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Sample records for acute hepatocellular necrosis

  1. Spontaneous Proliferation of H2M-/- CD4 T Cells Results in Unusual Acute Hepatocellular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jeong-su; Baldwin, William M.; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    Naïve CD4 T cells are triggered to undergo spontaneous proliferation, a proliferative response induced in response to homeostatic stimulation, when exposed to severe lymphopenic environments. They spontaneously acquire proinflammatory effector phenotypes, playing a major role in inducing chronic inflammation in the intestine that is believed to be induced by T cell recognition of commensal antigens. While the antigens inducing the T cell responses and inflammation are being extensively investigated, the role of clonality of T cells involved in this process remains poorly understood. In this study, we utilized naïve CD4 T cells isolated from B6 H2M−/− mice, in which MHCII molecules are complexed with a single CLIP molecule, and examined spontaneous proliferation and intestinal inflammation of CD4 T cells expressing limited T cell receptor repertoire diversity. We found that H2M−/− CD4 T cells undergo robust spontaneous proliferation, differentiate into IFNγ-producing Th1 type effector cells, and, most unexpectedly, induce severe acute hepatocellular necrosis. T cell interaction with MHCII molecule on cells of hematopoietic origin was essential to induce the pathology. Interestingly, B cells are fully capable of preventing necrotic inflammation via IL-10-independent and B7-H1-dependent mechanism. This could be a useful animal model to examine T cell-mediated liver inflammation and B cell-mediated immune regulation. PMID:25313460

  2. [Acute retinal necrosis].

    PubMed

    Lucke, K; Reinking, U; el-Hifnawi, E; Dennin, R H; Laqua, H

    1988-12-01

    The authors report on three patients with acute retinal necrosis who were treated with the virostatic agent Acyclovir and who underwent vitreoretinal surgery with silicone oil filling for total retinal detachment. In two eyes the retina was reattached, but useful vision was only preserved in one patient. Titers from blood and the vitreous, as well as microscopic findings in retinal biopsies, support the view that the necrosis is caused by a herpes simplex virus infection. After therapy with Acyclovir was instituted no further progression on the necrosis was observed. However, the development of retinal detachment could not be prevented. Early diagnosis and antiviral therapy are essential to improve the otherwise poor prognosis in this rare syndrome. PMID:3221657

  3. Black Anal Canal: Acute Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Catarina; Gonçalves, Cláudia; Alves, Paulo; Gil, Inês; Canhoto, Manuela; Silva, Filipe; Cotrim, Isabel; Amado, Cristina; Eliseu, Liliana; Vasconcelos, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemia of the rectum or anal canal resulting in necrosis is extremely uncommon because both the rectum and the anal canal have excellent blood supplies. We present a case with spontaneous necrosis of the anal canal without rectal involvement. Surgical debridement was accomplished, and the recovery was uneventful. The patient was elderly, with probable atherosclerotic arterial disease, and presented with hypotension. Due to the lack of other precipitating factors, the hypoperfusion hypothesis seems to be the most suitable in this case. To the best of our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature on this subject.

  4. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or “black esophagus” is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  5. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident. PMID:26949146

  6. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and hepatocellular necrosis due to clove oil.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Biggerstaff, J; Savidge, G F

    1992-10-01

    We describe the case of a 2-year-old child who suffered from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hepatocellular necrosis, following ingestion of clove oil. The patient was treated with heparin and fresh frozen plasma, and, following specific haemostasis assays, with appropriate coagulation factor and inhibitor concentrates. The case demonstrates how this approach can be successfully used in the management of DIC with coexisting liver failure. PMID:1450336

  7. Computed tomography predictors of hepatocellular carcinoma tumour necrosis after chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Mary K; Dorn, David P; Zarzour, Jessica; Smith, J Kevin; Redden, David T; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Gray, Stephen H; Eckhoff, Devin E; DuBay, Derek A

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiographical features associated with a favourable response to trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) are poorly defined for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods From 2008 to 2012, all first TACE interventions for HCC performed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) were retrospectively reviewed. Only patients with a pre-TACE and a post-TACE computed tomography (CT) scan were included in the analyses (n = 115). HCC tumour response to TACE was quantified via the the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) criteria. Univariate and multivariable analyses were constructed. Results The index HCC tumours experienced a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis in 59/115 (51%) of patients after the first TACE intervention. On univariate analysis, smaller tumour size, peripheral tumour location and arterial enhancement were associated with a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis, whereas, only smaller tumour size [odds ratio (OR) 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48, 0.81] and peripheral location (OR 6.91; 95% CI 1.75, 27.29) were significant on multivariable analysis. There was a trend towards improved survival in the patients that experienced a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis (P = 0.08). Conclusions Peripherally located smaller HCC tumours are most likely to experience a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis after TACE. Surprisingly, arterial-phase enhancement and portal venous-phase washout were not significantly predictive of TACE-induced tumour necrosis. The TACE response was not statistically associated with improved survival. PMID:23980917

  8. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F.; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S.; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Stein, Eytan M.; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient’s liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Stein, Eytan M; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J; Harding, James J

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient's liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma: IVIM diffusion quantification for prediction of tumor necrosis compared to enhancement ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kakite, Suguru; Dyvorne, Hadrien A.; Lee, Karen M.; Jajamovich, Guido H.; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To correlate intra voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion parameters of liver parenchyma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with degree of liver/tumor enhancement and necrosis; and to assess the diagnostic performance of diffusion parameters vs. enhancement ratios (ER) for prediction of complete tumor necrosis. Patients and methods In this IRB approved HIPAA compliant study, we included 46 patients with HCC who underwent IVIM diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI in addition to routine sequences at 3.0 T. True diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), perfusion fraction (PF) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were quantified in tumors and liver parenchyma. Tumor ER were calculated using contrast-enhanced imaging, and degree of tumor necrosis was assessed using post-contrast image subtraction. IVIM parameters and ER were compared between HCC and background liver and between necrotic and viable tumor components. ROC analysis for prediction of complete tumor necrosis was performed. Results 79 HCCs were assessed (mean size 2.5 cm). D, PF and ADC were significantly higher in HCC vs. liver (p < 0.0001). There were weak significant negative/positive correlations between D/PF and ER, and significant correlations between D/PF/ADC and tumor necrosis (for D, r 0.452, p < 0.001). Among diffusion parameters, D had the highest area under the curve (AUC 0.811) for predicting complete tumor necrosis. ER outperformed diffusion parameters for prediction of complete tumor necrosis (AUC > 0.95, p < 0.002). Conclusion D has a reasonable diagnostic performance for predicting complete tumor necrosis, however lower than that of contrast-enhanced imaging. PMID:27069971

  11. Contemporary management of infected necrosis complicating severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jamdar, Saurabh; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic necrosis complicating severe acute pancreatitis is a challenging scenario in contemporary critical care practice; it requires multidisciplinary care in a setting where there is a relatively limited evidence base to support decision making. This commentary provides a concise overview of current management of patients with infected necrosis, focusing on detection, the role of pharmacologic intervention, and the timing and nature of surgical interventions. Fine-needle aspiration of necrosis remains the mainstay for establishment of infection. Pharmacological intervention includes antibiotic therapy as an adjunct to surgical debridement/drainage and, more recently, drotrecogin alfa. Specific concerns remain regarding the suitability of drotrecogin alfa in this setting. Early surgical intervention is unhelpful; surgery is indicated when there is strong evidence for infection of necrotic tissue, with the current trend being toward 'less drastic' surgical interventions. PMID:16356213

  12. Complete spontaneous necrosis of hepatocellular carcinoma confirmed on resection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Ryusuke; Amano, Hironobu; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujikuni, Nobuaki; Nakahara, Masahiro; Yonehara, Shuji; Teramen, Kazushi; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Complete spontaneous necrosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without any pretreatment or angiography is rare. We present a rare case of spontaneous complete necrosis of HCC, as confirmed after hepatectomy. Presentation of case The patient, a 74-year-old man with a history of alcoholic hepatitis, was referred to our hospital for confirmation of suspected HCC. In March 2015, abdominal ultrasonography detected a low echoic mass in segment 8 (S8) of the liver. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging revealed interval growth of this tumor and showed that the tumor was well enhanced in the arterial phase and washed out in the portal and delayed phases. The serum alpha-fetoprotein level was elevated at 30.8 ng/mL and the percentage of the L3 isoform was 25.5%. Two months later, CT imaging showed that the tumor was of low density and had decreased in size; no contrast enhancement of the tumor was seen. Spontaneous necrosis of the HCC was considered; however, as we could not exclude viable malignant cells in the tumor, we performed S8 segmentectomy of the liver. The resected tumor specimen had a thick fibrous capsule. Histopathological findings showed only granulation and necrotic tissue accompanied by bleeding and hemosiderosis. No viable tumor cells were observed. The serum alpha-fetoprotein level returned to the normal range one month after surgery. Discussion If spontaneous regression has occurred, there is a possibility of HCC recurrence and of remnant viable tumor cells. Conclusion We present a rare case of complete spontaneous necrosis of HCC and strongly recommended surgical intervention. PMID:27060644

  13. Spontaneous complete necrosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    TAKEDA, YUKI; WAKUI, NORITAKA; ASAI, YASUTSUGU; DAN, NOBUHIRO; YAMAUCHI, YOSHIYA; UEKI, NOBUO; OTSUKA, TAKAFUMI; OBA, NOBUYUKI; NISHINAKAGAWA, SHUTA; MINAGAWA, MASAMI; TAKEDA, YASUSHI; SHIONO, SAORI; KOJIMA, TATSUYA

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a 68-year-old male patient who presented to Tokyo Rosai Hospital for the treatment of alcoholic liver disease. A high density was observed in liver segment S2, while a tumor, 30 mm in size, exhibiting a low density was observed in the delayed phase upon contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), which was performed prior to admission. The tumor appeared slightly poorly defined upon abdominal ultrasound and was observed as a 30 mm low-echoic nodule that was internally heterogeneous. A 5-mm thick contrast enhancement effect was observed in the tumor border in the vascular phase on Sonazoid contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, while a defect in the entire tumor was observed in the post-vascular phase. Dysphagia had commenced three months prior to presentation and a weight loss of ~3 kg was observed. Therefore, the patient was admitted to Tokyo Rosai Hospital due to the presence of a hepatic tumor, and to undergo a close inspection of the cause of the tumor. Upon close inspection, it was determined that the weight loss and aphagia were caused by progressive bulbar paralysis. A contrast-enhanced CT was performed on post-admission day 29 as a follow-up regarding the hepatic tumor. As a result, although no change in the tumor size was observed, the contrast enhancement in the tumor borderline had disappeared. Necrosis of the tumor was considered. However, as viable persistence of the malignant tumor could not be excluded, a hepatic left lobe excision was performed. The patient was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on the morphology of the cellular necrosis. In addition, occlusion due to thrombus was observed within the blood vessels passing inside the fibrous capsule. It was hypothesized that the formation of a thick fibrous capsule and occlusion due to thrombus in the feeding vessel were possibly involved as the cause of complete spontaneous necrosis. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient. PMID

  14. Clinical Manifestation of Self-Limiting Acute Retinal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Brydak-Godowska, Joanna; Borkowski, Piotr; Szczepanik, Szymon; Moneta-Wielgoś, Joanna; Kęcik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper was to present a case series of self-limiting, peripheral acute retinal necrosis and to demonstrate efficacy of treatment with valacyclovir in patients resistant to acyclovir. The diagnosis was made on ophthalmoscopic examination and positive serum tests for herpes viruses. Material/Methods Ten patients (6F and 4M) aged 19–55 years were diagnosed and treated for self-limiting acute retinal necrosis (ARN). The following endpoints were reported: visual outcomes, clinical features, disease progression, treatment, and complications. Patients received only symptomatic treatment because they did not consent to vitreous puncture. Results Peripheral, mild retinitis was diagnosed in all eyes at baseline. Initially, all patients were treated with systemic acyclovir (800 mg, 5 times a day), prednisone (typically 40–60 mg/day), and aspirin in an outpatient setting. In 6 patients, treatment was discontinued at 6 months due to complete resolution of the inflammatory process. Four patients with immune deficiency showed signs and symptoms of chronic inflammation. Two patients did not respond to acyclovir (2 non-responders); however, those patients were successfully treated with valacyclovir. Complete resolution of inflammatory lesions was observed in 8 patients. In 2 patients, the disease progressed despite treatment – 1 female patient after kidney transplant who stopped the prescribed medications, and 1 male patient with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome who experienced breakthrough symptoms on-treatment. He died due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Neurological complications (encephalitis and meningitis) were observed in 2 female patients. Prophylactic laser photocoagulation was performed in 1 subject. Conclusions A series of cases of self-limiting acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is presented. This clinical form of ARN can resemble toxoplasmic retinitis in some cases. Oral antiviral medications provide an effective alternative to

  15. Emerging concepts in the management of acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Robert William; Jumper, J Michael; McDonald, H Richard; Johnson, Robert N; Fu, Arthur; Lujan, Brandon J; Cunningham, Emmett T

    2013-05-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN), also known as Kirisawa-type uveitis, is an uncommon condition caused by infection of the retina by one of the herpes family of viruses, most typically varicella zoster virus or herpes simplex virus and less commonly cytomegalovirus. Clinical diagnosis can be challenging and is often aided by PCR-based analysis of ocular fluids. Treatment typically involves extended use of one or more antiviral agents. Long term retinal detachment risk is high. We review the literature on ARN and present an approach to the diagnosis and management of this serious condition. PMID:23235944

  16. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  17. Suppression of Kupffer cell function prevents cadmium induced hepatocellular necrosis in the male Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Sauer, J M; Waalkes, M P; Hooser, S B; Kuester, R K; McQueen, C A; Sipes, I G

    1997-08-15

    Exposure of humans to toxic metals and metalloids is a major environmental problem. Many metals, such as cadmium, can be hepatotoxic. However, the mechanisms by which metals cause acute hepatic injury are in many cases unknown. Previous reports suggest a major role for inflammation in acute cadmium induced hepatotoxicity. In initial experiments we found that a non-hepatotoxic dose of cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2.0 mg/kg, i.v.) markedly increased the clearance rate of colloidal carbon from the blood, which is indicative of enhanced phagocytic activity by Kupffer cells (resident hepatic macrophages). Thus. the objective these studies was to determine the involvement of Kupffer cells in cadmium induced liver injury by inhibiting their function with gadolinium chloride (GdCl3). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered GdCl3 (10 mg/kg, i.v.) followed 24 h later by a single dose of CdCl2 (3.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, i.v.). Twenty four hours after CdCl2 administration animals were killed and the degree of liver toxicity was assessed using plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as light microscopy. Cadmium chloride administration produced multifocal hepatocellular necrosis and increased plasma ALT activity. Pretreatment with GdCl3 significantly reduced both the morphological changes and hepatic ALT release caused by CdCl2. However, the protection was specific to the liver, and did not alter CdCl2 induced testicular injury, as determined by histopathological damage. In many cases, the inducible cadmium-binding protein, metallothionein (MT) is often an essential aspect of the acquisition of cadmium tolerance in the liver. Although cadmium caused a dramatic induction of hepatic MT (32-fold), GdCl3 caused only a minor increase (2-fold). Combined CdCl2 and GdCl3 treatment did not induce levels to an extent greater than CdCl2 alone. As expected, GdCl3 also caused a slight increase in the amount of cadmium associated with the liver. In cultured hepatocytes isolated from GdCl3

  18. Antiviral selection in the management of acute retinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Patrick MK; Hooper, Claire Y; Lightman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal antiviral regimen in the management of acute retinal necrosis, a disease caused by herpetic viruses with devastating consequences for the eye. The current gold standard is based on retrospective case series. Because the incidence of disease is low, few well-designed, randomized trials have evaluated treatment dosage and duration. Newer oral antiviral agents are emerging as alternatives to high-dose intravenous acyclovir, avoiding the need for inpatient intravenous treatment. Drug resistance is uncommon but may also be difficult to identify. Antiviral drugs have few side effects, but special attention needs to be paid to patients who have underlying renal disease, are pregnant or are immunocompromised. PMID:20169044

  19. Gallbladder torsion with acute cholecystitis and gross necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Eyas; Bencsath, Kalman

    2014-01-01

    A 92-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of worsening right-sided abdominal pain. On examination she had right mid-abdominal tenderness. Laboratory studies demonstrated leukocytosis with normal liver function tests. A CT of the abdomen was remarkable for a large fluid collection in the right abdomen and no discernible gallbladder in the gallbladder fossa. An ultrasound confirmed the suspicion of a distended, floating gallbladder. The patient was taken to the operating room for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The gallbladder was found to have volvulised in a counter -clockwise manner around its pedicle, with gross necrosis of the gallbladder. She underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Pathological examination revealed acute necrotising calculus cholecystitis. PMID:24862426

  20. Acute retinal necrosis secondary to herpes simplex virus type 2 with preexisting chorioretinal scarring.

    PubMed

    Moesen, Ingemarie; Khemka, Sneh; Ayliffe, William

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis in children is a devastating disease that requires early diagnosis and treatment. The authors describe a rarely reported case of bilateral acute retinal necrosis in a child caused by neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2, where the presence of previous chorioretinal scarring made diagnosis challenging. PMID:18286969

  1. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor in Human Acute Cardiac Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Grasso, Maurizia; Diegoli, Marta; Bramerio, Manuela; Foglieni, Andrea Scotti; Albertario, Marco; Martinelli, Luigi; Gavazzi, Antonello; Goggi, Claudio; Campana, Carlo; Vigano, Mario

    1991-01-01

    The authors performed an immunohistochemical study on expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in endomyocardial biopsies from human cardiac allografts. TNFα immunoreactivity was found in 45% biopsies with mild acute rejection, in 83% biopsies with focal moderate rejection, in 80% biopsies with diffuse moderate rejection. Biopsies with absent rejection did not show immunoreactive cells. In mild rejection, positive cells were few and scanty monocytes and macrophages (MAC-387 and LN5 positive cells) and T lymphocytes (UCHL-1/CD45 RO positive cells) (up to 20% of all infiltrating cells). Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens on infiltrating and endothelial cells occurred earlier and independent of TNFα reactivity. Number of immunoreactive cells increased in moderate rejection (up to 50%). Immunoreactivity was also present in nonpigmented macrophages in part of the biopsies with resolving rejection (45%). The authors conclude that TNFα is expressed in acute cardiac rejection by immunologically activated inflammatory cells. Immunoreactive cells increase in number with increasing severity of the reaction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1928295

  2. Quantitation of Acute Necrosis After Experimental Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, Xin-Yi; Dehn, Shirley; Adelman, Jeremy; Lipsitz, Jeremy; Thorp, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is death and necrosis of myocardial tissue secondary to ischemia. MI is associated with adverse cardiac remodeling, progressive heart chamber dilation, ventricular wall thinning, and loss of cardiac function. Myocardial necrosis can be experimentally induced in rodents to simulate human MI by surgical occlusion of coronary arteries. When induced in knockout or transgenic mice, this model is useful for the identification of molecular modulators of cell death, cardiac remodeling, and preclinical therapeutic potential. Herein we outline in tandem, methods for microsurgical ligation of the left anterior descending artery followed by quantitation of myocardial necrosis. Necrosis is quantified after staining the heart with triphenyltetrazolium chloride. PMID:23733573

  3. Use of drug therapy to manage acute cutaneous necrosis of the skin.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jill S; Hall, John C

    2010-04-01

    Acute cutaneous necrosis is defined as a sudden onset of gangrenous skin changes in the skin, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The following diseases are included in this discussion: coumadin necrosis, heparin necrosis, brown recluse spider bite, necrotizing fasciitis, vasculitis, pyoderma gangrenosum, calciphylaxis, clotting abnormalities and embolic phenomena. The importance of early diagnosis, early distinction and early drug therapy or drug withdrawal must match the diagnosis for maximal preservation of the skin and underlying tissue. PMID:20514791

  4. Coagulopathy and encephalopathy in a dog with acute hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Strombeck, D R; Krum, S; Rogers, Q

    1976-10-15

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation developed secondary to hepatic necrosis in a 5-year-old Saint Bernard. Although the coagulopathy responded to treatment with heparin, the dog died from the combined effects of gastric hemorrhage and encephalopathy, both of which are complications of hepatic necrosis. PMID:977448

  5. Acute esophageal necrosis occurring in a patient undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyung-Jin; Park, Sang-Ho; Ahn, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Chang-Kyun

    2014-05-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis is uncommon in the literature. Its etiology is unknown, although cardiovascular disease, hemodynamic compromise, gastric outlet obstruction, alcohol ingestion, hypoxemia, hypercoagulable state, infection, and trauma have all been suggested as possible causes. A 67-year-old female underwent a coronary angiography (CAG) for evaluation of chest pain. CAG findings showed coronary three-vessel disease. We planned percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Coronary arterial dissection during the PCI led to sudden hypotension. Six hours after the index procedure, the patient experienced a large amount of hematemesis. Emergency gastrofibroscopy was performed and showed mucosal necrosis with a huge adherent blood clot in the esophagus. After conservative treatment for 3 months, the esophageal lesion was completely improved. She was diagnosed with acute esophageal necrosis. We report herein a case of acute esophageal necrosis occurring in a patient undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:24851074

  6. [Acute hemorrhagic necrosis of the breast following treatment with Cumarin].

    PubMed

    Lüchtrath, H; Walkowsky, A

    1983-08-01

    A case of hemorrhagic necrosis of the breast is reported in a thirty-four year old woman who received Cumarin treatment for deep leg vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It was necessary to remove the breast. The microscopic examination showed complete blockage of the vessels by fibrin thrombi in almost all veins. The cause of this venous thrombosis was explained as a Shwartzman-Sanarelli-Phenomenon. PMID:6555120

  7. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Tiffany J.; Sentongo, Timothy A.; Mak, Grace Z.; Kahn, Stacy A.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26925282

  8. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Patton, Tiffany J; Sentongo, Timothy A; Mak, Grace Z; Kahn, Stacy A

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26925282

  9. Acute Hepatic Necrosis Caused by Salmonella enterica Serotype I 4,5,12:−:1,2 in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Thelma; Grant, Andrew J.; Watson, Penny J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatic necrosis was diagnosed in a dog. Gram staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization identified Salmonella enterica in the liver, subsequently confirmed as S. enterica serotype I 4,5,12:−:1,2. This is the first report of acute hepatic necrosis with liver failure caused by Salmonella in a dog. PMID:26292301

  10. Binge Eating Leading to Acute Gastric Dilatation, Ischemic Necrosis and Rupture -A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dewangan, Manish; Khare, Manish Kumar; Mishra, Sumanta; Marhual, Jogesh Chandra

    2016-03-01

    Acute gastric dilatation is a rarely encountered clinical scenario in our day to day practice. This is very rapidly progressing condition and can lead to ischemic necrosis and perforation/rupture of the stomach. It could be fatal if not timely intervened. We report such a case of a 17-year-old, otherwise healthy boy, who presented with pain and distension of abdomen following binge eating episode after 24 hours of prolonged fasting. On exploration, stomach was dilated with necrosis and perforation at fundus near greater curvature. He was managed with excision of all the devitalized area and primary repair with feeding jejunostomy. The case is presented due to its rarity. Acute gastric dilatation (AGD) leading to ischemic necrosis and perforation because of binge eating episode in an otherwise healthy person is an exceptional occurrence with only few cases reported in literature. The clinician should be aware of this condition for prompt and appropriate management. PMID:27134932

  11. Binge Eating Leading to Acute Gastric Dilatation, Ischemic Necrosis and Rupture –A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Manish Kumar; Mishra, Sumanta; Marhual, Jogesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastric dilatation is a rarely encountered clinical scenario in our day to day practice. This is very rapidly progressing condition and can lead to ischemic necrosis and perforation/rupture of the stomach. It could be fatal if not timely intervened. We report such a case of a 17-year-old, otherwise healthy boy, who presented with pain and distension of abdomen following binge eating episode after 24 hours of prolonged fasting. On exploration, stomach was dilated with necrosis and perforation at fundus near greater curvature. He was managed with excision of all the devitalized area and primary repair with feeding jejunostomy. The case is presented due to its rarity. Acute gastric dilatation (AGD) leading to ischemic necrosis and perforation because of binge eating episode in an otherwise healthy person is an exceptional occurrence with only few cases reported in literature. The clinician should be aware of this condition for prompt and appropriate management. PMID:27134932

  12. Does the Degree of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tumor Necrosis following Transarterial Chemoembolization Impact Patient Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Nathan; Gennaro, Kyle; Obert, John; Sauer, Paul F.; Redden, David T.; Zarzour, Jessica; Smith, J. Kevin; Bolus, David; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Gray, Stephen; White, Jared; Eckhoff, Devin E.; DuBay, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The association between transarterial chemoembolization- (TACE-) induced HCC tumor necrosis measured by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (mRECIST) and patient survival is poorly defined. We hypothesize that survival will be superior in HCC patients with increased TACE-induced tumor necrosis. Materials and Methods. TACE interventions were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor response was quantified via dichotomized (responders and nonresponders) and the four defined mRECIST categories. Results. Median survival following TACE was significantly greater in responders compared to nonresponders (20.8 months versus 14.9 months, p = 0.011). Survival outcomes also significantly varied among the four mRECIST categories (p = 0.0003): complete, 21.4 months; partial, 20.8; stable, 16.8; and progressive, 7.73. Only progressive disease demonstrated significantly worse survival when compared to complete response. Multivariable analysis showed that progressive disease, increasing total tumor diameter, and non-Child-Pugh class A were independent predictors of post-TACE mortality. Conclusions. Both dichotomized (responders and nonresponders) and the four defined mRECIST responses to TACE in patients with HCC were predictive of survival. The main driver of the survival analysis was poor survival in the progressive disease group. Surprisingly, there was small nonsignificant survival benefit between complete, partial, and stable disease groups. These findings may inform HCC treatment decisions following first TACE. PMID:26949394

  13. Acute Tumor Lysis Syndrome Caused by Transcatheter Oily Chemoembolization in a Patient with a Large Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Noriaki Monzawa, Shuichi; Nagano, Hidenobu; Nishizaki, Hogara; Arai, Yasuaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2007-06-15

    Acute tumor lysis syndrome results from a sudden and rapid release of products of cellular breakdown after anticancer therapy. Severe alterations of metabolic profile might occur and result in acute renal failure. We present a patient with a large hepatocellular carcinoma who received transcatheter oily chemoembolization and died subsequently of this syndrome. To our knowledge, there has been only one report of this syndrome induced by chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. This case illustrates the need to anticipate the development of acute tumor lysis syndrome when chemoembolization is planned for a large hepatocellular carcinoma.

  14. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. PMID:26947104

  15. Acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis: single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and review.

    PubMed

    Zevit, Noam; Steinmetz, Adam; Kornreich, Liora; Straussberg, Rachel

    2007-10-01

    Acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis is a rarely described acute neurological syndrome associated with radiological findings. Its etiology and pathogenic mechanisms are unknown. Clinically, the syndrome usually follows respiratory illnesses and presents with an array of neurological findings, including axial ataxia, grimacing, mutism, head nodding, and high-pitched cry. This study follows a child with acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis both clinically and radiologically. In addition, for the first time, the authors describe the serial findings of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from onset of illness through 20 months. Their findings indicate an initial insult apparent on both magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT localized to the basal ganglia, which, although improved over time, does not fully regress. The residual lesion on SPECT was clinically associated with only mild attention deficit disorder and no motor pathology. The authors review the published literature concerning acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis and suggest possible mechanisms of this poorly understood and probably underreported condition. PMID:17940250

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-308 G/A Polymorphisms and Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolpour, Soheil; Sali, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Context Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common disorder throughout the world that can develop due to various factors, including genetics. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is the most frequently studied cytokine related to the risk of developing HCC, and an association between the 308 position of the TNF-α promoter (TNF-α-308) and HCC risk has been confirmed in various reports. Evidence Acquisition The PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases were searched through July 12, 2015, for studies on associations between TNF-α-308 and the risk of HCC. To determine this association, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Results A total of 23 case-control studies were investigated, involving 3,389 cases and 4,235 controls. The overall conclusion was that the A allele was more frequent in case groups compared to control groups (13.4% vs. 8.4%). Thus, the A allele was significantly associated with increased HCC risk (OR = 1.77; 95% CI = [1.26-2.50]; P value < 0.002). In addition to the allelic model, the dominant model (AA + AG vs. GG) was significantly associated with HCC risk (OR = 1.80; CI = [1.29-2.51]; P value < 0.001). In the sensitivity analysis for co-dominant (AA vs. GG) and recessive models (AA vs. AG + GG), no trustworthy associations with the risk of HCC development were observed. Conclusions This meta-analysis indicated that the TNF-α-308 G/A polymorphism is significantly associated with increased susceptibility to HCC. However, to confirm this finding, more studies are needed on TNF-α-308 G/A polymorphisms associated with HCC. PMID:27257425

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2: Its Contribution to Acute Cellular Rejection and Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and one of the two receptors that orchestrate the complex biological functions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, also designed TNF-α). Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that TNFR2 plays an important role in renal disorders associated with acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma but its exact role in these settings is still not completely understood. This papers reviews the factors that may mediate TNFR2 induction in acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma and its contribution to these conditions and discusses its therapeutic implications. A greater understanding of the function of TNFR2 may lead to the development of new anti-TNF drugs. PMID:24350291

  18. Good visual outcome in an immunocompromised patient with bilateral acute retinal necrosis syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marrocos de Aragão, Ricardo E.; Barreira, Ieda M.A.; Arrais, Barbara L.A.; Pereira, Leidiane A.; Ramos, Carine S.

    2013-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is an uncommon necrotizing, fulminant retinopathy caused by the herpes simplex virus types 1 or 2 or by the varicella zoster vírus with visually devastating consequences. Generally it occurs in patients who are systemically healthy, but occasionally occurs in immunocompromised host. We report a case of bilateral ARN in a patient with AIDS with a good final visual outcome. PMID:25278806

  19. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gregory R.; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis. PMID:26504868

  20. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called “second pathway of liver regeneration.” The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  1. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called "second pathway of liver regeneration." The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  2. Lipolysis of Visceral Adipocyte Triglyceride by Pancreatic Lipases Converts Mild Acute Pancreatitis to Severe Pancreatitis Independent of Necrosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N.; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A.; DeLany, James P.; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  3. Duration of injury correlates with necrosis in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis: implications for pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Tony G; Raghav, Rahul; Kumar, Ajay; Garg, Pramod K; Roy, Tara S

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell necrosis is indicative of severe pancreatitis and the degree of necrosis is an index of its outcome. We studied whether the dose and duration of injury correlates with severity, particularly in terms of necrosis, in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in Swiss albino mice. In addition to control group 1 (G1), groups 2 and 3 received four injections of caerulein every hour but were sacrificed at five hours (G2) and nine hours (G3) respectively, and group 4 received eight injections and was sacrificed at nine hours (G4). The severity of pancreatitis was assessed histopathologically and biochemically. The histopathological scores of pancreatitis in groups 3 and 4 were significantly higher than in groups 1 and 2 (4 vs. 1, 4 vs. 2, 3 vs. 1, 3 vs. 2; P < 0.05). TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were significantly higher in groups 2 and 3 compared with groups 1 and 4 (P < 0.05). Necrosis was significantly more in group 4 than other groups (37.49% (4.68) vs. 19.97% (1.60) in G2; 20.36% (1.56) in G3; P = 0.006 for G 2 vs. 4 and P = 0.019 for G 3 vs. 4). Electron microscopy revealed numerous autophagosomes in groups 2 and 3 and mitochondrial damage and necrosis in group 4. The pancreatic and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity in group 4 was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P < 0.01). Hence, severity of pancreatitis is a function of the dose of injurious agent, while inflammation is both dose and duration dependent, which may also explain the wide spectrum of severity of AP seen in clinical practice. PMID:24761825

  4. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography of Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Chemoembolisation Using Drug-Eluting Beads: A Pilot Study Focused on Sustained Tumor Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moschouris, Hippocrates; Malagari, Katerina; Papadaki, Marina Georgiou; Kornezos, Ioannis Matsaidonis, Dimitrios

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and the sustained antitumor effect of drug-eluting beads used for transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Ten patients with solitary, unresectable HCC underwent CEUS before, 2 days after, and 35 to 40 days after TACE using a standard dose (4 ml) of drug-eluting beads (DC Beads; Biocompatibles, Surrey, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (25 mg doxorubicin/ml hydrated beads). For CEUS, a second-generation contrast agent (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) and a low mechanical-index technique were used. A part of the tumor was characterized as necrotic if it showed complete lack of enhancement. The percentage of necrosis was calculated at the sonographic section that depicted the largest diameter of the tumor. Differences in the extent of early (2 days after TACE) and delayed (35 to 40 days after TACE) necrosis were quantitatively and subjectively assessed. Early post-TACE tumor necrosis ranged from 21% to 70% (mean 43.5% {+-} 19%). There was a statistically significant (p = 0.0012, paired Student t test) higher percentage of delayed tumor necrosis, which ranged from 24% to 88% (mean 52.3% {+-} 20.3%). Subjective evaluation showed a delayed obvious increase of the necrotic areas in 5 patients. In 2 patients, tumor vessels that initially remained patent disappeared on the delayed follow-up. A part of tumor necrosis after chemoembolisation of HCC with DEB seems to take place later than 2 days after TACE. CEUS may provide evidence for the sustained antitumor effect of DEB-TACE. Nevertheless, the ideal time for the imaging evaluation of tumor response remains to be defined.

  5. A case of presumed acute retinal necrosis after intraocular foreign body injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Who; Byon, Ik Soo; Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Ji Eun; Oum, Boo Sup

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report a case of acute retinal necrosis (ARN) after intraocular foreign body removal. A 32-year-old male presented with visual loss in the left eye. He was hit by an iron fragment while he was hammering. An intraocular foreign body was found with corneal laceration and traumatic cataract. On the day he was injured, primary closure of the laceration, lensectomy, and vitrectomy were performed, and the foreign body was removed. The day after the operation, there was no sign of retinal detachment or retinitis. Two days after the operation, retinal necrosis and accompanying vitreous inflammation were noted in the far periphery. On day 3, the necrosis spread circumferentially and inflammation became more distinct. ARN was presumed and intravenous acyclovir was administered. The necrotic areas were reduced 2 days later, and were resolved in 1 month. The final visual acuity in his left eye was 20/20 after implantation of an intraocular lens. This case is the first report of ARN after penetrating injury and an intraocular foreign body. ARN may develop after open-globe injury. PMID:23658473

  6. Mitochondria Play a Central Role in Nonischemic Cardiomyocyte Necrosis: Common to Acute and Chronic Stressor States

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Usman; Cheema, Yaser; Shahbaz, Atta U.; Ahokas, Robert A.; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    The survival of cardiomyocytes must be ensured as the myocardium adjusts to a myriad of competing physiologic and pathophysiologic demands. A significant loss of these contractile cells, together with their replacement by stiff fibrillar collagen in the form of fibrous tissue accounts for a transition from a usually efficient muscular pump into one that is failing. Cellular and subcellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenic origins of cardiomyocyte cell death have long been of interest. This includes programmed molecular pathways to either necrosis or apoptosis which are initiated from ischemic or nonischemic origins. Herein we focus on the central role played by a mitochondriocentric signal-transducer-effector pathway to nonischemic cardiomyocyte necrosis which is common to acute and chronic stressor states. We begin by building upon the hypothesis advanced by Albrecht Fleckenstein and coworkers some 40 years ago based on the importance of calcitropic hormone- mediated intracellular Ca2+ overloading which predominantly involves subsarcolemmal mitochondria and is the signal to pathway activation. Other pathway components, which came to be recognized in subsequent years, include the induction of oxidative stress and opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore. The ensuing loss of cardiomyocytes and consequent replacement fibrosis, or scarring, represents a disease of adaptation and a classic example of when homeostasis begets dyshomeostasis. PMID:22328074

  7. Mitochondria play a central role in nonischemic cardiomyocyte necrosis: common to acute and chronic stressor states.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Usman; Cheema, Yaser; Shahbaz, Atta U; Ahokas, Robert A; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2012-07-01

    The survival of cardiomyocytes must be ensured as the myocardium adjusts to a myriad of competing physiological and pathophysiological demands. A significant loss of these contractile cells, together with their replacement by stiff fibrillar collagen in the form of fibrous tissue accounts for a transition from a usually efficient muscular pump into one that is failing. Cellular and subcellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenic origins of cardiomyocyte cell death have long been of interest. This includes programmed molecular pathways to either necrosis or apoptosis, which are initiated from ischemic or nonischemic origins. Herein, we focus on the central role played by a mitochondriocentric signal-transducer-effector pathway to nonischemic cardiomyocyte necrosis, which is common to acute and chronic stressor states. We begin by building upon the hypothesis advanced by Albrecht Fleckenstein and coworkers some 40 years ago based on the importance of calcitropic hormone-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) overloading, which predominantly involves subsarcolemmal mitochondria and is the signal to pathway activation. Other pathway components, which came to be recognized in subsequent years, include the induction of oxidative stress and opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore. The ensuing loss of cardiomyocytes and consequent replacement fibrosis, or scarring, represents a disease of adaptation and a classic example of when homeostasis begets dyshomeostasis. PMID:22328074

  8. Neonatal herpes simplex virus type-1 central nervous system disease with acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Fong, Choong Yi; Aye, Aye Mya Min; Peyman, Mohammadreza; Nor, Norazlin Kamal; Visvaraja, Subrayan; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Ong, Lai Choo

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 central nervous system disease with bilateral acute retinal necrosis (ARN). An infant was presented at 17 days of age with focal seizures. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction was positive for HSV-1 and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebritis. While receiving intravenous acyclovir therapy, the infant developed ARN with vitreous fluid polymerase chain reaction positive for HSV-1 necessitating intravitreal foscarnet therapy. This is the first reported neonatal ARN secondary to HSV-1 and the first ARN case presenting without external ocular or cutaneous signs. Our report highlights that infants with neonatal HSV central nervous system disease should undergo a thorough ophthalmological evaluation to facilitate prompt diagnosis and immediate treatment of this rapidly progressive sight-threatening disease. PMID:24378951

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  11. Microvascular inflammation and acute tubular necrosis are major histologic features of hantavirus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gnemmi, Viviane; Verine, Jérôme; Vrigneaud, Laurence; Glowacki, François; Ratsimbazafy, Anderson; Copin, Marie-Christine; Dewilde, Anny; Buob, David

    2015-06-01

    Hantavirus nephropathy (HVN) is an uncommon etiology of acute renal failure due to hantavirus infection. Pathological features suggestive of HVN historically reported are medullary interstitial hemorrhages in a background of acute interstitial nephritis (AIN). However, interstitial hemorrhages may be lacking because of medullary sampling error. This emphasizes that other pathological criteria may be of interest. We performed a retrospective clinicopathological study of 17 serologically proven HVN cases with renal biopsy from 2 nephrology centers in northern France. Histologic analysis was completed by immunohistochemistry with anti-CD3, anti-CD68, and anti-CD34 antibodies. Three control groups were not related to hantavirus infection: acute tubular necrosis (ATN) of ischemic or toxic etiology and AIN were used for comparison. Renal biopsy analysis showed that almost all HVN cases with medullary sampling (9/10) displayed interstitial hemorrhages, whereas focal hemorrhages were detected in 2 of the 7 "cortex-only" specimens. ATN was common, as it was present in 15 (88.2%) of 17 HVN cases. By contrast, interstitial inflammation was scarce with no inflammation or only slight inflammation, representing 15 (88.2%) of 17 cases. Moreover, HVN showed inflammation of renal microvessels with cortical peritubular capillaritis and medullary vasa recta inflammation; peritubular capillaritis was significantly higher in HVN after comparison with ischemic and toxic ATN controls (P = .0001 and P = .003, respectively), but not with AIN controls. Immunohistochemical studies highlighted the involvement of T cells and macrophages in renal microvascular inflammation related to HVN. Our study showed that microvascular inflammation, especially cortical peritubular capillaritis, and ATN are important histologic features of HVN. PMID:25791582

  12. Histamine receptor antagonists, cyclooxygenase blockade, and tumor necrosis factor during acute septic insult.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Carey, D; Byrne, K; Walsh, C; Fisher, B; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1998-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be a major endogenous mediator of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. We proposed that treatment of septic pigs with the combined agents ibuprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, and histamine receptor antagonists, cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) would result in lower circulating levels of TNF and decreased parameters of sepsis-induced injury in these animals. To test this, plasma TNF activity, cardiac index, systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, arterial PO2 and bronchoalveolar lavage protein content were monitored for 300 min in four groups of anesthetized pigs: saline-infused control pigs (n = 4); pigs infused for 60 min with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(8) organisms/mL, .3 mL/20 kg/min) (n = 5) and pigs infused for 60 min with P. aeruginosa plus ibuprofen (12.5 mg/kg) alone (n = 4) or ibuprofen plus cimetidine (150 mg) and diphenhydramine (30 mg/kg) at 0 and 120 min (CID, n = 4). Within 60 min, pigs infused with P. aeruginosa exhibited increased plasma TNF activity (>8-fold increase in ng/mL TNF; L929 cytolysis assay) and showed alterations in all hemodynamic and pulmonary parameters. Ibuprofen or CID administration in the septic pigs decreased peak TNF activity by 4.6 and 10.2 ng/mL, respectively, and CID treatment was correlated with better attenuation of certain sepsis-induced alterations. These results show that CID treatment attenuates sepsis-induced injury and that this is correlated with reduced plasma TNF activity in a porcine model of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. PMID:9488252

  13. Acute retinal necrosis in the United Kingdom: results of a prospective surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, T F; Silvestri, G; McDowell, C; Foot, B; McAvoy, C E

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the incidence of acute retinal necrosis (ARN) in the United Kingdom and to describe the demographics, management, and visual outcome in these patients. Methods This was a prospective study carried out by the British Ophthalmological Surveillance Unit (BOSU) between September 2007 and October 2008. Initial and 6-month questionnaires were sent to UK ophthalmologists who reported cases of ARN via the monthly BOSU report card system. Results In all, 45 confirmed cases (52 eyes) of ARN were reported in the 14-month study period, giving a minimum incidence of 0.63 cases per million population per year. There were 20 females and 25 males. Age ranged from 10 to 94 years. Eight patients had a history of herpetic CNS disease. Aqueous sampling was carried out in 13 patients, vitreous in 27, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 4. Varicella-zoster virus followed by herpes simplex were the most common causative agents. Treatment in 76% of the cases was with intravenous antivirals; however, 24% received only oral antivirals. In all, 47% of patients had intravitreal antiviral therapy. Visual outcome at 6 months was <6/60 in 48% of the affected eyes. Conclusion The minimum incidence of ARN in the UK is 0.63 cases per million. Patients with a history of herpetic CNS disease should be warned to immediately report any visual symptoms. There is increased use of oral and intravitreal antivirals in initial treatment. PMID:22281865

  14. Acute Retinal Necrosis Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus in a Patient Undergoing Immunosuppressive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oe, Chiaki; Hiraoka, Miki; Tanaka, Sachie; Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is a rapidly progressive and severe retinitis resulting in a poor visual outcome. Infections caused by herpes viruses such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 or the varicella zoster virus (VZV) are known to be implicated in the development of ARN. In the present study, an 80-year-old female with ARN was examined. She had been affected with rheumatoid arthritis and had taken methotrexate for over 10 years. Her right eye showed clinical features of ARN, and her left eye showed mild retinitis. The genomic DNA in the aqueous humor and vitreous fluid from her right eye were analyzed by a comprehensive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to screen infectious pathogens including viruses. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected from both specimens, but neither HSV or VZV nor cytomegalovirus was detected. She underwent intraocular surgery following systemic corticosteroid and acyclovir applications. However, although the retinitis of her right eye was extinguished, the final visual outcome was blindness due to optic nerve atrophy. There are few reports indicating that EBV is associated with ARN development. The present findings suggest that EBV alone can be the causative agent of ARN. PMID:27194989

  15. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kongrueng, J; Yingkajorn, M; Bunpa, S; Sermwittayawong, N; Singkhamanan, K; Vuddhakul, V

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus was isolated from shrimp of five farms located in the Pattani and Songkhla provinces of southern Thailand. Using a PCR method targeted to the unique DNA sequences derived from the plasmid (AP2 primers) and the toxin gene (AP3 primers) of V. parahaemolyticus that caused acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), a total of 33 of 108 isolates were positive. In contrast, all 63 and 66 isolates of clinical and environmental V. parahaemolyticus, respectively, obtained previously from 2008 to 2014 from the same area were negative. This implied that these strains were likely to be the cause of the outbreak of AHPND in this area. Intestinal samples proved to be a better source for the isolation of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND than the hepatopancreas. All isolates were investigated for haemolytic activity, virulence genes, serotypes, genotypes and antibiotic susceptibility. All the AHPND isolates had a unique O antigen, but small variations of the K antigens were detected from different farms. In addition, the DNA profiles of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND isolates were similar, but distinct from those clinical and environmental isolates. It is postulated that the causative agent of AHPND might have originated from one clone and then slightly different serotypes subsequently developed. PMID:25287127

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β regulates tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis via the NF-κB pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    FU, KAI; PAN, HUAZHENG; LIU, SHIHAI; LV, JING; WAN, ZHAOJUN; LI, JIAO; SUN, QING; LIANG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is known for its ability to selectively induce apoptosis in malignant cells. However, human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells display resistance to TRAIL-induced cell death. The present study investigated whether TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCC cells was enhanced by the administration of an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) or by short hairpin RNA-mediated inhibition of GSK-3β. The results of the current study demonstrated that inhibition of GSK-3β significantly impairs the expression of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) target genes Bcl-xL and clAP2 in HCC cells (P<0.05). This indicates that GSK-3β may regulate NF-κB target genes involved in cell survival. Furthermore, knockdown of Bcl-xL significantly enhanced the sensitizing effect of GSK-3β inhibitor on TRAIL-induced apoptosis (P<0.05). Overall, the present study provides a rationale for further exploration of GSK-3β inhibition combined with TRAIL as a novel treatment for HCC. PMID:26788169

  17. Novel synthetic biscoumarins target tumor necrosis factor-α in hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Keerthy, Hosadurga Kumar; Mohan, Chakrabhavi Dhananjaya; Sivaraman Siveen, Kodappully; Fuchs, Julian E; Rangappa, Shobith; Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Li, Feng; Girish, Kesturu S; Sethi, Gautam; Basappa; Bender, Andreas; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal Subbegowda

    2014-11-14

    TNF is a pleotropic cytokine known to be involved in the progression of several pro-inflammatory disorders. Many therapeutic agents have been designed to counteract the effect of TNF in rheumatoid arthritis as well as a number of cancers. In the present study we have synthesized and evaluated the anti-cancer activity of novel biscoumarins in vitro and in vivo. Among new compounds, BIHC was found to be the most cytotoxic agent against the HepG2 cell line while exhibiting less toxicity toward normal hepatocytes. Furthermore, BIHC inhibited the proliferation of various hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Subsequently, using in silico target prediction, BIHC was predicted as a TNF blocker. Experimental validation was able to confirm this hypothesis, where BIHC could significantly inhibit the recombinant mouse TNF-α binding to its antibody with an IC50 of 16.5 μM. Furthermore, in silico docking suggested a binding mode of BIHC similar to a ligand known to disrupt the native, trimeric structure of TNF, and also validated with molecular dynamics simulations. Moreover, we have demonstrated the down-regulation of p65 phosphorylation and other NF-κB-regulated gene products upon BIHC treatment, and on the phenotypic level the compound shows inhibition of CXCL12-induced invasion of HepG2 cells. Also, we demonstrate that BIHC inhibits infiltration of macrophages to the peritoneal cavity and suppresses the activity of TNF-α in vivo in mice primed with thioglycollate broth and lipopolysaccharide. We comprehensively validated the TNF-α inhibitory efficacy of BIHC in an inflammatory bowel disease mice model. PMID:25231984

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Promoter Polymorphism and Severity of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Susantitaphong, Paweena; Perianayagam, Mary C.; Tighiouart, Hocine; Liangos, Orfeas; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Jaber, Bertrand L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in the pathobiology of acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods We explored the association of a functional polymorphism in the promoter region (rs1800629) of the TNFA gene with severity of AKI, as defined by level of glomerular filtration (serum cystatin C and creatinine) and tubular injury (urinary NAG, KIM-1, α-GST, and π-GST) markers, in 262 hospitalized adults. Results In unadjusted analyses, compared with the GG genotype, the TNFA GA and AA genotype groups tended to have higher enrollment (p = 0.08), peak (p = 0.004), and discharge (p = 0.004) serum creatinine levels, and the AA genotype tended to have a higher enrollment serum cystatin C level (p = 0.04). Compared with the GG genotype, the TNFA GA and AA genotype groups tended to have a higher urinary KIM-1 level (p = 0.03), and the AA genotype group tended to have a higher urinary π-GST level (p = 0.03). After adjustment for sex, race, age, baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, sepsis, and dialysis requirement, compared with the GG genotype, the TNFA minor A-allele group had a higher peak serum creatinine of 1.03 mg/dl (0.43, 1.63; p = 0.001) and a higher urinary KIM-1 (relative ratio: 1.73; 95% CI: 1.16, 2.59; p = 0.008). The TNFA minor A-allele group also had a higher Multiple Organ Failure score of 0.26 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.49; p = 0.024) after adjustment for sex, race, age, and sepsis. Conclusions The TNFA rs1800629 gene polymorphism is associated with markers of kidney disease severity and distant organ dysfunction among patients with AKI. Larger studies are needed to confirm these relationships. PMID:23796916

  19. Gastrointestinal Fistulas in Acute Pancreatitis With Infected Pancreatic or Peripancreatic Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Tong, Zhihui; Yang, Dongliang; Ke, Lu; Shen, Xiao; Zhou, Jing; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) fistula is a well-recognized complication of acute pancreatitis (AP). However, it has been reported in limited literature. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and outcome of GI fistulas in AP patients complicated with infected pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis (IPN). Between 2010 and 2013 AP patients with IPN who diagnosed with GI fistula in our center were analyzed in this retrospective study. And we also conducted a comparison between patients with and without GI fistula regarding the baseline characteristics and outcomes. Over 4 years, a total of 928 AP patients were admitted into our center, of whom 119 patients with IPN were diagnosed with GI fistula and they developed 160 GI fistulas in total. Colonic fistula found in 72 patients was the most common form of GI fistula followed with duodenal fistula. All duodenal fistulas were managed by nonsurgical management. Ileostomy or colostomy was performed for 44 (61.1%) of 72 colonic fistulas. Twenty-one (29.2%) colonic fistulas were successfully treated by percutaneous drainage or continuous negative pressure irrigation. Mortality of patients with GI fistula did not differ significantly from those without GI fistula (28.6% vs 21.9%, P = 0.22). However, a significantly higher mortality (34.7%) was observed in those with colonic fistula. GI fistula is a common finding in patients of AP with IPN. Most of these fistulas can be successfully managed with different procedures depending on their sites of origin. Colonic fistula is related with higher mortality than those without GI fistula. PMID:27057908

  20. Acute Respiratory Failure Caused by Hepatopulmonary Fistula in a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsil; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jee-Min; Kim, Young-Chan

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with acute dyspnea following sudden productive cough and expectoration of a full cup of "blood-tinged" sputum. He had been diagnosed with hepatitis B virus–related hepatocellular carcinoma and had received transarterial chemoembolization 5 years ago for a 20-cm hepatic mass; he denied any history of hematemesis and the last esophagogastroduodenoscopy from a year ago showed absence of varix. Chest computed tomography (CT) with angiography showed new appearance of right basal lung consolidation but no bleeding focus. Despite the use of systemic antibiotics, the patient developed respiratory failure on day 7 of hospitalization. After intubation, a massive amount of brown sputum with anchovy-paste-like consistency was suctioned via the endotracheal tube. Bronchoscopic toileting was performed and the patient was extubated. In the ward, he continued to expectorate the brown sputum. On day 25 of hospitalization, a repeat CT scan showed simultaneous disappearance of the pneumonic consolidation and the necrotic fluid within the hepatic mass, suggesting the presence of a fistula. He has continued to receive systemic antibiotics, sorafenib, and entecavir, and follow up by respiratory and hepato-oncology specialists. PMID:27433178

  1. Acute Respiratory Failure Caused by Hepatopulmonary Fistula in a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungsil; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jee-Min; Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Sun Mi

    2016-07-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with acute dyspnea following sudden productive cough and expectoration of a full cup of "blood-tinged" sputum. He had been diagnosed with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma and had received transarterial chemoembolization 5 years ago for a 20-cm hepatic mass; he denied any history of hematemesis and the last esophagogastroduodenoscopy from a year ago showed absence of varix. Chest computed tomography (CT) with angiography showed new appearance of right basal lung consolidation but no bleeding focus. Despite the use of systemic antibiotics, the patient developed respiratory failure on day 7 of hospitalization. After intubation, a massive amount of brown sputum with anchovy-paste-like consistency was suctioned via the endotracheal tube. Bronchoscopic toileting was performed and the patient was extubated. In the ward, he continued to expectorate the brown sputum. On day 25 of hospitalization, a repeat CT scan showed simultaneous disappearance of the pneumonic consolidation and the necrotic fluid within the hepatic mass, suggesting the presence of a fistula. He has continued to receive systemic antibiotics, sorafenib, and entecavir, and follow up by respiratory and hepato-oncology specialists. PMID:27433178

  2. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Acute Variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hassanien, Moataz; EL-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; EL-Ghannam, Maged; El Ray, Ahmed; Ali, Abdel Aziz; Taleb, Hoda Abu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients remains a serious, unsolved problem, and the risk factors for acute variceal bleeding (AVB) in HCC patients remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the in-hospital mortality (IHM) and factors influencing the clinical outcomes of AVB in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Methods This was a retrospective, non-randomized, clinical study that was conducted in 2014. The study was conducted on 70 patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC presenting by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIH). All patients were examined endoscopically within 24 hours from presentation and bleeding varices accounted for AUGIH. Full medical history, clinical examination, and laboratory and radiologic data were collected from admission charts, and hospital medical records were statistically analyzed with SSPS version 22. Results Thirty-two patients (45.7%) survived and 38 died (54.3%). Survivors are more likely to be Child-Pugh class A or B, and the non-survivors were class C. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) was highly predictive of IHM at an optimized cut-off value of ≥ 12.9. Higher esophageal varices grades and presence of active bleeding on index endoscopy were significant (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors compared to survivors. Complications of liver cirrhosis and associated major comorbidity were significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors than the survivors. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified higher Grade Esophageal Varices and number of transfused packed red blood cells units as two independent predictors of IHM. Conclusions IHM was particularly high (54.3%) among HCC patients with AVB who had MELD score > 12.9, higher grade Esophageal Varices, active bleeding on index endoscopy, more increased needs for blood transfusion, longer hospital stay, decompensated liver disease with major comorbidity. PMID:26516439

  3. The phospholipase A2 activity of peroxiredoxin 6 promotes cancer cell death induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Lu, Di; Zhuang, Runzhou; Wei, Xuyong; Xie, Haiyang; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Yangbo; Wang, Jianguo; Zhong, Cheng; Zhang, Xuanyu; Wei, Qiang; He, Zenglei; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we used proteomic profiling to compare hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and peri-tumoral tissues to identify potential tumor markers of HCC. We identified eight differentially expressed proteins (>3-fold), including Peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6). PRDX6 is a bifunctional enzyme with both peroxidase and calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) activity. We found that peri-tumoral tissues expressed higher levels of PRDX6 mRNA (n = 59, P = 0.018) and protein (n = 265, P < 0.001) than HCC tissues, and that decreased expression of PRDX6 in HCC tissues was an independent risk factor indicating a poor prognosis (n = 145, P = 0.007). Combining the examination of serum PRDX6 with α-fetoprotein improved the diagnostic sensitivity of tests for HCC compared to α-fetoprotein alone (85.0% vs 50.0%, n = 40). We found that PRDX6 induced S phase arrest in HCC cells and inhibited HCC tumorigenicity in mice injected with cancer cells. When treated with H2 O2 , PRDX6 inhibited apoptosis. When treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), PRDX6 promoted apoptosis. Inhibition of iPLA2 activity of PRDX6 decreased the apoptosis induced by TNF-α. In conclusion, PRDX6 inhibited the carcinogenesis of HCC, and the iPLA2 activity of PRDX6 promoted cancer cell death induced by TNF-α. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26293541

  4. Myocardial uptake of indium-111-labeled antimyosin in acute subendocardial infarction: Clinical, histochemical, and autoradiographic correlation of myocardial necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, R.C.; McSherry, B.A.; Leppo, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Indium-111-labeled antimyosin has been utilized in the diagnosis and localization of acute transmural myocardial infarction. The present report describes a patient who presented with a massive subendocardial infarction. Two days after the injection of antimyosin, the patient's clinical status markedly deteriorated and he expired. Postmortem examination demonstrated severe three-vessel coronary artery disease with extensive myocyte death in the endocardium. Autoradiography and histochemical staining of the prosected heart demonstrated high correlation for myocardial necrosis and corresponded to clinical evidence for diffuse subendocardial infarction.

  5. BIOPSY PROVEN ACUTE TUBULAR NECROSIS DUE TO RHABDOMYOLYSIS IN A DENGUE FEVER PATIENT: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Repizo, Liliany P.; Malheiros, Denise M.; Yu, Luis; Barros, Rui T.; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Renal histology results are very scarce in dengue-associated rhabdomyolysis patients developing acute kidney injury (AKI). We report a case of dengue fever-induced AKI associated to rhabdomyolysis with a renal biopsy showing acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and renal deposition of myoglobin. A 28-year-old patient who presented dengue fever (DF) complicated by severe AKI and rhabdomyolysis is described. The patient required hemodialysis for three weeks. A renal biopsy revealed ATN with positive staining for myoglobin in the renal tubuli. The patient was discharged with recovered renal function. In conclusion, this case report described a biopsy proven ATN associated to DF-induced rhabdomyolysis, in which renal deposition of myoglobin was demonstrated. We suggest that serum creatine phosphokinase should be monitored in DF patients to allow for an early diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis and the institution of renal protective measures. PMID:24553615

  6. Calcitriol inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhu-Xia; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, Shen; Qin, Hou-Ying; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of sepsis in intensive care unit patients with an extremely high mortality. The present study investigated the effects of calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.0mg/kg) to establish the animal model of sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Some mice were i.p. injected with calcitriol (1.0μg/kg) before LPS injection. An obvious infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs was observed beginning at 1h after LPS injection. Correspondingly, TNF-α and MIP-2 in sera and lung homogenates were markedly elevated in LPS-treated mice. Interestingly, calcitriol obviously alleviated LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs. Moreover, calcitriol markedly attenuated LPS-induced elevation of TNF-α and MIP-2 in sera and lung homogenates. Further analysis showed that calcitriol repressed LPS-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. In addition, calcitriol blocked LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and p50 subunit in the lungs. Taken together, these results suggest that calcitriol inhibits inflammatory cytokines production in LPS-induced acute lung injury. PMID:27216047

  7. Successful Endoscopic Management of Acute Necrotic Pancreatitis and Walled Off Necrosis After Auxiliary Partial Orthotopic Living-Donor Liver Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Miura, K; Ishikawa, H; Soma, D; Zhang, Z; Yuza, K; Hirose, Y; Takizawa, K; Nagahashi, M; Sakata, J; Kameyama, H; Kosugi, S; Wakai, T

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic management of acute necrotic pancreatitis and walled off necrosis is less invasive than surgical treatment and has become the 1st choice for treating pancreatic necrosis and abscess. We treated a case of acute necrotic pancreatitis and walled off necrosis after auxiliary partial orthotopic living-donor liver transplantation (APOLT). A 24-year-old woman was admitted to our university hospital for removal of the internal biliary stent, which had already been placed endoscopically for the treatment of biliary stricture after APOLT. She had been treated for acute liver failure by APOLT 10 years before. After we removed the internal stent with the use of an endoscopic retrograde approach, she presented with severe abdominal pain and a high fever. Her diagnosis was severe acute pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). Her symptoms worsened, and she had multiple organ failure. She was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). Immunosuppression was discontinued because infection treatment was necessary and the native liver had already recovered sufficiently. After she had been treated for 19 days in the ICU, she recovered from her multiple organ failure. However, abdominal computerized tomography demonstrated the formation of pancreatic walled off necrosis and an abscess on the 20th day after ERC. We performed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided abscess drainage and repeated endoscopic necrosectomy. The walled off necrosis diminished gradually in size, and the symptoms disappeared. The patient was discharged on the 87th day after ERC. This is the 1st report of a case of acute necrotic pancreatitis and walled off necrosis that was successfully treated by endoscopic management after APOLT. PMID:27320589

  8. Rapamycin Treatment of Healthy Pigs Subjected to Acute Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Attenuates Cardiac Functions and Increases Myocardial Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lassaletta, Antonio D; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Zanetti, Arthus V D; Feng, Jun; Anduaga, Javier; Gohh, Reginald Y.; Sellke, Frank W; Bianchi, Cesario

    2013-01-01

    Background The Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a major regulator of cell immunity and metabolism. mTOR is a well-known suppressor of tissue rejection in organ transplants, however, it has other non-immune functions including in the cardiovascular system, where it is a regulator of heart hypertrophy and locally, in coated vascular stents, inhibits vascular wall cell growth and hence neointimal formation/restenosis. Because the mTOR pathway plays major roles in normal cell growth, metabolism and survival, we hypothesized that inhibiting it with rapamycin, prior to an acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), would confer cardioprotection by virtue of slowing down cardiac function and metabolism. Methods Yorkshire pigs received orally either placebo or 4 mg/day rapamycin for 7 days before the IRI. All animals underwent median sternotomy and the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 60 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Left ventricular pressure-volume data was collected throughout the operation. The ischemic and infarcted areas were determined by monastral blue and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining, respectively and plasma cardiac troponin I concentration. mTOR kinase activities were monitored in remote cardiac tissue by western blotting with specific antibodies against specific substrates phosphorylating sites. Results Rapamycin pre-treatement impaired endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation, attenuated cardiac function during IRI, and increased myocardial necrosis. Western blotting confirmed effective inhibition of myocardial mTOR kinase activities. Conclusions Pre-treatment of healthy pigs with rapamycin prior to acute myocardial IRI is associated with decreased cardiac function and higher myocardial necrosis. PMID:24266948

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Non-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease Strain KC13.17.5, Isolated from Diseased Shrimp in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hidehiro; Van, Phan Thi; Dang, Lua T.

    2015-01-01

    A strain of Vibrio (KC13.17.5) causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp in northern Vietnam was isolated. Normally, AHPND is caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, but the genomic sequence of the strain indicated that it belonged to Vibrio harveyi. The sequence data included plasmid-like sequences and putative virulence genes. PMID:26383659

  10. Assessment of acute myocardial necrosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and cardioversion by means of combined thallium-201/technetium-99m pyrophosphate tomography.

    PubMed

    Krause, T; Hohnloser, S H; Kasper, W; Schümichen, C; Reinhardt, M; Moser, E

    1995-11-01

    Diagnosis of acute myocardial necrosis by means of conventional electrocardiographic criteria or the release of cardiac enzymes is often difficult or even impossible in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation with subsequent cardiopulmonary resuscitation including several DC countershocks. Simultaneous thallium-201/technetium-99m pyrophosphate (PYP) tomography was prospectively applied to 57 patients without typical clinical or electrocardiographic signs of acute myocardial infarction within 48 h after successful resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Scintigraphic evidence of acute necrosis was present in 23/57 patients (40%). Increased 99mTc-PYP uptake in the pericardial tissue was found in 24 patients (42%). Maximal creatine kinase (CK) concentration was increased in 50/57 patients (88%). CK-MB activity averaged 68+/-52 U/l in patients with positive and 17+/-13 U/l in patients with negative tomograms (P<0.0005), demonstrating the validity of 201Tl/99mTc-PYP tomography. It may be concluded that simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc-PYP tomography is a valuable tool for evaluation of myocardial necrosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation including DC countershock. Acute myocardial necrosis, as indicated by scintigraphy, represents a potential trigger for the occurrence of ventricular fibrillation. Therefore, 201Tl/99mTc-PYP tomography can be recommended in order to guide further diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in whom the underlying cause of the occurrence of ventricular fibrillation is obscure. PMID:8575479

  11. Eugenol reduces acute pain in mice by modulating the glutamatergic and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) pathways.

    PubMed

    Dal Bó, Wladmir; Luiz, Ana Paula; Martins, Daniel F; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Santos, Adair R S

    2013-10-01

    Eugenol is utilized together with zinc oxide in odontological clinical for the cementation of temporary prostheses and the temporary restoration of teeth and cavities. This work explored the antinociceptive effects of the eugenol in different models of acute pain in mice and investigated its possible modulation of the inhibitory (opioid) and excitatory (glutamatergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines) pathways of nociceptive signaling. The administration of eugenol (3-300 mg/kg, p.o., 60 min or i.p., 30 min) inhibited 82 ± 10% and 90 ± 6% of the acetic acid-induced nociception, with ID₅₀ values of 51.3 and 50.2 mg/kg, respectively. In the glutamate test, eugenol (0.3-100 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the response behavior by 62 ± 5% with an ID₅₀ of 5.6 mg/kg. In addition, the antinociceptive effect of eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the glutamate test was prevented by the i.p. treatment for mice with naloxone. The pretreatment of mice with eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to inhibit the nociception induced by the intrathecal (i.t.) injection of glutamate (37 ± 9%), kainic (acid kainite) (41 ± 12%), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) (55 ± 5%), and substance P (SP) (39 ± 8%). Furthermore, eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) also inhibited biting induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, 65 ± 8%). These results extend our current knowledge of eugenol and confirm that it promotes significant antinociception against different mouse models of acute pain. The mechanism of action appears to involve the modulation of the opioid system and glutamatergic receptors (i.e., kainate and AMPA), and the inhibition of TNF-α. Thus, eugenol could represent an important compound in the treatment for acute pain. PMID:22775297

  12. Fever and acute phase response induced in dwarf goats by endotoxin and bovine and human recombinant tumour necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    van Miert, A S; van Duin, C T; Wensing, T

    1992-12-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF), a polypeptide produced by mononuclear phagocytes, has been implicated as an important mediator of inflammatory processes and of clinical manifestations in acute infectious diseases. To study further the potential role of TNF in infectious diseases, recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) derived human (r.HuTNF-alpha) and bovine TNF (r.BoTNF-alpha) were intravenously (i.v.) administered in dwarf goats. Rectal temperature, heart rate, rumen motility, plasma zinc and iron concentrations, and certain other blood biochemical and haematological values were studied and compared with the changes seen after E. coli endotoxin (LPS) was administered (dose: 0.1 microgram/kg i.v.). Following a single injection of 4 micrograms/kg of r.BoTNF-alpha, shivering and biphasic febrile response were observed, accompanied by tachycardia, inhibition of rumen contractions, drop in plasma zinc and iron concentrations, lymphopenia, and neutropenia followed by neutrophilia. The i.v. administration of a single injection of 4 micrograms/kg r.HuTNF-alpha induced shivering and biphasic febrile responses, accompanied by anorexia and a similar drop in plasma trace metal concentrations when compared with r.BoTNF-alpha-treated goats. The TNF-alpha-induced symptoms were essentially the same as those that occurred after LPS administration. However, the time of onset of these changes after the injection of TNF-alpha was significantly shorter than after LPS. Moreover, the r.BoTNF-alpha induced a longer lasting neutrophilic leucopenia, less neutrophilia, and a more persistent lymphopenia than after LPS injection. Neither r.BoTNF-alpha nor LPS caused severe haemo-concentration. Furthermore, no cross-tolerance between r.BoTNF-alpha and LPS could be demonstrated. We conclude that both r.BoTNF-alpha and r.HuTNF-alpha induce many of the physiologic, haematologic and metabolic changes that characterize the acute phase response to LPS. The overlapping biological activities of r

  13. Incidence of acute myeloid leukemia and hepatocellular carcinoma in mice irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe ions.

    PubMed

    Weil, Michael M; Bedford, Joel S; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Ray, F Andrew; Genik, Paula C; Ehrhart, Eugene J; Fallgren, Christina M; Hailu, Fitsum; Battaglia, Christine L R; Charles, Brad; Callan, Matthew A; Ullrich, Robert L

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Estimates of cancer risks posed to space-flight crews by exposure to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) ions are subject to considerable uncertainty because epidemiological data do not exist for human populations exposed to similar radiation qualities. We assessed the leukemogenic efficacy of one such HZE species, 1 GeV (56)Fe ions, a component of space radiation, in a mouse model for radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia. CBA/CaJ mice were irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe ions or (137)Cs gamma rays and followed until they were moribund or to 800 days of age. We found that 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe ions do not appear to be substantially more effective than gamma rays for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, (56)Fe-ion-irradiated mice had a much higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) than gamma-irradiated mice, with an estimated RBE of approximately 50. These data suggest a difference in the effects of HZE iron ions on the induction of leukemia compared to solid tumors, suggesting potentially different mechanisms of tumorigenesis. PMID:19630525

  14. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) presenting with an unusually prolonged period of marked polyuria heralded by an abrupt oliguric phase

    PubMed Central

    Ramoutar, Virin; Landa, Cristian; James, Leighton R

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old African-American man presented with acute tubular necrosis (ATN) secondary to hypotension from non-typhoid Salmonella gastroenteritis and bacteraemia. The oliguric phase lasted only 24 h followed by prolonged polyuria for 20 days, with urine output in excess of 16 L/day at maximum. As indexed in PubMed this is only the second published case of this nature since 1974, in which an abrupt oliguric phase of 24 h or less heralded prolonged polyuria in ATN. The diagnosis is challenging as fractional excretion of sodium early in the clinical course and rapid normalisation of serum creatinine with intravenous fluids (IVF) may point towards prerenal azotaemia resulting in a premature discharge from hospital. Patients with an abrupt oliguric phase may suffer a secondary renal insult from the profound fluid loss that is to follow and may need inpatient monitoring with supplemental IVF to prevent deleterious outcomes. PMID:25150229

  15. Complete genome sequence of acute viral necrosis virus associated with massive mortality outbreaks in the Chinese scallop, Chlamys farreri

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute viral necrosis virus (AVNV) is the causative agent of a serious disease resulting in high mortality in cultured Chinese scallops, Chlamys farreri. We have sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of AVNV. Results The AVNV genome is a linear, double-stranded DNA molecule of 210,993 bp with a nucleotide composition of 38.5% G + C. A total of 123 open reading frames were predicted to encode functional proteins, ranging from 41 to 1,878 amino acid residues. The DNA sequence of AVNV is 97% identical to that of ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1), and the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins of these two viruses are 94-100% identical. The genomic organization of AVNV is similar to that of OsHV-1, and consists of two unique regions (170.4 kb and 3.4 kb, respectively), each flanked by two inverted repeats (7.6 kb and 10.2 kb, respectively), with a third unique region (1.5 kb) situated between the two internal repeats. Conclusions Our results indicate that AVNV is a variant of OsHV-1. The AVNV genome sequence provides information useful for understanding the evolution and divergence of OsHV-1 in marine molluscs. PMID:23566284

  16. Extensive Bone Marrow Necrosis and Osteolytic Lesions in a Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformed from Polycythemia Vera.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Isaac; Truong, Phu; Kallail, K James; Palko, William

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common leukemia in adults. In rare cases, bone marrow necrosis (BMN) and osteolytic lesions are presenting features of AML. The following case describes a patient with known polycythemia vera (PV) that presented with signs of multiple myeloma, including hypercalcemia, anemia, and lytic lesions of the thoracic spine and skull. Laboratory workup was not indicative of myeloma. A bone marrow biopsy was performed, which revealed extensive BMN and initial pathology was consistent with metastatic carcinoma. However, no immunohistochemical stains could be performed due to the extent of BMN; a repeat biopsy was therefore performed. Flow cytometry and CD45 staining were consistent with PV that had transformed to AML. Due to the patient's comorbidities, she was a poor candidate for stem cell transplant and did not wish to pursue chemotherapy. Ultimately, she pursued hospice care. Based on our literature review, both BMN and osteolytic lesions are rare manifestations of AML and have not been reported to occur simultaneously. These findings can lead to a diagnostic dilemma and suspicion of other malignancies. This case demonstrates that AML should remain in the differential diagnosis in those patients who present with BMN and osteolytic lesions. PMID:27433418

  17. Extensive Bone Marrow Necrosis and Osteolytic Lesions in a Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformed from Polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Phu; Kallail, K. James; Palko, William

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common leukemia in adults. In rare cases, bone marrow necrosis (BMN) and osteolytic lesions are presenting features of AML. The following case describes a patient with known polycythemia vera (PV) that presented with signs of multiple myeloma, including hypercalcemia, anemia, and lytic lesions of the thoracic spine and skull. Laboratory workup was not indicative of myeloma. A bone marrow biopsy was performed, which revealed extensive BMN and initial pathology was consistent with metastatic carcinoma. However, no immunohistochemical stains could be performed due to the extent of BMN; a repeat biopsy was therefore performed. Flow cytometry and CD45 staining were consistent with PV that had transformed to AML. Due to the patient’s comorbidities, she was a poor candidate for stem cell transplant and did not wish to pursue chemotherapy. Ultimately, she pursued hospice care. Based on our literature review, both BMN and osteolytic lesions are rare manifestations of AML and have not been reported to occur simultaneously. These findings can lead to a diagnostic dilemma and suspicion of other malignancies. This case demonstrates that AML should remain in the differential diagnosis in those patients who present with BMN and osteolytic lesions.  PMID:27433418

  18. Successful Resolution of Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Pancreatic Pseudocyst or Walled-Off Necrosis After Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Shao-Yang; Gao, Shun-Liang; Liang, Zhong-Yan; Yu, Wen-Qiao; Liang, Ting-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) can be caused by gastroparesis or gastric outlet obstruction, which may occur when pancreatic pseudocyst (PP) or walled-off necrosis (WON) compresses the stomach. The aim of the study was to explore a proper surgical treatment. Methods From June 2010 to June 2013, 25 of 148 patients with AP suffered DGE. Among them, 12 were caused by gastroparesis, 1 was a result of obstruction from a Candida albicans plug, and 12 were gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) compressed by PP (n = 8) or WON (n = 4), which were treated by percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD). Results All 12 cases of compressing GOO achieved resolution by PCD after 6 [1.86] and 37.25 [12.02] days for PP and WON, respectively. Five cases developed intracystic infection, 3 cases had pancreatic fistulae whereas 2 achieved resolution and 1 underwent a pseudocyst jejunostomy. Conclusions Gastric outlet obstruction caused by a PP or WON is a major cause of DGE in patients with AP. Percutaneous catheter drainage with multiple sites, large-bore tubing, and lavage may be a good therapy due to high safety and minimal invasiveness. PMID:26465954

  19. High-Quality Draft Genomes of Two Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains Aid in Understanding Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease of Cultured Shrimps in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Noriega-Orozco, Lorena; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Cantu-Robles, Vito A.; Cobian-Guemes, Ana G.; Cota-Verdugo, Rosario G.; Gamez-Alejo, Luis A.; del Pozo-Yauner, Luis; Guevara-Hernandez, Eduardo; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.

    2014-01-01

    The high-quality draft genomes of two Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains, one that causes the acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in cultured shrimps (FIM-S1708+), and another that does not (FIM-S1392−) are reported. A chromosome-scale assembly for the FIM-S1392− genome is reported here. The analysis of the two genomes gives some clues regarding the genomic differences between the strains. PMID:25125645

  20. A case report of the use of nanocrystalline silver dressing in the management of acute surgical site wound infected with MRSA to prevent cutaneous necrosis following revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Mayukh; Bradley, Helen

    2008-03-01

    The authors report the use of nanocrystalline silver (Acticoat 7, Smith and Nephew, London, UK) in an acute surgical wound to prevent localized skin necrosis due to infection, thereby avoiding skin grafting as a secondary procedure. Two patients were successfully treated with Acticoat 7 dressings without using systemic antimicrobials after developing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the surgical site. Despite a history of smoking and incision through scar tissues, the wound did not progress into deep infection nor was there recurrence of infection at 2 years follow-up. The intention was to use this particular dressing to assess the effect of silver on infected keratinocytes in an acute wound environment. It is possible that the use of Acticoat 7 may reduce the bacterial loading at the wound site, thereby decreasing a propensity for skin necrosis caused by the infective process. This case report demonstrates that the acute surgical wound with impending cutaneous necrosis due to localized infection may be treated without oral antimicrobials. PMID:18372271

  1. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL’s protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  2. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Mediated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N; Gonzalez, Frank J; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factorα(TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL's protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  3. Gastrointestinal Fistulas in Acute Pancreatitis With Infected Pancreatic or Peripancreatic Necrosis: A 4-Year Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Tong, Zhihui; Yang, Dongliang; Ke, Lu; Shen, Xiao; Zhou, Jing; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) fistula is a well-recognized complication of acute pancreatitis (AP). However, it has been reported in limited literature. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and outcome of GI fistulas in AP patients complicated with infected pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis (IPN).Between 2010 and 2013 AP patients with IPN who diagnosed with GI fistula in our center were analyzed in this retrospective study. And we also conducted a comparison between patients with and without GI fistula regarding the baseline characteristics and outcomes.Over 4 years, a total of 928 AP patients were admitted into our center, of whom 119 patients with IPN were diagnosed with GI fistula and they developed 160 GI fistulas in total. Colonic fistula found in 72 patients was the most common form of GI fistula followed with duodenal fistula. All duodenal fistulas were managed by nonsurgical management. Ileostomy or colostomy was performed for 44 (61.1%) of 72 colonic fistulas. Twenty-one (29.2%) colonic fistulas were successfully treated by percutaneous drainage or continuous negative pressure irrigation. Mortality of patients with GI fistula did not differ significantly from those without GI fistula (28.6% vs 21.9%, P = 0.22). However, a significantly higher mortality (34.7%) was observed in those with colonic fistula.GI fistula is a common finding in patients of AP with IPN. Most of these fistulas can be successfully managed with different procedures depending on their sites of origin. Colonic fistula is related with higher mortality than those without GI fistula. PMID:27057908

  4. Acute tubular necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the following cases: Decreased mental status Fluid overload Increased potassium level Pericarditis Removal of toxins that ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  5. Acute tubular necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is often caused by a lack of blood flow and oxygen to the kidney tissues (ischemia of the kidneys). ... treating conditions that can lead to decreased blood flow as well as decreased oxygen to the kidneys can reduce the risk for ...

  6. Radiofrequency and microwave ablation in combination with transarterial chemoembolization induce equivalent histopathologic coagulation necrosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients bridged to liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Michael; Ahmed, Osman; Doshi, Taral; Hart, John; Te, Helen; Van Ha, Thuong Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Background Bridging therapy plays an increasingly important role in the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Combination therapy with drug-eluting bead transarterial chemoembolization (DEB-TACE) and percutaneous thermal ablation, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or microwave ablation (MWA), has shown success at prolonging survival and bridging patients to LT. However, few studies have evaluated the two combination therapy regimens head-to-head at a single institution, and fewer have compared histopathology. This retrospective study compares tumor coagulation on explanted livers in patients with HCC treated with DEB-TACE sequentially combined with RFA versus MWA. Methods From 2005 to 2015, 42 sequential patients underwent combination therapy prior to LT by Milan criteria, with 11 patients (11 tumors; mean, 2.9 cm; range, 1.8–4.3 cm) in the DEB-TACE/RFA cohort and 31 patients (40 tumors; mean, 2.4 cm; range, 1.1–5.4 cm) in the DEB-TACE/MWA cohort. The mean TACE procedures in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 1.3 (range, 1–2) and 1.3 (range, 1–3), respectively. The mean thermal ablations in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 1.2 (range, 1–2) and 1.3 (range, 1–3), respectively. Tumor coagulation was evaluated on explanted livers. Results Mean tumor coagulation in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 88.9% (range, 0–100%) and 90.5% (range, 30–100%), respectively (P=0.82). Rates of complete tumor coagulation in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 45% and 53%, respectively (P=0.74). No difference in tumor coagulation was found between the cohorts when separating tumors <3 cm (P=0.21) and >3 cm (P=0.09). Among all 51 tumors, the 36 in complete response (CR) on imaging at LT demonstrated mean tumor coagulation of 95.8%. No correlation was found between tumor coagulation and initial tumor size or time interval to LT. No tumor seeding was seen along the ablation tracts. Conclusions RFA and MWA in sequential combination

  7. Effects of 28Si ions, 56Fe ions, and protons on the induction of murine acute myeloid leukemia and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weil, Michael M; Ray, F Andrew; Genik, Paula C; Yu, Yongjia; McCarthy, Maureen; Fallgren, Christina M; Ullrich, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of cancer risks posed to space-flight crews by exposure to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) ions are subject to considerable uncertainty because epidemiological data do not exist for human populations exposed to similar radiation qualities. We assessed the carcinogenic effects of 300 MeV/n 28Si or 600 MeV/n 56Fe ions in a mouse model for radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia and hepatocellular carcinoma. C3H/HeNCrl mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, or 1 Gy of 300 MeV/n 28Si ions, 600 MeV/n 56Fe ions or 1 or 2 Gy of protons simulating the 1972 solar particle event (1972SPE) at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Additional mice were irradiated with 137Cs gamma rays at doses of 1, 2, or 3 Gy. All groups were followed until they were moribund or reached 800 days of age. We found that 28Si or 56Fe ions do not appear to be substantially more effective than gamma rays for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia. However, 28Si or 56Fe ion irradiated mice had a much higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma than gamma ray irradiated or proton irradiated mice. These data demonstrate a clear difference in the effects of these HZE ions on the induction of leukemia compared to solid tumors, suggesting potentially different mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Also seen in this study was an increase in metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma in the 28Si and 56Fe ion irradiated mice compared with those exposed to gamma rays or 1972SPE protons, a finding with important implications for setting radiation exposure limits for space-flight crew members. PMID:25126721

  8. Effects of 28Si Ions, 56Fe Ions, and Protons on the Induction of Murine Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Michael M.; Ray, F. Andrew; Genik, Paula C.; Yu, Yongjia; McCarthy, Maureen; Fallgren, Christina M.; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of cancer risks posed to space-flight crews by exposure to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) ions are subject to considerable uncertainty because epidemiological data do not exist for human populations exposed to similar radiation qualities. We assessed the carcinogenic effects of 300 MeV/n 28Si or 600 MeV/n 56Fe ions in a mouse model for radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia and hepatocellular carcinoma. C3H/HeNCrl mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, or 1 Gy of 300 MeV/n 28Si ions, 600 MeV/n 56Fe ions or 1 or 2 Gy of protons simulating the 1972 solar particle event (1972SPE) at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Additional mice were irradiated with 137Cs gamma rays at doses of 1, 2, or 3 Gy. All groups were followed until they were moribund or reached 800 days of age. We found that 28Si or 56Fe ions do not appear to be substantially more effective than gamma rays for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia. However, 28Si or 56Fe ion irradiated mice had a much higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma than gamma ray irradiated or proton irradiated mice. These data demonstrate a clear difference in the effects of these HZE ions on the induction of leukemia compared to solid tumors, suggesting potentially different mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Also seen in this study was an increase in metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma in the 28Si and 56Fe ion irradiated mice compared with those exposed to gamma rays or 1972SPE protons, a finding with important implications for setting radiation exposure limits for space-flight crew members. PMID:25126721

  9. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor MPT0G009 induces cell apoptosis and synergistic anticancer activity with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand against human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Chuan; Huang, Hui-Hsuan; Lai, Chin-Yu; Lin, Yi-Jyun; Liou, Jing-Ping; Lai, Mei-Jung; Li, Yu-Hsuan; Teng, Che-Ming; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a frequent cause of cancer-related death; therefore, more effective anticancer therapies for the treatment of HCC are needed. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors serve as promising anticancer drugs because they can induce cell growth arrest and apoptosis. We previously reported that 3-[1-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-5-yl]-N-hydroxyacrylamide (MPT0G009)-a novel 1-arylsulfonyl-5-(N-hydroxyacrylamide)indolines compound-demonstrated potent pan-HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated the anti-HCC activity of MPT0G009 in vitro and in vivo. Growth inhibition, apoptosis, and inhibited HDAC activity induced by MPT0G009 were more potent than a marketed HDAC inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat). Furthermore, MPT0G009-induced apoptosis of Hep3B cells was characterized by an increase in apoptotic (sub-G1) population, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase cascade, increased levels of pro-apoptotic protein (Bim), and decreased levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and FLICE-inhibitory protein); the downregulation FLIP by MPT0G009 is mediated through proteasome-mediated degradation and transcriptional suppression. In addition, combinations of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with lower concentrations (0.1 μM) of MPT0G009 were synergistic in cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in HCC cells. In the in vivo model, MPT0G009 markedly reduced Hep3B xenograft tumor volume, inhibited HDAC activities, and induced apoptosis in the Hep3B xenografts. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G009 is a potential new candidate drug for HCC therapy. PMID:26587975

  10. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor MPT0G009 induces cell apoptosis and synergistic anticancer activity with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand against human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chin-Yu; Lin, Yi-Jyun; Liou, Jing-Ping; Lai, Mei-Jung; Li, Yu-Hsuan; Teng, Che-Ming; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a frequent cause of cancer-related death; therefore, more effective anticancer therapies for the treatment of HCC are needed. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors serve as promising anticancer drugs because they can induce cell growth arrest and apoptosis. We previously reported that 3-[1-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-5-yl]-N-hydroxyacrylamide (MPT0G009)—a novel 1-arylsulfonyl-5-(N-hydroxyacrylamide)indolines compound—demonstrated potent pan-HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated the anti-HCC activity of MPT0G009 in vitro and in vivo. Growth inhibition, apoptosis, and inhibited HDAC activity induced by MPT0G009 were more potent than a marketed HDAC inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat). Furthermore, MPT0G009-induced apoptosis of Hep3B cells was characterized by an increase in apoptotic (sub-G1) population, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase cascade, increased levels of pro-apoptotic protein (Bim), and decreased levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and FLICE-inhibitory protein); the downregulation FLIP by MPT0G009 is mediated through proteasome-mediated degradation and transcriptional suppression. In addition, combinations of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with lower concentrations (0.1 μM) of MPT0G009 were synergistic in cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in HCC cells. In the in vivo model, MPT0G009 markedly reduced Hep3B xenograft tumor volume, inhibited HDAC activities, and induced apoptosis in the Hep3B xenografts. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G009 is a potential new candidate drug for HCC therapy. PMID:26587975

  11. Patient with hepatocellular carcinoma related to prior acute arsenic intoxication and occult HBV: Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic results after 14 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Casanovas-Taltavull, Teresa; Ribes, Josepa; Berrozpe, Ana; Jordan, Sara; Casanova, Aurora; Sancho, Concha; Valls, Carles; Bosch, F Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the long-term survivors of acute arsenic intoxication. We present here a clinical case report of a man with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection who developed hepatocellular carcinoma four years after acute arsenic poisoning. HBsAg was detected in serum in 1990 when he voluntarily donated blood. In 1991, the patient suffered from severe psychological depression that led him to attempt suicide by massive ingestion of an arsenic-containing rodenticide. He survived with polyneuropathy and paralysis of the lower limbs, and has been wheelchair-bound since then. During participation in a follow-up study conducted among HBV carriers, abdominal ultrasound detected a two-centimeter liver mass consistent with hepatocellular carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image (MRI). Because of his significant comorbidity, the patient received palliative treatment with transarterial lipiodol chemoembolization (TACE) on three occasions (1996, 1997 and 1999). At his most recent visit in May 2005, the patient was asymptomatic, liver enzymes were normal and the tumor was in remission on ultrasound. PMID:16610011

  12. Acute tubular necrosis as a part of vancomycin induced drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome with coincident postinfectious glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Min; Sung, Kyoung; Yang, Hea Koung; Kim, Seong Heon; Kim, Hye Young; Ban, Gil Ho; Park, Su Eun; Lee, Hyoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal condition characterized by skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiorgan involvement. Various drugs may be associated with this syndrome including carbamazepine, allopurinol, and sulfasalazine. Renal involvement in DRESS syndrome most commonly presents as acute kidney injury due to interstitial nephritis. An 11-year-old boy was referred to the Children's Hospital of Pusan National University because of persistent fever, rash, abdominal distension, generalized edema, lymphadenopathy, and eosinophilia. He previously received vancomycin and ceftriaxone for 10 days at another hospital. He developed acute kidney injury with nephrotic range proteinuria and hypocomplementemia. A subsequent renal biopsy indicated the presence of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and late exudative phase of postinfectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN). Systemic symptoms and renal function improved with corticosteroid therapy after the discontinuation of vancomycin. Here, we describe a biopsy-proven case of severe ATN that manifested as a part of vancomycin-induced DRESS syndrome with coincident PIGN. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this syndrome due to its severity and potentially fatal nature. PMID:27186222

  13. Enhanced cortisol increase upon awakening is associated with greater pain ratings but not salivary cortisol or soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II responses to acute pain

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; Quinn, Noel B.; King, Christopher D.; Page, Gayle G.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.; Stapleton, Laura M.; McGuire, Lynanne

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is related with psychosocial factors and health in potentially significant ways, suggesting that it may be a distinctive marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and dysfunction. This sought to expand upon previous work that examined the association between CAR and ratings of laboratory-evoked acute pain stimulation. In addition to evoked pain ratings, this study also tested whether CAR was prospectively related with salivary cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II (sTNFαRII) responses to acute pain stimulation. Methods This study included 36 healthy, pain-free volunteers of both sexes recruited via posted study flyers. Prior to completion of laboratory pain testing, salivary cortisol samples were obtained at home over the course of a single morning according to the following time frame: upon awakening, and 15, 30, and 60 min after awakening. Following collection of saliva, study participants brought their home saliva samples to the laboratory for assay and subsequently completed acute experimental pain testing procedures. Results Cluster analysis of CAR revealed two distinct groups with similar patterns of cortisol response to awakening; increased and flattened. Relative to flattened CAR, increased CAR was associated with greater ratings of pain intensity and unpleasantness. Salivary cortisol was significantly increased and sTNFαRII significantly decreased following pain testing, but neither of these responses differed as a function of increased versus flattened CAR. Discussion CAR may be a marker for stress sensitivity and/or the anticipation of impending stress, which could explain why the increased CAR cohort reported greater acute pain ratings. PMID:21904196

  14. Chicken amyloid arthropathy: serum amyloid A, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitric oxide profile in acute phase (12th hour).

    PubMed

    Sevimli, A; Bülbül, T; Bülbül, A; Yagci, A

    2013-01-01

    Acute phase response (APR) is part of the early defense system, which is triggered by different stimuli including, infection, trauma, stres, inflammation and neoplasia. The APR complex is a reaction which induces homeostasis and recovery. In this research, serum amyloid A (SAA), interlaukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were measured 12 hours following injection. For this purpose, Thirty-two 5 weeks old laying chicken were allocated into four groups and intra-articular injections of Freund's adjuvant were used to induce amylod arthropathy in Groups II, III and IV. Vitamin A in group II, and methylprednisolone in group IV were added to enhance and to reduce the severity of amyloidosis, respectively. At the end of the research, it was observed that TNF-alpha and NO increased significantly (P < 0.05) in vitamin A and methylprednisolone groups whereas SAA decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in all groups. It was also observed that IL-6 increased (P < 0.05) in vitamin A group and decreased in all other gorups however, IL-1beta decreased in vitamin A and methylprednisolone groups, while it was increased in the control group. The results of this study suggest that there is a positive correlation between serum TNF-alpha levels in acute and chronic phase in chickens with amyloid arthropathy. PMID:23971191

  15. Smooth muscle cells of the coronary arterial tunica media express tumor necrosis factor-alpha and proliferate during acute rejection of rabbit cardiac allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, H.; Swanson, S. J.; Sukhova, G.; Schoen, F. J.; Libby, P.

    1995-01-01

    Graft coronary arteriosclerosis (GCA) frequently limits the long-term success of cardiac transplantation. The pathogenic mechanisms of and stimuli that provoke GCA remain uncertain. Whatever the initiating factors, deranged control of smooth muscle cells (SMC) proliferation likely contributes to the intimal hyperplasia that produces obstructive lesions. To identify mediators that may contribute to ongoing modulation of SMC functions during acute rejection and to explore the mechanisms of the pathogenesis of graft coronary arteriosclerosis, we studied the kinetics of proliferation and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a proinflammatory and SMC growth-promoting cytokine, in coronary arterial SMCs in rabbit hearts transplanted heterotopically without immunosuppression. Hearts were harvested at 2 (n = 5), 5 (n = 5), and 8.2 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SD, n = 5) days after transplantation, just before graft failure as judged clinically. SMC proliferation was assessed by continuous bromodeoxyuridine labeling (BrdU 10 mg/kg/d. s.q.). Whole heart cross sections were stained immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies that recognize TNF-alpha, BrdU, and SMCs (muscle alpha-actin). Major epicardial coronary arteries (five to nine profiles in each animal) were evaluated. Histological rejection grades by the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation scale at 2, 5, and 10 days were 1.6 +/- 0.9, 2.8 +/- 1.1, and 4.0 +/- 0.0, respectively. Medial SMCs in normal hearts and 2 days after transplant expressed little or no TNF-alpha and displayed negligible BrdU incorporation. At 5 days after transplantation, some medial SMCs stained for TNF-alpha and had a low BrdU labeling index (0.5 +/- 0.8%). At 8.2 days after transplant, almost all medial SMCs expressed TNF-alpha intensely and had a high labeling index (29.8 +/- 8.0%). These results demonstrate that acute rejection activates medial SMCs in coronary arteries to express TNF-alpha and that SMC

  16. A Case of Acute Ischemic Duodenal Ulcer Associated with Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection After Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Sun; Jeong, Sook-Hyang Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Hyub; Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon

    2009-03-15

    We report a case of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)-related acute ischemic duodenal ulcer that developed in association with dissection of the superior mesenteric artery. We conclude that the acute duodenal ulcer was developed by ischemia related to superior mesenteric artery dissection during TACE. TACE should be conducted carefully with continuous observation of abdominal arteries.

  17. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Ramia, J M; de la Plaza, R; Quiñones-Sampedro, J E; Ramiro, C; Veguillas, P; García-Parreño, J

    2012-05-01

    Acute severe pancreatitits may be complicated by the development of 'walled-off pancreatic necrosis' (WOPN), which is characterised by a mixture of solid components and fluids on imaging studies as a consequence of organised pancreatic tissue necrosis. We present here an overview of the definition, clinical features, and diagnostic and therapeutic management of this clinical condition, which is mostly based on consensus as adequate clinical trials are lacking. PMID:22641624

  18. Field and Experimental Evidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as the Causative Agent of Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease of Cultured Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in Northwestern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Lozano-Olvera, Rodolfo; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel; Morales-Covarrubias, Maria Soledad

    2014-01-01

    Moribund shrimp affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) from farms in northwestern Mexico were sampled for bacteriological and histological analysis. Bacterial isolates were molecularly identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus by the presence of the tlh gene. The tdh-negative, trh-negative, and tlh-positive V. parahaemolyticus strains were further characterized by repetitive extragenic palindromic element-PCR (rep-PCR), and primers AP1, AP2, AP3, and AP and an ems2 IQ2000 detection kit (GeneReach, Taiwan) were used in the diagnostic tests for AHPND. The V. parahaemolyticus strains were used in immersion challenges with shrimp, and farmed and challenged shrimp presented the same clinical and pathological symptoms: lethargy, empty gut, pale and aqueous hepatopancreas, and expanded chromatophores. Using histological analysis and bacterial density count, three stages of AHNPD (initial, acute, and terminal) were identified in the affected shrimp. The pathognomonic lesions indicating severe desquamation of tubular epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas were observed in both challenged and pond-infected shrimp. The results showed that different V. parahaemolyticus strains have different virulences; some of the less virulent strains do not induce 100% mortality, and mortality rates also rise more slowly than they do for the more virulent strains. The virulence of V. parahaemolyticus strains was dose dependent, where the threshold infective density was 104 CFU ml−1; below that density, no mortality was observed. The AP3 primer set had the best sensitivity and specificity. Field and experimental results showed that the V. parahaemolyticus strain that causes AHPND acts as a primary pathogen for shrimp in Mexico compared with the V. parahaemolyticus strains reported to date. PMID:25548045

  19. Field and experimental evidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as the causative agent of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease of cultured shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in Northwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rodriguez, Sonia A; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Lozano-Olvera, Rodolfo; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel; Morales-Covarrubias, Maria Soledad

    2015-03-01

    Moribund shrimp affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) from farms in northwestern Mexico were sampled for bacteriological and histological analysis. Bacterial isolates were molecularly identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus by the presence of the tlh gene. The tdh-negative, trh-negative, and tlh-positive V. parahaemolyticus strains were further characterized by repetitive extragenic palindromic element-PCR (rep-PCR), and primers AP1, AP2, AP3, and AP and an ems2 IQ2000 detection kit (GeneReach, Taiwan) were used in the diagnostic tests for AHPND. The V. parahaemolyticus strains were used in immersion challenges with shrimp, and farmed and challenged shrimp presented the same clinical and pathological symptoms: lethargy, empty gut, pale and aqueous hepatopancreas, and expanded chromatophores. Using histological analysis and bacterial density count, three stages of AHNPD (initial, acute, and terminal) were identified in the affected shrimp. The pathognomonic lesions indicating severe desquamation of tubular epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas were observed in both challenged and pond-infected shrimp. The results showed that different V. parahaemolyticus strains have different virulences; some of the less virulent strains do not induce 100% mortality, and mortality rates also rise more slowly than they do for the more virulent strains. The virulence of V. parahaemolyticus strains was dose dependent, where the threshold infective density was 10(4) CFU ml(-1); below that density, no mortality was observed. The AP3 primer set had the best sensitivity and specificity. Field and experimental results showed that the V. parahaemolyticus strain that causes AHPND acts as a primary pathogen for shrimp in Mexico compared with the V. parahaemolyticus strains reported to date. PMID:25548045

  20. The role of slow and persistent TTX-resistant sodium currents in acute tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated increase in nociceptors excitability

    PubMed Central

    Gudes, Sagi; Barkai, Omer; Caspi, Yaki; Katz, Ben; Lev, Shaya

    2014-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) sodium channels are key players in determining the input-output properties of peripheral nociceptive neurons. Changes in gating kinetics or in expression levels of these channels by proinflammatory mediators are likely to cause the hyperexcitability of nociceptive neurons and pain hypersensitivity observed during inflammation. Proinflammatory mediator, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), is secreted during inflammation and is associated with the early onset, as well as long-lasting, inflammation-mediated increase in excitability of peripheral nociceptive neurons. Here we studied the underlying mechanisms of the rapid component of TNF-α-mediated nociceptive hyperexcitability and acute pain hypersensitivity. We showed that TNF-α leads to rapid onset, cyclooxygenase-independent pain hypersensitivity in adult rats. Furthermore, TNF-α rapidly and substantially increases nociceptive excitability in vitro, by decreasing action potential threshold, increasing neuronal gain and decreasing accommodation. We extended on previous studies entailing p38 MAPK-dependent increase in TTX-r sodium currents by showing that TNF-α via p38 MAPK leads to increased availability of TTX-r sodium channels by partial relief of voltage dependence of their slow inactivation, thereby contributing to increase in neuronal gain. Moreover, we showed that TNF-α also in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner increases persistent TTX-r current by shifting the voltage dependence of activation to a hyperpolarized direction, thus producing an increase in inward current at functionally critical subthreshold voltages. Our results suggest that rapid modulation of the gating of TTX-r sodium channels plays a major role in the mediated nociceptive hyperexcitability of TNF-α during acute inflammation and may lead to development of effective treatments for inflammatory pain, without modulating the inflammation-induced healing processes. PMID:25355965

  1. Silencer of Death Domains Controls Cell Death through Tumour Necrosis Factor-Receptor 1 and Caspase-10 in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naveed I.; Welschinger, Robert; Basnett, Jordan; Fung, Carina; Rizos, Helen; Bradstock, Kenneth F.; Bendall, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis remains a significant problem in drug resistance and treatment failure in malignant disease. NO-aspirin is a novel drug that has efficacy against a number of solid tumours, and can inhibit Wnt signaling, and although we have shown Wnt signaling to be important for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell proliferation and survival inhibition of Wnt signaling does not appear to be involved in the induction of ALL cell death. Treatment of B lineage ALL cell lines and patient ALL cells with NO-aspirin induced rapid apoptotic cell death mediated via the extrinsic death pathway. Apoptosis was dependent on caspase-10 in association with the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) incorporating pro-caspase-10 and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1). There was no measurable increase in TNF-R1 or TNF-α in response to NO-aspirin, suggesting that the process was ligand-independent. Consistent with this, expression of silencer of death domain (SODD) was reduced following NO-aspirin exposure and lentiviral mediated shRNA knockdown of SODD suppressed expansion of transduced cells confirming the importance of SODD for ALL cell survival. Considering that SODD and caspase-10 are frequently over-expressed in ALL, interfering with these proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of this and potentially other cancers. PMID:25061812

  2. Genetic diversity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from farmed Pacific white shrimp and ambient pond water affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease outbreak in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chonsin, Kaknokrat; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Theethakaew, Chonchanok; Kodama, Toshio; Junjhon, Jiraphan; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Suthienkul, Orasa; Iida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is an emerging shrimp disease that causes massive die-offs in farmed shrimps. Recent outbreaks of AHPND in Asia have been causing great losses for shrimp culture and have become a serious socioeconomic problem. The causative agent of AHPND is Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which is typically known to cause food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. However, there have been few reports of the epidemiology of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND strains, and the genetic relationship among AHPND strains is unclear. Here, we report the genetic characterization of V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from AHPND outbreaks in Thailand. We found eight isolates from AHPND-suspected shrimps and pond water that were positive for AHPND markers AP1 and AP2. PCR analysis confirmed that none of these eight AP-positive AHPND strains possesses the genes for the conventional virulence factors affecting to humans, such as thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) and type III secretion system 2. Phylogenetic analysis by multilocus sequence typing showed that the AHPND strains are genetically diverse, suggesting that AHPND strains were not derived from a single genetic lineage. Our study represents the first report of molecular epidemiology of AHPND-causing V. parahaemolyticus strains using multilocus sequence typing, and provides an insight into their evolutionary mechanisms. PMID:26590959

  3. Comparison of Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, BISAP, APACHE-II, CTSI Scores, IL-6, CRP, and Procalcitonin in Predicting Severity, Organ Failure, Pancreatic Necrosis, and Mortality in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ajay K.; Meher, Susanta; Prakash, Shashi; Tiwary, Satyendra Kumar; Singh, Usha; Srivastava, Arvind; Dixit, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multifactorial scorings, radiological scores, and biochemical markers may help in early prediction of severity, pancreatic necrosis, and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods. BISAP, APACHE-II, MOSS, and SIRS scores were calculated using data within 24 hrs of admission, whereas Ranson and Glasgow scores after 48 hrs of admission; CTSI was calculated on day 4 whereas IL-6 and CRP values at end of study. Predictive accuracy of scoring systems, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of various markers in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis, organ failure, pancreatic necrosis, admission to intensive care units and mortality were calculated. Results. Of 72 patients, 31 patients had organ failure and local complication classified as severe acute pancreatitis, 17 had pancreatic necrosis, and 9 died (12.5%). Area under curves for Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, APACHE-II, BISAP, CTSI, IL-6, and CRP in predicting SAP were 0.85, 0.75, 0.73, 0.73, 0.88, 0.80, 0.90, and 0.91, respectively, for pancreatic necrosis 0.70, 0.64, 0.61, 0.61, 0.68, 0.61, 0.75, 0.86, and 0.90, respectively, and for mortality 0.84, 0.83, 0.77, 0.76, 0.86, 0.83, 0.57, 0.80, and 0.75, respectively. Conclusion. CRP and IL-6 have shown a promising result in early detection of severity and pancreatic necrosis whereas APACHE-II and Ranson score in predicting AP related mortality in this study. PMID:24204087

  4. C1q/Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Protein 9 Protects against Acute Myocardial Injury through an Adiponectin Receptor I-AMPK-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kambara, Takahiro; Shibata, Rei; Ohashi, Koji; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Hiramatsu-Ito, Mizuho; Enomoto, Takashi; Yuasa, Daisuke; Ito, Masanori; Hayakawa, Satoko; Ogawa, Hayato; Aprahamian, Tamar; Walsh, Kenneth; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ouchi, Noriyuki

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein 9 (CTRP9) is an adipokine that is downregulated by obesity. We investigated the role of CTRP9 in cardiac injury with loss-of-function genetic manipulations and defined the receptor-mediated signaling pathway downstream of this adipokine. CTRP9-knockout (CTRP9-KO) mice at the age of 12 weeks were indistinguishable from wild-type (WT) mice under basal conditions. CTRP9-KO mice had exacerbated contractile left ventricle dysfunction following intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compared to WT mice. Administration of LPS to CTRP9-KO mice also resulted in increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress markers in the heart compared to WT mice. Likewise, CTRP9-KO mice showed increased myocardial infarct size and elevated expression of inflammatory mediators in ischemic heart following ischemia and reperfusion compared to WT mice. Treatment of cardiac myocytes with CTRP9 protein led to suppression of LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory genes, which was reversed by blockade of AMPK or ablation of adiponectin receptor I (AdipoR1). Systemic delivery of CTRP9 attenuated LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction in WT mice but not in muscle-specific transgenic mice expressing dominant-negative mutant form of AMPK or in AdipoR1-knockout mice. CTRP9 protects against acute cardiac damage in response to pathological stimuli by suppressing inflammatory reactions through AdipoR1/AMPK-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25870106

  5. Time Profile of Viral DNA in Aqueous Humor Samples of Patients Treated for Varicella-Zoster Virus Acute Retinal Necrosis by Use of Quantitative Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Bernheim, D.; Germi, R.; Labetoulle, M.; Romanet, J. P.; Morand, P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) loads using quantitative PCR (qPCR) in patients treated for acute retinal necrosis (ARN). Six patients (52 ± 13 years old) with ARN syndrome were consecutively studied. Aqueous humor (AH) was sampled from both eyes of all patients for qPCR evaluation. The patients were treated with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreal injections of antiviral drugs. The mean follow-up time was 17.6 ± 16.4 months. Main outcome measures were the numbers of viral genome copies in the AH, assessed using real-time qPCR with hydrolysis probe technology with a threshold of detection of 200 copies/ml. Two main portions of the viral load curves were observed for each patient: a plateau phase (27.8 ± 24.9 days) and a decrease in the number of viral genome copies. The mean baseline viral load was 3.4 × 107 ± 4.45 × 107 copies/ml (6 × 106 to 1.2 × 108 copies/ml). The viral load decreased according to a logarithmic model, with a 50% reduction obtained in 3 ± 0.7 days. There was a significant viral load (>102 copies/ml) at 50 days after the onset of treatment, despite antiviral drugs. qPCR use demonstrated reproducible VZV DNA kinetics with a two-phase evolution: a plateau followed by a logarithmic decrease. These data suggest that high-dosage antiviral therapy administered for the conventional 10-day duration is insufficient for most patients. This series of patients responded with a similar decrease in viral load once treatment was initiated, and the data from these patients may be used to predict the responses of future patients. PMID:23637296

  6. Genetic Variations of Tumor Necrosis Factor –α-308 and Lymphtoxin-α+252 in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Hajar; Farajnia, Safar; Rezamand, Azim; MovassaghPour, Ali Akbar; Esmaeili, Heydar Ali; Monfaredan, Amir; Mobarra, Naser; Rahimifar, Nasser; Sahebi, Leyla; Farshdousti Hagh, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Non- Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are two main hematological malignances which have been driven from lymphoid tissue. Genetic polymorphisms in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) -308 and lymphotoxin-α (LT-α) +252 may affect their transcription and expression which leads to their high plasma level. The frequency of the TNF-α (-308) and LT-α (+ 252) polymorphisms are different for NHL and ALL cases in various populations with different ethnicity. This research is designed to investigate the prevalence and association of TNF-α (-308) and LT-α (+ 252) polymorphisms from NHL and ALL in Azarian patients and healthy individuals from Northwestern part of Iran. Materials and Methods: Seventy subjects with ALL and 68 NHL, along with another 130 healthy subjects as control group took part in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted, then genetic polymorphisms in TNF-α and LT-α genes were analyzed with the PCR-RFLP and NCOI as restriction enzyme. A statistical analysis was performed by chi-square test using SPSS software. A P-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A statistically significant difference of LT-α polymorphism was in NHL patients and control (P-value= 0.008) but there was not any association of TNF-α polymorphism between NHL patients and control group. A significant association for TNF-a variant was in ALL and control (P-value =0.005), however, there was no relationship about LT variant between ALL and control. Conclusion: The results show that there are significant differences between TNF-α (-308) and LT-α (+252) genetic polymorphisms respectively in ALL and NHL patients with control group from Northwestern part of Iran. PMID:24171078

  7. Characterization and PCR Detection Of Binary, Pir-Like Toxins from Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates that Cause Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND) in Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Sirikharin, Ratchanok; Taengchaiyaphum, Suparat; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Chi, Thanh Duong; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Proespraiwong, Porranee; Nuangsaeng, Bunlung; Thitamadee, Siripong; Flegel, Timothy W.; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2015-01-01

    Unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND) have previously been identified as the causative agent of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp. AHPND is characterized by massive sloughing of tubule epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas (HP), proposed to be induced by soluble toxins released from VPAHPND that colonize the shrimp stomach. Since these toxins (produced in broth culture) have been reported to cause AHPND pathology in reverse gavage bioassays with shrimp, we used ammonium sulfate precipitation to prepare protein fractions from broth cultures of VPAHPND isolates for screening by reverse gavage assays. The dialyzed 60% ammonium sulfate fraction caused high mortality within 24–48 hours post-administration, and histological analysis of the moribund shrimp showed typical massive sloughing of hepatopancreatic tubule epithelial cells characteristic of AHPND. Analysis of the active fraction by SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at marker levels of approximately 16 kDa (ToxA) and 50 kDa (ToxB). Mass spectrometry analysis followed by MASCOT analysis revealed that both proteins had similarity to hypothetical proteins of V. parahaemolyticus M0605 (contig034 GenBank accession no. JALL01000066.1) and similarity to known binary insecticidal toxins called 'Photorhabdus insect related' proteins A and B (Pir-A and Pir-B), respectively, produced by the symbiotic, nematode bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. In in vivo tests, it was shown that recombinant ToxA and ToxB were both required in a dose dependent manner to cause AHPND pathology, indicating further similarity to Pir-A and -B. A single-step PCR method was designed for detection of the ToxA gene and was validated using 104 bacterial isolates consisting of 51 VPAHPND isolates, 34 non-AHPND VP isolates and 19 other isolates of bacteria commonly found in shrimp ponds (including other species of Vibrio and Photobacterium). The results showed 100% specificity and sensitivity for detection of

  8. Time profile of viral DNA in aqueous humor samples of patients treated for varicella-zoster virus acute retinal necrosis by use of quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Bernheim, D; Germi, R; Labetoulle, M; Romanet, J P; Morand, P; Chiquet, C

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) loads using quantitative PCR (qPCR) in patients treated for acute retinal necrosis (ARN). Six patients (52 ± 13 years old) with ARN syndrome were consecutively studied. Aqueous humor (AH) was sampled from both eyes of all patients for qPCR evaluation. The patients were treated with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreal injections of antiviral drugs. The mean follow-up time was 17.6 ± 16.4 months. Main outcome measures were the numbers of viral genome copies in the AH, assessed using real-time qPCR with hydrolysis probe technology with a threshold of detection of 200 copies/ml. Two main portions of the viral load curves were observed for each patient: a plateau phase (27.8 ± 24.9 days) and a decrease in the number of viral genome copies. The mean baseline viral load was 3.4 × 10(7) ± 4.45 × 10(7) copies/ml (6 × 10(6) to 1.2 × 10(8) copies/ml). The viral load decreased according to a logarithmic model, with a 50% reduction obtained in 3 ± 0.7 days. There was a significant viral load (>102 copies/ml) at 50 days after the onset of treatment, despite antiviral drugs. qPCR use demonstrated reproducible VZV DNA kinetics with a two-phase evolution: a plateau followed by a logarithmic decrease. These data suggest that high-dosage antiviral therapy administered for the conventional 10-day duration is insufficient for most patients. This series of patients responded with a similar decrease in viral load once treatment was initiated, and the data from these patients may be used to predict the responses of future patients. PMID:23637296

  9. Contrast echocardiography in acute myocardial ischemia. III. An in vivo comparison of the extent of abnormal wall motion with the area at risk for necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kaul, S; Pandian, N G; Gillam, L D; Newell, J B; Okada, R D; Weyman, A E

    1986-02-01

    To define the in vivo relation between abnormal wall motion and the area at risk for necrosis after acute coronary occlusion, 11 open chest dogs were studied. Five dogs underwent left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and six underwent left circumflex artery occlusion. Area at risk was defined at five short-axis levels (mitral valve, chordal, high and low papillary muscle and apex) using myocardial contrast echocardiography. Wall motion was measured in the cycles preceding injection of contrast medium. Two observers used two different methods to measure wall motion. In method A, end-diastolic to end-systolic fractional radial change for each of 32 endocardial targets was determined. The extent of abnormal wall motion was then calculated using three definitions of wall motion abnormality: akinesia/dyskinesia, fractional inward endocardial excursion of less than 10%, and fractional inward endocardial excursion of less than 20%. In method B, the information from the entire systolic contraction sequence was analyzed and correlated with a normal contraction pattern. The best linear correlation between area at risk (AR) and abnormal wall motion (AWM) was achieved using method B and expressed by the following linear regression: AWM = 0.92 AR + 3.0 (r = 0.92, p less than 0.0001, SEE = 1.7%). Of the three definitions of abnormality used in method A, the best correlation was achieved between area at risk and less than 10% inward endocardial excursion and was expressed by the following polynomial regression: AWM = -0.01 AR2 + 1.5 AR -0.14 (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001, SEE = 1.7%). These data demonstrate that there is a definite relation between area at risk and abnormal wall motion but that this relation varies depending on the method used to analyze wall motion. However, wall motion during acute ischemia is also influenced by the loading conditions of the heart. Because these may vary in a manner that is independent of the ischemic process, measurement of both

  10. Dietary ergot alkaloids as a possible cause of tail necrosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Korn, A K; Gross, M; Usleber, E; Thom, N; Köhler, K; Erhardt, G

    2014-11-01

    This study describes the association between tail necrosis in rabbits and mycotoxins in rabbit feed. Clinical cases of tail necrosis were observed in 14 out of 103 rabbits kept in an outdoor group housing, fed with hay and a commercial pelleted feed. The observed clinical symptoms, alopecia, erosions, crusts and necrosis were restricted to the tail area and exclusively occurred in young rabbits aged 113 ± 20 days. Dermatological examination suggested that ischemia had caused necrosis. Analysis of blood samples showed an elevated level of creatine kinase. No weight loss occurred in affected rabbits. Trauma caused by injuries or technopathic lesions was also excluded. Histopathologically, the lesions were characterized by acute muscle fibre degeneration and chronic active dermatitis with granulation tissue formation. Necropsy of one rabbit revealed hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis as remarkable findings. Feed analysis for ergot alkaloids by enzyme immunoassays yielded a mean and maximum ergot alkaloid content of 410 ± 250 μg/kg and 1,700 μg/kg, respectively. Faeces of affected rabbits contained ergot alkaloids at levels up to 200 μg/kg. The mean and maximum dietary intake of total ergot alkaloids were 17 and 71 μg/kg bodyweight, respectively. Fusarium toxins (trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins) were also found in the feed, but at levels which did not explain the observed effects. The results indicate that ergot alkaloids may have been the cause of tail necrosis, which is supported by literature data showing that rabbits are especially sensitive towards these toxins. PMID:25234267

  11. Tumor necrosis factor alpha negatively regulates hepatitis B virus gene expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, P N; Fey, G; Chisari, F V

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that several inflammatory cytokines can modulate hepatocellular gene expression in a complex physiological process known as the hepatic acute-phase response. Since hepatitis B virus (HBV) characteristically induces a vigorous lymphomononuclear inflammatory response in the liver during acute and chronic hepatitis, it is possible that hepatocellular HBV gene expression may also be modulated by one or more of the cytokines produced by these cells. Using bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a surrogate inducer of inflammatory cytokines in vivo, we have tested this hypothesis in a transgenic mouse model system. In experiments with two independent transgenic mouse lineages that express the HBV envelope region under the control of either HBV or cellular promoters, we observed a 50 to 80% reduction in the hepatic steady-state content of a 2.1-kb HBV mRNA following administration of a single intraperitoneal dose of LPS. The regulatory influence of several inflammatory cytokines known to be induced by LPS was also examined in this system. The negative regulatory effect of LPS was consistently reproduced by the administration of a single nontoxic dose of tumor necrosis factor alpha, and it was occasionally observed following the administration of high doses of alpha interferon and interleukin-6, while no effect was detectable in response to high-dose interleukin-1 alpha or to gamma interferon. These observations suggest that tumor necrosis factor alpha and perhaps other cytokines may activate a heretofore unsuspected intracellular pathway that negatively regulates HBV gene expression. The intracellular mechanism(s) responsible for this effect and its pathophysiologic relevance remain to be elucidated. Images PMID:1583737

  12. Prediction of pancreatic necrosis by dynamic pancreatography.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, E L; Murphy, F; Ferguson, C

    1989-01-01

    Parenchymal necrosis has recently been recognized as the principal determinant of the incidence of secondary infection in acute pancreatitis. Because secondary infection of pancreatic necrosis accounts for more than 80% of all deaths from acute pancreatitis, a method for determining the presence or absence of parenchymal necrosis would offer considerable prognostic and therapeutic information. Thirty seven patients with unequivocal acute pancreatitis and five normal controls were prospectively studied with intravenous bolus, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (dynamic pancreatography). In the absence of pancreatic necrosis, there were no significant differences in parenchymal enhancement between any of the following patient groups: controls (5), uncomplicated pancreatitis (20), pancreatic abscess (7), or peripancreatic necrosis (4)(p less than 0.05). On the other hand, pancreatic parenchymal enhancement was significantly reduced or absent in all six patients with segmental or diffuse pancreatic necrosis (p less than 0.05). Postcontrast pancreatic parenchymal enhancement was also found to be inversely correlated with the number of Ranson signs (p less than 0.001). Dynamic pancreatography offers prognostic information and is a safe and reliable technique for predicting the presence or absence of pancreatic parenchymal necrosis. Images Figs. 1A and B. Figs. 3A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Fig. 5. Figs. 6A and B. Fig. 7. PMID:2802834

  13. Cortical necrosis in a renal transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhardt, R.; Growcock, G.; Lasher, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    The /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA renogram is a well extabished noninvasive method for evaluating and following transplanted kidneys. The examination is useful in distinguishing rejection from acute tubular necrosis as well as demonstrating several less common complications such as vascular occlusion, urinary extravasation, obstruction, and lymphocele. A previously unreported condition involving a transplant kidney (i.e., renal cortical necrosis) is described which was diagnosed with renal scintigraphy in combination with sonography.

  14. Metabolic effects of cachectin/tumor necrosis factor are modified by site of production. Cachectin/tumor necrosis factor-secreting tumor in skeletal muscle induces chronic cachexia, while implantation in brain induces predominantly acute anorexia.

    PubMed

    Tracey, K J; Morgello, S; Koplin, B; Fahey, T J; Fox, J; Aledo, A; Manogue, K R; Cerami, A

    1990-12-01

    We have developed a murine model of wasting by injecting intracerebrally cells which continuously secrete h-cachectin/TNF (CHO-TNF) to: (a) determine the effects of cachectin/TNF produced continuously in the central nervous system (CNS), and (b) compare the metabolic effects of cachectin/TNF-secreting tumor in the brain to the cachexia caused by CHO-TNF tumor in peripheral tissue (IM). Intracerebral CHO-TNF tumors produced increased serum h-cachectin/TNF levels with lethal hypophagia and weight loss (mean survival time of 11 d); these changes were not observed in association with nonsecretory control brain tumors. The metabolic consequences of intracerebral cachectin/TNF production were indistinguishable from acute, lethal starvation: whole-body lipid content was decreased significantly but protein was conserved. Although intramuscular cachectin/TNF-secreting tumors caused similar increases of serum h-cachectin/TNF levels, profound anorexia did not develop; wasting developed after a longer period of tumor burden (50 d) with classical signs of cachexia (i.e., anemia and depletion of both protein and lipid). These studies provide a reproducible animal model of site-specific cytokine production and suggest that, regardless of serum levels, cachectin/TNF produced locally in brain influences both the rate of development of wasting and its net metabolic effects. PMID:2254457

  15. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  16. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Marie-Annick; Neuveut, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a widespread human pathogen that causes liver inflammation, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent sequencing technologies have refined our knowledge of the genomic landscape and pathogenesis of HCC, but the mechanisms by which HBV exerts its oncogenic role remain controversial. In a prevailing view, inflammation, liver damage, and regeneration may foster the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic defects leading to cancer onset. However, a more direct and specific contribution of the virus is supported by clinical and biological observations. Among genetically heterogeneous HCCs, HBV-related tumors display high genomic instability, which may be attributed to the ability of HBV to integrate its DNA into the host cell genome, provoking chromosomal alterations and insertional mutagenesis of cancer genes. The viral transactivator HBx may also participate in transformation by deregulating diverse cellular machineries. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms linking HBV to HCC will improve prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:25646384

  17. [Digital necrosis in hand by uncommon mechanism].

    PubMed

    Leroux, Maria Bibiana; Lashak, Celina; Mazzurco, Martin

    2013-07-01

    A 43-year-old, non-smoking man presented with acute ischemic lesions of his left hand. He had been taking beta-blockers for his arterial hypertension. The day before the occurrence of these acute lesions, he self medicated with a drug containing ergotamine and caffeine because of a headache. About one hour after mild trauma to the hand, he noticed intense cyanosis accompanied by severe pain in the fingers that progressed to digital necrosis. Hematological tests, hand radiography, echo Doppler, and nailfold videocapillaroscopy were performed. Digital necrosis owing to an unusual combination of ischemic mechanisms is assumed. PMID:24010508

  18. Diagnostic features in 10 naturally occurring cases of acute fatal canine leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Brown, Cathy A

    2014-11-01

    The current report describes the diagnostic features in 10 cases of acute fatal canine leptospirosis with minimal renal and hepatic changes that may present a diagnostic challenge for the pathologist. Most affected dogs were less than 6 months of age and had a biochemical profile consistent with hepatorenal dysfunction. Clinical signs consisted of vomiting, depression, icterus, dehydration, diarrhea, and anorexia. All dogs died or were humanely euthanized within 3-7 days after the onset of clinical disease. Necropsy findings included pulmonary edema with hemorrhages, icterus, renal and hepatic pallor and swelling, and gastric edema with hemorrhage. Despite severe azotemia, histological changes in the kidneys were subtle in all dogs, and included mild renal tubular simplification, with single-cell necrosis and attenuation, along with minimal interstitial lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, edema, and hemorrhage. Hepatic lesions included scattered hepatocellular single-cell necrosis and hepatocellular dissociation. Prominent extrarenal lesions typically associated with uremia including vascular fibrinoid necrosis in multiple organs, pulmonary mineralization with occasional fibrinosuppurative exudation, and gastric mineralization were also present. Postmortem diagnostic confirmation was based on the detection of leptospiral antigen on fresh renal samples by fluorescent antibody test and on the demonstration of intact spirochetes in sections of kidneys using immunohistochemical staining. Acute fatal canine leptospirosis occurred as a fulminant hepatorenal disease affecting mainly young dogs, and the diagnosis was dependent on the recognition of the subtle renal changes with confirmation via fluorescent antibody testing or immunohistochemical staining. PMID:25274745

  19. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or older. Hepatocellular ...

  20. Ketoconazole attenuates radiation-induction of tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D.E.; Virudachalam, S.; Kufe, D.W.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1994-07-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that inhibitors of phospholipase A2 attenuate ionizing radiation-induced arachidonic acid production, protein kinase C activation, and prevent subsequent induction of the tumor necrosis factor gene. Because arachidonic acid contributes to radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor expression, the authors analyzed the effects of agents which alter arachidonate metabolism on the regulation of this gene. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors quinicrine, bromphenyl bromide, and pentoxyfylline or the inhibitor of lipoxygenase (ketoconazole) or the inhibitor of cycloxygenase (indomethacine) were added to cell culture 1 h prior to irradiation. Radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by each of the phospholipase A2 inhibitors (quinicrine, bromphenylbromide, and pentoxyfylline). Furthermore, ketoconazole attenuated X ray induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression. Conversely, indomethacin enhanced tumor necrosis factor expression following irradiation. The finding that radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by ketoconazole suggests that the lipoxygenase pathway participates in signal transduction preceding tumor necrosis factor induction. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor expression by indomethacin following irradiation suggests that prostaglandins produced by cyclooxygenase act as negative regulators of tumor necrosis factor expression. Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor induction ameliorate acute and subacute sequelae of radiotherapy. The authors propose therefore, that ketoconazole may reduce acute radiation sequelae such as mucositis and esophagitis through a reduction in tumor necrosis factor induction or inhibition of phospholipase A2 in addition to its antifungal activity. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  1. [Hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Colombo, Massimo; Sangiovanni, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death and the first in patients with compensated cirrhosis. Chronic infection with hepatitis B and C, alcohol, smoking, exposure to aflatoxin and metabolic syndrome, associated with diabetes and obesity are the main etiological factors. Regardless of etiology, patients with cirrhosis stand as the category at higher risk of developing HCC, and indeed are the target of surveillance programs aimed to the early diagnosis of HCC, the only chance to reduce HCC-related mortality. This notwithstanding, International Scientific Societies have issued recommendations for the management of HCC, a significant number of patients are treated outside guidelines, due to several reasons. Among queries still unsolved, the impact of biological characterization of HCC, along with the biological profiling of patients at risk of developing HCC represent main challenges for the future. Treatment personalization and multimodal treatment being further challenges. This chapter summarizes the recommendations for surveillance, diagnosis and treatment of HCC and focus on future directions. PMID:27571469

  2. Subacute hepatic necrosis mimicking veno-occlusive disease in a patient with HFE H63D homozygosity after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with busulfan conditioning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sylvia; Osborn, James Dane; Chen, Xinjian; Boyer, Michael W; McDonald, George B; Hildebrandt, Gerhard Carl

    2015-12-01

    Busulfan is a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent in myeloablative conditioning regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). It has been associated with sinusoidal-obstructive syndrome(SOS) as a life-threatening complication of myeloablative allo-HCT, yet it has not been found to cause severe hepatocellular injury, even in cases of significant accidental overdose.We report the case of a 31-year-old male with a history of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome transitioning to acute myeloid leukemia, who in complete remission underwent allo-HCT using myeloablative busulfan–fludarabine conditioning, and who developed hepatic failure. While he met clinical criteria for SOS and was treated with defibrotide,liver biopsy demonstrated severe subacute hepatic necrosis and lacked characteristics of SOS. Further evaluation revealed that the patient was homozygous for the HFE H63D gene mutation, associated with hereditary hemochromatosis.Both Busulfan and iron overload related to HFE H63D homozygosity can cause oxidative stress resulting in cellular injury, and the cumulative effects of these risk factors are possibly responsible for the severe hepatocellular injury in this case, making our patient the first-known case of subacute hepatic necrosis related to busulfan administration. PMID:26497867

  3. Draft genome sequence of pathogenic bacteria Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain Ba94C2, associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease isolate from South America.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Leda; Bayot, Bonny; Betancourt, Irma; Pinzón, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a pathogenic bacteria which has been associated to the early mortality syndrome (EMS) also known as hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) causing high mortality in shrimp farms. Pathogenic strains contain two homologous genes related to insecticidal toxin genes, PirA and PirB, these toxin genes are located on a plasmid contained within the bacteria. Genomic sequences have allowed the finding of two strains with a divergent structure related to the geographic region from where they were found. The isolates from the geographic collection of Southeast Asia and Mexico show variable regions on the plasmid genome, indicating that even though they are not alike they still conserve the toxin genes. In this paper, we report for the first time, a pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strain in shrimp from South America that showed symptoms of AHPND. The genomic analysis revealed that this strain of V. parahaemolyticus found in South America appears to be more related to the Southeast Asia as compared to the Mexican strains. This finding is of major importance for the shrimp industry, especially in regards to the urgent need for disease control strategies to avoid large EMS outbreaks and economic loss, and to determine its dispersion in South America. The whole-genome shotgun project of V. parahaemolyticus strain Ba94C2 have been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession PRJNA335761. PMID:27570736

  4. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J T; Macdonald, G A

    2000-05-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) appears to be declining in Taiwan and potentially in other high-prevalence areas as a consequence of vaccination for hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, there is evidence that the incidence of HCC is increasing in North America and Europe. This appears to be related to the increasing prevalence and duration of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in these countries. There is also growing evidence to support an increase in the risk of HCC in patients with HCV who are coinfected with occult HBV (patients who have lost HBV surface antigen but still have detectable HBV DNA either in blood or liver). Occult HBV infection in patients with HCV may be more common than previously thought, and HCC that occurs in this setting appears to have a worse prognosis. There is continuing interest in the effect of interferon therapy on the incidence of HCC in patients with HCV. Several studies from Japan have shown a benefit in patients without cirrhosis, although there are a number of potentially confounding variables that may partly explain these results. Prospective randomized studies are needed to investigate this important question. The molecular biology of HCC and the events of malignant transformation in the liver continue to be areas of intense study. Recently, there has been considerable interest in telomeres, the repeat units on the ends of chromosomes, and the enzyme that maintains these, telomerase. Telomeres shorten with each cell division and can be used to determine the number of divisions a cell has undergone. Eventually they reach a critical length, with further loss resulting in cellular senescence. Telomerase restores telomere length and may help malignant cells escape senescence. Nearly all HCCs have telomerase activity and assessments of telomeres and telomerase may be clinically useful. PMID:17023886

  5. Tumour necrosis factor soluble receptors behave as acute phase reactants following surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, chronic osteomyelitis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Chikanza, I C; Roux-Lombard, P; Dayer, J M; Panayi, G S

    1993-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is involved in diverse biological processes including immune and inflammatory reactions and the response to surgical stress. Two soluble TNF receptor protein fragments, TNF-sR55 (from the p55 kD TNF receptor) and TNF-sR75 (from the p75 kD TNF receptor), are released by cells during inflammation and may modulate the e effects of TNF-alpha. We have studied the kinetics of secretion of TNF-alpha, TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 in the sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and control subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) or chronic osteomyelitis (OM) before and after major surgery. Significantly higher pre-operative levels of TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 were found in RA and OM as compared with OA (P < 0.02). Following surgery, TNF-sR55 increased within 24 h in RA, OM and OA (P < 0.05), whereas TNF-sR75 increased significantly only in OM and OA patients (P < 0.05). By contrast, no TNF-alpha was detectable before and after surgery in any of the subjects, but this may have been due to impaired detection (by ELISA) of TNF-alpha when it is bound to TNF-sR. These findings suggest that TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 may be further markers of the host's reaction to inflammatory insults. They may also play a role in modulating the immune and inflammatory reactions by inhibiting the systemic effects of TNF-alpha. PMID:8385584

  6. Olfactory mucosal necrosis in rats following acute intraperitoneal administration of 1,2-diethylbenzene, 1,2-diacetylbenzene and 2,5-hexanedione.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, François; Boucard, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    1,2-Diethylbenzene (1,2-DEB) is used in the manufacture of some plastics. Exposure to 1,2-DEB has been shown to induce peripheral neuropathy in rats. This neurotoxicity is thought to be caused by a metabolite, 1,2-diacetylbenzene (1,2-DAB), a γ-diketone-like compound. 1,2-DEB was previously shown to be extensively and rapidly taken up by the nasal mucosa in male rats. In the present study, the nasal mucosa in rats exposed to 1,2-DEB and 1,2-DAB were examined histologically. Results were compared to sections from rats exposed to two other DEB isomers - 1,3-diethylbenzene (1,3-DEB) and 1,4-diethylbenzene (1,4-DEB) - and to two other neurotoxic compounds - n-hexane and its γ-diketone metabolite, 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD). A single intraperitoneal dose of 1,2-DEB (200mg/kg) induced time-dependent necrosis in the olfactory epithelium and Bowman's glands, with lesions appearing from the earliest observation time (4h) in the dorsomedial olfactory mucosa. Lesions spread through the lateral and ventral parts of the ethmoturbinates over the following days. The dorsal and medial zones of the nasal cavity started to regenerate from 72h after treatment, with the new epithelium showing metaplasia. One month after treatment, most of the olfactory epithelium had returned to normal. 1,2-DAB (40mg/kg) caused the same lesions as those observed after treatment with 1,2-DEB. Treatment with 2,5-HD (1g/kg) also caused lesions of the olfactory epithelium, mainly at level IV. However, these were comparatively less severe than those observed after exposure to 1,2-DEB. In contrast, intraperitoneal injection of 1,3-DEB (800mg/kg), 1,4-DEB (800mg/kg) and n-hexane (2g/kg) did not affect the nasal mucosa. Pretreatment of rats with 5-phenyl-1-pentyne, an inhibitor of CYP2F2 and CYP2E1 completely inhibited the olfactory toxicity caused by 1,2-DEB. These results suggest that metabolic activation of 1,2-DEB may be responsible for the toxicity observed. PMID:24373906

  7. Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous Topic Granular cell tumors Next Topic Mastitis Fat necrosis and oil cysts Fat necrosis happens when ... lumpy area if it becomes bothersome. How do fat necrosis and oil cysts affect your risk for ...

  8. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal papillary necrosis, especially after taking over-the-counter pain medicines ... diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To prevent renal ... over-the-counter pain relievers. Do not take more than the ...

  9. Cortical laminar necrosis following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Simona; Silvestrini, Mauro; Provinciali, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    The cortical laminar necrosis (CLN) is a permanent injury characterized by the selective delayed necrosis of the cerebral cortex, mainly of the third layer, and usually greater in the depths and sides of the sulci than over the crest of the gyri. The damage involves all cellular components - either neurons, glia cells and blood vessels - and results in a focal cortical band of pan-necrosis detectable in late sub-acute or chronic stages of reduced energy supply to the brain. The CLN has been described in different conditions as hypoxia, hypoglycemia and status epilepticus. At brain CT or MR scans it appears with pathognomonic highly hyperdense or T1-hyperintense lesions following the gyral anatomy of the cerebral cortex. We reported a case of CLN associated to myocardial infarct and discussed the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27375142

  10. [APOPTOSIS AND NECROSIS OF CIRCULATING NEUTROPHILS IN PATIENTS WHILE HIGH RISK OF POSTOPERAIVE PERITONITIS OCCURRENCE].

    PubMed

    Sheyko, V D; Sytnik, D A; Shkurupiy, O O

    2015-11-01

    Processes of apoptosis and necrosis of peripheral neutrophils were investigated in 43 patients, operated on for an acute abdominal organs diseases on the first and fourth postoperative days. Changes of apoptosis and necrosis processes in peripheral neutrophils in dynamics were established. Unfavorable course of early postoperative period in patients with initial high and average risk of postoperative peritonitis occurrence was accompanied by shift in necrosis/apoptosis ratio towards necrosis of peripheral neutrophils. PMID:26939426

  11. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or older. ...

  12. Robotic cystogastrostomy and debridement of walled-off pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Ibrahim; Ramzan, Zeeshan; Kukreja, Sachin

    2016-09-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis is a known complication of acute pancreatitis and requires intervention if symptomatic or complicated. Laparoscopic cystogastrostomy as a minimally invasive surgical intervention has been well-described in surgical literature but data on a robotic approach is limited. Here we report a case of robotic cystogastrostomy and debridement of walled-off pancreatic necrosis in a patient with a history of severe biliary pancreatitis. PMID:27039191

  13. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-04-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help future surgeons to establish the diagnosis peroperatively. PMID:27099753

  14. Inhibition of caspase-9 aggravates acute liver injury through suppression of cytoprotective autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Lin, Bin; Pan, Jing Fei; Liong, Emily C.; Xu, Ai Min; Youdim, Moussa; Fung, Man Lung; So, Kwok Fai; Tipoe, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver disease is characterized by inflammation, oxidative stress and necrosis, which can greatly influence the long term clinical outcome and lead to liver failure or cancer. Here, we initially demonstrated the beneficial role of caspase-9-dependent autophagy in acute liver injury. Treatment with caspase-9 inhibitor z-LEHD-FMK in HepG2 cells, AML12 cells and C57BL/b6N mice exacerbated CCl4-induced acute hepatocellular damage, and also down-regulated autophagy markers expression levels, indicating that caspase-9 inhibition may aggravate acute liver damage by suppressing cytoprotective autophagy. CCl4 was used as an acute liver injury inducer which caused oxidative stress and apoptosis through up-regulation of HIF-1α, as well as triggered hepatic inflammation and necroptosis via TLR4/NF-κB pathway. Caspase-9 Thr125 site was firstly phosphorylated by ERK1/2 which subsequently activated the cytoprotective autophagy process to attenuate acute CCl4 injury. Caspase-9 inhibition further aggravated hepatic necroptosis through NF-κB expression, leading to increased pro-inflammatory mediators levels, suggesting a protective role of caspase-9-dependent autophagy in the inflammatory process as well as its possibility being a new therapeutic target for the treatment of acute liver injury. PMID:27580936

  15. Inhibition of caspase-9 aggravates acute liver injury through suppression of cytoprotective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Lin, Bin; Pan, Jing Fei; Liong, Emily C; Xu, Ai Min; Youdim, Moussa; Fung, Man Lung; So, Kwok Fai; Tipoe, George L

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver disease is characterized by inflammation, oxidative stress and necrosis, which can greatly influence the long term clinical outcome and lead to liver failure or cancer. Here, we initially demonstrated the beneficial role of caspase-9-dependent autophagy in acute liver injury. Treatment with caspase-9 inhibitor z-LEHD-FMK in HepG2 cells, AML12 cells and C57BL/b6N mice exacerbated CCl4-induced acute hepatocellular damage, and also down-regulated autophagy markers expression levels, indicating that caspase-9 inhibition may aggravate acute liver damage by suppressing cytoprotective autophagy. CCl4 was used as an acute liver injury inducer which caused oxidative stress and apoptosis through up-regulation of HIF-1α, as well as triggered hepatic inflammation and necroptosis via TLR4/NF-κB pathway. Caspase-9 Thr125 site was firstly phosphorylated by ERK1/2 which subsequently activated the cytoprotective autophagy process to attenuate acute CCl4 injury. Caspase-9 inhibition further aggravated hepatic necroptosis through NF-κB expression, leading to increased pro-inflammatory mediators levels, suggesting a protective role of caspase-9-dependent autophagy in the inflammatory process as well as its possibility being a new therapeutic target for the treatment of acute liver injury. PMID:27580936

  16. Pancreatography after recovery from massive pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Howard, J M; Wagner, S M

    1989-01-01

    Massive retroperitoneal necrosis may follow life-threatening acute pancreatitis. At delayed operation, the surgeon may not be able to delineate dead pancreas from dead adipose tissue. The question arises: has "gloved hand" debridement resulted in pancreatectomy? The histologists report only "necrotic debris, of uncertain origin." To obtain objective data, pancreatography was performed in 13 patients, 10 weeks to 23 months after onset of massive pancreatic necrosis. Each patient had required delayed laparotomy for debridement and external drainage at some earlier stage of their illness. Pancreatography was correlated with the clinical assessment of diabetes and steatorrhea. Except in specific cases involving internal fistulae, pancreatography has not been previously reported in such patients. The results demonstrate that the main pancreatic duct usually maintained its normal length and configuration. Necrosis or stricture of the main duct, if it occurred, was more likely to be followed by diabetes. Steatorrhea was clinically detected in a single patient only. The necrotic tissue, up to several kilograms in wet weight, is largely dead adipose tissue. The pancreas, especially its head, is resistant to necrosis, much more resistant than is the retroperitoneal fat. PMID:2910213

  17. Radiologic–Pathologic Correlation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Ahsun; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Kulik, Laura; Ryu, Robert K.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Baker, Talia; Gates, Vanessa; Nayar, Ritu; Wang, Ed; Miller, Frank H.; Sato, Kent T.; Omary, Reed A.; Abecassis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To correlate posttreatment radiologic and pathologic findings in patients who underwent transarterial chemoembolization before transplantation or resection. Thirty-five patients with postchemoembolization follow-up imaging underwent liver transplantation/resection. Pre- and posttreatment contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were used to evaluate radiologic findings. Imaging characteristics using World Health Organization (WHO) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria after treatment were evaluated. Treated lesions were examined by pathology (gold standard) for the assessment of necrosis. Radiologic findings on magnetic resonance imaging were correlated to pathologic findings to assess the predictability by imaging of actual necrosis. Kappa (κ) statistics were used to determine intermethod agreement between WHO and EASL criteria. Fourteen (40%) of 35 lesions had biopsy-proven hepatocellular carcinoma. Thirteen (37%) of 35 target lesions showed complete pathologic necrosis. Complete pathologic necrosis was seen in 35% of lesions with pretreatment size <3 cm. Complete pathologic necrosis was seen in 1 (100%) of 1, 6 (67%) of 9, 6 (33%) of 18, and 0 (0%) of 7 of the lesions that exhibited complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), or progressive disease (PD) by WHO criteria, respectively. Complete pathologic necrosis was seen in 9 (82%) of 11, 4 (36%) of 11, 0 (0%) of 8, and 0 (0%) of 5 of the lesions that showed CR, PR, SD, or PD by EASL criteria, respectively. EASL CR and WHO response were shown to have ≥85% specificity for predicting complete pathologic necrosis. The κ coefficient for agreement between WHO and EASL was 0.29. EASL and WHO criteria had minimal intermethod agreement. EASL CR and WHO response were able to predict pathologic necrosis. PMID:19967371

  18. Fulminant hepatitis in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis treated with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Brandi, Giovanni; De Lorenzo, Stefania; Di Girolamo, Stefania; Bellentani, Stefano; Saccoccio, Gioconda; Biasco, Guido

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of acute liver failure in a patient with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis during sorafenib treatment. A 74-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma associated with fatty liver. Three weeks after sorafenib therapy, at Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 3, he developed jaundice, general weakness, flapping tremor, nausea, and anorexia. Sorafenib was stopped: laboratory tests showed a relevant elevation of transaminases suggesting diagnosis of acute hepatitis. During hospital admission, the patient died of liver failure. Sorafenib is the first successful target therapy effective for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The most common adverse events are fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction, skin rash/desquamation, diarrhea, and hypertension, whereas liver dysfunction is uncommon. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported in the literature with hepatocellular carcinoma related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis who died of rapid worsening of liver function during sorafenib treatment. PMID:25702656

  19. Necrosis Avidity: A Newly Discovered Feature of Hypericin and its Preclinical Applications in Necrosis Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Binghu; Wang, Jichen; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Hypericin has been widely studied as a potent photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy in both preclinical and clinical settings. Recently, hypericin has also been discovered to have a specific avidity for necrotic tissue. This affinity is also observed in a series of radiolabeled derivatives of hypericin, including [123I]iodohypericin, [124I]iodohypericin, and [131I]iodohypericin. Hypericin, along with other necrosis-avid contrast agents, has been investigated for use in noninvasively targeting necrotic tissues in numerous disorders. Potential clinical applications of hypericin include the identification of acute myocardial infarction, evaluation of tissue viability, assessment of therapeutic responses to treatments, and interventional procedures for solid tumors. The mechanisms of necrosis avidity in hypericin remain to be fully elucidated, although several hypotheses have been suggested. In particular, it has been proposed that the necrosis avidity of hypericin is compound specific; for instance, cholesterol, phosphatidylserine, or phosphatidylethanolamine components in the phospholipid bilayer of cellular membranes may be the major targets for its observed selectivity. Further investigations are needed to identify the specific binding moiety that is responsible for the necrosis avidity of hypericin. PMID:24052807

  20. Biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Behne, Tara; Copur, M. Sitki

    2012-01-01

    The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors and carries a poor survival rate. The management of patients at risk for developing HCC remains challenging. Increased understanding of cancer biology and technological advances have enabled identification of a multitude of pathological, genetic, and molecular events that drive hepatocarcinogenesis leading to discovery of numerous potential biomarkers in this disease. They are currently being aggressively evaluated to establish their value in early diagnosis, optimization of therapy, reducing the emergence of new tumors, and preventing the recurrence after surgical resection or liver transplantation. These markers not only help in prediction of prognosis or recurrence but may also assist in deciding appropriate modality of therapy and may represent novel potential targets for therapeutic interventions. In this paper, a summary of most relevant available data from published papers reporting various tissue and serum biomarkers involved in hepatocellular carcinoma was presented. PMID:22655201

  1. Biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Behne, Tara; Copur, M Sitki

    2012-01-01

    The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors and carries a poor survival rate. The management of patients at risk for developing HCC remains challenging. Increased understanding of cancer biology and technological advances have enabled identification of a multitude of pathological, genetic, and molecular events that drive hepatocarcinogenesis leading to discovery of numerous potential biomarkers in this disease. They are currently being aggressively evaluated to establish their value in early diagnosis, optimization of therapy, reducing the emergence of new tumors, and preventing the recurrence after surgical resection or liver transplantation. These markers not only help in prediction of prognosis or recurrence but may also assist in deciding appropriate modality of therapy and may represent novel potential targets for therapeutic interventions. In this paper, a summary of most relevant available data from published papers reporting various tissue and serum biomarkers involved in hepatocellular carcinoma was presented. PMID:22655201

  2. Hepatocellular adenoma: An update

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Adarsh; Elaffandi, Ahmed; Khalaf, Hatem

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas (HCA) are rare benign liver tumors. Recent technological advancements have helped in the early identification of such lesions. However, precise diagnosis of hepatocellular incidentalomas remains challenging. Studies at the molecular level have provided new insights into the genetics and pathophysiology of these lesions. These in turn have raised questions over their existing management modalities. However, the rarity of the tumor still restricts the quality of evidence available for current recommendations and guidelines. This article provides a comprehensive review on the etiology, molecular biology, patho-physiology, clinical manifestations, and complications associated with HCA. It also elaborates on the genetic advancements, existing diagnostic tools and current guidelines for management for such lesions. PMID:26557953

  3. Prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kew, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Because of its frequency and grave prognosis, preventing hepatocellular carcinoma is an urgent priority. Prevention should be possible because environmental carcinogens-chronic hepatitis B and C virus infections, dietary exposure to aflatoxins, and iron overload-cause the great majority of these tumors. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection accounts for 55% of global hepatocellular carcinomas and 80% of those in the high-incidence Asia Pacific and sub-Saharan African regions. In these regions the infection that becomes chronic is predominantly acquired very early in life. A safe and effective vaccine against this virus is available and its universal inclusion in the immunization of infants has already resulted in a marked reduction of chronic infection and a 70% decrease in the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in those immunized. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is the major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in industrialized countries. The infection is mainly acquired in adulthood and, until a vaccine becomes available, prevention will consist mainly of identifying, counselling, and treating chronically infected individuals, preventing spread of the virus by the use of safe injection practices (particularly in intravenous drug abusers), and screening all donated blood for the presence of the virus. 4.5 billion of the world.s population are exposed to dietary aflatoxins. Prevention involves treating susceptible crops to prevent fungal contamination, and handling the foodstuffs in such a way as to prevent contamination during storage. Iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis can be prevented by repeated venesection and in African dietary iron overload by fermenting the home-brewed beer in iron-free containers. PMID:20526004

  4. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  5. Complete Penile Necrosis in a Patient With Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia: A Case Report*

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Anne-Sophie; Deschênes Rompré, Marie-Pier; Lacombe, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Penile necrosis is a rare condition that has been mostly described in association with diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal disease. We report an unusual case of acute penile necrosis because of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. A 75-year-old man presented with acute renal failure and experienced cardiac complications during the hospitalization. The patient was treated twice with intravenous heparin. He developed symptoms of penile necrosis 4 days after the reintroduction of heparin. At that moment, the platelet count dropped by 61%, and the analysis of heparin-pf4 antibodies was positive for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. The patient underwent a total penectomy and a perineal urethrostomy. PMID:26954936

  6. Protective effects of Parinari curatellifolia flavonoids against acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Olaleye, Mary Tolulope; Amobonye, Ayodeji Emmannuel; Komolafe, Kayode; Akinmoladun, Afolabi Clement

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the hepatoprotective potential of Parinari curatellifolia Planch (Chrysobalanaceae) in experimental rats in order to ascertain the validity of folkloric claims of its effectiveness in the treatment of hepatic-related disorders. Flavonoid extract of P. curatellifolia seed, PCF (10-, 20- or 30 mg/kg body weight) or silymarin (25 mg/kg), dissolved in corn oil, was administered by gavage to experimental animals once daily for 14 consecutive days before liver damage was chemically induced through the administration of acetaminophen (2 g/kg p.o.) on the 14th day. Hepatoprotection was assessed by analyzing liver homogenate and serum for markers of hepatotoxicity – alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities as well as prothrombin time (PT). Evaluation of biochemical indices of oxidative stress – level of lipid peroxides (LPO), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, along with histological assessment of hepatic tissue sections were also carried out. Results revealed that all doses of PCF significantly (P < 0.001) and dose dependently prevented acetaminophen-induced increase in serum activities of hepatic enzymes (ALT, AST, GGT, LDH) and PT. Furthermore, PCF (10- and 20 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.001) reduced lipid peroxidation in liver tissue and restored the activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and catalase toward normal levels. Histopathology of the liver tissue showed that PCF mitigated the toxicant-induced hepatocellular necrosis, reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and enhanced hepatocyte regeneration. The results indicated that P. curatellifolia flavonoids demonstrated remarkable hepatoprotective activity in acute liver injury caused by acetaminophen. PMID:25313285

  7. Current update on combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maximin, Suresh; Ganeshan, Dhakshina Moorthy; Shanbhogue, Alampady K.; Dighe, Manjiri K.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Bhargava, Puneet; Lalwani, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma is a rare but unique primary hepatic tumor with characteristic histology and tumor biology. Recent development in genetics and molecular biology support the fact that combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma is closely linked with cholangiocarcinoma, rather than hepatocellular carcinoma. Combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinoma tends to present with an more aggressive behavior and a poorer prognosis than either hepatocellular carcinoma or cholangiocarcinoma. An accurate preoperative diagnosis and aggressive treatment planning can play crucial roles in appropriate patient management. PMID:26937426

  8. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma with rapid growth after spontaneous regression

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tomoki; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Watanabe, Tadashi; Noda, Masao; Fuji, Nobuaki; Minami, Masahito; Itoh, Yoshito; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    We report an 80-year-old man who presented with sponta- neous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). He complained of sudden right flank pain and low-grade fever. The level of protein induced by vitamin K antagonist (PIVKA)-II was 1137 mAU/mL. A computed tomography scan in November 2000 demonstrated a low-density mass located in liver S4 with marginal enhancement and a cystic mass of 68 mm × 55 mm in liver S6, with slightly high density content and without marginal enhancement. Angiography revealed that the tumor in S4 with a size of 25 mm × 20 mm was a typical hypervascular HCC, and transarterial chemoembolization was performed. However, the tumor in S6 was hypovascular and atypical of HCC, and thus no therapy was given. In December 2000, the cystic mass regressed spontaneously to 57 mm × 44 mm, and aspiration cytology revealed bloody fluid, and the mass was diagnosed cytologically as class I. The tumor in S4 was treated successfully with a 5 mm margin of safety around it. The PIVKA-II level normalized in February 2001. In July 2001, the tumor regressed further but presented with an enhanced area at the posterior margin. In November 2001, the enhanced area extended, and a biopsy revealed well-differentiated HCC, although the previous tumor in S4 disappeared. Angiography demonstrated two tumor stains, one was in S6, which was previously hypovascular, and the other was in S8. Subsequently, the PIVKA-II level started to rise with the doubling time of 2-3 wk, and the tumor grew rapidly despite repeated transarterial embolization with gel foam. In February 2003, the patient died of bleeding into the peritoneal cavity from the tumor that occupied almost the entire right lobe. Considering the acute onset of the symptoms, we speculate that local ischemia possibly due to rapid tumor growth, resulted in intratumoral bleeding and/or hemorrhagic necrosis, and finally spontaneous regression of the initial tumor in S6. PMID:15484326

  9. Mechanisms of Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Dean W.; James, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Although considered safe at therapeutic doses, at higher doses, acetaminophen produces a centrilobular hepatic necrosis that can be fatal. Acetaminophen poisoning accounts for approximately one-half of all cases of acute liver failure in the United States and Great Britain today. The mechanism occurs by a complex sequence of events. These events include: (1) CYP metabolism to a reactive metabolite which depletes glutathione and covalently binds to proteins; (2) loss of glutathione with an increased formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in hepatocytes undergoing necrotic changes; (3) increased oxidative stress, associated with alterations in calcium homeostasis and initiation of signal transduction responses, causing mitochondrial permeability transition; (4) mitochondrial permeability transition occurring with additional oxidative stress, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and loss of the ability of the mitochondria to synthesize ATP; and (5) loss of ATP which leads to necrosis. Associated with these essential events there appear to be a number of inflammatory mediators such as certain cytokines and chemokines that can modify the toxicity. Some have been shown to alter oxidative stress, but the relationship of these modulators to other critical mechanistic events has not been well delineated. In addition, existing data support the involvement of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in the initiation of regenerative processes leading to the reestablishment of hepatic structure and function. PMID:20020268

  10. Bilateral putaminal necrosis and bronopol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Trivisano, Marina; Carapelle, Elena; Martino, Tommaso; Specchio, Luigi Maria

    2015-01-01

    Among alcohols, methanol intoxication is the most frequently associated with cerebral toxicity, causing retinal damage and putaminal necrosis. This consequence is believed to be due to the transformation of methanol into formic acid. We describe the case of a patient who presented with acute impairment of consciousness and tetraparesis after she had been drinking several bottles of a topical antiseptic solution (Lysoform Medical) containing 2-bromo-2-nitro-1,3-propandiol (bronopol) among excipients, in order to lose weight during previous months. Moreover, she had been on a strict slimming diet. Soon after admission, a severe respiratory and metabolic impairment became rapidly evident, requiring an intensive care unit admission. Cerebral MRI showed the presence of bilateral putaminal necrosis. She recovered in 10 days, surprisingly, without any evident clinical neurological signs. Methanol, also bronopol, when diluted in aqueous solution, at warm temperature and/or higher pH, may release formaldehyde, which is converted into formic acid, a basal ganglia toxic compound. PMID:25697297

  11. An Unusual Complication Following Transarterial Chemoembolization: Acute Myocardial Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Yiliang; Chang Weichou; Kuo Wuhsien; Huang Tienyu; Chu Hengcheng; Hsieh Tsaiyuan; Chang Weikuo

    2010-02-15

    Transarterial chemoembolization has been widely used to treat unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Various complications have been reported, but they have not included acute myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction results mainly from coronary artery occlusion by plaques that are vulnerable to rupture or from coronary spasm, embolization, or dissection of the coronary artery. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case report that describes a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent transarterial chemoembolization and died subsequently of acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of this complication induced by transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. This case illustrates the need to be aware of acute myocardial infarction when transarterial chemoembolization is planned for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, especially in patients with underlying coronary artery disease.

  12. Irreversible Electroporation of a Hepatocellular Carcinoma Lesion Adjacent to a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Stent Graft

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ernst Michael; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.; Trabold, Benedikt; Haimerl, Michael; Schreyer, Andreas; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    We report in a 65-year-old man hepatocellular carcinoma adjacent to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent-graft which was successfully treated with irreversible electroporation (IRE). IRE is a new non-thermal tissue ablation technique which uses electrical pulses to induce cell necrosis by irreversible membrane poration. IRE proved to be more advantageous in the ablation of perivascular tumor with little injury to the surrounding structures. PMID:24043975

  13. Histopathology of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlageter, Manuel; Terracciano, Luigi Maria; D’Angelo, Salvatore; Sorrentino, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the sixth most common type of cancer with a high mortality rate and an increasing incidence worldwide. Its etiology is usually linked to environmental, dietary or life-style factors. HCC most commonly arises in a cirrhotic liver but interestingly an increasing proportion of HCCs develop in the non-fibrotic or minimal fibrotic liver and a shift in the underlying etiology can be observed. Although this process is yet to be completely understood, this changing scenario also has impact on the material seen by pathologists, presenting them with new diagnostic dilemmas. Histopathologic criteria for diagnosing classical, progressed HCC are well established and known, but with an increase in detection of small and early HCCs due to routine screening programs, the diagnosis of these small lesions in core needle biopsies poses a difficult challenge. These lesions can be far more difficult to distinguish from one another than progressed HCC, which is usually a clear cut hematoxylin and eosin diagnosis. Furthermore lesions thought to derive from progenitor cells have recently been reclassified in the WHO. This review summarizes recent developments and tries to put new HCC biomarkers in context with the WHOs reclassification. Furthermore it also addresses the group of tumors known as combined hepatocellular-cholangiocellular carcinomas. PMID:25473149

  14. Correlation between liver cell necrosis and circulating alanine aminotransferase after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Anders R; Andersen, Kasper J; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Nyengaard, Jens R; Mortensen, Frank V

    2016-04-01

    Circulating liver enzymes such as alanine transaminase are often used as markers of hepatocellular damage. Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an inevitable consequence of prolonged liver ischaemia. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between liver enzymes and volume of liver cell necrosis after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries, using design-unbiased stereological methods. Forty-seven male Wistar rats were subjected to 1 h of partial liver ischaemia, followed by either 4 or 24 h of reperfusion. Within each group, one-third of animals were subjected to ischaemic preconditioning and one-third to ischaemic postconditioning. At the end of reperfusion, blood and liver samples were collected for analysis. The volume of necrotic liver tissue was subsequently correlated to circulating markers of I/R injury. Correlation between histological findings and circulating markers was performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Alanine transferase peaked after 4 h of reperfusion; however, at this time-point, only mild necrosis was observed, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.663 (P = 0.001). After 24 h of reperfusion, alanine aminotransferase was found to be highly correlated to the degree of hepatocellular necrosis R = 0.836 (P = 0.000). Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase (R = 0.806) and α-2-macroglobulin (R = 0.655) levels were also correlated with the degree of necrosis. We show for the first time that there is a close correlation between the volume of hepatocellular necrosis and alanine aminotransferase levels in a model of I/R injury. This is especially apparent after 24 h of reperfusion. Similarly, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase and α-2-macroglobulin are correlated to the volume of liver necrosis. PMID:27292534

  15. [Renal ultrasound in fat necrosis].

    PubMed

    Tizki, S; Lasry, F; Elftoiki, F Z; Hadj Khalifa, H; Itri, M; Khadir, K; Benchikhi, H

    2013-07-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis is an uncommon disease that may be complicated with potentially fatal hypercalcemia or with nephrocalcinosis. We report on the case of a patient with a history of significant perinatal asphyxia, hospitalized for a urinary tract infection. Lesions of subcutaneous fat necrosis were noted, with asymptomatic hypercalcemia at 3.9mmol/L. A renal ultrasound was performed and showed echogenic medullary pyramids bilaterally, consistent with nephrocalcinosis and left nephrolithiasis. The treatment of hypercalcemia included hyperhydration, a diuretic and corticosteroids. Progression was characterized by the total regression of skin lesions and normalization of serum calcium. Hypercalcemia is a rare complication of subcutaneous fat necrosis. It develops within days to weeks after the appearance of skin lesions. Nephrocalcinosis appears after several weeks or months. Hypercalcemia must be treated in due time to avoid the impact on the kidney. PMID:23726682

  16. Microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Emre; İdilman, İlkay Sedakat; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular invasion is a crucial histopathologic prognostic factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. We reviewed the literature and aimed to draw attention to clinicopathologic and imaging findings that may predict the presence of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma. Imaging findings suggesting microvascular invasion are disruption of capsule, irregular tumor margin, peritumoral enhancement, multifocal tumor, increased tumor size, and increased glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In the presence of typical findings, microvascular invasion may be predicted. PMID:26782155

  17. Radiological Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Samir; Shukla, Akash; Paunipagar, Bhawan

    2014-01-01

    Present article is a review of radiological features of hepatocellular carcinoma on various imaging modalities. With the advancement in imaging techniques, biopsy is rarely needed for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), unlike other malignancies. Imaging is useful not only for diagnosis but also for surveillance, therapy and assessing response to treatment. The classical and the atypical radiological features of HCC have been described. PMID:25755613

  18. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Widespread marrow necrosis during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Knickerbocker, W.J.; Quenville, N.F.

    1982-11-01

    Recently, a 22-year-old Caucasian female was referred to our Hospital two days post-partum. She had been feeling unwell during the last few days of her pregnancy and complained of multiple aches and pains, worst in the abdomen and lower back. Her admission platelet count was severely depressed and a bone biopsy showed extensive marrow necrosis with viable bony trabeculae. There was no evidence of vasculitis, vascular thrombosis, or malignancy. Widespread marrow necrosis in pregnancy followed by recovery, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported.

  20. Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered to be one of the most common malignancies worldwide, and the most common one in Africa and Asia. Over the last decade, a rising incidence of up to 10-15/100,000 per population has been seen in the Western world, with an estimate of 250,000 deaths and more than a million worldwide per year. By the year 2010, the World Health Organization expects that HCC will be the leading cause of cancer mortality surpassing lung cancer. This increasing incidence is most likely related to an increasing prevalence of chronic hepatitis C (HC) and B (HB) virus infections and other diseases inducing chronic inflammation (Befeler and Di Bisceglie 2002; Llovet et al. 2003).

  1. Diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.

    2005-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is responsible for a large proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. HCC is frequently diagnosed after the development of clinical deterioration at which time survival is measured in months. Long-term survival requires detection of small tumors, often present in asymptomatic individuals, which may be more amenable to invasive therapeutic options. Surveillance of high-risk individuals for HCC is commonly performed using the serum marker alfa-fetoprotein (AFP) often in combination with ultrasonography. Various other serologic markers are currently being tested to help improve surveillance accuracy. Diagnosis of HCC often requires more sophisticated imaging modalities such as CT scan and MRI, which have multiphasic contrast enhancement capabilities. Serum AFP used alone can be helpful if levels are markedly elevated, which occurs in fewer than half of cases at time of diagnosis. Confirmation by liver biopsy can be performed under circumstances when the diagnosis of HCC remains unclear. PMID:18333158

  2. Acute Effect of Intravenous Administration of Magnesium Sulfate on Serum Levels of Interleukin-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in Patients Undergoing Elective Coronary Bypass Graft With Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Aryana, Parastou; Rajaei, Samira; Bagheri, Abdolhamid; Karimi, Forouzan; Dabbagh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular problems are among the most common health issues. A considerable number of cardiac patients undergo cardiac surgery, and coronary artery disease patients constitute about two-thirds of all these surgeries. The application of cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP) usually results in some untoward effects. Objectives: Studies have suggested magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) as an anti-inflammatory agent in a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). This study aimed to assess the effect of an IV MgSO4 infusion during elective CABG (with CBP) on the blood levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Materials and Methods: During a 12 month period, after review board approval and based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, 90 patients were selected and entered randomly into one of the two study groups (MgSO4 or placebo). Anesthesia, surgery and CBP were performed in exactly the same way, except for the use of MgSO4 or a placebo. Both preoperative and postoperative plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were checked and compared between the two groups using an ELISA. Results: There was no difference found between the two groups with regard to; gender, basic variables, Ejection Fraction (EF), CBP time and aortic cross-clamp time. The preoperative levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were not different; however, their postoperative levels were significantly higher in the placebo group (P value = 0.01 for IL-6 and 0.005 for TNF-α). Conclusions: This study showed that MgSO4 infusion could suppress part of the inflammatory response after CABG with CBP. This was demonstrated by decreased levels of interleukin-6 and TNF-α in postoperative serum levels in elective CABG with CBP. PMID:25237633

  3. Protective effect of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in acute dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis: differential regulation of tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-18 in BALB/c and severe combined immunodeficiency mice

    PubMed Central

    Hudcovic, T; Kolinska, J; Klepetar, J; Stepankova, R; Rezanka, T; Srutkova, D; Schwarzer, M; Erban, V; Du, Z; Wells, J M; Hrncir, T; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, H; Kozakova, H

    2012-01-01

    One of the promising approaches in the therapy of ulcerative colitis is administration of butyrate, an energy source for colonocytes, into the lumen of the colon. This study investigates the effect of butyrate producing bacterium Clostridium tyrobutyricum on dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. Immunocompetent BALB/c and immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice reared in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) conditions were treated intrarectally with C. tyrobutyricum 1 week prior to the induction of DSS colitis and during oral DSS treatment. Administration of DSS without C. tyrobutyricum treatment led to an appearance of clinical symptoms – bleeding, rectal prolapses and colitis-induced increase in the antigen CD11b, a marker of infiltrating inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. The severity of colitis was similar in BALB/c and SCID mice as judged by the histological damage score and colon shortening after 7 days of DSS treatment. Both strains of mice also showed a similar reduction in tight junction (TJ) protein zonula occludens (ZO)-1 expression and of MUC-2 mucin depression. Highly elevated levels of cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the colon of SCID mice and of interleukin (IL)-18 in BALB/c mice were observed. Intrarectal administration of C. tyrobutyricum prevented appearance of clinical symptoms of DSS-colitis, restored normal MUC-2 production, unaltered expression of TJ protein ZO-1 and decreased levels of TNF-α and IL-18 in the descending colon of SCID and BALB/c mice, respectively. Some of these features can be ascribed to the increased production of butyrate in the lumen of the colon and its role in protection of barrier functions and regulation of IL-18 expression. PMID:22236013

  4. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Who have Previously Received Sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Nitesh; Ju, Andrew Wenhua; Bazylewicz, Michael; Kallakury, Bhaskar; He, Aiwu Ruth; Unger, Keith R.; Lee, Justin S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) is a locoregional therapy option for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor used in HCC that can potentially affect the efficacy of RE by altering tumor vascularity or suppressing post-irradiation angiogenesis. The safety and efficacy of sorafenib followed by RE has not been previously reported. Materials and Methods: Patients with HCC who received RE after sorafenib were included in this retrospective review. Overall survival, toxicity, and maximal radiographic response and necrosis criteria were examined. Results: Ten patients (15 RE administrations) fit the inclusion criteria. All were Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage C. Median follow-up was 16.5 weeks. Median overall survival and radiographic progression-free survival were 30 and 28 weeks, respectively. Significant differences in overall survival were seen based on Child-Pugh class (p = 0.002) and radiographic response (p = 0.009). Three patients had partial response, six had stable disease, and one had progressive disease. Grade 1 or 2 acute fatigue, anorexia, and abdominal pain were common. Three patients had Grade 3 ascites in the setting of disease progression. Two patients had Grade 3 biochemical toxicity. One patient was sufficiently downstaged following RE and sorafenib to receive a partial hepatectomy. Conclusion: Yttrium-90 RE in patients with HCC who have received sorafenib demonstrate acceptable toxicity and rates of radiographic response. However, the overall survival is lower than that reported in the literature on RE alone or sorafenib alone. This may be due in part to more patients in this study having advanced disease compared to these other study populations. Larger prospective studies are needed to determine whether the combination of RE and sorafenib is superior to either therapy alone. PMID:24416722

  5. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  6. Nutrition and Hepatocellular Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schütte, Kerstin; Schulz, Christian; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) significantly contributes to the global burden of cancer. Liver cancer is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death with HCC representing more than 90% of primary liver cancers. The majority of patients are not only affected by the malignant disease but do also suffer from chronic liver disease. Therefore, several factors impact on the prognosis of patients with HCC, including tumor-related factors, liver function and patient-related factors such as performance status and other comorbidities. The nutritional status is of high significance for the patients' performance status, the tolerance of tumor-targeting therapy and the prognosis of cancer of any type and is specially referenced in HCC. This overview is on current concepts on the role of nutritional factors in hepatocarcinogenesis and the role of nutrition in patients affected by HCC. Summary Nutritional status and composition of diet are relevant factors related to the risk of HCC. They also have an important role concerning the prognosis of patients with HCC. Besides risk factors, several macro- and micronutrient components have been found to be inversely correlated with the risk of HCC. To prevent disease progression to liver cirrhosis or HCC in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, it is crucial to optimize the metabolic state Key Message and Practical Implication Evidence from well-designed prospective interventional trials with the aim to reduce the HCC incidence or to prolong survival in patients with HCC based on nutritional modification is still to be generated. PMID:27403413

  7. Immunology of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Meenakshi; Chawla, Yogesh K; Arora, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is primarily a malignancy of the liver, advancing from a damaged, cirrhotic liver to HCC. Globally, HCC is the sixth most prevalent cancer and the third-most prevalent reason for neoplastic disease-related deaths. A diverse array of infiltrating immunocytes regulates the development and progression of HCC, as is the case in many other cancers. An understanding of the various immune components during HCC becomes necessary so that novel therapeutic strategies can be designed to combat the disease. A dysregulated immune system (including changes in the number and/or function of immune cells, cytokine levels, and the expression of inhibitory receptors or their ligands) plays a key role in the development of HCC. Alterations in either the innate or adaptive arm of the immune system and cross-talk between them make the immune system tolerant to tumors, leading to disease progression. In this review, we have discussed the status and roles of various immune effector cells (e.g., dendritic cells, natural killer cells, macrophages, and T cells), their cytokine profile, and the chemokine-receptor axis in promoting or impeding HCC. PMID:26301050

  8. Screening for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mindie H; Keeffe, Emmet B

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is common throughout the world and most often develops as a late complication of chronic viral hepatitis or cirrhosis of any cause. As a result of the high prevalence rate of chronic hepatitis C, the incidence of HCC is rising in the United States, as well as in European and Asian countries. The overall survival rate of HCC is poor, and surgical resection and liver transplantation are the only curative treatment options. Screening for HCC offers the best hope for early detection, eligibility for treatment, and improved survival. Most physicians routinely screen at-risk patients with chronic viral hepatitis and cirrhosis for HCC, despite the lack of official guidelines. The current consensus recommendations are to screen healthy hepatitis B virus carriers with annual or semiannual serum alpha-fetoprotein; carriers with chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis and patients with cirrhosis of any etiology are surveyed with twice yearly serum alpha-fetoprotein and liver ultrasound. This article will review the current recommendations for HCC screening, the rationale that led to these recommendations, and the challenges of cost-effectiveness research in this area. PMID:12394211

  9. Staging of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duseja, Ajay

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is different from other malignancies because the prognosis in HCC is not only dependent upon the tumor stage but also on the liver function impairment due to accompanying cirrhosis liver. Various other staging systems used in HCC include the European systems [French staging system, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system and the cancer of the liver Italian program (CLIP)] and Asian systems [Okuda staging system, Japan integrated Staging (JIS), Tokyo score and Chinese University Prognostic Index (CUPI)]. Out of all the staging systems used in HCC, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system is probably the best because it takes in to account the tumor status (defined by tumor size and number, presence of vascular invasion and extrahepatic spread), liver function (defined either by the Child-Pugh's class) and general health status of the patient (defined by the ECOG classification and the presence of symptoms). Since most of the extrahepatic spread in HCC occurs to lymph nodes, lungs and bones, the assessment can be done with either PET/CT or a combination of CT (Chest and abdomen) and a bone scan. This article describes the various staging systems used in HCC, guides choosing a staging system particularly in the Indian context and the assessment of extra-hepatic spread in HCC. PMID:25755615

  10. Chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the standard of care for patients with preserved liver function and asymptomatic, noninvasive multinodular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) confined to the liver. However, the survival benefit of conventional TACE-including the administration of an anticancer agent-in-oil emulsion followed by embolic agents-reported in randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses was described as modest. Various strategies to improve outcomes for this patient group have become the subject of much ongoing clinical research. The introduction of embolic, drug-eluting beads (DEB) for transarterial administration has been shown to significantly reduce liver toxicity and systemic drug exposure compared to conventional regimens. The addition of molecular targeted drugs to the therapeutic armamentarium for HCC has prompted the design of clinical trials aimed at investigating the synergies between TACE and systemic treatments. Combining TACE with agents with anti-angiogenic properties represents a promising strategy, because TACE is thought to cause local hypoxia, resulting in a temporary increase in levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. Recently, a large phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (the SPACE study) has shown that the concurrent administration of DEB-TACE and sorafenib has a manageable safety profile and has suggested that time to progression and time to vascular invasion or extrahepatic spread may be improved with respect to DEB-TACE alone. These data support the further evaluation of molecular targeted, systemically active agents in combination with DEB-TACE in a phase III setting. PMID:22846867

  11. Chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the current standard of care for patients with intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and relatively preserved liver function. In a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing conventional TACE regimens-including the administration of an anticancer-in-oil emulsion followed by embolic agents-versus best supportive care, TACE was shown to improve median survival from 16 to 20 months. Various strategies to improve outcomes for this patient group have become the subject of much ongoing clinical research. The introduction of an embolic drug-eluting bead (DEB) has been shown to substantially improve the pharmacokinetic profile of TACE, providing levels of consistency and repeatability not available with conventional regimens while concomitantly significantly diminishing systemic drug exposure. In randomized trials, DEB-TACE significantly reduced liver toxicity and drug-related adverse events compared with conventional TACE. In this article, technique, indications and contraindications, and clinical outcomes of conventional and DEB-TACE in the management of HCC are reviewed. In addition, scientific background and early clinical experience with the use of combination regimens including TACE and systemically active molecular-targeted agents with antiangiogenic properties are discussed. The combination of DEB-TACE and antiangiogenic therapy represents a potentially powerful approach that is currently undergoing clinical investigation in a phase 3 setting. PMID:24436512

  12. Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the current standard of care for patients with intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and relatively preserved liver function. In a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing conventional TACE regimens—including the administration of an anticancer-in-oil emulsion followed by embolic agents—versus best supportive care, TACE was shown to improve median survival from 16 to 20 months. Various strategies to improve outcomes for this patient group have become the subject of much ongoing clinical research. The introduction of an embolic drug-eluting bead (DEB) has been shown to substantially improve the pharmacokinetic profile of TACE, providing levels of consistency and repeatability not available with conventional regimens while concomitantly significantly diminishing systemic drug exposure. In randomized trials, DEB-TACE significantly reduced liver toxicity and drug-related adverse events compared with conventional TACE. In this article, technique, indications and contraindications, and clinical outcomes of conventional and DEB-TACE in the management of HCC are reviewed. In addition, scientific background and early clinical experience with the use of combination regimens including TACE and systemically active molecular-targeted agents with antiangiogenic properties are discussed. The combination of DEB-TACE and antiangiogenic therapy represents a potentially powerful approach that is currently undergoing clinical investigation in a phase 3 setting. PMID:24436512

  13. Pancreatic necrosis: results of necrosectomy, packing, and ultimate closure over drains.

    PubMed Central

    Branum, G; Galloway, J; Hirchowitz, W; Fendley, M; Hunter, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The treatment of pancreatic necrosis at a tertiary referral center was reviewed to effect better patient outcome. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pancreatic necrosis is a devastating disease that leads to death in 10% to 50% of cases. Infected necrosis is particularly deadly because 80% of deaths from necrosis are due to infection or its complications. Therapeutic strategies center on aggressive support of organ systems and prevention and treatment of infectious complications. METHODS: Records of all patients who underwent pancreatic necrosectomy from 1990 to 1996 at Emory University Hospital were reviewed. Patients with infected necrosis were debrided as soon as the diagnosis was made. Reoperation for completion necrosectomy with ultimate closure over lavage catheters was performed as necessary. RESULTS: Of the 244 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis in the study period, 50 underwent pancreatic debridement. The mean age was 52 years, and 74% of patients were transferred from other institutions. Eighty-four percent of patients had infected necrosis, and all patients underwent sequential debridement with eventual closure over drains. Organ failure occurred in 72% of cases, and the overall mortality rate was 12%. The mean length of stay was 54 days. CONCLUSIONS: The management of pancreatic necrosis demands the allocation of extensive resources. An aggressive operative strategy of multiple debridements with ultimate closure over drains can lead to a low mortality rate in patients with this complex disease, but the determination of when to explore patients with sterile necrosis remains difficult. PMID:9637550

  14. Genetic heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, H.; Isselbacher, K.J. ); Yakicier, C.; Marcais, C.; Ozturk, M. ); Kew, M. ); Volkmann, M. ); Zentgraf, H. )

    1994-01-18

    The authors studied 80 hepatocellular carcinomas from three continents for p53 gene (TP53) mutations and hepatitis B virus (HBV) sequences. p53 mutations were frequent in tumors from Mozambique but not in tumors from South Africa, China, and Germany. Independent of geographic origin, most tumors were positive for HBV sequences. X gene coding sequences of HBV were detected in 78% of tumors, whereas viral sequences in the surface antigen- and core antigen-encoding regions were present in less than 35% of tumors. These observations indicate that hepatocellular carcinomas are genetically heterogeneous. Mozambican-types of hepatocellular carcinomas are characterized by a high incidence of p53 mutations related to aflatoxins. In other tumors, the rarity of p53 mutations combined with the frequent presence of viral X gene coding sequences suggests a possible interference of HBV with the wild-type p53 function.

  15. [Talus necrosis and its treatment].

    PubMed

    Trauth, J; Bläsius, K

    1988-08-01

    Aetiopathogenesis of the necrosis of the talus has not yet been definitely clarified, and neither has that of the other aseptic necroses. We were able to study the aetiopathogenesis, course of the disease and therapy in 20 of our own patients by follow-up; two of these developed necrosis of the talus in both feet. We definitely excluded patients suffering from osteochondrosis dissecans. Even though fracture of the talus is on the whole relatively rare, it remains the most frequent cause of necrosis of the talus. We also found talonecrosis after surgical correction of clubfoot, after Sudeck's disease (Sudeck-Leriche syndrome, Sudeck's atrophy or dystrophy), suppurative arthritis of the ankle joint, subtalar luxation and haematogenic osteomyelitis. Only few patients required surgery. In most cases a special boot constructed for arthrodesis patients proved sufficient. Each patient developed arthrodesis to a different degree. Depending upon the complaints and stiffening of the ankle joint or of the talo-calcanonavicular joint, the capacity of the patients to be gainfully employed was reduced by an amount between 20 and 30 per cent. PMID:2905578

  16. Infiltrative Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaopeng; Fu, Xu; Deng, Min; Chen, Jun; He, Jian; Shi, Jiong; Qiu, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on infiltrative hepatocellular carcinoma (iHCC) receiving hepatectomy are unclear. Our study assessed the outcomes, effects of anatomical resection, and prognostic factors in a cohort of Chinese patients with iHCC undergoing hepatectomy. Data from 47 patients with iHCC undergoing hepatectomy were analyzed in a retrospective study. Independent prognostic factors of overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Correlations between microvascular invasion (MVI) and clinicopathological features were assessed using the χ2 test, Student t test, or the Mann–Whitney U test. Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The median OS was 27.37 months and the 1-year RFS rate were 61.7%. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was not a specific parameter in iHCC patients undergoing hepatectomy. Anatomic resection was significantly associated with increased RFS (P = 0.007). Patients showing MVI were observed with decreased RFS (P < 0.001). A high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level was significantly associated with decreased OS and RFS (P = 0.003 and P = 0.020, respectively). MVI was shown correlated with the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and LDH. Subgroup analysis indicated that in mild MVI group, survival outcome was significantly more favorable in patients with high LDH level (P = 0.019). iHCC patients are related with higher MVI rate and patients may still derive survival benefit from anatomic resection at early and intermediate stages. MVI classification could be used to identify iHCC patients with a poorer survival, especially those with a high preoperative LDH level. PMID:27175659

  17. Liver necrosis and photosensitisation in cattle after eating Persicaria lapathifolia (pale knotweed) and Persicaria orientalis (Prince's feather).

    PubMed

    Lugton, I W; Woolacott, J

    2014-03-01

    Cattle deaths in two contemporaneous incidents were attributed to acute intoxication with Persicaria lapathifolia and P. orientalis when the plants were under heat and moisture stress. To our knowledge this is the first confirmed report of acute, fatal hepatic necrosis associated with ingestion of these plants. PMID:24571339

  18. Interventional therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Isaac R.; Novelli, Paula M.; Vellody, Ranjith; Pandya, Amit; Krishnamurthy, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer-related death. In the past few years, staging systems have been developed that enable patients to be stratified into treatment algorithms in a multidisciplinary setting. Several of these treatments involve minimally invasive image-guided therapy that can be performed by radiologists. PMID:22487698

  19. The Oncogenic MicroRNA miR-21 Promotes Regulated Necrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaodong; Conklin, Daniel J.; Li, Fenge; Dai, Zhongping; Hua, Xiang; Li, Yan; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Young, Ken H.; Xiong, Wei; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate apoptosis, yet their role in regulated necrosis remains unknown. miR-21 is overexpressed in nearly all human cancer types and its role as an oncogene is suggested to largely depend on its anti-apoptotic action. Here we show that miR-21 is overexpressed in a murine model of acute pancreatitis, a pathologic condition involving RIP3-dependent regulated necrosis (necroptosis). Therefore, we investigate the role of miR-21 in acute pancreatitis injury and necroptosis. miR-21 deficiency protects against caerulein- or L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. miR-21 inhibition using locked-nucleic-acid-modified oligonucleotide effectively reduces pancreatitis severity. miR-21 deletion is also protective in tumor necrosis factor-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome. These data suggest that miRNAs are critical participants in necroptosis, and miR-21 enhances cellular necrosis by negatively regulating tumor suppressor genes associated with the death-receptor-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway and could be a therapeutic target for preventing pathologic necrosis. PMID:25990308

  20. Coexistence of splenic marginal zone lymphoma with hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-Hui; Xu, Ai-Min; Zheng, Jian-Ming; He, Miao-Xia

    2007-01-01

    Background Coexistence of splenic marginal zone lymphoma with hepatocellular carcinoma is rare. Although some reports have suggested the possible pathogenic role of HBV, HCV, chronic and persistent antigenic stimulation in lymphoma, their role in causing lymphomas is still unclear. Case presentation We describe a hepatocellular carcinoma with concomitant splenic marginal zone lymphoma in a 64-year-old Chinese man with cirrhosis. Serum hepatitis B virus surface antigen was positive and antihepatitis C virus antibody was negative. The resected liver mass measuring 4 × 3 × 3 cm was grey and soft with a small area of bleeding, necrosis and intact capsule. Cut surface of the spleen was red-purple and had a diffuse reticulonodular appearance indicative of prominent white pulp. On histologic sections, the liver mass was well and moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, and the splenic tumor was a specific low-grade small B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining and gene rearrangement studies supported that the splenic tumor represents a clonal B-cell lymphoma. Therefore, the diagnosis of SMZL was made from the splenic specimen. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the second case report describing coexistence of hepatocellular carcinoma and splenic marginal zone lymphoma in the course of chronic HBV infection. However, we cannot assert at present that hepatitis B virus is directly involved in splenic lymphomagenesis until more information is collected from more cases in the future. PMID:17284308

  1. Skin necrosis caused by prallethrin-A worldwide used insecticide.

    PubMed

    Botnariu, Gina; Birsan, Cristina; Podoleanu, Cristian; Moldovan, Cosmin; Stolnicu, Simona; Chiriac, Anca

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of necrosis caused by the use of prallethrin (mosquito repellent) on the skin in a 67-year-old diabetic female patient suffering from delusions of parasitosis. Cutaneous toxicity due to pyrethroids is less known or reported, despite well-documented pyrethroid poisoning involving the gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiac, and nervous systems. Skin irritation has been described after acute accidental exposure but, as far as we know, no data have been published on the effects of pyrethroids when applied directly to the skin. PMID:26987111

  2. Avascular necrosis of bone after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: clinical findings, incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Socié, G; Sélimi, F; Sedel, L; Frija, J; Devergie, A; Esperou Bourdeau, H; Ribaud, P; Gluckman, E

    1994-03-01

    In the present study we describe the incidence, clinical course, and management of avascular necrosis of bone following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and identify risk factors related to its development. All patients developing avascular necrosis of bone after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation between January 1974 and September 1992 were included in the analysis and were studied using the Hôpital Saint Louis Bone Marrow Transplant Database and hospital records. 27/727 allogeneic transplant recipients developed avascular necrosis leading to an 8.1% incidence at 5 years, by product limit estimate, ranging from 5% to 11.2%. Symptoms developed 119-1747 d (median 398 d) after transplantation. In these 27 patients a total of 52 joints were affected (mean 1.92 per patient, range 1-7). The hip joint was most often affected (69% of patients). All patients had joint pain that led to diagnosis by means of standard radiographs with or without the help of technetium-99 scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging. All but three patients received steroid therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease. Among 10 factors tested, three were shown to be significantly linked to an increased risk for developing avascular necrosis by multivariate analysis: male gender (relative risk (RR) 4.72, P = 0.002), age older than 16 (RR = 3.87, P = 0.004), and acute graft-versus-host disease requiring steroid therapy (RR = 6.30, P = 0.0002). 10 patients (37%) required joint replacement within 19 months (range 2-42) following diagnosis of avascular necrosis. In conclusion, avascular necrosis of bone is a frequent late complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation causing significant morbidity and requiring replacement surgery in one-third of affected patients. In this 18-year single-centre survey, older age, male gender and steroid therapy given for acute graft-versus-host disease were shown to independently increase the risk of avascular necrosis of bone. PMID:8043445

  3. Cerebral radiation necrosis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Plimpton, S Reed; Stence, Nicholas; Hemenway, Molly; Hankinson, Todd C; Foreman, Nicholas; Liu, Arthur K

    2015-02-01

    Radiation necrosis is a well-described toxicity following radiation therapy in the brain. There is little data regarding the incidence of radiation necrosis in pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with 101 children with solid brain tumors. Radiation necrosis was diagnosed by examination of magnetic resonance imaging. Median follow-up for all patients was 13 months (range 3-51). Radiation necrosis occurred in 5% (5/101) of cases with a median time to onset of 1.2 months. In three of these children, the child was symptomatic, requiring management with steroids and bevacizumab. Radiation necrosis did not correlate with the administration of chemotherapy, age at treatment, or planning treatment volume. Our experience with pediatric patients treated with radiotherapy for solid brain tumor suggests that children may have an increased likelihood to develop radiation necrosis compared to adults. PMID:23647507

  4. Effect of Preoperative Radiological Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Before Liver Transplantation: A Retrospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, Andrea; Grosso, Maurizio; Martina, Maria C.; Ciancio, Alessia; David, Ezio; Salizzoni, Mauro; Soldano, Umberto; Galli, Joseph; Fava, Cesare

    1998-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the results of radiological treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) performed before orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods: Sixty-two transplanted patients with a total of 89 HCC nodules were studied; 50 lesions in 38 patients had been treated prior to OLT with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE; n= 29), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI; n= 10), or combined therapy (TACE + PEI; n= 11). The induced necrosis was pathologically evaluated. The recurrence rate after OLT in the treated group of patients (n= 38) was compared with that in the non-treated group (n= 24). Results: After TACE, necrosis was complete in 7 of 29 lesions (24.1%), partial in 11 of 29 (37.9%), and absent in 11 of 29 (37.9%). After PEI, necrosis was complete in 8 of 10 lesions (80%), and partial in 2 of 10 (20%). Using combined therapy, necrosis was complete in 11 of 11 lesions (100%). Four of 24 untreated and 4 of 38 treated patients did not survive OLT from causes not related to the HCC; 3 of 20 non-treated patients (15%) and 4 of 34 treated patients (11.8%) had post-OLT recurrence (these last four patients had undergone only TACE and did not have tumor necrosis at pathological examination). Conclusion: TACE of HCC prior to OLT had no influence on the recurrence rate. PEI and combined therapy (TACE + PEI) may be recommended in patients awaiting OLT.

  5. Cation dyshomeostasis and cardiomyocyte necrosis: the Fleckenstein hypothesis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Brian J.; Cheema, Yaser; Shahbaz, Atta U.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing loss of cardiomyocytes to apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways contributes to the progressive nature of heart failure. The pathophysiological origins of necrotic cell loss relate to the neurohormonal activation that accompanies acute and chronic stressor states and which includes effector hormones of the adrenergic nervous system. Fifty years ago, Albrecht Fleckenstein and coworkers hypothesized the hyperadrenergic state, which accompanies such stressors, causes cardiomyocyte necrosis based on catecholamine-initiated excessive intracellular Ca2+ accumulation (EICA), and mitochondrial Ca2+ overloading in particular, in which the ensuing dysfunction and structural degeneration of these organelles leads to necrosis. In recent years, two downstream factors have been identified which, together with EICA, constitute a signal–transducer–effector pathway: (i) mitochondria-based induction of oxidative stress, in which the rate of reactive oxygen metabolite generation exceeds their rate of detoxification by endogenous antioxidant defences; and (ii) the opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore (mPTP) followed by organellar swelling and degeneration. The pathogenesis of stress-related cardiomyopathy syndromes is likely related to this pathway. Other factors which can account for cytotoxicity in stressor states include: hypokalaemia; ionized hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia with resultant elevations in parathyroid hormone serving as a potent mediator of EICA; and hypozincaemia with hyposelenaemia, which compromise antioxidant defences. Herein, we revisit the Fleckenstein hypothesis of EICA in leading to cardiomyocyte necrosis and the central role played by mitochondria. PMID:21398641

  6. The imprint of radiofrequency in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bramis, Ioannis; Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Madariaga, Juan; Dervenis, Christos

    2006-01-01

    Background. This article reviews the current results of radiofrequency application in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with reference to the comparison between the different surgical modalities. Method. An electronic search was performed for studies on the treatment of HCC. Results. Thermoablation by means of radiofrequency (RFA), microwave coagulation therapy (MCT) and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) provides tumor necrosis with a low complication rate. These methods are still not predictable and it is difficult to monitor the extent of necrosis in a real-time manner. Combined transarterial embolization and RF ablation is a promising strategy for large HCCs. Radiofrequency-assisted liver resection is unique and has become very popular recently because it permits parenchymal transection with minimal blood loss. Conclusion. Many alternative techniques have been applied recently for the management of HCC but their exact roles need to be defined by randomized studies. Advances in technology and refinements in technique may provide an effective and predictable way to ablate liver tumors using radiofrequency devices. PMID:18333136

  7. Pseudoephedrine/ephedrine shows potent anti-inflammatory activity against TNF-α-mediated acute liver failure induced by lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongping; Kong, Xiangliang; Zhang, Tong; Ye, Jin; Fang, Zhaoqin; Yang, Xuejun

    2014-02-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of pseudoephedrine/ephedrine were investigated using the experimental model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute liver failure in D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-sensitised male rats in order to elucidate effects other than sympathomimetic effects. Rats were intraperitoneally injected with D-GalN (400 mg/kg) and LPS (40 μg/kg) to induce acute liver failure. The treatment groups were then intraperitoneally administered pseudoephedrine/ephedrine at 0 h and 4 h after induction and the activation induced by treatment with pseudoephedrine and/or LPS on the primary Kupffer cells (KCs) was monitored. Compared with controls induced by GalN/LPS alone, pseudoephedrine dramatically reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and bile ductular hyperplasia and hepatic necrosis observed in liver sections. It inhibited both hepatocellular apoptosis and the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1. It lowered the production of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the beginning of acute liver failure induced by D-GalN/LPS. Correspondingly, levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (TBIL) and malondialdehyde were attenuated. Ephedrine demonstrated all these identical protective effects as well. In addition, pseudoephedrine significantly suppressed the production of p-IκB-α, reducing the degradation of sequestered nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the cytoplasm, and inhibited the translocation of NF-κB/p65 to the nucleus, the transcription of TNF-α mRNA and the production of TNF-α in primary KCs. These results suggest that pseudoephedrine and ephedrine have a potent anti-inflammatory activity against D-GalN/LPS-induced acute liver failure in rats, and this comprehensive anti-inflammatory effect may result from the inhibition of TNF-α production. PMID:24365491

  8. Proteome Analyses of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Megger, Dominik A.; Naboulsi, Wael; Meyer, Helmut E.; Sitek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into a powerful and widely used bioanalytical technique in the study of cancer, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this review, we provide an up to date overview of feasible proteome-analytical techniques for clinical questions. In addition, we present a broad summary of proteomic studies of HCC utilizing various technical approaches for the analysis of samples derived from diverse sources like HCC cell lines, animal models, human tissue and body fluids. PMID:26357614

  9. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. [Acute pancreas necrosis with biliary peritonitis in cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Zoldos, L; Hincová, M

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a hemorrhagic pancreatitis with non-perforating biliary peritonitis. The abdomen symptomatology was hidden by the beginning contractions and due to the dystocia the delivery was finished by caesarean section. The presence of choleperitoneum required a surgical revision of the abdominal cavity which enabled to make the right diagnosis. This thesis deals with aetiology and mechanism of choleperitoneum inception during hemorrhagic pancreatitis. PMID:3788337

  11. Imaging for assessment of treatment response in hepatocellular carcinoma: Current update

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Koichi; Lee, Sang Ho; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2015-01-01

    Morphologic methods such as the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) are considered as the gold standard for response assessment in the management of cancer. However, with the increasing clinical use of antineoplastic cytostatic agents and locoregional interventional therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), conventional morphologic methods are confronting limitations in response assessment. Thus, there is an increasing interest in new imaging methods for response assessment, which can evaluate tumor biology such as vascular physiology, fibrosis, necrosis, and metabolism. In this review, we discuss various novel imaging methods for response assessment and compare them with the conventional ones in HCC. PMID:25969635

  12. Advances in managing hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Reataza, Marielle; Imagawa, David K

    2014-06-01

    Multiple modalities for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma are available, depending on tumor size and number. Surgical resection remains the gold standard, so long as the residual liver function reserve is sufficient. In patients with advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation is the preferred option, as these patients may not have adequate hepatic reserve after resection. Salvage liver transplantation has also become an option for a select few patients who recur after surgical resection. Ablative techniques have been used for palliation as well as to either completely destroy the tumor, act as an adjunct to resection, or downstage the tumor to meet Milan criteria such that a patient may be a candidate for liver transplantation. Radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, chemoembolization, radioembolization, and irreversible electroporation have all been used in this capacity. Currently, sorafenib is the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved chemotherapeutic for hepatocellular carcinoma. The efficacy of sorafenib, in combination with other agents, transarterial chemoembolization, and surgical resection is currently being investigated. Sunitinib and brivanib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have failed as potential first- or second-line options for chemotherapy. Bevacizumab in combination with erlotinib is also currently being studied. Final analysis for ramucirumab and axitinib are pending. Tivantinib, a selective mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) inhibitor, is also undergoing clinical trials for efficacy in MET-high tumors. This review serves to emphasize the current and new technologies emerging in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24810646

  13. Thermal inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gosting, L.; Gould, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A plaque assay was used to follow the inactivation kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in cell culture media at various temperatures. Inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a visceral organ slurry was compared with that in culture media.

  14. Relationship between hepatocyte necrosis, proliferation, and initiation induced by diethylnitrosamine in the male F344 rat.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Popp, J A; Conolly, R B; Cattley, R C

    1993-02-01

    Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) is commonly used as an initiator in rodent models of multistage carcinogenesis. Because the initiating activity of DEN has been attributed, in part, to its induction of regenerative cell proliferation, the temporal and quantitative relationships among necrosis, replication, and initiation were characterized in livers of male F344 rats subsequent to administration of a single dose of 10 or 150 mg DEN/kg. Following a dose of 150 mg DEN/kg body weight, maximal hepatocellular necrosis was observed 2 days postinjection and amounted to 9% of the hepatic volume being necrotic by light microscopic criteria. Changes in serum levels of alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicators of hepatocellular necrosis, paralleled changes in the necrotic volume fraction. Hepatocyte replication was estimated using nuclear labeling with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), which was constantly infused for 2 or 7 days by osmotic minipump. BrdU labeling was maximally increased at 4 days with 2-day infusion (26.1% in treated vs 0.5% in controls) and at 7 days with 7-day infusion (46% in treated vs 2% in controls). Initiation was quantitated by enumeration of hepatocytes which stained positive for placental glutathione-S-transferase (GST-P). Increased numbers of GST-P-positive hepatocytes were observed on Day 4 and increased to a maximum of 109/cm2 section area, or 0.077% of all hepatocytes. Thus, the temporal pattern changes following 150 mg DEN/kg body wt are consistent with the attribution of regenerative cell proliferation contributing to the yield of initiated cells. A comparison of the peak BrdU (2-day) labeling index and the peak GST-P staining frequency suggests a rate of initiation of roughly 10(-3)-10(-4)/cell division following 150 mg DEN/kg body wt.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8449386

  15. Targeted disruption of fibrinogen like protein-1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma development

    SciTech Connect

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamed; Desai, Anal; Demchev, Valeriy; Bronson, Roderick T.; Hornick, Jason L.; Cohen, David E.; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2015-09-18

    Fibrinogen like protein-1 (Fgl1) is a predominantly liver expressed protein that has been implicated as both a hepatoprotectant and a hepatocyte mitogen. Fgl1 expression is decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its loss correlates with a poorly differentiated phenotype. To better elucidate the role of Fgl1 in hepatocarcinogenesis, we treated mice wild type or null for Fgl1 with diethyl nitrosamine and monitored for incidence of hepatocellular cancer. We find that mice lacking Fgl1 develop HCC at more than twice the rate of wild type mice. We show that hepatocellular cancers from Fgl1 null mice are molecularly distinct from those of the wild type mice. In tumors from Fgl1 null mice there is enhanced activation of Akt and downstream targets of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In addition, there is paradoxical up regulation of putative hepatocellular cancer tumor suppressors; tripartite motif-containing protein 35 (Trim35) and tumor necrosis factor super family 10b (Tnfrsf10b). Taken together, these findings suggest that Fgl1 acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular cancer through an Akt dependent mechanism and supports its role as a potential therapeutic target in HCC. - Highlights: • Fgl1 knockout mice (Fgl1KO) are more prone to carcinogen-induced liver cancer compared to wild type (WT) mates. • Tumors from the Fgl1KO are molecularly distinct with enhanced Akt and mTOR activity in comparison with Fgl1WT tumors. • Tumors from the Fgl1KO have enhanced expression of Trim35 and Tnfrsf10b, putative HCC tumor suppressors.

  16. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  17. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  18. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  19. Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Mechanistic Distinction From Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Riggle, Kevin M; Turnham, Rigney; Scott, John D; Yeung, Raymond S; Riehle, Kimberly J

    2016-07-01

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL-HCC) has historically been classified as a rare subtype of HCC. However, unlike "classic" HCC, it occurs in children and young adults without underlying liver disease. The recent discovery of a deletion mutation in all FL-HCCs represented a major advancement in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. This deletion results in the fusion of the genes encoding a heat shock protein (DNAJB1) and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA, PRKACA), and overexpression of PRKACA and enhanced cAMP-dependent PKA activity. This review summarizes recent advancements in FL-HCC pathogenesis and characteristics of the HSP40-PKA C protein. PMID:26990031

  20. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  1. Oncogenic viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ben Ari, Ziv; Weitzman, Ella; Safran, Michal

    2015-05-01

    About 80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections especially in the setting of established cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis, making HCC prevention a major goal of antiviral therapy. HCC tumors are highly complex and heterogeneous resulting from the aberrant function of multiple molecular pathways. The roles of HCV or HBV in promoting HCC development are still either directly or indirectly are still speculative, but the evidence for both effects is compelling. In patients with chronic hepatitis viral infection, cirrhosis is not a prerequisite for tumorigenesis. PMID:25921667

  2. Current management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Parissa; Roayaie, Sasan; Schwartz, Myron E

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and leading cause of death among patients with cirrhosis. Treatment guidelines are based according to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging system. The choice among therapeutic options that include liver resection, liver transplantation, locoregional, and systemic treatments must be individualized for each patient. The aim of this paper is to review the outcomes that can be achieved in the treatment of HCC with the heterogeneous therapeutic options currently available in clinical practice. PMID:25132740

  3. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma: Brazilian survey

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Helma P.; Oliveira, Claudia P.; Coelho, Henrique Sérgio M.; Alvares-da-Silva, Mario R.; Nabuco, Leticia; Parise, Edison Roberto; Ivantes, Claúdia; Martinelli, Ana LC; Galizzi-Filho, João; Carrilho, Flair J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The majority of cases of hepatocellular carcinoma have been reported in individuals with cirrhosis due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcoholism, but recently, the prevalence has become increasingly related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis around the world. The study aimed to evaluate the clinical and histophatological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma in Brazilians' patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis at the present time. METHODS: Members of the Brazilian Society of Hepatology were invited to complete a survey regarding patients with hepatocellular carcinoma related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Patients with a history of alcohol intake (>20 g/day) and other liver diseases were excluded. Hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis was performed by liver biopsy or imaging methods according to the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases' 2011 guidelines. RESULTS: The survey included 110 patients with a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease from nine hepatology units in six Brazilian states (Bahia, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paraná and Rio Grande do Sul). The mean age was 67±11 years old, and 65.5% were male. Obesity was observed in 52.7% of the cases; diabetes, in 73.6%; dyslipidemia, in 41.0%; arterial hypertension, in 60%; and metabolic syndrome, in 57.2%. Steatohepatitis without fibrosis was observed in 3.8% of cases; steatohepatitis with fibrosis (grades 1-3), in 27%; and cirrhosis, in 61.5%. Histological diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma was performed in 47.2% of the patients, with hepatocellular carcinoma without cirrhosis accounting for 7.7%. In total, 58 patients with cirrhosis had their diagnosis by ultrasound confirmed by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Of these, 55% had 1 nodule; 17%, 2 nodules; and 28%, ≥3 nodules. CONCLUSIONS: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is a relevant risk factor associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with and

  4. Metastatic malignant melanoma in liver aspirate: cytomorphologic distinction from hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Parwani, Anil V; Chan, Theresa Y; Mathew, Seema; Ali, Syed Z

    2004-04-01

    Hepatic metastases of malignant melanoma are not unusual and frequently occur with a clinically long latent period following resection of a cutaneous or ocular primary. Due to its overlapping cytomorphology with a primary hepatocellular carcinoma, diagnostic difficulties may arise on fine-needle aspiration of these lesions if the clinical history of melanoma is not known. Thirty-two cases of metastatic melanoma in the liver and primary hepatocellular carcinoma were studied. Aspiration was performed under ultrasound guidance using 22-gauge spinal needle. Slides were stained with Diff-Quik and Papanicolaou stain; cell blocks were stained with H&E. A panel of immunostains was performed using conventional methodology. Of the 12 cytologic parameters assessed, the most helpful in making a metastatic melanoma diagnosis were the presence of sheet-like architecture, plasmacytoid and/or biphasic (epithelioid/spindled cell) morphology, cytoplasmic tails, necrosis, and cytoplasmic melanin-like pigment. For hepatocellular carcinoma, the presence of trabeculae, perivascular cellular clustering, endothelial wrapping, and centrally located nuclei with granular cytoplasm were helpful features. In selected cases, IPOX studies were critical in arriving at the correct diagnosis. PMID:15048959

  5. Transarterial Embolization and Percutaneous Ethanol Injection as an Effective Bridge Therapy before Liver Transplantation for Hepatitis C-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chedid, Marcio F.; Scaffaro, Leandro A.; Chedid, Aljamir D.; Maciel, Antonio C.; Cerski, Carlos Thadeu S.; Reis, Matheus J.; Grezzana-Filho, Tomaz J. M.; de Araujo, Alexandre; Leipnitz, Ian; Kruel, Cleber D. P.; Alvares-da-Silva, Mario R.; Kruel, Cleber R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transarterial chemoembolization alone or in association with radiofrequency ablation is an effective bridging strategy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting for a liver transplant. However, cost of this therapy may limit its utilization. This study was designed to evaluate the outcomes of a protocol involving transarterial embolization, percutaneous ethanol injection, or both methods for bridging hepatocellular carcinomas prior to liver transplantation. Methods. Retrospective review of all consecutive adult patients who underwent a first liver transplant as a treatment to hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma at our institution between 2002 and 2012. Primary endpoint was patient survival. Secondary endpoint was complete tumor necrosis. Results. Forty patients were analyzed, age 58 ± 7 years. There were 23 males (57.5%). Thirty-six (90%) out of the total 40 patients were within Milan criteria. Complete necrosis was achieved in 19 patients (47.5%). One-, 3-, and 5-year patient survival were, respectively, 87.5%, 75%, and 69.4%. Univariate analysis did not reveal any variable to impact on overall patient survival. Conclusions. Transarterial embolization, ethanol injection, or the association of both methods followed by liver transplantation comprises effective treatment strategy for hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma. This strategy should be adopted whenever transarterial chemoembolization and/or radiofrequency ablation are not available options. PMID:26819615

  6. Hepatocellular carcinoma: From diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Grandhi, Miral Sadaria; Kim, Amy K; Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M; Kamel, Ihab R; Ghasebeh, Mounes A; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Primary liver cancer is the sixth most common cancer overall and the second most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for up to 90% of all primary hepatic malignancies and represents a major international health problem. While surgical resection and transplantation are the cornerstone of therapy in early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma, locoregional therapy and sorafenib are beneficial in those with more advanced disease or those who are not surgical candidates. At times, the integration of both surgical and locoregional therapy may be necessary. Hence, hepatocellular carcinoma requires a multidisciplinary approach to determine the most appropriate treatment as well as the timing of various treatments for optimal outcomes. PMID:27312032

  7. Acute and chronic drug-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Pessayre, D; Larrey, D

    1988-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions may mimic almost any kind of liver disease. Acute hepatitis is often due to the formation of reactive metabolites in the liver. Despite several protective mechanisms (epoxide hydrolases, conjugation with glutathione), this formation may lead to predictable toxic hepatitis after hugh overdoses (e.g. paracetamol), or to idiosyncratic toxic hepatitis after therapeutic doses (e.g. isoniazid). Both genetic factors (e.g. constitutive levels of cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes, or defects in protective mechanisms) and acquired factors (e.g. malnutrition, or chronic intake of alcohol or other microsomal enzyme inducers) may explain the unique susceptibility of some patients. Formation of chemically reactive metabolites may also lead to allergic hepatitis, probably through immunization against plasma membrane protein epitopes modified by the covalent binding of the reactive metabolites. This may be the mechanism for acute hepatitis produced by many drugs (e.g. amineptine, erythromycin derivatives, halothane, imipramine, isaxonine, alpha-methyldopa, tienilic acid, etc.). Genetic defects in several protective mechanisms (e.g. epoxide hydrolase, acetylation) may explain the unique susceptibility of some patients, possibly by increasing exposure to allergenic, metabolite-altered plasma membrane protein epitopes. Like toxic idiosyncratic hepatitis, allergic hepatitis occurs in a few patients only. Unlike toxic hepatitis, allergic hepatitis is frequently associated with fever, rash or other hypersensitivity manifestations; it may be hepatocellular, mixed or cholestatic; it promptly recurs after inadvertent drug rechallenge. Lysosomal phospholipidosis occurs frequently with three antianginal drugs (diethylaminoethoxyhexestrol, amiodarone and perhexiline). These cationic, amphiphilic drugs may form phospholipid-drug complexes within lysosomes. Such complexes resist phospholipases and accumulate within enlarged lysosomes, forming myeloid figures. This

  8. Experimental Papillary Necrosis of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, R. G.; Hill, G. S.; Murray, G.; Ramsden, P. W.; Heptinstall, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Reserpine is able to exert a pronounced inhibitory effect on the development of papillary necrosis following the administration of bromoethylamine hydrobromide to the rat. This inhibitory effect has been observed using light microscopy, histochemistry, indigo carmine excretion and urine output. These observations suggest that vasoconstriction may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of papillary necrosis, but the evidence for this is incomplete. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6 PMID:4114974

  9. [Palatal necrosis in children. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sancho, M A; Parri, F J; Raigosa, J M; Lerena, J; Cacéres, F; Muñoz, M E

    2006-04-01

    Palate necrosis as a consequence of palate infection it's an exceptional condition about there's not too much references at literature. We present a case of a 6 months old child who present a palatal necrosis after a supurative medial otitis that involved hard and soft palate, with positive culture for Pseudomona aeruginosa causing a almost complete absence of the palate that simulate a bilateral palatal cleft. PMID:16846136

  10. Intracellular signaling and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iakova, Polina; Timchenko, Lubov; Timchenko, Nikolai A

    2011-02-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer related death in the world. The recent development of new techniques for the investigations of global change in the gene expression, signaling pathways and wide genome binding has provided novel information for the mechanisms underlying liver cancer progression. Although these studies identified gene expression signatures in hepatocellular carcinoma, the early steps of the development of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are not well understood. The development of HCC is a multistep process which includes the progressive alterations of gene expression leading to the increased proliferation and to liver cancer. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification of the key steps of the development of HCC with the focus on early events of carcinogenesis and on the role of translational and epigenetic alterations in the development of HCC. Quiescent stage of the liver is supported by several tumor suppressor proteins including p53, Rb and C/EBPα. Studies with chemical models of liver carcinogenesis and with human HCC have shown that the elevation of gankyrin is responsible for the elimination of these three proteins at early steps of carcinogenesis. Later stages of progression of the liver cancer are associated with alterations in many signaling pathways including translation which leads to epigenetic silencing/activation of many genes. Particularly, recent reports suggest a critical role of histone deacetylase 1, HDAC1, in the development of HCC through the interactions with transcription factors such as C/EBP family proteins. PMID:20850540

  11. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol

    PubMed Central

    Aghighi, Maryam; Golovko, Daniel; Ansari, Celina; Marina, Neyssa M.; Pisani, Laura; Kurlander, Lonnie; Klenk, Christopher; Bhaumik, Srabani; Wendland, Michael; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2015-01-01

    showed similar findings with high T1 signal in areas of tumor necrosis and low signal in areas of intracellularly compartmentalized iron. Conclusion Differential T1- and T2-enhancement patterns of USPIO in tumors enable conclusions about their intracellular and extracellular location. This information can be used to characterize the composition of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26569397

  12. Angiogenic Blockade and Radiotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Chang, Chih-Chia; Ko, Hui-Ling; Tsang, Yuk-Wah; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: We report our preliminary experience of combining sunitinib and helical tomotherapy in patients with advanced HCC. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with helical tomotherapy and sunitinib after radiation therapy (RT) from March 2007 to August 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. We report acute toxicities, radiologic response, serial {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP) kinetics, and survival. Results: Of 23 evaluable patients, 60% had {>=}2 hepatic lesions, extrahepatic disease was present in 5 (21.7%), and all received 2 tablets (25 mg) of sunitinib at least 1 week before, during, and 2 weeks after RT. Thirteen patients continued maintenance sunitinib after RT until disease progression. Hypofractionated RT with a median target dose of 52.5 Gy/15 fractions was delivered. An objective response was achieved in 74% of patients. The 1-year survival rate was 70%, with median survival of 16 months. Multivariate analysis showed that maintenance sunitinib was the most significant factor for survival. The time to progression was 10 months in the maintenance group compared with 4 months in the control group. Eighteen out of 21 patients with elevated AFP (85.7%) had {>=}50% decline of AFP within 2 months after RT. There were three episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and one episode of pancreatitis; 10 patients had {>=}Grade 2 elevation of liver enzymes, and 15 had {>=}Grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that sunitinib and helical tomotherapy yield high Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and AFP response rates in advanced HCC with an acceptable safety profile. Maintenance sunitinib after RT potentially prolongs survival. A randomized trial is warranted.

  13. Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicating Liver Cirrhosis: Utility of Repeat Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy after Unsuccessful First Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Caturelli, Eugenio; Biasini, Elisabetta; Bartolucci, Francesca; Facciorusso, Domenico; Decembrino, Francesco; Attino, Vito; Bisceglia, Michele

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a second ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules thought to be hepatocellular carcinoma when the original biopsy has failed to provide a reliable diagnosis. Methods: Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules that were subsequently diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma. Each biopsy involved a single puncture with a 20 G cutting needle, which yielded pathologic material used both for cytologic and histologic studies. In 23 cases (mean diameter of nodules 48 mm) the biopsy furnished exclusively necrotic material (non-diagnostic subgroup); in the other 14 cases (mean diameter 26 mm) the biopsy yielded no neoplastic elements (false-negative subgroup). All 37 nodules were subjected to repeat biopsies performed in the same manner. Results: The repeat biopsies provided a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in six of the 23 patients from the non-diagnostic subgroup and in seven of the 14 in the false-negative subgroup. Overall, repeat biopsy produced a diagnostic gain of 35.1%. Conclusion: The chance of success with repeat biopsy of hepatocellular carcinoma is limited and may depend to some extent on the characteristics of the lesions (i.e., areas of necrosis in large nodules, well-differentiated cellular populations in small ones)

  14. Carbendazim impends hepatic necrosis when combined with imazalil or cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Dikić, Domagoj; Landeka, Irena; Knežević, Fabijan; Mojsović-Ćuić, Ana; Benković, Vesna; Horvat-Knežević, Anica; Lončar, Goran; Teparić, Renata; Rogić, Dunja

    2012-05-01

    Imazalil, cypermethrin and carbendazim are detected in plants for human nutrition. To explore whether their combinations, applied orally in low doses, would induce changes in metabolic patterns and hepatotoxicity, a subchronic in vivo experiment was conducted. Doses of 10mg/kg of imazalil (im) and cypermethrin (cy) and 20 mg/kg of carbendazim (car) and their combinations (im, 10 mg/kg+cy, 10mg/kg; im, 10mg/kg+car, 20mg/kg; car, 20 mg/kg + im, 10 mg/kg) were given to Swiss mice daily over 28 days. After 24 hr from the last dose, the relationships of cytotoxicity biomarkers were analysed: serum lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate transaminase, alanine transferase, amylase, alkaline phosphatase, creatine kinase, creatinine and total proteins. Individual pesticides showed different toxic potential (cy>im car) generally characterized by increase in enzyme activities. Histological analysis showed that cypermethrin, but not imazalil or carbendazim, alone can cause mild necrosis. Combinations generally caused decrease in the activity of enzymes, indicating liver damage. Low doses of carbendazim in combination with low doses of imazalil or cypermethrin caused very pronounced hepatic necrosis, more than any of the three individually applied pesticides or combination of imazalil and cypermethrin. In fruits and vegetables for human consumption, residues of these three pesticides and prolonged combined intake of low doses, which by themselves acutely would not cause any effect, may have similar hepatotoxic effects. PMID:22077925

  15. Management of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Nilesh; Agarwal, Pravin; Gandhi, Vidhyachandra

    2012-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Risk factors independently determining the outcome of SAP are early multiorgan failure (MOF), infection of necrosis, and extended necrosis (>50%). Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week it is strongly related to systemic inflammatory response syndrome while, sepsis due to infected pancreatic necrosis leading to MOF syndrome occurs in the later course after the first week. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or are at risk for developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis are candidates for intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased to below 20% in high-volume centers. PMID:23372306

  16. Isolated duodenal varices as the initial presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Okoli, Amara; Raymond, Pascale; Ammannagari, Nischala; Merrell, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Duodenal varices are an uncommon, life-threatening cause of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding commonly caused by portal hypertension. Though generally regarded as a complication of advanced cirrhosis and portal hypertension, often overlooked is that in about 2.7% of cases, it can be the first presenting symptom of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We report a case of an isolated, duodenal variceal bleeding as the first clinical manifestation of HCC, complicated by portal venous thrombosis. Diagnosis of HCC was established by a markedly elevated α-fetoprotein, hepatitis B surface and core antibody positivity and consistent radiological findings. Although not the first choice, variceal bleeding was successfully arrested with endoclips. The patient thereafter declined further evaluation and unsurprisingly died within a few weeks from a massive GI bleed. An initial bleed from a duodenal varix often confers a poor prognosis. Patients with HCC who present with variceal bleeding reportedly have a median survival of 71 days. PMID:24347452

  17. General Information about Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition or to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer ... PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. Correlation of MRI Biomarkers with Tumor Necrosis in Hras5 Tumor Xenograft in Athymic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Daniel P; Tessier, Jean J; Ashton, Susan E; Waterton, John C; Wilson, Zena; Worthington, Philip L; Ryan, Anderson J

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of therapies targeting the tumor vasculature and has demonstrated that vascular-damaging agents (VDA) induce acute vascular shutdown in tumors in human and animal models. However, at subtherapeutic doses, blood flow may recover before the induction of significant levels of necrosis. We present the relationship between changes in MRI biomarkers and tumor necrosis. Multiple MRI measurements were taken at 4.7 T in athymic rats (n = 24) bearing 1.94 ± 0.2-cm3 subcutaneous Hras5 tumors (ATCC 41000) before and 24 hours after clinically relevant doses of the VDA, ZD6126 (0–10 mg/kg, i.v.). We measured effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*), initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve (IAUGC60/150), equivalent enhancing fractions (EHF60/150), time constant (Ktrans), proportion of hypoperfused voxels as estimated from fit failures in Ktrans analysis, and signal intensity (SI) in T2-weighted MRI (T2W). ZD6126 treatment induced > 90% dose-dependent tumor necrosis at 10 mg/kg; correspondingly, SI changes were evident from T2W MRI. Although R2* did not correlate, other MRI biomarkers significantly correlated with necrosis at doses of ≥ 5 mg/kg ZD6126. These data on Hras5 tumors suggest that the quantification of hypoperfused voxels might provide a useful biomarker of tumor necrosis. PMID:17534443

  19. Coumadin-induced skin necrosis in a 64 year-old female despite LMWH bridging therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mehandar; Abrina, Vanessa Mae; Chittimireddy, Sasikala

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Coumadin is the standard oral anticoagulant used in a variety of clinical conditions. Coumadin inhibits the vitamin-K dependent gamma-carboxylation of coagulation factors II, VII, IX, X and the anticoagulant proteins C and S. Rarely, skin necrosis occurs when the resultant initial procoagulant state in the first few days of starting coumadin leads to thrombosis and formation of blood clots tin the dermal capillaries. This in turn causes skin necrosis due to interruption in blood supply to the skin. Case Report: We are presenting the case of a 64 year-old female admitted for acute respiratory distress secondary to newly-diagnosed pulmonary embolism. The patient was started on therapeutic doses of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and coumadin. After 5 days of treatment, the patient started complaining of pain and numbness in both upper extremities. Overnight, this rapidly progressed to manifest hemorrhagic bullae with necrotic areas. This was immediately recognized as coumadin-induced skin necrosis. Coumadin was stopped immediately. Vitamin K was administered and local wound care was provided. Therapeutic LMWH was continued. The skin lesions began to show improvement after 3 days. Conclusions: In coumadin-induced skin necrosis, the patient initially presents with pain and erythema, followed by petechial lesions which progress to become purpuric. Hemorrhagic bullae with necrosis and eschar formation may soon develop. Once it is suspected, coumadin should be stopped and the patient should be given Vitamin K and FFP to reverse the effects of coumadin. PMID:23569516

  20. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Khoo, J J; Clouston, A

    2001-12-01

    A 6-year-old Malay boy presented with fever and abdominal pain for 2 months. Computerised tomography showed a nodular mass in the left lobe of the liver. There was also portal vein thrombosis on the left side. Serum alpha-fetoprotein was not elevated and Hepatitis B antigen was negative. Biopsy of the liver mass led to a histological diagnosis of fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. In view of extensive tumour involvement, he could not be operated on but was treated with chemotherapy. However, the tumour did not respond. While this is expected for fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma, the possibility of the tumour having a component of ordinary hepatocellular carcinoma could not be excluded as the tumour was not resected. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma is a rare histological subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma, associated with a better prognosis. It affects the younger age group and has no association with cirrhosis, hepatitis B virus infection or exposure to oral contraceptives, all of which are implicated in ordinary hepatocellular carcinoma. Serum alpha-fetoprotein level is usually within normal limits and other laboratory values are not contributory to the diagnosis. The diagnosis is usually suggested by radiographic studies viz. CT scan of the abdomen, which would show an irregular non-homogenous mass in the liver, and confirmed by histological examination. The most characteristic microscopical feature is fibrosis arranged in a lamellar fashion around polygonal and deeply eosinophilic neoplastic hepatocytes. PMID:12166592

  1. Monocyte Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–Converting Enzyme Catalytic Activity and Substrate Shedding in Sepsis and Noninfectious Systemic Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, David J. P.; O’Dea, Kieran P.; Scott, Alasdair J.; Takata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of severe sepsis on monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme baseline and inducible activity profiles. Design: Observational clinical study. Setting: Mixed surgical/medical teaching hospital ICU. Patients: Sixteen patients with severe sepsis, 15 healthy volunteers, and eight critically ill patients with noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Monocyte expression of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide, sol-tumor necrosis factor production, tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme expression and catalytic activity, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 expression, and shedding at 48-hour intervals from day 0 to day 4, as well as p38-mitogen activated protein kinase expression. Compared with healthy volunteers, both sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients’ monocytes expressed reduced levels of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide and released less sol-tumor necrosis factor on in vitro lipopolysaccharide stimulation, consistent with the term monocyte deactivation. However, patients with sepsis had substantially elevated levels of basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity that were refractory to lipopolysaccharide stimulation and this was accompanied by similar changes in p38-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. In patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, monocyte basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme, and its induction by lipopolysaccharide, appeared similar to healthy controls. Changes in basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity at day 0 for sepsis patients correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and the attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme response to lipopolysaccharide was associated with increased mortality. Similar changes in monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity could

  2. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L.; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  3. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Sudeep; Khan, Shahid A; Grover, Vijay Paul Bob; Gwilt, Catherine; Smith, Belinda; Brown, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the commonest primary malignancy of the liver. It usually occurs in the setting of chronic liver disease and has a poor prognosis if untreated. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is a suitable therapeutic option for early, unresectable HCC particularly in the setting of chronic liver disease. Following on from disappointing initial results, the seminal study by Mazzaferro et al in 1996 established OLT as a viable treatment for HCC. In this study, the “Milan criteria” were applied achieving a 4-year survival rate similar to OLT for benign disease. Since then various groups have attempted to expand these criteria whilst maintaining long term survival rates. The technique of living donor liver transplantation has evolved over the past decade, particularly in Asia, and published outcome data is comparable to that of OLT. This article will review the evidence, indications, and the future direction of liver transplantation for liver cancer. PMID:19938188

  4. Alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stickel, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma shows a rising incidence worldwide, and the largest burden of disease in Western countries derives from patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and cirrhosis, the latter being the premier premalignant factor for HCC. The present chapter addresses key issues including the epidemiology of alcohol-associated HCC, and its link to other coexisting non-alcoholic liver diseases, and additional host and environmental risk factors including the underlying genetics. Also discussed are molecular mechanisms of alcohol-associated liver cancer evolution involving the mediators of alcohol toxicity and carcinogenicity, acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species, as well as the recently described mutagenic adducts which these mediators form with DNA. Specifically, interference of alcohol with retinoids and cofactors of transmethylation processes are outlined. Information presented in this chapter illustrates that the development of HCC in the context of ALD is multifaceted and suggests several molecular targets for prevention and markers for the screening of risk groups. PMID:25427904

  5. Hepatocellular carcinoma: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Lisa P; Deshpande, Vrushak; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is rapidly becoming one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. With a rising rate, it is a prominent source of mortality. Patients with advanced fibrosis, predominantly cirrhosis and hepatitis B are predisposed to developing HCC. Individuals with chronic hepatitis B and C infections are most commonly afflicted. Different therapeutic options, including liver resection, transplantation, systemic and local therapy, must be tailored to each patient. Liver transplantation offers leading results to achieve a cure. The Milan criteria is acknowledged as the model to classify the individuals that meet requirements to undergo transplantation. Mean survival remains suboptimal because of long waiting times and limited donor organ resources. Recent debates involve expansion of these criteria to create options for patients with HCC to increase overall survival. PMID:26609342

  6. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M

    2008-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  7. Renal Papillary Necrosis: Role of Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi K.

    2016-01-01

    Renal Papillary Necrosis (RPN) is idefined as Ischemic necrobiosis of the papilla in the medulla of the kidneys. Variety of etiological factors are recognized which cause papillary necrosis, such as analgesic nephropathy, diabetes mellitus, urinary obstruction and sickle cell haemoglobinopathy. The early diagnosis of RPN is important to improve prognosis and reduce morbidity. Radiological Imaging offers early diagnosis and can guide prompt treatment of papillary necrosis and can minimize a decline in renal function. Here we report three cases of RPN with typical imaging findings. One of them was diabetic and hypertensive female with recurrent Urinary tract Infections and other was a male with no known co-morbidity. Both of them were diagnosed to have renal papillary necrosis on CT scan and were managed operatively and conservatively, respectively. Third case was a healthy female being investigated to be renal donor for her son. Here RPN was an incidental finding and was treated conservatively. Thus CT scan could detect it pre-operatively and complications due to transplantation of a kidney with papillary necrosis were avoided. So, we want to emphasize the importance of Radiology, particularly CT scanning in detection of RPN and to guide early and prompt treatment. PMID:26894147

  8. Hyperglycemia Increases Susceptibility to Ischemic Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lévigne, D.; Tobalem, M.; Modarressi, A.; Pittet-Cuénod, B.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk for spontaneous foot ulcers, chronic wounds, infections, and tissue necrosis. Current theories suggest that the development and progression of diabetic foot ulcers are mainly caused by arteriosclerosis and peripheral neuropathy. Tissue necrosis plays a primordial role in the progression of diabetic foot ulcers but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia per se on the susceptibility of ischemic tissue to necrosis, using a critical ischemic hind limb animal model. We inflicted the same degree of ischemia in both euglycemic and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats by resecting the external iliac, the femoral, and the saphenous arteries. Postoperative laser Doppler flowmetry of the ischemic feet showed the same degree of reduction in skin perfusion in both hyperglycemic and euglycemic animals. Nevertheless, we found a significantly higher rate of limb necrosis in hyperglycemic rats compared to euglycemic rats (71% versus 29%, resp.). In this study, we revealed that hyperglycemia per se increases the susceptibility to limb necrosis in ischemic conditions. Our results may help to better understand the physiopathology of progressive diabetic wounds and underline the importance of strict glycemic control in patients with critical limb ischemia. PMID:23509730

  9. Management strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma: old certainties and new realities.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Tarquini, Roberto; Valoriani, Alice; Oben, Jude; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Marra, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly prevalent disease ranking among the ten most common cancers worldwide with increasing trend of incidence in most developed countries. The great healthcare costs and economic burden of HCC dictate proper preventive interventions as well as surveillance and screening programs to decrease disease incidence and allow early diagnosis. HCC treatment outcomes are affected by several variables, including liver function, patient's performance status, and tumor stage. In line with the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging curative treatments, such as surgery or radio-frequency ablation, are indicated in early-stage HCC (BCLC-A), and the noncurative treatments are indicated in intermediate and advanced stages of HCC (BCLC-B, C). Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) represents the treatment of choice for intermediate-stage HCC with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, and the long-term survival after liver transplantation is inferior to that of early-stage HCCs. In advanced-stage HCC or when complete necrosis is not achieved or early recurrence after TACE develops, individualized treatments such as systemic treatment or combined radiation therapy are indicated. The increasing knowledge of the genomic landscape of HCC and the development of molecular-targeted therapies is heading toward expanding the armamentarium for HCC management. PMID:26077653

  10. Therapeutic inhibition of phospholipase D1 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junjie; Sun, Qi; Bei, Yihua; Zhang, Ling; Dimitrova-Shumkovska, Jasmina; Lv, Dongchao; Yang, Yuefeng; Cao, Yan; Zhao, Yingying; Song, Meiyi; Song, Yang; Wang, Fei; Yang, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a leading cause of deaths worldwide. Novel therapeutic targets for HCC are needed. Phospholipase D (PD) is involved in cell proliferation and migration, but its role in HCC remains unclear. In the present study, we show that PLD1, but not PLD2, was overexpressed in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Bel-7402 and Bel-7404) compared with the normal human L-02 hepatocytes. PLD1 was required for the proliferation, migration and invasion of HCC cells without affecting apoptosis and necrosis, and PLD1 overexpression was sufficient to promote those effects. By using HCC xenograft models, we demonstrated that therapeutic inhibition of PLD1 attenuated tumour growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HCC mice. Moreover, PLD1 was found to be highly expressed in tumour tissues of HCC patients. Finally, mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) and Akt (protein kinase B) were identified as critical pathways responsible for the role of PLD1 in HCC cells. Taken together, the present study indicates that PLD1 activation contributes to HCC development via regulation of the proliferation, migration and invasion of HCC cells, as well as promoting the EMT process. These observations suggest that inhibition of PLD1 represents an attractive and novel therapeutic modality for HCC. PMID:27129182

  11. Gold Nanoparticles and Radiofrequency in Experimental Models for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Corr, Stuart J.; Zhu, Cihui; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Kaluarachchi, Warna D; Phounsavath, Sophia; Wilson, Lon J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal and chemo-refractory cancers, clearly, alternative treatment strategies are needed. We utilized 10nm gold nanoparticles as a scaffold to synthesize nanoconjugates bearing a targeting antibody (cetuximab, C225) and gemcitabine. Loading efficiency of gemcitabine on the gold nanoconjugates was 30%. Targeted gold nanoconjugates in combination with RF were selectively cytotoxic to EGFR expressing Hep3B and SNU449 cells when compared to isotype particles with/without RF (p<0.05). In animal experiments, targeted gold nanoconjugates halted the growth of subcutaneous Hep3B xenografts in combination with RF exposure (p<0.05). These xenografts also demonstrated increased apoptosis, necrosis and decreased proliferation compared to controls. Normal tissues were unharmed. We have demonstrated that non-invasive RF-induced hyperthermia when combined with targeted delivery of gemcitabine is more effective and safe at dosages ~275-fold lower than the current clinically-delivered systemic dose of gemcitabine. PMID:24650884

  12. Recurrent AAV2-related insertional mutagenesis in human hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nault, Jean-Charles; Datta, Shalini; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Franconi, Andrea; Mallet, Maxime; Couchy, Gabrielle; Letouzé, Eric; Pilati, Camilla; Verret, Benjamin; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Balabaud, Charles; Calderaro, Julien; Laurent, Alexis; Letexier, Mélanie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Calvo, Fabien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are liver tumors related to various etiologies, including alcohol intake and infection with hepatitis B (HBV) or C (HCV) virus. Additional risk factors remain to be identified, particularly in patients who develop HCC without cirrhosis. We found clonal integration of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) in 11 of 193 HCCs. These AAV2 integrations occurred in known cancer driver genes, namely CCNA2 (cyclin A2; four cases), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase; one case), CCNE1 (cyclin E1; three cases), TNFSF10 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 10; two cases) and KMT2B (lysine-specific methyltransferase 2B; one case), leading to overexpression of the target genes. Tumors with viral integration mainly developed in non-cirrhotic liver (9 of 11 cases) and without known risk factors (6 of 11 cases), suggesting a pathogenic role for AAV2 in these patients. In conclusion, AAV2 is a DNA virus associated with oncogenic insertional mutagenesis in human HCC. PMID:26301494

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Kew, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the major malignant tumors in the world today. The number of new cases of the tumor increases year by year, and hepatocellular carcinoma almost always runs a fulminant course and carries an especially grave prognosis. It has a low resectability rate and a high recurrence rate after surgical intervention, and responds poorly to anticancer drugs and radiotherapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma does not have a uniform geographical distribution: rather, very high incidences occur in Eastern and Southeastern Asia and in sub-Saharan Black Africans. In these regions and populations, the tumor shows a distinct shift in age distribution toward the younger ages, seen to greatest extent in sub-Saharan Black Africans. In all populations, males are more commonly affected. The most common risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in resource-poor populations with a high incidence of the tumor are chronic hepatitis B virus infection and dietary exposure to the fungal hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B1. These two causative agents act either singly or synergistically. Both the viral infection and exposure to the fungus occur from early childhood, and the tumor typically presents at an early age. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is an important cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in resource-rich countries with a low incidence of the tumor. The infection is acquired in adulthood and hepatocellular carcinoma occurs later than it does with hepatitis B virus-induced tumors. In recent years, obesity and the metabolic syndrome have increased markedly in incidence and importance as a cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in some resource-rich regions. Chronic alcohol abuse remains an important risk factor for malignant transformation of hepatocytes, frequently in association with alcohol-induced cirrhosis. Excessive iron accumulation in hereditary hemochromatosis and dietary iron overload in the Black African population and membranous obstruction of the inferior cava

  14. Green Tea Extract-induced Acute Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sayama, Kazutoshi; Tsubura, Airo

    2014-01-01

    Although green tea is considered to be a healthy beverage, hepatotoxicity associated with the consumption of green tea extract has been reported. In the present study, we characterized the hepatotoxicity of green tea extract in rats and explored the responsible mechanism. Six-week-old IGS rats received a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 200 mg/kg green tea extract (THEA-FLAN 90S). At 8, 24, 48 and 72 hrs and 1 and 3 months after exposure, liver damage was assessed by using blood-chemistry, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry to detect cell death (TUNEL and caspase-3) and proliferative activity (PCNA). Analyses of malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum and the liver and of MDA and thymidine glycol (TG) by immunohistochemistry, as oxidative stress markers, were performed. Placental glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), which is a marker of hepatocarcinogenesis, was also immunohistochemically stained. To examine toxicity at older ages, 200 mg/kg green tea extract was administered to 18-wk-old female rats. In 6-wk-old rats, 12% of males and 50% of females died within 72 hrs. In 18-wk-old rats, 88% died within 72 hrs. The serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and/or total bilirubin increased in both males and females. Single-cell necrosis with positive signs of TUNEL and caspase-3 was seen in perilobular hepatocytes from 8 hrs onward in all lobular areas. PCNA-positive hepatocytes increased at 48 hrs. MDA levels in the serum and liver tended to increase, and MDA- and TG-positive hepatocytes were seen immunohistochemically. GST-P–positive hepatocellular altered foci were detected in one female rat at the 3-month time point. In conclusion, a single injection of green tea extract induced acute and severe hepatotoxicity, which might be associated with lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidative stress in hepatocytes. PMID:25378801

  15. Liver metastasis from hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma: Dynamic computed tomography findings

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yang-Yu; Chen, Chien-Ming; Huang, Yu-Hsiu; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Chu, Sung-Yu; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Pan, Kuang-Tse; Tseng, Jeng-Hwei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the dynamic computed tomography (CT) findings of liver metastasis from hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach (HAS) and compared them with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Between January 2000 and January 2015, 8 patients with pathologically proven HAS and liver metastases were enrolled. Basic tumor status was evaluated for the primary tumor location and metastatic sites. The CT findings of the liver metastases were analyzed for tumor number and size, presence of tumor necrosis, hemorrhage, venous tumor thrombosis, and dynamic enhancing pattern. RESULTS: The body and antrum were the most common site for primary HAS (n = 7), and observed metastatic sites included the liver (n = 8), lymph nodes (n = 7), peritoneum (n = 4), and lung (n = 2). Most of the liver metastases exhibited tumor necrosis regardless of tumor size. By contrast, tumor hemorrhage was observed only in liver lesions larger than 5 cm (n = 4). Three patterns of venous tumor thrombosis were identified: direct venous invasion by the primary HAS (n = 1), direct venous invasion by the liver metastases (n = 7), and isolated portal vein tumor thrombosis (n = 2). Dynamic CT revealed arterial hyperattenuation and late phase washout in all the liver metastases. CONCLUSION: On dynamic CT, liver metastasis from HAS shared many imaging similarities with HCC. For liver nodules, the presence of isolated portal vein tumor thrombosis and a tendency for tumor necrosis are imaging clues that suggest the diagnosis of HAS. PMID:26730164

  16. Epinephrine Injection Associated Scrotal Skin Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Murat; Kaynar, Mehmet; Sekmenli, Tamer; Ciftci, Ilhan; Goktas, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Male circumcision is among the most frequent surgical interventions throughout history. Although considered as a minor intervention, it may have complications ranging from insignificant to catastrophic. These complications can be attributed to the surgical procedure and anesthesia. In this report we present two cases of scrotal skin necrosis after lidocaine with epinephrine injection using subcutaneous ring block technique prior to circumcision. PMID:26185706

  17. Pythium Root Rot (and Feeder Root Necrosis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium species cause a number of diseases on corn. Among the Pythium diseases, root rot presents the least conspicuous aboveground symptoms. Broadly defined, root rot also includes feeder root necrosis. At least 16 species of Pythium are known to cause root rot of corn. These include P. acanthicu...

  18. Radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Kimura, Toru; Kita, Ryuichi; Osaki, Yukio

    2013-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Unfortunately, only 20% of HCC patients are amenable to curative therapy (liver transplantation or surgical resection). Locoregional therapies such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), percutaneous ethanol injection, microwave coagulation therapy, and transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation play a key role in the management of HCC. The choice of the treatment modality depends on the size of the tumour, tumour location, anatomic considerations and the number of tumours present and liver function. RFA therapy for HCC can be performed safely using a percutaneous, laparoscopic, or an open approach, even in patients with poor functional reserve. Since the introduction of RFA, several randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies comparing RFA and other therapies for HCC have been conducted. In addition, in the last decade there have been technical advances in RFA therapy for HCC, resulting in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients treated with this modality. In this review, we primarily focus on percutaneous RFA therapy for HCC and refer to current knowledge and future perspectives for this therapy. We also discuss new emerging ablation techniques. PMID:23937321

  19. Hepatitis D and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaigham; Abbas, Minaam; Abbas, Sarim; Shazi, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is a defective circular shape single stranded HDV RNA virus with two types of viral proteins, small and large hepatitis D antigens, surrounded by hepatitis B surface antigen. Superinfection with HDV in chronic hepatitis B is associated with a more threatening form of liver disease leading to rapid progression to cirrhosis. In spite of some controversy in the epidemiological studies, HDV infection does increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to hepatitis B virus (HBV) monoinfection. Hepatic decompensation, rather than development of HCC, is the first usual clinical endpoint during the course of HDV infection. Oxidative stress as a result of severe necroinflammation may progress to HCC. The large hepatitis D antigen is a regulator of various cellular functions and an activator of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Another proposed epigenetic mechanism by which HCC may form is the aberrant silencing of tumor suppressor genes by DNA Methyltransferases. HDV antigens have also been associated with increased histone H3 acetylation of the clusterin promoter. This enhances the expression of clusterin in infected cells, increasing cell survival potential. Any contribution of HBV DNA integration with chromosomes of infected hepatocytes is not clear at this stage. The targeted inhibition of STAT3 and cyclophilin, and augmentation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ have a potential therapeutic role in HCC. PMID:25914778

  20. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sarpel, Umut; Schwartz, Myron

    2007-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma can only be cured by physical removal or destruction of the tumor before it has spread. This can be accomplished by the ablation of the tumor, surgical resection of the tumor-bearing liver, or by liver transplantation. Ablation and resection can only be performed in patients who will be left with sufficient liver volume to sustain normal hepatic function. Unfortunately, the same disease that caused the HCC also limits the amount of parenchymal loss that can be tolerated by the patient. Liver transplantation is an appealing treatment option because it has the potential to cure patient of both the cancer and the predisposinig liver disease. Excellent survival rates are possible in patients with early HCC who receive a transplant, but dismal results are seen when patients with advanced tumors are transplanted.Wide criteria for transplant allow for more patients to be cured of HCC, but this comes at the expense of a greater overall recurrence rate. The acceptable recurrence rate is not a concrete number, but this is a function of donor organ availability. A 50% cure rate is viewed as an excellent outcome for many accepted cancer operations; however, in the case of transplant for HCC, this would represent a poor use of the scarce donor resource when the same liver offers a 70% 5-year survival rate to a non-HCC patient. These issues and methods retarding tumor progression while on the transplant waiting list are reviewed herein. PMID:17877492

  1. Tissue Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali

    2014-01-01

    The current American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) guideline provides strategies for achieving the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on the size of liver nodules seen on surveillance imaging. For lesions less than 1 cm in size, follow-up surveillance imaging is recommended. Lesions larger than 2 cm require typical radiological hallmark on dynamic imaging. Lesions of 1–2 cm in size require typical imaging features including intense uptake of contrast during arterial phases followed by decreased enhancement during portal venous phases on at least 2 imaging modalities. In cases of atypical radiological features of the suspected lesion, tissue diagnosis either by fine needle aspiration or biopsy should be obtained. Although fine needle aspiration could give a smaller risk of seeding than biopsy, biopsy has been preferred over cytology. Percutaneous biopsy of HCC carries a potential risk of tumor seeding along the needle tract. However the risk is low and there is no clear evidence of post transplant recurrence due to needle tract seeding. Histopathologic assessment can differentiate between premalignant lesions such as dysplastic nodules and early HCC. Atypical variants of HCC can be recognized morphologically which may have associated prognostic value. PMID:25755614

  2. Gut Microbiota and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xuemei; Wang, Ning; Qin, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common complication of liver diseases such as those related to viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. The gut-liver axis is gaining increasing attention as a key pathophysiological mechanism responsible for the progression of HCC. Here, we will review the data from the published literature to address the association between HCC and gut microbiota. Summary The presence of high levels of endotoxemia in the blood results in portal hypertension and ensuing hepatocyte damage, thus leading to the development of HCC. Probiotics can be used to treat or prevent the progression of HCC, because they may decrease the counts of gut microbiota and thus improve the endotoxemia. Key Message Increased bacterial translocation can result in endotoxemia, which may play a critical role in the progression of HCC. Modulation of the gut microbiota by probiotics may represent a new avenue for therapeutic intervention in HCC. Practical Implications Breakdown in intestinal barrier function and bacterial overgrowth are main events in the development of HCC. When the intestinal barrier function is disrupted, large amounts of bacterial products can enter the liver and induce inflammation through their receptors, leading to liver diseases. Altering the gut microflora has been proposed as an adjunctive therapy to reduce bacterial translocation and prevent progression of HCC. The purpose of this review is to discuss the relationship between gut microbiota and HCC in both pathogenesis and treatment by probiotics. PMID:26673641

  3. Oncotic necrosis and caspase-dependent apoptosis during galactosamine-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Jaspreet S; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2003-07-01

    The mode of cell death during galactosamine (Gal)-induced liver injury was originally thought to be oncotic necrosis but recently it was suggested to be apoptosis. Thus, the objective was to assess whether apoptosis and oncosis are sequential or independent events in the pathophysiology. In addition, the role of caspases in Gal-induced apoptotic signaling was investigated. A dose of 500 mg/kg Gal caused a time-dependent increase in plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) levels (24 h: 430 +/- 122 U/L) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. This was accompanied by processing of procaspase-3 and significant increases in hepatic and plasma caspase-3 activities. Using morphology and TUNEL staining, apoptotic and oncotic cells were quantitated. The number of apoptotic hepatocytes increased from 0.14% in controls to 5.4 +/- 1.0% 24 h after Gal treatment. In addition, the number of cells with oncotic morphology increased from 0 to 6.9% of total hepatocytes. Treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor IDN-7314 (10 mg/kg) or pretreatment with uridine (1 g/kg), reduced all parameters of apoptosis to baseline. However, IDN-7314 administration did not affect plasma ALT activities and the number of oncotic cells at 6 h and only modestly reduced these parameters at 24 h. Uridine, on the other hand, prevented the increase of plasma ALT levels and reduced the number of apoptotic and oncotic cells by >80%. In conclusion, galactosamine-induced hepatocellular apoptosis in rats is caspase dependent. Although some of the apoptotic cells may undergo secondary necrosis, a significant number of hepatocytes die through oncotic necrosis as an independent mechanism of cell death. PMID:12831781

  4. Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Edeline, Julien; Gilabert, Marine; Garin, Etienne; Boucher, Eveline; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2015-03-01

    Yttrium-90 (Y90) radioembolization is an emerging strategy to treat liver malignancies, and clinical data supporting its use have accumulated in recent years. Y90-radioembolization has shown clinical effectiveness in intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, with a favorable safety profile. Retrospective data show similar levels of effectiveness to transarterial chemoembolization in intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma, with some evidence of better tolerance. While phase 3 studies comparing Y90-radioembolization to chemoembolization in intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma would be difficult to conduct, studies comparing or combining Y90-radioembolization with sorafenib are under way. Questions also remain about the most suitable modalities for defining the dose to administer. Phase 3 studies are under way to clarify the place of Y90-radioembolization in the algorithm of HCC treatment. PMID:26020026

  5. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 2: complications of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yüce, G

    2015-02-01

    The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Major changes include subdividing acute fluid collections into "acute peripancreatic fluid collection" and "acute post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collection (acute necrotic collection)" based on the presence of necrotic debris. Delayed fluid collections have been similarly subdivided into "pseudocyst" and "walled of pancreatic necrosis". Appropriate use of the new terms describing the fluid collections is important for management decision-making in patients with acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of complications of the acute pancreatitis with emphasis on their prognostic significance and impact on clinical management and to clarify confusing terminology for pancreatic fluid collections. PMID:24703377

  6. Atypical β-Catenin Activated Child Hepatocellular Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Unlu, Havva Akmaz; Karakus, Esra; Yazal Erdem, Arzu; Yakut, Zeynep Ilerisoy

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas are a benign, focal, hepatic neoplasm that have been divided into four subtypes according to the genetic and pathological features. The β-catenin activated subtype accounts for 10-15% of all hepatocellular adenomas and specific magnetic resonance imaging features have been defined for different hepatocellular adenomas subtypes. The current study aimed to report the magnetic resonance imaging features of a well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma that developed on the basis of β-catenin activated hepatocellular adenomas in a child. In this case, atypical diffuse steatosis was determined in the lesion. In the literature, diffuse steatosis, which is defined as a feature of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α-inactivated hepatocellular adenomas subtype, has not been previously reported in any β-catenin activated hepatocellular adenomas case. Interlacing magnetic resonance imaging findings between subtypes show that there are still many mysteries about this topic and larger studies are warranted. PMID:26157702

  7. Atypical β-Catenin Activated Child Hepatocellular Tumor.

    PubMed

    Turan, Aynur; Unlu, Havva Akmaz; Karakus, Esra; Yazal Erdem, Arzu; Yakut, Zeynep Ilerisoy

    2015-06-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas are a benign, focal, hepatic neoplasm that have been divided into four subtypes according to the genetic and pathological features. The β-catenin activated subtype accounts for 10-15% of all hepatocellular adenomas and specific magnetic resonance imaging features have been defined for different hepatocellular adenomas subtypes. The current study aimed to report the magnetic resonance imaging features of a well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma that developed on the basis of β-catenin activated hepatocellular adenomas in a child. In this case, atypical diffuse steatosis was determined in the lesion. In the literature, diffuse steatosis, which is defined as a feature of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α-inactivated hepatocellular adenomas subtype, has not been previously reported in any β-catenin activated hepatocellular adenomas case. Interlacing magnetic resonance imaging findings between subtypes show that there are still many mysteries about this topic and larger studies are warranted. PMID:26157702

  8. Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Risk Factors, Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Janevska, Dafina; Chaloska-Ivanova, Viktorija; Janevski, Vlado

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most often primary cancer of the liver and is one if the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The incidence of HCC has geographic distribution with the highest levels in countries with developing economies. Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma have poor prognosis despite the achievements in surgery techniques and other therapeutic procedures and it is a reason why continuous attention should be paid to this issue. This article provides an overview of this disease based on an extensive review of relevant literature. The article summarizes the current risk factors, diagnosis, staging and the management of HCC. PMID:27275318

  9. Synchronous Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Auricular Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    González-Cantú, Yessica M.; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; García de la Fuente, Alberto; Mejía-Bañuelos, Rosa María; Díaz Mendoza, Raymundo; Quintanilla-Garza, Samuel; Batisda-Acuña, Yolaester

    2015-01-01

    Synchronic occurrence of benign and malignant tumors is extremely rare. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma represents 1% to 2% of all hepatocarcinomas, while myxomas represent about half of all the cases of primary tumors of the heart. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a left atrial myxoma that was surgically removed. Several weeks later, the patient returned to the hospital with abdominal pain. CT scan showed a mass in the left lobe of the liver that was resected and diagnosed as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. As of this writing, the patient is healthy. PMID:26509093

  10. Synchronous Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Auricular Myxoma.

    PubMed

    González-Cantú, Yessica M; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; García de la Fuente, Alberto; Mejía-Bañuelos, Rosa María; Díaz Mendoza, Raymundo; Quintanilla-Garza, Samuel; Batisda-Acuña, Yolaester

    2015-01-01

    Synchronic occurrence of benign and malignant tumors is extremely rare. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma represents 1% to 2% of all hepatocarcinomas, while myxomas represent about half of all the cases of primary tumors of the heart. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a left atrial myxoma that was surgically removed. Several weeks later, the patient returned to the hospital with abdominal pain. CT scan showed a mass in the left lobe of the liver that was resected and diagnosed as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. As of this writing, the patient is healthy. PMID:26509093

  11. Infected pancreatic necrosis and peripancreatic fluid collections: serendipitous response to antibiotics and medical therapy in three patients.

    PubMed

    Dubner, H; Steinberg, W; Hill, M; Bassi, C; Chardavoyne, R; Bank, S

    1996-04-01

    Three patients with clinical and radiologic evidence of pancreatic necrosis or peripancreatic fluid collections/inflammatory masses who were advised to have surgery on the basis of bacterial infection on skinny-needle aspiration of the pancreas but were deemed medically unstable or refused operative intervention were treated with intensive antibiotic therapy. All three patients survived the attack of acute pancreatitis with infection on medical therapy alone. This suggests that occasional patients with infected necrosis and/or peripancreatic collections/inflammatory masses may respond to antibiotics, especially those antibiotics that have recently been shown to have a high penetration into pancreatic tissue. PMID:8830338

  12. Statin-induced muscle necrosis in the rat: distribution, development, and fibre selectivity.

    PubMed

    Westwood, F Russell; Bigley, Alison; Randall, Kevin; Marsden, Alan M; Scott, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Simvastatin and cerivastatin have been used to investigate the development of statin-induced muscle necrosis in the rat. This was similar for both statins and was treatment-duration dependent, only occurring after 10 days had elapsed even if the dose was increased, and still occurring after this time when dosing was terminated earlier as a result of morbidity. It was then widespread and affected all areas of the muscular system. However, even when myotoxicity was severe, particular individual muscles and some types of fibres within affected muscles were spared consistently. Fibre typing of spared muscles and of acutely necrotic fibres within affected muscles indicated a differential fibre sensitivity to statin-induced muscle necrosis. The fibres showed a necrotic response to statin administration that matched their oxidative/glycolytic metabolic nature: Least sensitive --> I < - > IIA < - > IID < - > IIB <-- most sensitive. Type I and IIB fibres represent metabolic extremes of a continuum of metabolic properties through the fibre types with type I fibres most oxidative in metabolism and type IIB fibres most glycolytic. In addition, in some (nonnecrotic) glycolytic fibres from muscles showing early multifocal single fibre necrosis the only subcellular alterations present in isolation of any other changes were mitochondrial. These changes were characterised by an increased incidence of vacuolation and the formation of myelinoid vesicular bodies that accumulated in the subsarcolemmal areas. These findings suggest an important early involvement of mitochondria in selective glycolytic muscle fibre necrosis following inhibition of the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:15902968

  13. Intraperitoneal administration of high doses of polyethylene glycol (PEG) causes hepatic subcapsular necrosis and low-grade peritonitis with a rise in hepatic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Giovanni; Starkey Lewis, Phil J; Palmer, Luke; Hetzel, Udo; Goldring, Christopher E; Park, B Kevin; Kipar, Anja; Williams, Dominic P

    2013-12-15

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are commonly employed as excipients in preclinical studies and in vitro experiments to dissolve poorly hydrosoluble drugs. Their use is generally considered safe in both animals and humans; however, limited data is available concerning the safety of PEGs when administered parenterally. The results of our investigation demonstrate that PEG-400 can have an irritant effect on serosal surfaces and causes subcapsular hepatocellular necrosis in mice when administered intraperitoneally at a high dose (4 mL/kg). Accordingly, levels of serum biomarkers of liver injury need to be carefully interpreted in studies where PEG is administered intraperitoneally and always in association with the results of the histological assessment. PMID:23831209

  14. Liver resection for hemoperitoneum caused by spontaneous rupture of unrecognized hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, G E; Spaziani, E; Costantino, A; Ceci, F; Di Grazia, C; Martellucci, A; Pecchia, M; Cipriani, B; De Angelis, F; Corelli, S; Napoleoni, A; Stefanelli, F; Salvadori, C; Parisella, M; Nicodemi, S; Stagnitti, F

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an increasingly common form of cancer. Although its spontaneous rupture is rare in Western countries, it constitutes a surgical emergency and is associated with high mortality. There is a lack of consensus as to the best approach and what parameters to use in choosing it. The three main approaches are conservative, endovascular and resection - the treatment of choice for acute abdominal bleeding. We report a case of hemoperitoneum following the spontaneous rupture of an unrecognized HCV-related HCC in a patient with no history of liver disease. The patient was successfully treated by emergency surgery, with resection of two segments of the left liver. PMID:22958803

  15. Regulated necrosis and its implications in toxicology.

    PubMed

    Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    Recent research developments have revealed that caspase-dependent apoptosis is not the sole form of regulated cell death. Caspase-independent, but genetically regulated, forms of cell death include pyroptosis, necroptosis, parthanatos, and the recently discovered ferroptosis and autosis. Importantly, regulated necrosis can be modulated by small molecule inhibitors/activators, confirming the cell autonomous mechanism of these forms of cell death. The success of small molecule-mediated manipulation of regulated necrosis has produced great changes in the field of cell death research, and has also brought about significant changes in the fields of pharmacology as well as toxicology. In this review, we intend to summarize the modes of regulated cell death other than apoptosis, and discuss their implications in toxicology. PMID:25865964

  16. Giant cell arteritis presenting as scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Daniel E; Muñoz, Silvia; Acebes, Xènia; Llatjós, Roger; Jucglà, Anna; Alvarez, Alba

    2011-01-01

    The differential of scalp ulceration in older patients should include several causes, such as herpes zoster, irritant contact dermatitis, ulcerated skin tumors, postirradiation ulcers, microbial infections, pyoderma gangrenosum, and giant cell arteritis. Scalp necrosis associated with giant cell arteritis was first described in the 1940s. The presence of this dermatological sign within giant cell arteritis represents a severity marker of this disease, with a higher mean age at diagnosis, an elevated risk of vision loss and tongue gangrene, as well as overall higher mortality rates, in comparison to patients not presenting this manifestation. Even though scalp necrosis due to giant cell arteritis is exceptional, a high level of suspicion must be held for this clinical finding, in order to initiate prompt and proper treatment and avoid blindness. PMID:21789466

  17. Current Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Crissien, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy. Despite efforts for prevention and screening as well as development of new technologies for diagnosis and treatment, the incidence of HCC has doubled, and mortality rates have increased in recent decades. A variety of important risk factors are associated with the development of HCC, with any type of cirrhosis, regardless of etiology, being the major contributor. Hepatitis C virus infection with bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis and hepatitis B virus infection are independent risk factors. The diagnosis of HCC is made without liver biopsy in over 90% of cases. Screening with ultrasound and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) at 6-month intervals is advised; however, it is not adequate for patients on the orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) list. Triple-phase computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging are used in combination with the detection of AFP, AFP-L3%, and/or des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin due to their superior sensitivities and specificities. Several treatment modalities are available, but only surgical resection and OLT are curative. OLT is available only for patients who meet or are downstaged into Milan or University of California, San Francisco criteria. Other treatment options include radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, percutaneous ethanol injection, transarterial chemoembolization, radioembolization, cryoablation, radiation therapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted therapies. The management of HCC is based on tumor size and location, extrahepatic spread, and underlying liver function. Given the complexity of the disease, patients are often best served in centers with experience in HCC management, where a multi-disciplinary approach can take place. PMID:24829542

  18. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  19. Newer markers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Jorge A; Lok, Anna S F

    2004-11-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing worldwide; the overall survival of patients with HCC is grim because most patients are diagnosed late, when curative treatment is not possible. Cirrhosis is the strongest risk factor for the development of HCC. HCC surveillance with alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and ultrasonography has been recommended for persons with cirrhosis. However, AFP level is insensitive for the early detection of HCC, and ultrasonography is expensive and operator dependent. Clearly, there is a need for novel strategies for the early detection of HCC. The ideal biomarker assay for HCC would be sensitive, specific, noninvasive, reproducible, inexpensive, and acceptable to patients. The Early Detection Research Network of the National Cancer Institute has proposed 5 phases for biomarker validation: preclinical exploratory studies, clinical assay development for disease, retrospective longitudinal study to detect preclinical disease, prospective screening study, and cancer control studies. Several biomarkers, such as des-gamma carboxyprothrombin, lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive AFP, human hepatocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1, are promising, but none of these markers has been validated for clinical use. Limitations of the current literature include inadequate sample size, heterogeneity in biomarker assay methods and result reporting, limited analysis of demographics and cause of liver disease as covariates in the expression of these markers, and a scarcity of longitudinal studies evaluating the ability of biomarkers to detect preclinical disease. There is an urgent need for novel biomarkers for the detection of early HCC; the National Cancer Institute proposal provides a framework for future validation studies. PMID:15508074

  20. New advances in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sonia; Herrera, Iván; Irurzun, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in cirrhotic patients and the third cause of cancer related deaths. Most HCC are associated with well known underlying risk factors, in fact, HCC arise in cirrhotic patients in up to 90% of cases, mainly due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcohol abuse. The worldwide prevention strategies are conducted to avoid the infection of new subjects and to minimize the risk of liver disease progression in infected patients. HCC is a condition which lends itself to surveillance as at-risk individuals can readily be identified. The American and European guidelines recommended implementation of surveillance programs with ultrasound every six months in patient at-risk for developing HCC. The diagnosis of HCC can be based on non-invasive criteria (only in cirrhotic patient) or pathology. Accurately staging patients is essential to oncology practice. The ideal tumour staging system in HCC needs to account for both tumour characteristics and liver function. Treatment allocation is based on several factors: Liver function, size and number of tumours, macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. The recommendations in terms of selection for different treatment strategies must be based on evidence-based data. Resection, liver transplant and interventional radiology treatment are mainstays of HCC therapy and achieve the best outcomes in well-selected candidates. Chemoembolization is the most widely used treatment for unresectable HCC or progression after curative treatment. Finally, in patients with advanced HCC with preserved liver function, sorafenib is the only approved systemic drug that has demonstrated a survival benefit and is the standard of care in this group of patients. PMID:27028578

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Mazzanti, Roberto; Arena, Umberto; Tassi, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second cause of death due to malignancy in the world, following lung cancer. The geographic distribution of this disease accompanies its principal risk factors: Chronic hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection, alcoholism, aflatoxin B1 intoxication, liver cirrhosis, and some genetic attributes. Recently, type II diabetes has been shown to be a risk factor for HCC together with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Although the risk factors are quite well known and it is possible to diagnose HCC when the tumor is less than 1 cm diameter, it remains elusive at the beginning and treatment is often unsuccessful. Liver transplantation is thus far considered the best treatment for HCC as it cures HCC and the underlying liver disease. Using the Milan criteria, overall survival after liver transplantation for HCC is about 70% after 5 years. Many attempts have been made to go beyond the Milan Criteria and according to recent works reasonably good results have been achieved by using a histochemical marker such as cytokeratine 19 and the so-called “up to seven criteria” to divide patients into categories according to their risk of relapse. In addition to liver transplantation other therapies have been proposed such as resection, tumor ablation by different means, embolization and chemotherapy. An important step in the treatment of advanced HCC has been the introduction of sorafenib, the first oral, systemic drug that has provided significant improvement in survival. Treatment of HCC patients must be multidisciplinary and by using the different approaches discussed in this review it is possible to offer prolonged survival and quite good and sometimes even excellent quality of life to many patients. PMID:26929917

  2. New advances in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Sonia; Herrera, Iván; Irurzun, Javier

    2016-03-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in cirrhotic patients and the third cause of cancer related deaths. Most HCC are associated with well known underlying risk factors, in fact, HCC arise in cirrhotic patients in up to 90% of cases, mainly due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcohol abuse. The worldwide prevention strategies are conducted to avoid the infection of new subjects and to minimize the risk of liver disease progression in infected patients. HCC is a condition which lends itself to surveillance as at-risk individuals can readily be identified. The American and European guidelines recommended implementation of surveillance programs with ultrasound every six months in patient at-risk for developing HCC. The diagnosis of HCC can be based on non-invasive criteria (only in cirrhotic patient) or pathology. Accurately staging patients is essential to oncology practice. The ideal tumour staging system in HCC needs to account for both tumour characteristics and liver function. Treatment allocation is based on several factors: Liver function, size and number of tumours, macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. The recommendations in terms of selection for different treatment strategies must be based on evidence-based data. Resection, liver transplant and interventional radiology treatment are mainstays of HCC therapy and achieve the best outcomes in well-selected candidates. Chemoembolization is the most widely used treatment for unresectable HCC or progression after curative treatment. Finally, in patients with advanced HCC with preserved liver function, sorafenib is the only approved systemic drug that has demonstrated a survival benefit and is the standard of care in this group of patients. PMID:27028578

  3. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  4. New cancer therapies and jaw necrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, V; Kelleher, M; Sproat, C; Kwok, J; McGurk, M

    2015-09-11

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) has a number of causes, the most familiar being radiation or bisphosphonate induced. Various other novel anti-neoplastic and bone-targeting therapies that can also cause jaw necrosis have recently become available. This has led to the suggested acronym MRONJ for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. This article summarises the available information on these drugs and their implications for the dental surgeon. PMID:26361116

  5. Uterine Necrosis Associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Widelock, T.; Elkattah, R.; Gibbs, S.; Mashak, Z.; Mohling, S.; DePasquale, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is infrequently implicated as a pathogenic organism. When pathogenic, the typical clinical presentation is that of pharyngitis, cervical adenopathy, and unilateral thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Infections caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum within the fields of obstetrics and gynecology have been infrequently reported. We describe a 19-year-old woman who underwent a cesarean delivery complicated by sepsis and purulent uterine necrosis secondary to Fusobacterium necrophorum infection. PMID:26000185

  6. Multiparametric human hepatocellular carcinoma characterization and therapy response evaluation by hyperpolarized (13) C MRSI.

    PubMed

    Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Gringeri, Concetta V; Kosanke, Yvonne; Gross, Claudia; Janich, Martin A; Haase, Axel; Glaser, Steffen J; Schwaiger, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F; Braren, Rickmer; Menzel, Marion I

    2016-07-01

    Individual tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring based on current medical imaging methods remain challenging. This work investigates hyperpolarized (13) C compounds in an orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model system before and after transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). HCC ranks amongst the top six most common cancer types in humans and accounts for one-third of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early therapy response monitoring could aid in the development of personalized therapy approaches and novel therapeutic concepts. Measurements with selectively (13) C-labeled and hyperpolarized urea, pyruvate and fumarate were performed in tumor-bearing rats before and after TAE. Two-dimensional, slice-selective MRSI was used to obtain spatially resolved maps of tumor perfusion, cell energy metabolic conversion rates and necrosis, which were additionally correlated with immunohistochemistry. All three injected compounds, taken together with their respective metabolites, exhibited similar signal distributions. TAE induced a decrease in blood flow into the tumor and thus a decrease in tumor to muscle and tumor to liver ratios of urea, pyruvate and its metabolites, alanine and lactate, whereas conversion rates remained stable or increased on TAE in tumor, muscle and liver tissue. Conversion from fumarate to malate successfully indicated individual levels of necrosis, and global malate signals after TAE suggested the washout of fumarase or malate itself on necrosis. This study presents a combination of three (13) C compounds as novel candidate biomarkers for a comprehensive characterization of genetically and molecularly diverse HCC using hyperpolarized MRSI, enabling the simultaneous detection of differences in tumor perfusion, metabolism and necrosis. If, as in this study, bolus dynamics are not required and qualitative perfusion information is sufficient, the desired information could be extracted from hyperpolarized fumarate and

  7. Percutaneous hepatic radiofrequency for hepatocellular carcinoma: results and outcome of 46 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Julie; Caillol, Fabrice; Borentain, Patrick; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Heyries, Laurent; Bories, Erwan; Pesenti, Christian; Ratone, Jean-Philippe; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Gerolami, René; Giovannini, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a curative option for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common primary malignancy of the liver. This bicentric retrospective study includes 46 patients admitted for their first percutaneous RFA for HCC. Sixty-three nodules were treated, with an average size of 32.5 mm. Our study confirms the efficiency of this technique for attaining necrosis of HCC nodules, with few complications. Subgroup studies according to RFA mode (mono- or multipolar), etiology of cirrhosis (alcoholic or viral), and HCC size showed better efficiency for multipolar RFA when applied to small tumors and better survival when the cirrhosis was due to viral infection. However, we noted a high rate of local recurrence in our and other recent works compared to previous studies, probably due to improved imaging techniques. The main problem is still de novo intrahepatic recurrence in diseased livers. PMID:26056497

  8. Pathological evidence of the cause of spontaneous regression in a case of resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Shunichi; Tamura, Akinori; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Fujikawa, Hirotoshi; Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Sugitani, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented for an evaluation after experiencing right hypochondrial pain lasting for two months. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a hepatic tumor in the right liver and extremely mild hepatic steatosis. The imaging findings indicated that the tumor (43 mm in size) was ischemic, and the lesion was surgically resected and examined. The histopathological findings demonstrated 95% necrosis with moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The diagnosis was HCC with spontaneous regression. There was also pathological evidence of thrombus formation in the peripheral arteries and portal veins. In addition, the non-cancerous regions of the liver were diagnosed as exhibiting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The pathological findings obtained after resection of the HCC lesion showed spontaneous regression. PMID:25742889

  9. Hepatocellular carcinoma in captive slender tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta): 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Marrow, Judilee C; Basu, Puja; Walsh, Timothy F; Siegal-Willott, Jessica L

    2014-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed in five slender tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta) housed at the Smithsonian Institution's National Zoological Park between 1980 and 2013. Animals included four females and one male, ranging from 7 to 15 yr of age. Common clinical signs included weight loss and lethargy. Three of the neoplasms originated from the right medial liver lobe and were located adjacent to or partially incorporated in the gall bladder. Three animals had solitary masses, and two animals had multiple hepatic masses; all were characterized by polygonal to round neoplastic hepatocytes arranged in a trabecular pattern with smaller regions of varied solid, adenoid, and rarely peliod cell patterns. Hemorrhage and necrosis often with cystic degeneration was noted in all five cases. There was no evidence of metastatic disease in any of the cases examined. PMID:24712172

  10. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma with transarterial chemoembolization in the era of systemic targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    The clinical management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often complicated by poor liver function. Treatment options for intermediate- and advanced-stage disease are limited. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is an effective first-line therapy for intermediate-stage HCC. By interrupting blood flow to the tumor and administering concentrated chemotherapy locoregionally, TACE induces necrosis at the tumor site, but may create conditions that permit or encourage angiogenesis and recurrence of the tumor. Combination of TACE with new targeted agents may be an effective way to treat intermediate-stage HCC, particularly in higher risk patients. Because of the efficacy and safety of sorafenib-the first systemic therapy to show significant clinical benefit in advanced HCC-there is great interest in its potential use in combination with existing treatment modalities. The synergistic combination of TACE plus sorafenib represents a promising opportunity for tumor control. PMID:22142656

  11. Idiopathic incus necrosis: Analysis of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Kansu, Leyla; Yilmaz, Ismail; Akdogan, Volkan; Avci, Suat; Ozluoglu, Levent

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated ossicular chain reconstruction in patients with idiopathic incus necrosis who have conductive hearing loss and an intact ear drum. The study included four patients (3 women and 1 man; the ages of the patients were 22, 31, 35, and 56 years, respectively) with unilateral conductive hearing loss, no history of chronic serous otitis media, an intact ear drum, normal middle ear mucosa, and necrosis of the long processes of the incus. On preoperative pure tone audiometry, air-bone gaps were 24, 25, 38, and 33 dB. Bilateral tympanometry and temporal bone computed tomography results were normal. All 4 patients underwent an exploratory tympanotomy. During the operation, the mucosa of the middle ear was normal, with a mobile stapes foot plate and malleus. No evidence of any granulation tissue was found; however, necrosis of the incus long processes was seen. For ossicular reconstruction, we used tragal cartilage between the incus and the stapes in 1 patient; in the other 3 patients, glass ionomer bone cement was used (an interposition cartilage graft also was used in the patients who received the glass ionomer bone cement). In all patients, air-bone gaps under 20 dB were established in the first year after surgery. In the ossicular disorders within the middle ear, the incus is the most commonly affected ossicle. While, the most common cause of these disorders is chronic otitis media, it may be idiopathic rarely. Several ossicular reconstruction techniques have been used to repair incudostapedial discontinuity. PMID:23460219

  12. Prognostic factors for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Colecchia, Antonio; Schiumerini, Ramona; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Cescon, Matteo; Taddia, Martina; Marasco, Giovanni; Festi, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma, the sixth most common neoplasm and the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, represents an important clinical problem, since it may occur after both surgical and medical treatment. The recurrence rate involves 2 phases: an early phase and a late phase. The early phase usually occurs within 2 years after resection; it is mainly related to local invasion and intrahepatic metastases and, therefore, to the intrinsic biology of the tumor. On the other hand, the late phase occurs more than 2 years after surgery and is mainly related to de novo tumor formation as a consequence of the carcinogenic cirrhotic environment. Since recent studies have reported that early and late recurrences may have different risk factors, it is clinically important to recognize these factors in the individual patient as soon as possible. The aim of this review was, therefore, to identify predicting factors for the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma, by means of invasive and non-invasive methods, according to the different therapeutic strategies available. In particular the role of emerging techniques (e.g., transient elastography) and biological features of hepatocellular carcinoma in predicting recurrence have been discussed. In particular, invasive methods were differentiated from non-invasive ones for research purposes, taking into consideration the emerging role of the genetic signature of hepatocellular carcinoma in order to better allocate treatment strategies and surveillance follow-up in patients with this type of tumor. PMID:24876717

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma and evidence-based surgery

    PubMed Central

    Braillon, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation cannot be considered the most important therapeutic procedure for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In France, no more than 2% of patients with HCC undergo a transplantation. Randomized controlled trial must assess the benefit to risk ratio of various potentially “curative” treatment procedures (transplantation, resection, radio-frequency ablation). PMID:19908350

  14. Non-hepatocellular carcinoma spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Boone, Christine; Ruiz-Valls, Alejandro; Sankey, Eric W; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Elder, Benjamin D; Kosztowski, Thomas; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Metastases to the spine from non-hepatocellular carcinomas, such as cholangiocarcinoma and angiosarcoma, occur rarely. With improvements in oncologic care, the number of patients diagnosed with metastatic cancer is expected to increase. We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the clinical presentation, treatment, outcome and survival of patients diagnosed with non-hepatocellular carcinoma spinal metastasis using PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and Web of Science. We identified 19 cases of spinal metastases from non-hepatocellular carcinomas that fit our pre-specified criteria. The mean age at presentation was 62.3years and cholangiocarcinoma was the most common subtype. Patients frequently presented with pain, weakness or paraparesis and at the time of diagnosis, most of them had multi-level involvement of the spine. A majority of patients with spinal metastasis were treated either with radiation or chemotherapy or received no treatment. A minority of the reports included information on survival, which revealed a median survival of 1.5months following diagnosis of the spinal metastasis. Although there is a paucity of published literature on non-hepatocellular carcinoma spinal metastasis, this systematic review provides descriptive clinical characteristics of these patients. PMID:26778049

  15. Overview of Hepatocellular Adenoma in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Motoko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) is generally a benign hepatocellular tumor arising in a nonfibrotic/cirrhotic liver, and recently four major subgroups were identified based on genotype and phenotype classification from Europe. HCA is rare in Asian countries including Japan, and there have been few studies regarding the subgroups of HCA in Japan. We surveyed subgroups of HCA in 13 patients (7 women) in Japan, based on the phenotypic classification. As results, we identified 2 hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 1α-inactivated HCAs (15%), two β-catenin-activated HCAs (15%), 5 inflammatory HCAs (39%), and 4 unclassified HCAs (29%). The use of oral contraceptives was found only in 2 unclassified HCAs (29%). Rather low percentage of female patients and use of oral contraceptives appear to be common clinicopathological features in Japan and also East Asian countries. Furthermore, a group of possible inflammatory HCAs characterized by strong immunoreactivity for serum amyloid A (SAA) was found in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. The inflammatory HCA/SAA-positive hepatocellular neoplasm in alcoholic cirrhosis may be a new entity of HCA, which may have potential of malignant transformation. Further studies are needed to clarify genetic changes, monoclonality, and pathogenesis of this new type of hepatocellular neoplasm. PMID:22973519

  16. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  17. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  18. Successful treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis following drug-induced hepatic necrosis requiring liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Marra, F; Cox, V C; FitzGerald, J M; Moadebi, S; Elwood, R K

    2004-07-01

    A 28-year-old female developed multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculous lymphadenitis following a trip to India. She was initially treated with a four-drug regimen of first-line anti-tuberculosis medications, but when sensitivities indicated resistance to isoniazid and rifampin, her regimen was altered to ciprofloxacin (CFX), pyrazinamide (PZA) and ethambutol. She subsequently developed a rash, flu-like symptoms and fever, which progressed to acute hepatic necrosis despite discontinuation of medication. The clinical presentation and subsequent investigations suggested a hypersensitivity reaction, possibly related to the quinolone. The patient subsequently had an orthoptic liver transplant; second-line anti-tuberculosis medications were restarted to which she responded clinically and radiologically. Our findings raise the possibility that the CFX and PZA combination was responsible for the hepatic necrosis. The patient also illustrates that active, even MDR tuberculosis is not a contraindication to hepatic transplant. PMID:15260286

  19. Pathological Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Cellular Adenoma according to the Clinical Context

    PubMed Central

    Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Sempoux, Christine; Possenti, Laurent; Frulio, Nora; Laumonier, Hervé; Laurent, Christophe; Chiche, Laurence; Frédéric Blanc, Jean; Saric, Jean; Trillaud, Hervé; Le Bail, Brigitte; Balabaud, Charles

    2013-01-01

    In Europe and North America, hepatocellular adenomas (HCA) occur, classically, in middle-aged woman taking oral contraceptives. Twenty percent of women, however, are not exposed to oral contraceptives; HCA can more rarely occur in men, children, and women over 65 years. HCA have been observed in many pathological conditions such as glycogenosis, familial adenomatous polyposis, MODY3, after male hormone administration, and in vascular diseases. Obesity is frequent particularly in inflammatory HCA. The background liver is often normal, but steatosis is a frequent finding particularly in inflammatory HCA. The diagnosis of HCA is more difficult when the background liver is fibrotic, notably in vascular diseases. HCA can be solitary, or multiple or in great number (adenomatosis). When nodules are multiple, they are usually of the same subtype. HNF1α-inactivated HCA occur almost exclusively in woman. The most important point of the classification is the identification of β-catenin mutated HCA, a strong argument to identify patients at risk of malignant transformation. Some HCA already present criteria indicating malignant transformation. When the whole nodule is a hepatocellular carcinoma, it is extremely difficult to prove that it is the consequence of a former HCA. It is occasionally difficult to identify HCA remodeled by necrosis or hemorrhage. PMID:23691330

  20. Expression of liver fatty acid binding protein in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Ferrell, Linda D; Gill, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Loss of expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) by immunohistochemistry has been shown to be characteristic of a subset of hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs) in which HNF1A is inactivated. Transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma is thought to be a very rare phenomenon in the HNF1A-inactivated variant of HCA. However, we recently observed 2 cases at our institution, 1 definite hepatocellular carcinoma and 1 possible hepatocellular carcinoma, with loss of LFABP staining, raising the possibility that LFABP down-regulation may be associated with hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Our aim was to evaluate hepatocellular carcinomas arising in various backgrounds and with varying degrees of differentiation for loss of LFABP staining. Twenty total cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were examined. Thirteen cases arose in a background of cirrhosis due to hepatitis C (n = 8) or steatohepatitis (n = 5); 7 cases arose in a noncirrhotic background, with 2 cases arising within HNF1A-inactivated variant HCA and 2 cases arising within inflammatory variant HCA. Complete loss of expression of LFABP was seen in 6 of 20 cases, including 2 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma arising within HNF1A-inactivated variant HCA. Thus, loss of staining for LFABP appears to be common in hepatocellular carcinoma and may be seen in well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, LFABP loss should not be interpreted as evidence for hepatocellular adenoma over carcinoma, when other features support a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. The findings raise consideration for a role of HNF1A inactivation in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, particularly in less differentiated tumors. PMID:26997447

  1. Efficacy and Tolerability of ABT-869 Versus Sorafenib in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-09-07

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma Non-resectable; Hepatocellular Carcinoma Recurrent; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular; Liver Diseases; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Digestive System Neoplasms; Carcinoma; Liver Neoplasms; Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Adenocarcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial

  2. Ethanol, ethyl and sodium pyruvate decrease the inflammatory responses of human lung epithelial cells via Akt and NF-κB in vitro but have a low impact on hepatocellular cells.

    PubMed

    Relja, B; Omid, N; Wagner, N; Mörs, K; Werner, I; Juengel, E; Perl, M; Marzi, I

    2016-02-01

    Increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and tissue-infiltrating leukocytes have been closely linked to increased systemic and local inflammation, which result in organ injury. Previously, we demonstrated the beneficial and hepatoprotective anti-inflammatory effects of acute ethanol (EtOH) ingestion in an in vivo model of acute inflammation. Due to its undesirable side-effects, however, EtOH does not represent a therapeutic option for treatment of acute inflammation. Therefore, in this study, we compared the effects of acute EtOH exposure with ethyl pyruvate (EtP) as an alternative anti-inflammatory drug in an in vitro model of hepatic and pulmonary inflammation. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells Huh7 and alveolar epithelial cells A549 were stimulated with either interleukin (IL) IL-1β (1 ng/ml, 24 h) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (10 ng/ml, 4 h), and then treated with EtP (2.5-10 mM), sodium pyruvate (NaP, 10 mM) or EtOH (85-170 mM) for 1 h. IL-6 or IL-8 release from Huh7 or A549 cells, respectively, was measured by an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Neutrophil adhesion to cell monolayers and CD54 expression were also analyzed. Bcl-2 and Bax gene expression was determined by RT-qPCR, and western blot analysis was performed to determine the mechanisms involved. Treating A549 cells with either EtOH or EtP significantly reduced the IL-1β- or TNF‑induced IL-8 release, whereas treating Huh7 cells did not significantly alter IL-6 release. Similarly, neutrophil adhesion to stimulated A549 cells was significantly reduced by EtOH or EtP, whereas for Huh7 cells the tendency for reduced neutrophil adhesion rates by EtOH or EtP was not significant. CD54 expression was noticeably reduced in A549 cells, but this was not the case in Huh7 cells after treatment. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was dose‑dependently decreased by EtOH and by high-dose EtP in A549 cells, indicating a reduction in apoptosis, whereas this effect was not observed in Huh7 cells. The underlying

  3. Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by a Lumbar Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Myun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Woo, Sungmin; Son, Kyu Ri; Cho, Seong Whi; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo describe the radiologic findings and imaging response of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the lumbar artery.MethodsBetween April 2004 and December 2012, we encountered HCC supplied by a lumbar artery in 21 patients. Two investigators retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiological findings of HCC supplied by the lumbar artery using computed tomography (CT) scans and digital subtraction angiograms.ResultsPatients had received 1–27 sessions of previous chemoembolization procedures (mean 7.7 sessions, median 4 sessions). Mean tumor size was 5.3 cm. The locations of HCC supplied by lumbar artery were the bare area (n = 14, 67 %) and segment VI (n = 7, 33 %). Tumor-feeding arteries arose from the main lumbar artery (n = 7), proximal anterior division (n = 4), and distal anterior division (n = 14). In 20 patients, selective chemoembolization through the tumor-feeding arteries of the lumbar artery was achieved. In 1 patient, nonselective embolization at the main lumbar artery was performed. There was no complication such as skin necrosis or paralysis. On the first follow-up enhanced CT scan, target tumors fed by the lumbar artery showed complete response (n = 6), partial response (n = 4), stable disease (n = 3), and progressive disease (n = 8), but overall tumor response was partial response (n = 1) and progressive disease (n = 20).ConclusionWhen HCC is located in the inferior tip or bare area of the liver, a lumbar artery may supply the tumor. Although selective chemoembolization via the tumor-feeding vessel of the lumbar artery can be achieved in most cases, overall tumor response is commonly unfavorable.

  4. [Transarterial ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. Status and developments].

    PubMed

    Radeleff, B A; Stampfl, U; Sommer, C M; Bellemann, N; Hoffmann, K; Ganten, T; Ehehalt, R; Kauczor, H U

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and represents the main cause of death among European patients with liver cirrhosis. Only 30-40% of patients diagnosed with HCC are candidates for curative treatment options (e.g. surgical resection, liver transplantation or ablation). The remaining majority of patients must undergo local regional and palliative therapies. Transvascular ablation of HCC takes advantage of the fact that the hypervascularized HCC receives most of its blood supply from the hepatic artery. In this context transvascular ablation describes different therapy regimens which can be assigned to four groups: cTACE (conventional transarterial chemoembolization), bland embolization (transarterial embolization TAE), DEB-TACE (TACE with drug-eluting beads, DEB) and SIRT (selective internal radiation therapy, radioembolization). Conventional TACE is the most common type of transvascular ablation and represents a combination of intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization with occlusion of the arterial blood supply. However, there is no standardized regimen with respect to the chemotherapeutic drug, the embolic agent, the usage of lipiodol and the interval between the TACE procedures. Even the exact course of a cTACE procedure (order of chemotherapy or embolization) is not standardized. It remains unclear whether or not intra-arterial chemotherapy is definitely required as bland embolization using very small, tightly calibrated spherical particles (without intra-arterial administration of a chemotherapeutic drug) shows tumor necrosis comparable to cTACE. For DEB-TACE microparticles loaded with a chemotherapeutic drug combine the advantages of cTACE and bland embolization. Thereby, a continuing chemotherapeutic effect within the tumor might cause a further increase in intratumoral cytotoxicity and at the same time a decrease in systemic toxicity. PMID:22249701

  5. Renal Papillary Necrosis Appearing as Bladder Cancer on Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dagrosa, Lawrence M.; Gormley, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 79-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) presented with acute onset left lower quadrant pain, left-sided back pain, vomiting, and dysuria. Abdominopelvic CT scan revealed left hydroureteronephrosis to the level of the left ureterovesical junction (UVJ) where a bladder mass appeared to be obstructing the left ureteral orifice. The obstruction was ultimately found to be the result of a sloughed renal papilla lodged in the distal ureter, which created an inflammatory mass at the UVJ. Her history of diabetes and frequent UTIs likely predisposed her to the development of renal papillary necrosis (RPN) that resulted in sloughing of a renal papilla, distal ureteral obstruction with subsequent bladder inflammation that mimicked a bladder mass on imaging. RPN is a condition associated with many etiologies and likely represents a common final pathway of several diseases. Although several hypotheses exist, it is primarily thought to be ischemic in nature and is related to the underlying physiology of the renal papillae. We present a case of hydroureteronephrosis and bladder mass secondary to a sloughed renal papilla from RPN.

  6. Tracheal necrosis with surgical emphysema following thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, A; Ganguly, M; Saidha, N; Gulia, P

    2009-01-01

    Tracheal necrosis after thyroidectomy is an extremely rare event with only a few published reports. We present a case of a 65-year-old male who developed rapidly progressive surgical emphysema of face and upper thorax on the seventh day following total thyroidectomy. Prompt surgical exploration of neck revealed a tracheal rent at the level of the second tracheal ring. This hole was then refashioned into a formal tracheostomy. Patient had an eventful recovery. Tracheostomy was closed by the 14th day. The complication was probably related to tracheal injury sustained due to electro-coagulation and subsequent secondary infection. PMID:19884745

  7. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for early hepatocellular carcinoma: Risk factors for survival

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Luciana; Menezes, Marcos; Chagas, Aline L; Tani, Claudia M; Alencar, Regiane SSM; Diniz, Marcio A; Alves, Venâncio AF; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Carrilho, Flair José

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate outcomes of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapy for early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identify survival- and recurrence-related factors. METHODS: Consecutive patients diagnosed with early HCC by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (single nodule of ≤ 5 cm, or multi- (up to 3) nodules of ≤ 3 cm each) and who underwent RFA treatment with curative intent between January 2010 and August 2011 at the Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, Brazil were enrolled in the study. RFA of the liver tumors (with 1.0 cm ablative margin) was carried out under CT-fluoro scan and ultrasonic image guidance of the percutaneous ablation probes. Procedure-related complications were recorded. At 1-mo post-RFA and 3-mo intervals thereafter, CT and MRI were performed to assess outcomes of complete response (absence of enhancing tissue at the tumor site) or incomplete response (enhancing tissue remaining at the tumor site). Overall survival and disease-free survival rates were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared by the log rank test or simple Cox regression. The effect of risk factors on survival was assessed by the Cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS: A total of 38 RFA sessions were performed during the study period on 34 patients (age in years: mean, 63 and range, 49-84). The mean follow-up time was 22 mo (range, 1-33). The study population showed predominance of male sex (76%), less severe liver disease (Child-Pugh A, n = 26; Child-Pugh B, n = 8), and single tumor (65%). The maximum tumor diameters ranged from 10 to 50 mm (median, 26 mm). The initial (immediately post-procedure) rate of RFA-induced complete tumor necrosis was 90%. The probability of achieving complete response was significantly greater in patients with a single nodule (vs patients with multi-nodules, P = 0.04). Two patients experienced major complications, including acute pulmonary edema (resolved with intervention) and intestinal perforation

  8. Renal Papillary Necrosis Caused by Protein C Deficiency Leading to Recurrent Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olorunnisomo, Vincent; Fowle, Evan James; Modica, Ippolito; Meisels, Ira; Gupta, Mantu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A patient with history of a solitary functioning kidney and protein C deficiency (PCD) presented with recurrent severe hydronephrosis causing acute kidney injury upon chronic kidney disease. Work-up with endoscopic evaluation revealed renal papillary necrosis (RPN) and sloughed renal papillae to be the true cause of the recurrent obstruction. Pathologic evaluation of the sloughed tissue confirmed the diagnosis of RPN. This is the first case reported in the literature illustrating the unique presentation of RPN in the setting of PCD. PMID:27579411

  9. Renal Papillary Necrosis Caused by Protein C Deficiency Leading to Recurrent Hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Rohit Kumar; Olorunnisomo, Vincent; Fowle, Evan James; Modica, Ippolito; Meisels, Ira; Gupta, Mantu

    2016-01-01

    A patient with history of a solitary functioning kidney and protein C deficiency (PCD) presented with recurrent severe hydronephrosis causing acute kidney injury upon chronic kidney disease. Work-up with endoscopic evaluation revealed renal papillary necrosis (RPN) and sloughed renal papillae to be the true cause of the recurrent obstruction. Pathologic evaluation of the sloughed tissue confirmed the diagnosis of RPN. This is the first case reported in the literature illustrating the unique presentation of RPN in the setting of PCD. PMID:27579411

  10. Acute pyelonephritis can have serious complications.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joanne; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2010-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) may predominantly involve the lower urinary tract, i.e. acute cystitis, or upper urinary tract consisting of the renal pelvis and kidney,, i.e. acute pyelonephritis The incidence of acute pyelonephritis is higher in young women than in men but the incidence in men over 65 is similar to that in older women. Women have up to a 10% risk of recurrent acute pyelonephritis in the year following a first acute episode. The equivalent risk in men is 6%. Acute pyelonephritis may be uncomplicated and resolve without serious sequelae. A minority of episodes may be complicated by acute kidney injury, papillary necrosis, renal or perinephric abscess or the development of emphysematous pyelonephritis. Acute pyelonephritis is generally caused by microorganisms ascending from the urethra via the bladder into the upper urinary tract. Rarely the kidney may be seeded by blood-borne infection. Ecoli is the most common uropathogen causing pyelonephritis accounting for 70-90% of infections. Species of Enterococci, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Proteus and Staphylococci are responsible for the remaining infections. There is a rising incidence in the community of UTI with bacteria that produce extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes. These ESBL bacteria have developed resistance to antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporins and increasingly to quinolones. Risk factors for uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis include recent sexual intercourse, acute cystitis, stress incontinence and diabetes and for complicated acute pyelonephritis include pregnancy, diabetes, anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract and renal calculi. PMID:20486480

  11. A steroid-induced bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head in an underage patient affected by multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Nistri, Lorenzo; Bracco, Laura; Giannini, Marta; Amato, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patients affected by Multiple Sclerosis are often treated by pulsed intravenous corticosteroids to manage acute relapses with positive outcomes. The intravenous administration is frequently associated to avascular necrosis of several bones, particularly the femur. The present report regards a case of an underage MS patient with a bilateral ANFH secondary to pulsed administrations of steroids, managed by a conservative approach on a hip, and by a novel surgical technique on the contralateral side. PMID:26811707

  12. A steroid-induced bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head in an underage patient affected by multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Carulli, Christian; Nistri, Lorenzo; Bracco, Laura; Giannini, Marta; Amato, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Patients affected by Multiple Sclerosis are often treated by pulsed intravenous corticosteroids to manage acute relapses with positive outcomes. The intravenous administration is frequently associated to avascular necrosis of several bones, particularly the femur. The present report regards a case of an underage MS patient with a bilateral ANFH secondary to pulsed administrations of steroids, managed by a conservative approach on a hip, and by a novel surgical technique on the contralateral side. PMID:26811707

  13. The Pathology of Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitch, Jay H

    2016-05-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare and severe liver disease that usually develops in 8 weeks or less in individuals without preexisting liver disease. Its chief causes worldwide are hepatitis virus infections (hepatitis A, B, and E) and drug hepatotoxicity (particularly intentional or unintentional acetaminophen toxicity). Massive hepatic necrosis is often seen in liver specimens in ALF and features marked loss of hepatocytes, variable degrees of inflammation, and a stereotypic proliferation of bile ductular structures (neocholangioles) derived from activated periportal hepatic progenitor cells. This paper reviews the liver pathology in ALF, including forms of zonal necrosis and their etiologies. PMID:27058243

  14. Hepatitis B vaccination and prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kao, Jia-Horng

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global health threat; with 240 million people are chronic carriers of the virus. The infection can cause acute and chronic liver disease including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). On the basis of disease burden and the availability of safe and effective vaccines, World Health Organization has recommended that hepatitis B vaccine be incorporated into routine infant and childhood immunization programs for all countries. The efficacy of universal immunization has been proven in many countries, with substantial reductions of the prevalence of HBV carriage in children, adolescents and young adults. Most important, hepatitis B vaccination can protect them from HCC, as has been demonstrated in Taiwan and other countries. Nevertheless, the implementation of worldwide vaccination against HBV indeed requires more effort to overcome the social and economic challenges. To have a global control of HBV infection, we have to continue the universal HBV vaccination, interrupt the possible transmission routes and treat eligible patients with antiviral agents. However, current treatments are still far from ideal as they cannot eradicate intrahepatic HBV cccDNA, and lifelong administration of these agents will pose a major economic burden, especially in the endemic Asia-Pacific region. Thus we need innovative treatment strategies and novel agents with difference modes of action to overcome the unmet medical need for an efficient HBV cure with subsequent global eradication of HBV infection, hopefully by the first half of 21st century. PMID:26651252

  15. Transcriptomic characterization of fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Simon, Elana P; Freije, Catherine A; Farber, Benjamin A; Lalazar, Gadi; Darcy, David G; Honeyman, Joshua N; Chiaroni-Clarke, Rachel; Dill, Brian D; Molina, Henrik; Bhanot, Umesh K; La Quaglia, Michael P; Rosenberg, Brad R; Simon, Sanford M

    2015-11-01

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLHCC) tumors all carry a deletion of ∼ 400 kb in chromosome 19, resulting in a fusion of the genes for the heat shock protein, DNAJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 1, DNAJB1, and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A, PRKACA. The resulting chimeric transcript produces a fusion protein that retains kinase activity. No other recurrent genomic alterations have been identified. Here we characterize the molecular pathogenesis of FLHCC with transcriptome sequencing (RNA sequencing). Differential expression (tumor vs. adjacent normal tissue) was detected for more than 3,500 genes (log2 fold change ≥ 1, false discovery rate ≤ 0.01), many of which were distinct from those found in hepatocellular carcinoma. Expression of several known oncogenes, such as ErbB2 and Aurora Kinase A, was increased in tumor samples. These and other dysregulated genes may serve as potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26489647

  16. Combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinoma: Controversies to be addressed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Qiang; Zheng, Yong-Chang; Du, Juan; Zhu, Cheng-Pei; Huang, Han-Chun; Wang, Shan-Shan; Wu, Liang-Cai; Wan, Xue-Shuai; Zhang, Hao-Hai; Miao, Ruo-Yu; Sang, Xin-Ting; Zhao, Hai-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinoma (CHC) accounts for 0.4%-14.2% of primary liver cancer cases and possesses pathological features of both hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. Since this disease was first described and classified in 1949, the classification of CHC has continuously evolved. The latest definition and classification of CHC by the World Health Organization is based on the speculation that CHC arises from hepatic progenitor cells. However, there is no evidence demonstrating the common origin of different components of CHC. Furthermore, the definition of CHC subtypes is still ambiguous and the identification of CHC subtype when a single tumor contains many components has remained unresolved. In addition, there is no summary on the newly recognized histopathology features or the contribution of CHC components to prognosis and outcome of this disease. Here we provide a review of the current literature to address these questions. PMID:27182157

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haoran; Song, Tianqiang

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the growing knowledge on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), as well as continuous improvement in imaging techniques and experienced interpretation of imaging features of the nodules in cirrhotic liver, the detection and characterization of HCC has improved in the past decade. A number of practice guidelines for imaging diagnosis have been developed to reduce interpretation variability and standardize management of HCC, and they are constantly updated with advances in imaging techniques and evidence based data from clinical series. In this article, we strive to review the imaging techniques and the characteristic features of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhotic liver, with emphasis on the diagnostic value of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and utilization of hepatocyte-specific MRI contrast agents. We also briefly describe the concept of liver imaging reporting and data systems and discuss the consensus and controversy of major practice guidelines. PMID:26632539

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma in the Malaysian Orang Asli.

    PubMed

    Sumithran, E; Prathap, K

    1976-05-01

    Necropsies were performed on 285 consecutively unclaimed Orang Asli bodies from Gombak Orang Asli Hospital during an eight-year period from May 1967 to April 1975. Of the 25 malignant neoplasms, hepatocellular carcinoma was by far the commonest (36%). The nine patients with this neoplasm had coexistant macronodular cirrhosis. There were 20 cases of cirrhosis; 45% of these had coexistant hepatocellular carcinoma. The 53,000 Orang Aslis living in West Malaysia comprise three tribes, the Negrito, Senoi, and Melayu Asli (Proto Malays). The Sinoi appear to have a high predilection for liver cancer, all our nine cases occurring in this group. These aboriginal people live in the jungles where they practice shifting cultivation and maintain their own dietary and social customs. Detailed studies of their dietary habits may provide a clue to the etiology of liver cancer in these people. PMID:177187

  19. Transcriptomic characterization of fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Elana P.; Freije, Catherine A.; Farber, Benjamin A.; Lalazar, Gadi; Darcy, David G.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Chiaroni-Clarke, Rachel; Dill, Brian D.; Molina, Henrik; Bhanot, Umesh K.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Rosenberg, Brad R.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLHCC) tumors all carry a deletion of ∼400 kb in chromosome 19, resulting in a fusion of the genes for the heat shock protein, DNAJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 1, DNAJB1, and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A, PRKACA. The resulting chimeric transcript produces a fusion protein that retains kinase activity. No other recurrent genomic alterations have been identified. Here we characterize the molecular pathogenesis of FLHCC with transcriptome sequencing (RNA sequencing). Differential expression (tumor vs. adjacent normal tissue) was detected for more than 3,500 genes (log2 fold change ≥1, false discovery rate ≤0.01), many of which were distinct from those found in hepatocellular carcinoma. Expression of several known oncogenes, such as ErbB2 and Aurora Kinase A, was increased in tumor samples. These and other dysregulated genes may serve as potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26489647

  20. Stereotactic Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy as a Bridge to Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Clinical Outcome and Pathologic Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Alan W.; Chawla, Sheema; Qu, Zhenhong; Kashyap, Randeep; Milano, Michael T.; Hezel, Aram F.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine efficacy, safety, and outcome of stereotactic hypofractionated radiation therapy (SHORT) as a suitable bridging therapy for patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also examined histological response to radiation in the resected or explanted livers. Methods and Materials: Between August 2007 and January 2009, 18 patients with 21 lesions received SHORT. A median total dose of 50 Gy was delivered in 10 fractions. Three patients underwent either chemoembolization (n = 1) or radiofrequency ablation (n = 2) prior to SHORT. Radiographic response was based on computed tomography evaluation at 3 months after SHORT. Histological response as a percentage of tumor necrosis was assessed by a quantitative morphometric method. Results: Six of 18 patients were delisted because of progression (n = 3) or other causes (n = 3). Twelve patients successfully underwent major hepatic resection (n = 1) or LT (n = 11) at a median follow-up of 6.3 months (range, 0.6-11.6 months) after completion of SHORT. No patient developed gastrointestinal toxicity Grade {>=}3 or radiation-induced liver disease. Ten patients with 11 lesions were evaluable for pathological response. Two lesions had 100% necrosis, three lesions had {>=}50% necrosis, four lesions had {<=}50% necrosis, and two lesions had no necrosis. All patients were alive after LT and/or major hepatic resection at a median follow-up of 19.6 months. Conclusions: SHORT is an effective bridging therapy for patients awaiting LT for HCC. It provides excellent in-field control with minimal side effects, helps to downsize or stabilize tumors prior to LT, and achieves good pathological response.

  1. Influence of preoperative transarterial lipiodol chemoembolization on resection and transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, P E; Adam, R; Bismuth, H; Castaing, D; Ariche, A; Krissat, J; Perrin, H; Azoulay, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of preoperative transarterial lipiodol chemoembolization (TACE) in the management of patients undergoing liver resection or liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: TACE was performed before surgery in 49 of 76 patients undergoing resection and in 54 of 111 patients undergoing liver transplantation. Results were retrospectively analyzed with regard to the response to treatment, the type of procedure performed, the incidence of complications, the incidence and pattern of recurrence, and survival. RESULTS: In liver resection, downstaging of the tumor by TACE (21 of 49 patients [42%]) and total necrosis (24 of 49 patients [50%]) were associated with a better disease-free survival than either no response to TACE or no TACE (downstaging, 29% vs. 10% and 11 % at 5 years, p = 0.08 and 0.10; necrosis, 22% vs. 13% and 11% at 5 years, p = 0.1 and 0.3). Five patients (10%) with previously unresectable tumors could be resected after downstaging. In liver transplantation, downstaging of tumors >3 cm (19 of 35 patients [54%]) and total necrosis (15 of 54 patients [28%]) were associated with better disease-free survival than either incomplete response to TACE or no TACE (downstaging, 71 % vs. 29% and 49% at 5 years, p = 0.01 and 0.09; necrosis, 87% vs. 47% and 60% at 5 years, p = 0.03 and 0.14). Multivariate analysis of the factors associated with response to TACE showed that downstaging occurred more frequently for tumors >5 cm. CONCLUSIONS: Downstaging or total necrosis of the tumor induced by TACE occurred in 62% of the cases and was associated with improved disease-free survival both after liver resection and transplantation. In liver resection, TACE was also useful to improve the resectability of primarily unresectable tumors. In liver transplantation, downstaging in patients with tumors >3 cm was associated with survival similar to that in patients with less extensive disease. Images Figure 7. Figure 8

  2. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  3. Acute Pancreatitis Classifications: Basis and Key Goals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao Dong; Wang, Zhe Yuan; Zhang, Ling Yi; Ni, Rui; Wei, Feng Xian; Han, Wei; Zhang, Hui Han; Zhang, Ya Wu; Wei, Zhen Gang; Guo, Xiao Hu; Guo, Liu Qiang; Ma, Jian Zhong; Zhang, You Cheng

    2015-12-01

    To explore the efficacy of the revised Atlanta classification (RACAP) and the determinant-based classification of acute pancreatitis severity (DBCAPS) on the basis of clinical data and feedback from patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). The authors retrospectively investigated a total of 573 patients with AP admitted to our hospital between December 2011 and December 2014. The definitions of severity and local complications in AP using RACAP and DBCAPS are presented and common points and mutual differences between the 2 groups are analyzed and discussed. Classification according to RACAP and DBCAPS found 86 (15%) and 178 (31.1%) mild cases (P < 0.01), 269 (46.9%) and 176 (30.7%) moderate cases (P < 0.01), and 218 (38.0%) and 219 (38.2%) severe cases (P = 0.95), respectively. A major contribution of DBCAPS is the introduction of a new type of severe AP, critical AP, identified in 4 patients (0.7%). Complications were observed in 313 RACAP-defined cases and 153 DBCAPS-defined cases (P < 0.01). Among the 313 RACAP-defined cases, acute peripancreatic fluid collection (236 patients, 75.40%), pancreatic pseudocysts (20 patients, 6.4%), acute necrotic collection (42 patients, 13.4%), and walled-off necrosis (15 patients, 4.8%) were observed. Among the 153 DBCAPS-defined cases, sterile peripancreatic necrosis (105 patients, 68.6%), sterile pancreatic necrosis (44 patients, 28.8%), infected peripancreatic necrosis (2 patients, 1.3%), and infected pancreatic necrosis (2/153 patients, 1.3%) were observed. Both classifications adopted organ failure and complications as determinants of severity. Revised Atlanta classification refined local complications and DBCAPS modified severity to include critical AP. In accordance with the demands of precision medicine, a combination of the 2 could be important for further clinical practice and scientific research. PMID:26632905

  4. Predictors of Microvascular Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Shirabe, Ken; Aishima, Shinichi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-09-01

    This chapter covers a range of important topics in the evaluation of the microvascular invasion (MVI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before treatment. The malignant potential of HCC is reflected by the types of MVI such as portal venous (vp), hepatic vein (vv) or bile duct (b) infiltration. The identification of the type of MVI in HCC has a key role in decisions regarding the effective treatment of HCC. Here, we describe the possible and important predictors of MVI in HCC. PMID:26398341

  5. Chemoembolization and Radioembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Riad; Lewandowski, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to represent a major worldwide problem. While treatments such as resection, transplantation and ablation may provide a chance for cure, these options are often precluded because of advanced disease presentation. Palliative treatments include transarterial embolization and systemic therapies. This review will summarize the state of the science for embolic therapies in HCC (conventional and drug-eluting chemoembolization, radioembolization), as well as discuss related topics including HCC staging, assessment of response and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:23357493

  6. Mechanism of cell death during warm hepatic ischemia-reperfusion in rats: apoptosis or necrosis?

    PubMed

    Gujral, J S; Bucci, T J; Farhood, A; Jaeschke, H

    2001-02-01

    Reperfusion injury can cause liver dysfunction after cold storage and warm ischemia. Recently it has been suggested that more than 50% of hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC) are undergoing apoptosis during the first 24 hours of reperfusion. The aim of our study was to quantify apoptotic and necrotic hepatocytes and apoptotic SEC after 60 or 120 minutes of warm, partial no-flow ischemia and 0 to 24 hours reperfusion in male SD rats. Apoptotic cells were identified by TUNEL assay in combination with morphological criteria. After 60 minutes of ischemia and 1 hour of reperfusion there was a significant increase of apoptotic hepatocytes (0.7 +/- 0.1% vs. 0.3 +/- 0.1% in controls) and SEC (1.5 +/- 0.6% vs. 0.3 +/- 0.1% in controls). The number of apoptotic SEC and hepatocytes was not different from controls at 6 hours or 24 hours of reperfusion. In contrast, the number of necrotic hepatocytes was quantified as 12 +/- 2% at 1 hour, 34 +/- 6% at 6 hours, and 57 +/- 11% at 24 hours. These results correlated with the increase in plasma ALT levels at these time points. Longer (120 min) ischemia times did not affect the number of apoptotic cells but increased hepatocellular necrosis to 58 +/- 4% at 6 hours reperfusion. No significant increase in caspase-3 activity and processing was detectable in any of these livers. Moreover, the caspase inhibitor Z-Asp-cmk (2 mg/kg IV) had no significant effect on reperfusion injury. Our results suggest that only a small minority of SEC and hepatocytes undergo apoptosis after 60 to 120 minutes of warm ischemia followed by 0 to 24 hours of reperfusion. Oncotic necrosis appears to be the principal mechanism of cell death for both cell types. PMID:11172341

  7. [Hepatocellular carcinoma: occurrence, risk factors, biomarkers].

    PubMed

    Fehér, János; Lengyel, Gabriella

    2010-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Primary hepatocellular carcinoma can be found most frequently (80-90 %) in patients with liver cirrhosis. The most frequent causes of liver cirrhosis are chronic hepatitis B and C virus infections and chronic alcohol consumption. The occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma is about 3-15 % in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Other predisposing causes can be: non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), obesity, diabetes mellitus, autoimmune hepatitis, intrahepatic biliary inflammations (primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis), copper and iron metabolic diseases (Wilson-disease, haemochromatosis), congenital alpha-1-antitripsin deficiency. The causative role of hepatitis B és C viruses have been well established in the pathogenesis of liver cancer. Other pathogenic factors are smoking, and different chemical agents. Treatment options for these patients have previously been limited to best supportive care and palliative therapy. Beside surgical treatment (resection, liver transplantation) the invasive radiologic therapy also has been widely used. The effectiveness of targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies or small-molecule kinase inhibitors has now been demonstrated for the treatment of different tumors. In year 2007, sorafenib, a multitargeted kinase inhibitor was introduced to clinical practice and found to prolong survival significantly for patients with advanced HCC. PMID:20494888

  8. Hepatocyte-derived microRNAs as sensitive serum biomarkers of hepatocellular injury in Labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Dirksen, K; Verzijl, T; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Vernooij, J C M; van der Laan, L J W; Burgener, I A; Spee, B; Fieten, H

    2016-05-01

    Common parenchymal liver diseases in dogs include reactive hepatopathies and primary hepatitis (acute or chronic). In chronic hepatitis, there is usually a long subclinical phase. Specific clinical signs become overt only when liver damage is severe and in this phase, treatment is usually less effective. Limited data are available regarding the sensitivity of liver enzyme activity or biomarkers for early detection of subclinical hepatitis. Hepatocyte-derived microRNAs (HDmiRs) were recently identified as promising biomarkers for hepatocellular injury in multiple species. Here, the potential of the HDmiRs miR-122 and miR-148a as sensitive diagnostic biomarkers for hepatocellular injury in Labrador retrievers was investigated. Samples from 66 Labrador retrievers with histologically normal livers, high hepatic copper, and with various forms of liver injury were evaluated for serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and microRNA values. Median values of HDmiR-122 were 34.6 times higher in dogs with liver injury and high ALT than in normal dogs (95% confidence intervals [CI], 13-95; P <0.001). HDmiR-122 values were significantly increased in dogs with liver injury and normal ALT (4.2 times; 95% CI, 2-12; P <0.01) and in dogs with high hepatic copper concentrations and unremarkable histopathology (2.9 times; 95% CI, 1.1-8.0; P <0.05). Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that miR-122 and miR-148a were both predictors of hepatocellular injury. The sensitivity of miR-122 was 84% (95% CI, 73-93%), making it superior to ALT (55%; 95% CI, 41-68%) for the detection of hepatocellular injury in Labrador retrievers (P <0.001). This study demonstrated that serum HDmiR, particularly miR-122, is a highly sensitive marker for the detection of hepatocellular injury in Labrador retrievers and is a promising new biomarker that may be used for early detection of subclinical hepatitis in dogs. PMID:27021912

  9. Centrilobular zonal necrosis as a hallmark of a distinctive subtype of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Hiroshi; Sugita, Tomonori; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Chuganji, Yoshimichi; Furumoto, Youhei; Sakata, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Centrilobular zonal necrosis (CZN) is a known histological variant of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). However, the significance of CZN is yet to be fully elucidated. This study aimed to determine whether CZN is a hallmark of a distinctive subtype of AIH. Methods Histological changes in the centrilobular zones of liver biopsies from 113 AIH patients were assessed by a single pathologist and classified into three categories: typical zonal necrosis defined as CZN (15 patients); other necroinflammatory change (NIC; 24 patients); and absence of necrosis (non-NIC; 74 patients). The clinicopathological features and immunogenetic background of CZN patients were then assessed. Results The clinicopathological features of AIH with CZN were distinct from other types of AIH, including a higher frequency of acute onset, lower frequency of antinuclear antibodies, lower antinuclear antibody titers, lower serum immunoglobulin G levels, lower grade interface hepatitis, less prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and lower AIH score. Increased and decreased frequencies of HLA-DR9 and HLA-DR4, respectively, were identified as immunogenetic features of AIH with CZN. Conversely, the clinicopathological characteristics of AIH with NIC were similar to those of non-NIC AIH, including the majority of the AIH patients. The therapeutic outcomes of AIH with CZN were excellent when precise diagnoses were made without delay. Conclusion The clinicopathological features and immunogenetic background of AIH with CZN differed from AIH without CZN. CZN may be a hallmark of a distinct subtype of AIH. PMID:26657454

  10. The interplay between regulated necrosis and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Blériot, Camille; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Necrosis has long been considered as a passive event resulting from a cell extrinsic stimulus, such as pathogen infection. Recent advances have refined this view and it is now well established that necrosis is tightly regulated at the cell level. Regulated necrosis can occur in the context of host-pathogen interactions, and can either participate in the control of infection or favor it. Here, we review the two main pathways implicated so far in bacteria-associated regulated necrosis: caspase 1-dependent pyroptosis and RIPK1/RIPK3-dependent necroptosis. We present how these pathways are modulated in the context of infection by a series of model bacterial pathogens. PMID:27048818

  11. Tumour necrosis factor production in Falciparum malaria and its association with schizont rupture.

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, D; Cannon, J G; Manogue, K R; Cerami, A; Dinarello, C A; Greenwood, B M

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the involvement of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in human malaria, we studied TNF production in patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum, and in co-cultures of human mononuclear cells and malaria parasites in vitro. In the examined sample, plasma TNF levels of over 39 pg/ml were detected in the plasma of 59% of Gambian children with acute malaria, 17% of convalescents, 9% of children with mild infections other than malaria, and 7% of healthy Gambian adults. Mononuclear cells of acute malaria patients, when stimulated with endotoxin in vitro, secreted twice as much TNF as did those of convalescent individuals, and three times that of healthy adult controls. Erythrocytic cultures of P. falciparum stimulated increased TNF secretion by mononuclear cells from uninfected individuals, and a sharp rise in the rate of secretion occurred shortly after schizont rupture. We suggest that malaria fever is mediated, at least in part, through paroxysmal TNF release associated with schizont rupture. PMID:2680183

  12. Modulation of Endogenous Hormone Action by Recombinant Human Tumor Necrosis Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Robert S.; Donner, David B.; Fletcher Starnes, H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1987-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated in the toxic manifestations of overwhelming bacterial infection and in the tissue wasting that often accompanies prolonged infections and malignancy. We have examined a possible role of TNF in the early metabolic alterations following acute tissue injury or sepsis. Recombinant human TNF stimulated rat liver amino acid uptake up to 5-fold in vivo and there was a concomitant increase in plasma glucagon. In vitro TNF had no direct effect on hepatocyte amino acid uptake, but it markedly enhanced the stimulation of amino acid transport by glucagon, without an alteration in binding of glucagon to hepatocytes. This permissive effect of TNF on glucagon action represents an interrelationship between the immune and endocrine systems, and it may help to explain the mechanism of hormonal regulation of both the anabolic and catabolic responses to acute injury.

  13. Segmental Transarterial Embolization in a Translational Rat Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Terence P.F.; Hunt, Stephen J.; Harrison, Neil; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Weber, Charles; Pickup, Stephen; Furth, Emma E.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Soulen, Michael C.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a clinically relevant, minimally invasive technique for transarterial embolization in a translational rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Oral diethylnitrosamine was administered to 53 male Wistar rats ad libitum for 12 weeks. Tumor induction was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging. Minimally invasive lobar or segmental transarterial embolization was performed through a left common carotid artery approach. Necropsy was performed to evaluate periprocedural mortality. Histologic analysis of tumors that received embolization was performed to assess percent tumor necrosis. Results Severe cirrhosis and autochthonous HCCs were characterized in a cohort of rats composed of two groups of rats identically treated with diethylnitrosamine with median survival times of 101 days and 105 days (n = 10/group). A second cohort was used to develop minimally invasive transarterial embolization of HCCs (n = 10). In a third cohort, lobar embolization was successfully performed in 9 of 10 rats and demonstrated a high rate of periprocedural mortality (n = 5). Necropsy performed for periprocedural mortality after lobar embolization demonstrated extensive tissue necrosis within the liver (n = 3) and lungs (n = 2), indicating nontarget embolization as the likely cause of mortality. In a fourth cohort of rats, a segmental embolization technique was successfully applied in 10 of 13 rats. Segmental embolization resulted in a reduction in periprocedural mortality (P = .06) relative to selective embolization and a 19% increase in average tumor necrosis (P = .04). Conclusions Minimally invasive, segmental embolization mimicking the currently applied clinical approach is feasible in a translational rat model of HCC and offers the critical advantage of reduced nontarget embolization relative to lobar embolization. PMID:25863596

  14. Treating and Downstaging Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the Caudate Lobe with Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Saad M.; Kulik, Laura; Baker, Talia; Ryu, Robert K.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Abecassis, Michael; Salem, Riad; Lewandowski, Robert J.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the technical feasibility, safety, efficacy, and potential to downstage patients to within transplantation criteria when treating patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of the caudate lobe using Y90 radioembolization. Methods: During a 4-year period, 8 of 291 patients treated with radioembolization for unresectable HCC had disease involving the caudate lobe. All patients were followed for treatment-related clinical/biochemical toxicities, serum tumor marker response, and treatment response. Imaging response was assessed with the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) classification schemes. Pathologic response was reported as percent necrosis at explantation. Results: Caudate lobe radioembolization was successfully performed in all eight patients. All patients presented with both cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Half were United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) stage T3 (n = 4, 50%). Fatigue was reported in half of the patients (n = 4, 50%). One (13%) grade 3/4 bilirubin toxicity was reported. One patient (13%) showed complete tumor response by WHO criteria, and three patients (38%) showed complete response using EASL guidelines. Serum AFP decreased by more than 50% in most patients (n = 6, 75%). Four patients (50%) were UNOS downstaged from T3 to T2, three of who underwent transplantation. One specimen showed histopathologic evidence of 100% complete necrosis, and two specimens demonstrated greater than 50% necrosis. Conclusions: Radioembolization with yttrium-90 appears to be a feasible, safe, and effective treatment option for patients with unresectable caudate lobe HCC. It has the potential to downstage patients to transplantation.

  15. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants do not prevent tumour necrosis factor-induced necrosis of L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Reagan M; Göttert, Jana; Murphy, Michael P; Ledgerwood, Elizabeth C

    2007-09-01

    Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely reported as a central effector during TNF-induced necrosis. The effect of a family of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants on TNF-induced necrosis of L929 cells was studied. While the commonly used lipid-soluble antioxidant BHA effectively protected cells from TNF-induced necrosis, the mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQ(3), MitoQ(5), MitoQ(10) and MitoPBN had no effect on TNF-induced necrosis. Since BHA also acts as an uncoupler of mitochondrial membrane potential, two additional uncouplers were tested. FCCP and CCCP both provided dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-induced necrosis. In conclusion, the generation of mitochondrial ROS may not be necessary for TNF-induced necrosis. Instead, these results suggest alternative mitochondrial functions, such as a respiration-dependent process, are critical for necrotic death. PMID:17729122

  16. Severe Hepatic Necrosis Associated with Methyldopa

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ian A.; Achord, James L.; Bartee, Harry

    1981-01-01

    Family physicians should carefully follow their patients receiving methyldopa for liver toxicity. Methyldopa is commonly used in treating hypertension and its hepatotoxic potential is frequently overlooked. This point is illustrated in the following case report involving a 45-year-old black female. The patient had been receiving oral methyldopa for 7.5 months prior to hospitalization for control of severe hypertension. Methyldopa was discontinued on her second hospital day when her liver tests were found to be abnormal. She developed progressive liver failure and lapsed into hepatic coma. Subsequently, her liver biopsy showed severe hepatic necrosis. She slowly improved with medical management. Her liver tests returned to normal; she resumed work and at 14 months follow up her liver biopsy showed no evidence of chronic active liver disease. Monitoring for methyldopa toxicity as outlined in this article could have prevented this costly and near lethal side effect. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:21289717

  17. Eosinophilic Gastritis Presenting as Tissue Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yong Min; Jang, Jin Seok; Han, Seung Hee; Kang, Sang Hyun; Kim, Woo Jae; Jeong, Jin Sook

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is very rare disorder that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of any definite causes of eosinophilia. It is associated with various clinical gastrointestinal manifestations, and depends on the involved layer and site. We report a case of eosinophilic gastritis presenting with severe necrosis. The symptoms disappeared immediately after beginning steroid treatment, and the eosinophil count decreased to the reference range. The patient showed eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis. It is a unique presentation of eosinophilic gastritis. To the best of our knowledge, no case of eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis has been previously reported in Korea. PMID:26668805

  18. Hypertrophic osteopathy associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Victoria D.; Souza, Carlos; Vanderhart, Daniel; Boston, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female dog diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma and hypertrophic osteopathy was negative for additional lesions on computed tomography of the thorax and abdomen. Resection of the affected liver lobe resulted in resolution of clinical signs. This is the first case of hypertrophic osteopathy secondary to hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26130837

  19. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  20. Activation of caspase 3 (CPP32)-like proteases is essential for TNF-alpha-induced hepatic parenchymal cell apoptosis and neutrophil-mediated necrosis in a murine endotoxin shock model.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, H; Fisher, M A; Lawson, J A; Simmons, C A; Farhood, A; Jones, D A

    1998-04-01

    Endotoxin (ET)-induced liver failure is characterized by parenchymal cell apoptosis and inflammation leading to liver cell necrosis. Members of the caspase family have been implicated in the signal transduction pathway of apoptosis. The aim of this study was to characterize ET-induced hepatic caspase activation and apoptosis and to investigate their effect on neutrophil-mediated liver injury. Treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 700 mg/kg galactosamine (Gal) and 100 microg/kg Salmonella abortus equi ET increased caspase 3-like protease activity (Asp-Val-Glu-Asp-substrate) by 1730 +/- 140% at 6 h. There was a parallel enhancement of apoptosis (assessed by DNA fragmentation ELISA and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay). In contrast, activity of caspase 1 (IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-like proteases (Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-substrate) did not change throughout the experiment. Caspase 3-like protease activity and apoptosis was not induced by Gal/ET in ET-resistant mice (C3H/HeJ). Furthermore, only murine TNF-alpha but not IL-1alphabeta increased caspase activity and apoptosis. Gal/ET caused neutrophil-dependent hepatocellular necrosis at 7 h (area of necrosis, 45 +/- 3%). Delayed treatment with the caspase 3-like protease inhibitor Z-Val-Ala-Asp-CH2F (Z-VAD) (10 mg/kg at 3 h) attenuated apoptosis by 81 to 88% and prevented liver cell necrosis (< or = 5%). Z-VAD had no effect on the initial inflammatory response, including the sequestration of neutrophils in sinusoids. However, Z-VAD prevented neutrophil transmigration and necrosis. Our data indicate that activation of the caspase 3 subfamily of cysteine proteases is critical for the development of parenchymal cell apoptosis. In addition, excessive hepatocellular apoptosis can be an important signal for transmigration of primed neutrophils sequestered in sinusoids. PMID:9531309

  1. Benign hepatocellular nodules of healthy liver: focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Roncalli, Massimo; Sciarra, Amedeo; Tommaso, Luca Di

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the progress of imaging techniques, benign hepatocellular nodules are increasingly discovered in the clinical practice. This group of lesions mostly arises in the context of a putatively normal healthy liver and includes either pseudotumoral and tumoral nodules. Focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenoma are prototypical examples of these two categories of nodules. In this review we aim to report the main pathological criteria of differential diagnosis between focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenoma, which mainly rests upon morphological and phenotypical features. We also emphasize that for a correct diagnosis the clinical context such as sex, age, assumption of oral contraceptives, associated metabolic or vascular disturbances is of paramount importance. While focal nodular hyperplasia is a single entity epidemiologically more frequent than adenoma, the latter is representative of a more heterogeneous group which has been recently and extensively characterized from a clinical, morphological, phenotypical and molecular profile. The use of the liver biopsy in addition to imaging and the clinical context are important diagnostic tools of these lesions. In this review we will survey their systematic pathobiology and propose a diagnostic algorithm helpful to increase the diagnostic accuracy of not dedicated liver pathologists. The differential diagnosis between so-called typical and atypical adenoma and well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma will also be discussed. PMID:27189732

  2. MicroRNA-mediated Th2 bias in methimazole-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Yasuaki; Akai, Sho; Tochitani, Tomoaki; Oda, Shingo; Yamada, Toru; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-09-15

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of small non-coding RNAs containing approximately 20 nucleotides that negatively regulate target gene expression. Little is known about the role of individual miRNAs and their targets in immune- and inflammation-related responses in drug-induced liver injury. In the present study, involvement of miRNAs in the T helper (Th) 2-type immune response was investigated using a methimazole (MTZ)-induced liver injury mouse model. Co-administration of L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine and MTZ induced acute hepatocellular necrosis and elevated plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) from 4h onward in female Balb/c mice. The hepatic mRNA expression of Th2 promotive factors was significantly increased concomitantly with plasma ALT levels. In contrast, the hepatic mRNA expression of Th2 suppressive factors was significantly decreased during the early phase of liver injury. Comprehensive profiling of hepatic miRNA expression was analyzed before the onset of MTZ-induced liver injury. Using in silico prediction of miRNAs that possibly regulate Th2-related genes and subsequent quantification, we identified up-regulation of expression of miR-29b-1-5p and miR-449a-5p. Among targets of these miRNAs, down-regulation of Th2 suppressive transcription factors, such as SRY-related HMG-box 4 (SOX4) and lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF1), were observed from the early phase of liver injury. In conclusion, negative regulation of the expression of SOX4 by miR-29b-1-5p and that of LEF1 by miR-449a-5p is suggested to play an important role in the development of Th2 bias in MTZ-induced liver injury. PMID:27421576

  3. United Kingdom nationwide study of avascular necrosis of the jaws including bisphosphonate-related necrosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Palmer, N O A; Lowe, D; Randall, C

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to record all new patients who presented to departments of oral surgery, oral medicine, and oral and maxillofacial surgery, and to dental hospitals in the UK, with avascular necrosis of the jaws including bisphosphonate-related necrosis (BRONJ) over a 2-year period (1 June 2009-31 May 2011). They were eligible irrespective of age, cause, or coexisting conditions. Data on incidence, clinical characteristics, risk factors, and coexisting conditions were collected. A total of 383 cases were registered: 369 were described as BRONJ, 5 as avascular necrosis, and 9 were unknown. Bisphosphonates had been given orally in 207 (56%), intravenously in 125 (34%), both orally and intravenously in 27 (7%), and was unknown in 9 (2%); one had been given denosumab. The main risk factor was dental extraction, and the mandible was commonly affected. The median duration of administration until onset of BRONJ was 3 years in those treated intravenously and 4 years in those treated orally. Levels of engagement with the study varied between regions, and extrapolation from the 2 most involved (Merseyside and Northern Ireland) found around 8.2-12.8 cases/million/year, which is 508-793 patients/year across the UK. To our knowledge this is one of the first studies to estimate national rates of BRONJ. It confirms that the risk and incidence are low. With changes in trends for antiresorptive bone medication, and increasing numbers of elderly people, it would be useful to repeat the registration in the future. PMID:25497376

  4. Elevated serum levels of Chromogranin A in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the past three decades, the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States has tripled. The neuroendocrine character has been observed in some tumor cells within some hepatocellular carcinoma nodules and elevated serum chromogranin A also been reported in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of serum concentration of chromogranin A in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma at different stages. Methods The study population consisted of 96 patients (63 males and 33 females age range 52-84) at their first hospital admission for hepatocellular carcinoma. The control group consisted of 35 volunteers (20 males and 15 females age range 50-80). The hepatocellular carcinoma patients were stratified according the Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer classification. Venous blood samples were collected before treatment from each patients before surgery, centrifuged to obtain serum samples and stored at -80° C until assayed. Results The chromogranin A serum levels were elevated (> 100 ng/ml) in 72/96 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The serum levels of chromogranin A were significantly correlated (p<0.05) with alpha-fetoprotein. In comparison with controls, the hepatocellular carcinoma patients showed a significant increase (p<0.001) vs controls. The chromogranin A levels in the Barcelona staging of hepatocellular carcinoma was higher in stage D compared to stage C (p<0.01), to stage B (p<0.001), and to stage A (p<0.001). Conclusions Molecular markers, such as chromogranin A, could be very useful tools for hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis. However the molecular classification should be incorporated into a staging scheme, which effectively separated patients into groups with homogeneous prognosis and response to treatment, and thus serves to aid in the selection of appropriate therapy. PMID:23173843

  5. [Acute pancreatitis with hypertriglyceridemia--an underestimated disease?].

    PubMed

    Wild, Wolfgang; Tajjiou, Morad; Ferschke, Melanie; Bormann, Fabian; Dörr, Pius; Schwarzbach, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare, but since a long time well known etiology for acute pancreatitis. It could occure alone or coactive with other triggers like alcohlic excess. Nevertheless it found no approach to the current classifications and parameters of prognosis of the acute pancreatitis. We refer about two patients with hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis, whose initial disease was limited on the tail of the pancreas with just a circumscripted or--in the other case--no necrosis. However, in both cases and although a consequent treatment started immediately, a serious process developed including a life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome in one case, which necessitated an extracorporal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26710203

  6. Regulation of necrotic cell death: p53, PARP1 and cyclophilin D-overlapping pathways of regulated necrosis?

    PubMed

    Ying, Yuan; Padanilam, Babu J

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to apoptosis and autophagy, necrotic cell death was considered to be a random, passive cell death without definable mediators. However, this dogma has been challenged by recent developments suggesting that necrotic cell death can also be a regulated process. Regulated necrosis includes multiple cell death modalities such as necroptosis, parthanatos, ferroptosis, pyroptosis, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP)-mediated necrosis. Several distinctive executive molecules, particularly residing on the mitochondrial inner and outer membrane, amalgamating to form the MPTP have been defined. The c-subunit of the F1F0ATP synthase on the inner membrane and Bax/Bak on the outer membrane are considered to be the long sought components that form the MPTP. Opening of the MPTP results in loss of mitochondrial inner membrane potential, disruption of ATP production, increased ROS production, organelle swelling, mitochondrial dysfunction and consequent necrosis. Cyclophilin D, along with adenine nucleotide translocator and the phosphate carrier are considered to be important regulators involved in the opening of MPTP. Increased production of ROS can further trigger other necrotic pathways mediated through molecules such as PARP1, leading to irreversible cell damage. This review examines the roles of PARP1 and cyclophilin D in necrotic cell death. The hierarchical role of p53 in regulation and integration of key components of signaling pathway to elicit MPTP-mediated necrosis and ferroptosis is explored. In the context of recent insights, the indistinct role of necroptosis signaling in tubular necrosis after ischemic kidney injury is scrutinized. We conclude by discussing the participation of p53, PARP1 and cyclophilin D and their overlapping pathways to elicit MPTP-mediated necrosis and ferroptosis in acute kidney injury. PMID:27048819

  7. [Programmed necrosis: a new target for
ischemia reperfusion injury].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Ming, Yingzi; Niu, Ying; Liu, Qianwen; Ye, Qifa

    2016-07-01

    Recent years, the researchers have found a new type of cell death, referred to programmed necrosis or necroptosis, which involves the death receptor and the ligand binds and is initiated under the inhibition of apoptosis pathway. Programmed necrosis possesses the morphological features of typical necrosis accompanied by inflammation. The receptor interacting protein kinase 1/3(RIPK1/3) can be inhibited by the specific inhibitors, such as necrostatin-1. RIPK1/3 could regulate programmed necrosis and play a key role in the process. The significance of programmed necrosis in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) has been attracted great attention at present. Simultaneously, a series of studies have found it also involves in the IRI of heart, kidney, brain and retina. PMID:27592584

  8. Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Radiation Necrosis in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; NONOGUCHI, Noasuke; FURUSE, Motomasa; YORITSUNE, Erina; MIYATA, Tomo; KAWABATA, Shinji; KUROIWA, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    New radiation modalities have made it possible to prolong the survival of individuals with malignant brain tumors, but symptomatic radiation necrosis becomes a serious problem that can negatively affect a patient’s quality of life through severe and lifelong effects. Here we review the relevant literature and introduce our original concept of the pathophysiology of brain radiation necrosis following the treatment of brain, head, and neck tumors. Regarding the pathophysiology of radiation necrosis, we introduce two major hypotheses: glial cell damage or vascular damage. For the differential diagnosis of radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence, we focus on the role of positron emission tomography. Finally, in accord with our hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology, we describe the promising effects of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab on symptomatic radiation necrosis in the brain. PMID:25744350

  9. Acute Hematogenous Osteomyelitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Noelle S B; Bielski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This article discusses the most common organisms associated with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. Magnetic resonance imaging is extremely important in evaluating the extent of the disease process. Osteomyelitis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus can be extremely difficult to treat and eradicate. It spreads quickly and causes local tissue necrosis. It is also associated with other serious sequelae such as deep venous thrombosis and septic pulmonary emboli. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to treat these infections. Hospital stays are often lengthy, complications are frequent, and patients are often critically ill. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(6):e204-e208.]. PMID:27294494

  10. Plasma intestinal alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in neonates with bowel necrosis.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, R; Coakley, J; Murton, L; Campbell, N

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To determine if the intestinal isoenzymes of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) are biochemical markers of bowel necrosis in neonates. METHODS--Plasma ALP isoenzymes were measured in 22 babies with bowel necrosis, histologically confirmed, and in 22 matched controls. The isoenzymes were also measured in 16 infants with signs of necrotising enterocolitis, who recovered without histological confirmation of bowel necrosis. The isoenzymes were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Auxiliary tests for identification included neuraminidase digestion and treatment with monoclonal and polyclonal antiplacental antibodies. RESULTS--Intestinal ALP was detected in 16 infants with bowel necrosis--13 had fetal intestinal ALP (FI-ALP) and three had adult intestinal ALP (AI-ALP). FI-ALP was detected in nine of the controls. In the babies with bowel necrosis intestinal ALP was found over all gestations, but in the controls only in those less than 34 weeks. The percentages of total ALP activity due to intestinal ALP were significantly higher in those with bowel necrosis compared with matched controls (p = 0.028). In babies of all gestations diagnostic sensitivity for the presence of intestinal ALP as a marker of bowel necrosis was 73% and diagnostic specificity 59%. In babies greater than 34 weeks' gestation, diagnostic sensitivity fell to 60% but the test became completely specific. In two babies FI-ALP increased from zero/trace to high activity coincident with the episode of bowel necrosis. In 16 babies with signs of necrotising enterocolitis but unconfirmed bowel necrosis FI-ALP was detected in four. CONCLUSION--Intestinal ALP seems to be released into the circulation in some babies with bowel necrosis, but its detection does not have the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity to be a reliable biochemical marker of the condition. Images PMID:8157755

  11. Transarterial radioembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma: a review

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Rodolfo; Conte, Caterina; Tumino, Emanuele; Parisi, Giuseppe; Marceglia, Sara; Metrangolo, Salvatore; Eggenhoffner, Roberto; Bresci, Giampaolo; Cabibbo, Giuseppe; Giacomelli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer and is the second cause of death due to malignancy in the world. The treatment of HCC is complex and includes potentially curative and palliative approaches. However, both curative and palliative treatments for HCC are often associated with a not-completely favorable safety/efficacy ratio. Therefore, other treatment options appear necessary in clinical practice. Transarterial radioembolization has shown a promising efficacy in terms of disease control and is associated with a good safety profile. This review discusses the use of transarterial radioembolization in HCC, with a focus on the clinical aspects of this therapeutic strategy. PMID:27574589

  12. Innovative surgical approaches for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; de’Angelis, Nicola; de Blasi, Vito; Cherkaoui, Zineb; Brunetti, Oronzo; Longo, Vito; Piardi, Tullio; Sommacale, Daniele; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with an increasing diffusion in Europe and the United States. The management of such a cancer is continuously progressing and the objective of this paper is to evaluate innovation in the surgical treatment of HCC. In this review, we will analyze the modern concept of preoperative management, the role of laparoscopic and robotic surgery, the intrao-perative use of three dimensional models and augme-nted reality, as well as the potential application of fluore-scence. PMID:27168871

  13. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heinz; Tilg, Herbert

    2016-08-01

    The fastest growing cause of cancer-related death is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is at least partly attributable to the rising prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a broad spectrum of conditions, ranging from non-progressive bland steatosis to malignant transformation into hepatocellular cancer. The estimated annual HCC incidence in the progressive form of NAFLD - non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) - is about 0.3%. The risk of HCC development is higher in men and increases with age, more advanced fibrosis, progressive obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. Studies on the molecular mechanism of HCC development in NAFLD have shown that hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with complex changes at the immunometabolic interface. In line with these clinical risk factors, administration of a choline-deficient high-fat diet to mice over a prolonged period results in spontaneous HCC development in a high percentage of animals. The role of altered insulin signaling in tumorigenesis is further supported by the observation that components of the insulin-signaling cascade are frequently mutated in hepatocellular cancer cells. These changes further enhance insulin-mediated growth and cell division of hepatocytes. Furthermore, studies investigating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling and HCC development allowed dissection of the complex links between inflammation and carcinogenesis. To conclude, NAFLD reflects an important risk factor for HCC, develops also in non-cirrhotic livers and is a prototypic cancer involving inflammatory and metabolic pathways. STRENGTHS/WEAKNESSES AND SUMMARY OF THE TRANSLATIONAL POTENTIAL OF THE MESSAGES IN THE PAPER: The systematic review summarizes findings from unbiased clinical and translational studies on hepatocellular cancer in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This provides a concise overview on the epidemiology, risk factors and molecular

  14. Non-viral causes of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Blonski, Wojciech; Kotlyar, David S; Forde, Kimberly A

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy and represents an international public health concern as one of the most deadly cancers worldwide. The main etiology of HCC is chronic infection with hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. However, there are other important factors that contribute to the international burden of HCC. Among these are obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and dietary exposures. Emerging evidence suggests that the etiology of many cases of HCC is in fact multifactorial, encompassing infectious etiologies, comorbid conditions and environmental exposures. Clarification of relevant non-viral causes of HCC will aid in preventative efforts to curb the rising incidence of this disease. PMID:20677332

  15. Innovative surgical approaches for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Memeo, Riccardo; de'Angelis, Nicola; de Blasi, Vito; Cherkaoui, Zineb; Brunetti, Oronzo; Longo, Vito; Piardi, Tullio; Sommacale, Daniele; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with an increasing diffusion in Europe and the United States. The management of such a cancer is continuously progressing and the objective of this paper is to evaluate innovation in the surgical treatment of HCC. In this review, we will analyze the modern concept of preoperative management, the role of laparoscopic and robotic surgery, the intrao-perative use of three dimensional models and augme-nted reality, as well as the potential application of fluore-scence. PMID:27168871

  16. Cellular prognostic markers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buonaguro, Luigi; Tagliamonte, Maria; Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Damiano, Elvira; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Buonaguro, Franco M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the five big killers worldwide and is frequently associated with chronic hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections. Tumor microenvironment consists of a complex network of cells and factors that plays a key role in the tumor progression and prognosis. This is true also for HCC. Several studies have shown strikingly strong correlation between HCC clinical prognosis and intratumoral infiltration of cells affecting tumor growth, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. None of such cells is yet validated for routine diagnostic and prognostic assessment. The present review aims at providing a state-of-the-art of such studies. PMID:26043213

  17. The Role of Autophagy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Jang, Byoung Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in cellular homeostasis under basal and stressed conditions. Autophagy is crucial for normal liver physiology and the pathogenesis of liver diseases. During the last decade, the function of autophagy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been evaluated extensively. Currently, autophagy is thought to play a dual role in HCC, i.e., autophagy is involved in tumorigenesis and tumor suppression. Recent investigations of autophagy have suggested that autophagy biomarkers can facilitate HCC prognosis and the establishment of therapeutic approaches. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding of autophagy and discuss recent evidence for its role in HCC. PMID:26561802

  18. The Role of Autophagy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Jang, Byoung Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in cellular homeostasis under basal and stressed conditions. Autophagy is crucial for normal liver physiology and the pathogenesis of liver diseases. During the last decade, the function of autophagy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been evaluated extensively. Currently, autophagy is thought to play a dual role in HCC, i.e., autophagy is involved in tumorigenesis and tumor suppression. Recent investigations of autophagy have suggested that autophagy biomarkers can facilitate HCC prognosis and the establishment of therapeutic approaches. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding of autophagy and discuss recent evidence for its role in HCC. PMID:26561802

  19. [Hepatocellular carcinoma and vitamin K2].

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Toshihiko; Ozaki, Iwata

    2015-11-01

    Despite recent progress in diagnosis and therapy, hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)remains among the cancers with the poorest prognoses. Vitamin Ks(VKs)have been shown to suppress the growth of HCC cells. Long-term administration of VK2 has established its clinical safety, but it does not appear to exhibit marked anti-tumor effects when administered alone. For more effective use of VK2 against HCC, co-administration of VK2 with other proven anticancer agents or development of a new VK preparation with a modified side-chain should be investigated in the future. PMID:26503869

  20. Acute hemorrhage within intradural extramedullary schwannoma in cervical spine presenting with quadriparesis

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Das, Pulin Bihari; Sarangi, Gouri Sankar; Mohanty, Sureswar

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma with acute hemorrhage is rarely seen. A 44-years-old male patient presented with complaint of neck pain and acute onset of quadriparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of his cervical spine revealed evidence of an intradural extramedullary tumor with intratumoral acute hemorrhage. He was operated in emergency and the mass was found to be schwannoma with acute hemorrhage. Post operatively the patient improved significantly. Though schwannomas show microscopic intratumoral hemorrhage and necrosis at times, schwannoma with acute hemorrhage resulting acute onset of neurological deficit is very uncommon. PMID:25972715

  1. Sodium hypochlorite-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Peck, Brandon W; Workeneh, Biruh; Kadikoy, Huseyin; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2014-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is commonly used as an irrigant during dental procedures as well as a topical antiseptic agent. Although it is generally safe when applied topically, reports of accidental injection of sodium hypochlorite into tissue have been reported. Local necrosis, pain and nerve damage have been described as a result of exposure, but sodium hypo-chlorite has never been implicated as a cause of an acute kidney injury (AKI). In this report, we describe the first case of accidental sodium hypochlorite injection into the infraorbital tissue during a dental procedure that precipitated the AKI. We speculate that oxidative species induced by sodium hypochlorite caused AKI secondary to the renal tubular injury, causing mild acute tubular necrosis. PMID:24626008

  2. Immunization with viral antigens: infectious haematopoietic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Winton, J R

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease. PMID:9270850

  3. Pyelo-ureteral necrosis after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce B; Masin-Spasovska, Jelka; Stavridis, Sotir; Saiti, Skender; Lekovski, Ljupco

    2008-01-01

    Because of the limited chance of receiving a kidney transplant (for several well-known reasons), a lot of desperate dialysis patients procure an unrelated donor kidney transplant against all medical advice. This type of renal paid transplantation is associated with many surgical complications and invasive opportunistic infections that increase the morbidity and mortality in this group of transplant recipients. In this report, we describe a case of a 22-year-old girl with a segmental infarction of the graft lower pole and a complete pyelo-ureteral necrosis as a consequence of some vascular damage, complicated by a pathohistological finding of an invasive candidiasis. Despite the successful surgical pyelovesical anastomosis and the good recovery of the patient and the kidney, long-term prognosis remains poor. The lack of information from the transplanting center regarding both donor and recipient and the associated, unacceptable risks on the graft and patient survival in unrelated, paid transplant recipients reinforce the standpoint that this practice should be abandoned. PMID:18204913

  4. [An infected necrosis of the chin].

    PubMed

    Muller, B S; van Goor, H F; Rosenberg, A J W P

    2016-07-01

    A 51-year-old man was referred by his dentist to a maxillofacial surgeon with complaints of illness and pain in the mandible, associated with a rapidly expanding area of black gingiva and mucosa surrounding the lower front teeth. Clinically and radiographically there was evidence of an infected necrosis of the chin and floor of mouth. Following debridement at the operating room, the patient was treated at the intensive care unit for septic shock leading to prolonged hospitalisation. Investigation of the bone marrow did not provide an explanation for pancytopenia or the severity of the illness. In addition, genetic investigation of thiopurine S-methyltransferase gene showed no mutations. This gene codes for an identically named protein enzyme that contributes in the metabolising of the medicine azathioprine, used daily for an autoimmune disease. A combination of the use of azathioprine, a folic acid deficiency and sepsis led to this exceptional course of illness. Therapeutic intervention consisted of surgical debridement and treatment of the bacteraemia. Afterwards several corrective surgeries were necessary to restore oral functions. PMID:27430038

  5. Clinical studies with tumour necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, D R; Sherman, M L; Frei, E; Kufe, D W

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) cytotoxicity remains unknown. The in vivo antitumour effects of TNF may be related to direct cytotoxicity, immunomodulatory effects or endothelial effects on tumour vasculature. Phase I and early Phase II clinical trials of human recombinant TNF are under way in Japan, the USA, the UK and Germany. The maximum Phase II dose for TNF has not been established. The clinical toxicity of TNF is generally similar to that of other biological agents. Systemic toxicity, including fever, chills, anorexia and nausea, has been seen in most patients treated with TNF and has not been clearly related to dose. Other toxicities have included liver function abnormalities, hypotension, transient neurological changes and haematological abnormalities. Few clinical responses have been reported but organized Phase II testing remains to be completed. Combination trials with interferons have recently been initiated. Phase II efficacy studies of TNF as a single agent and in combination are needed for an assessment of the value of this agent in cancer therapy. PMID:3330011

  6. Intraarterial combined immunochemotherapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Hazama, S; Yoshino, S; Shimoda, K; Suzuki, M; Shimizu, R; Yano, K; Nishida, M; Suzuki, T

    1994-03-01

    An important objective for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the development of effective chemotherapy. We administered a combination of biological response modifiers and anticancer agents to 24 patients with unresectable HCC. Each case had an implanted infuser port which was connected to a catheter placed in the hepatic artery for the intraarterial (i.a.) administration of chemotherapy. The following agents were administered to each patient: recombinant interleukin-2 (800,000 JRU/day infused i.a. continuously for 6 days/week); OK-432 (5 KE injected i.a. twice in 4 weeks and i.m. three times per week); Adriamycin (10 mg injected i.a. twice in 4 weeks); cyclophosphamide (300 mg injected i.a. twice in 4 weeks), and famotidine (40 mg/day administered orally). Objective response was assessed according to tumor size measured by computed tomography and angiography before and after treatment. We observed a complete response (CR) in 4, partial response (PR) in 3, minor response (MR) in 7, no change (NC) in 7, and progressive disease (PD) in 3. The response rate (CR+PR+MR) was 58.3%. The overall 2-year survival rate was 52%. The 2-year survival rate of the responders (CR+PR+MR) was 80%, while that of the non-responders (NC+PD) was 0%. There was a significant difference between the responders and non-responders in respect to survival rate (P < 0.05). The percentages of CD25+ cells, CD56+ cells, and Leu7-CD16+ cells and NK activity in the peripheral blood showed a significant increase following the regimen. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha TNF alpha rose after the initiation of OK-432. TNF alpha levels were higher in the responders than in the non-responders. Adverse effects included high fever (all patients) and severe transient hypotension (15 patients) that was controlled by conservative therapy. Combined immunochemotherapy administered intraarterially may be a new strategy for treating unresectable HCC. PMID:8124688

  7. Acute copper toxicosis in the Canada goose.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B M; Winterfield, R W

    1975-01-01

    Acute copper toxicosis resulted in Canada geese, Branta canadensis, following ingestion of copper sulfate at about 600mg/kg from a small man-made pond on a game farm. The lesions were those associated with copper toxicosis in other avian species. The primary pathologic change was necrosis and sloughing of the proventriculus and gizzard. A greenish discoloration of the lungs also occurred. PMID:1156262

  8. Primary hepatocellular carcinoma and metabolic syndrome: An update

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rubayat; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Ahmed, Khulood T; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma has increased dramatically by 80% over the past two decades in the United States. Numerous basic science and clinical studies have documented a strong association between hepatocellular carcinoma and the metabolic syndrome. These studies have documented that, in most patients, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, which may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma through the cirrhotic process. However, minority of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma without cirrhosis. This review summarizes the current literature of the link between hepatocellular carcinoma and metabolic syndrome with special emphasis on various components of the metabolic syndrome including risk of association with obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Current understanding of pathophysiology, clinical features, treatments, outcomes, and surveillance of hepatocellular carcinoma in the background of metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is reviewed. With the current epidemic of metabolic syndrome, the number of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is increasing. Subsequently, it is expected that the incidence and prevalence of HCC will also increase. It is very important for the scientific community to shed more light on the pathogenesis of HCC with metabolic syndrome, both with and without cirrhosis. At the same time it is also important to quantify the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with the metabolic syndrome in a prospective setting and develop surveillance recommendations for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:24069511

  9. Acute dental pain, Part II: Diagnosis and emergency treatment.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, J R

    1990-09-01

    Part II of this two-part series differentiates and explores endodontic-related emergencies with reversible and irreversible pulpitis. Indications and contra-indications for vital pulp therapy are explained, and treatment is outlined. The inflammatory process involved in irreversible pulpal disease is summarized, and the clinical signs, symptoms, and treatment of irreversible pulpitis (with and without acute periradicular involvement, with pulp necrosis, and acute periradicular abscess with and without cellulitis) are discussed. PMID:2097056

  10. Carbon monoxide poisoning and nonoliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bessoudo, R.; Gray, J.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning in a 37-year-old man was complicated by neurologic damage, skin changes, muscle necrosis and nonoliguric renal failure. The relation between nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in carbon monoxide poisoning is reviewed. Recognition of the acute renal failure in such cases is important, for this complication can be fatal; the prognosis is excellent, however, if proper medical management is provided. PMID:679099

  11. Early growth response 1 regulates glucose deprivation-induced necrosis

    PubMed Central

    JEON, HYUN MIN; LEE, SU YEON; JU, MIN KYUNG; KIM, CHO HEE; PARK, HYE GYEONG; KANG, HO SUNG

    2013-01-01

    Necrosis is commonly found in the core region of solid tumours due to metabolic stress such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation (GD) resulting from insufficient vascularization. Necrosis promotes tumour growth and development by releasing the tumour-promoting cytokine high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1); however, the molecular mechanism underlying necrotic cell death remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that early growth response 1 (Egr-1) is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner by GD in several cell lines such as A549, MDA-MB-231 and HepG2 cells that exhibit necrosis upon GD. We found that Egr-1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) prevented GD-induced necrosis and HMGB1 release. Necrosis-inhibiting activity of Egr-1 shRNA was also seen in multicellular tumour spheroids (MTSs), an in vitro tumour model system. In contrast, Egr-1 overexpression appeared to make tumour cells more susceptible to GD-induced necrosis. Finally, Egr-1 shRNA suppressed the growth of MTSs. These findings demonstrate that Egr-1 is implicated in GD-induced necrosis and tumour progression. PMID:23152075

  12. Preclinical evaluation of recombinant human IFNα2b-containing magnetoliposomes for treating hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Tong, Jiansong; Wu, Jianzhang; Xu, Xia; Wu, Shenjie; Tan, Botao; Shi, Mengjing; Wang, Jianguang; Zhao, Weibo; Jiang, Heng; Jin, Sha

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoliposomes are phospholipid vesicles encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles that can be used to encapsulate therapeutic drugs for delivery into specific organs. Herein, we developed magnetoliposomes containing recombinant human IFNα2b, designated as MIL, and evaluated this combination’s biological safety and therapeutic effect on both cellular and animal hepatocellular carcinoma models. Our data showed that MIL neither hemolyzed erythrocytes nor affected platelet-aggregation rates in blood. Nitroblue tetrazolium-reducing testing showed that MIL did not change the absolute numbers or phagocytic activities of leukocytes. Acute-toxicity testing also showed that MIL had no devastating effect on mice behaviors. All the results indicated that the nanoparticles could be a safe biomaterial. Pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue-distribution studies showed that MIL maintained stable and sustained drug concentrations in target organs under a magnetic field, helped to increase bioavailability, and reduced administration time. MIL also dramatically inhibited the growth of hepatoma cells. Targeting of MIL in the livers of nude mice bearing human hepatocellular carcinoma showed that MIL significantly reduced the tumor size to 38% of that of the control group. Further studies proved that growth inhibition of cells or tumors was due to apoptosis-signaling pathway activation by human IFNα2b. PMID:25288882

  13. Therapeutic evaluation of sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography: Preliminary result

    PubMed Central

    SHIOZAWA, KAZUE; WATANABE, MANABU; IKEHARA, TAKASHI; KOGAME, MICHIO; KIKUCHI, YOSHINORI; IGARASHI, YOSHINORI; SUMINO, YASUKIYO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid in evaluating the therapeutic response to sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In total, 26 patients with advanced HCC who received sorafenib and were followed up by CEUS were enrolled in the present study. CEUS was performed prior to and within 2–4 weeks of treatment, and the images of the target lesion in the post-vascular phase with a re-injection method were analyzed. The presence (+) or absence (−) of intratumoral necrosis and the intratumoral vascular architecture on micro-flow imaging (MFI) were compared prior to and subsequent to treatment. Target lesions that exhibited non-enhancement after re-injection were considered to indicate intratumoral necrosis. The intratumoral vascular architecture was classified into three groups, as follows: Vd, the intratumoral vessels visually narrowed or decreased; Vnc, the vessels remained unchanged; and Vi, the vessels were thickened or increased. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log rank test between the intratumoral necrosis (+) and (−) groups, and among the Vd, Vnc and Vi groups. P<0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. The number of patients in the intratumoral necrosis (+) and (−) groups was 8 and 18 patients, respectively, and the median survival time (MST) was 7.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.2–12.2] and 9.5 months (95% CI, 5.1–13.8), respectively (P=0.44). The MFI findings were observed in 11 patients in the Vd group, 10 patients in the Vnc group and 5 patients in the Vi group. The MSTs in the Vd, Vnc and Vi groups were 15.6 months (95% CI, 5.0–23.3), 11.0 months (95% CI, 3.5–17.6) and 3.6 months (95% CI: 1.2–6.0), respectively. The P-value for the differences between the Vd and Vnc groups, Vd and Vi groups, and Vnc and Vi groups were 0.78, 0.016 and 0.047, respectively, which indicated

  14. Antineoplastic activity of monocrotaline against hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Sandeep Solmon; Tanneeru, Karunakar; Didla, Swroopa; Devendra, Bellary Nagaraju; Kiranmayi, Patnala

    2014-01-01

    Plants are fantastic sources for present day life saving drugs. Monocrotaline a natural ligand exhibits dose-dependent cytotoxicity with potent antineoplastic activity. This study was intended to disclose the therapeutic potential of monocrotaline against hepatocellular carcinoma. The in silico predictions have highlighted the antineoplastic potential, druglikeness and biodegradability of monocrotaline. The in silico docking study has provided an insight and evidence for the antineoplastic activity of monocrotaline against p53, HGF and TREM1 proteins which play a threatening role in causing hepatocellular carcinoma. The mode of action of monocrotaline was determined experimentally by in vitro techniques such as XTT assay, NRU assay and whole cell brine shrimp assay have further supported our in silico studies. The in vitro cytotoxicity of monocrotaline was proved at IC50 24.966 µg/mL and genotoxicity at 2 X IC50 against HepG2 cells. Further, the credible druglike properties with non-mutagenicity, non-toxic on mammalian fibroblast and the potential antineoplastic activity through in vitro experimental validations established monocrotaline as a novel scaffold for liver cancer with superior efficacy and lesser side effects. PMID:25028149

  15. Imaging findings of mimickers of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunchae; Jang, Hyun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC in high-risk patients by typical imaging findings alone is widely adopted in major practice guidelines for HCC. While imaging techniques have markedly improved in detecting small liver lesions, they often detect incidental benign liver lesions and non-hepatocellular malignancy that can be misdiagnosed as HCC. The most common mimicker of HCC in cirrhotic liver is nontumorous arterioportal shunts that are seen as focal hypervascular liver lesions on dynamic contrast-enhanced cross-sectional imaging. Rapidly enhancing hemangiomas can be easily misdiagnosed as HCC especially on MR imaging with liver-specific contrast agent. Focal inflammatory liver lesions mimic HCC by demonstrating arterial-phase hypervascularity and subsequent washout on dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. It is important to recognize the suggestive imaging findings for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC) as the management of CC is largely different from that of HCC. There are other benign mimickers of HCC such as angiomyolipomas and focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules. Recognition of their typical imaging findings can reduce false-positive HCC diagnosis. PMID:26770920

  16. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells activate the survival protein Akt in cardiac myocytes and endothelial cells that limits apoptosis and necrosis during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J; Dennis, Steve; Sawmiller, Darrell; Hunter, Lorynn; Sanberg, Paul; Miller, Leslie

    2012-06-01

    We have previously reported that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and endothelial stem cells, can significantly reduce acute myocardial infarction size. To determine the mechanism whereby HUCBC increase myocyte and vascular endothelial cell survival, we treated cardiac myocytes and coronary artery endothelial cells in separate experiments with HUCBC plus culture media or culture media alone and subjected the cells to 24 h of hypoxia or normoxia. We then determined in myocytes and endothelial cells activation of the cell survival protein Akt by Western blots. We also determined in these cells apoptosis by annexin V staining and necrosis by propidium iodide staining. Thereafter, we inhibited with API, a specific and sensitive Akt inhibitor, Akt activation in myocytes and endothelial cells cultured with HUCBC during hypoxia and determined cell apoptosis and necrosis. In cells cultured without HUCBC, hypoxia only slightly activated Akt. Moreover, hypoxia increased myocyte apoptosis by ≥ 226% and necrosis by 58% in comparison with myocytes in normoxia. Hypoxic treatment of endothelial cells without HUCBC increased apoptosis by 94% and necrosis by 59%. In contrast, hypoxia did not significantly affect HUCBC. Moreover, in myocyte + HUCBC cultures in hypoxia, HUCBC induced a ≥ 135% increase in myocyte phospho-Akt. Akt activation decreased myocyte apoptosis by 76% and necrosis by 35%. In endothelial cells, HUCBC increased phospho-Akt by 116%. HUCBC also decreased endothelial cell apoptosis by 58% and necrosis by 42%. Inhibition of Akt with API in myocytes and endothelial cells cultured with HUCBC during hypoxia nearly totally prevented the HUCBC-induced decrease in apoptosis and necrosis. We conclude that HUCBC can significantly decrease hypoxia-induced myocyte and endothelial cell apoptosis and necrosis by activating Akt in these cells and in this manner HUCBC can limit myocardial ischemia and injury. PMID

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Jen, Yee-Min; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Chang, Li-Ping; Chen, Chang-Ming; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  18. Challenges With the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Samuel T.; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S.; Barnett, Gene H.; Stevens, Glen H.J.; Murphy, Erin S.; Stockham, Abigail L.; Shiue, Kevin; Suh, John H.

    2013-11-01

    The incidence of radiation necrosis has increased secondary to greater use of combined modality therapy for brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery. Given that its characteristics on standard imaging are no different that tumor recurrence, it is difficult to diagnose without use of more sophisticated imaging and nuclear medicine scans, although the accuracy of such scans is controversial. Historically, treatment had been limited to steroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulants, and surgical resection. A recent prospective randomized study has confirmed the efficacy of bevacizumab in treating radiation necrosis. Novel therapies include using focused interstitial laser thermal therapy. This article will review the diagnosis and treatment of radiation necrosis.

  19. Anti-necrosis potential of polyphenols against snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Leanpolchareanchai, Jiraporn; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Bavovada, Rapepol

    2009-01-01

    Polyphenols from the extracts of Areca catechu L. and Quercus infectoria Oliv. inhibited phospholipase A(2), proteases, hyaluronidase and L-amino acid oxidase of Naja naja kaouthia Lesson (NK) and Calloselasma rhodostoma Kuhl (CR) venoms by in vitro tests. Both extracts inhibited the hemorrhagic activity of CR venom and the dermonecrotic activity of NK venom by in vivo tests. The inhibitory activity of plant polyphenols against local tissue necrosis induced by snake venoms may be caused by inhibition of inflammatory reactions, hemorrhage, and necrosis. The result implies the therapeutic potential of plant polyphenols against necrosis in snakebite victims. PMID:19874222

  20. Practical quantification of necrosis in histological whole-slide images.

    PubMed

    Homeyer, André; Schenk, Andrea; Arlt, Janine; Dahmen, Uta; Dirsch, Olaf; Hahn, Horst K

    2013-06-01

    Since the histological quantification of necrosis is a common task in medical research and practice, we evaluate different image analysis methods for quantifying necrosis in whole-slide images. In a practical usage scenario, we assess the impact of different classification algorithms and feature sets on both accuracy and computation time. We show how a well-chosen combination of multiresolution features and an efficient postprocessing step enables the accurate quantification necrosis in gigapixel images in less than a minute. The results are general enough to be applied to other areas of histological image analysis as well. PMID:23796718

  1. Incus and stapes necrosis associated with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tüz, M; Doğru, H; Yasan, H; Döner, F; Yariktaş, M

    2006-07-01

    Chronic otitis media is often associated with ossicular defects, the most frequent being necrosis of the long process of incus. Except for infection and cholesteatoma; trauma and local pressure by chorda tympani are uncommon causes leading to incus erosion. In the literature, no case of incus necrosis has been reported associated with type II diabetes mellitus (DM). A patient is presented in this report with incus and stapes suprastructure necrosis and associated type II DM who was admitted to the out-patient clinic with complaints of conductive hearing loss. PMID:16834796

  2. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  3. Immunization With AFP + GM CSF Plasmid Prime and AFP Adenoviral Vector Boost in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hepatoma; Liver Cancer, Adult; Liver Cell Carcinoma; Liver Cell Carcinoma, Adult; Cancer of Liver; Cancer of the Liver; Cancer, Hepatocellular; Hepatic Cancer; Hepatic Neoplasms; Hepatocellular Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neoplasms, Hepatic; Neoplasms, Liver

  4. Pulmonary embolism after arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma: An autopsy case report

    PubMed Central

    Hatamaru, Keiichi; Azuma, Shunjiro; Akamatsu, Takuji; Seta, Takeshi; Urai, Shunji; Uenoyama, Yoshito; Yamashita, Yukitaka; Ono, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of pulmonary lipiodol embolism with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 77-year-old man who was diagnosed with a huge HCC was admitted for TACE. Immediately after the procedure, this patient experienced severe dyspnea. We suspected that his symptoms were associated with a pulmonary lipiodol embolism after TACE, and we began intensive treatment. However, his condition did not improve, and he died on the following day. A subsequent autopsy revealed that the cause of death was ARDS due to pulmonary lipiodol embolism. No cases have been previously reported for which an autopsy was performed to explain the most probable mechanism of pulmonary lipiodol embolism; thus, ours is the first report for such a rare case. PMID:25632211

  5. Pictures of focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Sempoux, Christine; Balabaud, Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    This practical atlas aims to help liver and non liver pathologists to recognize benign hepatocellular nodules on resected specimen. Macroscopic and microscopic views together with immunohistochemical stains illustrate typical and atypical aspects of focal nodular hyperplasia and of hepatocellular adenoma, including hepatocellular adenomas subtypes with references to clinical and imaging data. Each step is important to make a correct diagnosis. The specimen including the nodule and the non-tumoral liver should be sliced, photographed and all different looking areas adequately sampled for paraffin inclusion. Routine histology includes HE, trichrome and cytokeratin 7. Immunohistochemistry includes glutamine synthase and according to the above results additional markers such as liver fatty acid binding protein, C reactive protein and beta catenin may be realized to differentiate focal nodular hyperplasia from hepatocellular adenoma subtypes. Clues for differential diagnosis and pitfalls are explained and illustrated. PMID:25232451

  6. Post-facelift flap necrosis treatment using charged polystyrene microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Oren; Farber, Nimrod; Remer, Eric; Tessone, Ariel; Trivizki, Omer; Bank, Jonathan; Winkler, Eyal; Zilinsky, Isaac; Haik, Josef

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Flap necrosis following facial rhytidectomy constitutes a vexing and grievous complication to the patient and the surgeon. Treatment modalities that can expedite wound healing and re-epithelialization rates are highly desired. OBJECTIVES: To assess wound healing and re-epithelialization rates of open wounds following postrhytidectomy flap necrosis treated with commercially available charged polystyrene microspheres (Polyheal-1, Polyheal Ltd, Israel). METHODS: Flap necrosis following rhytidectomy with open wounds in three female patients were treated using dressings soaked with Polyheal-1. Wound closure rates were documented. RESULTS: The wounds demonstrated both accelerated granulation tissue formation and rapid re-epithelialization rates. No complications or side effects were encountered. CONCLUSIONS: Charged polystyrene microspheres may offer a new and efficacious way to treat open wounds due to flap necrosis following facial rhytidectomy. Further research with larger patient numbers is still needed to verify these findings. PMID:24431937

  7. Acute liver impairment after sodium valproate overdose

    PubMed Central

    Waring, William Stephen; Nixon, Andrew C

    2009-01-01

    Liver impairment is a recognised adverse effect of long-term sodium valproate treatment, but there are few reports concerning its occurrence after acute overdose. This report describes a 36-year-old woman who deliberately ingested 32 g of sodium valproate (Epilim). Serum valproate concentration was 4370 μmol/l (630 mg/l) at 4.3 h post-ingestion (therapeutic reference range: 300–600 μmol/l), and the elimination half-life was 14.1 h. Liver biochemistry tests were initially normal but gradually became impaired, and highest alanine aminotransferase (761 U/l) occurred 2.3 days after ingestion. Supportive measures alone were sufficient to allow recovery of liver function. This case indicates that sodium valproate overdose may cause acute hepatocellular injury, even in the absence of pre-existing liver disease. PMID:21686945

  8. Skin and Neourethral Necrosis in Staged Hypospadias Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Sarafi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Complications in hypospadias surgery are not uncommon however penile skin or flap necrosis is rarely reported. Ischemia of the flap or graft is a major complication in two stage repair of hypospadias. A 2-year old boy with proximal penile hypospadias, operated earlier for chordee correction and urethral plate formation with a preputial flap, presented for stage 2 repair. Ten days after surgery patient developed skin and neourethral necrosis. Early debridement was done followed by coverage with scrotal flaps. PMID:27398320

  9. Skin and Neourethral Necrosis in Staged Hypospadias Repair.

    PubMed

    Mirshemirani, Alireza; Mahdavi, Alireza; Sarafi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Complications in hypospadias surgery are not uncommon however penile skin or flap necrosis is rarely reported. Ischemia of the flap or graft is a major complication in two stage repair of hypospadias. A 2-year old boy with proximal penile hypospadias, operated earlier for chordee correction and urethral plate formation with a preputial flap, presented for stage 2 repair. Ten days after surgery patient developed skin and neourethral necrosis. Early debridement was done followed by coverage with scrotal flaps. PMID:27398320

  10. Cyclophilin D regulates necrosis, but not apoptosis, of murine eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang; Hogan, Simon P; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Zimmermann, Nives

    2016-04-15

    Eosinophil degranulation and clusters of free extracellular granules are frequently observed in diverse diseases, including atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Whether these intact granules are released by necrosis or a biochemically mediated cytolysis remains unknown. Recently, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase located within the mitochondrial matrix, cyclophilin D (PPIF), was shown to regulate necrotic, but not apoptotic, cell death in vitro in fibroblasts, hepatocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Whether cyclophilin D regulates necrosis in hematopoietic cells such as eosinophils remains unknown. We used PPIF-deficient (Ppif(-/-)) mice to test whether cyclophilin D is required for regulating eosinophil necrosis. PPIF deficiency did not affect eosinophil development or maturation at baseline. After in vitro ionomycin or H2O2 treatment, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils were significantly protected from Ca(2+) overload- or oxidative stress-induced necrosis. Additionally, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils demonstrated significantly decreased necrosis, but not apoptosis, in response to Siglec-F cross-linking, a stimulus associated with eosinophil-mediated processes in vitro and in vivo. When treated with apoptosis inducers, Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) eosinophils exhibited no significant difference in apoptosis or secondary necrosis. Finally, in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model, although levels of colitogenic cytokines and eosinophil-selective chemokines were comparable between Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) mice, the latter exhibited decreased clinical outcomes. This correlated with significantly reduced eosinophil cytolysis in the colon. Collectively, our present studies demonstrate that murine eosinophil necrosis is regulated in vitro and in vivo by cyclophilin D, at least in part, thus providing new insight into the mechanism of eosinophil necrosis and release of free extracellular granules in eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:26893161

  11. Inguinoscrotal region as an unusual site of extra-pancreatic collections in infected pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Saurabh; Gupta, Rahul; Shenvi, Sunil D; Kumar, Hemanth; Gupta, Rajesh; Kang, Mandeep; Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Singh, Rajinder

    2016-08-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis often leads to pancreatic and peripancreatic collections but, rarely, it can lead to collections at sites remote from the pancreas. Three male patients presented with abdominal pain and inguinoscrotal swelling. They were initially misdiagnosed with obstructed inguinal hernia, epididymo-orchitis and hydrocele, respectively. Later, their diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was revealed on laparotomy in one patient and on computed tomography (CT) in the remaining two patients. All these cases had extensive peripancreatic necrosis and paracolic collections tracking along the psoas muscle, downwards towards the pelvis. These collections were initially managed by percutaneous drainage and saline irrigation as a part of the 'step-up' approach. Two of these patients required open necrosectomy, while all required incision and drainage of inguinoscrotal collections. All the patients were discharged in satisfactory condition. Inguinoscrotal swelling is unusual as a first presentation of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion, with careful study of patient's history and examination along with CT, may provide an accurate diagnosis. Local drainage may be required to control sepsis and also provide an egress route for intra-abdominal collections. PMID:25649933

  12. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  13. The histone acetyltransferase hMOF suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Liu, Hui; Pan, Hao; Yang, Yuan; Huang, Gang; Yang, Yun; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Pan, Ze-Ya

    2014-09-26

    Males absent on the first (MOF) is a histone acetyltransferase belongs to the MYST (MOZ, Ybf2/Sas3, Sas2 and TIP60) family. In mammals, MOF plays critical roles in transcription activation by acetylating histone H4K16, a prevalent mark associated with chromatin decondensation. MOF can also acetylate transcription factor p53 on K120, which is important for activation of pro-apoptotic genes; and TIP5, the largest subunit of NoRC, on K633. However, the role of hMOF in hepatocellular carcinoma remains unknown. Here we find that the expression of hMOF is significantly down-regulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma and cell lines. Furthermore, our survival analysis indicates that low hMOF expression predicts poor overall and disease-free survival. We demonstrate that hMOF knockdown promotes hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo, while hMOF overexpression reduces hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Mechanically, we show that hMOF regulates the expression of SIRT6 and its downstream genes. In summary, our findings demonstrate that hMOF participates in human hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting SIRT6, and hMOF activators may serve as potential drug candidates for hepatocellular carcinoma therapy. PMID:25181338

  14. Interactive toxicity of inorganic mercury and trichloroethylene in rat and human proximal tubules: Effects on apoptosis, necrosis, and glutathione status

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, Lawrence H. . E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu; Putt, David A.; Hueni, Sarah E.; Payton, Scott G.; Zwickl, Joshua

    2007-06-15

    Simultaneous or prior exposure to one chemical may alter the concurrent or subsequent response to another chemical, often in unexpected ways. This is particularly true when the two chemicals share common mechanisms of action. The present study uses the paradigm of prior exposure to study the interactive toxicity between inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) and trichloroethylene (TRI) or its metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) in rat and human proximal tubule. Pretreatment of rats with a subtoxic dose of Hg{sup 2+} increased expression of glutathione S-transferase-{alpha}1 (GST{alpha}1) but decreased expression of GST{alpha}2, increased activities of several GSH-dependent enzymes, and increased GSH conjugation of TRI. Primary cultures of rat proximal tubular (rPT) cells exhibited both necrosis and apoptosis after incubation with Hg{sup 2+}. Pretreatment of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells with Hg{sup 2+} caused little or no changes in GST expression or activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, decreased apoptosis induced by TRI or DCVC, but increased necrosis induced by DCVC. In contrast, pretreatment of hPT cells with TRI or DCVC protected from Hg{sup 2+} by decreasing necrosis and increasing apoptosis. Thus, whereas pretreatment of hPT cells with Hg{sup 2+} exacerbated cellular injury due to TRI or DCVC by shifting the response from apoptosis to necrosis, pretreatment of hPT cells with either TRI or DCVC protected from Hg{sup 2+}-induced cytotoxicity by shifting the response from necrosis to apoptosis. These results demonstrate that by altering processes related to GSH status, susceptibilities of rPT and hPT cells to acute injury from Hg{sup 2+}, TRI, or DCVC are markedly altered by prior exposures.

  15. PRDX2 protects hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Silei; Han, Quanli; Wang, Ru; Li, Xin; Wang, Qingyang; Wang, Huizhong; Wang, Jing; Ma, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin2 (PRDX2) is a member of the peroxiredoxin family of antioxidant enzymes. A number of previous studies have indicated that PRDX2 may serve a cell type-dependent role in tumorigenesis. Recently, PRDX2 has been identified to be the new target of miR-122a, which has been demonstrated to be frequently downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thus, PRDX2 may have a pro-tumorigenic role in HCC. Because the role of PRDX2 in HCC has not yet been reported, it is of interest to explore how PRDX2 may affect reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell death in HCC cells. The present study analyzed the effects of PRDX2 knockdown or overexpression on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell death in HCC SMMC-7721 cells. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced cell death upon PRDX2 knockdown or overexpression was also examined in SMMC-7721 cells. It was found that PRDX2 knockdown augmented H2O2-induced cell death in SMMC-7721 cells, whereas PRDX2 overexpression exhibited opposite effects. By contrast, PRDX2 knockdown enhanced TNF-α-induced apoptosis, whereas PRDX2 overexpression reduced it, even though both treatments showed little effects on TNF-α-induced necrosis in SMMC-7721 cells. Further exploration confirmed PRDX2 knockdown led to enhanced ROS generation in response to H2O2. Taken together, the present study supports that PRDX2 serves a pro-tumorigenic role in HCC through, at least partially, limiting ROS-mediated apoptosis under oxidative stress. PMID:27602166

  16. Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Comprehensive Imaging and Survival Analysis in a 172-Patient Cohort 1

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Robert J.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Kulik, Laura M.; Riaz, Ahsun; Ryu, Robert K.; Baker, Talia B.; Ibrahim, Saad M.; Abecassis, Michael I.; Miller, Frank H.; Sato, Kent T.; Senthilnathan, Seanthan; Resnick, Scott A.; Wang, Edward; Gupta, Ramona; Chen, Richard; Newman, Steven B.; Chrisman, Howard B.; Nemcek, Albert A.; Vogelzang, Robert L.; Omary, Reed A.; Benson, Al B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine comprehensive imaging and long-term survival outcome following chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy-two patients with HCC treated with chemoembolization were studied retrospectively in an institutional review board approved protocol; this study was HIPAA compliant. Baseline laboratory and imaging characteristics were obtained. Clinical and laboratory toxicities following treatment were assessed. Imaging characteristics following chemoembolization were evaluated to determine response rates (size and necrosis) and time to progression (TTP). Survival from the time of first chemoembolization treatment was calculated. Subanalyses were performed by stratifying the population according to Child-Pugh, United Network for Organ Sharing, and Barcelona Clinic for Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging systems. Results: Cirrhosis was present in 157 patients (91%); portal hypertension was present in 139 patients (81%). Eleven patients (6%) had metastases at baseline. Portal vein thrombosis was present in 11 patients (6%). Fifty-five percent of patients experienced some form of toxicity following treatment; 21% developed grade 3 or 4 bilirubin toxicity. Post-chemoembolization response was seen in 31% and 64% of patients according to size and necrosis criteria, respectively. Median TTP was 7.9 months (95% confidence interval: 7.1, 9.4) but varied widely by stage. Median survival was significantly different between patients with BCLC stages A, B, and C disease (stage A, 40.0 months; B, 17.4 months; C, 6.3 months; P < .0001). Conclusion: The determination of TTP and survival in patients with HCC is confounded by tumor biology and background cirrhosis; chemoembolization was shown to be a safe and effective therapy in patients with HCC. © RSNA, 2010 PMID:20501733

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma detected by iodized oil

    SciTech Connect

    Yumoto, Y.; Jinno, K.; Tokuyama, K.; Araki, Y.; Ishimitsu, T.; Maeda, H.; Konno, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Okuda, K.

    1985-01-01

    This study assesses the diagnostic value of Lipiodol (iodized oil) and computed tomography (CT) in detecting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty-four patients who were suspected of having HCC received injections of a small amount of Lipiodol, along with an antitumor agent, in the hepatic artery following routine celiac angiography. CT scans obtained 7-10 days after Lipiodol administration demonstrated HCC in distinct contrast to the surrounding noncancerous parenchyma. In particular, the CT-Lipiodol procedure disclosed many small HCC lesions that were not shown by celiac angiography, scintigraphy, CT with an without contrast medium enhancement, and ultrasonography. Although this procedure may miss very small or highly fibrotic lesions, it is recommended for patients suspected of having HCC and for patients for whom hepatic resection is being considered.

  18. Biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): An Update.

    PubMed

    Li, Dave; Satomura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have witnessed increased use of biomarkers in disease management. A biomarker is any characteristic that can be objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biological process, pathogenic process, or pharmacological response to a therapeutic intervention. The clinical measurements of biomarkers can be carried out in vivo using imaging modalities like ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as in vitro utilizing serum or plasma or other body fluids as specimens. In contrast to the imaging modalities, a prominent value of serum biomarkers is that they could be biologically relevant and disease-specific to pathophysiologic or pathologic process of disease development. This article provides an update of serum biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in risk assessment for early detection through surveillance. PMID:26530367

  19. Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma Responsive to Pembrolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Phu; Kallail, K. James

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive liver tumor that occurs with chronic liver disease. Surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for localized disease whereas therapeutic options for advanced disease are limited. The innovative blockade of immune checkpoints with targeted immunotherapies, such as monoclonal antibodies against programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1), have shown promise in the treatment of solid malignancies. The PD-1 inhibiting antibodies, nivolumab and pembrolizumab prolonged overall survival in randomized trials in metastatic melanoma and advanced non-small cell lung cancer. This is a report of a 75-year-old male patient with metastatic HCC who was initially treated with the standard of therapy sorafenib. After failure of sorafenib therapy, pembrolizumab was started. There was a dramatic response to pembrolizumab with decrease in tumor size and drop in alfa fetoprotein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of metastatic HCC responsive to pembrolizumab after failure of sorafenib. PMID:27433410

  20. Immunological landscape and immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Jesús; Melero, Ignacio; Sangro, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a serious therapeutic challenge and targeted therapies only provide a modest benefit in terms of overall survival. Novel approaches are urgently needed for the treatment of this prevalent malignancy. Evidence demonstrating the antigenicity of tumour cells, the discovery that immune checkpoint molecules have an essential role in immune evasion of tumour cells, and the impressive clinical results achieved by blocking these inhibitory receptors, are revolutionizing cancer immunotherapy. Here, we review the data on HCC immunogenicity, the mechanisms for HCC immune subversion and the different immunotherapies that have been tested to treat HCC. Taking into account the multiplicity of hyperadditive immunosuppressive forces acting within the HCC microenvironment, a combinatorial approach is advised. Strategies include combinations of systemic immunomodulation and gene therapy, cell therapy or virotherapy. PMID:26484443

  1. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma: current clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lafaro, Kelly J; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-01-01

    Fibrolamellar carcinoma (FLC) is a variant of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which comprises ∼1%–9% of all HCCs. Although FLC is a variant of HCC, it is distinct from HCC in that it most often affects younger patients (10–35 years of age) with no underlying liver disease. FLC often presents with vague abdominal pain, nausea, abdominal fullness, malaise, and weight loss. Surgery is the current mainstay of treatment for FLC and remains the only potentially curative option. While FLCs are considered less responsive to chemotherapy than their classic HCC counterparts, there have been suggestions that multimodality treatments may be effective, especially in advanced cases. Further research is necessary to determine effective systemic therapies as an adjunct to surgery for FLC. PMID:27508204

  2. Combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Toh, C H; Cheung, Y C; Ng, S H; Lin, C Y; Chan, S C; Ng, K K

    2004-12-01

    Combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma (HCC-CC) is a rare primary liver tumour. We report a carrier of both HBV and HCV presenting with intermittent abdominal pain, fever, chillness and elevated á-fetoprotein (AFP) of 1197 ng/ml. Computed tomography showed an irregular hypodense mass in the left lateral segment of the liver with vague contrast enhancement and multiple regional lymphadenopathy. Hepatic angiogram showed that the mass was hypovascular and the left portal vein was occluded with a tapered end. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of the liver yielded HCC-CC. We suggest that HCC-CC should be considered in hypovascular liver tumours with striking elevation of serum AFP and multiple regional lymphadenopathy. PMID:15646418

  3. The mutational landscape of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex process, and HCC arises from the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations leading to changes in the genomic landscape. Current advances in genomic technologies have revolutionized the search for genetic alterations in cancer genomes. Recent studies in which all coding exons in HCC were sequenced have shed new light on the genomic landscape of this malignant disease. Catalogues of these somatic mutations and systematic analysis of catalogued mutations will lead us to uncover candidate HCC driver genes, although further functional validation is needed to determine whether these genes play a causal role in the development of HCC. This review provides an overview of previously known oncogenes and new oncogene candidates in HCC that were uncovered from recent exome or whole-genome sequencing studies. This knowledge provides direction for future personalized treatment approaches for patients with HCC. PMID:26523267

  4. Gene Signatures in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

    PubMed Central

    Studach, Leo; Merle, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a significant human cancer globally, with poor prognosis. New and efficacious therapy strategies are needed as well as new biomarkers for early detection of at-risk patients. In this review, we discuss select microarray studies of human HCCs, and propose a gene signature that has promise for clinical/translational application. This gene signature combines the proliferation cluster of genes and the hepatic cancer initiating/stem cell gene cluster for identification of HCCs with poor prognosis. Evidence from cell-based assays identifies the existence of a mechanistic link between these two gene clusters, involving the proliferation cluster gene Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1). We propose that PLK1 is a promising therapy target for HCC. PMID:20851183

  5. Charged Particle Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Heath D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the use of external beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been limited by toxicity to the uninvolved liver and surrounding structures. Advances in photon radiotherapy have improved dose conformality to the tumor and facilitated dose escalation, a key contributor to improved HCC radiation treatment outcomes. However, despite these advances in photon radiotherapy, significant volumes of liver still receive low doses of radiation that can preclude dose escalation, particularly in patients with limited functional liver reserves. By capitalizing on the lack of exit dose along the beam path beyond the tumor and higher biological effectiveness, charged particle therapy offers the promise of maximizing tumor control via dose escalation without excessive liver toxicity. In this review we discuss the distinctive biophysical attributes of both proton and carbon ion radiotherapy, particularly as they pertain to treatment of HCC. We also review the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using charged particles for the treatment of HCC. PMID:21939857

  6. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:22941021

  7. Undiagnosed Hepatocellular Carcinoma Presenting as Nasal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Hassen; Sheikh, Rashid; Rahman, Waheed; Sheta, Sally; Dogan, Zeynel

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver with up to half of cases suffering from extrahepatic metastasis in the later stages of the disease. Commonly reported and encountered metastatic sites include the lymph nodes, lung, bone, and adrenal glands. This is an effort to throw a spotlight on a rare case of metastatic HCC which presented to us as two distinct lesions in the nose. It focuses on the presentation and the steps that were taken to reach this rare and unusual diagnosis. It sparks interest from a clinical and histopathology perspective. Our cynosure is the findings of the case coupled with a probe on the possible routes of spread of HCC to sinonasal region. PMID:26618018

  8. Profiles of metabolites and gene expression in rats with chemically induced hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Heijne, Wilbert H M; Lamers, Robert-Jan A N; van Bladeren, Peter J; Groten, John P; van Nesselrooij, Joop H J; van Ommen, Ben

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated whether integrated analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics data increased the sensitivity of detection and provided new insight in the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. Metabolite levels in plasma or urine were analyzed in relation to changes in hepatic gene expression in rats that received bromobenzene to induce acute hepatic centrilobular necrosis. Bromobenzene-induced lesions were only observed after treatment with the highest of 3 dose levels. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that metabolite profiles of blood plasma were largely different from controls when the rats were treated with bromobenzene, also at doses that did not elicit histopathological changes. Changes in levels of genes and metabolites were related to the degree of necrosis, providing putative novel markers of hepatotoxicity. Levels of endogenous metabolites like alanine, lactate, tyrosine and dimethylglycine differed in plasma from treated and control rats. The metabolite profiles of urine were found to be reflective of the exposure levels. This integrated analysis of hepatic transcriptomics and plasma metabolomics was able to more sensitively detect changes related to hepatotoxicity and discover novel markers. The relation between gene expression and metabolite levels was explored and additional insight in the role of various biological pathways in bromobenzene-induced hepatic necrosis was obtained, including the involvement of apoptosis and changes in glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. The complete Table 2 is available as a supplemental file online at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/openurlasp?genre=journal&issn=0192-6233. To access the file, click on the issue link for 33(4), then select this article. A download option appears at the bottom of this abstract. In order to access the full article online, you must either have an individual subscription or a member subscription accessed through www.toxpath.org. PMID:16036859

  9. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  10. A case of gouty arthritis following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dae Hee; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) is considered an effective technique for providing local control in the majority of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Although RFA is generally well tolerated, recent studies have reported complications associated with RFA. We describe a case of acute gouty arthritis in a 71-year-old man with chronic renal failure who was treated with RFA for a HCC lesion and who had hepatitis B-associated cirrhosis and mild renal insufficiency. Regular surveillance of the patient detected a 3.5 cm HCC lesion. Because the patient had declined surgery, RFA was chosen for therapy. On the third post-procedural day, the laboratory results showed increases in his uric acid and potassium levels, which were compatible with a tumor lysis syndrome. On the 6th post-procedural day, the patient complained of new right knee pain. Subsequent joint aspiration revealed monosodium urate monohydrate crystals. We made the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis arising from tumor lysis and liver infarction caused by HCC ablation, which was aggravated by acute renal insufficiency. After adequate hydration and administration of oral colchicines, the patient’s right knee pain subsided and the uric acid serum level returned to normal. This is the first described case of acute gouty arthritis after RFA for a HCC lesion in a patient with underlying chronic renal insufficiency. To avoid hyperuricemia and an acute attack of gout after RFA therapy for HCC, early identification of patients at risk is warranted, such as those with a large tumor, rapid tumor growth, and renal insufficiency, and preventative measures should be considered. PMID:20135729

  11. Hepatocellular adenoma: what is new in 2008.

    PubMed

    Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Laumonier, Hervé; Laurent, Christophe; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Balabaud, Charles

    2008-09-01

    Patients (85%) with hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) are women taking oral contraceptives. They can be divided into four subgroups according to their genotype/phenotype features. (1) Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1alpha) biallelic somatic mutations are observed in 35% of the HCA cases. It occurs in almost all cases in women. HNF1alpha-mutated HCA are most of the time, highly steatotic, with a lack of expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) in immunohistochemistry analyses. Adenomatosis is frequently detected in this context. An HNF1alpha germline mutation is observed in less than 5% of HCA cases and can be associated with MODY 3 diabetes. (2) An activating beta-catenin mutation was found in 10% of HCA. These beta-catenin activated HCAs are observed in men and women, and specific risk factors, such as male hormone administration or glycogenosis, are associated with their development. Immunohistochemistry studies show that these HCAs overexpress beta-catenin (nuclear and cytoplasmic) and glutamine synthetase. This group of tumours has a higher risk of malignant transformation into hepatocellular carcinoma. (3) Inflammatory HCAs are observed in 40% of the cases, and they are most frequent in women but are also found in men. Lesions are characterised by inflammatory infiltrates, dystrophic arteries, sinusoidal dilatation and ductular reaction. They express serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein. In this group, GGT is frequently elevated, with a biological inflammatory syndrome present. Also, there are more overweight patients in this group. An additional 10% of inflammatory HCAs express beta-catenin, and are also at risk of malignant transformation. (4) Currently, less than 10% of HCAs are unclassified. It is hoped that in the near future it will be possible with clinical, biological and imaging data to predict in which of the 2 major groups (HNF1alpha-mutated HCA and inflammatory HCA) the patient belongs and to propose better guidelines in terms of

  12. Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management

    PubMed Central

    Beger, Hans G; Rau, Bettina M

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (> 50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop in the late course infection of necroses. Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week strongly related to early and persistence of organ or multi-organ dysfunction. Clinical sepsis caused by infected necrosis leading to multi-organ failure syndrome (MOFS) occurs in the later course after the first week. To predict sepsis, MOFS or deaths in the first 48-72 h, the highest predictive accuracy has been objectified for procalcitonin and IL-8; the Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)-score predicts the outcome in the first 48 h, and provides a daily assessment of treatment response with a high positive predictive value. Contrast-enhanced CT provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or at risk of developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Early vigorous intravenous fluid replacement is of foremost importance. The goal is to decrease the hematocrit or restore normal cardiocirculatory functions. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased in high volume centers to below 20%. PMID:17876868

  13. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  14. Management of infection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Werner; Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W

    2002-01-01

    The clinical course of acute pancreatitis varies from a mild, transitory illness to a severe, rapidly fatal disease. In about 80% to 90% of cases pancreatitis presents as a mild, self-limiting disease with low morbidity and mortality. Unlike mild pancreatitis, necrotizing pancreatitis develops in about 15% of patients, with infection of pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis representing the single most important risk factor for a fatal outcome. Infection of pancreatic necrosis in the natural course develops in the second and third week after onset of the disease and is reported in 40% to 70% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Just recently, prevention of infection by prophylactic antibiotic treatment and assessment of the infection status of pancreatic necrosis by fine-needle aspiration have been established in the management of severe pancreatitis. Because medical treatment alone will result in a mortality rate of almost 100% in patients with signs of local and systemic septic complications, patients with infected necrosis must undergo surgical intervention, which consists of an organ-preserving necrosectomy combined with a postoperative closed lavage concept that maximizes further evacuation of infected debris and exudate. However, intensive care treatment, including prophylactic antibiotics, reduces the infection rate and delays the need for surgery in most patients until the third or fourth week after the onset of symptoms. At that time, debridement of necrosis is technically easier to perform, due to better demarcation between viable and necrotic tissue compared with necrosectomy earlier in the disease. In contrast, surgery is rarely needed in the presence of sterile pancreatic necrosis. In those patients the conservative approach is supported by the present data. PMID:12483263

  15. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis associated with the use of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor adalimumab

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alan William; Rosenblatt, Randall Lee

    2014-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman was referred for evaluation of progressive dyspnea of 3 months— duration. She had received 3 doses of adalimumab for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis prior to the onset of her dyspnea. Her chest examination revealed absent diaphragmatic movement with inspiration. Spirometry showed a severe restrictive defect. Radiologic studies confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. Laboratory and radiologic workup excluded other possible causes of the diagnosis. Adalimumab was discontinued, and she was treated with bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation and intravenous immunoglobulin. Three months later, the diaphragmatic paralysis persisted. This is the second reported case of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis occurring in a patient who had received adalimumab. Acute neuropathies are rare side effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. PMID:24688191

  16. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients. PMID:15255240

  17. Combined Ethanol Injection Therapy and Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy in Percutaneous Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Larger than 4 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Vallone, Paolo; Catalano, Orlando Izzo, Francesco; Siani, Alfredo

    2006-08-15

    Background. Optimal treatment of large-sized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still debated, because percutaneous ablation therapies alone do not always achieve complete necrosis. Objective. To report our experience in the treatment of patients with HCC larger than 4 cm in diameter by combined percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation. Methods. In a 5-year period there were 40 consecutive patients meeting the inclusion criteria (24 men and 16 women; age range 41-72 years, mean 58 years). These subjects had a single HCC larger than 4 cm. Twelve subjects also had one or two additional nodules smaller than 4 cm (mean 1.2 nodules per patient). Patients were submitted to one to three sessions consisting of ethanol injection at two opposite tumor poles (mean 12 ml) and then of radiofrequency application through one or two electrodes placed at the tumor center (mean treatment duration 30 min). Results. Complete necrosis was obtained in all cases with one to three sessions (mean 1.3 sessions per patient). All patients experienced pain and fever but one only subject had a major complication requiring treatment (abscess development and fistulization). Overall follow-up was 7-69 months. Two patients showed local recurrence and 9 developed new etherotopic HCC nodules. Seven subjects died during follow-up while 33 were free from recurrence 8-69 months after treatment. Conclusion. A combination of ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation is effective in the treatment of large HCC.

  18. A case of acute hepatitis following mad honey ingestion.

    PubMed

    Sari Dogan, Fatma; Ozaydin, Vehbi; Incealtin, Onur; Guneysel, Ozlem; Demireller, Merve

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatitis is characterized by liver inflammation and liver cell necrosis. The most frequently observed underlying cause thereof is viruses, but various other causes, such as alcohol, medication, or toxins may also lead thereto. In this paper, a case of acute hepatitis presenting with bradycardia, hypotension, and a prominent increase in liver enzymes following mad honey ingestion is discussed. Since there are only few cases of acute hepatitis following mad honey ingestion in the literature, we want to present this subject matter. PMID:27239626

  19. Renin and Acute Renal Failure: Studies in Man

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. J.; Gleadle, R. I.; Lawson, D. H.; Lever, A. F.; Linton, A. L.; Macadam, R. F.; Prentice, E.; Robertson, J. I. S.; Tree, M.

    1970-01-01

    Plasma renin concentration was increased, usually appreciably, in 22 out of 25 patients with acute renal failure, the average value being 226 units/litre (mean for normal subjects 8·2 units/1.). The highest renin values were found in the first 10 days of the disease; lower and sometimes normal values were found subsequently. Unequivocal acute tubular necrosis was present in only two of the eight cases examined post mortem. These findings are compatible with Goormaghtigh's proposal that an excess of renin and angiotensin may act within the kidney to produce acute renal failure. PMID:4313590

  20. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  1. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26759047

  2. The Combination of d-Dimer and Peritoneal Irritation Signs as a Potential Indicator to Exclude the Diagnosis of Intestinal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Wei-Han; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intestinal necrosis is a life-threatening disease, and its prompt and accurate diagnosis is very important. This study aimed to evaluate the value of d-dimer as a marker for early diagnosis of bowel necrosis. From 2009 to 2013, patients undergoing operation due to acute intestinal obstruction were retrospectively analyzed. Clinicopathologic characteristics were compared among no ischemia group, reversible ischemia group, and bowel necrosis group. There were totally 274 patients being included for analyses. Patients with bowel necrosis had a significant highest level of d-dimer compared with other 2 groups (P = 0.007) when FEU unit was applied. The optimal cutoff value of d-dimer levels as an indicator in diagnosing bowel necrosis was projected to be 1.965 mg/L, which yielded a sensitivity of 84.0%, a specificity of 45.6%, a positive predictive value of 60.7%, and a negative predictive value of 74.0%. And the sensitivity of 84.0% and specificity of 70.0% were detected, when 1.65 mg/L of d-dimer was set as the cutoff value to distinguish the reversible ischemia and bowel necrosis. The corresponding results in patients with no or slight peritoneal irritation signs were 85.2%, 44.7%, 35.4% and 89.5% respectively. The sensitivity and negative predictive value were 96.0% and 91.7%, respectively, when d-dimer and peritoneal irritation signs were combined to perform the parallel analysis. The combination of d-dimer and peritoneal irritation signs could generate a reliable negative predictive value, which is helpful to exclude the diagnosis of intestinal necrosis. However, it should also be proved in well-designed large-scale prospective study. PMID:26448003

  3. The Combination of D-Dimer and Peritoneal Irritation Signs as a Potential Indicator to Exclude the Diagnosis of Intestinal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Wei-Han; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal necrosis is a life-threatening disease, and its prompt and accurate diagnosis is very important. This study aimed to evaluate the value of D-dimer as a marker for early diagnosis of bowel necrosis. From 2009 to 2013, patients undergoing operation due to acute intestinal obstruction were retrospectively analyzed. Clinicopathologic characteristics were compared among no ischemia group, reversible ischemia group, and bowel necrosis group. There were totally 274 patients being included for analyses. Patients with bowel necrosis had a significant highest level of D-dimer compared with other 2 groups (P =  .007) when FEU unit was applied. The optimal cutoff value of D-dimer levels as an indicator in diagnosing bowel necrosis was projected to be 1.965 mg/L, which yielded a sensitivity of 84.0%, a specificity of 45.6%, a positive predictive value of 60.7%, and a negative predictive value of 74.0%. And the sensitivity of 84.0% and specificity of 70.0% were detected, when 1.65 mg/L of D-dimer was set as the cutoff value to distinguish the reversible ischemia and bowel necrosis. The corresponding results in patients with no or slight peritoneal irritation signs were 85.2%, 44.7%, 35.4% and 89.5% respectively. The sensitivity and negative predictive value were 96.0% and 91.7%, respectively, when D-dimer and peritoneal irritation signs were combined to perform the parallel analysis. The combination of D-dimer and peritoneal irritation signs could generate a reliable negative predictive value, which is helpful to exclude the diagnosis of intestinal necrosis. However, it should also be proved in well-designed large-scale prospective study. PMID:26448003

  4. A phase I clinical trial of thymidine kinase-based gene therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sangro, B; Mazzolini, G; Ruiz, M; Ruiz, J; Quiroga, J; Herrero, I; Qian, C; Benito, A; Larrache, J; Olagüe, C; Boan, J; Peñuelas, I; Sádaba, B; Prieto, J

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this phase I clinical trial was to assess the feasibility and safety of intratumoral administration of a first-generation adenoviral vector encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene (Ad.TK) followed by systemic ganciclovir to patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Secondarily, we have analyzed its antitumor effect. Ten patients were enrolled in five dose-level cohorts that received from 10¹⁰ to 2 × 10¹² viral particles (vp). Ad.TK was injected intratumorally and patients received up to three doses at 30-day intervals. Positron emission tomography was used to monitor TK gene expression. Ad.TK injection was feasible in 100% of cases. Treatment was well tolerated and dose-limiting toxicity was not achieved. Cumulative toxicity was not observed. Hepatic toxicity was absent even in cirrhotic patients. Fever, flu-like syndrome, pain at the injection site and pancytopenia were the most common side effects. No partial responses were observed and 60% of patients showed tumor stabilization of the injected lesion. Importantly, two patients who received the highest dose showed signs of intratumoral necrosis by imaging procedures. One of them achieved a sustained stabilization and survived for 26 months. In conclusion, Ad.TK can be safely administered by intratumoral injection to patients with HCC up to 2 × 10¹² vp per patient. PMID:20689572

  5. Hepatocyte-Specific Arid1a Deficiency Initiates Mouse Steatohepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Tao-Tao; Fan, Zu-Sen; Han, Ze-Guang

    2015-01-01

    ARID1A, encoding a subunit of chromatin remodeling SWI/SNF complexes, has recently been considered as a new type of tumor suppressor gene for its somatic mutations frequently found in various human tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the role and mechanism of inactivated ARID1A mutations in tumorigenesis remain unclear. To investigate the role of ARID1A inactivation in HCC pathogenesis, we generated hepatocyte-specific Arid1a knockout (Arid1aLKO) mice by crossing mice carrying loxP-flanked Arid1a exon 8 alleles (Arid1af/f) with albumin promoter-Cre transgenic mice. Significantly, the hepatocyte-specific Arid1a deficiency results in mouse steatohepatitis and HCC development. In Arid1aLKO mice, we found that innate immune cells, including F4/80+ macrophages and CD11c+ neutrophil cells, infiltrate into the liver parenchyma, accompanied by the increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6, and activation of STAT3 and NF-κB pathways. In conclusion, hepatocyte-specific Arid1a deficiency could lead to mouse steatohepatitis and HCC development. This study provides an alternative mechanism by which Arid1a deficiency contributes to HCC tumorigenesis. PMID:26569409

  6. TIPE1 induces apoptosis by negatively regulating Rac1 activation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Liang, X; Gao, L; Ma, H; Liu, X; Pan, Y; Yan, W; Shan, H; Wang, Z; Chen, Y H; Ma, C

    2015-05-14

    TIPE1 (tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like 1 or TNFAIP8L1) is a newly identified member of the TIPE (TNFAIP8) family, which play roles in regulating cell death. However, the biologic functions of TIPE1 in physiologic and pathologic conditions are largely unknown. Here, we report the roles of TIPE1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Evaluated by immunohistochemical staining, HCC tissues showed significantly downregulated TIPE1 expression compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, which positively correlated with tumor pathologic grades and patient survival. Using a homograft tumor model in Balb/c mice, we discovered that TIPE1 significantly diminished the growth and tumor weight of murine liver cancer homografts. Consistently, TIPE1 inhibited both cell growth and colony formation ability of cultured HCC cell lines, which was further identified to be due to TIPE1-inducing apoptosis in a caspase-independent, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1)-insensitive manner. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations revealed that TIPE1 interacted with Rac1, and inhibited the activation of Rac1 and its downstream p65 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. Moreover, overexpression of constitutively active Rac1 partially rescued the apoptosis induced by TIPE1, and Rac1 knockdown significantly restored the deregulated cell growth induced by TIPE1 small interfering RNA. Our findings revealed that TIPE1 induced apoptosis in HCC cells by negatively regulating Rac1 pathway, and loss of TIPE1 might be a new prognostic indicator for HCC patients. PMID:25043299

  7. CT Appearance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Locoregional Treatments: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Marin, Daniel; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Serra, Nicola; Sica, Assunta; Lassandro, Francesco; D'Angelo, Roberto; La Porta, Michelearcangelo; Fiore, Francesco; Somma, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem worldwide, affecting more than 600,000 new patients per year. Curative treatments are available in a small percentage of patients, while most of them present in stages requiring locoregional treatments such as thermoablation, transarterial chemoembolization, and/or radioembolization. These therapies result in specific imaging features that the general radiologist has to be aware of in order to assess the response to treatment and to correctly manage the follow-up of treated patients. Multiphasic helical computed tomography has become a popular imaging modality for detecting hypervascular tumors and characterizing liver lesions. On this basis, many staging and diagnostic systems have been proposed for evaluating response to all different existing strategies. Radiofrequencies and microwaves generate thermoablation of tumors, and transarterial chemoembolization exploits the double effect of the locoregional administration of drugs and embolizing particles. Eventually radioembolization uses a beta-emitting isotope to induce necrosis. Therefore, the aim of this comprehensive review is to analyze and compare CT imaging appearance of HCC after various locoregional treatments, with regard to specific indications for all possible procedures. PMID:26798332

  8. Inhibition of galactosamine cytotoxicity in an in vivo/in vitro hepatocellular toxicity model

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, J.R.; Thayer, K.J.; White, C.

    1987-06-30

    A combined in vivo/in vitro model of galactosamine hepatotoxicity was employed to test whether previously reported cytoprotective actions of cystamine administration on galactosamine-induced hepatic injury in vivo could be attributed to a direct action of cystamine on toxicant-challenged hepatocytes. In this model, male Sprague-Dawley rats received a 400 mg/kg galactosamine challenge via intraperitoneal injection 1 hr prior to portal vein cannulation for hepatocyte isolation. Isolated cells are established in monolayer culture and galactosamine-induced cellular injury is then expressed over the ensuing 24-48 hr in culture. Consistent with the biochemical basis of galactosamine-induced hepatocellular injury in vivo, cytotoxicity could be prevented by in vitro uridine treatments within 3 hr of the in vivo galactosamine challenge, but not when added 12 hr later. Cystamine, in contrast, exhibited a cytoprotective effect even when added to cultures 12 hr after the in vivo toxicant challenge. Post-toxicant cytoprotection by cystamine in vitro was concentration dependent and did not produce an alteration of hepatocyte nonprotein sulfhydryl content. Post-toxicant cytoprotection by uridine and cystamine in this in vivo/in vitro model of toxicity were fully consistent with in vivo protection from galactosamine-induced necrosis by these agents. This model eliminates potential extrahepatic mechanisms for cystamine's hepatoprotective effect and demonstrates a direct cytoprotective action on galactosamine-challenged hepatocytes.

  9. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography in assessing the treatment response to transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sparchez, Zeno; Mocan, Tudor; Radu, Pompilia; Anton, Ofelia; Bolog, Nicolae

    2016-03-01

    The last decades have known continuous development of therapeutic strategies in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately the disease it still not diagnosed until it is already at an intermediate or even an advanced disease. In these circumstances transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is considered an effective treatment for HCC. The most important independent prognostic factor of both disease free survival and overall survival is the presence of complete necrosis. Therefore, treatment outcomes are dictated by the proper use of radiological imaging. Current guidelines recommend contrast enhanced computer tomography (CECT) as the standard imaging technique for evaluating the therapeutic response in patients with HCC after TACE. One of the most important disadvantage of CECT is the overestimation of tumor response. As an attempt to overcome this limitation contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has gained particular attention as an imaging modality in HCC patients after TACE. Of all available imaging modalities, CEUS performs better in the early and very early assessment of TACE especially after lipiodol TACE. As any other imaging techniques CEUS has disadvantages especially in hypovascular tumors or in cases of tumor multiplicity. Not far from now the current limitations of CEUS will be overcome by the new CEUS techniques that are already tested in clinical practice such as dynamic CEUS with quantification, three-dimensional CEUS or fusion techniques. PMID:26962561

  10. Fusaric acid induces mitochondrial stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Sheik Abdul, Naeem; Nagiah, Savania; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium spp are common contaminants of maize and produce many mycotoxins, including the fusariotoxin fusaric acid (FA). FA is a niacin related compound, chelator of divalent cations, and mediates toxicity via oxidative stress and possible mitochondrial dysregulation. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is a stress response deacetylase that maintains proper mitochondrial function. We investigated the effect of FA on SIRT3 and oxidative and mitochondrial stress pathways in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell line. We determined FA toxicity (24 h incubation; IC50 = 104 μg/ml) on mitochondrial output, cellular and mitochondrial stress responses, mitochondrial biogenesis and markers of cell death using spectrophotometry, luminometry, qPCR and western blots. FA caused a dose dependent decrease in metabolic activity along with significant depletion of intracellular ATP. FA induced a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, despite up-regulation of the antioxidant transcription factor, Nrf2. FA significantly decreased expression of SIRT3 mRNA with a concomitant decrease in protein expression. Lon protease was also significantly down-regulated. FA induced aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis as evidenced by significantly decreased protein expressions of: PGC-1α, p-CREB, NRF1 and HSP70. Finally, FA activated apoptosis as noted by the significantly increased activity of caspases 3/7 and also induced cellular necrosis. This study provides insight into the molecular mechanisms of FA (a neglected mycotoxin) induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27390038

  11. CT Appearance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Locoregional Treatments: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Daniel; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Serra, Nicola; Sica, Assunta; D'Angelo, Roberto; La Porta, Michelearcangelo; Fiore, Francesco; Somma, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem worldwide, affecting more than 600,000 new patients per year. Curative treatments are available in a small percentage of patients, while most of them present in stages requiring locoregional treatments such as thermoablation, transarterial chemoembolization, and/or radioembolization. These therapies result in specific imaging features that the general radiologist has to be aware of in order to assess the response to treatment and to correctly manage the follow-up of treated patients. Multiphasic helical computed tomography has become a popular imaging modality for detecting hypervascular tumors and characterizing liver lesions. On this basis, many staging and diagnostic systems have been proposed for evaluating response to all different existing strategies. Radiofrequencies and microwaves generate thermoablation of tumors, and transarterial chemoembolization exploits the double effect of the locoregional administration of drugs and embolizing particles. Eventually radioembolization uses a beta-emitting isotope to induce necrosis. Therefore, the aim of this comprehensive review is to analyze and compare CT imaging appearance of HCC after various locoregional treatments, with regard to specific indications for all possible procedures. PMID:26798332

  12. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  13. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  14. Apoptosis, oncosis, and necrosis. An overview of cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1995-01-01

    The historical development of the cell death concept is reviewed, with special attention to the origin of the terms necrosis, coagulation necrosis, autolysis, physiological cell death, programmed cell death, chromatolysis (the first name of apoptosis in 1914), karyorhexis, karyolysis, and cell suicide, of which there are three forms: by lysosomes, by free radicals, and by a genetic mechanism (apoptosis). Some of the typical features of apoptosis are discussed, such as budding (as opposed to blebbing and zeiosis) and the inflammatory response. For cell death not by apoptosis the most satisfactory term is accidental cell death. Necrosis is commonly used but it is not appropriate, because it does not indicate a form of cell death but refers to changes secondary to cell death by any mechanism, including apoptosis. Abundant data are available on one form of accidental cell death, namely ischemic cell death, which can be considered an entity of its own, caused by failure of the ionic pumps of the plasma membrane. Because ischemic cell death (in known models) is accompanied by swelling, the name oncosis is proposed for this condition. The term oncosis (derived from ónkos, meaning swelling) was proposed in 1910 by von Reckling-hausen precisely to mean cell death with swelling. Oncosis leads to necrosis with karyolysis and stands in contrast to apoptosis, which leads to necrosis with karyorhexis and cell shrinkage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856735

  15. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:25676469

  16. Effect of bevacizumab on radiation necrosis of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Javier; Kumar, Ashok J.; Conrad, Charles A.; Levin, Victor A. . E-mail: vlevin@mdanderson.org

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Because blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from reaching leaky capillaries is a logical strategy for the treatment of radiation necrosis, we reasoned that bevacizumab might be an effective treatment of radiation necrosis. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients with malignant brain tumors were treated with bevacizumab or bevacizumab combination for their tumor on either a 5 mg/kg/2-week or 7.5 mg/kg/3-week schedule. Radiation necrosis was diagnosed in 8 of these patients on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and biopsy. MRI studies were obtained before treatment and at 6-week to 8-week intervals. Results: Of the 8 patients with radiation necrosis, posttreatment MRI performed an average of 8.1 weeks after the start of bevacizumab therapy showed a reduction in all 8 patients in both the MRI fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) abnormalities and T1-weighted post-Gd-contrast abnormalities. The average area change in the T1-weighted post-Gd-contrast abnormalities was 48% ({+-}22 SD), and the average change in the FLAIR images was 60% ({+-}18 SD). The average reduction in daily dexamethasone requirements was 8.6 mg ({+-}3.6). Conclusion: Bevacizumab, alone and in combination with other agents, can reduce radiation necrosis by decreasing capillary leakage and the associated brain edema. Our findings will need to be confirmed in a randomized trial to determine the optimal duration of treatment.

  17. Necroptosis: a potential, promising target and switch in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Qu, Feng-Zhi; Li, Le; Lv, Jia-Chen; Sun, Bei

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell death is the major pathophysiological change in early acute pancreatitis (AP), and the death modalities are important factors determining its progression and prognosis. During AP, acinar cells undergo two major modes of death, including necrosis and apoptosis. Acinar necrosis can lead to intensely local and systemic inflammatory responses, which both induce and aggravate the lesion. Necrosis has long been considered an unregulated, and passive cell death process. Since the effective interventions of necrosis are difficult to perform, its relevant studies have not received adequate attention. Necroptosis is a newly discovered cell death modality characterized by both necrosis and apoptosis, i.e., it is actively regulated by special genes, while has the typical morphological features of necrosis. Currently, necroptosis is gradually becoming an important topic in the fields of inflammatory diseases. The preliminary results from necroptosis in AP have confirmed the existence of acinar cell necroptosis, which may be a potential target for effectively regulating inflammatory injuries and improving its outcomes; however, the functional changes and mechanisms of necroptosis still require further investigation. This article reviewed the progress of necroptosis in AP to provide a reference for deeply understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of AP and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:26514558

  18. Chemical regulation of signaling pathways to programmed necrosis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Hyun; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Young Sik

    2014-06-01

    Necroptosis is an active and well-orchestrated necrosis, distinctive from apoptosis in microscopic structure, and biochemical and molecular features. Unlike apoptosis-undergoing cells, which are removed by macrophage or neighboring cells, necrotic cell death releases danger signals and provokes inflammation, and further a severe damage to neighbor tissue. A regulated necrosis, termed as necroptosis or programmed necrosis, is emerging as a new paradigm of cell death that can be activated when apoptotic machinery is genetically or pathogenically defective. It plays biological significances in pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory diseases as well as in a beneficial innate immune defense mechanism. This review highlights the identification of hits against necroptosis, and comprehensive approaches to discovery of small molecules that regulate necroptotic cell death. Also, the signaling molecular mechanism of necroptosis and future clinical uses of necroptosis inhibitor will be described in brief. PMID:24715577

  19. Scintigraphic study of propylthiouracil induced submassive hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Thakur, R

    1995-02-01

    Drug induced hepatitis is a rare complication of thiourea antithyroid drugs. In some patients, the hepatotoxicity may be severe and lead to submassive hepatic necrosis (SHN). Submassive hepatic necrosis is a potentially fatal complication which is usually recognized on the liver biopsy and histological examination or autopsy. In the case presented here, SHN was identified on Tc-99m SC liver images. Sharply defined intrahepatic photopenic abnormalities without significant colloid shift were noted. SPECT images were most remarkable and exhibited extensive liver necrosis. Resolution of hepatic abnormalities correlated with clinical and biochemical resolution of SHN. In patients with propylthiouracil hepatotoxicity, serial liver SPECT images with Tc-99m SC appear helpful for the diagnosis and follow up of SHN and, in an appropriate clinical context, may obviate the need for liver biopsy. PMID:7720304

  20. Conjunctival Necrosis and Scleritis Following Subtenon Triamcinolone Acetonide Injection

    PubMed Central

    Eslampour, Alireza; Abrishami, Mojtaba; Tafaghodi, Somaye

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to report a case of conjunctival necrosis and scleritis due to a subtenon injection of triamcinolone acetonate. A 15-year-old boy received a subtenon injection of triamcinolone acetonate after a pars plana vitrectomy due to an intraocular foreign body. Seven days later, conjunctival necrosis and scleritis appeared at the site of injection. No improvement was seen after seven days of conservative treatment, and necrotic tissue debridement was performed. Within one week the conjunctiva cleared. Conjunctival necrosis and scleritis are rare complications of periocular corticosteroid injections, but an early diagnosis can be very valuable. Improper dosage and injection site of corticosteroids with insufficient prophylactic antibiotics are predisposing factors. If conservative treatment is not sufficient, debridement should be considered as a potential critical treatment option. PMID:24396585

  1. [Treatment of early stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Zhu, He-Yu; Zhu, Bing

    2012-07-01

    Avascular necrosis is a progressively devastating disease and primarily affects weight-bearing joints. The hip is the most commonly affected joint. In early stage, nonoperative (including pharmacologic intervention and biophysical treatments) and operative modalities for protecting hip joint have become the main therapeutic methods. However there is still no satisfied mothod with reasonable effect. According to the treatment of the avascular necrosis of the femoral head of the pre-collapse stage, core decompression with modification of technique is still one of the safest and most commonly employed procedures. Recently there have been attempts to enhance the effect of core decompression with use of various growth and differentiation factors. Which is the hot spot of current research. Early diagnosis is the key to the treatment of the avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Comprehensive treatment which is based on the core decompression is still the main treatment of today. PMID:23116002

  2. Cannabinoids act as necrosis-inducing factors in Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Sugawa, Chitomi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Cannabis sativa is well known to produce unique secondary metabolites called cannabinoids. We recently discovered that Cannabis leaves induce cell death by secreting tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into leaf tissues. Examinations using isolated Cannabis mitochondria demonstrated that THCA causes mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) though opening of MPT pores, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction (the important feature of necrosis). Although Ca2+ is known to cause opening of animal MPT pores, THCA directly opened Cannabis MPT pores in the absence of Ca2+. Based on these results, we conclude that THCA has the ability to induce necrosis though MPT in Cannabis leaves, independently of Ca2+. We confirmed that other cannabinoids (cannabidiolic acid and cannabigerolic acid) also have MPT-inducing activity similar to that of THCA. Moreover, mitochondria of plants which do not produce cannabinoids were shown to induce MPT by THCA treatment, thus suggesting that many higher plants may have systems to cause THCA-dependent necrosis. PMID:19704450

  3. Cannabinoids act as necrosis-inducing factors in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Sugawa, Chitomi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-12-01

    Cannabis sativa is well known to produce unique secondary metabolites called cannabinoids. We recently discovered that Cannabis leaves induce cell death by secreting tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into leaf tissues. Examinations using isolated Cannabis mitochondria demonstrated that THCA causes mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) though opening of MPT pores, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction (the important feature of necrosis). Although Ca(2+) is known to cause opening of animal MPT pores, THCA directly opened Cannabis MPT pores in the absence of Ca(2+). Based on these results, we conclude that THCA has the ability to induce necrosis though MPT in Cannabis leaves, independently of Ca(2+). We confirmed that other cannabinoids (cannabidiolic acid and cannabigerolic acid) also have MPT-inducing activity similar to that of THCA. Moreover, mitochondria of plants which do not produce cannabinoids were shown to induce MPT by THCA treatment, thus suggesting that many higher plants may have systems to cause THCA-dependent necrosis. PMID:19704450

  4. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  5. A new geographic and host record for infectious pancreatic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parisot, T.J.; Yasutake, W.T.; Bressler, V.

    1963-01-01

    The occurrence of infectious pancreatic necrosis in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), and cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) has been experimentally authenticated for the first time in the western United States. The cutthroat trout represents a new host. Brook trout fin tissue culture inoculated with bacteria-free filtrate from the diseased fish tissue showed marked degenerative changes after 24 hours. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), kokanee (O. nerka), and silver salmon (O. kisutch) were not susceptible to the virus when inoculated. Histologically, extensive pancreatic necrosis was observed in the original and experimental materials, but striated muscle hyalinization was detected only in the original material.

  6. [Changes in the management of acute pancreatitis as related to its pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Bodnár, Zoltán

    2005-03-13

    Although acute pancreatitis runs a benign self limiting course in 80% of cases, acute necrotizing form of it still remained a severe disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Severity assessment thus plays an important role in identifying patients with high risk of local and/or systemic complications. Locally, development of necrosis especially if it becomes infected accounts for high mortality, but systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) following necrosis further increases the risk of fatal outcome. Several scoring systems, contrast-enhanced CT scan can help to recognize patients requiring early intensive management. Prophylactic systemic antibiotic treatment and nasojejunal feeding improves prognosis by decreasing the gut derived infection of necrosis. CT guided fine needle aspiration sample must be cultured to detect infection. Conservative therapy should be continued while necrosis remains sterile, but surgical and/or CT guided percutaneous catheter drainage is mandatory when infected necrosis developed. Results of therapeutic influence on the proinflammatory cytokine cascade in acute pancreatitis are still controversial. Enteral feeding seems to be the only proven tool in attenuating acute phase response and improving disease severity. PMID:15813188

  7. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  8. DNA methylation: potential biomarker in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world and it is often associated with poor prognosis. Liver transplantation and resection are two currently available curative therapies. However, most patients cannot be treated with such therapies due to late diagnosis. This underscores the urgent need to identify potential markers that ensure early diagnosis of HCC. As more evidences are suggesting that epigenetic changes contribute hepatocarcinogenesis, DNA methylation was poised as one promising biomarker. Indeed, genome wide profiling reveals that aberrant methylation is frequent event in HCC. Many studies showed that differentially methylated genes and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status in HCC were associated with clinicopathological data. Some commonly studied hypermethylated genes include p16, SOCS1, GSTP1 and CDH1. In addition, studies have also revealed that methylation markers could be detected in patient blood samples and associated with poor prognosis of the disease. Undeniably, increasing number of methylation markers are being discovered through high throughput genome wide data in recent years. Proper and systematic validation of these candidate markers in prospective cohort is required so that their actual prognostication and surveillance value could be accurately determined. It is hope that in near future, methylation marker could be translate into clinical use, where patients at risk could be diagnosed early and that the progression of disease could be more correctly assessed. PMID:24635883

  9. Liver-Directed Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Florence K.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to increase world-wide. Many patients present with advanced disease with extensive local tumor or vascular invasion and are not candidates for traditionally curative therapies such as orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or resection. Radiotherapy (RT) was historically limited by its inability to deliver a tumoricidal dose; however, modern RT techniques have prompted renewed interest in the use of liver-directed RT to treat patients with primary hepatic malignancies. Summary The aim of this review was to discuss the use of external beam RT in the treatment of HCC, with particular focus on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We review the intricacies of SBRT treatment planning and delivery. Liver-directed RT involves accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. We also summarize the published data on liver-directed RT, and demonstrate that it is associated with excellent local control and survival rates, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Key Messages Modern liver-directed RT is safe and effective for the treatment of HCC, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Liver-directed RT, including SBRT, depends on accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. Further prospective studies are needed to fully delineate the role of liver-directed RT in the treatment of HCC. PMID:27493895

  10. Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shibo; Hoffmann, Katrin; Schemmer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies, with an increasing incidence. With advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation and the development of molecular-target drugs, a number of potentially curative treatments have become available. Management of HCC patients depends on the stage of their tumor. Liver resection remains the first choice for very early-stage HCC, but it is being challenged by local ablative therapy. For early-stage HCC that meet the Milan criteria, liver transplantation still offers a better outcome; however, local ablative therapy can be a substitute when transplantation is not feasible. Local ablation is also used as a bridging therapy toward liver transplantation. HCC recurrence is the main obstacle to successful treatment, and there is currently no effective means of preventing or treating HCC recurrence. Transarterial therapy is considered suitable for intermediate-stage HCC, while sorafenib is recommended for advanced-stage HCC. This stage-based approach to therapy not only provides acceptable outcomes but also improves the quality of life of HCC patients. Because of the complexity of HCC, therapeutic approaches must be adapted according to the characteristics of each individual patient. This review discusses the current standards and trends in the treatment of HCC. PMID:24159579

  11. Problem of hepatocellular carcinoma in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ladep, Nimzing G; Lesi, Olufunmilayo A; Mark, Pantong; Lemoine, Maud; Onyekwere, Charles; Afihene, Mary; Crossey, Mary ME; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is known to be high in West Africa with an approximate yearly mortality rate of 200000. Several factors are responsible for this. Early acquisition of risk factors; with vertical or horizontal transmission of hepatitis B (HBV), environmental food contaminants (aflatoxins), poor management of predisposing risk factors and poorly-managed strategies for health delivery. There has been a low uptake of childhood immunisation for hepatitis B in many West African countries. Owing to late presentations, most sufferers of HCC die within weeks of their diagnosis. Highlighted reasons for the specific disease pattern of HCC in West Africa include: (1) high rate of risk factors; (2) failure to identify at risk populations; (3) lack of effective treatment; and (4) scarce resources for timely diagnosis. This is contrasted to the developed world, which generally has sufficient resources to detect cases early for curative treatment. Provision of palliative care for HCC patients is limited by availability and affordability of potent analgesics. Regional efforts, as well as collaborative networking activities hold promise that could change the epidemiology of HCC in West Africa. PMID:25429316

  12. Aflatoxins, hepatocellular carcinoma and public health

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Arvin; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide, primarily affecting populations in the developing countries. Aflatoxin, a food contaminant produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, is a known human carcinogen that has been shown to be a causative agent in the pathogenesis of HCC. Aflatoxin can affect a wide range of food commodities including corns, oilseeds, spices, and tree nuts as well as milk, meat, and dried fruit. Many factors affect the growth of Aspergillus fungi and the level of aflatoxin contamination in food. Drought stress is one of the factors that increase susceptibility of plants to Aspergillus and thus aflatoxin contamination. A recent drought is thought to be responsible for finding of trace amounts of aflatoxin in some of the corn harvested in the United States. Although it’s too soon to know whether aflatoxin will be a significant problem, since United States is the world’s largest corn producer and exporter, this has raised alarm bells. Strict regulations and testing of finished foods and feeds in the United States should prevent a major health scare, and prevent human exposure to deleterious levels of aflatoxin. Unfortunately, such regulations and testing are not in place in many countries. The purpose of this editorial is to summarize the current knowledge on association of aflatoxin and HCC, encourage future research and draw attention to this global public health issue. PMID:23539499

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma: modern image-guided therapies.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Sapna; Patel, Rafiuddin; Yap, Ki Sing; Patel, Jai; Wah, Tze; Snoddon, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The most common primary malignancy of the liver and the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which presents a major global health problem due to its increasing incidence. Most cases of HCC are secondary to either infection (hepatitis B or C) or cirrhosis (alcohol being the most common cause). Clinical presentation is variable and the tumour can be an incidental finding. Treatment options for HCC and prognosis are dependent on many factors but most importantly tumour size and staging. The last two decades have revolutionised the treatment of HCC using image-guided techniques. The concepts of imaging and image-guided techniques are still young and not well described in standard textbooks and hence an up to date review article is essential. The clinical subspecialities may lack familiarity with image-guided techniques but are responsible for management of these patients before and after the treatment by interventional radiologists. This article reviews current image-guided techniques, evidence and outcomes and provides educational highlights and question and answers. The article provides an overview in a simple understandable manner to enable readers from various levels of practice and training to benefit from and apply in their practice. PMID:26787919

  14. Diagnostic and therapeutic management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bellissimo, Francesco; Pinzone, Marilia Rita; Cacopardo, Bruno; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an increasing health problem, representing the second cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The major risk factor for HCC is cirrhosis. In developing countries, viral hepatitis represent the major risk factor, whereas in developed countries, the epidemic of obesity, diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis contribute to the observed increase in HCC incidence. Cirrhotic patients are recommended to undergo HCC surveillance by abdominal ultrasounds at 6-mo intervals. The current diagnostic algorithms for HCC rely on typical radiological hallmarks in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, while the use of α-fetoprotein as an independent tool for HCC surveillance is not recommended by current guidelines due to its low sensitivity and specificity. Early diagnosis is crucial for curative treatments. Surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation and liver transplantation are considered the cornerstones of curative therapy, while for patients with more advanced HCC recommended options include sorafenib and trans-arterial chemo-embolization. A multidisciplinary team, consisting of hepatologists, surgeons, radiologists, oncologists and pathologists, is fundamental for a correct management. In this paper, we review the diagnostic and therapeutic management of HCC, with a focus on the most recent evidences and recommendations from guidelines. PMID:26576088

  15. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Coakley, F V; Schwartz, L H

    2001-10-01

    Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is complicated because the tumor has a varied radiologic appearance and frequently coexists with cirrhotic regenerative and dysplastic nodules. In cirrhotic patients, any dominant solid nodule that is not clearly a hemangioma should be considered a HCC until proven otherwise, especially if the lesion is hypervascular, of high T2 signal intensity, or demonstrates venous invasion. Biopsy of HCC in cirrhosis is risky and surveillance is often preferable. The doubling time of HCC is 1 to 12 months, and a nodule that is stable over 4 months is very unlikely to be a HCC. However, stable nodules cannot be dismissed, since livers containing dysplastic nodules are at high risk to develop HCC. In noncirrhotic patients, any solid mass that is not clearly a hemangioma or focal nodular hyperplasia is potentially a HCC, and biopsy may be required. Venous invasion by tumor should be distinguished from bland thrombus. Imaging detection of nodal metastases is limited by the frequent finding of benign reactive lymphadenopathy in cirrhosis. Resection is the preferred treatment for HCC, but is contraindicated in the presence of tumors in both lobes, major venous invasion, invasion of adjacent organs other than the gallbladder, tumor rupture, nodal metastases, or distant metastases. PMID:11685739

  16. Interventional treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Murata, Satoru; Mine, Takahiko; Sugihara, Fumie; Yasui, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hidenori; Ueda, Tatsuo; Onozawa, Shiro; Kumita, Shin-ichiro

    2014-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The Barcelona clinic liver cancer classification is the current standard classification system for the clinical management of patients with HCC and suggests that patients with intermediate-stage HCC benefit from transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Interventional treatments such as TACE, balloon-occluded TACE, drug-eluting bead embolization, radioembolization, and combined therapies including TACE and radiofrequency ablation, continue to evolve, resulting in improved patient prognosis. However, patients with advanced-stage HCC typically receive only chemotherapy with sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor, or palliative and conservative therapy. Most patients receive palliative or conservative therapy only, and approximately 50% of patients with HCC are candidates for systemic therapy. However, these patients require therapy that is more effective than sorafenib or conservative treatment. Several researchers try to perform more effective therapies, such as combined therapies (TACE with radiotherapy and sorafenib with TACE), modified TACE for HCC with arterioportal or arteriohepatic vein shunts, TACE based on hepatic hemodynamics, and isolated hepatic perfusion. This review summarizes the published data and data on important ongoing studies concerning interventional treatments for unresectable HCC and discusses the technical improvements in these interventions, particularly for advanced-stage HCC. PMID:25309076

  17. Cellular reprogramming and hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Wen; Nie, Yun-Zhong; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2013-12-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and is also the leading cause of death worldwide. Studies have shown that cellular reprogramming contributes to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance and the recurrence of cancers. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest findings in the area of cellular reprogramming in HCC. The aberrant expression of transcription factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, c-MYC, NANOG, and LIN28 have been also observed, and the expression of these transcription factors is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in HCC. Studies indicate that cellular reprogramming may play a critical role in the occurrence and recurrence of HCC. Recent reports have shown that DNA methylation, miRNAs, tumor microenvironment, and signaling pathways can induce the expression of stemness transcription factors, which leads to cellular reprogramming in HCC. Furthermore, studies indicate that therapies based on cellular reprogramming could revolutionize HCC treatment. Finally, a novel therapeutic concept is discussed: reprogramming control therapy. A potential reprogramming control therapy method could be developed based on the reprogramming demonstrated in HCC studies and applied at two opposing levels: differentiation and reprogramming. Our increasing understanding and control of cellular programming should facilitate the exploitation of this novel therapeutic concept and its application in clinical HCC treatment, which may represent a promising strategy in the future that is not restricted to liver cancer. PMID:24379607

  18. Current and future treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlachterman, Alexander; Craft Jr, Willie W; Hilgenfeldt, Eric; Mitra, Avir; Cabrera, Roniel

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a unique challenge for physicians and patients. There is no definitively curative treatment. Rather, many treatment and management modalities exist with differing advantages and disadvantages. Both current guidelines and individual patient concerns must be taken into account in order to properly manage HCC. In addition, quality of life issues are particularly complex in patients with HCC and these concerns must also be factored into treatment strategies. Thus, considering all the options and their various pros and cons can quickly become complex for both clinicians and patients. In this review, we systematically discuss the current treatment modalities available for HCC, detailing relevant clinical data, risks and rewards and overall outcomes for each approach. Surgical options discussed include resection, transplantation and ablation. We also discuss the radiation modalities: conformal radiotherapy, yttrium 90 microspheres and proton and heavy ion radiotherapy. The biologic agent Sorafenib is discussed as a promising new approach, and recent clinical trials are reviewed. We then detail currently described molecular pathways implicated in the initiation and progression of HCC, and we explore the potential of each pathway as an avenue for drug exploitation. We hope this comprehensive and forward-looking review enables both clinicians and patients to understand various options and thereby make more informed decisions regarding this disease. PMID:26229392

  19. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (<5 cm) owing to surveillance programmes in high-risk patients. For these cases, curative therapies such as resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  20. Transplant benefit for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Alessandro; Volk, Michael; Cillo, Umberto

    2013-12-28

    Although liver transplantation is theoretically the best treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is limited by the realities of perioperative complications, and the shortage of donor organs. Furthermore, in many cases there are available alternative treatments such as resection or locoregional therapy. Deciding upon the best option for a patient with HCC is complicated, involving numerous ethical principles including: urgency, utility, intention-to-treat survival, transplant benefit, harm to candidates on waiting list, and harm to living donors. The potential contrast between different principles is particularly relevant for patients with HCC for several reasons: (1) HCC candidates to liver transplantation are increasing; (2) the great prognostic heterogeneity within the HCC population; (3) in HCC patients tumor progression before liver transplantation may significantly impair post transplant outcome; and (4) effective alternative therapies are often available for HCC candidates to liver transplantation. In this paper we suggest that allocating organs by transplant benefit could help balance these competing principles, and also introduce equity between patients with HCC and nonmalignant liver disease. We also propose a triangular equipoise model to help decide between deceased donor liver transplantation, living donor liver transplantation, or alternative therapies. PMID:24409046

  1. [Inspection of guidelines for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Arii, Shigeki

    2010-04-01

    An evidence-based clinical guideline for diagnosing and treating hepatocellular carcinoma patients was published in 2005, based on 7,118 original English papers(published between 1966-2002)and edited by the executive members of the Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan (Chief Editor, Professor M. Makuuchi, MD). These were composed of 58 clinical questions which covered prevention, surveillance, diagnosis, surgery, transplantation, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chemoembolization and ablation therapy. The surveys investigating the validity and usefulness of this guideline revealed that it is well worked out and considered useful by medical practitioners. This guideline changed the therapeutic strategy of 20% of the experts. However, 43% of experts and 30% of non experts believed that this guideline restricted their medical discretion. Moreover, the percentage of medical practitioners who felt that medical malpractice suits would increase exceeded those who did not. A revised 2009 version was published based on the evaluation of 2,950 original papers (published between 2002-2007). Major revisions were not made, but clinical questions and scientific statements were updated. However, this version of the guideline does not provide clear recommendations in about 40% of the clinical questions because of lack of evidence. The guideline must be utilized based on an appropriate understanding of medical science and medical practice, and not on dogmatism. PMID:20414014

  2. Survivin in survival of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Su, Changqing

    2016-09-01

    Survivin is an anti-apoptotic protein belonging to the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. It is involved in the regulation of important physiological and pathological processes in cells and functions to inhibit cell apoptosis and promote cell proliferation. Normally and terminally differentiated tissues are nearly negative for survivin. In contrast, survivin is highly expressed in most human tumor tissues, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The abnormal overexpression of survivin is closely related to the malignant biological behaviors of tumors. During the development and progression of HCC, the high level of survivin expression promotes cancer cell proliferation, inhibits cancer cell apoptosis, induces tumor stromal angiogenesis, reduces the sensitivity of cancer cells to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and ultimately affects the prognosis of patients with HCC. Survivin expression is regulated by a large number of factors. The latest discovery indicated that the transcription factor octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) enhances the expression of survivin though cyclin D1 (CCND1), which, in part, accounts for tumor cell proliferation, recurrence and metastasis. Survivin plays key roles in HCC, which renders it an ideal target for the treatment of HCC. The present article reviews the research progress on the relationship between survivin and HCC and on the HCC treatment strategies targeting survivin. PMID:26118774

  3. Biological features and biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Saito, Tomoko; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tawada, Akinobu; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Similar to other cancers, a multistep process of carcinogenesis is observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although the mechanisms underlying the development of HCC have been investigated in terms of oncology, virology, and stem cell biology, the whole picture of hepatocarcinogenesis remains to be elucidated. Recent progress in molecular biology has provided clues to the underlying cause of various diseases. In particular, sequencing technologies, such as whole genome and exome sequencing analyses, have made an impact on genomic research on a variety of cancers including HCC. Comprehensive genomic analyses have detected numerous abnormal genetic alterations, such as mutations and copy number alterations. Based on these findings, signaling pathways and cancer-related genes involved in hepatocarcinogenesis could be analyzed in detail. Simultaneously, a number of novel biomarkers, both from tissue and blood samples, have been recently reported. These biomarkers have been successfully applied to early diagnosis and prognostic prediction of patients with HCC. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in molecular cancer research on HCC and explain the biological features and novel biomarkers. PMID:26261691

  4. Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: beyond international guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sangiovanni, Angelo; Colombo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is guided by the tumour stage. The Barcelona clinical liver cancer (BCLC) score endorsed by the European Society of the Liver EASL divides patients into five prognostic categories, each with a distinct treatment indication. Hepatic resection, orthotopic liver transplantation and percutaneous local ablation are strongly indicated in accurately selected patients with very early (BCLC 0) and early stage (BCLC A) tumours providing a survival rate of between 50 and 75% at year five. In patients with a large tumour burden such as those with intermediate stage BCLC B, repeated treatments with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) are advocated with clinical benefits (from 16 to 22 months). Survival may also improve in patients who are in poor condition or who do not respond to TACE and those with an advanced HCC (BCLC C), following oral therapy with the multikinase inhibitor, sorafenib. However, most recommendations are based on uncontrolled studies and expert opinions rather than well-designed controlled trials, and up to one-third of patients do not fit recommendations because of advanced age, the presence of significant comorbidities or a strategic location of the nodule. For these patients, treatment of HCC beyond guidelines is often advocated. PMID:26725909

  5. Percutaneous Local Ablative Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W. Y.; Leung, Thomas W. T.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Ho, Stephen K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review and compare treatment result for percutaneous local ablative therapy (PLAT) with surgical resection in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Summary Background Data PLAT is indicated for small unresectable HCC localized to the liver. From the use of ethanol to the latest technology of radiofrequency ablation, ablative techniques have been refined and their role in the management of HCC established. This review aims to give an overview of various ablative methods, including their efficacy, indications, and limitations, and also tries to look into the future of clinical trials in PLAT. Methods The authors reviewed recent papers in the English medical literature about the use of local ablative therapy for HCC. Focus was given to the results of treatment in terms of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival, and to compare treatment results with those of surgery. Results PLAT for small HCC (<5 cm) with thermal ablation (radiofrequency ablation or microwave coagulation) can achieve effective local control of disease and is superior to ethanol injection. Progressive disease in untreated areas is a common reason for failure. Overall progression-free survival is similar to that of surgical resection. Conclusions Thermal ablation gives good local control of small HCC, is superior to ethanol, and may be comparable to surgical resection in long-term outcome. PMID:12560774

  6. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Yasunori; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ablation therapy is one of the best curative treatment options for malignant liver tumors, and can be an alternative to resection. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and secondary liver cancers can be performed safely using percutaneous, laparoscopic, or open surgical techniques, and RFA has markedly changed the treatment strategy for small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Percutaneous RFA can achieve the same overall and disease-free survival as surgical resection for patients with small HCC. The use of a laparoscopic or open approach allows repeated placements of RFA electrodes at multiple sites to ablate larger tumors. RFA combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization will make the treatment of larger tumors a clinically viable treatment alternative. However, an accurate evaluation of treatment response is very important to secure successful RFA therapy. Since a sufficient safety margin (at least 0.5 cm) can prevent local tumor recurrences, an accurate evaluation of treatment response is very important to secure successful RFA therapy. To minimize complications of RFA, clinicians should be familiar with the imaging features of each type of complication. Appropriate management of complications is essential for successful RFA treatment. PMID:21179308

  7. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Borzio, Mauro; Dionigi, Elena; Parisi, Giancarlo; Raguzzi, Ivana; Sacco, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Mean age of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients has been progressively increasing over the last decades and ageing of these patients is becoming a real challenge in every day clinical practice. Unfortunately, international guidelines on HCC management do not address this problem exhaustively and do not provide any specific recommendation. We carried out a literature search in MEDLINE database for studies reporting on epidemiology, clinical characteristics and treatment outcome of HCC in elderly patients. Available data seem to indicate that in elderly patients the outcome of HCC is mostly influenced by liver function and tumor stage rather than by age and the latter should not influence treatment allocation. Age is not a risk for resection and older patients with resectable HCC and good liver function could gain benefit from surgery. Mild comorbidities do not seem a contraindication for surgery in aged patients. Conversely, major resection in elderly, even when performed in experienced high-volume centres, should be avoided. Both percutaneous ablation and transarterial chemoembolization are not contraindicated in aged patients and safety profile of these procedures is acceptable. Sorafenib is a viable option for advanced HCC in elderly provided that a careful evaluation of concomitant comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular ones, is taken into account. Available data seem to suggest that in either elderly and younger, treatment is a main predictor of outcome. Consequently, a nihilistic attitude of physicians towards under- or no-treatment of aged patients should not be longer justified. PMID:26085911

  8. Interventional treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Satoru; Mine, Takahiko; Sugihara, Fumie; Yasui, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hidenori; Ueda, Tatsuo; Onozawa, Shiro; Kumita, Shin-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The Barcelona clinic liver cancer classification is the current standard classification system for the clinical management of patients with HCC and suggests that patients with intermediate-stage HCC benefit from transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Interventional treatments such as TACE, balloon-occluded TACE, drug-eluting bead embolization, radioembolization, and combined therapies including TACE and radiofrequency ablation, continue to evolve, resulting in improved patient prognosis. However, patients with advanced-stage HCC typically receive only chemotherapy with sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor, or palliative and conservative therapy. Most patients receive palliative or conservative therapy only, and approximately 50% of patients with HCC are candidates for systemic therapy. However, these patients require therapy that is more effective than sorafenib or conservative treatment. Several researchers try to perform more effective therapies, such as combined therapies (TACE with radiotherapy and sorafenib with TACE), modified TACE for HCC with arterioportal or arteriohepatic vein shunts, TACE based on hepatic hemodynamics, and isolated hepatic perfusion. This review summarizes the published data and data on important ongoing studies concerning interventional treatments for unresectable HCC and discusses the technical improvements in these interventions, particularly for advanced-stage HCC. PMID:25309076

  9. Liver resection for intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Peng-Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ji-Tong; Xu, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system is regarded as the gold standard staging system for HCC, classifying HCC as early, intermediate, or advanced. For intermediate HCC, trans-catheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is recommended as the optimal strategy by the BCLC guideline. This review investigates whether liver resection is better than TACE for intermediate HCC. Based on published studies, we compare the survival benefits and complications of liver resection and TACE for intermediate HCC. We also compare the survival benefits of liver resection in early and intermediate HCC. We find that liver resection can achieve better or at least comparable survival outcomes compared with TACE for intermediate HCC; however, we do not observe a significant difference between liver resection and TACE in terms of safety and morbidity. We conclude that liver resection may improve the short- and long-term survival of carefully selected intermediate HCC patients, and the procedure may be safely performed in the management of intermediate HCC. PMID:27190577

  10. Diabetes mellitus and metformin in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Koji; Iwama, Hisakazu; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Tani, Joji; Oura, Kyoko; Tadokoro, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Teppei; Nomura, Takako; Morishita, Asahiro; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Diabetes mellitus, a risk factor for cancer, is also globally endemic. The clinical link between these two diseases has been the subject of investigation for a century, and diabetes mellitus has been established as a risk factor for HCC. Accordingly, metformin, a first-line oral anti-diabetic, was first proposed as a candidate anti-cancer agent in 2005 in a cohort study in Scotland. Several subsequent large cohort studies and randomized controlled trials have not demonstrated significant efficacy for metformin in suppressing HCC incidence and mortality in diabetic patients; however, two recent randomized controlled trials have reported positive data for the tumor-preventive potential of metformin in non-diabetic subjects. The search for biological links between cancer and diabetes has revealed intracellular pathways that are shared by cancer and diabetes. The signal transduction mechanisms by which metformin suppresses carcinogenesis in cell lines or xenograft tissues and improves chemoresistance in cancer stem cells have also been elucidated. This review addresses the clinical and biological links between HCC and diabetes mellitus and the anti-cancer activity of metformin in clinical studies and basic experiments. PMID:27468203

  11. Synchronous Hepatic Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Hadjittofi, Christopher; Luong, Tu Vinh; O’Beirne, James; Sharma, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We would like to report the first case in English literature, to the best of our knowledge, of a synchronous hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as well as to address the current trends and challenges in the management of HEHE. An otherwise well 58-year-old man was referred to his local hepatology service with elevated serum γ-GT levels. Imaging revealed bilobar liver lesions consistent with HEHE, a discrete left lobe lesion suspected as HCC, and multiple pulmonary nodules. Biopsies confirmed HEHE with pulmonary metastases. After multidisciplinary team discussions, the patient was admitted under our team and underwent an uneventful laparoscopic left lateral hepatectomy for suspected HCC, which was confirmed histologically. As part of a watch-and-wait approach to metastatic HEHE, in the first follow-up (3 months postoperatively) the patient was clinically fine and the surveillance CT scan did not show recurrent disease. By presenting this case, we aim to raise awareness that this rare entity can coexist with others, potentially complicating their management. PMID:26313777

  12. Hepatocellular carcinoma: clinical frontiers and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bruix, Jordi; Gores, Gregory J; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death and is currently the main event leading to death in patients with cirrhosis. Evolving information suggests that the metabolic syndrome with non-alcoholic liver disease may be an important cause of HCC in addition to viral hepatitis and alcohol-induced liver disease. The molecular pathogenesis is extremely complex and heterogeneous. To date the molecular information has not impacted on treatment decisions. Periodic surveillance imaging of patients with cirrhosis is widely practiced, especially because diagnostic, radiographic criteria for early-stage HCC have been defined (including nodules between 1 and 2 cm) and effective treatment is available for tumours detected at an early stage. Worldwide the approach to resection versus transplantation varies depending upon local resources, expertise and donor availability. The criteria for transplantation are discussed, and the controversial areas highlighted with evidence-based recommendations provided. Several approaches are available for intermediate stage disease, including radiofrequency ablation, transarterial chemoembolisation and radioembolisation; the rationale for these therapies is buttressed by appropriate outcome-based studies. For advanced disease, systemic therapy with sorafenib remains the option best supported by current data. Thus, while several trials have failed to improve the benefits of established therapies, studies assessing the sequential or combined application of those already known to be beneficial are needed. Also, new concepts are provided in regards to selecting and stratifying patients for second-line studies, which may help explain the failure of prior studies. PMID:24531850

  13. Nonsurgical therapies for hepatocellular and cholangiocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schmassmann, A

    1999-01-01

    Surgical resection is the first choice of treatment for patients with hepatocellular (HCC) and cholangiocellular carcinomas. Prolongation of survival is, however, the only realistic goal for most patients, which can be often achieved by nonsurgical therapies. Inoperable patients with large or multiple HCCs are usually treated with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with lipiodol in combination with a chemotherapeutic drug and gelfoam. Three-year survival depends on the stage of the disease and is about 20%. Patients with earlier tumor stages (one or two tumor nodules less than 3 cm in size) are suitable for treatment with percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) alone or in combination with TACE. Several studies have shown that in these early stages, the 3-year survival rate is approximately 55%-70% in the actively treated patients which is significantly higher than in untreated patients. In advanced stages of the disease, TACE and PEI have no effect on survival and should not be performed. Some of these patients have been successfully treated with octreotide. Patients with inoperable cholangiocellular carcinoma are treated by endoscopic or percutaneous stent placement. If stenting does not achieve adequate biliary drainage, multidisciplinary therapy including internal/external radiotherapy or photodynamic therapy should be considered in patients with potential long-term survival. In conclusion, nonresectional therapies play an essential role in the therapy of inoperable hepato- and cholangiocellular carcinomas as they lead to satisfactory survival. Multidisciplinary therapy appears to be the current trend of management. PMID:10414182

  14. Hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Cemal; Niemeyer, David J; Iannitti, David A; Russo, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer worldwide and is rising in incidence. Ultrasound is the preferred modality for screening high-risk patients for HCC because it detects clinically significant nodules, widespread availability and lower cost. HCC does not require a biopsy for diagnosis if specific imaging criteria are fulfilled. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the most common modality used to treat HCC followed by ablation. Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is increasing in incidence and the second most common primary malignancy of the liver. There is no effective screening strategy for CCA although magnetic resonance imaging and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) are commonly used without proven benefit. Therapy for CCA is challenging and resection, when possible, is the mainstay of therapy. Gemcitabine in combination with cisplatin or biologics may offer a modest survival benefit. Liver transplantation for CCA is associated with reasonable survival in select cases. Molecular diagnostics offer the potential to develop personalized approaches in the management of HCC and CCA. PMID:24245910

  15. Surveillance and Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmorris, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important cause of cancer-related death worldwide. If the disease is detected early, the treatment is more likely to be curative. This article discusses the current evidence regarding the surveillance and diagnosis of HCC, focusing on recent articles and the recommendations of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), which are briefly compared with the recommendations of other liver disease organizations. HCC surveillance aims to detect disease at an early stage in order to augment the likelihood of curative treatment. According to AASLD recommendations, patients who have cirrhosis and those who do not have cirrhosis but are at high risk for HCC should be screened. Ultrasonogra-phy (USG) at 6-month intervals is recommended. The available serologic markers, including serum alpha-fetoprotein, are inadequate for surveillance, even when combined with USG. Despite achievements in HCC management, physicians continue to underutilize surveillance. Quadruple-phase, contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans or magnetic resonance images with characteristic radiologic findings are commonly used to diagnose HCC in suspicious cases. The available surveillance and diagnostic tests effectively identify HCC at an early stage, and as a result, the chances of cure are increased. Physicians caring for patients who have cirrhosis and chronic liver disease should be familiar with HCC surveillance recommendations and the prognostic importance of early diagnosis. PMID:27099571

  16. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  17. Senescence and immortality in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mehmet; Arslan-Ergul, Ayca; Bagislar, Sevgi; Senturk, Serif; Yuzugullu, Haluk

    2009-12-01

    Cellular senescence is a process leading to terminal growth arrest with characteristic morphological features. This process is mediated by telomere-dependent, oncogene-induced and ROS-induced pathways, but persistent DNA damage is the most common cause. Senescence arrest is mediated by p16(INK4a)- and p21(Cip1)-dependent pathways both leading to retinoblastoma protein (pRb) activation. p53 plays a relay role between DNA damage sensing and p21(Cip1) activation. pRb arrests the cell cycle by recruiting proliferation genes to facultative heterochromatin for permanent silencing. Replicative senescence that occurs in hepatocytes in culture and in liver cirrhosis is associated with lack of telomerase activity and results in telomere shortening. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells display inactivating mutations of p53 and epigenetic silencing of p16(INK4a). Moreover, they re-express telomerase reverse transcriptase required for telomere maintenance. Thus, senescence bypass and cellular immortality is likely to contribute significantly to HCC development. Oncogene-induced senescence in premalignant lesions and reversible immortality of cancer cells including HCC offer new potentials for tumor prevention and treatment. PMID:19070423

  18. Hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The interaction of HCV with its human host is complex and multilayered; stemming in part from the fact that HCV is a RNA virus with no ability to integrate in the host's genome. Direct and indirect mechanisms of HCV-induced HCC include activation of multiple host pathways such as liver fibrogenic pathways, cellular and survival pathways, interaction with the immune and metabolic systems. Host factors also play a major role in HCV-induced HCC as evidenced by genomic studies identifying polymorphisms in immune, metabolic, and growth signaling systems associated with increased risk of HCC. Despite highly effective direct-acting antiviral agents, the morbidity and incidence of liver-related complications of HCV, including HCC, is likely to persist in the near future. Clinical markers to selectively identify HCV subjects at higher risk of developing HCC have been reported however they require further validation, especially in subjects who have experienced sustained virological response. Molecular biomarkers allowing further refinement of HCC risk are starting to be implemented in clinical platforms, allowing objective stratification of risk and leading to individualized therapy and surveillance for HCV individuals. Another role for molecular biomarker-based stratification could be enrichment of HCC chemoprevention clinical trials leading to smaller sample size, shorter trial duration, and reduced costs. PMID:26157746

  19. Hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatitis B surface protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Wei; Yang, Feng-Cai; Lu, Hui-Qiong; Zhang, Jiong-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been widely studied. HBV envelope proteins are important for the structure and life cycle of HBV, and these proteins are useful for judging the natural disease course and guiding treatment. Truncated and mutated preS/S are produced by integrated viral sequences that are defective for replication. The preS/S mutants are considered “precursor lesions” of HCC. Different preS/S mutants induce various mechanisms of tumorigenesis, such as transactivation of transcription factors and an immune inflammatory response, thereby contributing to HCC. The preS2 mutants and type II “Ground Glass” hepatocytes represent novel biomarkers of HBV-associated HCC. The preS mutants may induce the unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum stress-dependent and stress-independent pathways. Treatments to inhibit hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and damage secondary to HBsAg or the preS/S mutants include antivirals and antioxidants, such as silymarin, resveratrol, and glycyrrhizin acid. Methods for the prevention and treatment of HCC should be comprehensive. PMID:26877602

  20. Aflatoxins, hepatocellular carcinoma and public health.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Arvin; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-03-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide, primarily affecting populations in the developing countries. Aflatoxin, a food contaminant produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, is a known human carcinogen that has been shown to be a causative agent in the pathogenesis of HCC. Aflatoxin can affect a wide range of food commodities including corns, oilseeds, spices, and tree nuts as well as milk, meat, and dried fruit. Many factors affect the growth of Aspergillus fungi and the level of aflatoxin contamination in food. Drought stress is one of the factors that increase susceptibility of plants to Aspergillus and thus aflatoxin contamination. A recent drought is thought to be responsible for finding of trace amounts of aflatoxin in some of the corn harvested in the United States. Although it's too soon to know whether aflatoxin will be a significant problem, since United States is the world's largest corn producer and exporter, this has raised alarm bells. Strict regulations and testing of finished foods and feeds in the United States should prevent a major health scare, and prevent human exposure to deleterious levels of aflatoxin. Unfortunately, such regulations and testing are not in place in many countries. The purpose of this editorial is to summarize the current knowledge on association of aflatoxin and HCC, encourage future research and draw attention to this global public health issue. PMID:23539499

  1. Chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the standard of care for nonsurgical patients with preserved liver function with large or multinodular noninvasive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) confined to the liver. The administration of an anticancer-in-oil emulsion followed by embolic agents is the most popular TACE technique; however, the introduction of embolic, drug-eluting beads (DEB) has provided an alternative to conventional regimens. Experimental studies have shown that DEB-TACE results in a safe pharmacokinetic profile and effective tumor killing in animal models. Clinical experiences have confirmed that DEB-TACE provides a combined ischemic and cytotoxic effect locally, with significantly reduced drug-related toxicity and liver toxicity compared with conventional TACE. The addition of molecular targeted drugs to the therapeutic armamentarium for HCC has prompted the design of clinical trials aimed at investigating the synergies between TACE and systemic treatments. Combining TACE with antiangiogenic agents represents a promising strategy because TACE is thought to cause local hypoxia, resulting in a temporary increase in levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. Recently, a large phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (the SPACE study) indicated that the concurrent administration of DEB-TACE and sorafenib has a manageable safety profile and suggested that the time to progression (TTP) and time to vascular invasion or extrahepatic spread may be improved compared with DEB-TACE alone. These data support the further evaluation of molecular targeted, systemically active agents in combination with DEB-TACE in a phase 3 setting. PMID:24159570

  2. Potentiality of immunotherapy against hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Sawada, Yu; Endo, Itaru; Uemura, Yasushi; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of primary liver cancer, is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Despite the high incidence, treatment options remain limited for advanced HCC, and as a result prognosis continues to be poor. Current therapeutic options, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, have only modest efficacy. New treatment modalities to prolong survival and to minimize the risk of adverse response are desperately needed for patients with advanced HCC. Tumor immunotherapy is a promising, novel treatment strategy that may lead to improvements in both treatment-associated toxicity and outcome. The strategies have developed in part through genomic studies that have yielded candidate target molecules and in part through basic biology studies that have defined the pathways and cell types regulating immune response. Here, we summarize the various types of HCC immunotherapy and argue that the newfound field of HCC immunotherapy might provide critical advantages in the effort to improve prognosis of patients with advanced HCC. Already several immunotherapies, such as tumor-associated antigen therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors and cell transfer immunotherapy, have demonstrated safety and feasibility in HCC patients. Unfortunately, immunotherapy currently has low efficacy in advanced stage HCC patients; overcoming this challenge will place immunotherapy at the forefront of HCC treatment, possibly in the near future. PMID:26420958

  3. Local-regional treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Local-regional treatments play a key role in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Image-guided tumor ablation is recommended in patients with early-stage HCC when surgical options are precluded and can replace resection in selected patients. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has shown superior anticancer effects and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials and is currently established as the standard method for local tumor treatment. Novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation, including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation, seem to have potential to overcome the limitations of RF ablation and warrant further clinical investigation. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the standard of care for patients with asymptomatic noninvasive multinodular tumors in intermediate-stage disease. Embolic microspheres that have the ability to release a drug in a controlled and sustained fashion have been shown to substantially increase the safety and efficacy of TACE in comparison to conventional ethiodized oil-based regimens. The available data for radioembolization with yttrium 90 suggest that this is a potential new option for patients with HCC, and future studies should be devoted to assessments of the role of radioembolization in the treatment algorithm for HCC. PMID:22190656

  4. Cancer-associated fibroblasts in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Norio; Araki, Kenichiro; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Shirabe, Ken

    2016-08-14

    The hepatic stellate cells in the liver are stimulated sustainably by chronic injury of the hepatocytes, activating myofibroblasts, which produce abundant collagen. Myofibroblasts are the major source of extracellular proteins during fibrogenesis, and may directly, or secreted products, contribute to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the components of the tumor microenvironment that promote the proliferation and invasion of cancer cells by secreting various growth factors and cytokines. CAFs crosstalk with cancer cells stimulates tumor progression by creating a favorable microenvironment for progression, invasion, and metastasis through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Basic studies on CAFs have advanced, and the role of CAFs in tumors has been elucidated. In particular, for hepatocellular carcinoma, carcinogenesis from cirrhosis is a known fact, and participation of CAFs in carcinogenesis is supported. In this review, we discuss the current literature on the role of CAFs and CAF-related signaling in carcinogenesis, crosstalk with cancer cells, immunosuppressive effects, angiogenesis, therapeutic targets, and resistance to chemotherapy. The role of CAFs is important in cancer initiation and progression. CAFtargeted therapy may be effective for suppression not only of fibrosis but also cancer progression. PMID:27570421

  5. Cancer-associated fibroblasts in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Norio; Araki, Kenichiro; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Shirabe, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cells in the liver are stimulated sustainably by chronic injury of the hepatocytes, activating myofibroblasts, which produce abundant collagen. Myofibroblasts are the major source of extracellular proteins during fibrogenesis, and may directly, or secreted products, contribute to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the components of the tumor microenvironment that promote the proliferation and invasion of cancer cells by secreting various growth factors and cytokines. CAFs crosstalk with cancer cells stimulates tumor progression by creating a favorable microenvironment for progression, invasion, and metastasis through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Basic studies on CAFs have advanced, and the role of CAFs in tumors has been elucidated. In particular, for hepatocellular carcinoma, carcinogenesis from cirrhosis is a known fact, and participation of CAFs in carcinogenesis is supported. In this review, we discuss the current literature on the role of CAFs and CAF-related signaling in carcinogenesis, crosstalk with cancer cells, immunosuppressive effects, angiogenesis, therapeutic targets, and resistance to chemotherapy. The role of CAFs is important in cancer initiation and progression. CAFtargeted therapy may be effective for suppression not only of fibrosis but also cancer progression. PMID:27570421

  6. HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA: CURRENT AND PROSPECTIVE IMMUNOTHERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES.

    PubMed

    Kikodze, N; Mazmishvili, K; Iobadze, M; Rekhviashvili, Kh; Nanava, N; Pantsulaia, I; Mizandari, M; Janikashvili, N; Chikovani, T

    2015-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly lethal and the most common primary liver cancer with increasing worldwide incidence. Pathogenesis of HCC is immune mediated, however, not completely understood. Chronic low-grade inflammation alters both innate and adaptive immune responses. As a result tolerogenic environment is established in damaged organ. Up to date, incomplete understanding of HCC pathogenesis and the extend of biomarker variability among patients represent the major obstacle for early diagnosis and for the choice of effective treatment. Among current treatment options for HCC, thermal ablation strategy, which in addition to cancer eradication provides adjuvant/"danger"signal to the patient's immune cells, has demonstrated its active immunotherapeutic effect. In ongoing phase I/II clinical trials, tumor antigen loaded dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines as well as tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are being tested. Genetically redirected T cell therapy and more refined autologous vaccines are still awaiting approaches in HCC. The topic of this review focuses on current and bench-to-bedside immunotherapeutic strategies for HCC and discusses their advantages and limitations in clinic. We also weight up several prospective immunotherapeutic approaches which in theory have the potential for further implication in HCC. Combination of the induction of effective antitumor immunity with the inhibition of the mechanisms of tumor-induced immunosuppression ought to be a key objective in these future developments. PMID:26355320

  7. In Silico Analysis of Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Protein 8-Like-1 (TIPE1) Protein.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei; Zhang, Hong; Su, Zhaoliang; Wang, Shengjun; Xu, Huaxi

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8)-like protein 1 (TIPE1) was a member of TNFAIP8 family. Previous studies have shown that TIPE1 could induce apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we attempted to predict its potential structure. Bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 was performed to predict its potential structure using the bioinfomatic web services or softwares. The results showed that the amino acid sequences of TIPE1 were well conserved in mammals. No signal peptide and no transmembrane domain existed in human TIPE1. The aliphatic index of TIPE1 was 100.75 and the theoretical pI was 9.57. TIPE1 was a kind of stable protein and its grand average of hydropathicity was -0.108. Various post-translational modifications were also speculated to exist in TIPE1. In addition, the results of Swiss-Model Server and Swiss-Pdb Viewer program revealed that the predicted three-dimensional structure of TIPE1 protein was stable and it may accord with the rule of stereochemistry. TIPE1 was predicted to interact with FBXW5, caspase8 and so on. In conclusion, TIPE1 may be a stable protein with no signal peptide and no transmembrane domain. The bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 will provide the basis for the further study on the function of TIPE1. PMID:26207809

  8. Survival outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy for 79 Japanese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Naoya; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nomiya, Takuma; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-05-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a relatively new treatment for liver tumor. Outcomes of SBRT for liver tumors unsuitable for ablation or surgical resection were evaluated. A total of 79 patients treated with SBRT for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) between 2004 and 2012 in six Japanese institutions were studied retrospectively. Patients treated with SBRT preceded by trans-arterial chemoembolization were eligible. Their median age was 73 years, 76% were males, and their Child-Pugh scores were Grades A (85%) and B (11%) before SBRT. The median biologically effective dose (α/β = 10 Gy) was 96.3 Gy. The median follow-up time was 21.0 months for surviving patients. The 2-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival were 53%, 40% and 76%, respectively. Sex and serum PIVKA-II values were significant predictive factors for OS. Hypovascular or hypervascular types of HCC, sex and clinical stage were significant predictive factors for PFS. The 2-year PFS was 66% in Stage I vs 18% in Stages II-III. Multivariate analysis indicated that clinical stage was the only significant predictive factor for PFS. No Grade 3 laboratory toxicities in the acute, sub-acute, and chronic phases were observed. PFS after SBRT for liver tumor was satisfactory, especially for Stage I HCC, even though these patients were unsuitable for resection and ablation. SBRT is safe and might be an alternative to resection and ablation. PMID:25691453

  9. Survival outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy for 79 Japanese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Naoya; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nomiya, Takuma; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a relatively new treatment for liver tumor. Outcomes of SBRT for liver tumors unsuitable for ablation or surgical resection were evaluated. A total of 79 patients treated with SBRT for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) between 2004 and 2012 in six Japanese institutions were studied retrospectively. Patients treated with SBRT preceded by trans-arterial chemoembolization were eligible. Their median age was 73 years, 76% were males, and their Child–Pugh scores were Grades A (85%) and B (11%) before SBRT. The median biologically effective dose (α/β = 10 Gy) was 96.3 Gy. The median follow-up time was 21.0 months for surviving patients. The 2-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival were 53%, 40% and 76%, respectively. Sex and serum PIVKA-II values were significant predictive factors for OS. Hypovascular or hypervascular types of HCC, sex and clinical stage were significant predictive factors for PFS. The 2-year PFS was 66% in Stage I vs 18% in Stages II–III. Multivariate analysis indicated that clinical stage was the only significant predictive factor for PFS. No Grade 3 laboratory toxicities in the acute, sub-acute, and chronic phases were observed. PFS after SBRT for liver tumor was satisfactory, especially for Stage I HCC, even though these patients were unsuitable for resection and ablation. SBRT is safe and might be an alternative to resection and ablation. PMID:25691453

  10. [PREVENTION AND CORRECTION OF PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS FOR SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Fedorkiv, M B

    2015-06-01

    Increased of proinflammatory cytokines levels, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on severe acute pancreatitis causes vasodilatation, increased permeability of the wall, accumulation of fluid in lung tissue and pleural sinuses. Transudate from acute parapancreatyc clusters of hot liquid and abdomen falls into the chest cavity through microscopic defects in the diaphragm due to the formation of pathological pleural-peritoneal connections or the relevant pressure gradient between the abdominal and pleural cavities. Remediation and removal of acute parapancreatyc clusters combined with the use of a multicomponent drug infusion therapy Cytoflavin provide a reduction in the frequency of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis from 48.3 to 31.0%. Use of the drug Cytoflavin reduces the severity of endogenous intoxication and mortality from acute lung injury from 12.9 to 6.1%. PMID:26521460

  11. Imaging lexicon for acute pancreatitis: 2012 Atlanta Classification revisited.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Arora, Ankur

    2016-02-01

    The original 1992 Atlanta Classification System for acute pancreatitis was revised in 2012 by the Atlanta Working Group, assisted by various national and international societies, through web-based consensus. This revised classification identifies two phases of acute pancreatitis: early and late. Acute pancreatitis can be either oedematous interstitial pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis. Severity of the disease is categorized into three levels: mild, moderately severe and severe, depending upon organ failure and local/systemic complications. According to the type of pancreatitis, collections are further divided into acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, acute necrotic collection, and walled-off necrosis. Insight into the revised terminology is essential for accurate communication of imaging findings. In this review article, we will summarize the updated nomenclature and illustrate corresponding imaging findings using examples. PMID:26224684

  12. Myocardial steatosis and necrosis in atria and ventricles of rats given pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw Bowen; Reens, Jaimini; Johnson, Elizabeth; Brocklehurst, Simon; Slater, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Pharmaceutical therapies for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) include plasma glucose lowering by enhancing glucose utilization. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex is important in controlling the balance between glucose and fatty acid substrate oxidation. Administration of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors (PDHKIs) to rats effectively lowers plasma glucose but results in myocardial steatosis that in some instances is associated primarily with atrial and to a lesser degree with ventricular pathology. Induction of myocardial steatosis is not dose-dependent, varies from minimal to moderate severity, and is either of multifocal or diffuse distribution. Ventricular histopathology was restricted to few myocardial degenerative fibers, while that in the atrium/atria was of either acute or chronic appearance with the former showing myocardial degeneration/necrosis, acute myocarditis, edema, endothelial activation (rounding up), endocarditis, and thrombosis associated with moderate myocardial steatosis and the latter with myocardial loss, replacement fibrosis, and no apparent or minimal association with steatosis. The evidence from these evaluations indicate that excessive intramyocardial accumulation of lipid may be either primarily adverse or represents an indicator of other adversely affected cellular processes. PMID:24742628

  13. Cationic nanocarriers induce cell necrosis through impairment of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and cause subsequent inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiawei; Shao, Bin; He, Zhiyao; Ye, Tinghong; Luo, Min; Sang, Yaxiong; Liang, Xiao; Wang, Wei; Luo, Shuntao; Yang, Shengyong; Zhang, Shuang; Gong, Changyang; Gou, Maling; Deng, Hongxing; Zhao, Yinglan; Yang, Hanshuo; Deng, Senyi; Zhao, Chengjian; Yang, Li; Qian, Zhiyong; Li, Jiong; Sun, Xun; Han, Jiahuai; Jiang, Chengyu; Wu, Min; Zhang, Zhirong

    2015-02-01

    Nanocarriers with positive surface charges are known for their toxicity which has limited their clinical applications. The mechanism underlying their toxicity, such as the induction of inflammatory response, remains largely unknown. In the present study we found that injection of cationic nanocarriers, including cationic liposomes, PEI, and chitosan, led to the rapid appearance of necrotic cells. Cell necrosis induced by cationic nanocarriers is dependent on their positive surface charges, but does not require RIP1 and Mlkl. Instead, intracellular Na(+) overload was found to accompany the cell death. Depletion of Na(+) in culture medium or pretreatment of cells with the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase cation-binding site inhibitor ouabain, protected cells from cell necrosis. Moreover, treatment with cationic nanocarriers inhibited Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity both in vitro and in vivo. The computational simulation showed that cationic carriers could interact with cation-binding site of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Mice pretreated with a small dose of ouabain showed improved survival after injection of a lethal dose of cationic nanocarriers. Further analyses suggest that cell necrosis induced by cationic nanocarriers and the resulting leakage of mitochondrial DNA could trigger severe inflammation in vivo, which is mediated by a pathway involving TLR9 and MyD88 signaling. Taken together, our results reveal a novel mechanism whereby cationic nanocarriers induce acute cell necrosis through the interaction with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, with the subsequent exposure of mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns as a key event that mediates the inflammatory responses. Our study has important implications for evaluating the biocompatibility of nanocarriers and designing better and safer ones for drug delivery. PMID:25613571

  14. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  15. Transarterial chemoembolization and bland embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A; Fatourou, Evangelia; O'Beirne, James; Meyer, Tim; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2014-03-28

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the first line treatment for patients with intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma but is also increasingly being used for patients on the transplant waiting list to prevent further tumor growth. Despite its widespread use, TACE remains an unstandardized procedure, with variation in type and size of embolizing particles, type and dose of chemotherapy and interval between therapies. Existing evidence from randomized controlled trials suggest that bland transarterial embolization (TAE) has the same efficacy with TACE. In the current article, we review the use of TACE and TAE for hepatocellular carcinoma and we focus on the evidence for their use. PMID:24695579

  16. Fenofibrate-induced massive regression of mutiple inflammatory hepatocellular adenoma.

    PubMed

    Poupon, Raoul; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Arrivé, Lionel

    2016-02-01

    Inflammatory hepatocellular adenomas (IHCA), which accounts for 40% to 50% of all hepatocellular adenomas are characterized by the activation of the IL6/JAK/STAT pathway. We herein report the case of a 52-year-old woman presenting with severe multiple typical IHCA that regressed dramatically on treatment with fenofibrate, a PPAR agonist known to prevent IL6-induced inflammation experimentally and in humans. Further similar observations are needed to ascertain the potential benefit of this therapeutic approach for large or unresectable IHCA. PMID:26572747

  17. Risk factors of hepatocellular carcinoma--current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Xie, Li; Yang, Wan-Shui; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Shan; Wang, Jing; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a common disorder worldwide which ranks 5th and 7th most common cancer among men and women. In recent years, different incidence trends have been observed in various regions, but the reasons are not completely understood. However, due to the great public efforts in HCC prevention and alternation of lifestyle, the roles of some well documented risk factors played in hepatocarcinogenesis might have changed. This paper summarizes both the environmental and host related risk factors of hepatocellular carcinoma including well established risk factors such as hepatitis virus infection, aflatoxin and alcohol, as well as possible risk factors such as coffee drinking and other dietary agents. PMID:22631642

  18. STABILITY OF INTERNAL HEAT NECROSIS IN TETRAPLOID X DIPLOID POTATOES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internal heat necrosis (IHN) is a severe physiological disorder of tubers, characterized by brown spots that first appear towards the apical end of the tuber parenchyma, although most of the parenchyma tissue is involved in severe cases. 'Atlantic' is the predominant potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) c...

  19. Avascular necrosis of the hip in multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, W.G.; Bassett, G.S.; Mandell, G.A.; Scott, C.I. Jr. )

    1989-11-01

    We observed radiographic changes of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the capital femoral epiphysis in 9 hips of 11 patients with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Plain roentgenography, bone scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies all revealed characteristic asymmetric changes in the presence of AVN superimposed on dysplastic femoral heads.

  20. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  1. QTL mapping of internal heat necrosis in tetraploid potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internal heat necrosis (IHN) is a physiological disorder of potato tubers. We developed a linkage map of tetraploid potato using AFLP and SSR markers, and mapped QTL for mean severity and percent incidence of IHN. Phentypic data indicated that the distribution of IHN is skewed toward resistance. Lat...

  2. Avascular necrosis of the distal pole of the scaphoid

    PubMed Central

    Tokyay, Abbas; Gunal, Izge

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the scaphoid predominantly occurs in the proximal pole. Review of the literature revealed only six cases and all are suspect due to the lack of either MRI investigation or investigation of bleeding preoperatively. We report four new cases and one of them appears to be a real distal pole AVN of the scaphoid in the literature.

  3. Combined use of heat-shock protein 70 and glutamine synthetase is useful in the distinction of typical hepatocellular adenoma from atypical hepatocellular neoplasms and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy B; Roncalli, Massimo; Di Tommaso, Luca; Kakar, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma can mimic high-grade dysplastic nodule in cirrhotic liver and hepatocellular adenoma in non-cirrhotic liver. This study evaluates the efficacy of combined use of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glypican-3 in this setting. Immunohistochemistry for these three markers was done in 17 typical hepatocellular adenoma, 15 high-grade dysplastic nodules, 20 atypical hepatocellular neoplasms (14 clinically atypical and 6 pathologically atypical), 14 very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, and 43 well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. All three markers were negative in typical adenomas. HSP70 was positive in 10, 71, and 67% of atypical neoplasms, very well-differentiated and well-differentiated HCC, respectively, while GS was positive in 60, 50, and 60% of atypical neoplasms, very well-differentiated and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, respectively. Glypican-3 was negative in all atypical neoplasms and very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, and was positive in 27% of well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Positive staining with at least one marker (HSP70 and/or GS) was seen in 85% of very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, which was similar to well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (78%, P=0.4), and pathologically atypical cases (100%, P=0.5), but significantly higher compared with clinically atypical cases (43%. P=0.03) and none of typical adenomas (P<0.001). Positive staining with both GS and HSP70 was seen significantly more often in hepatocellular carcinoma compared with atypical neoplasms (45 vs 10%, P=0.004). Both these markers were also more often expressed in very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma compared with atypical cases (38 vs 10%, P=0.06). In conclusion, the combined use of GS and HSP70 can be useful in the diagnosis of very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. These stains can also help in the

  4. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  5. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  6. Acute pancreatitis associated with pegylated interferon-alpha-2a therapy in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Wook; Lee, June Sung; Paik, Woo Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Kim, Jung Wook; Bae, Won Ki; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jung Gon

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Combination therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) is a current standard treatment for chronic HCV infection in Korea, which has considerable adverse effects. Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of PEG-IFN-α administration. We report a case of a 62-year-old female who experienced acute pancreatitis after 4 weeks of PEG-IFN-α-2a and RBV combination therapy for chronic HCV infection. The main cause of the acute pancreatitis in this case was probably PEG-IFN-α rather than RBV for several reasons. A few cases have been reported in which acute pancreatitis occurred during treatment with PEG-IFN-α-2b. This is the first report of acute pancreatitis associated with PEG-IFN-α-2a in Korea. PMID:27044768

  7. Risk Factors for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in India

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Premashis

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important cause of death all over the world, more so in Asia and Africa. The representative data on epidemiology of HCC in India is very scanty and cancer is not a reportable disease in India and the cancer registries in India are mostly urban. 45 million people who are suffering from chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 15 million people who are afflicted with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in India. HBV and HCV infection is considered an important etiologic factor in HCC. Positive association between HCC and consumption of alcohol where alcohol contribute as a cofactor for hepatotoxins and hepatitis viruses. Aflatoxin contamination in the diets, Hepatitis B virus infection and liver cirrhosis in Andhra Pradesh, India and direct chronic exposure to aflatoxins was shown to cause liver cirrhosis. Cirrhosis of liver of any cause lead to develop about 70%–90% of HCC. Aflatoxin interact synergistically with Hepatitis B virus (HBV)/Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection which increase the risk of HCC. HBV infection, HBV infection with Aflatoxin exposure, viral infection and alcohol consumption leading to overt cirrhosis of the liver, alcohol consumption leading to cirrhosis of the liver with viral infection are the predominant risk factor for the development of HCC. HCV and alcohol are also associated with HCC in India. Indians develop diabetes at younger age, Asians have strong genetic susceptibility for type II diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is identified as a risk factor for HCC. Prevention of viral infection by universal vaccination against hepatitis virus, HCC surveillance program, preventing alcoholic liver diseases, fungal contamination of grains and ground crops to prevent basically Aflatoxin exposure are important measures to prevent liver diseases and HCC among those at risk. PMID:25755609

  8. Management of Hepatocellular Adenoma: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shefali; Agarwal, Sheela; Arnason, Thomas; Saini, Sanjay; Belghiti, Jacques

    2015-07-01

    Hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) is a rare benign liver cell neoplasm that occurs more frequently in young women with a history of prolonged use of oral contraceptives. Surgical resection is considered because of the risk of hemorrhage in 25% and of malignant transformation in 5% of patients with HCA. HCA is a heterogeneous disease comprising 3 subtypes with distinct molecular and complication profiles. The inflammatory or telangiectatic subtype is at increased risk for hemorrhage, the β-catenin-activated subtype is at increased risk for malignant transformation, and the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α-inactivated or steatotic subtype is at the least risk for complications. One-third of the patients with HCA have multiple tumors on imaging with no increased risk of complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for the diagnosis and subtype characterization of HCA. Systematic resection of HCA is recommended in male patients owing to the higher incidence of malignant transformation, and surgical excision in women should be reserved for tumors 5 cm or larger associated with an increased risk of complications. Cessation of hormonal therapy and radiologic surveillance in women with HCA tumors smaller than 5 cm shows that the vast majority of HCA remain stable or undergo spontaneous regression. Percutaneous core needle biopsy is of limited value because the therapeutic strategy is based primarily on patient sex and tumor size. Transarterial embolization is the initial treatment for HCA complicated by hemorrhage. Pregnancy should not be discouraged in the presence of HCA, however, frequent sonographic surveillance is recommended. PMID:24909909

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Maluccio, Mary; Kwo, Paul; Tector, A. Joseph; Zook, Jennifer; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, 60 patients with liver-confined HCC were treated with SBRT at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center: 36 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) Class A and 24 CTP Class B. The median number of fractions, dose per fraction, and total dose, was 3, 14 Gy, and 44 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class A cirrhosis and 5, 8 Gy, and 40 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class B. Treatment was delivered via 6 to 12 beams and in nearly all cases was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. The records of all patients were reviewed, and treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: The median follow-up time was 27 months, and the median tumor diameter was 3.2 cm. The 2-year LC, PFS, and OS were 90%, 48%, and 67%, respectively, with median TTP of 47.8 months. Subsequently, 23 patients underwent transplant, with a median time to transplant of 7 months. There were no {>=}Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities. Thirteen percent of patients experienced an increase in hematologic/hepatic dysfunction greater than 1 grade, and 20% experienced progression in CTP class within 3 months of treatment. Conclusions: SBRT is a safe, effective, noninvasive option for patients with HCC {<=}6 cm. As such, SBRT should be considered when bridging to transplant or as definitive therapy for those ineligible for transplant.

  10. Genetic Landscape and Biomarkers of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Llovet, Josep M

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has emerged as a major cause of cancer-related death. Its mortality has increased in Western populations, with a minority of patients diagnosed at early stages, when curative treatments are feasible. Only the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is available for the management of advanced cases. During the last 10 years, there has been a clear delineation of the landscape of genetic alterations in HCC, including high-level DNA amplifications in chromosome 6p21 (VEGFA) and 11q13 (FGF19/CNND1), as well as homozygous deletions in chromosome 9 (CDKN2A). The most frequent mutations affect TERT promoter (60%), associated with an increased telomerase expression. TERT promoter can also be affected by copy number variations and hepatitis B DNA insertions, and it can be found mutated in preneoplastic lesions. TP53 and CTNNB1 are the next most prevalent mutations, affecting 25%-30% of HCC patients, that, in addition to low-frequency mutated genes (eg, AXIN1, ARID2, ARID1A, TSC1/TSC2, RPS6KA3, KEAP1, MLL2), help define some of the core deregulated pathways in HCC. Conceptually, some of these changes behave as prototypic oncogenic addiction loops, being ideal biomarkers for specific therapeutic approaches. Data from genomic profiling enabled a proposal of HCC in 2 major molecular clusters (proliferation and nonproliferation), with differential enrichment in prognostic signatures, pathway activation and tumor phenotype. Translation of these discoveries into specific therapeutic decisions is an unmet medical need in this field. PMID:26099527

  11. Advances of imaging for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2010-07-01

    A variety of imaging modalities, including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine, and angiography, are currently used in evaluating patients with chronic liver disease and suspected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Further technological advancement will undoubtedly have a major impact on liver tumor imaging. Increased speed of data acquisition and consequently shorter scan times in CT and MRI show further improvement in resolution by further reducing motion artifacts. Development of new contrast materials for liver tumor imaging in US and MRI improve tumor detection and characterization by increasing the contrast resolution. Currently available advanced US techniques in the evaluation of HCC are various harmonic imaging techniques with contrast agents, volume imaging, and recently, US elastography, that has been developing and might play a role in characterizing liver nodules in the future. The latest advance in CT is the multidetector (MD) CT scanner where a 256- or 320-detector CT was introduced. Recent studies describe the high sensitivity of double arterial phase imaging in hepatic tumor detection and the usefulness of CT angiography by using MD CT in a detailed assessment of hepatic arterial anatomy using a three-dimensional dataset. In addition, perfusion CT imaging is also being developed and can be used for the characterization and treatment monitoring of HCC. Dual-energy CT with new technology is also continuously progressing. Advances in MR technology, including hardware and pulse sequence implementation, allow acquisition times to be reduced to the time frame of one breathhold, providing multiphasic dynamic MRI. Functional MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI, MR elastography, and new MR contrast agent with dual function have been investigated for the clinical utility of detection and characterization of HCCs. Functional MRI has a potential to be a promising technique for assessing HCC. PMID:20616584

  12. Targeting the tumor stroma in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Heindryckx, Femke; Gerwins, Pär

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and deadly cancers worldwide. In ninety percent of the cases it develops as a result of chronic liver damage and it is thus a typical inflammation-related cancer characterized by the close relation between the tumor microenvironment and tumor cells. The stromal environment consists out of several cell types, including hepatic stellate cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. They are not just active bystanders in the pathogenesis of HCC, but play an important and active role in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. Furthermore, the tumor itself influences these cells to create a background that is beneficial for sustaining tumor growth. One of the key players is the hepatic stellate cell, which is activated during liver damage and differentiates towards a myofibroblast-like cell. Activated stellate cells are responsible for the deposition of extracellular matrix, increase the production of angiogenic factors and stimulate the recruitment of macrophages. The increase of angiogenic factors (which are secreted by macrophages, tumor cells and activated stellate cells) will induce the formation of new blood vessels, thereby supplying the tumor with more oxygen and nutrients, thus supporting tumor growth and offering a passageway in the circulatory system. In addition, the secretion of chemokines by the tumor cells leads to the recruitment of tumor associated macrophages. These tumor associated macrophages are key actors of cancer-related inflammation, being the main type of inflammatory cells infiltrating the tumor environment and exerting a tumor promoting effect by secreting growth factors, stimulating angiogenesis and influencing the activation of stellate cells. This complex interplay between the several cell types involved in liver cancer emphasizes the need for targeting the tumor stroma in HCC patients. PMID:25729472

  13. Quality of life and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Khubchandani, Sapna; Iyer, Renuka

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and rapidly fatal cancer ranking third among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Potentially curative therapies like surgery, transplant and ablation are not an option for most patients as they are often diagnosed when the disease is advanced. Liver directed therapy and oral targeted therapies are used in these patients to prolong life and palliate symptoms of the cancer and associated liver failure. Overall survival remains poor and hence health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is of paramount importance in these patients. As novel therapies are developed to improve outcomes, a comprehensive knowledge of available tools to assess impact on QoL is needed. Hence we reviewed all the studies in HCC patients published within the last 13 years from 2001-2013 which assessed HRQoL as a primary or secondary endpoint. A total of 45 studies and 4 meta-analysis were identified. Commonly used tools were European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) (15 studies) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary Questionnaire (FACT-Hep) (14 studies). Of the 45 publications which incorporated HRQoL as end-point only 24 were clinical trials, 17/24 (71%) assessed systemic therapies while 7/24 (29%) assessed liver-directed therapies. Majority of the publications (trials + retrospective reviews) that had HRQoL as an endpoint in HCC patients were studies evaluating liver-directed therapies (23/45 or >50%). We discuss the measures included in the tools, their interpretation, and summarize existing QoL data that will help design future HCC trials. PMID:25083303

  14. The Eltrombopag antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Soichiro; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Kohno, Keisuke; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2015-11-01

    Currently, sorafenib is the only available chemotherapeutic agent for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but it cannot be used in patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) or thrombocytopenia. In these cases, sorafenib is likely effective if given in combination with treatments that increase the number of platelets, such as thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists. Increasing the platelet count via TPO treatment resulted in reduction of LC. Eltrombopag (EP), a TPO receptor agonist, has been reported to have antitumor effects against certain cancers, despite their lack of TPO receptor expression. We hypothesized that EP may possess antitumor activity against HCC in addition to its ability to suppress hepatic fibrosis by increasing the platelet count. In the present study, the antitumor activity of EP was examined by assessing the inhibition of cell proliferation and then ascertaining the ability of iron supplementation to reverse these effects in HepG2, Hep3B and Huh7 cells. In addition, a cell cycle assay was performed using flow cytometry, and signal transduction was evaluated by analyzing cell cycle-related protein expression. The results of EP were compared with those of the most common iron chelator, deferoxamine (DFO). The combined effect of EP and sorafenib was also assessed. The results revealed that EP exerts antitumor activity in HCC that is mediated by the modulation of intracellular iron content. EP suppressed the expression of the cell cycle-related protein cyclin D1 and elicited cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. The activity of EP was comparable to that of DFO in HCC, and EP did not compete with sorafenib at low concentrations. In conclusion, our findings suggest that EP is a good candidate chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of HCC in patients with LC and thrombocytopenia. PMID:26397763

  15. The Eltrombopag antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KUROKAWA, TOMOHIRO; MURATA, SOICHIRO; ZHENG, YUN-WEN; IWASAKI, KENICHI; KOHNO, KEISUKE; FUKUNAGA, KIYOSHI; OHKOHCHI, NOBUHIRO

    2015-01-01

    Currently, sorafenib is the only available chemotherapeutic agent for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but it cannot be used in patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) or thrombocytopenia. In these cases, sorafenib is likely effective if given in combination with treatments that increase the number of platelets, such as thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists. Increasing the platelet count via TPO treatment resulted in reduction of LC. Eltrombopag (EP), a TPO receptor agonist, has been reported to have antitumor effects against certain cancers, despite their lack of TPO receptor expression. We hypothesized that EP may possess antitumor activity against HCC in addition to its ability to suppress hepatic fibrosis by increasing the platelet count. In the present study, the antitumor activity of EP was examined by assessing the inhibition of cell proliferation and then ascertaining the ability of iron supplementation to reverse these effects in HepG2, Hep3B and Huh7 cells. In addition, a cell cycle assay was performed using flow cytometry, and signal transduction was evaluated by analyzing cell cycle-related protein expression. The results of EP were compared with those of the most common iron chelator, deferoxamine (DFO). The combined effect of EP and sorafenib was also assessed. The results revealed that EP exerts antitumor activity in HCC that is mediated by the modulation of intracellular iron content. EP suppressed the expression of the cell cycle-related protein cyclin D1 and elicited cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. The activity of EP was comparable to that of DFO in HCC, and EP did not compete with sorafenib at low concentrations. In conclusion, our findings suggest that EP is a good candidate chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of HCC in patients with LC and thrombocytopenia. PMID:26397763

  16. Epidemiology of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in India

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Subrat K.

    2014-01-01

    Indian data on epidemiology of HCC is not available. Cancer is not a reportable disease in India and the cancer registries in India are mostly urban. National cancer registry program of the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has been recently expanded to include 21 population based and 6 hospital based cancer registries. The last published registry data by ICMR available in the cancer registry website (www.ncrpindia.org) was in 2008 which provides information on various cancers from 2006 to 2008. The other source of information was the report published by International Agency for Research on Cancer (WHO). According to these available data the age adjusted incidence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in India for men ranges from 0.7 to 7.5 and for women 0.2 to 2.2 per 100,000 population per year. The male:female ratio for HCC in India is 4:1. The age of presentation varies from 40 to 70 years. According to a study conducted by verbal autopsy in 1.1 million homes representing the whole country, the age standardized mortality rate for HCC in India for men is 6.8/100,000 and for women is 5.1/100,000. According to another study the incidence of HCC in cirrhotics in India is 1.6% per year. The unpublished data from various tertiary care centers suggest that the incidence of HCC is increasing in India. There is a need for a multi-centric HCC registry under the aegis of INASL. PMID:25755607

  17. Epidemiology of hepatocellular carcinoma in India.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Subrat K

    2014-08-01

    Indian data on epidemiology of HCC is not available. Cancer is not a reportable disease in India and the cancer registries in India are mostly urban. National cancer registry program of the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has been recently expanded to include 21 population based and 6 hospital based cancer registries. The last published registry data by ICMR available in the cancer registry website (www.ncrpindia.org) was in 2008 which provides information on various cancers from 2006 to 2008. The other source of information was the report published by International Agency for Research on Cancer (WHO). According to these available data the age adjusted incidence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in India for men ranges from 0.7 to 7.5 and for women 0.2 to 2.2 per 100,000 population per year. The male:female ratio for HCC in India is 4:1. The age of presentation varies from 40 to 70 years. According to a study conducted by verbal autopsy in 1.1 million homes representing the whole country, the age standardized mortality rate for HCC in India for men is 6.8/100,000 and for women is 5.1/100,000. According to another study the incidence of HCC in cirrhotics in India is 1.6% per year. The unpublished data from various tertiary care centers suggest that the incidence of HCC is increasing in India. There is a need for a multi-centric HCC registry under the aegis of INASL. PMID:25755607

  18. First report of soybean vein necrosis disease caused by soybean vein necrosis-associated virus in Wisconsin and Iowa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several viral diseases of soybean (Glycine max) have been previously identified in the north-central U.S. soybean production area, which includes Wisconsin and Iowa (Hartman et al., 1999). In September 2012, soybean plants with symptoms similar to those reported for soybean vein necrosis disease (SV...

  19. Drug-Eluting Beads Loaded With Doxorubicin (DEBDOX) Chemoembolisation Before Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Imaging/Histologic Correlation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauwels, Xavier Azahaf, Mustapha; Lassailly, Guillaume; Sergent, Géraldine; Buob, David; Truant, Stéphanie Boleslawski, Emmanuel; Louvet, Alexandre; Gnemmi, Vivianne; Canva, Valérie Mathurin, Philippe; Pruvot, François-René; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Most transplant centers use chemoembolisation as locoregional bridge therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before liver transplantation (LT). Chemoembolisation using beads loaded with doxorubicin (DEBDOX) is a promising technique that enables delivery of a large quantity of drugs against HCC. We sought to assess the imaging–histologic correlation after DEBDOX chemoembolisation.Materials and Methods All consecutive patients who had undergone DEBDOX chemoembolisation before receiving liver graft for HCC were included. Tumour response was evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) and modified RECIST (mRECIST) criteria. The result of final imaging made before LT was correlated with histological data to predict tumour necrosis.ResultsTwenty-eight patients underwent 43 DEBDOX procedures for 45 HCC. Therapy had a significant effect as shown by a decrease in the mean size of the largest nodule (p = 0.02) and the sum of viable part of tumour sizes according to mRECIST criteria (p < 0.001). An objective response using mRECIST criteria was significantly correlated with mean tumour necrosis ≥90 % (p = 0.03). A complete response using mRECIST criteria enabled accurate prediction of complete tumour necrosis (p = 0.01). Correlations using RECIST criteria were not significant.ConclusionOur data confirm the potential benefit of DEBDOX chemoembolisation as bridge therapy before LT, and they provide a rational basis for new studies focusing on recurrence-free survival after LT. Radiologic evaluation according to mRECIST criteria enables accurate prediction of tumour necrosis, whereas RECIST criteria do not.

  20. Euforia-induced acute hepatitis in a patient with scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Encarnación, Esther; Ríos, Grissel; Muñoz-Mirabal, Angel; Vilá, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    Euforia, a supplement containing a variety of natural ingredients, is widely used as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory formula. It is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and its side effects are unknown. We report a 45-year-old woman with limited systemic sclerosis who presented with jaundice and marked elevation of serum transaminases. One month before, she started taking Euforia juice. A liver biopsy disclosed submassive hepatocellular necrosis with histopathological changes consistent with toxic hepatitis. The patient's symptoms resolved with cessation of Euforia. Six months later, she persisted with abnormal liver function tests, but these resolved 18 months after discontinuation of Euforia. The mechanism by which Euforia causes liver injury is unknown. Some ingredients contained in this supplement (green tea, Aloe vera, noni and goji) are linked to hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hepatotoxicity associated with Euforia. PMID:23257938