (control) were enrolled in the study. Patients were older (62.4±12.5 y vs 44.2±11.6 y, p=0.001), had worse endothelial dysfunction (–4.4±7.4% vs 16.6±7.6%, p=0.001), and had a higher BMI (28±6 vs 24±5, p=0.001). No gender effect was found in endothelial function (–5.1±7.8% vs –2.5±6.6%, p=0.25) and ABI (1.0±0.26 vs 1.0±0.5, p=0.29). However, men had lower BMIs compared to women (26.8±5.8 vs 31.4±5.5, p=0.01). The neurological scale decreased from 4.9±3.4 to 3.2±3.0 on day 4 (p=0.001). In men, it was 4.8±3.8 on admission, and decreased to 3.2±3.4 on day 4 (p=0.001). In women, it was 5.0±2.7, and decreased to 3.3±2.3 on day 4 (p=0.001). P-selectin levels were high on admission (68.0±55.5 pg/ml) and increased 4 days later (102.3±72.0 pg/ml) (p=0.01). Men had higher levels on admission (79.1± 66.7 pg/ml vs 48.9± 15.4 pg/ml, p=0.02) and rose on day 4 to 113.6±82.6 pg/ml (p=0.05); in women P

  2. Imaging Evidence for Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS), a rare complication after cerebral revascularization, is a well-described phenomenon after carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting. However, the imaging evidence of CHS after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (iv tPA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has not been reported. Case Report. Four patients were determined to have manifestations of CHS with clinical deterioration after treatment with iv tPA, including one patient who developed seizure, one patient who had a deviation of the eyes toward lesion with worsened mental status, and two patients who developed worsened hemiparesis. In all four patients, postthrombolysis head CT examinations were negative for hemorrhage; CT angiogram showed patent cervical and intracranial arterial vasculature; CT perfusion imaging revealed hyperperfusion with increased relative cerebral blood flow and relative cerebral blood volume and decreased mean transit time along with decreased time to peak in the clinically related artery territory. Vascular dilation was also noted in three of these four cases. Conclusions. CHS should be considered in patients with clinical deterioration after iv tPA and imaging negative for hemorrhage. Cerebral angiogram and perfusion studies can be useful in diagnosing CHS thereby helping with further management. PMID:27242938

  3. Protein methionine oxidation augments reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Blokhin, Ilya O.; Wilson, Katina M.; Dhanesha, Nirav; Doddapattar, Prakash; Grumbach, Isabella M.; Chauhan, Anil K.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Reperfusion injury can exacerbate tissue damage in ischemic stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms linking ROS to stroke severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that protein methionine oxidation potentiates NF-κB activation and contributes to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that overexpression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme that reverses protein methionine oxidation, attenuated ROS-augmented NF-κB activation in endothelial cells, in part, by protecting against the oxidation of methionine residues in the regulatory domain of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In a murine model, MsrA deficiency resulted in increased NF-κB activation and neutrophil infiltration, larger infarct volumes, and more severe neurological impairment after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This phenotype was prevented by inhibition of NF-κB or CaMKII. MsrA-deficient mice also exhibited enhanced leukocyte rolling and upregulation of E-selectin, an endothelial NF-κB–dependent adhesion molecule known to contribute to neurovascular inflammation in ischemic stroke. Finally, bone marrow transplantation experiments demonstrated that the neuroprotective effect was mediated by MsrA expressed in nonhematopoietic cells. These findings suggest that protein methionine oxidation in nonmyeloid cells is a key mechanism of postischemic oxidative injury mediated by NF-κB activation, leading to neutrophil recruitment and neurovascular inflammation in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27294204

  4. The economics of treating stroke as an acute brain attack

    PubMed Central

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Currently, treatments for ischemic stroke focus on restoring or improving perfusion to the ischemic area using thrombolytics. The increased hospitalization costs related to thrombolysis are offset by a decrease in rehabilitation costs, for a net cost savings to the healthcare system. However, early treatment is essential. The benefit of thrombolysis is time-dependent but only a very small proportion of patients, 2%, are presently being treated with tPA. In the United States, if the proportion of all ischemic stroke patients that receive tPA were increased to 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, or 20%, the realized cost saving would be approximately $ 15, 22, 30, 37, 55, and 74 million, respectively. Being so, efforts should be made to educate the public and paramedics regarding early stroke signs. Furthermore, additional acute stroke therapy training programs need to be established for emergency departments. Finally, hospital systems need to be re-engineered to treat patients as quickly as possible in order to optimize thrombolytic benefit as well as maximize cost-effectiveness. PMID:19775424

  5. The economics of treating stroke as an acute brain attack.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Currently, treatments for ischemic stroke focus on restoring or improving perfusion to the ischemic area using thrombolytics. The increased hospitalization costs related to thrombolysis are offset by a decrease in rehabilitation costs, for a net cost savings to the healthcare system. However, early treatment is essential. The benefit of thrombolysis is time-dependent but only a very small proportion of patients, 2%, are presently being treated with tPA. In the United States, if the proportion of all ischemic stroke patients that receive tPA were increased to 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, or 20%, the realized cost saving would be approximately $ 15, 22, 30, 37, 55, and 74 million, respectively. Being so, efforts should be made to educate the public and paramedics regarding early stroke signs. Furthermore, additional acute stroke therapy training programs need to be established for emergency departments. Finally, hospital systems need to be re-engineered to treat patients as quickly as possible in order to optimize thrombolytic benefit as well as maximize cost-effectiveness. PMID:19775424

  6. New pathways for evaluating potential acute stroke therapies.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Marc; Cheung, Kenneth; Howard, George; Warach, Steven

    2006-05-01

    Pharmacological therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains limited to one successful, approved treatment: tissue plasminogen activator within 3 h of stroke onset. Many neuroprotective drugs and a few other thrombolytics were evaluated in clinical trials, but none demonstrated unequivocal success and were approved by regulatory agencies. The development paradigm for such therapies needs to provide convincing evidence of efficacy and safety to obtain approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA modernization act of 1997 stated that such evidence could be derived from one large phase III trial with a clinical endpoint and supportive evidence. Drugs being developed for acute ischemic stroke can potentially be approved under this act by coupling a major phase III trial with supportive evidence provided by a phase IIB trial demonstrating an effect on a relevant biomarker such as magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography assessment of ischemic lesion growth. Statistical approaches have been developed to optimize the design of such an imaging-based phase IIB study, for example approaches that modify randomization probabilities to assign larger proportions of patients to the 'winning' strategy (i.e. 'pick the winner' strategies) with an interim assessment to reduce the sample size requirement. Demonstrating a treatment effect on a relevant imaging-based biomarker should provide supportive evidence for a new drug application, if a subsequent phase III trial with a clinical outcome demonstrates a significant treatment effect. PMID:18706045

  7. Repurposing an Old Drug to Improve the Use and Safety of Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration–approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Minocycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that has been found to be a neuroprotective agent in preclinical ischemic stroke models. Minocycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9, a biomarker for ICH associated with tPA use. Minocycline is also an anti-inflammatory agent and inhibits poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Minocycline has been safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:20410869

  8. Repurposing an old drug to improve the safety and use of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C; Fagan, Susan

    2014-01-01

    There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Minocycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic that has been found to be a neuroprotective agent in preclinical ischemic stroke models. Minocycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9, a biomarker for ICH associated with tPA use. Minocycline is also an anti-inflammatory agent and inhibits poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase- 1. Minocycline has been safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:20575623

  9. Timing of blood pressure lowering in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Carcel, Cheryl; Anderson, Craig S

    2015-08-01

    Whether there are any benefits without harm from early lowering of blood pressure (BP) in the setting of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has been a longstanding controversy in medicine. Whilst most studies have consistently shown associations between elevated BP, particularly systolic BP, and poor outcome, some also report that very low BP (systolic <130 mmHg) and large reductions in systolic BP are associated with poor outcomes in AIS. However, despite these associations, the observed U- or J-shaped relationship between BP and outcome in these patients may not be causally related. Patients with more severe strokes may have a more prominent autonomic response and later lower BP as their condition worsens, often pre-terminally. Fortunately, substantial progress has been made in recent years with new evidence arising from well-conducted randomized trials. This review outlines new evidence and recommendations for clinical practice over BP management in AIS. PMID:26041479

  10. Exertional heat stroke and acute liver failure: a late dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Rodeia, Simão C; Silvestre, Joana; Póvoa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is defined as a severe elevation of core body temperature along with central nervous system dysfunction. Exertional heat stroke (EHS) with acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare condition. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old man with a history of cognitive enhancers' intake who developed hyperthermia and neurological impairment while running an outdoor marathon. The patient was cooled and returned to normal body temperature after 6 h. He subsequently developed ALF and was transferred to the intensive care unit. Over-the-counter drug intake may have been related to heat intolerance and contributed to the event. The patient was successfully treated with conservative measures. In the presence of EHS, it is crucial to act promptly with aggressive total body cooling, in order to prevent progression of the clinical syndrome. Liver function must also be monitored, since it can be a late organ dysfunction. PMID:26969359

  11. [Acute hemorrhagic necrosis of the breast following treatment with Cumarin].

    PubMed

    Lüchtrath, H; Walkowsky, A

    1983-08-01

    A case of hemorrhagic necrosis of the breast is reported in a thirty-four year old woman who received Cumarin treatment for deep leg vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It was necessary to remove the breast. The microscopic examination showed complete blockage of the vessels by fibrin thrombi in almost all veins. The cause of this venous thrombosis was explained as a Shwartzman-Sanarelli-Phenomenon. PMID:6555120

  12. Acute and Chronic Fetal Anemia as a Result of Fetomaternal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Fetomaternal hemorrhage represents a transfer of fetal blood to the maternal circulation. Although many etiologies have been described, most causes of fetomaternal hemorrhage remain unidentified. The differentiation between acute and chronic fetomaternal hemorrhage may be accomplished antenatally and may influence perinatal management. Case. A 36-year-old gravida 6 para 3 presented at 37 and 5/7 completed gestational weeks with ultrasound findings suggestive of chronic fetal anemia such as right ventricular enlargement, diminished cerebral vascular resistance, and elevated middle cerebral artery end-diastolic velocity. On the other hand, signs of acute fetal decompensation such as deterioration of the fetal heart tracing, diminished biophysical score, decreased cord pH, and increased cord base deficit were noted. Following delivery, the neonate's initial hemoglobin was 4.0 g/dL and the maternal KB ratio was 0.015 indicative of a significant fetomaternal hemorrhage. Discussion. One should consider FMH as part of the differential diagnosis for fetal or immediate neonatal anemia. We describe a unique case of FMH that demonstrated both acute and chronic clinical features. It is our hope that this case will assist practitioners in differentiating acute FMH that may require emergent delivery from chronic FMH which may be able to be expectantly managed. PMID:24804127

  13. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  14. Stroke Epidemiology in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a major health burden in Thailand. It is the leading cause of death and long term disability in both men and women. Despite the improvement of healthcare system, the mortality rate of stroke is still increasing during the past 5 years. The incidence of stroke in Thailand is now being studied in a large population based cohort. The prevalence of stroke is estimated to be 1.88% among adults 45 years and older. Stroke is more prevalent in men than in women and the mean age of stroke onset is 65 years. Hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and atrial fibrillation are major risk factors of stroke in the Thai population. Evolution from predominantly rural to urbanized industrial communities result in the increasing prevalence of these risk factors. Similar to other parts of the world, ischemic stroke is the most common stroke type but the proportion of hemorrhagic stroke is higher when compared to Caucasian populations. Among patients with ischemic stroke, lacunar stroke is most common, accounting for almost half followed by atherosclerotic disease. Intracranial atherosclerosis is also prevalent in Thai population. For acute treatment, intravenous thrombolysis has been used in Thailand for over 20 years. Its cost is reimbursed by the national health care system but its use is still limited. With the introduction of the stroke fast track system, prompt stroke treatment across the country is warranted. Stroke unit is now the standard of care in large regional and provincial hospitals. PMID:24741559

  15. Arterial Spin Labeling for Acute Stroke: Practical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling is a non-contrast method of measuring cerebral perfusion with MRI. It has several advantages over traditional contrast-based perfusion-weighted imaging, including non-invasiveness, more straightforward cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification, and repeatability. However, because of its lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per unit time and its high sensitivity to arterial transit delays, it has not been used frequently in acute stroke, where arterial delays and time-efficiency are of the essence. This is beginning to change, driven by higher SNR implementations of ASL and the increasing use of 3T scanners. Furthermore, velocity selective ASL sequences that are largely insensitive to arrival times are beginning to be applied to patients with cerebrovascular disease, and promise the ability to quantify CBF even in regions supplied by late-arriving collateral flow. Despite these advances, many practical issues must be addressed to optimize ASL for use in acute stroke studies. These include optimizing the trade-off between time, SNR, imaging resolution, and sensitivity to slow flow. Rapid and robust post-processing of image data must be made routine, such that CBF maps are available in real-time so that they can be considered when making treatment decisions. Lastly, automated software needs to be developed to delineate hypoperfused tissue volumes, with attention to the inherent differences between gray and white matter CBF. Attention to these details is critical to translate this promising research tool into mainstream clinical trials and practice in acute stroke. PMID:24323778

  16. [Telemedicine in acute stroke care--a health economics view].

    PubMed

    Günzel, F; Theiss, S; Knüppel, P; Halberstadt, S; Rose, G; Raith, M

    2010-05-01

    Specialized stroke units offer optimal treatment of patients with an acute stroke. Unfortunately, their installation is limited by an acute lack of experienced neurologists and the small number of stroke patients in sparsely populated rural areas. This problem is increasingly being solved by the use of telemedicine, so that neurological expertise is made available to basic and regular care. It has been demonstrated by national and international pilot studies that solidly based and rapid decisions can be made by telemedicine regrading the use of thrombolysis, as the most important acute treatment, but also of other interventions. So far studies have only evaluated improvement in the quality of care achieved by networking, but not of any lasting effect on any economic benefit. Complementary to a medical evaluation, the qualitative economic assessment presented here of German and American concepts of telemetric care indicate no difference in efficacy between various ways of networking. Most noteworthy, when comparing two large American and German studies, is the difference in their priorities. While the American networks achieved targeted improvements in efficacy of care that go beyond the immediate wishes of the doctors involved, this was of only secondary importance in the German studies. Also, in contrast to several American networks, the German telemetry networks have not tended to be organized for future growth. In terms of economic benefits, decentralized organized networks offer a greater potential of efficacy than purely local ones. Furthermore, the integration of inducements into the design of business models is a fundamental factor for achieving successful and lasting existence, especially within a highly competitive market. PMID:20077382

  17. Novel Thrombolytics for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Logallo, Nicola; Kvistad, Christopher E; Nacu, Aliona; Thomassen, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Progress in finding a better alternative to alteplase has been slow. Tenecteplase and desmoteplase have better pharmacological profiles compared with alteplase, but definite clinical evidence of their superiority is lacking. The two major phase III studies that have tested the efficacy and safety of desmoteplase in ischemic stroke patients have shown neutral results and a promising safety profile, but the trials compared desmoteplase with placebo only in late admitted patients. Future trials should focus on testing novel thrombolytics in the early time window either as the sole acute recanalizing treatment or combined with thrombectomy. PMID:26798040

  18. Elevation of troponin I in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Chin; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Yang, Fu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cardiac morbidities account for 20% of deaths after ischemic stroke and is the second commonest cause of death in acute stroke population. Elevation of cardiac troponin has been regarded as a prognostic biomarker of poor outcome in patients with acute stroke. Methods. This retrospective study enrolled 871 patients with acute ischemic stroke from August 2010 to March 2015. Data included vital signs, laboratory parameters collected in the emergency department, and clinical features during hospitalization. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Barthel index, and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were used to assess stroke severity and outcome. Results. Elevated troponin I (TnI) > 0.01 µg/L was observed in 146 (16.8%) patients. Comparing to patients with normal TnI, patients with elevated TnI were older (median age 77.6 years vs. 73.8 years), had higher median heart rates (80 bpm vs. 78 bpm), higher median white blood cells (8.40 vs. 7.50 1,000/m3) and creatinine levels (1.40 mg/dL vs. 1.10 mg/dL), lower median hemoglobin (13.0 g/dL vs. 13.7 g/dL) and hematocrit (39% vs. 40%) levels, higher median NIHSS scores on admission (11 vs. 4) and at discharge (8 vs. 3), higher median mRS scores (4 vs3) but lower Barthel index scores (20 vs. 75) at discharge (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ≥ 76 years (OR 2.25, CI [1.59–3.18]), heart rate ≥ 82 bpm (OR 1.47, CI [1.05–2.05]), evidence of clinical deterioration (OR 9.45, CI [4.27–20.94]), NIHSS score ≥ 12 on admission (OR 19.52, CI [9.59–39.73]), and abnormal TnI (OR 1.98, CI [1.18–3.33]) were associated with poor outcome. Significant factors for in-hospital mortality included male gender (OR 3.69, CI [1.45–9.44]), evidence of clinical deterioration (OR 10.78, CI [4.59–25.33]), NIHSS score ≥ 12 on admission (OR 8.08, CI [3.04–21.48]), and elevated TnI level (OR 5.59, CI [2.36–13.27]). C-statistics revealed that abnormal TnI improved the predictive power of both poor

  19. The Relation Between GABA and L-Arginine Levels With Some Stroke Risk Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hosinian, Mohsen; Qujeq, Durdi; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in extra and intracellular neurotransmitter amino acids concentration in the early stage of acute cerebral ischemia have been reported. In this the study, serum level of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-Arginine in acute ischemic stroke patients was assessed. 60 patients with acute ischemic stroke and sixthy healthy volunteers as a control group were assessed. Serum GABA was measured with modified enzymatic method and serum L- Arginine was measured by modified Sakaguchi method. Serum GABA level in stroke cases was lower than that of the control group. There was no relationship between GABA level and age or gender. Also, no significant correlation was observed between GABA levels with ischemic stroke risk factors such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Serum L- Arginine level in patients was slightly increased in comparison with control group. There was a positive relationship between serum L- Arginine level and acute ischemic stroke risk factors. Serum GABA level was reduced in patients and had no correlation with acute ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:27478806

  20. The Relation Between GABA and L-Arginine Levels With Some Stroke Risk Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Hosinian, Mohsen; Qujeq, Durdi; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in extra and intracellular neurotransmitter amino acids concentration in the early stage of acute cerebral ischemia have been reported. In this the study, serum level of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-Arginine in acute ischemic stroke patients was assessed. 60 patients with acute ischemic stroke and sixthy healthy volunteers as a control group were assessed. Serum GABA was measured with modified enzymatic method and serum L- Arginine was measured by modified Sakaguchi method. Serum GABA level in stroke cases was lower than that of the control group. There was no relationship between GABA level and age or gender. Also, no significant correlation was observed between GABA levels with ischemic stroke risk factors such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Serum L- Arginine level in patients was slightly increased in comparison with control group. There was a positive relationship between serum L- Arginine level and acute ischemic stroke risk factors. Serum GABA level was reduced in patients and had no correlation with acute ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:27478806

  1. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H. Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  2. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia.

    PubMed

    Eker, Amber; Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-05-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  3. The Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and rt-PA in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pancioli, Arthur M.; Broderick, Joseph; Brott, Thomas; Tomsick, Thomas; Khoury, Jane; Bean, Judy; del Zoppo, Gregory; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Woo, Daniel; Khatri, Pooja; Castaldo, John; Frey, James; Gebel, James; Kasner, Scott; Kidwell, Chelsea; Kwiatkowski, Thomas; Libman, Richard; Mackenzie, Richard; Scott, Phillip; Starkman, Sidney; Thurman, R. Jason

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Multiple approaches are being studied to enhance the rate of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. Treatment of myocardial infarction with a combination of a reduced-dose fibrinolytic agent and a glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist has been shown to improve the rate of recanalization versus fibrinolysis alone. The combined approach to lysis utilizing eptifibatide and recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) (CLEAR) stroke trial assessed the safety of treating acute ischemic stroke patients within 3 hours of symptom onset with this combination. Methods The CLEAR trial was a National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke–funded multicenter, double-blind, randomized, dose-escalation and safety study. Patients were randomized 3:1 to either low-dose rt-PA (tier 1=0.3 mg/kg, tier 2=0.45 mg/kg) plus eptifibatide (75 μg/kg bolus followed by 0.75 μg/kg per min infusion for 2 hours) or standard-dose rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg). The primary safety end point was the incidence of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage within 36 hours. Secondary analyses were performed regarding clinical efficacy. Results Ninety-four patients (40 in tier 1 and 54 in tier 2) were enrolled. The combination group of the 2 dose tiers (n=69) had a median age of 71 years and a median baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 14, and the standard-dose rt-PA group (n=25) had a median age of 61 years and a median baseline NIHSS score of 10 (P=0.01 for NIHSS score). Fifty-two (75%) of the combination treatment group and 24 (96%) of the standard treatment group had a baseline modified Rankin scale score of 0 (P=0.04). There was 1 (1.4%; 95% CI, 0% to 4.3%) symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the combination group and 2 (8.0%; 95% CI, 0% to 19.2%) in the rt-PA–only arm (P=0.17). During randomization in tier 2, a review by the independent data safety monitoring board demonstrated that the safety

  4. Emergent management of postpartum hemorrhage for the general and acute care surgeon

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Postpartum hemorrhage is one of the rare occasions when a general or acute care surgeon may be emergently called to labor and delivery, a situation in which time is limited and the stakes high. Unfortunately, there is generally a paucity of exposure and information available to surgeons regarding this topic: obstetric training is rarely found in contemporary surgical residency curricula and is omitted nearly completely from general and acute care surgery literature and continuing medical education. Methods The purpose of this manuscript is to serve as a topic specific review for surgeons and to present a surgeon oriented management algorithm. Medline and Ovid databases were utilized in a comprehensive literature review regarding the management of postpartum hemorrhage and a management algorithm for surgeons developed based upon a collaborative panel of general, acute care, trauma and obstetrical surgeons' review of the literature and expert opinion. Results A stepwise approach for surgeons of the medical and surgical interventions utilized to manage and treat postpartum hemorrhage is presented and organized into a basic algorithm. Conclusion The manuscript should promote and facilitate a more educated, systematic and effective surgeon response and participation in the management of postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:19939251

  5. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N K; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P Suresh; Prabhakar, A T; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T V; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  6. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N. K.; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P. Suresh; Prabhakar, A. T.; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T. V.; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  7. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zheng; Tong, Wesley C.; Lu, Xiao-Xin; Peng, Hui-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Stroke, also known as cerebrovascular disease, is a common and serious neurological disease, which is also the fourth leading cause of death in the United States so far. Hyperbaric medicine, as an emerging interdisciplinary subject, has been applied in the treatment of cerebral vascular diseases since the 1960s. Now it is widely used to treat a variety of clinical disorders, especially hypoxia-induced disorders. However, owing to the complex mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, the therapeutic time window and the undefined dose as well as some common clinical side effects (such as middle ear barotrauma), the widespread promotion and application of HBO was hindered, slowing down the hyperbaric medicine development. In August 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration declared artery occlusion as one of the 13 specific indications for HBO therapy. This provides opportunities, to some extent, for the further development of hyperbaric medicine. Currently, the mechanisms of HBO therapy for ischemic stroke are still not very clear. This review focuses on the potential mechanisms of HBO therapy in acute ischemic stroke as well as the time window. PMID:25337089

  8. [Peri-interventional management of acute endovascular stroke treatment].

    PubMed

    Schönenberger, S; Bösel, J

    2015-10-01

    Due to the ground breaking consistent evidence that supports the effect of endovascular stroke treatment (EST), many acute care hospitals and stroke centers will have to be prepared to provide this treatment in an optimal way within the coming years. In addition to the intervention itself, patient preparation, stabilization and monitoring during the treatment as well as the aftercare represent significant challenges and have mostly not yet been sufficiently investigated. Under these aspects, the questions of optimal sedation and airway management have received the highest attention. Based on retrospective study results it already seems to be justified, respecting certain criteria, to prefer EST with the patient under conscious sedation (CS) in comparison to general anesthesia (GA) and to only switch to GA in cases of emergency until this question has been clarified by prospective studies. This and other aspects of peri-interventional management, such as logistics, monitoring, blood pressure, ventilation settings, postprocedural steps of intensive or stroke unit care and imaging follow-up are summarized in this overview. The clinical and radiological selection of patients and thus the decision for intervention or technical aspects of the intervention itself will not be part of this article. PMID:26311331

  9. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Oral Reading in Acute Left Hemispheric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cloutman, Lauren L.; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron L.; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Hillis, Argye E.

    2010-01-01

    Oral reading is a complex skill involving the interaction of orthographic, phonological, and semantic processes. Functional imaging studies with non-impaired adult readers have identified a widely distributed network of frontal, inferior parietal, posterior temporal, and occipital brain regions involved in the task. However, while functional imaging can identify cortical regions engaged in the process under examination, it cannot identify those brain regions essential for the task. The current study aimed to identify those neuroanatomical regions critical for successful oral reading by examining the relationship between word and nonword oral reading deficits and areas of tissue dysfunction in acute stroke. We evaluated 91 patients with left hemisphere ischemic stroke with a test of oral word and nonword reading, and magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted imaging, within 24–48 hours of stroke onset. A voxel-wise statistical map showed that impairments in word and nonword reading were associated with a distributed network of brain regions, including the inferior and middle frontal gyri, the middle temporal gyrus, the supramarginal and angular gyri, and the middle occipital gyrus. In addition, lesions associated with word deficits were found to be distributed more frontally, while nonword deficits were associated with lesions distributed more posteriorly. PMID:20889196

  10. Vasopressin, renin, and cortisol responses to hemorrhage during acute blockade of cardiac nerves in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) on the increases in plasma renin activity (PRA), arginine vasopressin (AVP), and cortisol in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage was determined in conscious dogs (n = 9). Procaine was infused into the pericardial space to produce acute reversible CNB, or saline was infused in the control hemorrhage. Blood was removed from the inferior vena cava at a rate of 1 ml.kg-1.min-1. In the control hemorrhage, plasma AVP increased from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 219 +/- 66 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.63 +/- 0.20 to 3.08 +/- 0.91 ng angiotensin I (ANG I).ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.4 +/- 0.2 to 4.0 +/- 0.7 micrograms/dl. When the hemorrhage was repeated during acute CNB, plasma AVP increased from 2.8 +/- 1.6 to 185 +/- 59 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.44 +/- 0.14 to 2.24 +/- 0.27 ng ANG I.ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 5.4 +/- 0.6 micrograms/dl, and none of the increases differed significantly from the responses during the control hemorrhage. Left atrial pressure fell significantly after removal of 6 ml/kg of blood, but mean arterial pressure was maintained at control levels until blood loss reached 20 ml/kg during pericardial infusion of either saline or procaine. The declines in MAP at the 30 ml/kg level of hemorrhage in both treatments were similar. These results demonstrate that acutely blocking input from cardiac receptors does not reduce the increases in plasma AVP, cortisol, and PRA in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that input from cardiac receptors is required for a normal AVP response to hemorrhage and suggest that other receptors, presumably arterial baroreceptors, can stimulate AVP and cortisol secretion in the absence of signals from the heart.

  11. Outcomes following sonothrombolysis in severe acute ischemic stroke:subgroup analysis of the CLOTBUST trial

    PubMed Central

    Barlinn, Kristian; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Barreto, Andrew D; Alleman, John; Molina, Carlos A; Mikulik, Robert; Saqqur, Maher; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schellinger, Peter D; Howard, George; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sonothrombolysis is safe and may increase the likelihood of early recanalization in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients Aims In preparation of a phase III clinical trial, we contrast the likelihood of achieving a sustained recanalization and functional independence in a post-hoc subgroup analysis of patients randomized to transcranial Doppler monitoring plus intravenous (IV) tPA (sonothrombolysis) compared to IV tPA alone in the CLOTBUST trial Methods We analyzed the data from all randomized AIS patients with pre-treatment NIHSS scores ≥10 points and proximal intracranial occlusions in the CLOTBUST trial. We compared sustained complete recanalization rate (TIBI flow grades 4-5) and functional independence (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] 0-1) at 90 days. Safety was evaluated by the rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) within 72 hours of stroke-onset Results Of 126 patients, a total of 85 AIS patients met our inclusion criteria: mean age 71±11years, 56% men, median NIHSS 17 (interquartile range 14-20). Of these patients, 41 (48%) and 44 (52%) were randomized to IV tPA alone and sonothrombolysis, respectively. More patients achieved sustained complete recanalization in the sonothrombolysis than in the IV tPA alone group (38.6% vs. 17.1%; p=0.032). Functional independence at 90 days was more frequently achieved in the sonothrombolysis than in the IV tPA alone group (37.2% vs. 15.8%; p=0.045). Symptomatic ICH rate was similar in both groups (4.9% vs. 4.6%; p=1.00) Conclusions Our results point to a signal of efficacy and provide information to guide the subsequent phase III randomized trial of sonothrombolysis in patients with severe ischemic strokes PMID:25079049

  12. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Park, David Jaehyun; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  13. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  14. The third international stroke trial (IST-3) of thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sandercock, Peter; Lindley, Richard; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dennis, Martin; Lewis, Steff; Venables, Graham; Kobayashi, Adam; Czlonkowska, Anna; Berge, Eivind; Slot, Karsten Bruins; Murray, Veronica; Peeters, Andre; Hankey, Graeme; Matz, Karl; Brainin, Michael; Ricci, Stefano; Celani, Maria Grazia; Righetti, Enrico; Cantisani, Teresa; Gubitz, Gord; Phillips, Steve; Arauz, Antonio; Prasad, Kameshwar; Correia, Manuel; Lyrer, Phillippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is approved for use in selected patients with ischaemic stroke within 3 hours of symptom onset. IST-3 seeks to determine whether a wider range of patients may benefit. Design International, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial of intravenous rt-PA in acute ischaemic stroke. Suitable patients must be assessed and able to start treatment within 6 hours of developing symptoms, and brain imaging must have excluded intracerebral haemorrhage. With 1000 patients, the trial can detect a 7% absolute difference in the primary outcome. With3500 patients, it can detect a 4.0% absolute benefit & with 6000, (mostly treated between 3 & 6 hours), it can detect a 3% benefit. Trial procedures Patients are entered into the trial by telephoning a fast, secure computerised central randomisation system or via a secure web interface. Repeat brain imaging must be performed at 24–48 hours. The scans are reviewed 'blind' by expert readers. The primary measure of outcome is the proportion of patients alive and independent (Modified Rankin 0–2) at six months (assessed via a postal questionnaire mailed directly to the patient). Secondary outcomes include: events within 7 days (death, recurrent stroke, symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage), outcome at six months (death, functional status, EuroQol). Trial registration ISRCTN25765518 PMID:18559104

  15. The velocity of collateral filling predicts recanalization in acute ischemic stroke after intravenous thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaocheng; Yan, Shenqiang; Lai, Yangxiao; Han, Quan; Sun, Jianzhong; Zhang, Minming; Parsons, Mark W; Wang, Shaoshi; Lou, Min

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pretreatment quality of collaterals, involving velocity and extent of collateral filling, on recanalization after intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). A retrospective analysis was performed of 66 patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) M1 segment occlusion who underwent MR perfusion (MRP) imaging before IVT. The velocity of collateral filling was defined as arrival time delay (ATD) of contrast bolus to Sylvian fissure between the normal and the affected hemisphere. The extent of collateral filling was assessed according to the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT (ASPECT) score on temporally fused maximum intensity projections (tMIP). Arterial occlusive lesion (AOL) score was used to assess the degree of arterial recanalization. ATD (OR = 0.775, 95% CI = 0.626-0.960, p = 0.020), but not tMIP-ASPECT score (OR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.820-1.405, p = 0.607), was independently associated with recanalization (AOL score of 2 and 3) at 24 hours after IVT. When recanalization was achieved, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) occurred more frequently in patients with slow collaterals (ATD ≥ 2.3 seconds) than those with rapid collaterals (ATD < 2.3 seconds) (88.9% vs 38.1%, p = 0.011). In conclusion, the velocity of collaterals related to recanalization, which may guide the decision-making of revascularization therapy in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27296511

  16. The velocity of collateral filling predicts recanalization in acute ischemic stroke after intravenous thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaocheng; Yan, Shenqiang; Lai, Yangxiao; Han, Quan; Sun, Jianzhong; Zhang, Minming; Parsons, Mark W.; Wang, Shaoshi; Lou, Min

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pretreatment quality of collaterals, involving velocity and extent of collateral filling, on recanalization after intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). A retrospective analysis was performed of 66 patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) M1 segment occlusion who underwent MR perfusion (MRP) imaging before IVT. The velocity of collateral filling was defined as arrival time delay (ATD) of contrast bolus to Sylvian fissure between the normal and the affected hemisphere. The extent of collateral filling was assessed according to the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT (ASPECT) score on temporally fused maximum intensity projections (tMIP). Arterial occlusive lesion (AOL) score was used to assess the degree of arterial recanalization. ATD (OR = 0.775, 95% CI = 0.626–0.960, p = 0.020), but not tMIP-ASPECT score (OR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.820–1.405, p = 0.607), was independently associated with recanalization (AOL score of 2 and 3) at 24 hours after IVT. When recanalization was achieved, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) occurred more frequently in patients with slow collaterals (ATD ≥ 2.3 seconds) than those with rapid collaterals (ATD < 2.3 seconds) (88.9% vs 38.1%, p = 0.011). In conclusion, the velocity of collaterals related to recanalization, which may guide the decision-making of revascularization therapy in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27296511

  17. Serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 is decreased in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bennion, Douglas M; Rosado, Christian A; Haltigan, Emily A; Regenhardt, Robert W; Sumners, Colin; Waters, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a cardio and neuro-protective carboxypeptidase, are dynamically altered after stroke in preclinical models. We sought to characterize the previously unexplored changes in serum ACE2 activity of stroke patients and the mechanism of these changes. Serum samples were obtained from patients during acute ischemic stroke (n=39), conditions mimicking stroke (stroke-alert, n=23), or from control participants (n=20). Enzyme activity levels were analyzed by fluorometric assay and correlated with clinical variables by regression analyses. Serum ACE2 activity was significantly lower in acute ischemic stroke as compared to both control and stroke-alert patients, followed by an increase to control levels at three days. Serum ACE2 activity significantly correlated with the presence of ischemic stroke after controlling for other factors (P=0.01). Additional associations with ACE2 activity included a positive correlation with systolic blood pressure at presentation in stroke-alert (R(2)=0.24, P=0.03), while stroke levels showed no correlation (R(2)=0.01, P=0.50). ACE2 sheddase activity was unchanged between groups. These dynamic changes in serum ACE2 activity in stroke, which concur with preclinical studies, are not likely to be driven primarily by acute changes in blood pressure or sheddase activity. These findings provide new insight for developing therapies targeting this protective system in ischemic stroke. PMID:27488276

  18. Crohns disease with central nervous system vasculitis causing subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm and cerebral ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Garge, Shaileshkumar S; Vyas, Pooja D; Modi, Pranav D; Ghatge, Sharad

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral vasculitis secondary to Crohn's disease (CD) seems to be a very rare phenomenon. We report a 39-year-old male who presented with headache, vomiting, and left-sided weakness in the known case of CD. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging,) showed right gangliocapsular acute infarct with supraclinoid cistern subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Cerebral digital substraction angiography (DSA) showed dilatation and narrowing of right distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Left ICA was chronically occluded. His inflammatory markers were significantly raised. Imaging features are suggestive of cerebral vasculitis. Arterial and venous infarcts due to thrombosis are known in CD. Our case presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in supraclinoid cistern due to rupture of tiny aneurysm of perforator arteries causing SAH and infarction in right basal ganglia. Patient was treated conservatively with immunosuppression along with medical management of SAH. PMID:25506170

  19. Aspiration-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Acute Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of oral or gastric contents into the larynx and lower respiratory tract is a common problem in acute stroke patients, which significantly increases the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of aspiration-related ARDS in acute stroke patients. Methods Over 17-month period a retrospective cohort study was done on 1495 consecutive patients with acute stroke. The data including demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, and hospital discharge status were collected to analysis. Results Aspiration-related ARDS was diagnosed in 54 patients (3.6%). The most common presenting symptom was tachypnea (respiratory rate ≥25 breaths/min) in 50 cases. Computed tomography (CT) images usually demonstrated diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and inhomogeneous patchy consolidations involving the low lobes. Age, NIHSS score, GCS score, dysphagia, dysarthria, hemoglobin concentration, serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin, serum sodium, and admission glucose level were independently associated with aspiration-related ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.04–1.07); OR 2.87, (2.68–3.63); OR 4.21, (3.57–5.09); OR 2.18, (1.23–3.86); OR 1.67, (1.31–2.14); OR 2.31, (1.11–4.84); OR 1.68, (1.01–2.80); OR 2.15, (1.19–3.90); OR 1.92, (1.10–3.36) and OR 1.14, (1.06–1.21) respectively). Conclusions Aspiration-related ARDS frequently occurs in acute stroke patient with impairment consciousness. It is advisable that performing chest CT timely may identify disease early and prompt treatment to rescue patients. PMID:25790377

  20. THE 5-LIPOXYGENASE PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ACUTE LUNG INJURY FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Eun, John C.; Moore, Ernest E.; Mauchley, David C.; Johnson, Chris A.; Meng, Xianzhong; Banerjee, Anirban; Wohlauer, Max V.; Zarini, Simona; Gijón, Miguel A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and biochemical mechanisms leading to acute lung injury and subsequent multiple organ failure are only partially understood. In order to study the potential role of eicosanoids, particularly leukotrienes, as possible mediators of acute lung injury, we used a murine experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock after blood removal via cardiac puncture. Neutrophil sequestration as shown by immunofluorescence, and protein leakage into the alveolar space, were measured as markers of injury. We used liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify several eicosanoids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of experimental animals. MK886, a specific inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway, as well as transgenic mice deficient in 5-lipoxygenase, were used to determine the role of this enzymatic pathway in this model. Leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 were consistently elevated in shock-treated mice compared to sham-treated mice. MK886 attenuated neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation induced by hemorrhagic shock. 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice showed reduced neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation after shock treatment, indicating greatly reduced lung injury. These results support the hypothesis that 5-lipoxygenase, most likely through the generation of leukotrienes, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock in mice. This pathway could represent a new target for pharmacological intervention to reduce lung damage following severe primary injury. PMID:22392149

  1. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  2. Usefulness of cervical magnetic resonance imaging for detecting type A acute aortic dissection with acute stroke symptoms.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Hirata, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD) sometimes presents with acute stroke-like symptoms. When intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) therapy is considered for acute ischemic stroke, TAAAD must be excluded. Painless TAAAD presenting with acute stroke may be easily missed. Two cases of painless TAAAD presenting with acute stroke in which IV-tPA therapy was considered are reported. In these cases, cervical magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was useful for detecting TAAAD, and IV-tPA therapy was canceled. The mottled high signal ("snowstorm") in the common carotid artery on cervical MRA is specific for TAAAD. We have thus named this phenomenon the "snowstorm sign" and believe it can help diagnose TAAAD. PMID:27118510

  3. Pharmacologic Resuscitation Decreases Circulating CINC-1 Levels and Attenuates hemorrhage-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fukudome, Eugene Y.; Li, Yongqing; Kochanek, Ashley R.; Lu, Jennifer; Smith, Eleanor J.; Liu, Baoling; Kim, Kyuseok; Velmahos, George C.; deMoya, Marc A.; Alam, Hasan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a complication of hemorrhagic shock (HS). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) such as valproic acid (VPA) can improve survival following HS, however, their effects on late organ injury are unknown. Here, we have investigated the effects of HS and VPA treatment on ALI as well as circulating cytokines that may serve as biomarkers for the development of organ injury. Materials and Methods Anesthetized Wistar-Kyoto rats (250-300g) underwent 40% blood volume hemorrhage over 10 minutes followed by 30 minutes of un-resuscitated shock and were treated with 1) VPA 300mg/kg or 2) vehicle control. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, following shock, and prior to sacrifice (1h, 4h, and 20h; n=3-4/timepoint/group). Serum samples were screened for possible biomarkers using a multiplex electrochemiluminescence detection assay, and results were confirmed using ELISA. Additionally, lung tissue lysate was examined for chemokine and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels as a marker for neutrophil infiltration and ALI. Additionally, lung CINC-1 (a chemokine belonging to the IL-8 family that promotes neutrophil chemotaxis) mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR. Results Serum screening revealed that hemorrhage rapidly altered levels of circulating CINC-1. ELISA confirmed that CINC-1 protein was significantly elevated in the serum as early as 4h, and in the lung at 20h following hemorrhage, without any significant changes in the CINC-1 mRNA expression. Lung MPO levels were also elevated 4h and 20h after hemorrhage. VPA treatment attenuated these changes Conclusions Hemorrhage resulted in development of ALI, which was prevented with VPA treatment. Circulating CINC-1 levels rose rapidly after hemorrhage, and serum CINC-1 levels correlated with lung CINC-1 and MPO levels. This suggests that circulating CINC-1 could be used as an early marker for the subsequent development of organ inflammation and injury. PMID:22657731

  4. Acute Abdominal Pain after Intercourse: Adrenal Hemorrhage as the First Sign of Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the adrenal glands are a common site of cancer metastases, they are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on CT scan or autopsy. Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage associated with metastatic lung cancer is an exceedingly rare phenomenon, and diagnosis can be difficult due to its nonspecific symptoms and ability to mimic other intra-abdominal pathologies. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with a history of right upper lobectomy seven months earlier for stage IB non-small cell lung cancer who presented with acute abdominal pain after intercourse. CT scan revealed a new right adrenal mass with surrounding hemorrhage, and subsequent FDG-PET scan confirmed new metabolic adrenal metastases. The patient's presentation of abdominal pain and adrenal hemorrhage immediately after sexual intercourse suggests that exertion, straining, or increased intra-abdominal pressure might be risk factors for precipitation of hemorrhage in patients with adrenal metastases. Management includes pain control and supportive treatment in mild cases, with arterial embolization or adrenalectomy being reserved for cases of severe hemorrhage. PMID:25126096

  5. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Cases in the Country of Georgia: Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Clark, Danielle V.; Bautista, Christian T.; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Wölfel, Silke; Wölfel, Roman; Rivard, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal information is available on the incidence of Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus and hantavirus infections in Georgia. From 2008 to 2011, 537 patients with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours without a diagnosis were enrolled into a sentinel surveillance study to investigate the incidence of nine pathogens, including CCHF virus and hantavirus. Of 14 patients with a hemorrhagic fever syndrome, 3 patients tested positive for CCHF virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Two of the patients enrolled in the study had acute renal failure. These 2 of 537 enrolled patients were the only patients in the study positive for hantavirus IgM antibodies. These results suggest that CCHF virus and hantavirus are contributing causes of acute febrile syndromes of infectious origin in Georgia. These findings support introduction of critical diagnostic approaches and confirm the need for additional surveillance in Georgia. PMID:24891463

  6. Quality of Life after Intra-arterial Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Melissa M.; Wilder, Michael; McFadden, Molly; Majersik, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Few data exist about health-related quality of life outcomes after intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke. We assessed stroke-specific quality of life in stroke survivors after intra-arterial therapy. Consecutive patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke from 2005-2010 were retrospectively identified via an institutional database. Stroke-specific quality of life (using the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Score) and disability status (modified Rankin Scale) were prospectively assessed via mailed questionnaire. We analyzed quality of life scores by domain and summary score, with a summary score of ≥ 4 defined as a good outcome. Analysis of variance was used to model the effect of final recanalization status, stroke severity, and modified Rankin Scale on total quality of life score. ANOVA and Pearson's correlations were used to test the association between stroke severity/modified Rankin Scale and quality of life/time since stroke respectively. Of ninety-nine acute ischemic stroke patients, 61 responded yielding: 11 interim deaths, 7 incomplete surveys, and 43 complete surveys for analysis. Among responding survivors, overall quality of life score was 3.9 (SD 0.7); 77% of these reported good quality of life. Scores were higher in recanalized patients in 11 of 12 domains, but was significant only for mood. Although modified Rankin Scale was associated with stroke severity, quality of life was independent of both. Seventy-seven percent of acute ischemic stroke survivors who received intra-arterial therapy reported good quality of life. Furthermore, these data suggest that stroke-specific quality of life is an independent outcome from stroke severity and disability status. PMID:24813258

  7. Hydrogen gas reduced acute hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation in a focal ischemia rat model.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Manaenko, A; Zhan, Y; Liu, W W; Ostrowki, R P; Tang, J; Zhang, J H

    2010-08-11

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested the effect of hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H(2)); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H(2) (MCAO+H(2)). All rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6 ml/kg i.p.) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 h during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 h, 0.5 h, 4 h, and 6 h after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluated by measuring the level of 8 Hydroxyguanosine (8OHG), 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (HNE) and nitrotyrosine), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 h after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 h reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen was accompanied by a reduction of the expression of 8OHG, HNE, and nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500+/-32.51 to 366+/-68.22 mg/dl at 4 h after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occludin, collagen IV or aquaporin4 (AQP4). In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced brain infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological function in rats. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation. PMID:20423721

  8. Hydrogen Gas Reduced Acute Hyperglycemia-Enhanced Hemorrhagic Transformation in a Focal Ischemia Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, C.H.; ANATOL, M.; ZHAN, Y.; LIU, W.W.; OSTROWKI, R.P.; TANG, JIPING; ZHANG, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague–Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H2); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H2 (MCAO+H2). All the rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6ml/kg intraperitoneally) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 hr during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 hr, 0.5 hr, 4 hr, and 6 hr after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluating by the level of 8OHG, HNE and nitrotyrosine), MMP-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 hr after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 hr reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen is accompanied by a reduction of the expressions of 8OHG, HNE, nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500±32.51 to 366±68.22 mg/dl at 4 hr after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occluding, collagen IV or AQP4. In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced the infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological functions in rat. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation. PMID:20423721

  9. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In Ontario, current treatment for eligible patients who have an acute ischemic stroke is intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). However, there are some limitations and contraindications to IVT, and outcomes may not be favourable for patients with stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. An alternative is mechanical thrombectomy with newer devices, and a number of recent studies have suggested that this treatment is more effective for improving functional independence and clinical outcomes. The objective of this health technology assessment was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices (with or without IVT) compared to IVT alone (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature, limited to randomized controlled trials that examined the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy using stent retrievers and thromboaspiration devices for patients with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy (with or without IVT) versus IVT alone (if eligible), calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios using a 5-year time horizon, and conducted sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of the estimates. Results There was a substantial, statistically significant difference in rate of functional independence (GRADE: high quality) between those who received mechanical thrombectomy (with or without IVT) and IVT alone (odds ratio [OR] 2.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.88–3.04). We did not observe a difference in mortality (GRADE: moderate quality) (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.60–1.07) or symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (GRADE: moderate quality) (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.66–1.87). In the base-case cost-utility analysis, which had a 5 year time horizon, the costs and effectiveness for

  10. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  11. Acute variceal hemorrhage: the persistent bleeder. A plea for management.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, M S; Boulos, F I; Aly, A M; Saad, M; Soliman, M A; Doss, W H; Zakaria, S; Thakeb, F

    1994-01-01

    A group of 1910 patients with acutely bleeding esophagogastric varices were managed in the Kasr El Aini sclerotherapy project; 458 of the patients (24%) were lost to follow-up. The remaining patients were studied in five groups: group I (294/401 patients), rigid versus flexible sclerotherapy; group II (254/336 patients), intravariceal versus paravariceal sclerotherapy; group III (174/227 patients), timing of initial sclerotherapy and the optimum frequency of sclerotherapy sessions; group IV (80/99 patients), splenectomy devascularization operation alone versus combined surgery with sclerotherapy; group V (650/847 patients), management of failures of and recurrences after sclerotherapy. The mean period of follow-up was 72 months. Rigid sclerotherapy was significantly superior to flexible sclerotherapy for emergency control of acute bleeding but was associated with significantly more morbidity. Paravariceal injection achieved insignificantly better initial control of bleeding and had more morbidity than intravariceal injection, which obliterated the varices in a significantly larger proportion of patients. Emergency injection of the acute bleeder should be carried out soon after admission, with sclerotherapy sessions repeated every 2 weeks. Combined sclerotherapy with splenectomy and devascularization was significantly more effective for controlling bleeding than surgery alone. Surgery should be done without delay for continued bleeding after the second attempt of sclerotherapy and in patients who rebleed after their third sclerotherapy session. Survival, however, was not significantly improved by the different modalities of sclerotherapy. PMID:8042334

  12. Cognitive Impairment After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gauba, Charu; Chaudhari, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vascular dementia is extremely common and contributes to stroke-associated morbidity and mortality. The study of vascular dementia may help to plan preventive interventions. Aims: To study the frequency of cognitive impairment after stroke in a series of consecutive patients with acute stroke, along with factors which influence it. Methods: Fifty adults with acute infarct or hemorrhage (as seen on computed tomography of the brain) were included in the study. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and Barthel’s Index scores were done. Cognitive testing was done by PGI Battery of Brain Dysfunction (PGI-BBD) and Short Form of the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (SIQCODE). Statistical analysis was by Student’s t-test, Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Mean age of patients was 61.82 years; males and ischemic strokes predominated. Dementia was seen in 30%, cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND) in 42%, and normal cognition in 28% patients. Factors associated with vascular cognitive impairment included old age, male sex, low education, hemorrhages, recurrent or severe stroke, silent infarcts, severe cortical atrophy, and left hemispheric or subcortical involvement. Conclusions: Up to 72% of patients have some form of cognitive impairment after a stroke. Secondary stroke prevention could reduce the incidence of vascular dementia. PMID:26543693

  13. A case of subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed by an acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

    PubMed

    Hatim, Abdedaim; El Otmani, Wafae; Houssa, Mehdi Ait; Atmani, Noureddine; Moutakiallah, Younes; Haimeur, Charqui; Drissi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is definitely the best descriptive model of the interaction between cardiovascular system and cerebral damage. The underlying mechanism of cardiovascular alterations after SAH is linked to the adrenergic discharge related to aneurysm rupture. Cardiac and pulmonary complications are common after severe brain injury, especially the aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Acute neurogenic pulmonary edema is not exceptional; it may occur in 20% of cases and commonly follows a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage. Severe myocardial damage with cardiogenic shock may possibly reveal the SAH (3% of cases) and mislead to wrong diagnosis of ACS with dramatic therapeutic consequences. The contribution of CT and cerebral angiography is essential for diagnosis and treatment. Surgical or endovascular treatment depends on location, size and shape of the aneurysm, on patient's age, neurological status and existence of concomitant diseases. We report the case of a 58 years old patient, with a past medical history of diabetes and hypertension, admitted for acute pulmonary edema with cardiogenic shock. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of aneurismal SAH in a patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26309459

  14. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for the management of acute variceal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Loffroy, Romaric; Estivalet, Louis; Cherblanc, Violaine; Favelier, Sylvain; Pottecher, Pierre; Hamza, Samia; Minello, Anne; Hillon, Patrick; Thouant, Pierre; Lefevre, Pierre-Henri; Krausé, Denis; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage, a life-threatening condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach for effective therapy, is defined as visible bleeding from an esophageal or gastric varix at the time of endoscopy, the presence of large esophageal varices with recent stigmata of bleeding, or fresh blood visible in the stomach with no other source of bleeding identified. Transfusion of blood products, pharmacological treatments and early endoscopic therapy are often effective; however, if primary hemostasis cannot be obtained or if uncontrollable early rebleeding occurs, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is recommended as rescue treatment. The TIPS represents a major advance in the treatment of complications of portal hypertension. Acute variceal hemorrhage that is poorly controlled with endoscopic therapy is generally well controlled with TIPS, which has a 90% to 100% success rate. However, TIPS is associated with a mortality of 30% to 50% in such a setting. Emergency TIPS should be considered early in patients with refractory variceal bleeding once medical treatment and endoscopic sclerotherapy failure, before the clinical condition worsens. Furthermore, admission to specialized centers is mandatory in such a setting and regional protocols are essential to be organized effectively. This review article discusses initial management and then focuses on the specific role of TIPS as a primary therapy to control acute variceal hemorrhage, particularly as a rescue therapy following failure of endoscopic approaches. PMID:24115809

  15. A Novel Rhabdovirus Associated with Acute Hemorrhagic Fever in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Slikas, Elizabeth; Steffen, Imke; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Sittler, Taylor; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Ruby, J. Graham; Wang, Chunlin; Makuwa, Maria; Mulembakani, Prime; Tesh, Robert B.; Mazet, Jonna; Rimoin, Anne W.; Taylor, Travis; Schneider, Bradley S.; Simmons, Graham; Delwart, Eric; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Chiu, Charles Y.; Leroy, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing was used to discover a novel rhabdovirus (Bas-Congo virus, or BASV) associated with a 2009 outbreak of 3 human cases of acute hemorrhagic fever in Mangala village, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Africa. The cases, presenting over a 3-week period, were characterized by abrupt disease onset, high fever, mucosal hemorrhage, and, in two patients, death within 3 days. BASV was detected in an acute serum sample from the lone survivor at a concentration of 1.09×106 RNA copies/mL, and 98.2% of the genome was subsequently de novo assembled from ∼140 million sequence reads. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BASV is highly divergent and shares less than 34% amino acid identity with any other rhabdovirus. High convalescent neutralizing antibody titers of >1∶1000 were detected in the survivor and an asymptomatic nurse directly caring for him, both of whom were health care workers, suggesting the potential for human-to-human transmission of BASV. The natural animal reservoir host or arthropod vector and precise mode of transmission for the virus remain unclear. BASV is an emerging human pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa. PMID:23028323

  16. Multinodular Goiter Spontaneous Hemorrhage in ESRD Patients Result in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wen-Hui; Shao, Chu-Xiao; Xin, Jun; Li, Jie; Mao, Ming-Feng; Yu, Xue-Ping; Jin, Lie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Euthyroid multinodular goiters may lead to acute respiratory failure caused by airway obstruction or laryngotracheal compression. Here, we present a case admitted to the nephrologist with multinodular goiter spontaneous hemorrhage along with respiratory failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which required urgent surgical intervention. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with ESRD who presented with a rapidly enlarging nodular goiter resulting in acute respiratory failure. Endotracheal intubation and emergency partial thyroidectomy were performed, revealing multinodular goiter spontaneous hemorrhage by postoperative histopathology. Several cases of benign goiters necessitating endotracheal intubation have been reported. Goiters are among the rare diagnoses in patients consulting at our institution's Nephrology. This case illustrates that ESRD patients with benign goiter may lead to acute respiratory failure due to airway obstruction or laryngotracheal compression. It was found in agreement with previous reports. This case highlights that ESRD patient at risk of this life threatening complication such as multinodular goiter hemorrhage should be managed with elective thyroidectomy to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26871832

  17. Treatment protocol based on assessment of clot quality during endovascular thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke using the Trevo stent retriever

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kojiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Nishihori, Masahiro; Imai, Tasuku; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The optional endovascular approach for acute ischemic stroke is unclear. The Trevo stent retriever can be used as first-line treatment for fast mechanical recanalization. The authors developed a treatment protocol for acute ischemic stroke based on the assessment of clot quality during clot removal with the Trevo. This prospective single-center study included all patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke between July 2014 and February 2015, who underwent emergency endovascular treatment. According to the protocol, the Trevo was used for first-line treatment. Immediately after the Trevo was deployed, the stent delivery wire was pushed to open the stent by force (ACAPT technique). Clot quality was assessed on the basis of the perfusion status after deployment of the Trevo; continued occlusion or immediate reopening either reoccluded or maintained after the stent retriever had been in place for 5 min. If there was no obvious clot removal after the first pass with the Trevo, according to the quality of the clot, either a second pass was performed or another endovascular device was selected. Twelve consecutive patients with acute major cerebral artery occlusion were analyzed. Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score 2b and 3 was achieved in 11 patients (91.7%) and 9 (75%) had a good clinical outcome after 90 days based on a modified Rankin scale score ≤ 2. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 1 patient (8.3%). The overall mortality rate was 8.3%. Endovascular thrombectomy using the Trevo stent retriever for first-line treatment is feasible and effective. PMID:27578909

  18. Treatment protocol based on assessment of clot quality during endovascular thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke using the Trevo stent retriever.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kojiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Nishihori, Masahiro; Imai, Tasuku; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-08-01

    The optional endovascular approach for acute ischemic stroke is unclear. The Trevo stent retriever can be used as first-line treatment for fast mechanical recanalization. The authors developed a treatment protocol for acute ischemic stroke based on the assessment of clot quality during clot removal with the Trevo. This prospective single-center study included all patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke between July 2014 and February 2015, who underwent emergency endovascular treatment. According to the protocol, the Trevo was used for first-line treatment. Immediately after the Trevo was deployed, the stent delivery wire was pushed to open the stent by force (ACAPT technique). Clot quality was assessed on the basis of the perfusion status after deployment of the Trevo; continued occlusion or immediate reopening either reoccluded or maintained after the stent retriever had been in place for 5 min. If there was no obvious clot removal after the first pass with the Trevo, according to the quality of the clot, either a second pass was performed or another endovascular device was selected. Twelve consecutive patients with acute major cerebral artery occlusion were analyzed. Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score 2b and 3 was achieved in 11 patients (91.7%) and 9 (75%) had a good clinical outcome after 90 days based on a modified Rankin scale score ≤ 2. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 1 patient (8.3%). The overall mortality rate was 8.3%. Endovascular thrombectomy using the Trevo stent retriever for first-line treatment is feasible and effective. PMID:27578909

  19. Ancrod causes rapid thrombolysis in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Pollak, V E; Glas-Greenwalt, P; Olinger, C P; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A

    1990-05-01

    Clot lysis is desirable in patients with thrombi in arteries and arterioles by a safe rapidly-acting thrombolytic agent. Ancrod cleaves fibrinogen; the resulting circulating ancrod-fibrin stimulates fibrinolysis. Ancrod action and effect were studied in 20 patients with acute developing stroke in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, and received either normal saline or ancrod 0.5 mu/kg in normal saline administered as a constant-rate intravenous infusion over 6 hours. Subsequent doses of ancrod (or saline placebo) were determined daily thereafter for a total treatment period of 7 days. Neither bleeding nor re-thrombosis occurred within the 90 day follow-up period. That ancrod acted rapidly was shown by a significant decrease in functional plasminogen activator inhibitor (PA-I) within 60 minutes, and by significant elevations of fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer within 3 and 4 hours. The biological effect of fibrinolysis in ancrod infused patients was demonstrated by a greater improvement in stroke score when compared to those infused with saline. PMID:2186630

  20. Technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.

    1998-02-09

    From October 1994 to June 1997, a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were funded through LDRD to develop and integrate technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke. The project was summarized in a Science and Technology Review article `Brain Attack` that appeared in June 1997 and again in the Center for Healthcare Technologies Report (UCRL-LR-124761). This article is the best overview of the project, epidemiology of stroke and technical progress. Most of the technical progress has been documented in conference papers and presentations and refereed journal articles. Additional technical publication can be expected as our remaining patent applications progress through the US Patent and Trademark Office. The purpose of this report is to provide an appropriate introduction and organization to the numerous publications so that interested readers can quickly find information. Because there is no documentation for the history of this project, this report provides a summary. It also provides the final status report for the LDRD funding.

  1. Classification of motor imagery performance in acute stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangwiriyasakul, Chayanin; Mocioiu, Victor; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; Rutten, Wim L. C.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Effective motor imagery performance, seen as strong suppression of the sensorimotor rhythm, is the key element in motor imagery therapy. Therefore, optimization of methods to classify whether the subject is performing the imagery task is a prerequisite. An optimal classification method should have high performance accuracy and use a small number of channels. We investigated the additional benefit of the common spatial pattern filtering (CSP) to a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier, for different channel configurations. Methods. Ten hemispheric acute stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects were included. EEGs were recorded using 60 channels. The classifier was trained with a motor execution task. For both healthy controls and patients, analysis of recordings was initially limited to 3 and 11 electrodes recording from the motor cortex area, and later repeated using 45 electrodes. Results. No significant improvement on the addition of CSP to LDA was found (in both cases, the area under the receiving operating characteristic (AU-ROC) ≈0.70 (acceptable)). We then repeated the LDA+CSP method on recordings of 45 electrodes, since the use of imagery neuronal circuits may well extend beyond the motor area. AU-ROC rose to 0.90, but no virtual ‘most responsible’ electrode was observed. Finally, in mild-to-moderate stroke patients we could successfully use the EEG data recorded from the healthy hemisphere to train the classifier (AU-ROC ≈ 0.70). Significance. Including only the channels on the unaffected motor cortex is sufficient to train a classifier.

  2. Nanotheragnostic applications for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes: improved delivery for a better prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Itani, Muhieddine M; Nokkari, Amaly; Ren, Changhong; Daoud, Georges; Zeidan, Asad; Mondello, Stefania; Kobeissy, Firas H

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and a major cause of long-term severe disability representing a global health burden and one of the highly researched medical conditions. Nanostructured material synthesis and engineering have been recently developed and have been largely integrated into many fields including medicine. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles might be a valuable tool in stroke. Different types, shapes, and sizes of nanoparticles have been used for molecular/biomarker profiling and imaging to help in early diagnosis and prevention of stroke and for drug/RNA delivery for improved treatment and neuroprotection. However, these promising applications have limitations, including cytotoxicity, which hindered their adoption into clinical use. Future research is warranted to fully develop and effectively and safely translate nanoparticles for stroke diagnosis and treatment into the clinic. This work will discuss the emerging role of nanotheragnostics in stroke diagnosis and treatment applications. PMID:25394858

  3. Code stroke: multicenter experience with in-hospital stroke alerts.

    PubMed

    Cumbler, Ethan; Simpson, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    Between 2.2% and 17% of all strokes have symptom onset during hospitalization in a patient originally admitted for another diagnosis or procedure. A response system to rapidly evaluate inpatients with acute neurologic symptoms facilitates evaluation and treatment of stroke developing during hospitalization. The National Stroke Association implemented an in-hospital stroke quality-improvement initiative from July 2010 to June 2011 in 6 certified stroke centers from Michigan, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Washington, and North Carolina. Three hundred ninety-three in-hospital stroke alerts were examined over a 1-year period. Of the alerts, 42.5% were for ischemic stroke, 8.7% probable or possible TIA, 2.8% intracranial hemorrhage, and 46.1% were stroke mimics. The most common stroke mimics were seizure, hypotension, and delirium. Participating hospitals had an alarm rate for diagnoses other than acute cerebrovascular events ranging from 28.0% to 66.7%. Of 194 in-hospital stroke/transient ischemic attack cases, 8.2% received intravenous thrombolysis alone, 10.3% received intra-arterial/mechanical thrombolysis alone, and 1% received both. No patient with a stroke mimic received thrombolysis. Our findings suggest that in-hospital response teams need to be prepared to respond to a range of acute medical conditions other than ischemic stroke. PMID:25537887

  4. Fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute intracerebral hemorrhage (FMRICH): study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous, nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a subtype of stroke that causes a great amount of disability and economic and social burden. This is particularly true in developing countries where it accounts for between 20% and 50% of all strokes. Pharmacological and surgical interventions have been attempted to reduce the mortality and disability caused by ICH, with unsuccessful results. Recently, the use of fluoxetine in addition to physical rehabilitation has been proven useful to improve motor recovery following cerebral infarct. The purpose of this study is to test whether a 3-month treatment with fluoxetine enhances motor recovery in nondepressed patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods/design Our study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial. We will recruit 86 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage of both sexes, aged >18 years, from four Mexican hospitals. The patients will receive either 20 mg of fluoxetine or a placebo once daily for 90 days. The primary outcome is the mean change in the Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale score between inclusion (day 0) and day 90. The secondary outcomes will be changes in the Barthel Index, the Modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health stroke scale. The outcomes will be measured at day 42 ± 7days and at day 90, for a total of four visits with each subject (at screening and at 0, 42 and 90 days). Discussion Current guidelines recommend early supported hospital discharge and home-based rehabilitation programs as the only cost-effective intervention to aid the recovery of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Nevertheless, such interventions are dependent on available resources and funding, which make them very difficult to implement in developing countries. We believe that the identification of a helpful pharmacological intervention to aid the motor recovery of these patients will constitute a breakthrough that will have a major impact in

  5. Quantitative permeability magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke: how long do we need to scan?

    PubMed

    Vidarsson, Logi; Thornhill, Rebecca E; Liu, Fang; Mikulis, David J; Kassner, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability estimation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has shown significant potential for predicting hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). In this work, the effects of scan duration on quantitative BBB permeability estimates (KPS) were investigated. Data from eight patients (three with HT) aged 37-93 years old were retrospectively studied by directly calculating the standard deviation of KPS as a function of scan time. The uncertainty in KPS was reduced only slightly for a scan time of 3 min and 30 s (4% reduction in P value from .047 to .045). When more than 3 min and 30 s of data were used, quantitative permeability MRI was able to separate those patients who proceeded to HT from those who did not (P value <.05). Our findings indicate that reducing permeability acquisition times is feasible in keeping with the need to maintain time-efficient MR protocols in the setting of AIS. PMID:19695816

  6. The Quest for Arterial Recanalization in Acute Ischemic Stroke-The Past, Present and the Future

    PubMed Central

    L.L.Yeo, Leonard; Sharma, Vijay K

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the major causes of mortality and long-term disability. In the recent past, only very few treatment options were available and a considerable proportion of stroke survivors remained permanently disabled. However, over the last 2 decades rapid advances in acute stroke care have resulted in a corresponding improvement in mortality rates and functional outcomes. In this review, we describe the evolution of systemic thrombolytic agents and various interventional devices, their current status as well as some of the future prospects. We reviewed literature pertaining to acute ischemic stroke reperfusion treatment. We explored the current accepted treatment strategies to attain cerebral reperfusion via intravenous modalities and compare and contrast them within the boundaries of their clinical trials. Subsequently we reviewed the trials for interventional devices for acute ischemic stroke, categorizing them into thrombectomy devices, aspiration devices, clot disruption devices and thrombus entrapment devices. Finally we surveyed several of the alternative reperfusion strategies available. We also shed some light on the controversies surrounding the current strategies of treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Acute invasive interventional strategies continue to improve along with the noninvasive modalities. Both approaches appear promising. We conducted a comprehensive chronological review of the existing treatments as well as upcoming remedies for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23864913

  7. [Bacillus cereus sepsis and subarachnoid hemorrhage following consolidation chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kawatani, Eri; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sankoda, Chikahiro; Kuwahara, Nobuo; Mori, Daisuke; Osoegawa, Kouichi; Matsuishi, Eijo; Gondo, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB classification, M7) in remission received consolidation chemotherapy with mitoxantrone/cytosine arabinoside. WBC counts decreased to 0/microl on day 14, and fever (39.3 degrees C) and epigastralgia developed on day 15. Cefozopran was instituted for febrile neutropenia; however, on day 16, he was found to be in cardiac arrest. CT scan on day 16 revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gram-positive rods were isolated from blood cultures on day 15, and were later identified as B.cereus. He recovered transiently, but eventually died on day 19. Postmortem examination demonstrated many colonies of B. cereus in the cerebrum, cerebellum, lung, and liver. Hepatocyte necrosis was also observed in the liver. Bacterial aneurysms or septic emboli were not identified in the arachnoid vessels, but necrosis of cerebral vessels was prominent, which was considered to be the cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been reported to be associated with B. cereus sepsis, which developed at nadir following chemotherapy for leukemia patients. Because of the aggressive clinical course of B. cereus sepsis, including the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, early treatment with effective antibiotics for B. cereus sepsis would be important in the management of leukemia patients after chemotherapy. PMID:19404024

  8. Pharmacological therapy of acute ischaemic stroke: Achievements and problems.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Antonio; Ferrari, Federica; Villa, Roberto F

    2015-09-01

    Acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Its incidence and prevalence increase considerably with age and numbers will grow with an ageing population. Consequently, the impact of AIS on costs is soaring. AIS is caused by the abrupt occlusion of an intracranial vessel resulting in reduced blood flow to the brain region supplied. The ischaemic core (which is irreversibly lesioned) is surrounded by the penumbra region with less severe flow reduction, lower functional impairment and potential recovery. Therefore, the fundamental treatment of AIS relies on prompt recanalisation and reperfusion of the threatened, but potentially salvageable, ischaemic penumbra. With this aim, intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) remains the current strategy. However, thrombolysis is underused, owing to various exclusion criteria that limit the number of treated patients. Other thrombolytics are under investigation. Endovascular therapy with mechanical recanalisation devices is also increasingly applied, though definite evidence of its benefit is lacking. Moreover, hypertension and hyperglycaemia are acute complications to be treated in AIS. This review analyses the current status, the problems, the perspectives and the cost-effectiveness of the pharmacological therapy for AIS. PMID:26079382

  9. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation under different inhaled concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in pigs undergoing hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Alexandre Hideaki; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Hamaji, Marcelo Waldir M; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Ida, Keila Kazue; Fantoni, Denise T; Auler, José Otavio Costa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalant anesthesia induces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression, but whether fluid responsiveness is differentially influenced by the inhalant agent and plasma volemia remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in pigs undergoing hemorrhage. METHODS: Twenty-five pigs were randomly anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were registered sequentially at minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M1), 1.25 (M2), and 1.00 (M3). Then, following withdrawal of 30% of the estimated blood volume, these data were registered at a minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M4) and 1.25 (M5). RESULTS: The minimum alveolar concentration increase from 1.00 to 1.25 (M2) decreased the cardiac index and increased the central venous pressure, but only modest changes in mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were observed in all groups from M1 to M2. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure was only observed with desflurane. Following blood loss (M4), pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation and central venous pressure increased (p<0.001) and mean arterial pressure decreased in all groups. Under hypovolemia, the cardiac index decreased with the increase of anesthesia depth in a similar manner in all groups. CONCLUSION: The effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were not different during normovolemia or hypovolemia. PMID:26735220

  10. Management of Postthrombolysis Hemorrhagic and Orolingual Angioedema Complications

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was first approved for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the United States in 1996. Thrombolytic therapy has been proven to be effective in acute ischemic stroke treatment and shown to improve long-term functional outcomes. Its use is associated with an increased risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage as well as orolingual angioedema. Our goal is to outline the management strategies for these postthrombolysis complications. PMID:26288671

  11. A qualitative exploration of discharge destination as an outcome or a driver of acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with acute stroke do not receive recommended care in tertiary hospital settings. Allied health professionals have important roles within multidisciplinary stroke teams and influence the quality of care patients receive. Studies examining the role of allied health professionals in acute stroke management are scarce, and very little is known about the clinical decision making of these stroke clinicians. In this study we aimed to describe factors that influence the complex clinical decision making of these professionals as they prioritise acute stroke patients for recommended care. This qualitative study was part of a larger mixed methods study. Methods The qualitative methodology applied was a constructivist grounded theory approach. Fifteen allied health professionals working with acute stroke patients at three metropolitan tertiary care hospitals in South Australia were purposively sampled. Semi-structured interviews were conducted face to face using a question guide, and digital recording. Interviews were transcribed and analysed by two researchers using rigorous grounded theory processes. Results Our analysis highlighted ‘predicted discharge destination’ as a powerful driver of care decisions and clinical prioritisation for this professional group. We found that complex clinical decision making to predict discharge destination required professionals to concurrently consider patient’s pre-stroke status, the nature and severity of their stroke, the course of their recovery and multiple factors from within the healthcare system. The consequences of these decisions had potentially profound consequences for patients and sometimes led to professionals experiencing considerable uncertainty and stress. Conclusions Our qualitative enquiry provided new insights into the way allied health professionals make important clinical decisions for patients with acute stroke. This is the first known study to demonstrate that the subjective prediction

  12. Combined Neuroprotective Modalities Coupled with Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Pilot Study of Caffeinol and Mild Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Hallevi, Hen; Shaltoni, Hashem; Barreto, Andrew D.; Gonzales, Nicole R.; Aronowski, Jarek; Savitz, Sean I.; Grotta, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Both caffeinol and hypothermia are neuroprotective in preclinical models of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. We tested whether combining caffeinol and hypothermia with t-PA in acute stroke patients is safe and feasible. Methods 20 patients with acute ischemic stroke were treated with caffeinol (caffeine 8-9 mg/kg + ethanol 0.4g/kg IV X 2 hours, started by 4 hrs after symptom onset) and hypothermia (started by 5 hrs and continued for 24 hrs (target temp 33-35°C) followed by 12 hrs of rewarming). IV t-PA was given to eligible patients. Meperidine and buspirone were used to suppress shivering. Results All patients received caffeinol, and most reached target blood levels. Cooling was attempted in 18 patients via endovascular (n=8) or surface (n=10) approaches. Two patients were not cooled due to catheter or machine failure. Thirteen patients reached target temperature; average time from symptom onset was 9hrs, 43min. The last 5 hypothermia patients received surface cooling with iced saline induction and larger doses of meperidine; all patients reached target temperature, on average within 2hrs 30min from induction and 6hrs 21min from symptom onset. Three patients died: one from symptomatic hemorrhage, one from malignant cerebral edema, and one from unrelated medical complications. No adverse events were attributed to caffeinol. One patient had reduced respiratory drive due to meperidine, requiring BiPAP. Discussion Combining caffeinol with hypothermia in acute stroke patients given IV t-PA is feasible. A prospective placebo-controlled randomized study is needed to further assess safety and to test the efficacy of caffeinol, hypothermia or both. PMID:19251183

  13. Endovascular therapy including thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Zhao, Dong Fang; Phan, Steven; Huo, Ya Ruth; Mobbs, Ralph J; Rao, Prashanth J; Mortimer, Alex M

    2016-07-01

    One of the primary strategies for the management of acute ischemic stroke is intravenous (IV) thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Over the past decade, endovascular therapies such as the use of stent retrievers to perform mechanical thrombectomy have been found to improve functional outcomes compared to t-PA alone. We aimed to reassess the functional outcomes and complications of IV thrombolysis with and without endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke using conventional meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis. Pooled relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for the effect of IV thrombolysis with and without endovascular therapy on functional outcome, mortality and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH). Trial sequential analysis was done to strengthen the meta-analysis. We analyzed six randomized controlled trials involving 1943 patients. Patients who received IV thrombolysis with endovascular treatment showed significantly higher rates of excellent functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] 0-1) (RR, 1.75 [95% CI, 1.29-2.39]) compared to those who received IV thrombolysis alone. A similar association was seen for good functional outcomes (mRS 0-2) (RR, 1.56 [95% CI, 1.24-1.96]). Trial sequential analysis demonstrated endovascular treatment increased the RR of a good functional outcome by at least 30% compared to IV thrombolysis alone. There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality for mechanical thrombectomy compared to IV thrombolysis alone or the incidence of SICH at 3month follow-up. Endovascular treatment is more likely to result in a better functional outcome for patients compared to IV thrombolysis alone for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26947342

  14. History, Evolution, and Importance of Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Holodinsky, Jessalyn K; Yu, Amy Y X; Assis, Zarina A; Al Sultan, Abdulaziz S; Menon, Bijoy K; Demchuk, Andrew M; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    More than 800,000 people in North America suffer a stroke each year, with ischemic stroke making up the majority of these cases. The outcomes of ischemic stroke range from complete functional and cognitive recovery to severe disability and death; outcome is strongly associated with timely reperfusion treatment. Historically, ischemic stroke has been treated with intravenous thrombolytic agents with moderate success. However, five recently published positive trials have established the efficacy of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we will discuss the history of stroke treatments moving from various intravenous thrombolytic drugs to intra-arterial thrombolysis, early mechanical thrombectomy devices, and finally modern endovascular devices. Early endovascular therapy failures, recent successes, and implications for current ischemic stroke management and future research directions are discussed. PMID:27021771

  15. ACUTE BEHAVORIAL EFFECTS FROM EXPOSURE TO TWO-STROKE ENGINE EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benefits of changing from two-stroke to four-stroke engines (and other remedial requirements) can be evaluated (monetized) from the standpoint of acute behavioral effects of human exposure to exhaust from these engines. The monetization process depends upon estimates of the magn...

  16. Right Hemispatial Neglect: Frequency and Characterization Following Acute Left Hemisphere Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of various types of unilateral spatial neglect and associated areas of neural dysfunction after left hemisphere stroke are not well characterized. Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in distinct spatial reference frames have been identified after acute right, but not left hemisphere stroke. We studied 47 consecutive right handed…

  17. [Features of memantine action profile in cholinergic deficit and intracerebral posttraumatic hematoma (hemorrhagic stroke) models in rats].

    PubMed

    Garibova, T L; Voronina, T A; Litvinova, S A; Kuznetsova, A L; Kul'chikov, A E; Alesenko, A V

    2008-01-01

    Memantine, a low-affinity non-competitive antagonist of glutamatergic NMDA-subtype receptors, was used at a daily dose of 1 mg/kg over 10 days for the treatment of rats with cholinergic deficit induced by the chronic administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg, 20 days). The drug prevented violation of the learning of conditioned active and passive avoidance reflexes and produced no significant effect on the emotional state of animals in elevated plus maze (EPM) test. In animals with intracerebral posttraumatic hematoma (hemorrhagic stroke), memantine (2 mg/kg, for 3 days after operation) completely prevented the loss of animals, reduced the neurological deficit, improved conditioned passive avoidance reflex performance, and decreased emotional stress in the EPM test. PMID:18488899

  18. Benign Sphenoid Wing Meningioma Presenting with an Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Frič, Radek; Hald, John K.; Antal, Ellen-Ann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY OBJECT We report an unusual case of a benign lateral sphenoid wing meningioma that presented with, and was masked by, an acute intracerebral hemorrhage. CASE REPORT A 68-year-old woman was admitted after sudden onset of coma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage, without any underlying vascular pathology on CT angiography. During the surgery, we found a lateral sphenoid wing meningioma with intratumoral bleeding that extended into the surrounding brain parenchyma. RESULTS We removed the hematoma and resected the tumor completely in the same session. The histopathological classification of the tumor was a WHO grade I meningothelial meningioma. The patient recovered very well after surgery, without significant neurological sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Having reviewed the relevant references from the medical literature, we consider this event as an extremely rare presentation of a benign sphenoid wing meningioma in a patient without any predisposing medical factors. The possible mechanisms of bleeding from this tumor type are discussed. PMID:27127413

  19. Hemodilution increases cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Vorstrup, S.; Andersen, A.; Juhler, M.; Brun, B.; Boysen, G.

    1989-07-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow in 10 consecutive, but selected, patients with acute ischemic stroke (less than 48 hours after onset) before and after hemodilution. Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and emission tomography, and only patients with focal hypoperfusion in clinically relevant areas were included. Hemodilution was done according to the hematocrit level: for a hematocrit greater than or equal to 42%, 500 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by the same volume of dextran 40; for a hematocrit between 37% and 42%, only 250 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by 500 cc of dextran 40. Mean hematocrit was reduced by 16%, from 46 +/- 5% (SD) to 39 +/- 5% (SD) (p less than 0.001). Cerebral blood flow increased in both hemispheres by an average of 20.9% (p less than 0.001). Regional cerebral blood flow increased in the ischemic areas in all cases, on an average of 21.4 +/- 12.0% (SD) (p less than 0.001). In three patients, a significant redistribution of flow in favor of the hypoperfused areas was observed, and in six patients, the fractional cerebral blood flow increase in the hypoperfused areas was of the same magnitude as in the remainder of the brain. In the last patient, cerebral blood flow increased relatively less in the ischemic areas. Our findings show that cerebral blood flow increases in the ischemic areas after hemodilution therapy in stroke patients. The marked regional cerebral blood flow increase seen in some patients could imply an improved oxygen delivery to the ischemic tissue.

  20. Utility of EEG measures of brain function in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jennifer; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Burke Quinlan, Erin; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L; Cramer, Steven C

    2016-06-01

    EEG has been used to study acute stroke for decades; however, because of several limitations EEG-based measures rarely inform clinical decision-making in this setting. Recent advances in EEG hardware, recording electrodes, and EEG software could overcome these limitations. The present study examined how well dense-array (256 electrodes) EEG, acquired with a saline-lead net and analyzed with whole brain partial least squares (PLS) modeling, captured extent of acute stroke behavioral deficits and varied in relation to acute brain injury. In 24 patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke, 3 min of resting-state EEG was acquired at bedside, including in the ER and ICU. Traditional quantitative EEG measures (power in a specific lead, in any frequency band) showed a modest association with behavioral deficits [NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score] in bivariate models. However, PLS models of delta or beta power across whole brain correlated strongly with NIHSS score (R(2) = 0.85-0.90) and remained robust when further analyzed with cross-validation models (R(2) = 0.72-0.73). Larger infarct volume was associated with higher delta power, bilaterally; the contralesional findings were not attributable to mass effect, indicating that EEG captures significant information about acute stroke effects not available from MRI. We conclude that 1) dense-array EEG data are feasible as a bedside measure of brain function in patients with acute stroke; 2) high-dimension EEG data are strongly correlated with acute stroke behavioral deficits and are superior to traditional single-lead metrics in this regard; and 3) EEG captures significant information about acute stroke injury not available from structural brain imaging. PMID:26936984

  1. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Telemedicine Service for the Treatment of Acute Stroke Patients: TeleStroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health care service based on telemedicine can reduce both physical and time barriers in stroke treatments. Moreover, this service connects centers specializing in stroke treatment with other centers and practitioners, thereby increasing accessibility to neurological specialist care and fibrinolytic treatment. Objective Development, implementation, and evaluation of a care service for the treatment of acute stroke patients based on telemedicine (TeleStroke) at Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. Methods The evaluation phase, conducted from October 2008 to January 2011, involved patients who presented acute stroke symptoms confirmed by the emergency physician; they were examined using TeleStroke in two hospitals, at a distance of 16 and 110 kilometers from Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. We analyzed the number of interconsultation sheets, the percentage of patients treated with fibrinolysis, and the number of times they were treated. To evaluate medical professionals’ acceptance of the TeleStroke system, we developed a web-based questionnaire using a Technology Acceptance Model. Results A total of 28 patients were evaluated through the interconsultation sheet. Out of 28 patients, 19 (68%) received fibrinolytic treatment. The most common reasons for not treating with fibrinolysis included: clinical criteria in six out of nine patients (66%) and beyond the time window in three out of nine patients (33%). The mean “onset-to-hospital” time was 69 minutes, the mean time from admission to CT image was 33 minutes, the mean “door-to-needle” time was 82 minutes, and the mean “onset-to-needle” time was 150 minutes. Out of 61 medical professionals, 34 (56%) completed a questionnaire to evaluate the acceptability of the TeleStroke system. The mean values for each item were over 6.50, indicating that respondents positively evaluated each item. This survey was assessed using the Cronbach alpha test to determine the reliability of the

  2. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes after Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Ago, Tetsuro; Hata, Jun; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated in response to inflammation caused by brain infarction, the association of CRP with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke remains uncertain. This study examined whether plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) levels at onset were associated with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors and acute infections after stroke. Methods We prospectively included 3653 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent and were hospitalized within 24 h of onset. Plasma hsCRP levels were measured on admission and categorized into quartiles. The association between hsCRP levels and clinical outcomes, including neurological improvement, neurological deterioration, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥3 at 3 months), were investigated using a logistic regression analysis. Results Higher hsCRP levels were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke subtype, conventional risk factors, intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, and acute infections during hospitalization (multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile as a reference: 0.80 [0.65–0.97] for neurological improvement, 1.72 [1.26–2.34] for neurological deterioration, and 2.03 [1.55–2.67] for a poor functional outcome). These associations were unchanged after excluding patients with infectious diseases occurring during hospitalization, or those with stroke recurrence or death. These trends were similar irrespective of stroke subtypes or baseline stroke severity, but more marked in patients aged <70 years (Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Conclusions High plasma hsCRP is independently associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27258004

  3. Effect of a 72 Hour Stroke Care Bundle on Early Outcomes after Acute Stroke: A Non Randomised Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Nakibuuka, Jane; Sajatovic, Martha; Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Ssendikadiwa, Charles; Kalema, Nelson; Kwizera, Arthur; Byakika-Tusiime, Jayne; Furlan, Anthony J.; Kayima, James; Ddumba, Edward; Katabira, Elly

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrated care pathways (ICP) in stroke management are increasingly being implemented to improve outcomes of acute stroke patients. We evaluated the effect of implementing a 72 hour stroke care bundle on early outcomes among patients admitted within seven days post stroke to the national referral hospital in Uganda. Methods In a one year non-randomised controlled study, 127 stroke patients who had ‘usual care’ (control group) were compared to 127 stroke patients who received selected elements from an ICP (intervention group). Patients were consecutively enrolled (controls first, intervention group second) into each group over 5 month periods and followed to 30-days post stroke. Incidence outcomes (mortality and functional ability) were compared using chi square test and adjusted for potential confounders. Kaplan Meier survival estimates and log rank test for comparison were used for time to death analysis for all strokes and by stroke severity categories. Secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality, median survival time and median length of hospital stay. Results Mortality within 7 days was higher in the intervention group compared to controls (RR 13.1, 95% CI 3.3–52.9). There was no difference in 30-day mortality between the two groups (RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.5–2.6). There was better 30-day survival in patients with severe stroke in the intervention group compared to controls (P = 0.018). The median survival time was 30 days (IQR 29–30 days) in the control group and 30 days (IQR 7–30 days) in the intervention group. In the intervention group, 41patients (32.3%) died in hospital compared to 23 (18.1%) in controls (P < 0.001). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days (IQR 5–12 days) in the controls and 4 days (IQR 2–7 days) in the intervention group. There was no difference in functional outcomes between the groups (RR 0.9, 95% CI 0.4–2.2). Conclusions While implementing elements of a stroke-focused ICP in a Ugandan national referral

  4. Generalization of the Right Acute Stroke Prevention Strategies in Reducing in-Hospital Delays

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xun-ming; Cheng, Wei-yang; Feng, Juan; Wu, Jian; Ma, Qing-feng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the door-to-needle (DTN) time of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) through a comprehensive, hospital-based implementation strategy. The intervention involved a systemic literature review, identifying barriers to rapid IVT treatment at our hospital, setting target DTN time intervals, and building an evolving model for IVT candidate selection. The rate of non-in-hospital delay (DTN time ≤ 60 min) was set as the primary endpoint. A total of 348 IVT cases were enrolled in the study (202 and 146 in the pre- and post-intervention group, respectively). The median age was 61 years in both groups; 25.2% and 26.7% of patients in the pre- and post-intervention groups, respectively, were female. The post-intervention group had higher rates of dyslipidemia and minor stroke [defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) ≤ 3]; less frequent atrial fibrillation; higher numbers of current smokers, heavy drinkers, referrals, and multi-model head imaging cases; and lower NIHSS scores and blood sugar level (all P < 0.05). All parameters including DTN, door-to-examination, door-to-imaging, door-to-laboratory, and final-test-to-needle times were improved post-intervention (all P < 0.05), with net reductions of 63, 2, 4, 28, and 23 min, respectively. The rates of DTN time ≤ 60 min and onset-to-needle time ≤ 180 min were significantly improved by the intervention (pre: 9.9% vs. post: 60.3%; P < 0.001 and pre: 23.3% vs. post: 53.4%; P < 0.001, respectively), which was accompanied by an increase in the rate of neurological improvement (pre: 45.5% vs. post: 59.6%; P = 0.010), while there was no change in incidence of mortality or systemic intracranial hemorrhage at discharge (both P > 0.05). These findings indicate that it is possible to achieve a DTN time ≤ 60 min for up to 60% of hospitals in the current Chinese system, and that this logistical change can yield a notable improvement in the outcome of

  5. Acute hemorrhage in a colloid cyst of the third ventricle: A rare cause of sudden deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Rodrigo; Pascual, José M.; Medina-López, Diego; Burdaspal-Moratilla, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute neurological deterioration and death in a patient harboring a colloid cyst of the third ventricle remains a poorly understood phenomenon. Sudden neurological derangement caused by spontaneous bleeding within a colloid cyst is a rare and potentially fatal event, usually requiring immediate diagnosis and emergency surgical treatment. Case Description: A 47-year-old male presented with acute right-sided hemiparesis and speech impediment, followed by rapid deterioration of consciousness. Neuroimaging studies showed a rounded mass at the roof of the anterior third ventricle, causing biventricular hydrocephalus along with a left-sided basal ganglia hematoma. The lesion showed scattered foci of a recent hemorrhage which extended into the left lateral ventricle. Surgical treatment involved emergency external ventricular drainage followed by the prompt elective total resection of the lesion via a transcallosal route. Pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a colloid cyst with focal areas of vascular congestion and blood extravasation within its wall. Conclusions: Spontaneous bleeding into a colloid cyst of the third ventricle may cause acute obstructive hydrocephalus and intracranial hypertension due to rapid enlargement of the lesion. This event may account for the sudden neurological deterioration and/or death observed in a previously asymptomatic patient. The diagnosis of hemorrhagic phenomena within a colloid cyst represents a challenge due to the variable signal usually displayed by these lesions on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Emergency ventricular drainage followed by elective tumoral removal constitutes a valid and safe treatment strategy. PMID:22439115

  6. Changes in the cerebral blood flow in newborn rats assessed by LSCI and DOCT before and after the hemorrhagic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Lychagov, V. V.; Abdurashitov, A. S.; Sindeeva, O. V.; Sindeev, S. S.; Zinchenko, E. M.; Kajbeleva, E. I.; Pavlov, A. N.; Kassim, M.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of perinatal hemorrhagic stroke (HS) is very similar to that in the elderly and produces a significant morbidity and long-term neurologic and cognitive deficits. There is strong evidence that cerebral blood flow (CBF) abnormalities make considerable contribution to HS development. However, the mechanisms responsible for pathological changes in CBF in infants with HS are not established. Therefore, quantitative assessment of CBF may significantly advance the understanding of the nature of neonatal stroke. The aim of this investigation was to determine the particularities of alterations in macro- microcirculation in the brain of newborn rats in the different stages of stress-related development of HS using three-dimensional Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI).Our results show that cerebral veins are more sensitive to harmful effect of stress compared with microcirculatory vessels. Stress-induced progressive dilation of cerebral veins with the fall of blood flow velocity precedes HS while pathological changes in microcirculatory vessels are accompanied by development of HS. The further detailed study of cerebral venous and microcirculatory circulation would be a significant advance in development of prognostic criteria for a HS risk during the first days after birthday.

  7. Acute stroke revealing Takayasu's arteritis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Gil; Zalmanovich, Anat; Golan, Yitzhak; Jonas Kimchi, Tali; Barenboim, Erez

    2016-08-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian male with Crohn's disease exhibited acute ischaemic stroke as the first manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis. Stroke as the first clinical manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis has been rarely reported. Though rare in Western countries, Takayasu's arteritis should be considered as a possibility in young patients presenting with stroke. Both Takayasu's arteritis and Crohn's disease may increase the risk of ischaemic stroke. Furthermore, their coexistence is much higher than that expected by chance and suggest a pathophysiological link between these diseases. PMID:27075786

  8. Endovascular Interventions in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Recent Evidence, Current Challenges, and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Appireddy, Ramana; Zerna, Charlotte; Menon, Bijoy K; Goyal, Mayank

    2016-07-01

    After many years of clinical research, endovascular thrombectomy has been conclusively proven to be an effective treatment in acute ischemic stroke. The evidence is compelling; however, it is generated in high volume stroke centers with stroke expertise. Challenges remain ahead on translating and implementing this evidence in routine clinical care across the world. The current evidence has opened up avenues for further research and innovation in this field. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of evidence on endovascular thrombectomy followed by a discussion of challenges and future prospects in this exciting field of stroke care. PMID:27221502

  9. Peptic ulcer hemorrhage combined with acute gout: analyses of treatment in 136 cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenglei; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Dingguo; Yao, Jun; Shi, Ruiyue; Tang, Qinghong; Wang, Lisheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to compare the safety and curative effect of celecoxib and small-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate in patients with peptic ulcer hemorrhage combined with acute gout. In this randomized, controlled trial, a total of 136 patients with peptic ulcer hemorrhage combined with acute gout were divided into the celecoxib group or the small-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate group. These patients underwent gastroscopy hemostasis and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Moreover, for the treatment of gout, the patients were administered either celecoxib or small-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate. Adverse reactions and the visual analogue scale (VAS) score were recorded for the two groups. The difference in adverse reactions between the two groups was not significant (χ(2) = 0.002, P = 0.967). The duration of evident pain relief after the first dose of treatment showed a significant difference between the two groups (t = 13.728, P < 0.01). The VAS scores before treatment were not significantly different between the two groups (t = -1.786, P = 0.076). The VAS scores at 6 h, 2 days, 4 days, 6 days, and 8 days after treatment were significantly different between the two groups (t = 3.239, 6.586, 6.280, 3.737, 3.215; P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.002, respectively). In cases that receive effective gastroscopy hemostasis and PPI therapy, small-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate exhibits a greater clinical curative effect for peptic ulcer hemorrhage combined with acute gout as compared to celecoxib, and is associated with greater safety. PMID:26131224

  10. Unsuccessful tissue plasminogen activator treatment of acute stroke caused by a calcific embolus.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John I; Bekavac, Ivo

    2004-10-01

    Intravenous (IV) administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) given to patients during acute cerebral ischemia according to National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) guidelines improves clinical outcome by 11% to 14%. The success of IV tPA stroke therapy is dependent on several previously reported factors. The authors suggest that the presence of calcification within an embolus may represent an additional important factor. This report describes a patient with an acute stroke secondary to a spontaneous calcific cerebral embolus who had a negative outcome despite receiving proper thrombolytic therapy. PMID:15358964

  11. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a patient with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis caused by impetigo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Kei; Hamaguchi, Akihiko; Ogura, Makoto; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of pulmonary renal syndrome with nephritis in a 17-year-old boy with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The patient exhibited hemoptysis two weeks after developing impetigo, and DAH was diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Respiratory failure progressed, and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy was administered; the respiratory failure regressed immediately after the onset of therapy. Streptococcus pyogenes was detected in an impetigo culture, and, together with the results of the renal biopsy, a diagnosis of APSGN was made. This case demonstrates the effects of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy in improving respiratory failure. PMID:25876581

  12. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. PMID:26116854

  13. Remote ischemic conditioning for acute ischemic stroke: dawn in the darkness.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jingrui; Li, Xiangpen; Peng, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Of all strokes, 87% are ischemic. The only approved treatments for acute ischemic stroke are intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase within 4.5 h and thrombectomy within 8 h after symptom onset, which can be applied to just a few patients. During the past decades, ischemic preconditioning has been widely studied to confirm its neuroprotection against subsequent ischemia/reperfusion injury in the brain, including preconditioning in situ or in a remote organ (such as a limb) before onset of brain ischemia, the latter of which is termed as remote ischemic preconditioning. Because acute stroke is unpredicted, ischemic preconditioning is actually not suitable for clinical application. So remote ischemic conditioning performed during or after the ischemic duration of the brain was then designed to study its neuroprotection alone or in combination with alteplase in animals and patients, which is named as remote ischemic perconditioning or remote ischemic postconditioning. As expected, animal experiments and clinical trials both showed exciting results, indicating that an evolution in the treatment for acute ischemic stroke may not be far away. However, some problems or disputes still exist. This review summarizes the research progress and unresolved issues of remote ischemic conditioning (pre-, per-, and post-conditioning) in treating acute ischemic stroke, with the hope of advancing our understanding of this promising neuroprotective strategy for ischemic stroke in the near future. PMID:26812782

  14. Acute Stroke and Obstruction of the Extracranial Carotid Artery Combined with Intracranial Tandem Occlusion: Results of Interventional Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Lescher, Stephanie Czeppan, Katja; Porto, Luciana; Singer, Oliver C.; Berkefeld, Joachim

    2015-04-15

    PurposeDue to high thrombus load, acute stroke patients with tandem obstructions of the extra- and intracranial carotid arteries or the middle cerebral artery show a very limited response to systemic thrombolysis. Interventional treatment with mechanical thrombectomy—often in combination with acute stenting of underlying atherosclerotic stenosis or dissection—is increasingly used. It has been shown that such complex interventions are technically feasible. The lack of optimal management strategies and clinical data encouraged us to review our acute stroke interventions in patient with anterior circulation tandem lesions to determine lesion patterns, interventional approaches, and angiographic or clinical outcomes.Patients and MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed a series of 39 consecutive patients with intracranial vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation simultaneously presenting with high-grade cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis or occlusion.ResultsEmergency ICA stent implantation was technically feasible in all patients, and intracranial recanalization with TICI ≥ 2b was reached in a large number of patients (64 %). Good clinical outcomes (mRS ≤ 2 at 3 months) were achieved in one third of the patients (36 %). Symptomatic hemorrhages occurred in four patients (10 %). Mortality was 10 %.ConclusionEndovascular recanalization of acute cervical carotid artery occlusion was technically feasible in all patients, and resulted in high extra- and intracranial revascularization rates. A trend for favorable clinical outcome was seen in a higher TICI score, younger age, good collateral status, and combined IV rTPA and endovascular therapy.

  15. [The use of frameless neuronavigation in the surgery of hemorrhagic stroke].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Dash'ian, V G; Shaklunov, A A; Burov, S A

    2008-01-01

    The application of CT-navigation in emergency neurosurgery for the calculation of surgery assets in 42 patients with hypertensive intracranial hemorrhages is presented. The relative simplicity and high precision of navigation (on average 2,2 +/- 1 mm) made it possible to use the method in emergency surgery of deep intracranial hematomas. The application of CT navigation in combination with neuroendoscopy and local fibrinolysis of hemorrhages allowed to decrease the post-surgery brain trauma and reduce the volume of intervention due to the high precision of calculation that resulted in the improvement of surgical outcome. The total post-operative mortality was 24%. In 94% of survived patients positive changes in neurological status were observed in 2-4 weeks after the surgery. PMID:19431271

  16. The Influence of Acute Hyperglycemia in an Animal Model of Lacunar Stroke That Is Induced by Artificial Particle Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Jun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Yu-Min; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have revealed that hyperglycemia during ischemic stroke increases the stroke's severity and the infarct size in clinical and animal studies. However, no conclusive evidence demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia worsens post-stroke outcomes and increases infarct size in lacunar stroke. In this study, we developed a rat model of lacunar stroke that was induced via the injection of artificial embolic particles during full consciousness. We then used this model to compare the acute influence of hyperglycemia in lacunar stroke and diffuse infarction, by evaluating neurologic behavior and the rate, size, and location of the infarction. The time course of the neurologic deficits was clearly recorded from immediately after induction to 24 h post-stroke in both types of stroke. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic deficit in diffuse infarction at 24 h after stroke, and also aggravated the cerebral infarct. Furthermore, the infarct volumes of the basal ganglion, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum but not the cortex were positively correlated with serum glucose levels. In contrast, acute hyperglycemia reduced the infarct volume and neurologic symptoms in lacunar stroke within 4 min after stroke induction, and this effect persisted for up to 24 h post-stroke. In conclusion, acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic outcomes in diffuse infarction, although it significantly reduced the size of the cerebral infarct and improved the neurologic deficits in lacunar stroke. PMID:27226775

  17. Building a "brain attack" team to administer thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M D; Barber, P A; Demchuk, A M; Sevick, R J; Newcommon, N J; Green, T; Buchan, A M

    2000-01-01

    Before tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was licensed for use in Canada, in February 1999, the Calgary Regional Stroke Program spearheaded the development and organization of local resources to use thrombolytic therapy in patients who had experienced acute ischemic stroke. In 1996 special permission was obtained from the Calgary Regional Health Authority to use intravenously administered tPA for acute ischemic stroke, and ethical and scientific review boards approved the protocols. After 3 years our efforts have resulted in improved patient outcomes, shorter times from symptom onset to treatment and acceptable adverse event rates. Areas for continued improvement include the door-to-needle time and broader education of the public about the symptoms of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:10862236

  18. Association between retinal hemorrhagic pattern and macular perfusion status in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study included 63 eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) to evaluate the retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior poles and explore their clinical relevance in macular perfusion differentiation. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns and macular perfusion status were evaluated via fundus photography and fluorescein angiography, respectively. Macular perfusion was judged as nonischemic in 30, ischemic in 28, and undeterminable in 5 among the 63 eyes. Predominant hemorrhagic patterns were flame-shaped in 39 (67.2%) and non-flame-shaped in 19 (32.8%) eyes. All 39 eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage showed a nonischemic macula. Of the 19 eyes classified as having a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage, 13 (68.4%) had an ischemic macula and 6 (31.6%) had a nonischemic macula (P < 0.001). Parallelism in eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage was higher than in those with a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage (P < 0.001), and in those with a nonischemic macula versus those with an ischemic macula (P < 0.001). The area under the curve for parallelism was 0.975 (P < 0.001), suggesting an accurate diagnostic parameter for macular perfusion differentiation. In conclusion, we objectively evaluated retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior pole in BRVO using the parallelism method, which was useful in differentiating macular perfusion status. PMID:27334338

  19. Outcomes of Patients Requiring Blood Pressure Control Before Thrombolysis with tPA for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Darger, Bryan; Gonzales, Nicole; Banuelos, Rosa C.; Peng, Hui; Radecki, Ryan P.; Doshi, Pratik B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to assess safety and efficacy of thrombolysis in the setting of aggressive blood pressure (BP) control as it compares to standard BP control or no BP control prior to thrombolysis. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) between 2004–2011. We compared the outcomes of patients treated with tPA for AIS who required aggressive BP control prior to thrombolysis to those requiring standard or no BP control prior to thrombolysis. The primary outcome of interest was safety, defined by all grades of hemorrhagic transformation and neurologic deterioration. The secondary outcome was efficacy, determined by functional status at discharge, and in-hospital deaths. Results Of 427 patients included in the analysis, 89 received aggressive BP control prior to thrombolysis, 65 received standard BP control, and 273 required no BP control prior to thrombolysis. Patients requiring BP control had more severe strokes, with median arrival National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale of 10 (IQR [6–17]) in patients not requiring BP control versus 11 (IQR [5–16]) and 13 (IQR [7–20]) in patients requiring standard and aggressive BP lowering therapies, respectively (p=0.048). In a multiple logistic regression model adjusting for baseline differences, there were no statistically significant differences in adverse events between the three groups (P>0.10). Conclusion We observed no association between BP control and adverse outcomes in ischemic stroke patients undergoing thrombolysis. However, additional study is necessary to confirm or refute the safety of aggressive BP control prior to thrombolysis. PMID:26759644

  20. Phase IIB/III Trial of Tenecteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results of a Prematurely Terminated Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haley, E. Clarke; Thompson, John L.P.; Grotta, James C.; Lyden, Patrick D.; Hemmen, Thomas G.; Brown, Devin L.; Fanale, Christopher; Libman, Richard; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Levine, Steven R.; Johnston, Karen C.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Levy, Gilberto; Levin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intravenous alteplase (rt-PA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use remains limited. In a previous pilot dose-escalation study, intravenous tenecteplase showed promise as a potentially safer alternative. Therefore, a Phase IIB clinical trial was begun to a) choose a best dose of tenecteplase to carry forward, and b) to provide evidence for either promise or futility of further testing of tenecteplase versus rt-PA. If promise was established, then the trial would continue as a Phase III efficacy trial comparing the selected tenecteplase dose to standard rt-PA. Methods: The trial began as a small, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial comparing 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4 mg/kg tenecteplase with standard 0.9 mg/kg rt-PA in patients with acute stroke within 3 hours of onset. An adaptive sequential design used an early (24 hour) assessment of major neurological improvement balanced against occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) to choose a “best” dose of tenecteplase to carry forward. Once a “best” dose was established, the trial was to continue until at least 100 pairs of the selected tenecteplase dose versus standard rt-PA could be compared by 3 month outcome using the modified Rankin Scale in an interim analysis. Decision rules were devised to yield a clear recommendation to either stop for futility or to continue into Phase III. Results: The trial was prematurely terminated for slow enrollment after only 112 patients had been randomized at 8 clinical centers between 2006 and 2008. The 0.4 mg/kg dose was discarded as inferior after only 73 patients were randomized, but the selection procedure was still unable to distinguish between 0.1 mg/kg and 0.25 mg/kg as a propitious dose at the time the trial was stopped. There were no statistically persuasive differences in 3 month outcomes between the remaining tenecteplase groups and rt-PA. Symptomatic ICH rates were highest in the

  1. Effects of Centralizing Acute Stroke Services on Stroke Care Provision in Two Large Metropolitan Areas in England

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Stephen; Hoffman, Alex; Hunter, Rachael M.; Boaden, Ruth; McKevitt, Christopher; Perry, Catherine; Pursani, Nanik; Rudd, Anthony G.; Turner, Simon J.; Tyrrell, Pippa J.; Wolfe, Charles D.A.; Fulop, Naomi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— In 2010, Greater Manchester and London centralized acute stroke care into hyperacute units (Greater Manchester=3, London=8), with additional units providing ongoing specialist stroke care nearer patients’ homes. Greater Manchester patients presenting within 4 hours of symptom onset were eligible for hyperacute unit admission; all London patients were eligible. Research indicates that postcentralization, only London’s stroke mortality fell significantly more than elsewhere in England. This article attempts to explain this difference by analyzing how centralization affects provision of evidence-based clinical interventions. Methods— Controlled before and after analysis was conducted, using national audit data covering Greater Manchester, London, and a noncentralized urban comparator (38 623 adult stroke patients, April 2008 to December 2012). Likelihood of receiving all interventions measured reliably in pre- and postcentralization audits (brain scan; stroke unit admission; receiving antiplatelet; physiotherapist, nutrition, and swallow assessments) was calculated, adjusting for age, sex, stroke-type, consciousness, and whether stroke occurred in-hospital. Results— Postcentralization, likelihood of receiving interventions increased in all areas. London patients were overall significantly more likely to receive interventions, for example, brain scan within 3 hours: Greater Manchester=65.2% (95% confidence interval=64.3–66.2); London=72.1% (71.4–72.8); comparator=55.5% (54.8–56.3). Hyperacute units were significantly more likely to provide interventions, but fewer Greater Manchester patients were admitted to these (Greater Manchester=39%; London=93%). Differences resulted from contrasting hyperacute unit referral criteria and how reliably they were followed. Conclusions— Centralized systems admitting all stroke patients to hyperacute units, as in London, are significantly more likely to provide evidence-based clinical

  2. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management

    PubMed Central

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. PMID:24990846

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in Trauma Patients Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, R. Heiss, P.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M. Schreyer, A. G. Hamer, O. W. Rennert, J. Hoffstetter, P. Stroszczynski, C.; Zorger, N.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of endovascular embolization with liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx) in patients with acute traumatic arterial bleeding. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 patients (9 men and 4 women; mean age 45 years) with severe trauma who underwent embolotherapy using Onyx from November 2003 to February 2009. Bleeding was located in the pelvis (5 patients), kidney (3 patients), mesenteric region (2 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), neck (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). In three cases (23.1%), Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. We evaluate the technical and clinical success, procedural and embolization time, occurrence of rebleeding, and embolotherapy-related complications, such as necrosis or migration of Onyx into nontarget vessels. Results: In all patients, embolotherapy was technically and clinically successful on the first attempt. Control of bleeding could be reached with a mean time of 19 (range, 4-63) min after correct placement of the microcatheter in the feeding artery. No recurrent bleeding was detected. No unintended necrosis or migration of Onyx into a nontarget region was observed. During the follow-up period, three patients (23.1%) died due to severe intracranial hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, and sepsis. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization with new liquid embolic agent Onyx is technically feasible and effective in trauma patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  4. Incremental Value of Left Atrial Global Longitudinal Strain for Prediction of Post Stroke Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Darae; Cho, In Jeong; Kim, Young Dae; Nam, Hyo Suk; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Geu-Ru; Ha, Jong-Won; Heo, Ji Hoe; Chung, Namsik

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a well-established risk factor for stroke. Interestingly, ischemic stroke increases risk of incident AF in patients without prior diagnosed AF. For better risk stratification for post-stroke AF, we studied left atrial (LA) size and mechanical function using two-dimensional (2D) speckle tracking imaging in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 227 patients (132 males, age 67 ± 12) with acute ischemic stroke without a history of AF underwent 2D transthoracic echocardiography and speckle tracking imaging for the assessment of LA volume index and global LA longitudinal strain (LALS). From clinical variables, the CHA2DS2-VASc score and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were calculated in each patient. Post-stroke AF was defined as newly diagnosed AF during the course after ischemic stroke. Results Post-stroke AF occurred in 25 patients (11%). Patients with post-stroke AF were older and showed a higher tendency of CHA2DS2-VASc score, significantly higher log NIHSS, larger LA volume index and lower global LALS than those without. In multivariate analysis, global LALS was an independent predictor for post-stroke AF (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.83.0.97, p < 0.01) after controlling for confounding factors. Furthermore, global LALS provided incremental predictive value for post-stroke AF over the CHA2DS2-VASc score, NIHSS, and LA volume index. The global LALS < 14.5% better distinguished post-stroke AF (area under the curve 0.837, sensitivity 60%, specificity 95%, p < 0.01) than CHA2DS2-VASc score. Conclusion Global LALS as a marker of LA mechanical function has incremental predictive value for post-stroke AF in patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27081440

  5. Risk of Ischemic Stroke, Hemorrhagic Stroke, Bleeding, and Death in Patients Switching from Vitamin K Antagonist to Dabigatran after an Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Lee, Christina Ji-Young; Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Staerk, Laila; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lindhardt, Tommi Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Safety regarding switching from vitamin K antagonist (VKA) to dabigatran therapy in post-ablation patients has never been investigated and safety data for this is urgently needed. The objective of this study was to examine if switch from VKA to dabigatran increased the risk of stroke, bleeding, and death in patients after ablation for atrial fibrillation. Methods Through the Danish nationwide registries, patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation undergoing ablation were identified, in the period between August 22nd 2011 and December 31st 2015. The risk of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, bleeding, and death, related to switching from VKA to dabigatran was examined using a multivariable Poisson regression model, where Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using VKA as reference. Results In total, 4,236 patients were included in the study cohort. The minority (n = 470, 11%) switched to dabigatran in the follow up period leaving the majority (n = 3,766, 89%) in VKA treatment. The patients in the dabigatran group were older, were more often males, and had higher CHA2DS2-VASc, and HAS-BLED scores. The incident rates of bleeding and death were almost twice as high in the dabigatran group compared with the VKA group. When adjusting for the individual components included in the CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores, the multivariable Poisson analyses yielded a non-significant IRR (95%CI) of 1.64 (0.72–3.75) for bleeding and of 1.41 (0.66–3.00) for death associated with the dabigatran group, compared to the VKA group. A significant increased risk of bleeding was found in the 110mg bid group with an IRR (95%CI) of 4.49(1.40–14.5). Conclusion Shifting from VKA to dabigatran after ablation was associated with twice as high incidence of bleeding compared to the incidence in patients staying in VKA treatment. The only significant increased risk found in the adjusted analyses was for bleeding with 110mg bid dabigatran and not for 150mg bid. Since there

  6. Emergency Care of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Integrated Health System

    PubMed Central

    Sauser-Zachrison, Kori; Shen, Ernest; Ajani, Zahra; Neil, William P; Sangha, Navdeep; Gould, Michael K; Sharp, Adam L

    2016-01-01

    Context: Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is underutilized for treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Objective: To determine whether the probability of tPA administration for patients with ischemic stroke in an integrated health care system improved from 2009 to 2013, and to identify predictors of tPA administration. Design: Retrospective analysis of all ischemic stroke presentations to 14 Emergency Departments between 2009 and 2013. A generalized linear mixed-effects model identified patient and hospital predictors of tPA. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome was tPA administration; secondary outcomes were door-to-imaging and door-to-needle times and tPA-related bleeding complications. Results: Of the 11,630 patients, 3.9% received tPA. The likelihood of tPA administration increased with presentation in 2012 and 2013 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26–2.43; and OR = 2.58; 95% CI = 1.90–3.51), female sex (OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.04–1.54), and ambulance arrival (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.76–2.67), and decreased with prior stroke (OR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.25–0.89) and increased age (OR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.97–0.99). Likelihood varied by Medical Center (pseudo-intraclass correlation coefficient 13.5%). Among tPA-treated patients, median door-to-imaging time was 15 minutes (interquartile range, 9–23 minutes), and door-to-needle time was 73 minutes (interquartile range, 55–103 minutes). The rate of intracranial hemorrhage was 4.2% and 0.9% among tPA- and non-tPA treated patients (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Acute ischemic stroke care improved over time in this integrated health system. Better understanding of differences in hospital performance will have important quality-improvement and policy implications. PMID:27043833

  7. [Ischemic stroke as reaction to an acute stressful event].

    PubMed

    Ibrahimagić, Omer C; Sinanović, Osman; Cickusić, Amra; Smajlović, Dzevdet

    2005-01-01

    The period following ischemic stroke can be considered as a reaction to a stressful event. Changes in cortisol secretion are one of the indicators of stress reaction. The aim of the study was to determine morning serum levels of cortisol in stroke patients within 48 hours and 15 days of ischemic stroke onset. Study group included 40 patients, 20 of them were females, mean age 65.3 +/- 10.3 years. The patients did not receive any corticosteroid agents or spironolactone, and did not suffer from Cushing's or Addison's syndrome. Ischemic stroke was verified by computed tomography of the brain. The fluorometric method with DELFIA Cortisol immunoassay was used to determine morning serum cortisol levels. Reference values of the measured hormone were 201-681 nmol/l. The mean level of serum cortisol within 48 hours of stroke was 560.9 +/- 318.9 nmol/l, and on day 15 it was 426.2 +/- 159.3 nmol/l, i.e. significantly lower (p < 0.02). On the first measurement, the level of serum cortisol was elevated in 32%, and on the second measurement in only 7.5% patients, which was also significantly lower (p < 0.001). It was concluded that the stress reaction in ischemic stroke patients was more pronounced within the first 48 hours of stroke onset. Judging from the morning cortisol levels, the reaction to stress was considerably less pronounced 15 days after stroke onset. PMID:15875466

  8. CT perfusion cerebral blood volume does not always predict infarct core in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    d'Esterre, Christopher D; Roversi, Gloria; Padroni, Marina; Bernardoni, Andrea; Tamborino, Carmine; De Vito, Alessandro; Azzini, Cristiano; Marcello, Onofrio; Saletti, Andrea; Ceruti, Stefano; Lee, Ting Yim; Fainardi, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the practical clinical utility of the CT perfusion (CTP) cerebral blood volume (CBV) parameter for differentiating salvageable from non-salvageable tissue in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Fifty-five patients with AIS were imaged within 6 h from onset using CTP. Admission CBV defect (CBVD) volume was outlined using previously established gray and white matter CBV thresholds for infarct core. Admission cerebral blood flow (CBF) hypoperfusion and CBF/CBV mismatch were visually evaluated. Truncation of the ischemic time-density curve (ITDC) and hypervolemia status at admission, recanalization at 24-h CT angiography, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) at 24 h and/or 7-day non-contrast CT (NCCT), final infarct volume as indicated by 3-month NCCT defect (NCCTD) and 3-month modified Rankin Score were determined. Patients with recanalization and no truncation had the highest correlation (R = 0.81) and regression slope (0.80) between CBVD and NCCTD. Regression slopes were close to zero for patients with admission hypervolemia with/without recanalization. Hypervolemia underestimated (p = 0.02), while recanalization and ITDC truncation overestimated (p = 0.03) the NCCTD. Among patients with confirmed recanalization at 24 h, 38 % patients had an admission CBF/CBV mismatch within normal appearing areas on respective NCCT. 83 % of these patients developed infarction in admission hypervolemic CBF/CBV mismatch tissue. A reduction in CBV is a valuable predictor of infarct core when the acquisition of ITDC data is complete and hypervolemia is absent within the tissue destined to infarct. Raised or normal CBV is not always indicative of salvageable tissue, contrary to the current definition of penumbra. PMID:25981225

  9. Early High-dosage Atorvastatin Treatment Improved Serum Immune-inflammatory Markers and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Strokes Classified as Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Arnao, Valentina; Corte, Vittoriano Della; Simonetta, Irene; Corpora, Francesca; Di Bona, Danilo; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins have beneficial effects on cerebral circulation and brain parenchyma during ischemic stroke and reperfusion. The primary hypothesis of this randomized parallel trial was that treatment with 80 mg/day of atorvastatin administered early at admission after acute atherosclerotic ischemic stroke could reduce serum levels of markers of immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase and that this immune-inflammatory modulation could have a possible effect on prognosis of ischemic stroke evaluated by some outcome indicators. We enrolled 42 patients with acute ischemic stroke classified as large arteries atherosclerosis stroke (LAAS) randomly assigned in a randomized parallel trial to the following groups: Group A, 22 patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg (once-daily) from admission day until discharge; Group B, 20 patients not treated with atorvastatin 80 mg until discharge, and after discharge, treatment with atorvastatin has been started. At 72 hours and at 7 days after acute ischemic stroke, subjects of group A showed significantly lower plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, whereas no significant difference with regard to plasma levels of IL-10, E-Selectin, and P-Selectin was observed between the 2 groups. At 72 hours and 7 days after admission, stroke patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg in comparison with stroke subjects not treated with atorvastatin showed a significantly lower mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin scores. Our findings provide the first evidence that atorvastatin acutely administered immediately after an atherosclerotic ischemic stroke exerts a lowering effect on immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase of stroke and that its early use is associated to a better functional and prognostic profile. PMID:27043681

  10. Acute Stroke Care at Rural Hospitals in Idaho: Challenges in Expediting Stroke Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhardt, James G.; Norris, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Thrombolytics are currently the most effective treatment for stroke. However, the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke criteria for initiation of thrombolytic therapy, most notably the 3-hour time limit from symptom onset, have proven challenging for many rural hospitals to achieve. Purpose: To provide a snapshot of…

  11. Motor recovery monitoring using acceleration measurements in post acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Its recovery and treatment depends on close clinical monitoring by a clinician especially during the first few hours after the onset of stroke. Patients who do not exhibit early motor recovery post thrombolysis may benefit from more aggressive treatment. Method A novel approach for monitoring stroke during the first few hours after the onset of stroke using a wireless accelerometer based motor activity monitoring system is developed. It monitors the motor activity by measuring the acceleration of the arms in three axes. In the presented proof of concept study, the measured acceleration data is transferred wirelessly using iMote2 platform to the base station that is equipped with an online algorithm capable of calculating an index equivalent to the National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) motor index. The system is developed by collecting data from 15 patients. Results We have successfully demonstrated an end-to-end stroke monitoring system reporting an accuracy of calculating stroke index of more than 80%, highest Cohen’s overall agreement of 0.91 (with excellent κ coefficient of 0.76). Conclusion A wireless accelerometer based ‘hot stroke’ monitoring system is developed to monitor the motor recovery in acute-stroke patients. It has been shown to monitor stroke patients continuously, which has not been possible so far with high reliability. PMID:23590690

  12. Absolute and Relative Contraindications to IV rt-PA for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the contraindications to the administration of intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) originated as exclusion criteria in major stroke trials. These were derived from expert consensus for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) trial. Despite the fact that the safety and efficacy of IV rtPA has been repeatedly confirmed in large international observational studies over the past 20 years, most patients with acute ischemic stroke disappointingly still do not receive thrombolytic treatment. Some of the original exclusion criteria have proven to be unnecessarily restrictive in real-world clinical practice. It has been suggested that application of relaxed exclusion criteria might increase the IV thrombolysis rate up to 20% with comparable outcomes to thrombolysis with more conventional criteria. We review the absolute and relative contraindications to IV rtPA for acute ischemic stroke, discussing the underlying rationale and evidence supporting these exclusion criteria. PMID:26288669

  13. Thrombolytics in acute ischaemic stroke: a guide to patient selection and optimum use.

    PubMed

    Adams, H P

    2000-02-01

    Intravenously administered alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator; rtPA) is the only medical treatment that has been approved for the management of acute ischaemic stroke. Although rtPA has demonstrated efficacy in improving outcomes of patients with a wide range of neurological impairments, it cannot be given with impunity. Thrombolytic therapy is associated with a considerable risk of intracranial bleeding that is likely to be catastrophic. Careful selection of patients to treat and intensive ancillary care are the keys for successful administration of rtPA. An algorithm for selection is based on the interval from the onset of stroke, history of recent medical illnesses or use of medications, findings of the medical and neurological examinations and the results of laboratory and brain imaging studies. Because rtPA must be given within 3 hours of onset of stroke, most patients cannot be treated. Thus, additional therapies are needed for treatment of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. PMID:18034518

  14. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  15. Is hyperglycaemia an independent predictor of poor outcome after acute stroke? Results of a long-term follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, C. J.; Murray, G. D.; Dyker, A. G.; Lees, K. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether raised plasma glucose concentration independently influences outcome after acute stroke or is a stress response reflecting increased stroke severity. DESIGN: Long-term follow up study of patients admitted to an acute stroke unit. SETTING: Western Infirmary, Glasgow. SUBJECTS: 811 patients with acute stroke confirmed by computed tomography. Analysis was restricted to the 750 non-diabetic patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survival time and placement three months after stroke. RESULTS: 645 patients (86%) had ischaemic stroke and 105 patients (14%) haemorrhagic stroke. Cox's proportional hazards modelling with stratification according to Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project categories identified increased age (relative hazard 1.36 per decade; 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 1.53), haemorrhagic stroke (relative hazard 1.67; 1.22 to 2.28), time to resolution of symptoms > 72 hours (relative hazard 2.15; 1.15 to 4.05), and hyperglycaemia (relative hazard 1.87; 1.43 to 2.45) as predictors of mortality. The effect of glucose concentration on survival was greatest in the first month. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma glucose concentration above 8 mmol/l after acute stroke predicts a poor prognosis after correcting for age, stroke severity, and stroke subtype. Raised plasma glucose concentration is therefore unlikely to be solely a stress response and should arguably be treated actively. A randomised trial is warranted. PMID:9158464

  16. Gender differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Alberti, Andrea; Lanari, Alessia; Micheli, Sara; Bertolani, Luca; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Billeci, Antonia M R; Comi, Giancarlo; Previdi, Paolo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women than men owing to the fact that women have more stroke events and are less likely to recover. Age-specific stroke rates are higher in men; however, because of women's longer life expectancy and the much higher incidence of stroke at older ages, women have more stroke events than men overall. The aims of this prospective study in consecutive patients were to assess whether there are gender differences in stroke risk factors, treatment or outcome. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were included in this prospective study at four study centers. Disability was assessed using a modified Rankin Scale score (>or=3 indicating disabling stroke) in both genders at 90 days. Outcomes and risk factors in both genders were compared using the chi(2) test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify any independent predictors of outcome. A total of 1136 patients were included in this study; of these, 494 (46%) were female. Women were statistically older compared with men: 76.02 (+/- 12.93) and 72.68 (+/- 13.27) median years of age, respectively. At admission, females had higher NIH Stroke Scale scores compared with males (9.4 [+/- 6.94] vs 7.6 [+/- 6.28] for men; p = 0.0018). Furthermore, females tended to have more cardioembolic strokes (153 [30%] vs 147 [23%] for men; p = 0.004). Males had lacunar and atherosclerotic strokes more often (146 [29%] vs 249 [39%] for men; p = 0.002, and 68 [13%] vs 123 [19%] for men; p = 0.01, respectively). The mean modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months was also significantly different between genders, at 2.5 (+/- 2.05) for women and 2.1 (+/- 2.02) for men (p = 0.003). However, at multivariate analysis, female gender was not an indicator for negative outcome. It was concluded that female gender was not an independent factor for negative outcome. In addition, both genders demonstrated different stroke pathophysiologies. These findings should be taken into account when diagnostic workup and

  17. Sex differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke in Tuzla region, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dzevdet; Sinanović, Osman; Kojić, Biljana

    2010-05-01

    Although many aspects of stroke are similar at both sexes, however, there are some differences and characteristics as well. The aim of this study was to analyze sex differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke (IS) regarding to risk factors, subtypes, stroke severity and outcome. From January 1st 2001 to December 31st 2005 at the Department of Neurology Tuzla 2833 patients were admitted with acute ischemic stroke (IS). We were analyzed risk factors, subtypes, stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), and thirty-day outcome. There were 1484 (52.3%) female, and they were older than male (67.8 +/- 10.6 vs. 65.7 +/- 10.5, p<0.0001). Hypertension (78% vs. 67%, p<0.0001), heart diseases (50% vs. 45%, p=0.009), atrial fibrillation (22% vs. 14%, p<0.0001) and diabetes mellitus (33% vs. 21%, p<0.0001) were frequently in female, while smoking (45% vs. 14%) and alcohol overuse (18% vs. 0,6%) in male (p<0.0001). Atherothrombotic type of ischemic stroke was frequently in male (37.4% vs. 31.6%, p=0.0013) and cardioembolic in female (21.7% vs. 15.5%, p<0.0001). At admission female had lower SS (SS 31.0 +/- 15 vs. 34.0 +/- 15, p<0.0001). Thirty-day mortality was significantly higher in female (23.3% vs. 18.4%, p=0.0015), and favourable outcome within one month (Rankin Scale stroke is higher in female who are older than male. There are some sex differences according to the distribution of risk factors and subtypes of ischemic stroke. Stroke severity at admission, thirty-day mortality, and disability are higher in female. PMID:20507291

  18. Intrinsic factors influencing help-seeking behaviour in an acute stroke situation.

    PubMed

    Zock, Elles; Kerkhoff, Henk; Kleyweg, Ruud Peter; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-09-01

    The proportion of stroke patients eligible for intravenous or intra-arterial treatment is still limited because many patients do not seek medical help immediately after stroke onset. The aim of our study was to explore which intrinsic factors and considerations influence help-seeking behaviour of relatively healthy participants, confronted with stroke situations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 non-stroke participants aged 50 years or older. We presented 5 clinical stroke situations as if experienced by the participants themselves. Recognition and interpretation of symptoms were evaluated and various factors influencing help-seeking behaviour were explored in-depth. We used the thematic synthesis method for data analysis. Five themes influencing help-seeking behaviour in a stroke situation were identified: influence of knowledge, views about seriousness, ideas about illness and health, attitudes towards others and beliefs about the emergency medical system. A correct recognition of stroke symptoms or a correct interpretation of the stroke situations did not automatically result in seeking medical help. Interestingly, similar factors could lead to different types of actions between participants. Many intrinsic, as well as social and environmental factors are of influence on help-seeking behaviour in an acute stroke situation. All these factors seem to play a complex role in help-seeking behaviour with considerable inter-individual variations. Accomplishing more patients eligible for acute stroke treatment, future research should focus on better understanding of all factors at various levels grounded in a theory of help-seeking behaviour. PMID:26732617

  19. What is still missing in acute-phase treatment of stroke: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, Sara; Turri, Giulia; Mirandola, Rina; Bovi, Paolo; Bisoffi, Giulia

    2013-04-01

    Early recognition of stroke symptoms and activation of emergency medical service (EMS) positively affects prognosis after a stroke. To assess stroke awareness among stroke patients and medical personnel in the catchment area of Verona Hospital and how it affects stroke care, we prospectively studied timing of acute stroke care in relation to patients' characteristics. Patients admitted to Medical Departments of Verona University Hospital between January 1st and December 31st 2009 with a diagnosis of TIA or stroke were enrolled. Outcome measures were: time between (i) symptoms onset and hospital arrival, (ii) hospital arrival and brain CT scan, blood examination, ECG and neurological evaluation. The following patient/event characteristics were also collected: means of hospital arrival, sex, age, degree of disability, type of event (first or recurrent) and acute-phase treatment. Of 578 patients providing complete information, 60 % arrived to the emergency department with the EMS (EMS+ group), while 40 % arrived on their own (EMS-). EMS+ group was older than EMS- (mean age 76.2, SD 13.2, vs. 72.3, SD 13, respectively), displayed more severe symptoms (mRS 4 vs. 2) and shorter time interval between symptoms onset and hospital arrival, hospital arrival and CT scan, ECG, laboratory tests and neurological evaluation (p < 0.0001); 22 % of the EMS+ patients were stroke recurrences versus 29 % of the EMS- (p = 0.058); 85 % of thrombolised patients were EMS+. We conclude that there is a lack of awareness of stroke symptoms and risks of recurrence even among patients who already had a stroke and among medical personnel. PMID:22466805

  20. Comparative health effects of margarines fortified with plant sterols and stanols on a rat model for hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, W M N; Plouffe, L; L'Abbé, M R; Trick, K; Mueller, R; Hayward, S

    2003-12-01

    the present study, plant stanols provoke hemorrhagic stroke in SHRSP rats to a slightly greater extent than plant sterols. The results also suggest that the mechanism by which plant stanols shorten the life span of SHRSP rats might differ from that of plant sterols. PMID:14870926

  1. Diagnostic Potential of the NMDA Receptor Peptide Assay for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dambinova, Svetlana A.; Bettermann, Kerstin; Glynn, Theodore; Tews, Matthew; Olson, David; Weissman, Joseph D.; Sowell, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The acute assessment of patients with suspected ischemic stroke remains challenging. The use of brain biomarker assays may improve the early diagnosis of ischemic stroke. The main goal of the study was to evaluate whether the NR2 peptide, a product of the proteolytic degradation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, can differentiate acute ischemic stroke (IS) from stroke mimics and persons with vascular risk factors/healthy controls. A possible correlation between biomarker values and lesion sizes was investigated as the secondary objective. Methods and Findings A total of 192 patients with suspected stroke who presented within 72 h of symptom onset were prospectively enrolled. The final diagnosis was determined based on clinical observations and radiological findings. Additionally gender- and age-matched healthy controls (n = 52) and persons with controlled vascular risk factors (n = 48) were recruited to compare NR2 peptide levels. Blinded plasma was assayed by rapid magnetic particles (MP) ELISA for NR2 peptide within 30 min and results for different groups compared using univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. There was a clinical diagnosis of IS in 101 of 192 (53%) and non-stroke in 91 (47%) subjects. The non-stroke group included presented with acute stroke symptoms who had no stroke (n = 71) and stroke mimics (n = 20). The highest NR2 peptide elevations where found in patients with IS that peaked at 12 h following symptom onset. When the biomarker cut off was set at 1.0 ug/L, this resulted in a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96% to detect IS. A moderate correlation (rs = 0.73) between NR2 peptide values and acute ischemic cortical lesions (<200 mL) was found. Conclusions This study suggests that the NR2 peptide may be a brain specific biomarker to diagnose acute IS and may allow the differentiation of IS from stroke mimics and controls. Additional larger scale clinical validation studies are required

  2. The unexpected force of acute stroke leading to patients' sudden death as described by nurses.

    PubMed

    Rejnö, Åsa; Danielson, Ella; von Post, Iréne

    2013-03-01

    Stroke occurs suddenly and unexpectedly and its consequences can mean the difference between life and death. Research into stroke is extensive but largely focused on patients who survive. The aim of the study was to describe how nurses experience the patient's death and dying, when patients are afflicted by acute stroke and whose lives cannot be saved. The study had a descriptive design with a hermeneutical approach. Interviews were carried out with ten nurses in stroke units at three hospitals. Data were interpreted using hermeneutic textual interpretation based on Gadamer's philosophy. The study shows that sudden death, when unexpected forces intervene in the lives of patients afflicted by acute stroke, was described by the main theme sudden death - the unexpected force and the following three sub-themes: death comes unexpectedly and without warning to the patient; the relatives are at the mercy of the unexpected and the nurses find themselves in demanding situations. The new understanding emphasizes that the unexpected and demanding situations the nurses are put in can be understood as ethical dilemmas and value conflicts because they are not free to give their time to preserving the dying patient's dignity and are not able to give the good care they wish to. A more flexible organization could support the nurses in making use of the creative forces in the unexpected event which an acute stroke that leads to death constitutes. PMID:22612457

  3. Developing drug strategies for the neuroprotective treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Arnao, Valentina; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Developing new treatment strategies for acute ischemic stroke in the last twenty years has offered some important successes, but also several failures. Most trials of neuroprotective therapies have been uniformly negative to date. Recent research has reported how excitatory amino acids act as the major excitatory neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, other therapeutic targets such as free radical scavenger strategies and the anti-inflammatory neuroprotective strategy have been evaluated with conflicting data in animal models and human subjects with acute ischemic stroke. Whereas promising combinations of neuroprotection and neurorecovery, such as citicoline, albumin and cerebrolysin have been tested with findings worthy of further evaluation in larger randomized clinical trials. Understanding the complexities of the ischemic cascade is essential to developing pharmacological targets for acute ischemic stroke in neuroprotective or flow restoration therapeutic strategies. PMID:26469760

  4. Predicting discharge mortality after acute ischemic stroke using balanced data.

    PubMed

    Ho, King Chung; Speier, William; El-Saden, Suzie; Liebeskind, David S; Saver, Jeffery L; Bui, Alex A T; Arnold, Corey W

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been developed to predict stroke outcomes (e.g., stroke mortality, patient dependence, etc.) in recent decades. However, there is little discussion regarding the problem of between-class imbalance in stroke datasets, which leads to prediction bias and decreased performance. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique to overcome such problems. We also compare state of the art machine learning methods and construct a six-variable support vector machine (SVM) model to predict stroke mortality at discharge. Finally, we discuss how the identification of a reduced feature set allowed us to identify additional cases in our research database for validation testing. Our classifier achieved a c-statistic of 0.865 on the cross-validated dataset, demonstrating good classification performance using a reduced set of variables. PMID:25954451

  5. Subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dahmardeh, Maryam; Dabiri, Soroosh

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is the first cause of morbidity all around the world. Entrapment neuropathies are a known complication of stroke. The objective of this study is to assess the frequency of subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in the healthy and paretic hands of stroke patients. Methods The authors performed nerve conduction study in the first three days after admission in 39 stroke patients without subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome and 30 days after admission. Electrophysiological studies were done in both paretic and non-paretic hands. Both ulnar and median nerves were studied. Results After one month we found subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in 16 paretic hands and 13 healthy hands. We did not find any difference in the frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome in two sides. Conclusion The authors suggest that simultaneous different mechanisms may act in inducing carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands of hemiparetic patients. PMID:24250872

  6. The Effect of Pulsatility Index on Infarct Volume in Acute Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon; Lee, Hanbin; An, Se-A; Yim, Byeongsoo; Kim, Jonguk; Kim, Ok Joon; Kim, Won Chan; Kim, Hyun Sook; Oh, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lacunar stroke, in the context of small vessel disease, is a type of cerebral infarction caused by occlusion of a penetrating artery. Pulsatility index (PI) is an easily measurable parameter in Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) study. PI reflects distal cerebral vascular resistance and has been interpreted as a surrogate marker of small vessel disease. We hypothesized that an increased PI, a marker of small vessel disease, might be associated with a larger infarct volume in acute lacunar stroke. Materials and Methods This study included 64 patients with acute lacunar stroke who underwent TCD and brain MRI. We evaluated the association between the mean PI value of bilateral middle cerebral arteries and infarct volume on diffusion-weighted MRI using univariate and multivariate linear regression. Results The mean infarct volume and PI were 482.18±406.40 mm3 and 0.86±0.18, respectively. On univariate linear regression, there was a significant positive association between PI and infarct volume (p=0.001). In the multivariate model, a single standard deviation increase of PI (per 0.18) was associated with an increase of 139.05 mm3 in infarct volume (95% confidence interval, 21.25 to 256.85; p=0.022). Conclusion We demonstrated that PI was an independent determinant of infarct volume in acute lacunar stroke. The PI value measured in acute stroke may be a surrogate marker of the extent of ischemic injury. PMID:27189290

  7. Acute ischemic non-embolic stroke and serum level of uric acid

    PubMed Central

    Sheykholeslami, Nazanin Zia; Gadari, Faranak; Ahmady, Jafar

    2012-01-01

    Background Impact of high level of uric acid on stroke is still controversial. We conducted this study to investigate the relationship between acute ischemic non-embolic stroke and serum levels of uric acid. Methods This was a case-control study on patients with acute ischemic non-embolic stroke in Rafsanjan, Iran. The control group consisted of normal persons who were similar to the case group in terms of age and gender. Serum level of uric acid in the first 24 hours of admission was measured with photometry method. Results In a total of 130 patients (59 mens), hyperuricemia was seen in 13.0% of subjects in the control group and 10.7% of subjects in the case group. Nine patients in case group and 7 patients in control group with hyperuricemia were women. No significant relationship was found between acute ischemic non-embolic stroke and serum level of uric acid. Conclusion There was no relationship between uric acid and acute ischemic non-embolic stroke. PMID:24250850

  8. Association between i.v. thrombolysis volume and door-to-needle times in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Groot, Adrien E; van Schaik, Ivo N; Visser, Marieke C; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Limburg, Martien; Aramideh, Majid; de Beer, Frank; Zwetsloot, Caspar P; Halkes, Patricia; de Kruijk, Jelle; Kruyt, Nyika D; van der Meulen, Willem; Spaander, Fianne; van der Ree, Taco; Kwa, Vincent I H; Van den Berg-Vos, Renske M; Roos, Yvo B; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-04-01

    Centralization of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) for acute ischemic stroke in high-volume centers is believed to improve the door-to-needle times (DNT), but limited data support this assumption. We examined the association between DNT and IVT volume in a large Dutch province. We identified consecutive patients treated with IVT between January 2009 and 2013. Based on annualized IVT volume, hospitals were categorized as low-volume (≤ 24), medium-volume (25-49) or high-volume (≥ 50). In logistic regression analysis, low-volume hospitals were used as reference category. Of 17,332 stroke patients from 11 participating hospitals, 1962 received IVT (11.3 %). We excluded 140 patients because of unknown DNT (n = 86) or in-hospital stroke (n = 54). There were two low-volume (total 101 patients), five medium-volume (747 patients) and four high-volume hospitals (974 patients). Median DNT was shorter in high-volume hospitals (30 min) than in medium-volume (42 min, p < 0.001) and low-volume hospitals (38 min, p < 0.001). Patients admitted to high-volume hospitals had a higher chance of DNT < 30 min (adjusted OR 3.13, 95 % CI 1.70-5.75), lower risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (adjusted OR 0.39, 95 % CI 0.16-0.92), and a lower mortality risk (adjusted OR 0.45, 95 % CI 0.21-1.01), compared to low-volume centers. There was no difference in DNT between low- and medium-volume hospitals. Onset-to-needle times (ONT) did not differ between the groups. Hospitals in this Dutch province generally achieved short DNTs. Despite this overall good performance, higher IVT volumes were associated with shorter DNTs and lower complication risks. The ONT was not associated with IVT volume. PMID:26946499

  9. Predictors of early rebleeding and mortality after acute variceal hemorrhage in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Andrew K; Triantos, Christos K; O'Beirne, James; Patch, David

    2009-02-01

    Despite improvements over the past 20 years in patient survival following episodes of acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) secondary to cirrhosis, AVH is still associated with a high rate of mortality. The ability to predict which patients are at high risk of death, or which are not likely to respond to standard therapy at admission to hospital is important, as it enables the immediate initiation of vasoactive drugs, early endoscopic intervention and prophylactic antibiotics. This commentary discusses a study that attempts to predict early rebleeding and mortality after AVH in patients with cirrhosis using the Model for End-stage Liver Disease. In this study, the model was a significant predictor of mortality; however, several defects in the study's design limit the conclusions that can be drawn from it. The model described in this study is neither more useful, nor more accurate, than those previously published for the prediction of rebleeding and mortality in patients with AVH. PMID:19092789

  10. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy: an unusual diagnosis for the general pediatrician

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Diego Fontana Siqueira; Darcie, Ana Letícia Fornazieri; Ferronato, Angela Espósito; Hein, Noely; Lo, Denise Swei; Yoshioka, Cristina Ryoka Miyao; Hirose, Maki; Cardoso, Debora Morais; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy (AHEI) is a rare leukocytoclastic vasculitis, clinically characterized by the classical triad: palpable purpuric skin lesions, edema and fever, and is commonly misdiagnosed as Henoch-Schönlein purpura. In addition to its sudden onset, AHEI is also characterized by its self-limited course with complete and spontaneous recovery occurring between 1 and 3 weeks. Because of the scarcity of studies on therapy with corticosteroids, the conservative approach is usually recommended. The authors report an unusual case of an one-year-old boy who presented with typical cutaneous rash of AHEI and orchitis, the latter showing complete resolution after less than 24 hours of prednisolone therapy. The authors call attention to this entity mainly as a differential diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and to the importance of new studies to establish the benefits of corticosteroid therapy for AHEI. PMID:26558246

  11. Concurrence of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Stanford Type A Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Suzuki, Takeya; Wakako, Akira; Sadato, Akiyo; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    We report a rare case of concurrent aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and acute aortic dissection (AAD). A 38-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of severe headache, and brain computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of SAH. Thoracic to neck computed tomography angiography (CTA), performed in addition to brain CTA, suggested a tear in the aortic arch, and subsequent CT aortography established the diagnosis of Stanford type A AAD. The AAD in our patient, who reported no episodes of chest or back pain, was detected incidentally by thoracic to neck CTA. The imaging study has rarely been indicated for SAH except that it provides additional anatomical information in patients for whom extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery or endovascular treatment is considered. Nevertheless, our experience may highlight additional diagnostic value of thoracic to neck CTA in SAH patients. PMID:27083068

  12. Abnormal EEG Complexity and Functional Connectivity of Brain in Patients with Acute Thalamic Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Guo, Jie; Meng, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhijun; Yao, Yang; Yang, Jiajia; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic thalamus stroke has become a serious cardiovascular and cerebral disease in recent years. To date the existing researches mostly concentrated on the power spectral density (PSD) in several frequency bands. In this paper, we investigated the nonlinear features of EEG and brain functional connectivity in patients with acute thalamic ischemic stroke and healthy subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) in resting condition with eyes closed was recorded for 12 stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects as control group. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), Sample Entropy (SampEn), and brain network using partial directed coherence (PDC) were calculated for feature extraction. Results showed that patients had increased mean LZC and SampEn than the controls, which implied the stroke group has higher EEG complexity. For the brain network, the stroke group displayed a trend of weaker cortical connectivity, which suggests a functional impairment of information transmission in cortical connections in stroke patients. These findings suggest that nonlinear analysis and brain network could provide essential information for better understanding the brain dysfunction in the stroke and assisting monitoring or prognostication of stroke evolution. PMID:27403202

  13. Music as Medicine: The Therapeutic Potential of Music for Acute Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Supnet, Charlene; Crow, April; Stutzman, Sonja; Olson, DaiWai

    2016-04-01

    Nurses caring for patients with acute stroke are likely to administer both music and medication with therapeutic intent. The administration of medication is based on accumulated scientific evidence and tailored to the needs of each patient. However, the therapeutic use of music is generally based on good intentions and anecdotal evidence. This review summarizes and examines the current literature regarding the effectiveness of music in the treatment of critically ill patients and the use of music in neurologically injured patients. The rationale for hypothesis-driven research to explore therapeutic music intervention in acute stroke is compelling. PMID:27037347

  14. Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis: anti-coxsackievirus A24 variant secretory immunoglobulin A in acute and convalescent tear

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Marlyn P; Anders, Edwin A; Burch, Maxwell A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present the clinical course of a laboratory-acquired case of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) caused by coxsackievirus A24 variant (CA24v). Also, the anti-CA24v neutralizing activity and anti-CA24v immunoglobulin (Ig) G and secretory IgA (sIgA) in acute and convalescent tears and/or sera are presented. Case A 60-year-old male presented with acute-onset left eyelid edema, tearing, conjunctival erythema, pain, foreign body sensation, and subconjunctival hemorrhage 24 hours after suspected laboratory exposure. Bilateral conjunctivitis presented 24 hours later and resolved in 10 days. Methods Tear and blood samples were collected for virus isolation and neutralizing assays. CA24v-reactive IgG and sIgA in tear and/or serum samples were detected by immunofluorescent antibody analysis of ethanol-fixed virus-infected cells. Results Peak tear neutralization titers (1,000–1,500 U/mL) against the isolated virus occurred 1 day post-onset (po) of AHC. Tear neutralization titers became undetectable by the sixth day as serum neutralization titers became detectable on the ninth day po (60 U/mL), peaked by 21 days (3,000 U/mL), declined by 1 year to 200 U/mL, and remained at 30 U/mL 5 years po. Antibody to human IgG, IgA, and secretory component (sIgA) reacted with CA24v-infected cells treated with pooled acute tears collected 1–4 days po. Predominantly, sIgA was detected in CA24v-infected cells treated with tears collected 4 years and 5 years post-AHC, while convalescent serum contained predominantly anti-CA24v IgG. Conclusion AHC was confirmed by CA24v isolation, tear anti-CA24v neutralizing activity, and seroconversion. The detection of CA24v-reactive IgG, sIgA, and neutralizing activity in tears collected 1–4 days po of AHC supports plasma extravasation of IgG and suggests a defensive role for tear anti-CA24v sIgA. The results suggest that immunofluorescent antibody analysis of tears for persistent anti-CA24v sIgA may be

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Panax notoginseng Saponin Therapy for Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Meta-Analysis, and Mini Review of Potential Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongying; Huang, Ping; Yu, Zhaosheng; Xing, Daniel H.; Ouyang, Shuai; Xing, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial/intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a leading cause of death and disability in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. No proven drug is available for ICH. Panax notoginseng (total saponin extraction, PNS) is one of the most valuable herb medicines for stroke and cerebralvascular disorders in China. We searched for randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) involving PNS injection to treat cerebral hemorrhage for meta-analysis from various databases including the Chinese Stroke Trials Register, the trials register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Chinese BioMedical disk, and China Doctorate/Master Dissertations Databases. The quality of the eligible trials was assessed by Jadad’s scale. Twenty (20) of the 24 identified randomized controlled trials matched the inclusive criteria including 984 ICH patients with PNS injection and 907 ICH patients with current treatment (CT). Compared to the CT groups, PNS-treated patients showed better outcomes in the effectiveness rate (ER), neurological deficit score, intracranial hematoma volume, intracerebral edema volume, Barthel index, the number of patients died, and incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: PNS injection is superior to CT for acute ICH. A review of the literature shows that PNS may exert multiple protective mechanisms against ICH-induced brain damage including hemostasis, anti-coagulation, anti-thromboembolism, cerebral vasodilation, invigorated blood dynamics, anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and anti-hyperglycemic effects. Since vitamin C and other brain cell activators (BCA) that are not considered common practice were also used as parts of the CT in several trials, potential PNS and BCA interactions could exist that may have made the effect of PNS therapy less or more impressive than by PNS therapy alone. Future PNS trials with and without the inclusion of such controversial BCAs as part of the CT could

  16. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. The WHO defines stroke as "rapidly developing clinical signs of focal disturbance of cerebral function lasting more than 24 hours with no apparent cause other than of vascular origin." Strokes are subdivided into two major classifications: ischemic (80-87 percent) andhemorrhagic (13-20 percent). Ischemic strokes occur from thrombi, emboli, or global hypoperfusion. Hemorrhagic strokes are either parenchymal (10 percent of all strokes) or subarachnoid (3 percent of all strokes). There are a variety of recognized risk factors for stroke which include: age, race, family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, prosthetic valves, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and others (drugs or hormones). The initial assessment of a patient suspected of stroke should be done quickly enough to ensure maximal reperfusion of brain tissue. The steps to achieve this goal are: 1) exclude an intracranial hemorrhage, 2) assess for contraindications to thrombolytics, 3) characterize the infarct. The workup for a patient should first include a history (especially the time when neurologic symptoms began), a physical exam (including the NIHSS), and imaging studies (to rule out hemorrhagic components). In addition, several lab studies can also be obtained including: PT/INR, glucose, complete blood count, metabolic panel, creatine kinase, ECG, echocardiogram, lipid panel, carotid Doppler, MRA or CTA. Acute management of a stroke is primarily focused on stabilizing the patient and allowing as much reperfusion as possible for at-risk brain tissue. Stroke management in the acute setting includes: use of thrombolytics if indicated, and re-assessment to monitor progression. Several trials have been completed in pursuit of safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial stroke therapy for patients outside the recommended thrombolytic time window

  17. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. The WHO defines stroke as "rapidly developing clinical signs of focal disturbance of cerebral function lasting more than 24 hours with no apparent cause other than of vascular origin." Strokes are subdivided into two major classifications: ischemic (80-87 percent) andhemorrhagic (13-20 percent). Ischemic strokes occur from thrombi, emboli, or global hypoperfusion. Hemorrhagic strokes are either parenchymal (10 percent of all strokes) or subarachnoid (3 percent of all strokes). There are a variety of recognized risk factors for stroke which include: age, race, family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, prosthetic valves, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and others (drugs or hormones). The initial assessment of a patient suspected of stroke should be done quickly enough to ensure maximal reperfusion of brain tissue. The steps to achieve this goal are: 1) exclude an intracranial hemorrhage, 2) assess for contraindications to thrombolytics, 3) characterize the infarct. The workup for a patient should first include a history (especially the time when neurologic symptoms began), a physical exam (including the NIHSS), and imaging studies (to rule out hemorrhagic components). In addition, several lab studies can also be obtained including: PT/INR, glucose, complete blood count, metabolic panel, creatine kinase, ECG, echocardiogram, lipid panel, carotid Doppler, MRA or CTA. Acute management of a stroke is primarily focused on stabilizing the patient and allowing as much reperfusion as possible for at-risk brain tissue. Stroke management in the acute setting includes: use of thrombolytics if indicated, and re-assessment to monitor progression. Several trials have been completed in pursuit of safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial stroke therapy for patients outside the recommended thrombolytic time window

  18. CT Angiography and Presentation NIH stroke Scale in Predicting TIA in Patients Presenting with Acute Stroke Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Bedriye; Selph, James; Burdine, Joselyn; Graham, Cole Blease; Sen, Souvik

    2013-11-01

    Patient candidacy for acute stroke intervention, is currently assessed using brain computed tomography angiography (CTA) evidence of significant stenosis/occlusion (SSO) with a high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (>6). This study examined the association between CTA without significant stenosis/occlusion (NSSO) and lower NIHSS (≤ 6) with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and other good clinical outcomes at discharge. Patients presenting <8 hours from stroke symptom onset, had an NIHSS assessment and brain CTA performed at presentation. Good clinical outcomes were defined as: discharge diagnosis of TIA, modified Rankin Score [mRS] ≤ 1, and home as the discharge disposition. Eighty-five patients received both an NIHSS at presentation and a CTA at 4.2 ± 2.2 hours from stroke symptom onset. Patients with NSSO on CTA as well as those with NIHSS≤6 had better outcomes at discharge (p<0.001). NIHSS ≤ 6 were more likely than NSSO (p=0.01) to have a discharge diagnosis of TIA (p<0.001). NSSO on CTA and NIHSS ≤ 6 also correlated with fewer deaths (p<0.001). Multivariable analyses showed NSSO on CTA (Adjusted OR: 5.8 95% CI: 1.2-27.0, p=0.03) independently predicted the discharge diagnosis of TIA. Addition of NIHSS ≤ 6 to NSSO on CTA proved to be a stronger independent predictor of TIA (Adjusted OR 18.7 95% CI: 3.5-98.9, p=0.001). PMID:24851234

  19. CT Angiography and Presentation NIH stroke Scale in Predicting TIA in Patients Presenting with Acute Stroke Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Bedriye; Selph, James; Burdine, Joselyn; Graham, Cole Blease; Sen, Souvik

    2014-01-01

    Patient candidacy for acute stroke intervention, is currently assessed using brain computed tomography angiography (CTA) evidence of significant stenosis/occlusion (SSO) with a high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (>6). This study examined the association between CTA without significant stenosis/occlusion (NSSO) and lower NIHSS (≤ 6) with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and other good clinical outcomes at discharge. Patients presenting <8 hours from stroke symptom onset, had an NIHSS assessment and brain CTA performed at presentation. Good clinical outcomes were defined as: discharge diagnosis of TIA, modified Rankin Score [mRS] ≤ 1, and home as the discharge disposition. Eighty-five patients received both an NIHSS at presentation and a CTA at 4.2 ± 2.2 hours from stroke symptom onset. Patients with NSSO on CTA as well as those with NIHSS≤6 had better outcomes at discharge (p<0.001). NIHSS ≤ 6 were more likely than NSSO (p=0.01) to have a discharge diagnosis of TIA (p<0.001). NSSO on CTA and NIHSS ≤ 6 also correlated with fewer deaths (p<0.001). Multivariable analyses showed NSSO on CTA (Adjusted OR: 5.8 95% CI: 1.2-27.0, p=0.03) independently predicted the discharge diagnosis of TIA. Addition of NIHSS ≤ 6 to NSSO on CTA proved to be a stronger independent predictor of TIA (Adjusted OR 18.7 95% CI: 3.5-98.9, p=0.001). PMID:24851234

  20. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic biomarker in mild cognitive impairment following stroke in acute phase.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ningqin; Shi, Shengliang; Su, Ying

    2016-05-25

    To investigate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HMRS) as a diagnostic biomarker to identify mild cognitive impairment (MCI) following stroke in the acute phase. A total of 72 stroke patients were recruited in the acute phase of stroke from the Department of Neurology, including 36 stroke patients with MCI and 36 stroke patients without MCI. All patients underwent brain MRI/MRS examination on a 3.0 T scanner and a neuropsychological test in the acute phase of stroke. Single-voxel HMRS was performed to obtain hippocampal metabolism intensities and brain infarcts were assessed on MRI. Group difference in metabolite ratios was analyzed using a T-test. Spearman rank correlation was used to study the correlation between metabolite ratios and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores. The hippocampal n-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio was found to be significantly lower in stroke patients with MCI compared with stroke patients without MCI (P<0.02). However, we found no differences in the metabolite ratios between hippocampus ipsilateral to infarctions and the contralateral side (P>0.05) in stroke patients with MCI. Furthermore, a correlation was found between hippocampal NAA/Cr ratios and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores in stroke patients with MCI (P<0.01). HMRS could be a biomarker to identify MCI following stroke in the acute phase by capturing neurodegenerative changes. PMID:26981713

  1. Perihematoma cerebral blood flow is unaffected by statin use in acute intracerebral hemorrhage patients.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Laura C; Kate, Mahesh; McCourt, Rebecca; Gould, Bronwen; Coutts, Shelagh B; Dowlatshahi, Dariush; Asdaghi, Negar; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M; Buck, Brian; Emery, Derek; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Butcher, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Statin therapy has been associated with improved cerebral blood flow (CBF) and decreased perihematoma edema in animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We aimed to assess the relationship between statin use and cerebral hemodynamics in ICH patients. A post hoc analysis of 73 ICH patients enrolled in the Intracerebral Hemorrhage Acutely Decreasing Arterial Pressure Trial (ICH ADAPT). Patients presenting <24 hours from ICH onset were randomized to a systolic blood pressure target <150 or <180 mm Hg with computed tomography perfusion imaging 2 hours after randomization. Cerebral blood flow maps were calculated. Hematoma and edema volumes were measured planimetrically. Regression models were used to assess the relationship between statin use, perihematoma edema and cerebral hemodynamics. Fourteen patients (19%) were taking statins at the time of ICH. Statin-treated patients had similar median (IQR Q25 to 75) hematoma volumes (21.1 (9.5 to 38.3) mL versus 14.5 (5.6 to 27.7) mL, P=0.25), but larger median (IQR Q25 to 75) perihematoma edema volumes (2.9 (1.7 to 9.0) mL versus 2.2 (0.8 to 3.5) mL, P=0.02) compared with nontreated patients. Perihematoma and ipsilateral hemispheric CBF were similar in both groups. A multivariate linear regression model revealed that statin use and hematoma volumes were independent predictors of acute edema volumes. Statin use does not affect CBF in ICH patients. Statin use, along with hematoma volume, are independently associated with increased perihematoma edema volume. PMID:25757757

  2. Perihematoma cerebral blood flow is unaffected by statin use in acute intracerebral hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Laura C; Kate, Mahesh; McCourt, Rebecca; Gould, Bronwen; Coutts, Shelagh B; Dowlatshahi, Dariush; Asdaghi, Negar; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M; Buck, Brian; Emery, Derek; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Butcher, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Statin therapy has been associated with improved cerebral blood flow (CBF) and decreased perihematoma edema in animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We aimed to assess the relationship between statin use and cerebral hemodynamics in ICH patients. A post hoc analysis of 73 ICH patients enrolled in the Intracerebral Hemorrhage Acutely Decreasing Arterial Pressure Trial (ICH ADAPT). Patients presenting <24 hours from ICH onset were randomized to a systolic blood pressure target <150 or <180 mm Hg with computed tomography perfusion imaging 2 hours after randomization. Cerebral blood flow maps were calculated. Hematoma and edema volumes were measured planimetrically. Regression models were used to assess the relationship between statin use, perihematoma edema and cerebral hemodynamics. Fourteen patients (19%) were taking statins at the time of ICH. Statin-treated patients had similar median (IQR Q25 to 75) hematoma volumes (21.1 (9.5 to 38.3) mL versus 14.5 (5.6 to 27.7) mL, P=0.25), but larger median (IQR Q25 to 75) perihematoma edema volumes (2.9 (1.7 to 9.0) mL versus 2.2 (0.8 to 3.5) mL, P=0.02) compared with nontreated patients. Perihematoma and ipsilateral hemispheric CBF were similar in both groups. A multivariate linear regression model revealed that statin use and hematoma volumes were independent predictors of acute edema volumes. Statin use does not affect CBF in ICH patients. Statin use, along with hematoma volume, are independently associated with increased perihematoma edema volume. PMID:25757757

  3. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Image Analysis Methods: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Noel; Valdés, Jose; Guevara, Miguel; Silva, Augusto

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) account for 10-30% of all strokes and are a result of acute bleeding into the brain due to ruptures of small penetrating arteries. Despite major advancements in the management of ischemic strokes and other causes of hemorrhagic strokes, such as ruptured aneurysm, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), or cavernous angioma, during the past several decades, limited progress has been made in the treatment of ICH, and the prognosis for patients who suffer them remains poor. The societal impact of these hemorrhagic strokes is magnified by the fact that affected patients typically are a decade younger than those afflicted with ischemic strokes. The ICH continues to kill or disable most of their victims. Some studies show that those who suffer ICH have a 30-day mortality rate of 35-44% and a 6-month mortality rate approaching 50%. Approximately 700,000 new strokes occur in the United States annually and approximately 15% are hem-orrhagic strokes related to ICH. The poor outcome associated with ICH is related to the extent of brain damage. ICH produces direct destruction and compression of surrounding brain tissue. Direct compression causes poor perfusion and venous drainage to surrounding penumbra at risk, resulting in ischemia to the tissues that most need perfusion [16].

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of acute vestibular syndrome at the bedside in a stroke unit.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Lee, W; Chambers, B R; Dewey, H M

    2011-05-01

    Acute vestibular syndrome may be due to vestibular neuritis (VN) or posterior circulation strokes. Bedside ocular motor testing performed by experts is superior to early MRI in excluding strokes. We sought to demonstrate that differentiation of strokes from VN in our stroke unit is reliable. During a prospective study at a tertiary hospital over 1 year, patients with AVS were evaluated in the emergency department (ED) and underwent admission with targeted examination: gait, gaze-holding, horizontal head impulse test (hHIT), testing for skew deviation (SD) and vertical smooth pursuit (vSP). Neuroimaging included CT, transcranial Doppler (TCD) and MRI with MR angiogram (MRA). VN was diagnosed with normal diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and absence of neurological deficits on follow-up. Acute strokes were confirmed with DWI. A total of 24 patients with AVS were enrolled and divided in two groups. In the pure vestibular group (n = 20), all VN (n = 10/10) had positive hHIT and unidirectional nystagmus, but 1 patient had SD and abnormal vertical smooth pursuit (SP). In all the strokes (n = 10/10), one of the following signs suggestive of central lesion was present: negative hHIT, central-type nystagmus, SD or abnormal vSP. Finding one of these was 100% sensitive and 90% specific for stroke. In the cochleovestibular group (n = 4) all had normal DWI, but 3 patients had central ocular motor signs (abnormal vertical SP and SD). Whilst the study is small, classification of AVS in our stroke unit is reliable. The sensitivity and specificity of bedside ocular motor testing are comparable to those previously reported by expert neuro-otologists. Acute cochleovestibular loss and normal DWI may signify a labyrinthine infarct but differentiating between different causes of inner ear dysfunction is not possible with bedside testing. PMID:21153732

  5. Effect of upper airway obstruction in acute stroke on functional outcome at 6 months

    PubMed Central

    Turkington, P; Allgar, V; Bamford, J; Wanklyn, P; Elliott, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether upper airway obstruction occurring within the first 24 hours of stroke onset has an effect on outcome following stroke at 6 months. Traditional definitions used for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are arbitrary and may not apply in the acute stroke setting, so a further aim of the study was to redefine respiratory events and to assess their impact on outcome. Methods: 120 patients with acute stroke underwent a sleep study within 24 hours of onset to determine the severity of upper airway obstruction (respiratory disturbance index, RDI-total study). Stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale, SSS) and disability (Barthel score) were also recorded. Each patient was subsequently followed up at 6 months to determine morbidity and mortality. Results: Death was independently associated with SSS (OR (95% CI) 0.92 (0.88 to 0.95), p<0.00001) and RDI-total study (OR (95% CI) 1.07 (1.03 to 1.12), p<0.01). The Barthel index was independently predicted by SSS (p = 0.0001; r = 0.259; 95% CI 0.191 to 0.327) and minimum oxygen saturation during the night (p = 0.037; r = 0.16; 95% CI 0.006 to 0.184). The mean length of the respiratory event most significantly associated with death at 6 months was 15 seconds (sensitivity 0.625, specificity 0.525) using ROC curve analysis. Conclusion: The severity of upper airway obstruction appears to be associated with a worse functional outcome following stroke, increasing the likelihood of death and dependency. Longer respiratory events appear to have a greater effect. These data suggest that long term outcome might be improved by reducing upper airway obstruction in acute stroke. PMID:15115859

  6. Lack of international consensus on ethical aspects of acute stroke trials.

    PubMed

    Leira, Enrique C; Kaldjian, Lauris C; Ludwig, Bryan R; Torner, James C; Olalde, Heena M; Hacke, Werner; Adams, Harold P

    2012-04-01

    Acute stroke trials are becoming increasingly multinational. Working toward a shared ethical standard for acute stroke research necessitates evaluating the degree of consensus among international researchers. We surveyed all 275 coinvestigators and coordinators who participated in the AbESTT II study (evaluating abciximab vs placebo) about their experience with their local institutional review board (IRB) or equivalent, as well as, about their personal beliefs regarding the ethical aspects of acute stroke trials. A total of 90 coinvestigators from 15 different countries responded to our survey. Among the IRBs represented by the responding coinvestigators, only 18% allowed surrogate consent to be obtained over the phone. Although 52% allowed the participation of subjects with aphasia, only 5% allowed the participation of subjects with neglect/hemi-inattention. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was deemed adequate to establish decisional capacity based on language by 62% of the coinvestigators and 36% of the IRBs. A belief that IRB regulations cause unnecessary delays and fear in relatives/patients was reported by 67% of coinvestigators, and the belief that granting an exemption from informed consent under specific circumstances is appropriate was reported by 41%. There appears to be considerable international diversity in the ethical priorities and informed consent standards among different IRBs and investigators in stroke research. The stroke community should make an attempt to standardize the consent process used in research. Given the critical nature of the time to treatment in stroke care, these standards should be integrated into current frameworks of clinical care and research. The absence of an ethical consensus can become a barrier to advancing stroke treatment internationally. PMID:20719537

  7. Acute Endovascular Reperfusion Therapy in Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Toshiya; Pasupuleti, Vinay; Deshpande, Abhishek; Thota, Priyaleela; Roman, Yuani; Hernandez, Adrian V.; Uchino, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke have had inconsistent results. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in published RCTs. Methods We performed a systematic review of RCTs of endovascular therapy with thrombolytic or mechanical reperfusion compared with interventions without endovascular therapy. Primary outcome was the frequency of good functional outcome (modified Rankin scale (mRS) of 0-2 at 90 days) and secondary outcomes were mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Random-effects meta-analysis was performed and the Cochrane risk of bias assessment was used to evaluate quality of evidence. Results Ten studies involving 1,612 subjects were included. Endovascular therapy was not significantly associated with good functional outcome (Relative Risk [RR] =1.17; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.42; p=0.10 and Absolute Risk Difference [ARD] =7%; 95%CI -0.1% to 14%; p=0.05); heterogeneity was moderate among studies (I2=30%). Mortality was unchanged with endovascular therapy (RR=0.92; 95 % CI, 0.75 to 1.13; p=0.45) and there was no difference in sICH (RR=1.20; 95 % CI, 0.79 to 1.82; p=0.39). The quality of evidence was low for all outcomes and the recommendation is weak for the use of endovascular therapy as per GRADE methodology. Conclusions Intra-arterial therapy did not show significant increase in good outcomes and no changes in either mortality or sICH in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We need further RCTs with better design and quality to evaluate the true efficacy of endovascular therapy. PMID:25915905

  8. Relationship between Blood Pressure and Outcomes in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Administered Lytic Medication in the TIMS-China Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xingquan; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Chunjuan; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased blood pressure (BP) management following acute ischemic stroke (AIS) remains controversial. This study aimed to identify the association between BP and clinical outcomes in AIS patients administered lytic medication in the TIMS-China (thrombolysis implementation and monitor of acute ischemic stroke in China) database. Methods The sample comprised 1128 patients hospitalized within 4.5 hours (h) of AIS for intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (i.v. rt-PA) thrombolysis. Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) at baseline, 2 h and 24 h after treatment, and changes from baseline were analyzed. The study outcomes comprised a favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale 0–1 at 90 days) and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), analyzed using logistic regression, with low BP as the reference group. Results Lower BP (baseline, 2 h, and 24 h) was beneficial in AIS patients and significantly related to a favorable outcome (P<0.05). A substantial BP decrease at 24 h after rt-PA thrombolysis was significantly associated with a favorable outcome compared with a moderate BP decrease (P = 0.0298). A SBP >160 mmHg 2 h after rt-PA thrombolysis was significantly associated with SICH compared with a SBP <140 mmHg (P = 0.0238). An increase or no change (>25 mmHg) in SBP was significantly associated with SICH (P = 0.002) compared with a small SBP decrease (1–9 mmHg). Conclusions This study provides novel evidence that lower BP within the first 24 h is associated with a more favorable outcome and less frequent SICH in AIS patients administered lytic medication. Routine BP-lowering treatment should be considered in AIS patients following lytic medication. PMID:26828609

  9. Acute care in stroke: the importance of early intervention to achieve better brain protection.

    PubMed

    Díez-Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B

    2004-01-01

    It is known that 'time is brain', and only early therapies in acute stroke have been effective, like thrombolysis within the first 3 h, and useful neuroprotective drugs are searched for that probably would be effective only with their very early administration. General care (respiratory and cardiac care, fluid and metabolic management, especially blood glucose and blood pressure control, early treatment of hyperthermia, and prevention and treatment of neurological and systemic complications) in acute stroke patients is essential and must already start in the prehospital setting and continue at the patient's arrival to hospital in the emergency room and in the stroke unit. A review of published studies analyzing the influence of general care on stroke outcome and the personal experience from observational studies was performed. Glucose levels >8 mmol/l have been found to be predictive of a poor prognosis after correcting for age, stroke severity, and stroke subtype. Although a clinical trial of glucose-insulin-potassium infusions is ongoing, increased plasma glucose levels should be treated. Moreover, insulin therapy in critically ill patients, including stroke patients, is safe and determines lower mortality and complication rates. Both high and low blood pressure levels have been related to a poor prognosis in acute stroke, although the target levels have not been defined yet in clinical trials. The body temperature has been shown to have a negative effect on stroke outcome, and its control and early treatment of hyperthermia are important. Hypoxemia also worsens the stroke prognosis, and oxygen therapy in case of <92% O(2) saturation is recommended. Besides, blood pressure stabilization avoiding falls of the diastolic pressure and the lowering of glycemia and temperature have been related to a better prognosis in stroke units patients, and homeostasis maintenance is associated with a better outcome. General care has become an emergent and first-line brain

  10. Excessive α-tocopherol exacerbates microglial activation and brain injury caused by acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Savita; Heigel, Mallory; Weist, Jessica; Gnyawali, Surya; Teplitsky, Seth; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.; Rink, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    The vitamin E family includes both tocopherols and tocotrienols, where α-tocopherol (αTOC) is the most bioavailable form. Clinical trials testing the therapeutic efficacy of high-dose αTOC against stroke have largely failed or reported negative outcomes when a “more is better” approach to supplementation (>400 IU/d) was used. This work addresses mechanisms by which supraphysiologic αTOC may contribute to stroke-induced brain injury. Ischemic stroke injury and the neuroinflammatory response were studied in tocopherol transfer protein-deficient mice maintained on a diet containing αTOC vitamin E at the equivalent human dose of 1680 IU/d. Ischemic stroke-induced brain injury was exacerbated in the presence of supraphysiologic brain αTOC levels. At 48 h after stroke, S100B and RAGE expression was increased in stroke-affected cortex of mice with elevated brain αTOC levels. Such increases were concomitant with aggravated microglial activation and neuroinflammatory signaling. A poststroke increase in markers of oxidative injury and neurodegeneration in the presence of elevated brain αTOC establish that at supraphysiologic levels, αTOC potentiates neuroinflammatory responses to acute ischemic stroke. Exacerbation of microglial activation by excessive αTOC likely depends on its unique cell signaling regulatory properties independent of antioxidant function. Against the background of clinical failure for high-dose αTOC, outcomes of this work identify risk for exacerbating stroke-induced brain injury as a result of supplementing diet with excessive levels of αTOC.—Khanna, S., Heigel,M., Weist, J., Gnyawali, S., Teplitsky, S., Roy, S., Sen, C. K., Rink, C. Excessive α-tocopherol exacerbates microglial activation and brain injury caused by acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25411436

  11. Lower Intraprocedural Systolic Blood Pressure Predicts Good Outcome in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    John, Seby; Hazaa, Walaa; Uchino, Ken; Toth, Gabor; Bain, Mark; Thebo, Umera; Hussain, Muhammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unknown if intraprocedural blood pressure (BP) influences clinical outcomes and what BP parameter best predicts outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients who undergo intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for emergent large vessel occlusion. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 147 patients who underwent IAT for anterior circulation AIS from January 2008 to December 2012 at our institution. Baseline demographics, stroke treatment variables, and detailed intraprocedural hemodynamic variables were collected. Results The entire cohort consisted of 81 (55%) females with a mean age of 66.9 ± 15.6 years and a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 16 (IQR 11-21). Thirty-six (24.5%) patients died during hospitalization, 25 (17%) achieved a 30-day modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2, and 24 (16.3%) suffered symptomatic parenchymal hematoma type 1/2 hemorrhage. Patients who achieved a good outcome had a significantly lower admission NIHSS score, a higher baseline CT ASPECTS score, and a lower rate of ICA terminus occlusions. Successful recanalization was more frequent in the good-outcome group, while symptomatic hemorrhages occurred only in poor-outcome patients. The first systolic BP (SBP; 146.5 ± 0.2 vs. 157.7 ± 25.6 mm Hg, p = 0.042), first mean arterial pressure (MAP; 98.1 ± 20.8 vs. 109.7 ± 20.3 mm Hg, p = 0.024), maximum SBP (164.6 ± 27.6 vs. 180.9 ± 18.3 mm Hg, p = 0.0003), and maximum MAP (125.5 ± 18.6 vs. 138.5 ± 24.6 mm Hg, p = 0.0309) were all significantly lower in patients who achieved good outcomes. A lower maximum intraprocedural SBP was an independent predictor of good outcome (adjusted OR 0.929, 95% CI 0.886-0.963, p = 0.0005). Initial NIHSS score was the only other independent predictor of a good outcome. Conclusion Lower intraprocedural SBP was associated with good outcome in patients undergoing IAT for AIS, and maximum SBP was an independent predictor of good outcome. SBP may be the optimal hemodynamic

  12. The Multidisciplinary Swallowing Team Approach Decreases Pneumonia Onset in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Shiro; Hirayama, Junko; Nakamori, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Mineka; Nezu, Tomohisa; Kubo, Satoshi; Nagano, Yuka; Nagao, Akiko; Yamane, Naoya; Nishikawa, Yuichi; Takamoto, Megumi; Ueno, Hiroki; Ochi, Kazuhide; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia occurs in acute stroke patients at high rates, and many of them develop aspiration pneumonia. Team approaches with the cooperation of various professionals have the power to improve the quality of medical care, utilizing the specialized knowledge and skills of each professional. In our hospital, a multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team was organized. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of a team approach on dysphagia by comparing the rates of pneumonia in acute stroke patients prior to and post team organization. All consecutive acute stroke patients who were admitted to our hospital between April 2009 and March 2014 were registered. We analyzed the difference in the rate of pneumonia onset between the periods before team organization (prior period) and after team organization (post period). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazards model to determine the predictors of pneumonia. We recruited 132 acute stroke patients from the prior period and 173 patients from the post period. Pneumonia onset was less frequent in the post period compared with the prior period (6.9% vs. 15.9%, respectively; p = 0.01). Based on a multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model, it was determined that a swallowing team approach was related to pneumonia onset independent from the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission (adjusted hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.19–0.84, p = 0.02). The multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team effectively decreased the pneumonia onset in acute stroke patients. PMID:27138162

  13. Minimising time to treatment: targeted strategies to minimise time to thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tai, Y J; Yan, B

    2013-11-01

    Time to thrombolysis is a critical determinant of favourable outcomes in acute ischaemic stroke. It is not infrequent that patient outcomes are compromised due to out-of-hospital and in-hospital time delays. On the other hand, time delays could be minimised through the identification of barriers and the implementation of targeted solutions. This review outlines the different strategies in minimising treatment delays and offers recommendations. Literature search in PubMed, Medline and EBSCO Host was conducted to identify studies that are relevant to reduction of time to treatment from January 1995 to December 2012. Strategies to reduce time to thrombolysis are categorised into pre-hospital strategies, in-hospital strategies and post-treatment decision strategies. Proposed pre-hospital strategies include public education on stroke symptoms awareness, prioritising stroke by emergency medical services, increasing ease of access to medical records, pre-hospital notification, and mobile computed tomography scanning. In-hospital strategies include a streamlined code stroke system, computed tomography scanner co-location with emergency department, 24/7 availability of stroke physicians, point-of-care laboratory testing and access to expert neuroimaging interpretation. Post-decision strategies include increasing availability of intravenous thrombolysis and simplification of informed consent procurement. Time to thrombolysis delays is multifactorial. Effective reduction of time delays for acute ischaemic stroke requires the correct identification of and targeted strategies to overcome time barriers. PMID:23734983

  14. Acupuncture for acute stroke: study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture has been widely used as a treatment for stroke in China for more than 3,000 years. However, previous research has not yet shown that acupuncture is effective as a stroke treatment. We report a protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled, and outcome assessor-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture on acute ischemic stroke. Methods/Design In a prospective trial involving three hospitals in the Zhejiang Province (China) 250 patients with a recent (less than 1 week previous) episode of ischemic stroke will be included. Patients will be randomized into two groups: an acupuncture group given scalp acupuncture and electroacupuncture, and a control group given no acupuncture. Eighteen treatment sessions will be performed over a three-week period. The primary outcome will be measured by changes in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at the one, three, and four-week follow-up. Secondary outcome measures will be: 1) the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for motor function; 2) the mini-mental state examination and Montreal cognitive assessment for cognitive function; 3) the video-fluoroscopic swallowing study for swallowing ability; and 4) the incidence of adverse events. Discussion This trial is expected to clarify whether or not acupuncture is effective for acute stroke. It will also show if acupuncture can improve motor, cognitive, or swallowing function. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-12001971. PMID:24908241

  15. Stroke genetics: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Arne

    2014-09-01

    Stroke genetics includes several topics of clinical interest, including (1) molecular genetic variations affecting risk of monogenic stroke syndromes; (2) molecular genetic variations affecting risk of common stroke syndromes, sometimes with specific effects on risk of specific main types of stroke or subtypes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke; (3) genetics of conditions associated with stroke risk e.g. white matter hyperintensities, atrial fibrillation and hypertension; (4) hereditary causes of familial aggregation of stroke; (5) epigenetic impact on protein expression during acute brain injury; (6) genetic influence on stroke recovery; and (7) pharmacogenetics. Genetic research methods include candidate gene studies; Genome Wide Association Studies; family studies; RNA and protein analyses; and advanced computer-aided analytical methods to detect statistically significant associations. Several methods that could improve our knowledge of stroke genetics are being developed e.g.: Exome content analysis; Next-generation sequencing; Whole genome sequencing; and Epigenetics. During 2012-2014, several Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) have been related to common ischemic stroke risk. Certain SNPs have been associated with risk of specific ischemic stroke subtypes such as large vessel disease and cardiac embolism, particular subtypes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), especially lobar ICH, and with prognosis after ICH. Large international studies on stroke recovery and exome content are ongoing. Advanced mathematical models have been used to study how several SNPs can act together and increase stroke risk burden. Such efforts require large numbers of patients and controls, which is achieved by co-operation in large international consortia such as the International Stroke Genetics Consortium. This overview includes an introduction to genetics, stroke genetics in general, and different genetic variations that may influence stroke risk. It presents some of the latest

  16. Melatonin reduces acute lung inflammation, edema, and hemorrhage in heatstroke rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-shiann; Chou, Ming-ting; Chao, Chien-ming; Chang, Chen-kuei; Lin, Mao-tsun; Chang, Ching-ping

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the therapeutic effect of melatonin on heat-induced acute lung inflammation and injury in rats. Methods: Heatstroke was induced by exposing anesthetized rats to heat stress (36 °C, 100 min). Rats were treated with vehicle or melatonin (0.2, 1, 5 mg/kg) by intravenous administration 100 min after the initiatioin of heatstroke and were allowed to recover at room temperature (26 °C). The acute lung injury was quantified by morphological examination and by determination of the volume of pleural exudates, the number of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells, and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) were measured by ELISA. Nitric oxide (NO) level was determined by Griess method. The levels of glutamate and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio were analyzed by CMA600 microdialysis analyzer. The concentrations of hydroxyl radicals were measured by a procedure based on the hydroxylation of sodium salicylates leading to the production of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA). Results: Melatonin (1 and 5 mg/kg) significantly (i) prolonged the survival time of heartstroke rats (117 and 186 min vs 59 min); (ii) attenuated heatstroke-induced hyperthermia and hypotension; (iii) attenuated acute lung injury, including edema, neutrophil infiltration, and hemorrhage scores; (iv) down-regulated exudate volume, BALF PMN cell number, and MPO activity; (v) decreased the BALF levels of lung inflammation response cytokines like TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 but further increased the level of an anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10; (vi) reduced BALF levels of glutamate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, NO, 2,3-DHBA, and lactate dehydrogenase. Conclusion: Melatonin may improve the outcome of heatstroke in rats by attenuating acute lung inflammation and injury. PMID:22609835

  17. Early phase combined therapeutic management of acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bassi, P; Lattuada, P; Tonietti, S

    2005-05-01

    An adequate treatment of ischaemic stroke in the early phase (28-48 h) is the most important factor for a better outcome. Thrombolysis with rTPA (within 3 h) and oral ASA 300 mg/days are the first therapeutic misures. Continuous monitoring of cardiological and haemodinamic parameters allows early detection of cardiac disturbances. Treatment of hypertension, low haematic oxigenation, hyperglicaemia, seizures and hypertermia is basic to improve outcome. Pharmacological therapy is only one of the components of effective multidisciplinary integrated management of ischaemic stroke; we remind also the precocity of rehabilitation procedures and an accurate psychological assessment. PMID:15883687

  18. Screening for dysphagia and aspiration in acute stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Perry, L; Love, C P

    2001-01-01

    Stroke is a common problem, producing a variety of neurological problems that affect eating. Dysphagia is a particular concern because of its potential for airway obstruction, malnutrition, and aspiration pneumonia. With chest infection reported in up to 32% of stroke patients, this is a major clinical issue. The following research questions are raised: (1) What are the incidence and outcomes of dysphagia and aspiration in acute stroke? (2) What screening interventions are available to detect dysphagia in patients with acute stroke and what effect have they on patient outcomes? A systematic review was carried out using methods and quality criteria of the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (1996), focusing on studies of adults with acute stroke. Data were extracted, collated, and presented descriptively. Two hundred forty-eight articles were retrieved with 26 meeting inclusion and quality criteria. Clinical dysphagia is common, associated with a range of deleterious outcomes and clearly linked to development of chest infection. Interpretation of aspiration on videofluoroscopy is not as straightforward but probably also confers additional risk. Further work is required on the relationship between aspiration and pneumonia, and pneumonia prevention. This will include exploration of the effects of screening, and the further development and validation of screening methods. While studies indicate current "best practice," in this important area of patient care further work is urgently required. PMID:11213249

  19. Multiparametric, Longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging Reveals Acute Injury and Chronic Recovery in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Can, Anil; Blasi, Francesco; Climov, Mihail; Daneshmand, Ali; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yu, Esther; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H.; Sakadžić, Sava; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Progress in experimental stroke and translational medicine could be accelerated by high-resolution in vivo imaging of disease progression in the mouse cortex. Here, we introduce optical microscopic methods that monitor brain injury progression using intrinsic optical scattering properties of cortical tissue. A multi-parametric Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) platform for longitudinal imaging of ischemic stroke in mice, through thinned-skull, reinforced cranial window surgical preparations, is described. In the acute stages, the spatiotemporal interplay between hemodynamics and cell viability, a key determinant of pathogenesis, was imaged. In acute stroke, microscopic biomarkers for eventual infarction, including capillary non-perfusion, cerebral blood flow deficiency, altered cellular scattering, and impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow, were quantified and correlated with histology. Additionally, longitudinal microscopy revealed remodeling and flow recovery after one week of chronic stroke. Intrinsic scattering properties serve as reporters of acute cellular and vascular injury and recovery in experimental stroke. Multi-parametric OCT represents a robust in vivo imaging platform to comprehensively investigate these properties. PMID:23940761

  20. Validity of Diagnostic Codes for Acute Stroke in Administrative Databases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Natalie; Bhole, Vidula; Lacaille, Diane; Avina-Zubieta, J. Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review of studies reporting on the validity of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes for identifying stroke in administrative data. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched (inception to February 2015) for studies: (a) Using administrative data to identify stroke; or (b) Evaluating the validity of stroke codes in administrative data; and (c) Reporting validation statistics (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), or Kappa scores) for stroke, or data sufficient for their calculation. Additional articles were located by hand search (up to February 2015) of original papers. Studies solely evaluating codes for transient ischaemic attack were excluded. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers; article quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. Results Seventy-seven studies published from 1976–2015 were included. The sensitivity of ICD-9 430-438/ICD-10 I60-I69 for any cerebrovascular disease was ≥ 82% in most [≥ 50%] studies, and specificity and NPV were both ≥ 95%. The PPV of these codes for any cerebrovascular disease was ≥ 81% in most studies, while the PPV specifically for acute stroke was ≤ 68%. In at least 50% of studies, PPVs were ≥ 93% for subarachnoid haemorrhage (ICD-9 430/ICD-10 I60), 89% for intracerebral haemorrhage (ICD-9 431/ICD-10 I61), and 82% for ischaemic stroke (ICD-9 434/ICD-10 I63 or ICD-9 434&436). For in-hospital deaths, sensitivity was 55%. For cerebrovascular disease or acute stroke as a cause-of-death on death certificates, sensitivity was ≤ 71% in most studies while PPV was ≥ 87%. Conclusions While most cases of prevalent cerebrovascular disease can be detected using 430-438/I60-I69 collectively, acute stroke must be defined using more specific codes. Most in-hospital deaths and death certificates with stroke as a cause-of-death correspond to true stroke deaths. Linking vital

  1. Intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with left atrial myxoma with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Yadav, Ravi; Mustare, Veerendrakumar; Modi, Sailesh

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is an accepted therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 3-4.5 hours of symptom onset. Selection of the patient for thrombolysis depends on the careful assessment for the risk of post thrombolysis symptomatic haemorrhage (6.2-8.9%) which may be fatal. Atrial myxomas which are the commonest tumors of the heart are associated with stroke due to tumor/clot embolism. There are very few case reports of IVT and its outcome in patients with atrial myxoma with stroke. Some have reported successful thrombolysis, while others have reported intracerebral bleeding. In this report we describe our experience of IVT in atrial myxoma patient with ischemic stroke and review the relevant literature. PMID:25506173

  2. Mechanical thrombectomy in pediatric acute ischemic stroke: Clinical outcomes and literature review.

    PubMed

    Madaelil, Thomas P; Kansagra, Akash P; Cross, DeWitte T; Moran, Christopher J; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2016-08-01

    There are limited data on outcomes of mechanical thrombectomy for pediatric stroke using modern devices. In this study, we report two cases of pediatric acute ischemic stroke treated with mechanical thrombectomy, both with good angiographic result (TICI 3) and clinical outcome (no neurological deficits at 90 days). In addition, we conducted a literature review of all previously reported cases describing the use of modern thrombectomy devices. Including our two cases, the aggregate rate of partial or complete vessel recanalization was 100% (22/22), and the aggregate rate of favorable clinical outcome was 91% (20/22). This preliminary evidence suggests that mechanical thrombectomy with modern devices may be a safe and effective treatment option in pediatric patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26945589

  3. Mutations of Complement Factor I and Potential Mechanisms of Neuroinflammation in Acute Hemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Lori; Gandhi, Chhavi; Mueller, James L.; Putnam, Christopher D.; Shayan, Katayoon; Giclas, Patricia C.; Peterson, Karin S.; Aceves, Seema S.; Sheets, Robert M.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Newbury, Robert O.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Bastian, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Acute Hemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis (AHLE) is a rare demyelinating disorder of acute onset, rapid deterioration and significant morbidity and mortality. Most often described as a post-infectious complication of an upper respiratory illness, its precise pathophysiology remains unclear. We describe two pediatric patients with AHLE with partial complement factor I (FI) deficiency whose successful treatment included the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, anakinra, implicating a role for FI and IL-1 in this disorder. Methods Extensive clinical workup of two patients presenting with AHLE revealed complement abnormalities, specifically related to the alternative pathway and its regulator, FI. Aggressive management with steroids, immunoglobulin, and anakinra ultimately led to improvement of clinical status and near return to neurologic baseline in both patients. Genetic sequencing of the FI coding regions of the patients and their families was performed. In vitro protein expression studies and immunohistochemistry of fixed brain tissue was used to investigate pathogenic mechanisms. Results Two novel mutations in FI were identified in our patients, which result in failure to secrete FI. Immunohistochemical evaluation of brain tissue demonstrated positive staining for C3, membrane attack complex (MAC) and IL-1. Conclusions We propose AHLE is an unreported, rare phenotype for partial FI deficiency. The upregulation of C3, MAC and IL-1 with subsequent demyelination support a pathologic role for complement activation in AHLE, and suggest anakinra as an important adjunctive therapy in this disease. PMID:22926405

  4. Analysis of the risk factors for the short-term prognosis of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jin; Liu, Wenbo; Sun, Jianping; Gu, Xinyi; Ma, Qiang; Tong, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the risk factors for the short-term prognosis of acute ischemic stroke to provide a scientific evidence for improving prevention and treatment. A total of 2557 cases of acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. We collected the data on demographic characteristics, life style-related risk factors, clinical feature, and other clinical characteristics for all the participants. The outcomes were assessed using the modified Rankin scale (mRs) on day 14 or at discharge. According to the mRs score, the subjects were divided into three groups, namely, the control group (0≤ mRs ≤2), the disability group (3≤ mRs ≤5), and the death group (mRs = 6). The general conditions of these three groups were compared. An mRs score of 3≤ mRs ≤6 belonged to the composite outcome group. Logistic regression was also applied to analyze the risk factors of short-term prognosis. Monovariant logistic regression showed that age, on-set admission, hospital stays, temperature, heart rate, stroke subtype, hypertension, hyperglycemia, history of heart disease, history of atrial fibrillation, history of cerebral stroke, drinking, count of WBC, count of mononuclear leucocyte, and rate of neutrophile granulocyte were statically significant. To further control the confounding factors, multivariant logistic regression analysis was carried out. The result showed that age, on-set admission, hospital stays, temperature, heart rate, hyperglycemia, history of atrial fibrillation, and cerebral stroke history were related to the short-term prognosis. Age, on-set admission, hospital stays, temperature, heart rate, hyperglycemia, history of atrial fibrillation, and cerebral stroke history were the risk factors of the short-term prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26885162

  5. Determinants of Quality of Life in the Acute Stage Following Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Bo-Ok; Kang, Hee-Ju; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Kim, Joon-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the factors influence the quality of life (QOL) of survivors of an acute stroke. Methods For 422 stroke patients, assessments were made within two weeks of the index event. QOL was measured using the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Abbreviated form (WHOQOL-BREF), which has four domains related to physical factors, psychological factors, social relationships, and environmental context. Associations of each four WHOQOL-BREF domain score with socio-demographic characteristics (age, sex, education, marital status, religion, and occupation), stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale), physical disability (Barthel Index), cognitive function (Mini-Mental Status Examination: MMSE), grip strength, and psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression and anxiety subscale: HADS-D and HADS-A) were investigated using the linear regression models. Results Higher physical domain scores were independently associated with higher MMSE scores, stronger hand-grip strength, and lower HADS-D and HADS-A scores; higher psychological domain scores were independently associated with higher educational level, higher MMSE scores, and lower HADS-D and HADS-A scores; higher social relationships domain scores were independently associated with lower HADS-D and HADS-A scores; and higher environmental domain scores were independently associated with higher educational level, higher MMSE scores, and lower HADS-D scores. Conclusion Psychological distress and impaired cognitive function were independently associated with lower QOL in patients with acute stroke. However, stroke severity, physical disability and other socio-demographic factors were less significantly associated with QOL. These findings underscore the importance of psychological interventions for improving QOL during the acute phase following stroke. PMID:22707962

  6. Modeling the Cost Effectiveness of Neuroimaging-Based Treatment of Acute Wake-Up Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Ankur; Eggman, Ashley A.; Kamel, Hooman; Gupta, Ajay; Schackman, Bruce R.; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombolytic treatment (tissue-type plasminogen activator [tPA]) is only recommended for acute ischemic stroke patients with stroke onset time <4.5 hours. tPA is not recommended when stroke onset time is unknown. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI mismatch information has been found to approximate stroke onset time with some accuracy. Therefore, we developed a micro-simulation model to project health outcomes and costs of MRI-based treatment decisions versus no treatment for acute wake-up stroke patients. Methods and Findings The model assigned simulated patients a true stroke onset time from a specified probability distribution. DWI-FLAIR mismatch estimated stroke onset <4.5 hours with sensitivity and specificity of 0.62 and 0.78, respectively. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores reflected tPA treatment effectiveness accounting for patients’ true stroke onset time. Discounted lifetime costs and benefits (quality-adjusted life years [QALYs]) were projected for each strategy. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated for the MRI-based strategy in base-case and sensitivity analyses. With no treatment, 45.1% of simulated patients experienced a good stroke outcome (mRS score 0–1). Under the MRI-based strategy, in which 17.0% of all patients received tPA despite stroke onset times >4.5 hours, 46.3% experienced a good stroke outcome. Lifetime discounted QALYs and costs were 5.312 and $88,247 for the no treatment strategy and 5.342 and $90,869 for the MRI-based strategy, resulting in an ICER of $88,000/QALY. Results were sensitive to variations in patient- and provider-specific factors such as sleep duration, hospital travel and door-to-needle times, as well as onset probability distribution, MRI specificity, and mRS utility values. Conclusions Our model-based findings suggest that an MRI-based treatment strategy for this population could be cost-effective and quantifies the impact that

  7. “Missing clot” during mechanical thrombectomy in acute stroke using Solitaire stent retrieval system

    PubMed Central

    Huded, Vikram; Nambiar, Vivek; De Souza, Romnesh; Bohra, Vikram; Ramankutty, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Stent retrieval system is an established treatment modality in acute ischemic stroke with large vessel occlusion. Here, we describe a complication which occurred during mechanical thrombectomy in three cases where the clot dislodged during retrieval. There was a possibility of the clot getting reinjected into the artery with possible dire consequences. PMID:27293350

  8. Acute recovery of oral word production following stroke: Patterns of performance as predictors of recovery

    PubMed Central

    Cloutman, Lauren; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Hillis, Argye E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Impairments in oral word production are common at the onset of stroke. The identification of factors that predict early recovery has important implications for identifying those at greater risk of continued impaired functioning, and the management of the patient’s care following discharge. Aims To identify patterns of performance that are predictors of acute recovery of oral word production abilities following stroke; to identify any association between early and more chronic recovery. Method and procedures Acute stroke patients were administered oral word production tasks within 1–2 days of hospital admission, with repeat testing by 7 days; a subset of patients had repeat testing between three weeks to one year later. Performance was examined for error rate and type to identify potential predictors of early recovery. Outcome and results The proportion of circumlocution and no response errors at initial testing were associated with the magnitude of recovery of language functioning within the first week following stroke. Patient characteristics of age and gender were found to have no influence on the degree of early recovery observed. None of the examined factors predicted late recovery. The degree of early recovery was not associated with the degree of later recovery. Conclusions The current study identified patterns of task performance that increase our understanding of how oral word production recovers following acute stroke. The finding that the degree of early recovery does not predict the degree of later recovery is consistent with the hypothesis that early and late recovery are due to different mechanisms (restored blood flow in acute stroke, and reorganization in later recovery). PMID:19996511

  9. High Homocysteine and Blood Pressure Related to Poor Outcome of Acute Ischemia Stroke in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Mo; Sun, Wenjie; Xu, Tan; Tong, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between plasma homocysteine (Hcy), blood pressure (BP) and poor outcome at hospital discharge among acute ischemic stroke patients, and if high Hcy increases the risk of poor outcome based on high BP status in a northern Chinese population. Methods Between June 1, 2009 and May 31, 2013, a total of 3695 acute ischemic stroke patients were recruited from three hospitals in northern Chinese cities. Demographic characteristics, lifestyle risk factors, medical history, and other clinical characteristics were recorded for all subjects. Poor outcome was defined as a discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≥3 or death. The association between homocysteine concentration, admission blood pressure, and risk of poor outcome following acute ischemic stroke was analyzed by using multivariate non-conditional logistic regression models. Results Compared with those in the lowest quartile of Hcy concentration in a multivariate-adjusted model, those in the highest quartile of Hcy concentration had increased risk of poor outcome after acute ischemic stroke, (OR = 1.33, P<0.05). The dose-response relationship between Hcy concentration and risk of poor outcome was statistically significant (p-value for trend  = 0.027). High BP was significantly associated with poor outcome following acute ischemic stroke (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95%CI, 1.19–1.74). Compared with non-high BP with nhHcy, in a multivariate-adjusted model, the ORs (95% CI) of non-high BP with hHcy, high BP with nhHcy, and high BP with hHcy to poor outcome were 1.14 (0.85–1.53), 1.37 (1.03–1.84) and 1.70 (1.29–2.34), respectively. Conclusion The present study suggested that high plasma Hcy and blood pressure were independent risk factors for prognosis of acute ischemic stroke, and hHcy may further increase the risk of poor outcome among patients with high blood pressure. Additionally, the results indicate that high Hcy with high BP may cause increased susceptibility

  10. Selection of Patients and Anesthetic Types for Endovascular Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Fubing; Chen, Yicong; Zhao, Yuhui; Dang, Ge; Liang, Jiahui; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated consistent effectiveness of endovascular treatment (EVT) for acute ischemic stroke, leading to update on stroke management guidelines. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of EVT overall and in subgroups stratified by age, baseline stroke severity, brain imaging feature, and anesthetic type. Methods Published randomized controlled trials comparing EVT and standard medical care alone were evaluated. The measured outcomes were 90-day functional independence (modified Rankin Scale ≤2), all-cause mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. Results Nine trials enrolling 2476 patients were included (1338 EVT, 1138 standard medical care alone). For patients with large vessel occlusions confirmed by noninvasive vessel imaging, EVT yielded improved functional outcome (pooled odds ratio [OR], 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64–2.50), lower mortality (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58–0.97), and similar symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rate (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.72–1.76) compared with standard medical care. A higher proportion of functional independence was seen in patients with terminus intracranial artery occlusion (±M1) (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.64–6.06), baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score of 8–10 (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.25–3.57) and age ≤70 years (OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.73–5.24). EVT performed under conscious sedation had better functional outcomes (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.47–2.96) without increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or short-term mortality compared with general anesthesia. Conclusions Vessel-imaging proven large vessel occlusion, a favorable scan, and younger age are useful predictors to identify anterior circulation stroke patients who may benefit from EVT. Conscious sedation is feasible and safe in EVT based on available data. However, firm conclusion on the choice of anesthetic types should be drawn from more

  11. Elevated Cardiac Troponin in Acute Stroke without Acute Coronary Syndrome Predicts Long-Term Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Reema; Bove, Alfred A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Elevated cardiac troponin in acute stroke in absence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has unclear long-term outcomes. Methods. Retrospective analysis of 566 patients admitted to Temple University Hospital from 2008 to 2010 for acute stroke was performed. Patients were included if cardiac troponin I was measured and had no evidence of ACS and an echocardiogram was performed. Of 200 patients who met the criteria, baseline characteristics, electrocardiograms, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) were reviewed. Patients were characterized into two groups with normal and elevated troponins. Primary end point was nonfatal myocardial infarction during follow-up period after discharge. The secondary end points were MACE and death from any cause. Results. For 200 patients, 17 patients had positive troponins. Baseline characteristics were as follows: age 63.1 ± 13.8, 64% African Americans, 78% with hypertension, and 22% with previous CVA. During mean follow-up of 20.1 months, 7 patients (41.2%) in elevated troponin and 6 (3.3%) patients in normal troponin group had nonfatal myocardial infarction (P = 0.0001). MACE (41.2% versus 14.2%, P = 0.01) and death from any cause (41.2% versus 14.5%, P = 0.017) were significant in the positive troponin group. Conclusions. Elevated cardiac troponin in patients with acute stroke and no evidence of ACS is strong predictor of long-term cardiac outcomes. PMID:25530906

  12. Acute ischemic stroke in a child due to basilar artery occlusion treated successfully with a stent retriever.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Luis; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Roark, Christopher; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic strokes in childhood are rare. Thrombolytic therapy with intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the main intervention for the management of pediatric stroke patients, but safety data are lacking and efficacy has been questioned. Recently, successful endovascular treatments for acute ischemic stroke in children have been reported with increasing frequency, suggesting that mechanical thrombectomy can be a safe and effective treatment. We present the case of a 22-month-old child with acute ischemic stroke due to basilar artery occlusion that was successfully treated with a stent retriever. PMID:26156170

  13. Ginsenoside Rd Is Efficacious Against Acute Ischemic Stroke by Suppressing Microglial Proteasome-Mediated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangyun; Xia, Feng; Zhang, Yunxia; Zhang, Xiao; Cao, Yuhong; Wang, Ling; Liu, Xuedong; Zhao, Gang; Shi, Ming

    2016-05-01

    A great deal of attention has been paid to neuroprotective therapies for cerebral ischemic stroke. Our two recent clinical trials showed that ginsenoside Rd (Rd), a kind of monomeric compound extracted from Chinese herbs, Panax ginseng and Panax notoginseng, was safe and efficacious for the treatment of ischemic stroke. In this study, we conducted a pooled analysis of the data from 199 patients with acute ischemic stroke in the first trial and 390 in the second to reanalyze the efficacy and safety of Rd. Moreover, animal stroke models were carried out to explore the possible molecular mechanisms underlying Rd neuroprotection. The pooled analysis showed that compared with placebo group, Rd could improve patients' disability as assessed by modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score on day 90 post-stroke and reduce neurologic deficits on day 15 or day 90 post-stroke as assessed by NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and Barthel Index (BI) scores. For neuroprotective mechanisms, administration of Rd 4 h after stroke could inhibit ischemia-induced microglial activation, decrease the expression levels of various proinflammatory cytokines, and suppress nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. An in vitro proteasome activity assay revealed a significant inhibitory effect of Rd on proteasome activity in microglia. Interestingly, Rd was showed to have less side effects than glucocorticoid. Therefore, our study demonstrated that Rd could safely improve the outcome of patients with ischemic stroke, and this therapeutic effect may result from its capability of suppressing microglial proteasome activity and sequential inflammation. PMID:26081140

  14. Carotid interventions (CEA and CAS) in acute stroke patients: which procedure on which patient.

    PubMed

    Darling, Ralph C; Warner, Courtney; Yeh, Chin C; Shah, Melissa D; Hnath, Jeffrey C; Shah, Dhiraj M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of carotid bifurcation disease in patients presenting with acute stroke has been a controversial issue over the past four decades. Classically, patients were asked to wait four to six weeks before intervention was entertained in order for the brain to stabilize and the risks of intervention to be minimized. Unfortunately, up to 20% of patients will have a secondary event after their index event and the window of opportunity to save potentially salvageable ischemic tissue will be missed. Early reports had demonstrated poor results with intervention. However, more recently, institutions such as ours have demonstrated excellent results with early intervention in patients who present with stable mild to moderate stroke with an NIH stroke scale less than 15 and preferably less than 10, present with stroke and ipsilateral carotid artery lesion of 50% or greater. Also more recently, we have been aggressively treating patients with larger ulcerative plaques even if the stenosis approaches 50%. In our and others experiences, patients who are treated at institutions that have comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) where they have a multidisciplinary system that consists of vascular surgeons, neuro interventionalists, stroke neurologists, specifically trained stroke nursing staff and a neuro intensive ICU have had optimal results. Early assessment, diagnosis of stroke with recognition of cause of embolization is mandatory but patient selection is extremely important; finding those patients who will benefit the most from urgent intervention. Most studies have demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy in these patients. More recent studies have demonstrated acceptable results with carotid stenting, especially in smaller lesions, those less than 1.2 centimeters. Early intervention should be avoided in most patients who are obtunded or with an NIH stroke scale greater than 15 or who do not have any "brain at risk" to salvage. These patients may be better served by

  15. Intranasal Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 as Neuroprotectants in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Alfaro-Martinez, Freddy; Bedoya, Francisco; Chung, Chen-Chih; Pimentel, Daniela A; Novak, Vera

    2015-08-01

    Treatment options for stroke remain limited. Neuroprotective therapies, in particular, have invariably failed to yield the expected benefit in stroke patients, despite robust theoretical and mechanistic background and promising animal data. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) play a pivotal role in critical brain functions, such as energy homeostasis, neuronal growth, and differentiation. They may exhibit neuroprotective properties in acute ischemic stroke based upon their vasodilatory, anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects, as well as improvements of functional connectivity, neuronal metabolism, neurotransmitter regulation, and remyelination. Intranasally administered insulin has demonstrated a benefit for prevention of cognitive decline in older people, and IGF-1 has shown potential benefit to improve functional outcomes in animal models of acute ischemic stroke. The intranasal route presents a feasible, tolerable, safe, and particularly effective administration route, bypassing the blood-brain barrier and maximizing distribution to the central nervous system (CNS), without the disadvantages of systemic side effects and first-pass metabolism. This review summarizes the neuroprotective potential of intranasally administered insulin and IGF-1 in stroke patients. We present the theoretical background and pathophysiologic mechanisms, animal and human studies of intranasal insulin and IGF-1, and the safety and feasibility of intranasal route for medication administration to the CNS. PMID:26040423

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of concomitant hypertension and stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Kenton, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    There remains nearly a twofold increase in blacks compared with whites for stroke mortality. The death rate from cerebral hemorrhage in blacks approximates twice that of whites. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a frequent cause of mortality and morbidity in stroke and is also about twice as frequent in blacks. Lacunar strokes occur more in blacks reflecting increased incidence of hypertension and are leading causes of multi-infarct encephalopathy and dementia. Therefore, the concomitant occurrence of hypertension and stroke is most common in African Americans and requires diagnosis of the type of stroke, which then defines the rationale of blood pressure control. Cerebral vascular changes associated with acute, chronic, and reactive hypertension are operative. When to treat, when not to treat, and the appropriateness of specific antihypertensive agents in acute stroke are relevant. A common misconception is that the increased blood pressure is the cause of the stroke when it is likely the result of the stroke. Lowering the blood pressure in all acute stroke patients with elevated blood pressure may worsen the neurologic deficit. Thus, the judicious control of blood pressure is to be stressed in the concomitant occurrence of hypertension and stroke. PMID:8691497

  17. Predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome in acute stroke due to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Melissa J; Tayal, Ashis H; Schlenk, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of acute ischemic stroke that results in severe neurological disability and death despite treatment with intravenous thrombolysis (intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rtPA]). We performed a retrospective review of a single-center registry of patients treated with intravenous rtPA for stroke. The purposes of this study were to compare intravenous rtPA treated patients with stroke with and without AF to examine independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome (in-hospital death or hospital discharge to a skilled nursing facility, long-term acute care facility, or hospice care). A univariate analysis was performed on 144 patients receiving intravenous rtPA for stroke secondary to AF and 190 patients without AF. Characteristics that were significantly different between the two groups were age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, length of hospital stay, gender, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking status, presence of large cerebral infarct, and hospital discharge outcome. Bivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that patients with stroke secondary to AF with a poor hospital discharge outcome had a greater likelihood of older age, higher initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, longer length of hospital stay, intubation, and presence of large cerebral infarct compared with those with good hospital discharge outcome (discharged to home or inpatient rehabilitation or signed oneself out against medical advice). A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older age, longer length of hospital stay, and presence of large cerebral infarct were independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome. These predictors can guide nursing interventions, aid the multidisciplinary treating team with treatment decisions, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:25503541

  18. Mechanical Revascularization for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Single-Center, Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeromel, Miran Milosevic, Z. V. Kocijancic, I. J. Lovric, D.; Svigelj, V. Zvan, B.

    2013-04-15

    BackgroundEndovascular mechanical revascularization (thrombectomy) is an increasingly used method for intracranial large vessel recanalization in acute stroke. The purpose of the study was to analyze the recanalization rate, clinical outcome, and complication rate in our stroke patients treated with mechanical revascularization. A total of 57 patients with large vessel stroke (within 3 h for anterior and 12 h for posterior circulation) were treated with mechanical revascularization at a single center during 24 months. The primary goal of endovascular treatment using different mechanical devices was recanalization of the occluded vessel. Recanalization rate (reported as thrombolysis in cerebral infarction [TICI] score), clinical outcome (reported as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score and modified Rankin scale [mRS] score), as well as periprocedural complications were analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 63.1 {+-} 12.9 years, with baseline median NIHSS score of 14 (interquartile range, 9.5-19). Successful recanalization (TICI 2b or 3) was achieved in 41 (72 %) patients. Twenty patients (35 %) presented with favorable outcome (mRS {<=}2) 30 days after stroke. Overall, significant neurological improvement ({>=}4 NIHSS point reduction) occurred in 36 (63 %) patients. A clinically significant procedure-related adverse events (vessel disruption, peri/postprocedural intracranial bleeding) defined with decline in NIHSS of {>=}4 or death occurred in three (5 %) patients. The study showed a high recanalization rate with improved clinical outcome and a low rate of periprocedural complications in our stroke patients treated with mechanical revascularization. Therefore, we could conclude that endovascular revascularization (primary or in combination with a bridging thrombolysis) was an effective and safe procedure for intracranial large vessel recanalization in acute stroke.

  19. The Impact of Acute Phase Domain-Specific Cognitive Function on Post-stroke Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jihong; Lee, Gangpyo; Lee, Shi-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the cognitive function in the acute stage evaluated by domain-specific neuropsychological assessments would be an independent predictor of functional outcome after stroke. Methods Forty patients underwent 4 domain-specific neuropsychological examinations about 3 weeks after the onset of stroke. The tests included the Boston Naming Test (BNT), the construction recall test (CRT), the construction praxis test (CPT), and the verbal fluency test (VFT). The Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) at 3 months and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 6 months were investigated as functional outcome after stroke. Functional improvement was assessed using the change in K-MBI during the first 3 months and subjects were dichotomized into 'good status' and 'poor status' according to mRS at 6 months. The domain-specific cognitive function along with other possible predictors for functional outcome was examined using regression analysis. Results The z-score of CPT (p=0.044) and CRT (p<0.001) were independent predictors for functional improvement measured by the change in K-MBI during the first 3 months after stroke. The z-score of CPT (p=0.049) and CRT (p=0.048) were also independent predictors of functional status at post-stroke 6 months assessed by mRS. Conclusion Impairment in visuospatial construction and memory within one month after stroke can be an independent prognostic factor of functional outcome. Domain-specific neuropsychological assessments could be considered in patients with stroke in the acute phase to predict long-term functional outcome. PMID:27152270

  20. Copolymer-1 promotes neurogenesis and improves functional recovery after acute ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  1. Copolymer-1 Promotes Neurogenesis and Improves Functional Recovery after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  2. Anticoagulation After Cardioembolic Stroke: To Bridge or Not to Bridge?

    PubMed Central

    Hallevi, Hen; Albright, Karen C.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Barreto, Andrew D.; Savitz, Sean I.; Escobar, Miguel A.; Gonzales, Nicole R.; Noser, Elizabeth A.; Illoh, Kachi; Grotta, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Most patients with cardioembolic stroke require long-term anticoagulation. Still, uncertainty exists regarding the best mode of starting long-term anticoagulation. Design, Setting, and Patients We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with cardioembolic stroke admitted to our center from April 1, 2004, to June 30, 2006, and not treated with tissue plasminogen activator. Patients were grouped by treatment: no treatment, aspirin only, aspirin followed by warfarin sodium, intravenous heparin sodium in the acute phase followed by warfarin (heparin bridging), and full-dose enoxaparin sodium combined with warfarin (enoxaparin bridging). Outcome measures and adverse events were collected prospectively. Laboratory values were captured from the records. Main Outcome Measures Symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation, stroke progression, and discharge modified Rankin Scale score. Results Two hundred four patients were analyzed. Recurrent stroke occurred in 2 patients (1%). Progressive stroke was the most frequent serious adverse event, seen in 11 patients (5%). Hemorrhagic transformation occurred in a bimodal distribution—an early benign hemorrhagic transformation and a late symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. All of the symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation cases were in the enoxaparin bridging group (10%) (P=.003). Systemic bleeding occurred in 2 patients (1%) and was associated with heparin bridging (P=.04). Conclusions Anticoagulation of patients with cardioembolic stroke can be safely started with warfarin shortly after stroke. Heparin bridging and enoxaparin bridging increase the risk for serious bleeding. PMID:18625852

  3. Reorganization of Motor Execution Networks During Sub-Acute Phase After Stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Wu, Zhiyuan; Sun, Junfeng; Fu, Yi; Wang, Xinning; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Miao, Fei; Tong, Shanbao

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies focused on brain reorganization after stroke from aspects of task-related brain activity and resting-state brain networks. However, studies focusing on the longitudinal reorganization of task-state brain networks were scarce. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected from twelve stroke patients during blocked finger-tapping task at four post-stroke time points (less than 10 days, around 2 weeks, 1 month and 3 months), respectively. The dynamic changes and prognostic value of the network parameters (i.e., topological parameters, functional connectivity and nodal parameters) in task-state motor execution networks were thoroughly evaluated. We found that the topological configuration (clustering coefficient and characteristic path length) of task-state motor execution networks underwent significant shift during stroke recovery. Especially, we found the topological configuration of task-state motor execution networks at the early recovery stage were capable of predicting the motor function restoration during sub-acute phase. In addition, we found increasing functional connectivity between ipsilesional cerebellum and motor cortices in task-state motor execution networks. In general, this study demonstrated the reorganization and prognostic value of task-state brain network after stroke, which provides new insights into understanding the brain reorganization and rehabilitation after stroke. PMID:26151748

  4. Acute hemorrhagic and necrotizing pneumonia, splenitis, and dermatitis in a pet rabbit caused by a novel herpesvirus (leporid herpesvirus-4)

    PubMed Central

    Brash, Marina L.; Nagy, Éva; Pei, Yanlong; Carman, Susy; Emery, Susan; Smith, Alec E.; Turner, Patricia V.

    2010-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old female rabbit (doe) was presented with a 3-day history of lethargy, anorexia, and mild facial swelling. The animal died shortly after examination and severe, acute hemorrhagic pneumonia was noted grossly. An alphaherpesvirus consistent with leporid herpesvirus-4 was isolated and characterized from this animal. This is the first confirmed report of the disease in Canada. PMID:21358932

  5. Stroke Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... weakened blood vessels that also cause hemorrhagic stroke: aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Treatment differs depending on ... the leg or arm, then guided to the aneurysm or AVM ; it then deposits a mechanical agent, ...

  6. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets’ tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight

  7. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  8. Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Acute Ischemic Stroke–Enhanced Regimen Stroke Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pancioli, Arthur M.; Adeoye, Opeolu; Schmit, Pamela A.; Khoury, Jane; Levine, Steven R.; Tomsick, Thomas A.; Sucharew, Heidi; Brooks, Claudette E.; Crocco, Todd J.; Gutmann, Laurie; Hemmen, Thomas M.; Kasner, Scott E.; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Knight, William A.; Martini, Sharyl; McKinney, James S.; Meurer, William J.; Meyer, Brett C.; Schneider, Alexander; Scott, Phillip A.; Starkman, Sidney; Warach, Steven; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose In a previous study, 0.3 and 0.45 mg/kg of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) were safe when combined with eptifibatide 75 mcg/kg bolus and a 2-hour infusion (0.75 mcg/kg per minute). The Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and rt-PA in Acute Ischemic Stroke–Enhanced Regimen (CLEAR-ER) trial sought to determine the safety of a higher-dose regimen and to establish evidence for a phase III trial. Methods CLEAR-ER was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized safety study. Ischemic stroke patients were randomized to 0.6 mg/kg rt-PA plus eptifibatide (135 mcg/kg bolus and a 2-hour infusion at 0.75 mcg/kg per minute) versus standard rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg). The primary safety end point was the incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage within 36 hours. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≤1 or return to baseline mRS at 90 days. Analysis of the safety and efficacy outcomes was done with multiple logistic regression. Results Of 126 subjects, 101 received combination therapy, and 25 received standard rt-PA. Two (2%) patients in the combination group and 3 (12%) in the standard group had symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (odds ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–1.40; P=0.053). At 90 days, 49.5% of the combination group had mRS ≤1 or return to baseline mRS versus 36.0% in the standard group (odds ratio, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.70–4.31; P=0.23). After adjusting for age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, time to intravenous rt-PA, and baseline mRS, the odds ratio was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 0.51–3.76; P=0.52). Conclusions The combined regimen of intravenous rt-PA and eptifibatide studied in this trial was safe and provides evidence that a phase III trial is warranted to determine efficacy of the regimen. PMID:23887841

  9. Acute Lung Injury Complicating Blood Transfusion in Post-Partum Hemorrhage: Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Teofili, Luciana; Bianchi, Maria; Zanfini, Bruno A.; Catarci, Stefano; Sicuranza, Rossella; Spartano, Serena; Zini, Gina; Draisci, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the incidence and risk factors for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) among patients transfused for post-partum hemorrhage (PPH). Methods We identified a series of 71 consecutive patients with PPH requiring the urgent transfusion of three or more red blood cell (RBC) units, with or without transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and/or platelets (PLT). Clinical records were then retrieved and examined for respiratory distress events. According to the 2004 consensus definition, cases of new-onset hypoxemia, within 6 hours after transfusion, with bilateral pulmonary changes, in the absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema were identified as TRALI. If an alternative risk factor for acute lung injury was present, possible TRALI was diagnosed. Results Thirteen cases of TRALI and 1 case of possible TRALI were identified (overall incidence 19.7%). At univariate analysis, patients with TRALI received higher number of RBC, PLT and FFP units and had a longer postpartum hospitalization. Among the diseases occurring in pregnancy- and various pre-existing comorbidities, only gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, significantly increased the risk to develop TRALI (p = 0.006). At multivariate analysis including both transfusion- and patient-related risk factors, pregnancy-related, hypertensive disorders were confirmed to be the only predictors for TRALI, with an odds ratio of 27.7 ( 95% CI 1.27–604.3, p=0.034). Conclusions Patients suffering from PPH represent a high-risk population for TRALI. The patients with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, not receiving anti-hypertensive therapy, have the highest risk. Therefore, a careful monitoring of these patients after transfusions is recommended. PMID:25408855

  10. Ischemic penumbra in acute stroke: Demonstration by PET with fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Liu, R.S.; Hu, H.H.

    1994-05-01

    Ischemic penumbra (IP) in acute stroke has gained clinical interest since tissue functions may be recovered if perfusion can be reestablished. However, such therapeutic intervention is {open_quotes}blind{close_quotes} since clinical examination can not distinguish IP from developing infarction. In vivo demonstration of IP may have significance for stroke patient management. This study was a preliminary evaluation of detecting IP in vivo by F-18 fluoromisonidazole ([F-18]-FMISO), a hypoxic imaging agent. Static PET imaging was performed after IV injection of 370 MBq of [F-18]-FMISO at 20 and 120 min. Tomograms were reconstructed and evaluated visually in correlation with CT or MR scans. In acute stroke, patients (pts) were called back for the second PET study one month after the initial study. CT was used for confirming infarction. In 6 pts with acute cerebral infarction, three of them had intense [F-18]-FMISO retention in the penumbra surrounding the central, eclipse-like zone of absent radio-activity (infarction) at 2 hr in the acute state, and the penumbra disappeared in association with increased area of infarction on CT in one case in the chronic state. In five pts with chronic infarction, all had no penumbra of [F-18]-FMISO retention. In summary, our preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using [F-18]-FMISO PET to detect ischemic penumbra in vivo.

  11. Phase-based metamorphosis of diffusion lesion in relation to perfusion values in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Islem; Allassonnière, Stéphanie; Luby, Marie; Carpenter, Trevor K; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Examining the dynamics of stroke ischemia is limited by the standard use of 2D-volume or voxel-based analysis techniques. Recently developed spatiotemporal models such as the 4D metamorphosis model showed promise for capturing ischemia dynamics. We used a 4D metamorphosis model to evaluate acute ischemic stroke lesion morphology from the acute diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to final T2-weighted imaging (T2-w). In 20 representative patients, we metamorphosed the acute lesion to subacute lesion to final infarct. From the DWI lesion deformation maps we identified dynamic lesion areas and examined their association with perfusion values inside and around the lesion edges, blinded to reperfusion status. We then tested the model in ten independent patients from the STroke Imaging Repository (STIR). Perfusion values varied widely between and within patients, and were similar in contracting and expanding DWI areas in many patients in both datasets. In 25% of patients, the perfusion values were higher in DWI-contracting than DWI-expanding areas. A similar wide range of perfusion values and ongoing expansion and contraction of the DWI lesion were seen subacutely. There was more DWI contraction and less expansion in patients who received thrombolysis, although with widely ranging perfusion values that did not differ. 4D metamorphosis modeling shows promise as a method to improve use of multimodal imaging to understand the evolution of acute ischemic tissue towards its fate. PMID:26288755

  12. Predictors of diagnostic neuroimaging delays among adults presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute stroke in Ontario: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Kapral, Moira K.; Li, Shudong; Fang, Jiming; Moody, Alan R.; Krahn, Murray; Laupacis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have examined the timeliness of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, but less is known about door-to-imaging time. We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the timing of neuroimaging among patients with suspected acute stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, and to examine factors associated with delays in neuroimaging. Methods: We included all patients 18 years and older with suspected acute stroke seen at hospitals with neuroimaging capacity within the Ontario Stroke Registry between Apr. 1, 2010, and Mar. 31, 2011. We used a hierarchical, multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the association between patient and hospital factors and the likelihood of receiving timely neuroimaging (≤ 25 min) after arrival in the emergency department. Results: A total of 13 250 patients presented to an emergency department with stroke-like symptoms during the study period. Of the 3984 who arrived within 4 hours after symptom onset, 1087 (27.3%) had timely neuroimaging. The factors independently associated with an increased likelihood of timely neuroimaging were less time from symptom onset to presentation, more severe stroke, male sex, no history of stroke or transient ischemic attack, arrival to hospital from a setting other than home and presentation to a designated stroke centre or an urban hospital. Interpretation: A minority of patients with stroke-like symptoms who presented within the 4-hour thrombolytic treatment window received timely neuroimaging. Neuroimaging delays were influenced by various patient and hospital factors, some of which are modifiable. PMID:27398382

  13. Review of technology development and clinical trials of transcranial laser therapy for acute ischemic stroke treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Brian E.; Streeter, Jackson; de Taboada, Luis

    2010-02-01

    Stroke is the one of the leading causes of mortality in the United States, claiming 600,000 lives each year. Evidence suggests that near infrared (NIR) illumination has a beneficial effect on a variety of cells when these cells are exposed to adverse conditions. Among these conditions is the hypoxic state produced by acute ischemic stroke (AIS). To demonstrate the impact NIR Transcranial Laser Therapy (TLT) has on AIS in humans, a series of double blind, placebo controlled clinical trials were designed using the NeuroThera(R) System (NTS). The NTS was designed and developed to treat subjects non-invasively using 808 nm NIR illumination. TLT, as it applies to stroke therapy, and the NTS will be described. The results of the two clinical trials: NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 1 (NEST-1) and NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 2 (NEST-2) will be reviewed and discussed.

  14. Availability of Diagnostic and Treatment Services for Acute Stroke in Frontier Counties in Montana and Northern Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okon, Nicholas J.; Rodriguez, Daniel V.; Dietrich, Dennis W.; Oser, Carrie S.; Blades, Lynda L.; Burnett, Anne M.; Russell, Joseph A.; Allen, Martha J.; Chasson, Linda; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Rapid diagnosis and treatment of ischemic stroke can lead to improved patient outcomes. Hospitals in rural and frontier counties, however, face unique challenges in providing diagnostic and treatment services for acute stroke. Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the availability of key diagnostic technology and programs for acute…

  15. Elevated Total Homocysteine Levels in Acute Ischemic Stroke Are Associated With Long-Term Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhihong; Guan, Yalin; Huo, Ya Ruth; Liu, Shuling; Zhang, Meilin; Lu, Hui; Yue, Wei; Wang, Jinhuan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Total homocysteine (tHcy) levels are associated with secondary vascular events and mortality after stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate whether tHcy levels in the acute phase of a stroke contribute to the recurrence of cerebro-cardiovascular events and mortality. Methods— A total of 3799 patients were recruited after hospital admission for acute ischemic stroke. Levels of tHcy were measured within 24 hours after primary admission. Patients were followed for a median of 48 months. Results— During the follow-up period, 233 (6.1%) patients died. After adjustment for age, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, and other cardiovascular risk factors, patients in the highest tHcy quartile (>18.6 μmol/L) had a 1.61-fold increased risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–2.53) compared with patients in the lowest quartile (≤10 μmol/L). Further subgroup analysis showed that this correlation was only significant in the large-artery atherosclerosis stroke subtype (adjusted HR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.05–3.07); this correlation was not significant in the small-vessel occlusion subtype (adjusted HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.30–2.12). The risk of stroke-related mortality was 2.27-fold higher for patients in the third tHcy quartile (adjusted HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.06–4.86) and 2.15-fold more likely for patients in the fourth quartile (adjusted HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.01–4.63) than for patients in the lowest tHcy quartile. The risk of cardiovascular-related mortality and the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke were not associated with tHcy levels. Conclusions— Our findings suggest that elevated tHcy levels in the acute phase of an ischemic stroke can predict mortality, especially in stroke patients with the large-vessel atherosclerosis subtype. PMID:26199315

  16. Glycated Hemoglobin Independently Predicts Stroke Recurrence within One Year after Acute First-Ever Non-Cardioembolic Strokes Onset in A Chinese Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuolin; Shi, Yuzhi; Wang, Chunxue; Jia, Qian; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Gaifen; Wang, Yilong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia is related to stroke. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) can reflect pre-stroke glycaemia status. However, the information on the direct association between HbA1c and recurrence after non-cardioembolic acute ischemic strokes is rare and there is no consistent conclusion. Methods The ACROSS-China database comprised of 2186 consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients with baseline HbA1c values. After excluding patients who died from non-stroke recurrence and patients lost to follow up, 1817 and 1540 were eligible for 3-month and 1-year analyses, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to evaluate the associations between HbA1c and 3-month and 1-year stroke recurrence. Results The HbA1c values at admission were divided into 4 levels by quartiles: Q1 (<5.5%); Q2 (5.5 to <6.1%); Q3 (6.1% to <7.2%); and Q4 (≥7.2%). The cumulative recurrence rates were 8.3% and 11.0% for 3 months and 1 year, respectively. In multivariate analyses, when compared with Q1, the adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) were 2.83 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-6.26) in Q3 and 3.71(95% CI 1.68-8.21) in Q4 for 3-month stroke recurrence; 3.30 (95% CI 1.31-8.34) in Q3 and 3.35 (95% CI 1.36-8.21) in Q4 for 1-year stroke recurrence. Adding fasting plasma glucose in the multivariate analyses did not modify the association: AHRs were 2.75 (95% CI 1.24-6.11) in Q3 and 3.67 (95% CI 1.59-8.53) in Q4 for 3-month analysis; AHRs were 3.08 (95% CI 1.10-8.64) in Q3 and 3.31(95% CI 1.35-8.14) in Q4 for 1-year analysis. Conclusions A higher “normal” HbA1c level reflecting pre-stroke glycaemia status independently predicts stroke recurrence within one year after non-cardioembolic acute ischemic stroke onset. HbA1c is recommended as a routine test in acute ischemic stroke patients. PMID:24236195

  17. Intralesional hemorrhage and thrombosis without rupture in a pure spinal epidural cavernous angioma: a rare cause of acute lumbal radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Floeth, Frank; Riemenschneider, Markus; Herdmann, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    Pure spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are extremely rare lesions, and their normal shape is that of a fusiform mass in the dorsal aspects of the spinal canal. We report a case of a lumbo-sacral epidural cavernous vascular malformation presenting with acute onset of right-sided S1 radiculopathy. Clinical aspects, imaging, intraoperative findings, and histology are demonstrated. The patient, a 27-year-old man presented with acute onset of pain, paraesthesia, and numbness within the right leg corresponding to the S1 segment. An acute lumbosacral disc herniation was suspected, but MRI revealed a cystic lesion with the shape of a balloon, a fluid level and a thickened contrast-enhancing wall. Intraoperatively, a purple-blue tumor with fibrous adhesions was located between the right S1 and S2 nerve roots. Macroscopically, no signs of epidural bleedings could be denoted. After coagulation of a reticular venous feeder network and dissection of the adhesions the rubber ball-like lesion was resected in total. Histology revealed a prominent venous vessel with a pathologically thickened, amuscular wall surrounded by smaller, hyalinized, venous vessels arranged in a back-to-back position typical for the diagnosis of a cavernous angioma. Lumina were partially occluded by thrombi. The surrounding fibrotic tissue showed signs of recurrent bleedings. There was no obvious mass hemorrhage into the surrounding tissue. In this unique case, the pathologic mechanism was not the usual rupture of the cavernous angioma with subsequent intraspinal hemorrhage, but acute mass effect by intralesional bleedings and thrombosis with subsequent increase of volume leading to nerve root compression. Thus, even without a sudden intraspinal hemorrhage a spinal cavernous malformation can cause acute symptoms identical to the clinical features of a soft disc herniation. PMID:20213297

  18. The Relationship between C-Reactive Protein Level and Discharge Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Geng, He-Hong; Wang, Xin-Wang; Fu, Rong-Li; Jing, Meng-Juan; Huang, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, was associated with stroke severity and long-term outcome. However, the relationship between the acute-phase CRP level and discharge outcome has received little attention. We prospectively studied 301 patients with acute ischemic stroke (over a period of two weeks) from two hospital stroke wards and one rehabilitation department in Henan, China. Patients’ demographic and clinical data were collected and evaluated at admission. Poor discharge outcome was assessed in patients at discharge using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS > 2). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the risk factors of poor discharge outcome after adjusting for potential confounders. Poor discharge outcome was observed in 78 patients (25.9%). Univariate analyses showed that factors significantly influencing poor discharge outcome were age, residence, recurrent acute ischemic stroke, coronary heart disease, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission, non-lacunar stroke, time from onset of stroke to admission, CRP, TBIL (total bilirubin), direct bilirubin (DBIL), ALB (albumin), FIB (fibrinogen) and D-dimer (p < 0.05). After adjusting for age, residence, recurrent ischemic stroke, coronary heart disease, NIHSS score at admission, lacunar stroke, time from onset of stroke to admission, CRP, TBIL, DBIL, ALB, FIB and D-dimer, multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that poor outcome at discharge was associated with recurrent acute ischemic stroke (OR, 2.115; 95% CI, 1.094–4.087), non-lacunar stroke (OR, 2.943; 95% CI, 1.436–6.032), DBIL (OR, 1.795; 95% CI, 1.311–2.458), and CRP (OR, 4.890; 95% CI, 3.063–7.808). In conclusion, the CRP level measured at admission was found to be an independent predictor of poor outcome at discharge. Recurrent acute ischemic stroke, non-lacunar stroke and DBIL were also significantly associated with discharge

  19. A Model for Predicting Persistent Elevation of Factor VIII among Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Alyana A.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Shaban, Amir; George, Alexander J.; Dowell, Lauren; Monlezun, Dominique J.; Leissinger, Cindy; Schluter, Laurie; El Khoury, Ramy; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Elevated levels of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) may persist independent of the acute-phase response; however, this relationship has not been investigated relative to acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We examined the frequency and predictors of persistently elevated FVIII in AIS patients. Methods AIS patients admitted between July 2008 and May 2014 with elevated baseline FVIII levels and repeat FVIII levels drawn for more than 7 days postdischarge were included. The patients were dichotomized by repeat FVIII level for univariate analysis at 150% and 200% activity thresholds. An adjusted model was developed to predict the likelihood of persistently elevated FVIII levels. Results Among 1616 AIS cases, 98 patients with elevated baseline FVIII had repeat FVIII levels. Persistent FVIII elevation was found in more than 75% of patients. At the 150% threshold, the prediction score ranged from 0 to 7 and included black race, female sex, prior stroke, hyperlipidemia, smoking, baseline FVIII > 200%, and baseline von Willebrand factor (vWF) level greater than 200%. At the 200% threshold, the prediction score ranged from 0–5 and included female sex, prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, baseline FVIII level greater 200%, and baseline vWF level greater than 200%. For each 1-point increase in score, the odds of persistent FVIII at both the 150% threshold (odds ratio [OR] = 10.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.63–66.9, P = .0134) and 200% threshold (OR = 10.2, 95% CI 1.82–57.5, P = .0083) increased 10 times. Conclusion Because an elevated FVIII level confers increased stroke risk, our model for anticipating a persistently elevated FVIII level may identify patients at high risk for recurrent stroke. FVIII may be a target for secondary stroke prevention. PMID:26777556

  20. Administration of Uric Acid in the Emergency Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Llull, Laura; Amaro, Sergio; Chamorro, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the main mechanisms implicated in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Uric acid (UA) is the end product of purine catabolism in humans, and it is the main endogenous antioxidant in blood. Low circulating UA levels have been associated with an increased prevalence and worse clinical course of several neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases of the CNS, including Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. Moreover, the exogenous administration of UA exerts robust neuroprotective properties in experimental models of CNS disease, including brain ischemia, spinal cord injury, meningitis, and experimental allergic encephalitis. In experimental brain ischemia, exogenous UA and the thrombolytic agent alteplase exert additive neuroprotective effects when administered in combination. UA is rapidly consumed following acute ischemic stroke, and higher UA levels at stroke admission are associated with a better outcome and reduced infarct growth at follow-up. A recent phase II trial demonstrated that the combined intravenous administration of UA and alteplase is safe and prevents an early decrease of circulating UA levels in acute ischemic stroke patients. Moreover, UA prevents the increase in the circulating levels of the lipid peroxidation marker malondialdehyde and of active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, a marker of blood-brain barrier disruption. The moderately sized URICOICTUS phase 2b trial showed that the addition of UA to thrombolytic therapy resulted in a 6% absolute increase in the rate of excellent outcome at 90 days compared to placebo. The trial also showed that UA administration resulted in a significant increment of excellent outcome in patients with pretreatment hyperglycemia, in females and in patients with moderate strokes. Overall, the encouraging neuroprotective effects of UA therapy in acute ischemic stroke warrants further investigation in adequately

  1. Diagnosis and acute management of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS) can be an unrecognized cause of short- and long-term neurologic disability. Focal clonic seizure in the newborn period is the most common clinical presentation of PAIS. MRI is optimal in diagnosing PAIS; negative cranial ultrasound or CT does not rule out PAIS. Given the low rate of recurrence in combination with risk factors thought to be isolated to the maternal-fetal unit, anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment is usually not recommended. The majority of newborns with PAIS do not go on to develop epilepsy, although further research is warranted in this area. Long-term morbidity, including motor, cognitive, and behavioral disabilities, can follow PAIS, necessitating early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy initiation. PMID:25317375

  2. Acute stroke trials: the problems of local investigators?

    PubMed

    Toni, D; Sacchetti, M L; Chamorro, A

    2003-01-01

    During stroke trials local investigators have to face many practical problems and time consuming procedures (filling in huge case report forms, performing repeat blood sample drawings for pharmacokinetic studies etc.) which, however, simply require organizational structures which is understood to be necessary to be able to conduct such kind of studies. Other, and most worrisome problems, are indeed to be solved when a sponsored research may rise potential ethical issues, or when academic research proposals clash with the interest of pharmaceutical companies or find difficulties in being funded by public institutions. It is just a greater involvement of these latter, possibly free from bureaucratic laces, which might help a balance to be struck between academic and industrial aims. PMID:12584421

  3. Design of the Intravenous Magnesium Efficacy in Acute Stroke (IMAGES) trial [ISRCTN19943732

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Andrew; Lees, Kennedy

    2000-01-01

    The Intravenous Magnesium Efficacy in Acute Stroke (IMAGES) trial is a multicentre,randomised, placebo-controlled trial of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) funded by the UK Medical Research Council. When complete, it will be the largest single neuroprotective study undertaken to date. Conscious patients presenting within 12 h of acute stroke with limb weakness are eligible. The primary outcome measure is combined death and disability as measured using the Barthel Index at 90-day follow up. By randomizing 2700 patients, the study will have 84% power to detect a 5.5% absolute reduction in the primary end-point. By April 2000, 86 centres were participating, with representation in Canada, USA, Europe, South America, Singapore and Australia. So far, 1206 patients have been randomised, of whom 37% were treated within 6 h. Overall 3-month mortality was 20% and the primary outcome event rate was 43%. The study is ongoing and centres worldwide are encouraged to participate. PMID:11714436

  4. Computed tomography angiography in acute stroke (revisiting the 4Ps of imaging).

    PubMed

    Varadharajan, Shriram; Saini, Jitender; Acharya, Ullas V; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Imaging in acute stroke has traditionally focussed on the 4Ps-parenchyma, pipes, perfusion, and penumbra-and has increasingly relied upon advanced techniques including magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate such patients. However, as per European Magnetic Resonance Forum estimates, the availability of magnetic resonance imaging scanners for the general population in India (0.5 per million inhabitants) is quite low as compared to Europe (11 per million) and United States (35 per million), with most of them only present in urban cities. On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) is more widely available and has reduced scanning duration. Computed tomography angiography of cervical and intracranial vessels is relatively simpler to perform with extended coverage and can provide all pertinent information required in such patients. This imaging review will discuss relevant imaging findings on CT angiography in patients with acute ischemic stroke through illustrated cases. PMID:26614583

  5. Successful intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome, acute ischemic stroke and severe thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Infante-Valenzuela, Adrian; Andrade-Vazquez, Catalina J; Enriquez-Noyola, Raul V; Garcia-Valadez, Erick A; Gongora-Rivera, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Alteplase is the only approved drug for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, but it is offered to a minority of patients, not only because of the short therapeutic window but also because of the numerous contraindications associated with thrombolysis, such as thrombocytopenia. There is some controversy on the true risk associated with thrombolysis in patients with thrombocytopenia. Here we report the case of a young patient, who developed an in-hospital acute ischemic stroke involving a large territory of the right middle cerebral artery, who was successfully treated with intravenous alteplase, despite having thrombocytopenia and prolonged prothrombin times due to systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome. This case exemplifies the need to reassess contraindications for thrombolysis, many based on expert opinion and not clinical evidence, especially in complex clinical situations. PMID:26575492

  6. Oxidative stress in post-acute ischemic stroke patients after intensive neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ciancarelli, Irene; De Amicis, Daniela; Di Massimo, Caterina; Carolei, Antonio; Ciancarelli, Maria Giuliana Tozzi

    2012-11-01

    We investigated in post-acute ischemic stroke patients the influence of intensive neurorehabilitation on oxidative stress balance during recovery of neurological deficits. For this purpose, fourteen patients were included in the study within 30 days of stroke onset. Outcome measures were the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), the Barthel Index, and the Katz Index. Redox balance was assessed by measuring plasma peroxidative by-products, nitrite/nitrate metabolites (NOx), as an index of nitric oxide (NO), Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD) activity, serum urate concentration, autoantibodies against ox-LDL (OLAB) serum level and plasma antioxidant capacity. Assessments were made before and after neurorehabilitation. Fifteen apparently healthy controls were investigated to compare redox markers. Intensive neurorehabilitation was associated with an improvement of all the outcome measures (P < 0.05). Decreased values of peroxidative by-products and of NOx (P < 0.05) were observed after neurorehabilitation in stroke patients even though their values were higher than in controls (P < 0.05). Changes observed before and after neurorehabilitation in NIHSS scores (Δ NIHSS scores) and in plasma NOx amount (Δ NOx) correlated positively (r=0.79; P < 0.005). No differences in EC-SOD activity, OLAB and serum urate concentrations were found between stroke patients and controls, before and after neurorehabilitation. Total plasma antioxidant capacity, lower in stroke patients than in controls before neurorehabilitation, was unchanged thereafter. Our data provide evidence of the effectiveness of neurorehabilitation on reducing redox unbalance in stroke patients and hints the role of NO as a messenger involved in post-ischemic neuronal plasticity influencing recovery of neurological deficits. PMID:22873723

  7. Trends in the Incidence of Hospitalized Acute Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Korea, 2006-2010

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Rock Bum; Kim, Byoung-Gwon; Kim, Yu-Mi; Seo, Jeong Wook; Lim, Young Shil; Kim, Hee Sook; Lee, Hey Jean; Moon, Ji Young; Kim, Keon Yeop; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Park, Hyeung-Keun; Song, Jung-Kook; Park, Ki-Soo; Jeong, Baek Geun; Park, Chan Gyeong; Shin, Hee-Young; Kang, Jong-Won; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lee, Young-Hoon; Seong, In-Whan; Yoo, Weon-Seob

    2013-01-01

    This study attempted to calculate and investigate the incidence of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke in Korea. Using the National Health Insurance claim data, we investigated patients whose main diagnostic codes included AMI or stroke during 2006 to 2010. As a result, we found out that the number of AMI hospitalized patients had decreased since 2006 and amounted to 15,893 in 2010; and that the number of those with stroke had decreased since 2006 and amounted to 73,501 in 2010. The age-standardized incidence rate of hospitalized AMI, after adjustment for readmission, was 41.6 cases per 100,000-population in 2006, and had decreased to 29.4 cases in 2010 (for trend P < 0.001). In the case of stroke was estimated at 172.8 cases per 100,000-population in 2006, and had decreased to 135.1 cases in 2010 (for trend P < 0.001). In conclusion, the age-standardized incidence rates of both hospitalized AMI and stroke in Korea had decreased continuously during 2006 to 2010. We consider this decreasing trend due to the active use of pharmaceuticals, early vascular intervention, and the national cardio-cerebrovascular disease care project as the primary and secondary prevention efforts. PMID:23341707

  8. Challenges in the Anesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Lambden, Simon; Smith, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a devastating condition with high morbidity and mortality. In the past 2 decades, the treatment of AIS has been revolutionized by the introduction of several interventions supported by class I evidence-care on a stroke unit, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 hours of stroke onset, aspirin commenced within 48 hours of stroke onset, and decompressive craniectomy for supratentorial malignant hemispheric cerebral infarction. There is new class I evidence also demonstrating benefits of endovascular therapy on functional outcomes in those with anterior circulation stroke. In addition, the importance of the careful management of key systemic physiological variables, including oxygenation, blood pressure, temperature, and serum glucose, has been appreciated. In line with this, the role of anesthesiologists and intensivists in managing AIS has increased. This review highlights the main challenges in the endovascular and intensive care management of AIS that, in part, result from the paucity of research focused on these areas. It also provides guidelines for the management of AIS based upon current evidence, and identifies areas for further research. PMID:26368664

  9. Neuro-mechanics of muscle coordination during recumbent pedaling in post-acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, C; Ambrosini, E; Schmid, M; Monticone, M; Pedrocchi, A; Ferrigno, G; D'Alessio, T; Conforto, S; Ferrante, S

    2015-01-01

    Motor impairment after stroke has been hypothesized to be related, among others, to impairments in the modular control of movement. In this study we analyzed muscle coordination and pedal forces during a recumbent pedaling exercise from a sample of post-acute stroke patients (n=5) and a population of age-matched healthy individuals (n=4). Healthy subjects and the less impaired patients showed a shared modular organization of pedaling based on 4 similar muscle synergies. The most impaired patient, characterized by a Motricity Index of 52/100, showed a reduced complexity (only 2 muscle synergies for the affected side). Differences between healthy subjects and post-stroke patients in the execution of the task were identified in terms of unbalance in mechanical work production, which well corresponded to the level of impairment. This pedaling unbalance could be traced back to different activation strategies of the 4 identified modules. Investigation on a more representative sample will provide a full characterization of the neuro-mechanics of pedaling after stroke, helping our understandings of the disruption of motor coordination at central level after stroke and of the most effective solutions for functional recovery. PMID:26736246

  10. Temporal Changes in the Quality of Acute Stroke Care in Five National Audits across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Hillmann, Steffi; Wiedmann, Silke; Fraser, Alec; Baeza, Juan; Rudd, Anthony; Norrving, Bo; Asplund, Kjell; Niewada, Maciej; Dennis, Martin; Hermanek, Peter; Wolfe, Charles D. A.; Heuschmann, Peter U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Data on potential variations in delivery of appropriate stroke care over time are scarce. We investigated temporal changes in the quality of acute hospital stroke care across five national audits in Europe over a period of six years. Methods. Data were derived from national stroke audits in Germany, Poland, Scotland, Sweden, and England/Wales/Northern Ireland participating within the European Implementation Score (EIS) collaboration. Temporal changes in predefined quality indicators with comparable information between the audits were investigated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate adherence to quality indicators over time. Results. Between 2004 and 2009, individual data from 542,112 patients treated in 538 centers participating continuously over the study period were included. In most audits, the proportions of patients who were treated on a SU, were screened for dysphagia, and received thrombolytic treatment increased over time and ranged from 2-fold to almost 4-fold increase in patients receiving thrombolytic therapy in 2009 compared to 2004. Conclusions. A general trend towards a better quality of stroke care defined by standardized quality indicators was observed over time. The association between introducing a specific measure and higher adherence over time might indicate that monitoring of stroke care performance contributes to improving quality of care. PMID:26783519

  11. Logistical and financial obstacles for endovascular therapy of acute stroke implementation.

    PubMed

    Schellinger, Peter D; Köhrmann, Martin; Nogueira, Raul G

    2016-07-01

    After publication of the recent positive randomized clinical endovascular trials, several questions and obstacles for wide spread implementation remain. We address specific issues namely efficacy, safety, logistics, timing, sedation, numbers, imaging, manpower, centers, geographics, and economical aspects of endovascular therapy. As we move forward, a high degree of collaboration will be crucial to implement a therapy with established overwhelming treatment efficacy for severe acute stroke patients. PMID:27016510

  12. Effect of IMOD™ on the inflammatory process after acute ischemic stroke: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Considering the role of inflammation in acute cerebrovascular accidents, anti-inflammatory treatment has been considered as an option in cerebrovascular diseases. Regarding the properties of Setarud (IMOD™) in immune regulation, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of this medication in treating patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 99 patients with their first ever acute ischemic stroke were divided into two groups of IMOD™ (n = 49) and control (n = 50). The control group underwent routine treatment and the intervention group underwent routine treatment plus daily intermittent infusion of IMOD™ (250mg on the first day and then 375mg into DW5% serum during a 30-minute period for 7 days). The serum levels of inflammatory markers were evaluated on the first day (baseline) and on 4th and 7th days. Data were analyzed and the results were compared. Results and major conclusion 58 males (58.6%) and 41 females (41.4%) with a mean age of 67.00 ± 8.82 years, who had their first ever stroke attack, were enrolled in this trial. Treatment with IMOD™ showed a decreasing trend in IL-6 levels compared to the control group (p = 0.04). In addition, the treatment resulted in the control of increasing serum levels of hsCRP after 7 days compared to the control group (p = 0.02). There was an insignificant decrease in TNF-α and IL-1 levels in the IMOD™ group. Considering the prominent role of inflammation after an ischemic cerebral damage, it appears that treatment with IMOD™ improves the inflammatory profile. Therefore, IMOD™ (Setarud) might be considered as a therapeutic option in the acute ischemic stroke. However, future studies are necessary on its long-term results and clinical efficacy. PMID:23514014

  13. Acute Small Bowel Hemorrhage in Three Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Diagnosis and Management by Angiographic Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Heoung Kil; Han, Young Min; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2002-03-15

    Three patients who had undergone hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease, presented with acute small bowel hemorrhage,and were treated with superselective transcatheter arterial embolization via coaxial microcatheters. In all patients pre-procedure upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and colonoscopy had failed to demonstrate the source of the hemorrhage. Selective diagnostic angiography revealed frank extravasations of contrast from the small bowel arteries (one jejunal artery and two ileal arteries). After superselection of feeding arteries with a microcatheter, transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and microcoils was performed in all three patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients and the patients were discharged free from symptoms 3-5 days after embolization. No evidence of intestinal ischemia or infarction was noted, with the time from procedure to last follow-up ranging from 4 to 12 months. We conclude that superselective angiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and treating acute small bowel hemorrhage inpatients with end-stage renal disease when endoscopic evaluation has failed.

  14. Direct evidence of acute, massive striatal dopamine release in gerbils with unilateral strokes.

    PubMed

    Brannan, T; Weinberger, J; Knott, P; Taff, I; Kaufmann, H; Togasaki, D; Nieves-Rosa, J; Maker, H

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine release into the extracellular space was measured with in vivo electrochemical detection in the ipsilateral and contralateral striata in Mongolian gerbils that suffered a stroke after acute unilateral carotid artery ligations. A sevenfold increase in the dopamine signal occurred within 15 minutes of carotid ligation in the ischemic side, while the unlesioned side had no significant change. Increased extracellular levels of dopamine persisted throughout the 3-hour recording period. Pretreatment with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine 6 hours prior to recording significantly attenuated the signal increase. This study is the first direct demonstration of the marked, continuous dopamine release that occurs during acute cerebral ischemia. PMID:3810742

  15. Assessment of serum and urine ghrelin levels in patients with acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seyhanli, Eyyup Sabri; Lok, Ugur; Gulacti, Umut; Buyukaslan, Hasan; Atescelik, Metin; Yildiz, Mustafa; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Goktekin, Mehmet Cagri; Aydın, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ghrelin is a novel brain-gut peptide hormone consisted of 28 amino-acid. In the plasma, it exists in two major molecular forms, acylated and des-acyled ghrelin, filtered in glomeruli or secreted by nephrons. Primary biological effects of hormones are regulating appetite, foods intake and energy metabolism. We investigated the changing and relationships between serum and urine ghrelin levels in acute stroke patients to provide more information whether diagnostic parameter. Methods: Thirty acute stroke patients and thirty consecutive volunteers included in study prospectively. To analyze serum and urine ghrelin levels, at the time of diagnose, all of participant blood and fresh urine (1 ml serum, 2 ml urine respectively) samples were obtained. Serum ghrelin levels analyzed ELISA technique, and urine ghrelin levels studied by validation technique. To compare quantitative data student’s t test, and for qualitative data chi-square and Fisher’s Exact Chi-square test was used. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Urine acyl ghrelin levels found statistically significant between patient and control groups (P=0.001), but there were no statistically significant differences between both groups (P>0.05) in serum acyl gherelin, des-acyl ghrelin and urine des-acyle ghrelin levels. Conclusions: The results indicate that urine acyl ghrelin levels may be considered as a diagnostic parameter in acute ischemic stroke patients. Further studies delineating the mechanism of these observed results are warranted. PMID:25785049

  16. Thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation as a rare cause of isolated intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Entwistle, John J; Arnold, Michael A; Pierson, Christopher R; Governale, Lance S

    2014-07-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare vascular lesions that most frequently present with back pain, radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy. Neurological decline is typically secondary to progressive radiculopathy, myelopathy, venous thrombosis, and stroke. Few case reports have described thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformations that present with both subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. This is the first reported case of a thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation presenting with isolated intraventricular hemorrhage on initial imaging followed by acute and fatal rehemorrhage. PMID:24784978

  17. Acute Phase IL-10 Plasma Concentration Associates with the High Risk Sources of Cardiogenic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arponen, Otso; Muuronen, Antti; Taina, Mikko; Sipola, Petri; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Vanninen, Ritva; Pulkki, Kari; Mustonen, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Background Etiological assessment of stroke is essential for accurate treatment decisions and for secondary prevention of recurrence. There is evidence that interleukin-10 (IL-10) associates with ischemic stroke. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the levels of IL-10 in ischemic stroke with unknown or suspected cardiogenic etiology, and evaluate the correlation between IL-10 plasma concentration and the number of diagnosed high risk sources for cardioembolism. Methods A total of 141 patients (97 males; mean age 61±11 years) with acute ischemic stroke with unknown etiology or suspected cardiogenic etiology other than known atrial fibrillation (AF) underwent imaging investigations to assess high risk sources for cardioembolic stroke established by the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE). IL-10 was measured on admission to the hospital and on a three month follow-up visit. Results Acute phase IL-10 concentration was higher in patients with EAE high risk sources, and correlated with their number (p<0.01). In patients with no risk sources (n = 104), the mean IL-10 concentration was 2.7±3.1 ng/L (range 0.3–16.3 ng/L), with one risk source (n = 26) 3.7±5.5 ng/L (0.3–23.6 ng/L), with two risk sources (n = 10) 7.0±10.0 ng/L (1.29–34.8 ng/L) and with three risk sources (n = 1) 37.2 ng/L. IL-10 level was not significantly associated with cerebral infarct volume, presence of previous or recent myocardial infarction, carotid/vertebral artery atherosclerosis, paroxysmal AF registered on 24-hour ECG Holter monitoring or given intravenous thrombolytic treatment. Conclusion IL-10 plasma concentration correlates independently with the number of EAE cardioembolic risk sources in patients with acute stroke. IL-10 may have potential to improve differential diagnostics of stroke with unknown etiology. PMID:25923658

  18. Risk-prediction model for ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (from the global registry of acute coronary events [GRACE]).

    PubMed

    Park, Kay Lee; Budaj, Andrzej; Goldberg, Robert J; Anderson, Frederick A; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Kennelly, Brian M; Gurfinkel, Enrique P; Fitzgerald, Gordon; Gore, Joel M

    2012-09-01

    The risk of stroke in patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) ranges from <1% to ≥ 2.5%. The aim of this study was to develop a simple predictive tool for bedside risk estimation of in-hospital ischemic stroke in patients with ACS to help guide clinicians in the acute management of these high-risk patients. Data were obtained from 63,118 patients enrolled from April 1999 to December 2007 in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE), a multinational registry involving 126 hospitals in 14 countries. A regression model was developed to predict the occurrence of in-hospital ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with an ACS. The main study outcome was the development of ischemic stroke during the index hospitalization for an ACS. Eight risk factors for stroke were identified: older age, atrial fibrillation on index electrocardiogram, positive initial cardiac biomarkers, presenting systolic blood pressure ≥ 160 mm Hg, ST-segment change on index electrocardiogram, no history of smoking, higher Killip class, and lower body weight (c-statistic 0.7). The addition of coronary artery bypass graft surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention into the model increased the prediction of stroke risk. In conclusion, the GRACE stroke risk score is a simple tool for predicting in-hospital ischemic stroke risk in patients admitted for the entire spectrum of ACS, which is widely applicable to patients in various hospital settings and will assist in the management of high-risk patients with ACS. PMID:22608950

  19. Combination treatment of r- tPA and an optimized human apyrase reduces mortality rate and hemorrhagic transformation 6h after ischemic stroke in aged female rats

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhenjun; Li, Xinlan; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; DiPasquale, Kenneth; Jeong, Soon Soeg; Chen, Ridong; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) is the only FDA-approved drug treatment for ischemic stroke and must be used within 4.5 hours. Thrombolytic treatment with r-tPA has deleterious effects on the neurovascular unit that substantially increases the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage if administered too late. These therapeutic shortcomings necessitate additional investigation into agents that can extend the therapeutic window for safe use of thrombolytics. In this study, combination of r-tPA and APT102, a novel form of human apyrase/ADPase, was investigated in a clinically-relevant aged-female rat embolic ischemic stroke model. We propose that successfully extending the therapeutic window of r-tPA administration would represent a significant advance in the treatment of ischemic stroke due to a significant increase in the number of patients eligible for treatment. Results of our study showed significantly reduced mortality from 47% with r-tPA alone to 16% with co-administration of APT102 and r-tPA. Co-administration decreased cortical (47±5% vs 29±5%), striatal (50±2%, vs 40±3%) and total (48±3%vs 33±4%) hemispheric infarct volume compared to r-tPA alone. APT102 improved neurological outcome (8.9±0.6, vs 6.8±0.8) and decreased hemoglobin extravasation in cortical tissue (1.9±0.1 mg/dlvs 1.4±0.1 mg/dl) striatal tissue (2.1±0.3 mg/dl vs 1.4±0.1 mg/dl) and whole brain tissue (2.0±0.2 mg/dl vs 1.4±0.1 mg/dl). These data suggest that APT102 can safely extend the therapeutic window for r-tPA mediated reperfusion to 6 h following experimental stroke without increased hemorrhagic transformation. APT102 offers to be a viable adjunct therapeutic option to increase the number of clinical patients eligible for thrombolytic treatment after ischemic stroke. PMID:24933645

  20. Variability in Motor and Language Recovery during the Acute Stroke Period

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Lauren E.; Schweber, Adam B.; Manson, Daniel K.; Lendaris, Andrea; Herber, Charlotte; Marshall, Randolph S.; Lazar, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most stroke recovery occurs by 90 days after onset, with proportional recovery models showing an achievement of about 70% of the maximal remaining recovery. Little is known about recovery during the acute stroke period. Moreover, data are described for groups, not for individuals. In this observational cohort study, we describe for the first time the daily changes of acute stroke patients with motor and/or language deficits over the first week after stroke onset. Methods Patients were enrolled within 24-72 h after stroke onset with upper extremity hemiparesis, aphasia, or both, and were tested daily until day 7 or discharge with the upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Motor Recovery after Stroke, the Boston Naming Test, and the comprehension domain from the Western Aphasia Battery. Discharge scores, and absolute and proportional changes were examined using t-tests for pairwise comparisons and linear regression to determine relative contributions of initial impairment, lesion volume, and age to recovery over this period. Results Thirty-four patients were enrolled: 19 had motor deficits alone, 8 had aphasia alone, and 7 had motor and language deficits. In a group analysis, statistically significant changes in absolute scores were found in the motor (p < 0.001) and comprehension (p < 0.001) domains but not in naming. Day-by-day recovery curves for individual patients displayed wide variation with comparable initial impairment. Proportional recovery calculations revealed that, on average, patients achieved less than 1/3 of their potential recovery by the time of discharge. Multivariate regression showed that the amount of variance accounted for by initial severity, age, and lesion volume in this early time period was not significant for motor or language domains. Conclusions Over the first week after stroke onset, recovery of upper extremity hemiparesis and aphasia were not predictable on the basis of initial impairment, lesion volume, or age. In

  1. Risk factors for early rebleeding and mortality in acute variceal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing-Run; Wang, Guang-Chuan; Hu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Chun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors for 6-wk rebleeding and mortality in acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) patients treated by percutaneous transhepatic variceal embolization (PTVE). METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of AVH patients who had undergone PTVE treatment was conducted between January 2010 and December 2012. Demographic information, medical histories, physical examination findings, and laboratory test results were collected. The PTVE procedure was performed as a rescue therapy for patients who failed endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. Survival analysis was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. The multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox regression test to identify independent risk factors for rebleeding and mortality. RESULTS: One hundred and one patients were included; 71 were males and the average age was 51 years. Twenty-one patients rebled within 6 wk. Patients with high-risk stigmata, PTVE with trunk obliteration, and a hepatic vein pressure gradient (HVPG) ≥ 20 mmHg were at increased risk for rebleeding (OR = 5.279, 95%CI: 2.782-38.454, P = 0.003; OR = 4.309, 95%CI: = 2.144-11.793, P < 0.001; and OR = 1.534, 95%CI: 1.062-2.216, P = 0.022, respectively). Thirteen patients died within 6 wk. A model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score ≥ 18 and an HVPG ≥ 20 mmHg were associated with 6-wk mortality (OR = 2.162, 95%CI: 1.145-4.084, P = 0.017 and OR = 1.423, 95%CI: 1.222-1.657, P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: MELD score and HVPG in combination allow for early identification of patients with AVH who are at substantially increased risk of death over the short term. PMID:25548492

  2. Prediction of esophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rockey, Don C; Elliott, Alan; Lyles, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), identifying those with esophageal variceal hemorrhage prior to endoscopy would be clinically useful. This retrospective study of a large cohort of patients with UGIB used logistic regression analyses to evaluate the platelet count, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to platelet ratio index (APRI), AST to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AAR) and Lok index (all non-invasive blood markers) as predictors of variceal bleeding in (1) all patients with UGIB and (2) patients with cirrhosis and UGIB. 2233 patients admitted for UGIB were identified; 1034 patients had cirrhosis (46%) and of these, 555 patients (54%) had acute UGIB due to esophageal varices. In all patients with UGIB, the platelet count (cut-off 122,000/mm(3)), APRI (cut-off 5.1), AAR (cut-off 2.8) and Lok index (cut-off 0.9) had area under the curve (AUC)s of 0.80 0.82, 0.64, and 0.80, respectively, for predicting the presence of varices prior to endoscopy. To predict varices as the culprit of bleeding, the platelet count (cut-off 69,000), APRI (cut-off 2.6), AAR (cut-off 2.5) and Lok Index (0.90) had AUCs of 0.76, 0.77, 0.57 and 0.73, respectively. Finally, in patients with cirrhosis and UGIB, logistic regression was unable to identify optimal cut-off values useful for predicting varices as the culprit bleeding lesion for any of the non-invasive markers studied. For all patients with UGIB, non-invasive markers appear to differentiate patients with varices from those without varices and to identify those with a variceal culprit lesion. However, these markers could not distinguish between a variceal culprit and other lesions in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26912006

  3. Motor recovery after acute ischaemic stroke: a metabolic study.

    PubMed Central

    Di Piero, V; Chollet, F M; MacCarthy, P; Lenzi, G L; Frackowiak, R S

    1992-01-01

    The metabolic changes occurring after ischaemic stroke were measured to investigate the functional anatomy of clinical motor recovery. Positron emission tomography (PET) and the steady-state 15O technique was used to compare resting relative metabolic distributions at the onset of functional deficit with those following recovery. Ten patients were studied with repeat scans. Motor recovery was associated in some patients with an increase of relative oxygen metabolism in anatomical structures normally involved in motor function in the affected hemisphere, particularly in the cortical motor areas. In those patients without such metabolic changes in the cortex of the diseased hemisphere, relative increases in cortical metabolism in the contralateral hemisphere were associated with better motor recovery than in patients with no relative cortical metabolic increase in either hemisphere. There was no correlation between the degree of improvement in motor function and the severity of motor deficit at onset, the size and site of the lesion and the metabolic changes in the infarcted zone. No particular pattern of global metabolic changes was observed after recovery. Thus different relative patterns of metabolic recovery were seen in patients with different lesions and evidence was found for the participation of contralateral structures in the recovery process in some patients. Images PMID:1469418

  4. Thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting in acute ischemic stroke management: benefits and harms.

    PubMed

    Steglich-Arnholm, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Markus; Kondziella, Daniel; Wagner, Aase; Stavngaard, Trine; Cronqvist, Mats E; Hansen, Klaus; Højgaard, Joan; Taudorf, Sarah; Krieger, Derk Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Extracranial carotid artery occlusion or high-grade stenosis with concomitant intracranial embolism causes severe ischemic stroke and shows poor response rates to intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). Endovascular therapy (EVT) utilizing thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting was long considered risky because of procedural complexities and necessity of potent platelet inhibition-in particular following IVT. This study assesses the benefits and harms of thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting and identifies factors associated with clinical outcome and procedural complications. Retrospective single-center analysis of 47 consecutive stroke patients with carotid occlusion or high-grade stenosis and concomitant intracranial embolus treated between September 2011 and December 2014. Benefits included early improvement of stroke severity (NIHSS ≥ 10) or complete remission within 72 h and favorable long-term outcome (mRS ≤ 2). Harms included complications during and following EVT. Mean age was 64.3 years (standard deviation ±12.5), 40 (85%) patients received IVT initially. Median NIHSS was 16 (inter-quartile range 14-19). Mean time from stroke onset to recanalization was 311 min (standard deviation ±78.0). Early clinical improvement was detected in 22 (46%) patients. Favorable outcome at 3 months occurred in 32 (68%) patients. Expedited patient management was associated with favorable clinical outcome. Two (4%) patients experienced symptomatic hemorrhage. Eight (17%) patients experienced stent thrombosis. Four (9%) patients died. Thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting seems beneficial and reasonably safe with a promising rate of favorable outcome. Nevertheless, adverse events and complications call for additional clinical investigations prior to recommendation as clinical standard. Expeditious patient management is central to achieve good clinical outcome. PMID:26345413

  5. Cerebrolysin effects on neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amiri-Nikpour, Mohammad Reza; Nazarbaghi, Surena; Ahmadi-Salmasi, Babak; Mokari, Tayebeh; Tahamtan, Urya; Rezaei, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrolysin, a brain-derived neuropeptide, has been shown to improve the neurological outcomes of stroke, but no study has demonstrated its effect on cerebral blood flow. This study aimed to determine the cerebrolysin impact on the neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow. Methods In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, 46 patients who had acute focal ischemic stroke were randomly assigned into two groups to receive intravenously either 30 mL of cerebrolysin diluted in normal saline daily for 10 days (n=23) or normal saline alone (n=23) adjunct to 100 mg of aspirin daily. All patients were examined using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and transcranial Doppler to measure the mean flow velocity and pulsatility index (PI) of their cerebral arteries at baseline as well as on days 30, 60, and 90. Results The patients’ mean age was 60±9.7 years, and 51.2% of patients were male. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on day 60 (median 10, interquartile range 9–11, P=0.008) and day 90 (median 11, interquartile range 10–13.5, P=0.001). The median of PI in the right middle cerebral artery was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on days 30, 60, and 90 (P<0.05). One patient in the cerebrolysin group and two patients in the placebo group died before day 30 (4.3% versus 8.7%). Conclusion Cerebrolysin can be useful to improve the neurological outcomes and the PI of middle cerebral artery in patients with acute focal ischemic stroke. PMID:25516711

  6. Severity of Spatial Neglect During Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Predicts Community Mobility After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Hung, Cynthia; Chen, Peii; Barrett, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether stroke survivors with more severe spatial neglect during their acute inpatient rehabilitation had poorer mobility after returning to their communities. Design A prospective observational study. Setting Acute inpatient rehabilitation and follow-up in the community. Participants Thirty-one consecutive stroke survivors with right-brain damage (women, n = 15 [48.4%]), with the mean (standard deviation) age of 60 ± 11.5 years, were included in the study if they demonstrated spatial neglect within 2 months after stroke. Methods Spatial neglect was assessed with the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT) (range, 0-146 [a lower score indicates more severity]) and the Catherine Bergego Scale (range, 0-30 [a higher score indicates more severity]). A score of the Behavioral Inattention Test <129 or of the Catherine Bergego Scale >0 defined the presence of spatial neglect. Main Outcome Measurements The outcome measure is community mobility, defined by the extent and frequency of traveling within the home and in the community, and is assessed with the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging Life-Space Assessment (range, 0-120 [a lower score indicates less mobile]). This measure was assessed after participants returned home ≥6 months after stroke. The covariates were age, gender, functional independence at baseline; follow-up interval; and depressed mood, which may affect the relationship between spatial neglect and community mobility. Results A lower Behavioral Inattention Test score was a significant predictor of a lower Life-Space Assessment score after controlling for all the covariates (β = 0.009 [95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.017]); P = .020). The proportion of participants unable to travel independently beyond their homes was 0%, 27.3%, and 72.7% for those with mild, moderate, and severe acute neglect, respectively (Catherine Bergego Scale range, 1-10, 11-20, and 21-30, respectively). Conclusions Our result indicates that acute

  7. Early and intermediate prognosis of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke subtypes according to the causative classification of stroke system

    PubMed Central

    Pashapour, Ali; Atalu, Abolfazl; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali-Akbar; Sadeghi Hokmabadi, Elyar; Sharifipour, Ehsan; NajafiNeshli, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Intravenous thrombolytic therapy has established acceptable results in treating ischemic stroke. However, there is little information on treatment outcome especially in different subtypes. The aim of current study was to evaluate early and intermediate prognosis in intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke subtypes. Methodology: Forty eligible patients (57.5% male with mean age of 63.18±13.49 years) with definite ischemic stroke who were admitted to emergency department of Imam Reza University Hospital, in the first 180 minutes after occurrence received recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. All investigation findings were recorded and stroke subtypes were determined according to the Causative Classification of Stroke System. Stroke severity forms including modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were recorded for all patients in first, seven and 90 days after stroke and disease outcome was evaluated. Results: The etiology of stroke was large artery atherosclerosis in 20%, cardio-aortic embolism in 45%, small artery occlusion in 17.5% and undetermined causes in 17.5%. NIHSS and mRS scores were significantly improved during time (P < 0.001 in both cases). Three months mortality rate was 25%. Among the etiologies, patients with small artery occlusion and then cardio-aortic embolism had lower NIHSS score at arrival (P = 0.04). Caplan-meier analysis showed that age, sex and symptom to needle time could predict disease outcome. Conclusion: Intravenous thrombolytic therapy is accompanied by good early and intermediate outcome in most patients with ischemic stroke. Small artery occlusion subtype had less disease severity and higher improvement. PMID:24353536

  8. ASTRAL-R score predicts non-recanalisation after intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Peter; Heldner, Mirjam R; Seiffge, David; Mueller, Hubertus; Eskandari, Ashraf; Traenka, Christopher; Ntaios, George; Mosimann, Pascal J; Sztajzel, Roman; Mendes Pereira, Vitor; Cras, Patrick; Engelter, Stefan; Lyrer, Philippe; Fischer, Urs; Lambrou, Dimitris; Arnold, Marcel; Michel, Patrik

    2015-05-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) as treatment in acute ischaemic strokes may be insufficient to achieve recanalisation in certain patients. Predicting probability of non-recanalisation after IVT may have the potential to influence patient selection to more aggressive management strategies. We aimed at deriving and internally validating a predictive score for post-thrombolytic non-recanalisation, using clinical and radiological variables. In thrombolysis registries from four Swiss academic stroke centres (Lausanne, Bern, Basel and Geneva), patients were selected with large arterial occlusion on acute imaging and with repeated arterial assessment at 24 hours. Based on a logistic regression analysis, an integer-based score for each covariate of the fitted multivariate model was generated. Performance of integer-based predictive model was assessed by bootstrapping available data and cross validation (delete-d method). In 599 thrombolysed strokes, five variables were identified as independent predictors of absence of recanalisation: Acute glucose > 7 mmol/l (A), significant extracranial vessel STenosis (ST), decreased Range of visual fields (R), large Arterial occlusion (A) and decreased Level of consciousness (L). All variables were weighted 1, except for (L) which obtained 2 points based on β-coefficients on the logistic scale. ASTRAL-R scores 0, 3 and 6 corresponded to non-recanalisation probabilities of 18, 44 and 74 % respectively. Predictive ability showed AUC of 0.66 (95 %CI, 0.61-0.70) when using bootstrap and 0.66 (0.63-0.68) when using delete-d cross validation. In conclusion, the 5-item ASTRAL-R score moderately predicts non-recanalisation at 24 hours in thrombolysed ischaemic strokes. If its performance can be confirmed by external validation and its clinical usefulness can be proven, the score may influence patient selection for more aggressive revascularisation strategies in routine clinical practice. PMID:25589216

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Thrombolysis within 4.5 Hours of Acute Ischemic Stroke in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xingquan; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Chunjuan; Du, Wanliang; Liu, Gaifen; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous economic studies conducted in developed countries showed intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is cost-effective for acute ischemic stroke. The present study aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of tPA treatment in China, the largest developing country. Methods A combination of decision tree and Markov model was developed to determine the cost-effectiveness of tPA treatment versus non-tPA treatment within 4.5 hours after stroke onset. Outcomes and costs data were derived from the database of Thrombolysis Implementation and Monitor of acute ischemic Stroke in China (TIMS-China) study. Efficacy data were derived from a pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials. Costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared in both short term (2 years) and long term (30 years). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results Comparing to non-tPA treatment, tPA treatment within 4.5 hours led to a short-term gain of 0.101 QALYs at an additional cost of CNY 9,520 (US$ 1,460), yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of CNY 94,300 (US$ 14,500) per QALY gained in 2 years; and to a long-term gain of 0.422 QALYs at an additional cost of CNY 6,530 (US$ 1,000), yielding an ICER of CNY 15,500 (US$ 2,380) per QALY gained in 30 years. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that tPA treatment is cost-effective in 98.7% of the simulations at a willingness-to-pay threshold of CNY 105,000 (US$ 16,200) per QALY. Conclusions Intravenous tPA treatment within 4.5 hours is highly cost-effective for acute ischemic strokes in China. PMID:25329637

  10. Paradoxical Association of Smoking With In‐Hospital Mortality Among Patients Admitted With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed F.; Smith, Eric E.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to those who never smoked, a paradoxical effect of smoking on reducing mortality in patients admitted with myocardial ischemia has been reported. We sought to determine if this effect was present in patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke. Methods and Results Using the local Get with the Guidelines‐Stroke registry, we analyzed 4305 consecutively admitted ischemic stroke patients (March 2002–December 2011). The sample was divided into smokers versus nonsmokers. The main outcome of interest was the overall inpatient mortality. Compared to nonsmokers, tobacco smokers were younger, more frequently male and presented with fewer stroke risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation. Smokers also had a lower average NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and fewer received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Patients in both groups had similar adherence to early antithrombotics, dysphagia screening prior to oral intake, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis. Smoking was associated with lower all‐cause in‐hospital mortality (6.6% versus 12.4%; unadjusted OR 0.46; CI [0.34 to 0.63]; P<0.001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, CAD, atrial fibrillation, NIHSS, and tPA, smoking remained independently associated with lower mortality (adjusted OR 0.64; CI [0.42 to 0.96]; P=0.03). Conclusions Similar to myocardial ischemia, smoking was independently associated with lower inpatient mortality in acute ischemic stroke. This effect may be due to tobacco‐induced changes in cerebrovascular vasoreactivity, or may be due in part to residual confounding. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to confirm the finding and the effect on 30‐day and 1‐year mortality. PMID:23782919

  11. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  12. Effect of a provincial system of stroke care delivery on stroke care and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kapral, Moira K.; Fang, Jiming; Silver, Frank L.; Hall, Ruth; Stamplecoski, Melissa; O’Callaghan, Christina; Tu, Jack V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Systems of stroke care delivery have been promoted as a means of improving the quality of stroke care, but little is known about their effectiveness. We assessed the effect of the Ontario Stroke System, a province-wide strategy of regionalized stroke care delivery, on stroke care and outcomes in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We used population-based provincial administrative databases to identify all emergency department visits and hospital admissions for acute stroke and transient ischemic attack from Jan. 1, 2001, to Dec. 31, 2010. Using piecewise regression analyses, we assessed the effect of the full implementation of the Ontario Stroke System in 2005 on the proportion of patients who received care at stroke centres, and on rates of discharge to long-term care facilities and 30-day mortality after stroke. Results: We included 243 287 visits by patients with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack. The full implementation of the Ontario Stroke System in 2005 was associated with an increase in rates of care at stroke centres (before implementation: 40.0%; after implementation: 46.5%), decreased rates of discharge to long-term care facilities (before implementation: 16.9%; after implementation: 14.8%) and decreased 30-day mortality for hemorrhagic (before implementation: 38.3%; after implementation: 34.4%) and ischemic stroke (before implementation: 16.3%; after implementation: 15.7%). The system’s implementation was also associated with marked increases in the proportion of patients who received neuroimaging, thrombolytic therapy, care in a stroke unit and antithrombotic therapy. Interpretation: The implementation of an organized system of stroke care delivery was associated with improved processes of care and outcomes after stroke. PMID:23713072

  13. Stroke in Canon of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Alorizi, Seyed Morteza Emami; Nimruzi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke has a huge negative impact on the society and more adversely affect women. There is scarce evidence about any neuroprotective effects of commonly used drug in acute stroke. Bushnell et al. provided a guideline focusing on the risk factors of stroke unique to women, including reproductive factors, metabolic syndrome, obesity, atrial fibrillation, and migraine with aura. The ten variables cited by Avicenna in Canon of Medicine would compensate for the gaps mentioned in this guideline. The prescribed drugs should be selected qualitatively opposite to Mizaj (warm-cold and wet-dry qualities induced by disease state) of the disease and according to ten variables, including the nature of the affected organ, intensity of disease, sex, age, habit, season, place of living, occupation, stamina and physical status. Methods: Information related to stroke was searched in Canon of Medicine, which is an outstanding book in traditional Persian medicine written by Avicenna. Results: A hemorrhagic stroke is the result of increasing sanguine humor in the body. Sanguine has warm-wet quality, and should be treated with food and drugs that quench the abundance of blood in the body. An acute episode of ischemic stroke is due to the abundance of phlegm that causes a blockage in the cerebral vessels. Phlegm has cold-wet quality and treatment should be started with compound medicines that either solve the phlegm or eject it from the body. Conclusion: Avicenna has cited in Canon of Medicine that women have cold and wet temperament compared to men. For this reason, they are more prone to accumulation of phlegm in their body organs including the liver, joints and vessels, and consequently in the risk of fatty liver, degenerative joint disease, atherosclerosis, and stroke especially the ischemic one. This is in accordance with epidemiological studies that showed higher rate of ischemic stroke in women rather than hemorrhagic one. PMID:26722147

  14. Changes of deceleration and acceleration capacity of heart rate in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Xing-De; Yang, Jia-Jun; Zhou, Li; Pan, Yong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Autonomic dysfunction is common after stroke, which is correlated with unfavorable outcome. Phase-rectified signal averaging is a newly developed technique for assessing cardiac autonomic function, by detecting sympathetic and vagal nerve activity separately through calculating acceleration capacity (AC) and deceleration capacity (DC) of heart rate. In this study, we used this technique for the first time to investigate the cardiac autonomic function of patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke. Methods A 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed in 63 patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke in hemisphere and sinus rhythm, as well as in 50 controls with high risk of stroke. DC, AC, heart rate variability parameters, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), and square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD) were calculated. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess the severity of stroke. We analyzed the changes of DC, AC, SDNN, and RMSSD and also studied the correlations between these parameters and NIHSS scores. Results The R–R (R wave to R wave on electrocardiogram) intervals, DC, AC, and SDNN in the cerebral infarction group were lower than those in controls (P=0.003, P=0.002, P=0.006, and P=0.043), but the difference of RMSSD and the D-value and ratio between absolute value of AC (|AC|) and DC were not statistically significant compared with those in controls. The DC of the infarction group was significantly correlated with |AC|, SDNN, and RMSSD (r=0.857, r=0.619, and r=0.358; P=0.000, P=0.000, and P=0.004). Correlation analysis also showed that DC, |AC|, and SDNN were negatively correlated with NIHSS scores (r=−0.279, r=−0.266, and r=−0.319; P=0.027, P=0.035, and P=0.011). Conclusion Both DC and AC of heart rate decreased in patients with hemispheric infarction, reflecting a decrease in both vagal

  15. Comparing Risk Factor Profiles between Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Ischemic Stroke in Chinese and White Populations: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chung-Fen; Anderson, Niall; Thomas, Brenda; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chinese populations have a higher proportion of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in total strokes. However, the reasons are not fully understood. Methods To assess the differences in frequency of major risk factors between ICH and ischemic stroke (IS) in Chinese versus white populations of European descent, we systematically sought studies conducted since 1990 that compared frequency of risk factors between ICH and IS in Chinese or white populations. For each risk factor, in Chinese and Whites separately, we calculated study-specific and random effects pooled prevalence and odds ratios (ORs) for ICH versus IS. Results Six studies among 36190 Chinese, and seven among 52100 white stroke patients studied hypertension, diabetes, atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypercholesterolemia, smoking and alcohol. Pooled prevalence of AF was significantly lower in Chinese. Pooled ORs for ICH versus IS were mostly similar in Chinese and Whites. However, in Chinese–but not Whites–mean age was lower (62 versus 69 years), while hypertension and alcohol were significantly more frequent in ICH than IS (ORs 1.38, 95% CI 1.18–1.62, and 1.46, 1.12–1.91). Hypercholesterolemia and smoking were significantly less frequent in ICH in Whites, but not Chinese, while IHD, AF and diabetes were less frequent in ICH in both. Conclusions Different risk factor distributions in ICH and IS raise interesting possibilities about variation in mechanisms underlying the different distributions of pathological types of stroke between Chinese and Whites. Further analyses in large, prospective studies, including adjustment for potential confounders, are needed to consolidate and extend these findings. PMID:26991497

  16. Protective effect of crocetin on hemorrhagic shock-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbo; Yan, Junling; Xi, Liang; Qian, Zhiyu; Wang, Zhenghong; Yang, Lina

    2012-07-01

    Multiple organ failure is a common outcome of hemorrhagic shock followed by resuscitation, and the kidney is one of the prime target organs involved. The main objective of the study was to evaluate whether crocetin, a natural product from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, has beneficial effects on renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Anesthetized rats were bled to reduce mean arterial blood pressure to 35 (SD, 5) mmHg for 60 min and then were resuscitated with their withdrawn shed blood and normal saline. Crocetin was administered via the duodenum at a dose of 50 mg/kg 40 min after hemorrhage. The increase in creatinine and blood urea nitrogen was significantly reduced at 2 h after hemorrhage and resuscitation in crocetin-treated rats. The increases in renal nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 were also attenuated by crocetin. Hemorrhagic shock resulted in a significant elevation in malondialdehyde production and was accompanied by a reduction in total superoxide dismutase activity, activation of nuclear factor κB, and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These changes were significantly attenuated by crocetin at 2 h after resuscitation. These results suggested that crocetin blocks inflammatory cascades by inhibiting production of reactive oxygen species and restoring superoxide dismutase activity to ameliorate renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhage shock and resuscitation. PMID:22576007

  17. Advances in interventional neuroradiology: novel use of mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sanjeev; Fitzpatrick, Sean

    2015-05-01

    Dr Sanjeev Nayak speaks to Sean Fitzpatrick, Commissioning Editor: Dr Sanjeev Nayak is a Consultant Neuroradiologist with special interest in Interventional Neuroradiology at the University Hospital of North Midlands, Stoke on Trent. He was responsible for the development of Interventional Stroke Service which he did immediately following his appointment in 2009 and was the lead neuroradiologist from 2010 to 2013. Dr Nayak and his team have pioneered in the field of mechanical thrombectomy and stenting in acute ischemic stroke and treated the largest number of such cases in the UK. His team has produced one of the best clinical outcomes for such patients with the lowest mortality rates in the UK. This work has been nominated for numerous national awards in various categories of BMJ, Patient Safety and Care integration awards. Dr Nayak was the finalist at the HSJ awards under the category of 'Clinical Leader of the Year 2012' and NHS Leadership awards 'NHS Inspirational Leader of the Year 2013. Dr Nayak is also involved in patents and designs involving new stroke interventional devices and is actively involved in stroke research which has led to numerous publications in peer reviewed journals. Dr Nayak has organized national conferences and lectured at various national and international conferences in his field of interest. PMID:26021630

  18. Antiplatelet Usage Impacts Clot Density in Acute Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Pikija, Slaven; Magdic, Jozef; Lukic, Anita; Schreiber, Catharina; Mutzenbach, Johannes Sebastian; McCoy, Mark R; Sellner, Johann

    2016-01-01

    We explored whether clot density in middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion is related to clinical variables, stroke etiology, blood constituents, and prestroke medication. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with acute ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation admitted to two Central European stroke centers. The acquisition of non-contrast enhanced CT (NECT) and CT angiography (CTA) within 4.5 h of symptom onset was obligatory. We assessed the site of MCA occlusion as well as density, area, and length of the clot in 150 patients. The Hounsfield unit values for the clot were divided with contralateral MCA segment to yield relative Hounsfield Unit ratio (rHU). The site of the vessel occlusion (M1 vs. M2) and antiplatelet usage, but not stroke etiology, significantly influenced rHU. We found an inverse correlation of rHU with erythrocyte count (p < 0.001). The multivariate analysis revealed that a higher rHU (i.e., clot being more hyperdense) was more likely with the use of antiplatelets (OR 4.24, CI 1.10-16.31, p = 0.036). Erythrocyte (OR 0.18, CI 0.05-0.55, p = 0.003), and thrombocyte counts (OR 0.99, CI 0.98-0.99, p = 0.029) were associated with odds for more hypodense clots (lower rHU). Our study disclosed that antiplatelet therapy impacts the composition of intracranial clots of the anterior circulation. PMID:27563874

  19. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Cerebral Thrombi Retrieved by Mechanical Thrombectomy from Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Michael K.; Gunreben, Ignaz; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kraft, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy is a novel treatment option for patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Only a few studies