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Sample records for acute high dose

  1. Acute high dose exposure to benzene in shipyard workers

    SciTech Connect

    Midzenski, M.A.; McDiarmid, M.A.; Rothman, N.; Kolodner, K. )

    1992-01-01

    Fifteen degassers were acutely exposed over several days to high concentrations (> 60 ppm) of benzene during removal of residual fuel (degassing) from shipboard fuel tanks. Medical surveillance evaluation mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Benzene Standard initially revealed 11 workers (73%) reporting neurotoxic symptoms while degassing. Workers with more than 2 days (16 hours) of acute exposure were significantly more likely to report dizziness and nausea than those with 2 or fewer days of acute exposure. Repeated laboratory analyses performed over a 4-month period after the acute exposure revealed at least one hematologic abnormality consistent with benzene exposure in 9 (60%) of these degassers. One year later, 6 workers (40%) had persistent abnormalities; an additional worker with normal hematologic parameters at the time of our initial evaluation subsequently developed an abnormality consistent with benzene exposure. Numerous large granular lymphocytes were observed on 6 (40%) of the peripheral blood smears. Despite these laboratory findings, there were no significant associations between the presence of hematologic abnormalities and either the number of hours of acute benzene exposure or the duration of employment as a degasser. Volatilization of benzene from the residual fuel was the suspected source of benzene in the headspace of tanks. Confined space exposure to petroleum products may be exposing workers to benzene at levels above the OSHA Short-Term Exposure Limit (STEL). This situation warrants further study.

  2. Acute cognitive effects of high doses of dextromethorphan relative to triazolam in humans

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Reissig, Chad J.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although concerns surrounding high-dose dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have recently increased, few studies have examined the acute cognitive effects of high doses of DXM. The aim of this study was to compare the cognitive effects of DXM with those of triazolam and placebo. METHODS Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg /70 kg), and placebo were administered p.o. to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Effects on cognitive performance were examined at baseline and after drug administration for up to 6 hours. RESULTS Both triazolam and DXM produced acute impairments in attention, working memory, episodic memory, and metacognition. Impairments observed following doses of 100-300 mg/70 kg DXM were generally smaller in magnitude than those observed after 0.5 mg/70 kg triazolam. Doses of DXM that impaired performance to the same extent as triazolam were in excess of 10-30 times the therapeutic dose of DXM. CONCLUSION The magnitude of the doses required for these effects and the absence of effects on some tasks within the 100-300 mg/70 kg dose range of DXM, speak to the relatively broad therapeutic window of over-the-counter DXM preparations when used appropriately. However, the administration of supratherapeutic doses of DXM resulted in acute cognitive impairments on all tasks that were examined. These findings are likely relevant to cases of high-dose DXM abuse. PMID:22989498

  3. High-dose gallium-67 therapy in patients with relapsed acute leukaemia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Jonkhoff, A. R.; Plaizier, M. A.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Teule, G. J.; Huijgens, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) accumulates in malignant tissues via the transferrin receptor without need for a monoclonal antibody and emits cytotoxic low-energy electrons. In this study we investigated the feasibility, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and preliminary efficiency of high-dose 67Ga injected intravenously (i.v.) in patients with acute leukaemia not responding to conventional therapy. Twelve doses of 36-105 mCi of Gallium67 citrate were administered as a push injection to eight patients with resistant leukaemia in a pilot study. All five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) had resistant disease or resistant relapse. No (sub)acute toxicity was observed. Independent of the administered dose, whole-blood radioactivity levels 10 min after administration measured only 1.25 +/- 1.39 microCi ml-1, indicating a large volume of distribution. Urine excretion in the first 24 h ranged from 18% to 51.5% (median 29.5%) of the administered dose. Cellular uptake of 67Ga was less than in previous in vitro studies. Whole-body radiation dose was estimated to be 0.25 +/- 0.03 cGy mCi-1. Red marrow dose was estimated to be between 0.18 +/- 0.02 and 0.97 +/- 0.12 cGy mCi-1. One definite response was observed in an ALL patient with disappearance of skin lesions, normalisation of the enlarged spleen and profound leucopenia. Three other patients showed transient reductions in white blood cell counts without disappearance of blasts from the peripheral blood. We conclude that high-dose i.v. 67Ga can be safely administered but that the uptake of 67Ga in blast cells must increase to make 67Ga therapeutically useful in patients with relapsed leukaemia. Images Figure 2 PMID:8519674

  4. [Cytosine-arabinoside in high doses in refractory acute granulocytic leukemia. Apropos of 17 cases].

    PubMed

    Jouet, J P; Simon, M; Fenaux, P; Pollet, J P; Bauters, F

    1985-01-01

    A total of 17 patients, 6 female and 11 male (age range 13 to 56 years), received high dose Ara-C for treatment of refractory acute myelogenous leukemia. Ara-C was given at 3 g/m2 twice daily for 6 days as a 1 infusion. 1 patient (with induced acute leukemia) was treated directly, two after failure of a chemotherapy schedule containing the usual dose Ara-C, 12 for first relapse and 2 for subsequent relapse. Maximum follow up is 16 months. Beside hematological toxicity, systemic tolerance was good with no neurological of cutaneous effects. Despite preventive corticoid eyewash, ocular complications occurred in 6 cases, mild and resolvable in 5 of them. The immediate results were as follows: 3 deaths during induction (18%); 6 failures (35%); 8 complete remissions (CR) (47%). After primary chemo-resistance (two cases) failure was always noted. In 3 cases, after less than 12 infusions had been given, 2 failures and 1 very short CR were noted. In 2 patients, when doxorubicin was added to Ara-C, we observed 1 death during induction and 1 failure. Of the patients achieving CR 8 were treated by periodic courses with high dose Ara-C and 4 of them relapsed. The longest failure free duration was 11 months. Median survival duration of the 17 patients is 5 months. PMID:3862072

  5. Fractional model for pharmacokinetics of high dose methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Jovan K.; Spasić, Dragan T.; Tošić, Jela; Kolarović, Jovanka L.; Malti, Rachid; Mitić, Igor M.; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to promote a model based on the fractional differential calculus related to the pharmacokinetic individualization of high dose methotrexate treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, especially in high risk patients. We applied two-compartment fractional model on 8 selected cases with the largest number (4-19) of measured concentrations, among 43 pediatric patients received 24-h methotrexate 2-5 g/m2 infusions. The plasma concentrations were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Our mathematical procedure, designed by combining Post's and Newton's method, was coded in Mathematica 8.0 and performed on Fujicu Celsius M470-2 PC. Experimental data show that most of the measured values of methotrexate were in decreasing order. However, in certain treatments local maximums were detected. On the other hand, integer order compartmental models do not give values which fit well with the observed data. By the use of our model, we obtained better results, since it gives more accurate behavior of the transmission, as well as the local maximums which were recognized in methotrexate monitoring. It follows from our method that an additional test with a small methotrexate dose can be suggested for the fractional system parameter identification and the prediction of a possible pattern with a full dose in the case of high risk patients. A special feature of the fractional model is that it can also recognize and better fit an observed non-monotonic behavior. A new parameter determination procedure can be successfully used.

  6. Impact of Bone Marrow Radiation Dose on Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer: Principal Component Analysis on High Dimensional Data

    SciTech Connect

    Yun Liang; Messer, Karen; Rose, Brent S.; Lewis, John H.; Jiang, Steve B.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of increasing pelvic bone marrow (BM) radiation dose on acute hematologic toxicity in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy, using a novel modeling approach to preserve the local spatial dose information. Methods and Materials: The study included 37 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent weekly cisplatin and pelvic radiation therapy. The white blood cell count nadir during treatment was used as the indicator for acute hematologic toxicity. Pelvic BM radiation dose distributions were standardized across patients by registering the pelvic BM volumes to a common template, followed by dose remapping using deformable image registration, resulting in a dose array. Principal component (PC) analysis was applied to the dose array, and the significant eigenvectors were identified by linear regression on the PCs. The coefficients for PC regression and significant eigenvectors were represented in three dimensions to identify critical BM subregions where dose accumulation is associated with hematologic toxicity. Results: We identified five PCs associated with acute hematologic toxicity. PC analysis regression modeling explained a high proportion of the variation in acute hematologicity (adjusted R{sup 2}, 0.49). Three-dimensional rendering of a linear combination of the significant eigenvectors revealed patterns consistent with anatomical distributions of hematopoietically active BM. Conclusions: We have developed a novel approach that preserves spatial dose information to model effects of radiation dose on toxicity, which may be useful in optimizing radiation techniques to avoid critical subregions of normal tissues. Further validation of this approach in a large cohort is ongoing.

  7. Effect of high dose cytosine arabinoside on quantitative EEG in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Marta; Marchesi, Francesco; Dispenza, Sabrina; Dinapoli, Loredana; Sperati, Francesca; Petreri, Gianluca; Gumenyuk, Svitlana; Dessanti, Maria Laura; Zarabla, Alessia; Cantelmi, Tonino; Mengarelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Background EEG activity is considered an index of functional state of brain. Chemotherapy (CT), used for non-central nervous system (CNS) cancer, can cross the blood brain barrier and contribute to changes in the functional state of brain that can alter background EEG activity. Quantitative EEG (qEEG) is superior to conventional EEG in the detection of subtle alterations of EEG background activity and for this reason, the use of qEEG might assist the clinician in evaluating the possible effect of CT on the CNS. The nucleoside analog cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) is one of the milestone chemotherapeutic agents used for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our observational study evaluates the possible effect of Ara-C on the qEEG of patients with AML, without CNS involvement. We conducted an observational study on newly diagnosed AML patients without CNS involvement, undergoing treatment with Ara-C to analyze the possible effect of Ara-C high doses on EEG background activity using qEEG analyses. A total of nine AML patients, 5 with Ara-C i.v. high dose (≥3 g/m(2) die), 4 with standard dose (100 mg/m(2) die) underwent qEEG (at rest, during hyperpnoea, mental arithmetic task and blocking reaction). We compared the EEG background activity of the two groups at baseline and after 6 months. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the two groups in mean relative power for all frequency bands, at rest and during hyperpnoea, mental arithmetic task and blocking reaction. Our data indicate that high dose Ara-C i.v. did not induce significant changes on EEG background activity in our patients. Future research in this area could include prospective studies that would combine qEEG and neuropsychological testing to assess the impact of CT on brain functions.

  8. TLD skin dose measurements and acute and late effects after lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Francisco . E-mail: francisco.perera@lrcc.on.ca; Chisela, Frank; Stitt, Larry; Engel, Jay; Venkatesan, Varagur

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: This report examines the relationships between measured skin doses and the acute and late skin and soft tissue changes in a pilot study of lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven of 39 women enrolled in this pilot study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (37.2 Gy in 10 fractions b.i.d.) each had thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) at 5 points on the skin of the breast overlying the implant volume. Skin changes at TLD dose points and fibrosis at the lumpectomy site were documented every 6 to 12 months posttreatment using a standardized physician-rated cosmesis questionnaire. The relationships between TLD dose and acute skin reaction, pigmentation, or telangiectasia at 5 years were analyzed using the GEE algorithm and the GENMOD procedure in the SAS statistical package. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant associations between acute skin reaction and late pigmentation or telangiectasia or between the volumes encompassed by various isodoses and fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results: The median TLD dose per fraction (185 dose points) multiplied by 10 was 9.2 Gy. In all 37 patients, acute skin reaction Grade 1 or higher was observed at 5.9% (6 of 102) of dose points receiving 10 Gy or less vs. 44.6% (37 of 83) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.0001). In 25 patients at 60 months, 1.5% telangiectasia was seen at dose points receiving 10 Gy or less (1 of 69) vs. 18% (10 of 56) telangiectasia at dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p 0.004). Grade 1 or more pigmentation developed at 1.5% (1 of 69) of dose points receiving less than 10 Gy vs. 25% (14 of 56) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.001). A Grade 1 or more acute skin reaction was also significantly associated with development of Grade 1 or more pigmentation or telangiectasia at 60 months. This association was most significant for acute reaction and telangiectasia directly over the

  9. A case of acute psychosis in a patient following exposure to a single high dose of styrene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eunsoo; Suh, Hwagyu; Lee, Byung Dae; Park, Je Min; Lee, Young Min; Jeong, Hee Jeong

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of acute psychotic symptoms following exposure to a single high dose of styrene monomer. The 24-year-old male patient showed psychotic and cognitive symptoms immediately after exposure. His psychotic symptoms included auditory hallucinations and delusions of reference. Brain magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, and laboratory examinations were performed to evaluate any other causes. The clinical, neuroimaging, and laboratory review in this case suggested that the suddenly developed psychotic symptoms that led to chronic deterioration were caused by the single exposure to styrene monomer. This is the first recent report in which acute psychotic symptoms developed from a single high dose of styrene suffocation compared with previous findings showing symptoms because of long-term low-dose exposure.

  10. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors.

  11. A high throughput passive dosing format for the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Schmidt, Stine N; Stinckens, Evelyn; Maho, Walid; Blust, Ronny; Mayer, Philipp; Covaci, Adrian; Knapen, Dries

    2015-11-01

    High throughput testing according to the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity (FET) test (OECD Testing Guideline 236) is usually conducted in well plates. In the case of hydrophobic test substances, sorptive and evaporative losses often result in declining and poorly controlled exposure conditions. Therefore, our objective was to improve exposure conditions in FET tests by evaluating a passive dosing format using silicone O-rings in standard 24-well polystyrene plates. We exposed zebrafish embryos to a series of phenanthrene concentrations until 120h post fertilization (hpf), and obtained a linear dilution series. We report effect values for both mortality and sublethal morphological effects based on (1) measured exposure concentrations, (2) (lipid normalized) body residues and (3) chemical activity. The LC50 for 120hpf was 310μg/L, CBR50 (critical body residue) was 2.72mmol/kg fresh wt and La50 (lethal chemical activity) was 0.047. All values were within ranges expected for baseline toxicity. Impaired swim bladder inflation was the most pronounced morphological effect and swimming activity was reduced in all exposure concentrations. Further analysis showed that the effect on swimming activity was not attributed to impaired swim bladder inflation, but rather to baseline toxicity. We conclude that silicone O-rings (1) produce a linear dilution series of phenanthrene in the 120hpf FET test, (2) generate and maintain aqueous concentrations for reliable determination of effect concentrations, and allow for obtaining mechanistic toxicity information, and (3) cause no toxicity, demonstrating its potential as an extension of the FET test when testing hydrophobic chemicals. PMID:26026258

  12. Efficacy of a High-Dose in Addition to Daily Low-Dose Vitamin A in Children Suffering from Severe Acute Malnutrition with Other Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Samima; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Rasul, Choudhury Habibur; Saha, Debasish; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Hossain, Md Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficacy of high-dose vitamin A (VA) in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) has recently been questioned. This study compared the efficacy of a single high-dose (200,000 IU) in addition to daily low-dose (5000 IU) VA in the management of children suffering from SAM with diarrhea and/or acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI). Methods In a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial in icddr,b, Bangladesh during 2005–07, children aged 6–59 months with weight-for-height <−3 Z-score and/or bipedal edema (SAM) received either a high-dose VA or placebo on admission day. Both the groups received 5,000 IU/day VA in a multivitamins drop for 15 days and other standard treatment which is similar to WHO guidelines. Results A total 260 children (130 in each group) were enrolled. All had diarrhea, 54% had concomitant ALRI, 50% had edema, 48.5% were girl with a mean±SD age of 16±10 months. None had clinical signs of VA deficiency. Mean±SD baseline serum retinol was 13.15±9.28 µg/dl, retinol binding protein was 1.27±0.95 mg/dl, and pre-albumin was 7.97±3.96 mg/dl. Median (inter quartile range) of C-reactive protein was 7.8 (2.1, 22.2) mg/L. Children of the two groups did not differ in any baseline characteristic. Over the 15 days treatment period resolution of diarrhea, ALRI, edema, anthropometric changes, and biochemical indicators of VA were similar between the groups. The high-dose VA supplementation in children with SAM did not show any adverse event. Conclusions Efficacy of daily low-dose VA compared to an additional single high-dose was not observed to be better in the management of children suffering from SAM with other acute illnesses. A single high-dose VA may be given especially where the children with SAM may leave the hospital/treatment center early. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00388921 PMID:22479361

  13. Meta-analysis of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome based on randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangdong; Li, Suwei; Zhang, Jiuzhi; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Lili; Deng, Qiuming; Wan, Xianyao

    2014-11-01

    This study seeks to evaluate the potential benefits of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by conducting a meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Pubmed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases through December 2013. Only RCTs evaluating high doses of ambroxol (≥15 mg/kg or 1000 mg/day) treatment for patients with ALI/ARDS were selected. We included 10 RCTs involving 508 patients. Adjuvant treatment with high doses of ambroxol increased PaO(2)/FiO(2) (weight mean differences [WMD] = 69.18, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 41.71-96.65), PO(2) (WMD = 11.74, 95% CI: 8.50-14.99), and SaO(2) (WMD = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.60-2.71) compared with usual treatment. Treatment with high doses of ambroxol appeared to reduce serum tumor necrosis factor-α level (WMD -7.92 µg/L; 95% CI, -10.94 to -4.9) and interleukin-6 level (WMD = -20.65 µg/L, 95% CI: -24.74 to -16.55) and to increase serum superoxide dismutase level (WMD = 19.07 NU/mL, 95% CI: 6.16-31.97). The findings suggest that treatment with high doses of ambroxol appears to improve PaO(2)/FiO(2), PO(2), and SaO(2), and the benefits might be related to ambroxol's anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  14. Meta-analysis of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome based on randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangdong; Li, Suwei; Zhang, Jiuzhi; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Lili; Deng, Qiuming; Wan, Xianyao

    2014-11-01

    This study seeks to evaluate the potential benefits of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by conducting a meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Pubmed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases through December 2013. Only RCTs evaluating high doses of ambroxol (≥15 mg/kg or 1000 mg/day) treatment for patients with ALI/ARDS were selected. We included 10 RCTs involving 508 patients. Adjuvant treatment with high doses of ambroxol increased PaO(2)/FiO(2) (weight mean differences [WMD] = 69.18, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 41.71-96.65), PO(2) (WMD = 11.74, 95% CI: 8.50-14.99), and SaO(2) (WMD = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.60-2.71) compared with usual treatment. Treatment with high doses of ambroxol appeared to reduce serum tumor necrosis factor-α level (WMD -7.92 µg/L; 95% CI, -10.94 to -4.9) and interleukin-6 level (WMD = -20.65 µg/L, 95% CI: -24.74 to -16.55) and to increase serum superoxide dismutase level (WMD = 19.07 NU/mL, 95% CI: 6.16-31.97). The findings suggest that treatment with high doses of ambroxol appears to improve PaO(2)/FiO(2), PO(2), and SaO(2), and the benefits might be related to ambroxol's anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:25174313

  15. High-dose perioperative atorvastatin and acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Frederic T.; Hendricks, Patricia A.; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Shi, Yaping; Petracek, Michael R.; Byrne, John G.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Hydroxy-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors affect several mechanisms underlying acute kidney injury (AKI). Objective To test the hypothesis that short-term high-dose perioperative atorvastatin would reduce AKI following cardiac surgery Design, Setting, Participants Double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of adult cardiac surgery patients conducted November 2009 to October 2014 at Vanderbilt University Medical Center Intervention Statin-naïve patients (n=199) were randomly assigned 80mg atorvastatin the day before surgery, 40mg the morning of surgery, and 40mg daily following surgery (n=102) or matching placebo (n=97). Patients using statins prior to study enrollment (n=416) continued their pre-enrollment statin until the day of surgery, were randomly assigned 80mg atorvastatin the morning of surgery and 40mg the morning after (n=206) or matching placebo (n=210), and resumed their statin on postoperative day 2. Main Outcome AKI, defined as 0.3 mg/dl rise in serum creatinine within 48 hours of surgery (AKIN criteria) Results The DSMB recommended stopping the statin-naïve group due to increased AKI among statin-naïve participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD, estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73 m2) receiving atorvastatin and then recommended stopping for futility after 615 participants (median age, 67 years; 188 [30.6%] women, and 202 [32.8%] diabetic) completed the study. Among all participants (n=615), AKI occurred in 64 of 308 participants (20.8%) randomized to atorvastatin versus 60 of 307 participants (19.5%) randomized to placebo (risk ratio [RR], 1.06 [95% CI, 0.78–1.46]; P=0.75). Among statin-naïve participants (n=199), AKI occurred in 22 of 102 (21.6%) receiving atorvastatin versus 13 of 97 (13.4%) receiving placebo (RR, 1.61 [0.86–3.01]; P=0.15), and serum creatinine increased 0.11mg/dl (−0.11 to 0.56) (median [10th to 90th percentile]) in those randomized to atorvastatin versus 0.05 (−0

  16. High-Dose Vincristine Sulfate Liposome Injection for Advanced, Relapsed, and Refractory Adult Philadelphia Chromosome–Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Susan; Schiller, Gary; Lister, John; Damon, Lloyd; Goldberg, Stuart; Aulitzky, Walter; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stock, Wendy; Coutre, Steven; Douer, Dan; Heffner, Leonard T.; Larson, Melissa; Seiter, Karen; Smith, Scott; Assouline, Sarit; Kuriakose, Philip; Maness, Lori; Nagler, Arnon; Rowe, Jacob; Schaich, Markus; Shpilberg, Ofer; Yee, Karen; Schmieder, Guenter; Silverman, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Deborah; Deitcher, Steven R.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is associated with high reinduction mortality, chemotherapy resistance, and rapid progression leading to death. Vincristine sulfate liposome injection (VSLI), sphingomyelin and cholesterol nanoparticle vincristine (VCR), facilitates VCR dose-intensification and densification plus enhances target tissue delivery. We evaluated high-dose VSLI monotherapy in adults with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) –negative ALL that was multiply relapsed, relapsed and refractory to reinduction, and/or relapsed after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients and Methods Sixty-five adults with Ph-negative ALL in second or greater relapse or whose disease had progressed following two or more leukemia therapies were treated in this pivotal phase II, multinational trial. Intravenous VSLI 2.25 mg/m2, without dose capping, was administered once per week until response, progression, toxicity, or pursuit of HCT. The primary end point was achievement of complete response (CR) or CR with incomplete hematologic recovery (CRi). Results The CR/CRi rate was 20% and overall response rate was 35%. VSLI monotherapy was effective as third-, fourth-, and fifth-line therapy and in patients refractory to other single- and multiagent reinduction therapies. Median CR/CRi duration was 23 weeks (range, 5 to 66 weeks); 12 patients bridged to a post-VSLI HCT, and five patients were long-term survivors. VSLI was generally well tolerated and associated with a low 30-day mortality rate (12%). Conclusion High-dose VSLI monotherapy resulted in meaningful clinical outcomes including durable responses and bridging to HCT in advanced ALL settings. The toxicity profile of VSLI was predictable, manageable, and comparable to standard VCR despite the delivery of large, normally unachievable, individual and cumulative doses of VCR. PMID:23169518

  17. Acute exposure of mice to high-dose ultrafine carbon black decreases susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that inhalation of carbonaceous particulate matter from biomass combustion increases susceptibility to bacterial pneumonia. In vitro studies report that phagocytosis of carbon black by alveolar macrophages (AM) impairs killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have previously reported high levels of black carbon in AM from biomass smoke-exposed children and adults. We therefore aimed to use a mouse model to test the hypothesis that high levels of carbon loading of AM in vivo increases susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Female outbred mice were treated with either intranasal phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or ultrafine carbon black (UF-CB in PBS; 500 μg on day 1 and day 4), and then infected with S. pneumoniae strain D39 on day 5. Survival was assessed over 72 h. The effect of UF-CB on AM carbon loading, airway inflammation, and a urinary marker of pulmonary oxidative stress was assessed in uninfected animals. Results Instillation of UF-CB in mice resulted a pattern of AM carbon loading similar to that of biomass-smoke exposed humans. In uninfected animals, UF-CB treated animals had increased urinary 8-oxodG (P = 0.055), and an increased airway neutrophil differential count (P < 0.01). All PBS-treated mice died within 72 h after infection with S. pneumoniae, whereas morbidity and mortality after infection was reduced in UF-CB treated animals (median survival 48 h vs. 30 h, P < 0.001). At 24 hr post-infection, UF-CB treated mice had lower lung and the blood S. pneumoniae colony forming unit counts, and lower airway levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine/growth-related oncogene (KC/GRO), and interferon gamma. Conclusion Acute high level loading of AM with ultrafine carbon black particles per se does not increase the susceptibility of mice to pneumococcal infection in vivo. PMID:20958976

  18. Comparison of Acute and Late Toxicities for Three Modern High-Dose Radiation Treatment Techniques for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Kestin, Larry; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank; Brabbins, Donald; Gustafson, Gary; Ye Hong; Martinez, Alavaro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We compared acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities in prostate cancer patients treated with three different high-dose radiation techniques. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,903 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive RT at William Beaumont Hospital from 1992 to 2006: 22% with brachytherapy alone (BT), 55% with image-guided external beam (EB-IGRT), and 23% external beam with high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost (EBRT+HDR). Median dose with BT was 120 Gy for LDR and 38 Gy for HDR (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4). Median dose with EB-IGRT was 75.6 Gy (PTV) to prostate with or without seminal vesicles. For EBRT+HDR, the pelvis was treated to 46 Gy with an additional 19 Gy (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered via HDR. GI and GU toxicity was evaluated utilizing the NCI-CTC criteria (v.3.0). Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Results: The incidences of any acute {>=} Grade 2 GI or GU toxicities were 35%, 49%, and 55% for BT, EB-IGRT, and EBRT+HDR (p < 0.001). Any late GU toxicities {>=} Grade 2 were present in 22%, 21%, and 28% for BT, EB-IGRT, and EBRT+HDR (p = 0.01), respectively. Patients receiving EBRT+HDR had a higher incidence of urethral stricture and retention, whereas dysuria was most common in patients receiving BT. Any Grade {>=}2 late GI toxicities were 2%, 20%, and 9% for BT, EB-IGRT, and EBRT+HDR (p < 0.001). Differences were most pronounced for rectal bleeding, with 3-year rates of 0.9%, 20%, and 6% (p < 0.001) for BT, EB-IGRT, and EBRT+HDR respectively. Conclusions: Each of the three modern high-dose radiation techniques for localized prostate cancer offers a different toxicity profile. These data can help patients and physicians to make informed decisions regarding radiotherapy for prostate andenocarcinoma.

  19. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated. PMID:27682899

  20. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated.

  1. Fast and delayed locomotor response to acute high-dose nicotine administration in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Jandová, K; Marešová, D; Pokorný, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the immediate and delayed locomotor response to high-dose nicotine (NIC) administration in rats. The vertical and horizontal activity of behavior in adult male rats exposed to 1 mg/kg NIC or saline (SAL) were tested in a Laboras apparatus for one hour after drug application. Animals were then returned to their cages and housed for another seven days. After this period all animals were placed in Laboras again and their behavioral pattern was retested for another period of one hour (delayed response). Horizontal activity: immediately after nicotine administration animal were less mobile (first 2-minutes interval), when compared with controls. The immobilization effect of nicotine disappeared within 4 minutes and during whole first 10-minutes interval time spent by locomotion did not differ from controls. Locomotion activity of animals treated with nicotine increased robustly in following 10 minutes and remained significantly higher in 2nd, 3rd and 5th 10-minutes interval. Vertical activity: Rearing frequency was significantly lowered by NIC administration in first two minutes of the experiment and the same was found when the duration of rearing was analyzed. Lower rearing intensity of NIC treated animals disappeared in 4 minutes and was finally higher during whole test session as compared with controls. When duration of rearing was analyzed it was significantly longer in NIC treated animals. In majority of observed behavioral aspects there were no differences between NIC treated rats and controls seven days after NIC or SAL treatment. Our results reflect effect of NIC and we conclude that NIC significantly influences behavior of experimental animals.

  2. Evaluation of continuous low dose rate versus acute single high dose rate radiation combined with oncolytic viral therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    LIU, CHUNYAN; ZHANG, YONGGANG; LIU, MINZHI MAGGIE; ZHOU, HAOMING; CHOWDHURY, WASIM H.; LUPOLD, SHAWN E.; DEWEESE, TED L.; RODRIGUEZ, RONALD

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus (CRAd) has been previously demonstrated to augment the activity of radiation, resulting in synergy of cell kill. However, previous models combining radiation with CRAd have not focused on the methods of radiation delivery. Materials and methods We model the combination of a novel prostate-specific CRAd, Ad5 PSE/PBN E1A-AR (Ad5: adenovirus 5; PSE: prostate-specific enhancer; PBN: rat probasin promoter; E1A: early region 1A; AR: androgen receptor), with radiation delivered both acutely and continuously, in an effort to better mimic the potential clinical modes of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Results We demonstrate that pre-treatment of cells with acute single high dose rate (HDR) radiation 24 hours prior to viral infection results in significantly enhanced viral replication and virus-mediated cell death. In addition, this combination causes increased level of γ-H2AX (Phosphorylated histone protein H2AX on serine 139), a marker of double-stranded DNA damage and an indirect measure of nuclear fragmentation. In contrast, continuous low dose rate (LDR) radiation immediately following infection of the same CRAd results in no enhancement of viral replication, and only additive effects in virus-mediated cell death. Conclusions These data provide the first direct assessment of the real-time impact of radiation on viral replication and the first comparison of the effect of radiation delivery on the efficacy of CRAd virotherapy. Our data demonstrate substantial differences in CRAd efficacy based on the mode of radiation delivery. PMID:20201650

  3. The acute effect of high-dose intravenous vitamin C and other nutrients on blood pressure: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Travica, Nikolaj; Sali, Avni

    2016-01-01

    Background Regular intake of vitamin C/ascorbate reduces blood pressure (BP) in hypertensives. High-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC) achieves higher plasma levels; however, there is a paucity of research on acute BP effects. Our study is the first to investigate the effect of high-dose IVC, with or without concomitant i.v. nutrients, on BP during i.v. treatment. Methods A cohort of adult patients scheduled to receive IVC treatment for infection, cancer or fatigue, as prescribed by their treating doctor, participated at a Melbourne clinic, Australia. Ambulatory BP was assessed every 10 min over 90 min during i.v. treatment. Patients received 15–100 g of IVC alone or in addition to i.v. vitamin B, glutathione, magnesium or zinc. BP change over time adjusted for baseline BP, IVC dosage, i.v. treatment and BMI was analysed. Results A total of 77 mostly normotensive patients participated, with a third receiving IVC alone (42±20 g), and two-thirds also received other i.v. nutrients. IVC alone (>30 g) reduced the mean BP up to 8–9 mmHg in prehypertensive patients. In contrast, concomitant intravenous vitamin B12 (IVB12) significantly increased the mean BP by 11–13 mmHg. Comparison of BP change during IVC versus IVC+IVB12 indicated a highly significant difference [systolic blood pressure: mean difference (SD)=16.6 (17.8) mmHg, P<0.001; diastolic blood pressure: mean difference (SD)=12.5 (16.7) mmHg, P=0.003]. Conclusion Our study suggests an acute BP-reducing effect of high-dose IVC, particularly with dosages above 30 g, and in patients with prehypertension and normal BMI. Furthermore, our study indicated a marked and clinically relevant hypertensive effect of IVB12, suggesting routine BP monitoring during i.v. therapy in clinical practice. PMID:26910646

  4. Acute toxicity of high doses of the glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, in the Syrian Golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Langkilde, Søren; Schrøder, Malene; Stewart, Derek; Meyer, Otto; Conner, Sean; Davies, Howard; Poulsen, Morten

    2008-09-24

    Sprouted, stressed, or spoiled potato tubers have reportedly led to human acute intoxication, coma, and death when consumed in high amounts. These effects have been attributed to glycoalkaloids (GAs), primarily alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, naturally present in all potatoes. The level of GAs in potato tubers has previously been shown to increase substantially as a result of improper handling and postharvest storage. A short-term study was performed to investigate the dose-response profile of alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine alone or in combination, administered daily by oral gavage to Syrian Golden hamsters. Daily doses of 100 mg of alpha-solanine [kg body weight (BW)] (-1) induced death in two of four hamsters within 4 days, when administered by gavage to female Syrian hamsters. Doses of 100 mg of alpha-chaconine alone or alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine combined in a ratio of 1:2.5, in doses of 75 or 100 mg (kg BW) (-1), induced death in one of four hamsters within the same period. Animals dosed with alpha-solanine alone or in combination with alpha-chaconine suffered from fluid-filled and dilated small intestines. The GA administration had no effect on acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) or butyryl cholinesterase (BuChE) activity in plasma or brain. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics showed that there was a specific accumulation of alpha-chaconine in the liver tissues. In addition, metabolomics gave direct evidence of glycolytic metabolism of the GA with the beta 1, beta 2, and gamma-GAs detected in the urine and, to a lesser extent, the feces. Doses from 75 mg (kg BW) (-1) of alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, or the two compounds combined were potentially lethal within 4-5 days in the Syrian Golden hamster. However, the cause of death in these studies could not be established. No synergistic effects of alpha-solanine combined with alpha-chaconine were evident.

  5. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  6. Possible benefit of consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine on overall survival of adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M.C.; Velloso, E.D.R.P.; Buccheri, V.; Chamone, D.A.F.; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    In adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML), high-dose cytarabine consolidation therapy has been shown to influence survival in selected patients, although the appropriate doses and schemes have not been defined. We evaluated survival after calculating the actual dose of cytarabine that patients received for consolidation therapy and divided them into 3 groups according to dose. We conducted a single-center, retrospective study involving 311 non-promyelocytic AML patients with a median age of 36 years (16-79 years) who received curative treatment between 1978 and 2007. The 131 patients who received cytarabine consolidation were assigned to study groups by their cytarabine dose protocol. Group 1 (n=69) received <1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles. The remaining patients received high-dose cytarabine (≥1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles). The actual dose received during the entire consolidation period in these patients was calculated, allowing us to divide these patients into 2 additional groups. Group 2 (n=27) received an intermediate-high-dose (<27 g/m2), and group 3 (n=35) received a very-high-dose (≥27 g/m2). Among the 311 patients receiving curative treatment, the 5-year survival rate was 20.2% (63 patients). The cytarabine consolidation dose was an independent determinant of survival in multivariate analysis; age, karyotype, induction protocol, French-American-British classification, and de novo leukemia were not. Comparisons showed that the risk of death was higher in the intermediate-high-dose group 2 (hazard ratio [HR]=4.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.81-11.21) and the low-dose group 1 (HR=4.43; 95% CI: 1.97-9.96) than in the very-high-dose group 3, with no significant difference between those two groups. Our findings indicated that very-high-dose cytarabine during consolidation in adults with non-promyelocytic AML may improve survival. PMID:25517921

  7. Does Pre-Treatment with High Dose Atorvastatin Prevent Microvascular Dysfunction after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong-Ki; Nam, Chang-Wook; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Chung, Woo-Young; Cho, Byung-Ryul; Fearon, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is controversy surrounding whether or not high dose statin administration before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) decreases peri-procedural microvascular injury. We performed a prospective randomized study to investigate the mechanisms and effects of pre-treatment high dose atorvastatin on myocardial damage in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) undergoing PCI. Subjects and Methods Seventy seven patients with NSTE-ACS were randomly assigned to either the high dose group (atorvastatin 80 mg loading 12 to 24 h before PCI with a further 40 mg loading 2 h before PCI, n=39) or low dose group (atorvastatin 10 mg administration 12 to 24 h before PCI, n=38). Index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was measured after stent implantation. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after PCI. Results The baseline characteristics were not different between the two patient groups. Compared to the low dose group, the high dose group had lower post PCI IMR (14.1±5.0 vs. 19.2±9.3 U, p=0.003). Post PCI CK-MB was also lower in the high dose group (median: 1.40 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR: 0.75 to 3.45] vs. 4.00 [IQR: 1.70 to 7.37], p=0.002) as was the post-PCI CRP level (0.09 mg/dL [IQR: 0.04 to 0.16] vs. 0.22 [IQR: 0.08 to 0.60], p=0.001). Conclusion Pre-treatment with high dose atorvastatin reduces peri-PCI microvascular dysfunction verified by post-PCI IMR and exerts an immediate anti-inflammatory effect in patients with NSTE-ACS. PMID:27482255

  8. Prasugrel compared with high-dose clopidogrel in acute coronary syndrome. The randomised, double-blind ACAPULCO study.

    PubMed

    Montalescot, Gilles; Sideris, Georgios; Cohen, Remy; Meuleman, Catherine; Bal dit Sollier, Claire; Barthélémy, Olivier; Henry, Patrick; Lim, Pascal; Beygui, Farzin; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Marshall, Debra; Luo, Junxiang; Petitjean, Helene; Drouet, Ludovic

    2010-01-01

    Compared with the approved dose regimen of clopidogrel (300-mg loading dose [LD], 75-mg maintenance dose [MD]), prasugrel has been demonstrated to reduce ischaemic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In ACS, antiplatelet effects of a prasugrel MD regimen have not been previously compared with either a higher clopidogrel MD or after switching from a higher clopidogrel LD. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antiplatelet effect of a prasugrel 10-mg MD versus a clopidogrel 150-mg MD in patients with ACS who had received a clopidogrel 900-mg LD. Patients with non-ST elevation ACS, treated with aspirin and a clopidogrel 900-mg LD, were randomised within 24 hours post-LD to receive a prasugrel 10-mg or clopidogrel 150-mg MD. After 14 days of the initial MD, subjects switched to the alternative treatment for 14 days. The primary endpoint compared maximum platelet aggregation (MPA, 20 microM adenosine diphosphate [ADP]) between prasugrel and clopidogrel MDs for both periods. Responder analyses between treatments were performed using several platelet-function methods. Of 56 randomised subjects, 37 underwent PCI. MPA was 26.2% for prasugrel 10 mg and 39.1% for clopidogrel 150 mg (p<0.001). The prasugrel MD regimen reduced MPA from the post-900-mg LD level (41.2% to 29.1%, p=0.003). Poor response ranged from 0% to 6% for prasugrel 10 mg and 4% to 34% for clopidogrel 150 mg. Thus, in ACS patients a prasugrel 10-mg MD regimen resulted in significantly greater platelet inhibition than clopidogrel at twice its approved MD or a 900-mg LD.

  9. Local Delivery of High-Dose Chondroitinase ABC in the Sub-Acute Stage Promotes Axonal Outgrowth and Functional Recovery after Complete Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chu-Hsun; Lin, Chi-Te; Lee, Meng-Jen; Tsai, May-Jywan; Huang, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ming-Chao; Lin, Yi-Lo; Chen, Ching-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are glial scar-associated molecules considered axonal regeneration inhibitors and can be digested by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to promote axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI). We previously demonstrated that intrathecal delivery of low-dose ChABC (1 U) in the acute stage of SCI promoted axonal regrowth and functional recovery. In this study, high-dose ChABC (50 U) introduced via intrathecal delivery induced subarachnoid hemorrhage and death within 48 h. However, most SCI patients are treated in the sub-acute or chronic stages, when the dense glial scar has formed and is minimally digested by intrathecal delivery of ChABC at the injury site. The present study investigated whether intraparenchymal delivery of ChABC in the sub-acute stage of complete spinal cord transection would promote axonal outgrowth and improve functional recovery. We observed no functional recovery following the low-dose ChABC (1 U or 5 U) treatments. Furthermore, animals treated with high-dose ChABC (50 U or 100 U) showed decreased CSPGs levels. The extent and area of the lesion were also dramatically decreased after ChABC treatment. The outgrowth of the regenerating axons was significantly increased, and some partially crossed the lesion site in the ChABC-treated groups. In addition, retrograde Fluoro-Gold (FG) labeling showed that the outgrowing axons could cross the lesion site and reach several brain stem nuclei involved in sensory and motor functions. The Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) open field locomotor scores revealed that the ChABC treatment significantly improved functional recovery compared to the control group at eight weeks after treatment. Our study demonstrates that high-dose ChABC treatment in the sub-acute stage of SCI effectively improves glial scar digestion by reducing the lesion size and increasing axonal regrowth to the related functional nuclei, which promotes locomotor recovery. Thus, our results will aid in

  10. Mitigation Effect of an FGF-2 Peptide on Acute Gastrointestinal Syndrome After High-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lurong; Sun Weimin; Wang Jianjun; Zhang Mei; Yang Shanmin; Tian Yeping; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; Pena, Louis A.; Zhang Kunzhong; Cao Yongbing; Yin Liangjie; Wang Wei; Zhang Lei; Schaefer, Katherine L.; Saubermann, Lawrence J.; Swarts, Steven G.; Fenton, Bruce M.; Keng, Peter C.; Okunieff, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Acute gastrointestinal syndrome (AGS) resulting from ionizing radiation causes death within 7 days. Currently, no satisfactory agent exists for mitigation of AGS. A peptide derived from the receptor binding domain of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-P) was synthesized and its mitigation effect on AGS was examined. Methods and Materials: A subtotal body irradiation (sub-TBI) model was created to induce gastrointestinal (GI) death while avoiding bone marrow death. After 10.5 to 16 Gy sub-TBI, mice received an intramuscular injection of FGF-P (10 mg/kg/day) or saline (0.2 ml/day) for 5 days; survival (frequency and duration) was measured. Crypt cells and their proliferation were assessed by hematoxylin, eosin, and BrdU staining. In addition, GI hemoccult score, stool formation, and plasma levels of endotoxin, insulin, amylase, interleukin (IL)-6, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were evaluated. Results: Treatment with FGF-P rescued a significant fraction of four strains of mice (33-50%) exposed to a lethal dose of sub-TBI. Use of FGF-P improved crypt survival and repopulation and partially preserved or restored GI function. Furthermore, whereas sub-TBI increased plasma endotoxin levels and several pro-inflammation cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-alpha), FGF-P reduced these adverse responses. Conclusions: The study data support pursuing FGF-P as a mitigator for AGS.

  11. Predictors for Rectal and Intestinal Acute Toxicities During Prostate Cancer High-Dose 3D-CRT: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vavassori, Vittorio; Fiorino, Claudio . E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it; Rancati, Tiziana; Magli, Alessandro; Fellin, Gianni; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To find predictors for rectal and intestinal acute toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with {>=}70 Gy conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between July 2002 and March 2004, 1,132 patients were entered into a cooperative study (AIROPROS01-02). Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale and by considering the changes (before and after treatment) of the scores of a self-administered questionnaire on rectal/intestinal toxicity. The correlation with a number of parameters was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Concerning the questionnaire, only moderate/severe complications were considered. Results: Of 1,132 patients, 1,123 were evaluable. Of these patients, 375, 265, and 28 had Grade 1, 2, and 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity, respectively. The mean rectal dose was the most predictive parameter (p = 0.0004; odds ratio, 1.035) for Grade 2 or worse toxicity, and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p 0.02; odds ratio, 0.63) and hormonal therapy (p = 0.04, odds ratio, 0.65) were protective. The questionnaire-based scoring revealed that a greater mean rectal dose was associated with a greater risk of bleeding; larger irradiated volumes were associated with frequency, tenesmus, incontinence, and bleeding; hormonal therapy was protective against frequency and tenesmus; hemorrhoids were associated with a greater risk of tenesmus and bleeding; and diabetes associated highly with diarrhea. Conclusion: The mean rectal dose correlated with acute rectal/intestinal toxicity in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and hormonal therapy and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants were protective. According to the moderate/severe injury scores on the self-assessed questionnaire, several clinical and dose-volume parameters were independently predictive for

  12. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  13. Effects of high doses of dexamethasone on hemodynamic and immunohistochemical characteristics of acute paraquat intoxication in rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Ekerbicer, N; Gurpinar, T; Tarakci, F; Turkoz Uluer, E; İnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium) (PQ), is a nonselective contact herbicide that is highly toxic to humans. The kidney is affected during PQ intoxication. Dexamethasone (Dexa) has anti-inflammatory effects and is used to treat cases of PQ poisoning. We investigated in rat kidney hemodynamic effects and immunohistochemical characteristics of Dexa treatment in acute PQ poisoning. Adult male rats were divided into four groups: 1, untreated control; 2, treated with 100 mg/kg Dexa; 3, treated with 25 mg/kg PQ; 4, treated with PQ + Dexa. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded during the experimental period (2 h). Tissues were removed after 2 h and immunohistochemistry was performed after 24 h. Paraffin sections of kidney were prepared and anti-cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1), anti-cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), anti-angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), anti-aquaporin-1 (AQU-1), anti-vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) primary antibodies were used for immunohistochemical examination. Immunoreactivities were scored as: (1) minimal, (2) weak, (3) mild, (4) moderate, (5) strong and (6) very strong. MAP and HR were measured at 10 min, 20 min, 1 h and 2 h. MAP at 10 and 20 min and 1 h was increased in the Dexa group. HR also was increased in all groups compared to controls at 2 h. Compared to groups 2 and 4, MAP values decreased significantly in group 3 at 1 h. The intensity of all of immunoreactivities was decreased in group 2. In group 3, immunoreactivities of COX-1, COX-2 and ACE were decreased compared to the control and the other groups, whereas AQU-1 and VCAM immunoreactivities were the same as the control group. ACE and VCAM immunoreactivities were decreased in group 4 compared to the control group, while COX-1, COX-2 and AQU-1 immunoreactivities were close to those of the control group. Dexa appears to be useful for treating PQ intoxication. PMID:26796020

  14. [High dose rate brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Aisen, S; Carvalho, H A; Chavantes, M C; Esteves, S C; Haddad, C M; Permonian, A C; Taier, M do C; Marinheiro, R C; Feriancic, C V

    1992-01-01

    The high dose rate brachytherapy uses a single source os 192Ir with 10Ci of nominal activity in a remote afterloading machine. This technique allows an outpatient treatment, without the inconveniences of the conventional low dose rate brachytherapy such as use of general anesthesia, rhachianesthesia, prolonged immobilization, and personal exposition to radiation. The radiotherapy department is now studying 5 basic treatment schemes concerning carcinomas of the uterine cervix, endometrium, lung, esophagus and central nervous system tumors. With the Micro Selectron HDR, 257 treatment sessions were done in 90 patients. Mostly were treated with weekly fractions, receiving a total of three to four treatments each. No complications were observed neither during nor after the procedure. Doses, fraction and ideal associations still have to be studied, so that a higher therapeutic ratio can be reached.

  15. Conventional and high-dose daunorubicin and idarubicin in acute myeloid leukaemia remission induction treatment: a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of 7258 patients.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Leo; Morais, Vinícius Daudt; Lima, Karine Margarites; Onsten, Tor Gunnar Hugo; Ziegelmann, Patrícia Klarmann; Ribeiro, Rodrigo Antonini

    2015-12-01

    Previous meta-analyses suggested that acute myeloid leukaemia induction regimens containing idarubicin (IDA) or high-dose daunorubicin (HDD) induce higher rates of complete remission (CR) than conventional-dose daunorubicin (CDD), with a possible benefit in overall survival. However, robust comparisons between these regimens are still lacking. We conducted a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis regarding these three regimens. Mixed treatment comparison is a statistical method of data summarization that aggregates data from both direct and indirect effect estimates. Literature search strategy included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Scielo and LILACS, from inception until August 2013 and resulted in the inclusion of 17 trials enrolling 7258 adult patients. HDD [relative risk (RR) 1.13; 95% credible interval (CrI) 1.02-1.26] and IDA (RR 1.13; 95% CrI 1.05-1.23) showed higher CR rates than CDD. IDA also led to lower long-term overall mortality rates when compared with CDD (RR 0.93, 95% CrI 0.86-0.99), whereas HDD and CDD were no different (RR 0.94, 95% CrI 0.85-1.02). HDD and IDA comparison did not reach statistically significant differences in CR (RR 1.00; 95% CrI 0.89-1.11) and in long-term mortality (RR 1.01, 95% CrI 0.91-1.11). IDA and HDD are consistently superior to CDD in inducing CR, and IDA was associated with lower long-term mortality. On the basis of these findings, we recommend incorporation of IDA and HDD instead of the traditional CDD as standard treatments for acute myeloid leukaemia induction. The lack of HDD benefit on mortality, when compared with CDD in this study, should be cautiously addressed, because it may have been susceptible to underestimation because of statistical power limitations.

  16. Anatomy-based inverse optimization in high-dose-rate brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: Comparison of incidence of acute genitourinary toxicity between anatomy-based inverse optimization and geometric optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, Tetsuo . E-mail: takimoto@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Shioya, Mariko; Nakano, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the advantages of anatomy-based inverse optimization (IO) in planning high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 114 patients who received HDR brachytherapy (9 Gy in two fractions) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were analyzed. The dose distributions of HDR brachytherapy were optimized using geometric optimization (GO) in 70 patients and by anatomy-based IO in the remaining 44 patients. The correlation between the dose-volume histogram parameters, including the urethral dose and the incidence of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity, was evaluated. Results: The averaged values of the percentage of volume receiving 80-150% of the prescribed minimal peripheral dose (V{sub 8}-V{sub 15}) of the urethra generated by anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than the corresponding values generated by GO. Similarly, the averaged values of the minimal dose received by 5-50% of the target volume (D{sub 5}-D{sub 5}) obtained using anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than those obtained using GO. Regarding acute toxicity, Grade 2 or worse acute GU toxicity developed in 23% of all patients, but was significantly lower in patients for whom anatomy-based IO (16%) was used than in those for whom GO was used (37%), consistent with the reduced urethral dose (p <0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that anatomy-based IO is superior to GO for dose optimization in HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  17. Increased BK viremia and progression to BK-virus nephropathy following high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin for acute cellular rejection.

    PubMed

    Boonyapredee, Maytee; Knight, Kendral; Little, Dustin

    2014-06-01

    BK virus nephropathy and cellular rejection are common causes of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. The two can be difficult to distinguish on allograft biopsy and can be present simultaneously. Management of the patient with coexistent BK infection and rejection is complicated by the conflicting ideals of decreasing immunosuppression to treat the former and increasing immunosuppression to treat the latter. The authors present the case of a 57-year-old renal transplant recipient who underwent allograft biopsy 8 weeks post-transplant for evaluation of increased serum creatinine in the setting of BK viremia (BKV). Biopsy revealed Banff classification 1b acute cellular rejection, with insufficient evidence to diagnose BK virus-associated nephropathy. The patient was administered intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), with no other changes in immunosuppressive therapy. Plasma and urine BK increased exponentially following IVIG administration, and allograft function further deteriorated. Repeat biopsy showed overt BK viral nephropathy, and BKV and creatinine decreased only after reduction in immunosuppression and initiation of leflunomide. Although case series have suggested a potential role for IVIG in the setting of BK infection, further study is needed to define the safety and efficacy of this approach.

  18. Attempts to counteract phosgene-induced acute lung injury by instant high-dose aerosol exposure to hexamethylenetetramine, cysteine or glutathione.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Jürgen; Hai, Chun Xue

    2011-01-01

    Phosgene is an important high-production-volume intermediate with widespread industrial use. Consistent with other lung irritants causing ALI (acute lung injury), mode-of-action-based countermeasures remain rudimentary. This study was conducted to analyze whether extremely short high-level exposure to phosgene gas could be mitigated using three different inhaled nucleophiles administered by inhalation instantly after exposure to phosgene. Groups of young adult male Wistar rats were acutely exposed to carbonyl chloride (phosgene) using a directed-flow nose-only mode of exposure of 600 mg/m³ for 1.5 min (225 ppm × min). Immediately after exposure to phosgene gas the rats were similarly exposed to three strong nucleophiles with and without antioxidant properties for 5 or 15 min. The following nucleophiles were used: hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), l-cysteine (Cys), and l-glutathione (GSH). The concentration of the aerosol (mass median aerodynamic diameter 1.7-2 µm) was targeted to be in the range of 1 mg/L. Cys and GSH have antioxidant properties in addition. The calculated alveolar molar dosage of phosgene was 9 µmol/kg. At 15-min exposure duration, the respective inhaled dose of HMT, Csy, and GSH were 111, 103, and 46 µmol/kg, respectively. The alveolar dose of drugs was ~10-times lower. The efficacy of treatment was judged by protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) collected 1 day post-exposure. In spite of using optimized aerosolization techniques, none of the nucleophiles chosen had any mitigating effect on BALF-protein extravasation. This finding appear to suggest that inhaled phosgene gas acylates instantly nucleophilic moieties at the site of initial deposition and that the resultant reaction products can not be reactivated even following instant inhalation treatment with competing nucleophilic agents. In spite of using maximal technically attainable concentrations, it appears to be experimentally challenging to deliver

  19. Single dose dipyrone for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Faura, Clara; Edwards, Jayne; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Dipyrone (metamizole) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in some countries to treat pain (postoperative, colic, cancer, and migraine); it is banned in others because of an association with life-threatening blood agranulocytosis. This review updates a 2001 Cochrane review, and no relevant new studies were identified, but additional outcomes were sought. Objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events of single dose dipyrone in acute postoperative pain. Search methods The earlier review searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Oxford Pain Relief Database to December 1999. For the update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE,EMBASE and LILACS to February 2010. Selection criteria Single dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo or active controlled trials of dipyrone for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. We included oral, rectal, intramuscular or intravenous administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief over six hours (TOTPAR) was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. Derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over six hours. Use and time to use of rescue medication were additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Fifteen studies tested mainly 500 mg oral dipyrone (173 participants), 2.5 g intravenous dipyrone (101), 2.5 g intramuscular dipyrone (99); fewer than 60 participants received any other dose. All studies used active controls (ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, flurbiprofen, ketoprofen, dexketoprofen, ketorolac, pethidine, tramadol, suprofen); eight used placebo controls. Over 70% of participants

  20. Plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels following high-dose methotrexate treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or Burkitt lymphoma: association with hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Masaru; Nakata, Rieko; Adachi, Souichi; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Heike, Toshio; Takeshita, Yasufumi; Shima, Midori

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate: (i) changes of plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels following high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) treatment and (ii) the correlation of these sulfur-containing amino acids with MTX-induced hepatotoxicity. Fifteen pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and one patient with Burkitt lymphoma, with a total of 26 treatment courses of HD-MTX, were enrolled. Homocysteine levels increased at 24 h after HD-MTX treatment, and showed marginal decreases at 48 and 72 h. Methionine levels showed a biphasic pattern, i.e. an initial decrease at 24 h followed by increases at 48 and 72 h. S-adenosylhomocysteine exhibited a marginal decrease at 24 h. Changes of homocysteine exhibited significant correlation only with a maximum increase of alanine aminotransferase or total bilirubin from baseline. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous changes of plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine following HD-MTX. The potential of homocysteine as a marker of hepatotoxicity is also presented.

  1. High-dose albumin treatment for acute ischaemic stroke (ALIAS): a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Myron D.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Hill, Michael D.; Martin, Renee H.; Moy, Claudia S.; Barsan, William G.; Waldman, Bonnie D.; Tamariz, Diego; Ryckborst, Karla J.

    2014-01-01

    Background In animal models of ischaemic stroke, 25% albumin reduced brain infarction and improved neurobehavioral outcome. In a pilot clinical trial, albumin doses as high as 2 g per kg were safely tolerated. Trial Design and Methods This was a randomised, parallel-group, double-blind trial to test the superiority of 25% albumin (dose 2 g [8 ml] per kg; maximum, 750 ml) over an equivalent volume of isotonic saline in improving the outcome of acute ischaemic stroke. Eligibility criteria were an ischaemic (i.e., non-haemorrhagic) stroke with baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 6 or above, ability to treat within 5 hours of onset, age 18 through 83 years, and written informed consent. The major exclusion criteria were cardiovascular. The objective was to test the hypothesis that the primary outcome (defined as either a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1, or a NIHSS score of 0 or 1, or both, at 90 days) with albumin treatment was superior to saline by an absolute margin of 10 percentage points. Centralised web-based randomisation was by a minimisation-plus-biased-coin algorithm. Thrombolytic therapies were permitted. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT00235495. Findings The trial was stopped prematurely for futility after 841 participants were randomised (422 patients to albumin and 419 to saline). The primary outcome did not differ by treatment assignment (albumin, 44.1%; saline, 44.2%; relative benefit, 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84 – 1.10 adjusted for baseline NIHSS score and thrombolysis stratum). Secondary outcomes were also neutral. The chief adverse event was mild-to-moderate pulmonary edema, which was more common with albumin than saline (13.1% and 1.2%, respectively), as was symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage within 24 hours (albumin, 4.1%; saline, 1.7%). While the favourable outcome rate in albumin-treated subjects remained consistent at 44–45% over the course of the trial, the

  2. Efficacy of Short-Term High-Dose Statin Pretreatment in Prevention of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Updated Study-Level Meta-Analysis of 13 Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ki-Hyun; Jung, Ji-hyun; Lee, Sang Eun; Han, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Yang, Han-Mo; Park, Kyung Woo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Jo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been conflicting results across the trials that evaluated prophylactic efficacy of short-term high-dose statin pre-treatment for prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) in patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG). The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date meta-analysis regarding the efficacy of high-dose statin pre-treatment in preventing CIAKI. Methods and Results Randomized-controlled trials comparing high-dose statin versus low-dose statin or placebo pre-treatment for prevention of CIAKI in patients undergoing CAG were included. The primary endpoint was the incidence of CIAKI within 2–5days after CAG. The relative risk (RR) with 95% CI was the effect measure. This analysis included 13 RCTs with 5,825 total patients; about half of them (n = 2,889) were pre-treated with high-dose statin (at least 40 mg of atorvastatin) before CAG, and the remainders (n = 2,936) pretreated with low-dose statin or placebo. In random-effects model, high-dose statin pre-treatment significantly reduced the incidence of CIAKI (RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.35–0.57, p<0.001, I2 = 8.2%, NNT 16), compared with low-dose statin or placebo. The benefit of high-dose statin was consistent in both comparisons with low-dose statin (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.34–0.65, p<0.001, I2 = 28.4%, NNT 19) or placebo (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.21–0.58, p<0.001, I2 = 0.0%, NNT 16). In addition, high-dose statin showed significant reduction of CIAKI across various subgroups of chronic kidney disease, acute coronary syndrome, and old age (≥60years), regardless of osmolality of contrast or administration of N-acetylcystein. Conclusions High-dose statin pre-treatment significantly reduced overall incidence of CIAKI in patients undergoing CAG, and emerges as an effective prophylactic measure to prevent CIAKI. PMID:25369120

  3. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies.

    PubMed

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G; Sopori, Mohan L

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD50 sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD50 sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, >90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD50 sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin.

  4. Low dose acute alcohol effects on GABAA receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Hanchar, H. Jacob; Olsen, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors and have long been implicated in mediating at least part of the acute actions of ethanol. For example, ethanol and GABAergic drugs including barbiturates and benzodiazepines share many pharmacological properties. Besides the prototypical synaptic GABAAR subtypes, nonsynaptic GABAARs have recently emerged as important regulators of neuronal excitability. While high doses (≥100 mM) of ethanol have been reported to enhance activity of most GABAAR subtypes, most abundant synaptic GABAARs are essentially insensitive to ethanol concentrations that occur during social ethanol consumption (<30 mM). However, extrasynaptic δ and β3 subunit-containing GABAARs, associated in the brain with α4or α6 subunits, are sensitive to low millimolar ethanol concentrations, as produced by drinking half a glass of wine. Additionally, we found that a mutation in the cerebellar α6 subunit (α6R100Q), initially reported in rats selectively bred for increased alcohol sensitivity, is sufficient to produce increased alcohol-induced motor impairment and further increases of alcohol sensitivity in recombinant α6β3δ receptors. Furthermore, the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 blocks the low dose alcohol enhancement on α4/6/β3δ receptors, without reducing GABA-induced currents. In binding assays α4β3δ GABAARs bind [3H] Ro15-4513 with high affinity, and this binding is inhibited, in an apparently competitive fashion, by low ethanol concentrations, as well as analogs of Ro15-4513 that are active to antagonize ethanol or Ro15-4513’s block of ethanol. We conclude that most low to moderate dose alcohol effects are mediated by alcohol actions on alcohol/Ro15-4513 binding sites on GABAAR subtypes. PMID:16814864

  5. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: Effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G.; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G.; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD{sub 50} sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24 h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD{sub 50} sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, > 90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD{sub 50} sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin. - Highlights: • Inhalation exposure of rats to LD{sub 50} sarin causes death through respiratory failure. • Severe bronchoconstriction is the major cause of sarin-induced respiratory failure. • Transfer of sarin exposed rats to 60% oxygen improves the mortality temporarily.

  6. Immediate and Complex Cardiovascular Adaptation to an Acute Alcohol Dose

    PubMed Central

    Buckman, Jennifer F.; Eddie, David; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.; Vaschillo, Bronya; Garcia, Aaron; Bates, Marsha E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The detrimental effects of chronic heavy alcohol use on the cardiovascular system are well established and broadly appreciated. Integrated cardiovascular response to an acute dose of alcohol has been less studied. This study examined the early effects of an acute dose of alcohol on the cardiovascular system, with particular emphasis on system variability and sensitivity. The goal was to begin to understand how acute alcohol disrupts dynamic cardiovascular regulatory processes prior to the development of cardiovascular disease. Methods Healthy participants (N = 72, age 21 to 29) were randomly assigned to an alcohol, placebo, or no-alcohol control beverage condition. Beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were assessed during a low-demand cognitive task prior to and following beverage consumption. Between-group differences in neurocardiac response to an alcohol challenge (blood alcohol concentration ~ 0.06 mg/dl) were tested. Results The alcohol beverage group showed higher average HR, lower average stroke volume, lower HR variability and BP variability, and increased vascular tone baroreflex sensitivity after alcohol consumption. No changes were observed in the placebo group, but the control group showed slightly elevated average HR and BP after beverage consumption, possibly due to juice content. At the level of the individual, an active alcohol dose appeared to disrupt the typically tight coupling between cardiovascular processes. Conclusions A dose of alcohol quickly invoked multiple cardiovascular responses, possibly as an adaptive reaction to the acute pharmacological challenge. Future studies should assess how exposure to alcohol acutely disrupts or dissociates typically integrated neurocardiac functions. PMID:26614647

  7. Dose-enhanced combined priming regimens for refractory acute myeloid leukemia and middle-and-high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: a single-center, retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaorong; Wang, Jin; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Wanggang; Liu, Jie; Cao, Xingmei; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Gu, Liufang; Lei, Bo; Wang, Jianli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess chemotherapeutic regimens for refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and middle-and-high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods Between 2004 and 2014, 44 patients with refractory AML and 36 patients with MDS were treated with new priming regimens (CHAG, CHTG, CHMG, or CTMG), and 77 patients with refractory AML and 52 patients with MDS were treated with conventional priming regimens (CHG or CAG). This was a single-center retrospective analysis of remission, adverse event, mortality, and survival. The capacity of clinical features (including the expression of co-stimulatory molecule B7.1 on tumor cells) to influence survival was assessed by multivariate Cox regression. Results Complete and partial remission rates (RRs) were significantly higher in AML patients treated with new regimens compared to conventional ones (68.2% vs 13.6%, P<0.05). Complete and partial remission were also significantly higher in patients with MDS treated with new regimens (55.6% vs 19.4%, P<0.05). However, although survival advantages were observed in the first year, the new regimens did not significantly improve 3-year overall survival (P>0.05). Patients administered the new regimens experienced more severe and sustained myelosuppression (P<0.05), but no severe adverse events or treatment-related deaths were observed. The rate of non-hematological side effects did not differ significantly between treatment regimens (P>0.05). Both RR and B7.1 expression were significantly higher in patients with AML-M2 and M5 (P<0.05). Conclusion The new priming regimens improved the RR, lowered the recurrence rate, and improved survival in AML and middle-and-high-risk MDS, without significantly increasing adverse events. PMID:27382304

  8. Single dose oral flurbiprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Asquad; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Background Flurbiprofen is a non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), related to ibuprofen and naproxen, used to treat acute and chronic painful conditions. There is no systematic review of its use in acute postoperative pain. Objectives To assess efficacy, duration of action, and associated adverse events of single dose oral flurbiprofen in acute postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to January 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered flurbiprofen in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk (RR) and number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Eleven studies compared flurbiprofen (699 participants) with placebo (362 participants) in studies lasting 6 to 12 hours. Studies were of adequate reporting quality, and most participants had pain following dental extractions. The dose of flurbiprofen used was 25 mg to 100 mg, with most information for 50 mg and 100 mg. The NNT for at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours for flurbiprofen 50 mg compared with placebo (692 participants) was 2.7 (2.3 to 3.3) and for 100 mg (416 participants) it was 2.5 (2.0 to 3.1). With flurbiprofen 50 mg and 100 mg 65% to 70% of participants experienced at least 50% pain relief, compared with 25% to 30% with placebo. Rescue medication was used by 25

  9. Modeling inoculum dose dependent patterns of acute virus infections.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Handel, Andreas

    2014-04-21

    Inoculum dose, i.e. the number of pathogens at the beginning of an infection, often affects key aspects of pathogen and immune response dynamics. These in turn determine clinically relevant outcomes, such as morbidity and mortality. Despite the general recognition that inoculum dose is an important component of infection outcomes, we currently do not understand its impact in much detail. This study is intended to start filling this knowledge gap by analyzing inoculum dependent patterns of viral load dynamics in acute infections. Using experimental data for adenovirus and infectious bronchitis virus infections as examples, we demonstrate inoculum dose dependent patterns of virus dynamics. We analyze the data with the help of mathematical models to investigate what mechanisms can reproduce the patterns observed in experimental data. We find that models including components of both the innate and adaptive immune response are needed to reproduce the patterns found in the data. We further analyze which types of innate or adaptive immune response models agree with observed data. One interesting finding is that only models for the adaptive immune response that contain growth terms partially independent of viral load can properly reproduce observed patterns. This agrees with the idea that an antigen-independent, programmed response is part of the adaptive response. Our analysis provides useful insights into the types of model structures that are required to properly reproduce observed virus dynamics for varying inoculum doses. We suggest that such models should be taken as basis for future models of acute viral infections.

  10. Effect of extended physiotherapy and high-dose vitamin D on rate of falls and hospital re-admission after acute hip fracture: a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines for post-fracture care of elderly hip fracture patients are not established despite the significant socio-economic burden of post hip fracture morbidity and mortality. Using a factorial design, we studied the effects of extended physiotherapy (supervised 1 hour per day during acute care p...

  11. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  12. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses. PMID:27390875

  13. Acceleration of atherogenesis in ApoE-/- mice exposed to acute or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquali, Emanuela; Braga-Tanaka, Ignacia; Tanaka, Satoshi; Pannicelli, Alessandro; Giardullo, Paola; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Tapio, Soile; Atkinson, Michael J; Saran, Anna

    2015-10-13

    There is epidemiological evidence for increased non-cancer mortality, primarily due to circulatory diseases after radiation exposure above 0.5 Sv. We evaluated the effects of chronic low-dose rate versus acute exposures in a murine model of spontaneous atherogenesis. Female ApoE-/- mice (60 days) were chronically irradiated for 300 days with gamma rays at two different dose rates (1 mGy/day; 20 mGy/day), with total accumulated doses of 0.3 or 6 Gy. For comparison, age-matched ApoE-/- females were acutely exposed to the same doses and sacrificed 300 days post-irradiation. Mice acutely exposed to 0.3 or 6 Gy showed increased atherogenesis compared to age-matched controls, and this effect was persistent. When the same doses were delivered at low dose rate over 300 days, we again observed a significant impact on global development of atherosclerosis, although at 0.3 Gy effects were limited to the descending thoracic aorta. Our data suggest that a moderate dose of 0.3 Gy can have persistent detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system, and that a high dose of 6 Gy poses high risks at both high and low dose rates. Our results were clearly nonlinear with dose, suggesting that lower doses may be more damaging than predicted by a linear dose response. PMID:26359350

  14. Acceleration of atherogenesis in ApoE−/− mice exposed to acute or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquali, Emanuela; Braga-Tanaka, Ignacia; Tanaka, Satoshi; Pannicelli, Alessandro; Giardullo, Paola; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Tapio, Soile; Atkinson, Michael J.; Saran, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There is epidemiological evidence for increased non-cancer mortality, primarily due to circulatory diseases after radiation exposure above 0.5 Sv. We evaluated the effects of chronic low-dose rate versus acute exposures in a murine model of spontaneous atherogenesis. Female ApoE−/− mice (60 days) were chronically irradiated for 300 days with gamma rays at two different dose rates (1 mGy/day; 20 mGy/day), with total accumulated doses of 0.3 or 6 Gy. For comparison, age-matched ApoE−/− females were acutely exposed to the same doses and sacrificed 300 days post-irradiation. Mice acutely exposed to 0.3 or 6 Gy showed increased atherogenesis compared to age-matched controls, and this effect was persistent. When the same doses were delivered at low dose rate over 300 days, we again observed a significant impact on global development of atherosclerosis, although at 0.3 Gy effects were limited to the descending thoracic aorta. Our data suggest that a moderate dose of 0.3 Gy can have persistent detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system, and that a high dose of 6 Gy poses high risks at both high and low dose rates. Our results were clearly nonlinear with dose, suggesting that lower doses may be more damaging than predicted by a linear dose response. PMID:26359350

  15. Associations of novel genetic variations in the folate-related and ARID5B genes with the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of high-dose methotrexate in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Csordas, Katalin; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Semsei, Agnes F; Harnos, Andrea; Hegyi, Marta; Erdelyi, Daniel J; Eipel, Oliver T; Szalai, Csaba; Kovacs, Gabor T

    2014-08-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) plays an important role in the consolidation therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in many treatment regimens worldwide. However, there is a large interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of the drug. We investigated the influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of the folate metabolic pathway, transporter molecules and transcription proteins on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of MTX and 7-hydroxy-methotrexate (7-OH-MTX). 63 SNPs of 14 genes were genotyped and a total of 463 HD-MTX courses (administered according to the ALL-BFM 95 and ALL IC-BFM 2002 protocols) were analysed. Haematological, hepatic and renal toxicities, estimated by routine laboratory parameters were evaluated. Random forest and regression trees were used for variable selection and model building. Linear mixed models were established to prove the significance of the selected variables. SNPs (rs4948502, rs4948496, rs4948487) of the ARID5B gene were associated with the serum levels of MTX (P < 0·02), serum levels and area under the curve of 7-OH-MTX (P < 0·02) and with hypoproteinaemia (P = 0·004). SLCO1B1 rs4149056 also showed a significant association with serum MTX levels (P < 0·001). Our findings confirm the association of novel genetic variations in folate-related and ARID5B genes with the serum MTX levels and acute toxicity.

  16. Prospective Phase II Single-Center Study of the Safety of a Single Very High Dose of Liposomal Amphotericin B for Antifungal Prophylaxis in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Annino, Luciana; Chierichini, Anna; Anaclerico, Barbara; Finolezzi, Erica; Norata, Marianna; Cortese, Stefania; Cassetta, Maria Iris; Fallani, Stefania; Novelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Some preclinical and pharmacokinetic studies suggested the variable safety and the potential efficacy of an antifungal prophylaxis with a single high dose of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) in high-risk patients. An open-label, prospective study was conducted with 48 adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients received a single infusion of 15 mg/kg of body weight L-AmB and, eventually, a second dose after 15 days of persistent neutropenia. The primary objective was tolerability and safety. Efficacy was also evaluated as a secondary endpoint. A pharmacokinetic study was performed with 34 patients in order to evaluate any association of plasma L-AmB levels with toxicity and efficacy. Overall, only 6 patients (12.5%) reported Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 hypokalemia, which was corrected with potassium supplementation in all cases, and no patient developed clinically relevant nephrotoxicity. Mild infusion-related adverse events occurred after 6 of 53 (11.3%) total infusions, with permanent drug discontinuation in only one case. Proven invasive fungal disease (IFD) was diagnosed in 4 (8.3%) patients. The mean AmB plasma levels at 6 h, 24 h, and 7 days after L-AmB administration were 160, 49.5, and 1 mg/liter, respectively. The plasma AmB levels were higher than the mean values of the overall population in 3 patients who developed CTC grade 3 hypokalemia and did not significantly differ from the mean values of the overall population in 3 patients who developed IFD. Our experience demonstrates the feasibility and safety of a single 15-mg/kg L-AmB dose as antifungal prophylaxis in AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy. PMID:23529741

  17. Linking Doses with Clinical Scores of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen

    2016-10-01

    In radiation accidents, determining the radiation dose the victim received is a key step for medical decision making and patient prognosis. To reconstruct and evaluate the absorbed dose, researchers have developed many physical devices and biological techniques during the last decades. However, using the physical parameter "absorbed dose" alone is not sufficient to predict the clinical development of the various organs injured in an individual patient. In operational situations for radiation accidents, medical responders need more urgently to classify the severity of the radiation injury based on the signs and symptoms of the patient. In this work, the author uses a unified hematopoietic model to describe dose-dependent dynamics of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets, and the corresponding clinical grading of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. This approach not only visualizes the time course of the patient's probable outcome in the form of graphs but also indirectly gives information of the remaining stem and progenitor cells, which are responsible for the autologous recovery of the hematopoietic system. Because critical information on the patient's clinical evolution can be provided within a short time after exposure and only peripheral cell counts are required for the simulation, these modeling tools will be useful to assess radiation exposure and injury in human-involved radiation accident/incident scenarios. PMID:27575346

  18. Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Combined With Recombinant CD19-Ligand × Soluble TRAIL Fusion Protein is Highly Effective Against Radiation-resistant B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Ma, Hong; Rose, Rebecca; Qazi, Sanjive

    2015-01-01

    In high-risk remission B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) patients, relapse rates have remained high post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) even after the use of very intensive total body irradiation (TBI)-based conditioning regimens, especially in patients with a high “minimal residual disease” (MRD) burden. New agents capable of killing radiation-resistant BPL cells and selectively augmenting their radiation sensitivity are therefore urgently needed. We report preclinical proof-of-principle that the potency of radiation therapy against BPL can be augmented by combining radiation with recombinant human CD19-Ligand × soluble TRAIL (“CD19L–sTRAIL”) fusion protein. CD19L–sTRAIL consistently killed radiation-resistant primary leukemia cells from BPL patients as well as BPL xenograft cells and their leukemia-initiating in vivo clonogenic fraction. Low dose total body irradiation (TBI) combined with CD19L–sTRAIL was highly effective against (1) xenografted CD19+ radiochemotherapy-resistant human BPL in NOD/SCID (NS) mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients as well as (2) radiation-resistant advanced stage CD19+ murine BPL with lymphomatous features in CD22ΔE12xBCR-ABL double transgenic mice. We hypothesize that the incorporation of CD19L–sTRAIL into the pre-transplant TBI regimens of patients with very high-risk BPL will improve their survival outcome after HSCT. PMID:26097891

  19. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis'', December 1987.

  20. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-09-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their ``Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis``, December 1987.

  1. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested.

  2. Acute, Low-dose CO Inhalation does not Alter Energy Expenditure during Submaximal Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kane, L A; Ryan, B J; Schmidt, W; Byrnes, W C

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide, a gas known most widely for its toxic effects at high doses, is receiving increased attention for its role as a physiological signaling molecule and potential therapeutic agent when administered in low doses. We sought to quantify any changes to oxygen consumption and energy expenditure during submaximal exercise after low-dose CO inhalation. 9 active individuals completed 4 graded submaximal exercise tests, with each test occurring during a separate visit. For their first exercise test, subjects inhaled CO or room air (1.2 mL·kg(-1) body mass) in a randomized, subject-blind fashion. A second test was repeated 24 h later when the inhaled gas should have cleared the system. Subjects repeated study procedures with the alternate dose after a washout period of at least 2 days. Low-dose CO administration did not affect oxygen consumption or energy expenditure during submaximal exercise immediately or 24 h following its administration. Increases in heart rate, blood [lactate], and perceived exertion were observed following acute CO inhalation but these effects were absent after 24 h. The results of this study suggest that low-dose CO administration does not influence the energetics of submaximal exercise, but it acutely increases the relative intensity associated with absolute workloads below the lactate threshold.

  3. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with 131I–anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Rajendran, Joseph; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Matthews, Dana C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, Paul J.; Storb, Rainer F.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 131I–anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with 131I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3+ and CD33+ cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of 131I-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177. PMID:19786617

  5. Salvage therapy with high-dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone in combination with all-trans retinoic acid and gemtuzumab ozogamicin in acute myeloid leukemia refractory to first induction therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hütter-Krönke, Marie-Luise; Benner, Axel; Döhner, Konstanze; Krauter, Jürgen; Weber, Daniela; Moessner, Margit; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Horst, Heinz A.; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.; Rummel, Mathias; Götze, Katharina; Koller, Elisabeth; Petzer, Andreas L.; Salwender, Hans; Fiedler, Walter; Kirchen, Heinz; Haase, Detlef; Kremers, Stephan; Theobald, Matthias; Matzdorff, Axel C.; Ganser, Arnold; Döhner, Hartmut; Schlenk, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Outcome of patients with primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia remains unsatisfactory. We conducted a prospective phase II clinical trial with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (3 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1), all-trans retinoic acid (45 mg/m2 orally on days 4–6 and 15 mg/m2 orally on days 7–28), high-dose cytarabine (3 g/m2/12 h intravenously on days 1–3) and mitoxantrone (12 mg/m2 intravenously on days 2–3) in 93 patients aged 18–60 years refractory to one cycle of induction therapy. Primary end point of the study was response to therapy; secondary end points included evaluation of toxicities, in particular, rate of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Complete remission or complete remission with incomplete blood count recovery was achieved in 47 (51%) and partial remission in 10 (11%) patients resulting in an overall response rate of 61.5%; 33 (35.5%) patients had refractory disease and 3 patients (3%) died. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation was performed in 71 (76%) patients; 6 of the 71 (8.5%) patients developed moderate or severe sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after transplantation. Four-year overall survival rate was 32% (95% confidence interval 24%-43%). Patients responding to salvage therapy and undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (n=51) had a 4-year survival rate of 49% (95% confidence intervaI 37%-64%). Patients with fms-like tyrosine kinase internal tandem duplication positive acute myeloid leukemia had a poor outcome despite transplantation. In conclusion, the described regimen is an effective and tolerable salvage therapy for patients who are primary refractory to one cycle of conventional intensive induction therapy. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00143975) PMID:27036160

  6. Acute and chronic bioeffects of single and multiple doses of piezoelectric shockwaves (EDAP LT.01).

    PubMed

    Ryan, P C; Jones, B J; Kay, E W; Nowlan, P; Kiely, E A; Gaffney, E F; Butler, M R

    1991-02-01

    Piezoelectric second generation lithotriptors are an established means of administering extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) enabling treatment to be performed without anaesthesia or analgesia, but higher shockwave doses and multiple or staged treatment are frequently required. The bioeffects of this modality of ESWL, therefore, require further assessment. Seven experimental groups of adult male rabbits were treated using the EDAP LT.01 in order to determine the acute and chronic bioeffects of clinical dose, excess dose, divided excess dose, high frequency and multiple treatment (X10) piezoelectric shockwaves (PSW). Renal function was measured before and after treatment using mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG 3) scans. Gross and histological morphological changes were assessed at one and 30 days following application of PSW. Application of single clinical dose PSW was not associated with any significant functional or morphological renal injury. Excess dose PSW caused transient gross renal contusion, which resolved in the majority of animals with no persistent microscopic abnormality. Divided excess dose PSW resulted in no gross or microscopic damage. High frequency PSW was associated with mild histological abnormality. Multiple PSW treatments caused small discrete fibrotic lesions in all cases, without any change in renal function.

  7. Effect of Admission Oral Diuretic Dose on Response to Continuous versus Bolus Intravenous Diuretics in Acute Heart Failure: An Analysis from DOSE-AHF

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravi V.; McNulty, Steven; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Felker, G. Michael; Braunwald, Eugene; Givertz, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Results from the Diuretic Optimization Strategies in Acute Heart Failure (DOSE-AHF) study suggest that an initial continuous infusion of loop diuretics is not superior to bolus dosing with regard to clinical endpoints in AHF. We hypothesized that outpatient furosemide dose was associated with congestion and poorer renal function, and explored the hypothesis that a continuous infusion may be more effective in patients on higher outpatient diuretic doses. Methods DOSE-AHF randomized 308 patients within 24 hours of admission to high vs. low initial intravenous diuretic dose given as either a continuous infusion or bolus. We compared baseline characteristics and assessed associations between mode of administration (bolus vs. continuous) and outcomes in patients receiving high-dose (≥120 mg furosemide equivalent, n=177) versus low-dose (<120 mg furosemide equivalent, n=131) outpatient diuretics. Results Patients on higher doses of furosemide were less frequently on renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (P=.01), and had worse renal function and more advanced symptoms. There was a significant interaction between outpatient dose and mode of therapy (P=0.01) with respect to net fluid loss at 72 hours after adjusting for creatinine and intensification strategy. Admission diuretic dose was associated with an increased risk of death or rehospitalization at 60 days (adjusted HR=1.08 per 20-mg increment in dose, 95% CI 1.01–1.16, P=.03). Conclusions In acute HF, patients on higher diuretic doses have greater disease severity, and may benefit from an initial bolus strategy. PMID:23194486

  8. No change in spontaneous behavior of rats after acute oral doses of aspartame, phenylalanine, and tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Mullenix, P J; Tassinari, M S; Schunior, A; Kernan, W J

    1991-04-01

    Spontaneous behavior subsequent to acute oral administration of high doses of aspartame, phenylalanine, or tyrosine was analyzed using a computer pattern recognition system. Sprague-Dawley male rats (250-300 g) were dosed orally with aspartame (500 or 1000 mg/kg), phenylalanine (281 or 562 mg/kg), or tyrosine (309 or 618 mg/kg), and their behavior was analyzed 1 hr after dosing. The computer pattern recognition system recorded and classified 13 different behavioral acts performed by the animals during the first 15-min exploration of a novel environment. Three measures that provide independent information concerning motor output from the central nervous system were taken: the number of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure. These results were compared with the effects induced by d-amphetamine. Plasma concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine were determined from blood samples taken immediately after behavioral examination. Data analysis revealed that these doses of aspartame, phenylalanine, and tyrosine did not induce any significant changes in spontaneous behavior. Unlike low doses of amphetamine and despite high plasma concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine, no behavioral alteration was detected by the computer pattern recognition system. Absence of behavioral changes in this study using an objective analysis of behavior raises questions concerning the relationship between amino acid precursor loading and purported anecdotal changes in behavior following aspartame administration.

  9. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  10. Acute mucosal pathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus is independent of viral dose in vaginally infected cats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mucosal pathogenesis of HIV has been shown to be an important feature of infection and disease progression. HIV-1 infection causes depletion of intestinal lamina propria CD4+ T cells (LPL), therefore, intestinal CD4+ T cell preservation may be a useful correlate of protection in evaluating vaccine candidates. Vaccine studies employing the cat/FIV and macaque/SIV models frequently use high doses of parenterally administered challenge virus to ensure high plasma viremia in control animals. However, it is unclear if loss of mucosal T cells would occur regardless of initial viral inoculum dose. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effect of viral dose on mucosal leukocytes and associated innate and adaptive immune responses. Results Cats were vaginally inoculated with a high, middle or low dose of cell-associated and cell-free FIV. PBMC, serum and plasma were assessed every two weeks with tissues assessed eight weeks following infection. We found that irrespective of mucosally administered viral dose, FIV infection was induced in all cats. However, viremia was present in only half of the cats, and viral dose was unrelated to the development of viremia. Importantly, regardless of viral dose, all cats experienced significant losses of intestinal CD4+ LPL and CD8+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Innate immune responses by CD56+CD3- NK cells correlated with aviremia and apparent occult infection but did not protect mucosal T cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in viremic cats were more likely to produce cytokines in response to Gag stimulation, whereas aviremic cats T cells tended to produce cytokines in response to Env stimulation. However, while cell-mediated immune responses in aviremic cats may have helped reduce viral replication, they could not be correlated to the levels of viremia. Robust production of anti-FIV antibodies was positively correlated with the magnitude of viremia. Conclusions Our results indicate that mucosal immune

  11. Acute serous macular detachment and cystoid macular edema after uncomplicated phacoemulsification using standard dose subconjunctival cefuroxime.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Andreas; Mitry, Danny; Althauser, Susanne; Jain, Saurabh

    2014-09-01

    Acute toxic serous macular detachment after cataract surgery is very rare, and has been described previously with the use of high concentrations of intra-cameral cefuroxime. We report a case of serous macular detachment and cystoid macular edema 1 day after uncomplicated phacoemulsification using standard dose subconjunctival cefuroxime at the end of surgery. Our case demonstrates that subconjunctival cefuroxime may cause retinal toxicity in a similar fashion to intra-cameral cefuroxime, possibly due to entry of the drug into the anterior chamber through the section or trans-scleral absorption. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this complication with subconjunctival administration of cefuroxime.

  12. Escalating dose methamphetamine pretreatment alters the behavioral and neurochemical profiles associated with exposure to a high-dose methamphetamine binge.

    PubMed

    Segal, David S; Kuczenski, Ronald; O'Neil, Meghan L; Melega, William P; Cho, Arthur K

    2003-10-01

    The neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH) have been characterized primarily from the study of high-dose binge regimens in rodents. However, this drug administration paradigm does not include a potentially important feature of stimulant abuse in humans, that is, the gradual escalation of stimulant doses that frequently occurs prior to high-dose exposure. We have argued that pretreatment with escalating doses (EDs) might significantly alter the neurotoxic profile produced by a single high-dose binge. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis by pretreating rats with saline or gradually increasing doses of METH (0.1-4.0 mg/kg over 14 days), prior to an acute METH binge (4 x 6 mg/kg at 2 h intervals). These animals, whose behavior was continuously monitored throughout drug treatment, were then killed 3 days later for determination of caudate-putamen dopamine (DA) content, levels of [(3)H]WIN 35,428 binding to the DA transporter, and levels of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine ([(3)H]DTBZ) binding to the vesicular monoamine transporter. ED pretreatment markedly attenuated the stereotypy response, as well as the hyperthermia and indices of sympathetic activation associated with the acute binge. In addition, ED pretreatment prevented the decline in [(3)H]WIN 35,428 binding, and significantly diminished the decrease in DA levels, but did not affect the decrease in [(3)H]DTBZ binding associated with the acute binge. We suggest that further study of the effects produced by a regimen which includes a gradual escalation of doses prior to high-dose METH binge exposure could more accurately identify the neurochemical and behavioral changes relevant to those that occur as a consequence of high-dose METH abuse in humans.

  13. Dose Determination for Acute Salmonella Infection in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Loynachan, A. T.; Harris, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Pigs were exposed to various levels of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium by either intranasal inoculation or by subjecting them to a contaminated environment. More than 103 salmonellae were required to induce acute Salmonella infection. These results indicate that intervention against acute Salmonella infection in lairage may be more readily achieved than previously thought. PMID:15870368

  14. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  15. Single dose rasburicase in the management of tumor lysis syndrome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A case series.

    PubMed

    Latha, S M; Krishnaprasadh, D; Murugapriya, P; Scott, J X

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) occurs in malignancies with high proliferative potential and tumor burden, such as lymphomas and leukemias. TLS syndrome is an oncologic emergency, requiring prompt intervention. The metabolic derangements cause acute kidney failure and may lead to cardiac arrhythmias, seizures, and death. With the advent of rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase, there has been a decline in the TLS-mediated renal failure and the need for dialysis. The recommended regimen and doses pose a heavy financial burden for patients in developing countries like India. With data and studies proving a similar efficacy for the reduced dose and lesser number of rasburicase, we report here a case series of seven children with acute leukemias, whose TLS was managed by a single dose of rasburicase. A retrospective analysis of case records of seven children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and TLS, admitted to our Pediatric Oncology Unit of our Hospital between the period 2011 and 2013, was done. All our patients responded to a single dose, indicating that in appropriately monitored patients, single dose followed by as-needed dosing can be cost-saving. PMID:25838646

  16. High event-free survival rate with minimum-dose-anthracycline treatment in childhood acute promyelocytic leukaemia: a nationwide prospective study by the Japanese Paediatric Leukaemia/Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Yuza, Yuki; Moritake, Hiroshi; Terui, Kiminori; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Nakayama, Hideki; Shimada, Akira; Kudo, Kazuko; Taki, Tomohiko; Yabe, Miharu; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Yuka; Koike, Kazutoshi; Ogawa, Atsushi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Taga, Takashi; Saito, Akiko M; Horibe, Keizo; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Miyachi, Hayato; Tawa, Akio; Adachi, Souichi

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of treatment using reduced cumulative doses of anthracyclines in children with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) in the Japanese Paediatric Leukaemia/Lymphoma Study Group AML-P05 study. All patients received two and three subsequent courses of induction and consolidation chemotherapy respectively, consisting of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), cytarabine and anthracyclines, followed by maintenance therapy with ATRA. Notably, a single administration of anthracyclines was introduced in the second induction and all consolidation therapies to minimize total doses of anthracycline. The 3-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival rates for 43 eligible children were 83·6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 68·6-91·8%] and 90·7% (95% CI: 77·1-96·4%), respectively. Although two patients died of intracranial haemorrhage or infection during induction phases, no cardiac adverse events or treatment-related deaths were observed during subsequent phases. Patients not displaying M1 marrow after the first induction therapy, or those under 5 years of age at diagnosis, showed inferior outcomes (3-year EFS rate; 33·3% (95% CI: 19·3-67·6%) and 54·6% (95% CI: 22·9-78·0%), respectively). In conclusion, a single administration of anthracycline during each consolidation phase was sufficient for treating childhood APL. In younger children, however, conventional ATRA and chemotherapy may be insufficient so that alternative therapies should be considered.

  17. Calculates External and Inhalation Doses from Acute Radionuclide Releases on the Hanford Site.

    1984-03-02

    HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) calculates external and inhalation doses resulting from postulated accidental radionuclide releases on the Hanford site. It generates doses to an individual at a specified location and to the population in the region near the Hanford site for specified organs. Doses reported include the maximally exposed individual's dose (by organ and exposure mode) and the total population dose (by organ and exposure mode) in the sector having the highest population exposuremore » factor. The first year and fifty-year dose commitments are reported. Optional reports giving the fractional contribution to total dose by radionuclide for each organ and dose commitment period for a maximally exposed individual and the population may be printed.« less

  18. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  19. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  20. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  1. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Neutral red uptake cytotoxicity tests for estimating starting doses for acute oral toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Stokes, William S; Casati, Silvia; Strickland, Judy; Paris, Michael

    2008-05-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity assays can be used as alternative toxicity tests to reduce the total number of animals needed for acute oral toxicity tests. This unit describes two methods for determining the in vitro cytotoxicity of test substances using neutral red uptake (NRU) and using the in vitro data to determine starting doses for in vivo acute oral systemic toxicity tests, e.g., the up-and-down procedure or the acute toxic class method. The use of the NRU methods to determine starting doses for acute oral toxicity tests may reduce the number of animals required, and for relatively toxic substances, this approach may also reduce the number of animals that die or require humane euthanasia due to severe toxicity. An interlaboratory validation study has demonstrated that the methods are useful and reproducible for these purposes. Two standardized protocols provide details for performing NRU tests with rodent and human cells.

  3. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  4. Acute tolerance to rate-decreasing effects of single doses of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Martinez, Gerardo; Friesenhahn, Gregory; Javors, Martin; Lamb, R J

    2008-06-01

    Acute tolerance occurs when behavioral impairment is greater at a given blood ethanol concentration (BAC) on the ascending versus descending limb of the BAC-time curve following administration of a single dose of ethanol, however studies utilizing learned behaviors have not been widely reported. We assessed acute tolerance to single doses of ethanol in five Lewis rats responding under a fixed-ratio (FR8) schedule of food presentation. Response rates for food during 1-min components (ending 2, 4, 11, 18, 33, and 57 min after ethanol administration) were determined, and BAC was measured immediately after each component using a rat breathalyzer. Ethanol (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg, i.p.) produced dose-related decreases in responding for food that tended to recover over time for all but the highest dose tested. Similarly, dose-related increases in BAC were also observed. Using either an analysis that expressed impairment per unit BAC on the ascending limb versus the descending limb (by assessing the area under the curve (AUC) for behavior and BAC on each limb), the slope of the function that relates the behavioral effect to BAC (each expressed as percent maximum effect), or a variant of the Mellanby method (hysteresis), acute tolerance was observed following a dose of 0.4 g/kg ethanol. Though behavior appeared to recover on the descending limb following higher doses (especially 0.6 and 0.8 g/kg), acute tolerance to these doses was not present. PMID:18328511

  5. Combined acute interstitial pneumonitis and pancytopenia induced by low-dose methotrexate in a hemodialysis patient treated for bullous pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibo; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Min; Yan, Wenliang; Sang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate has been widely used for many years in the treatment of a variety of diseases. Acute pneumonitis and bone marrow suppression are very serious side effects in methotrexate treatment. A 48-year-old man with end-stage renal disease undergoing chronic hemodialysis developed combined acute pneumonitis and pancytopenia after a cumulative dose of 20 mg methotrexate for bullous pemphigoid. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) can efficiently decrease serum methotrexate concentration. A rapid improvement of clinical symptoms and resolution of pulmonary opacification were found after CRRT. Blood cell counts returned to normal after component blood transfusion and cytokine supportive therapy. Patients with impaired renal function are at high risk of methotrexate toxicity, and low-dose methotrexate should be prescribed with great caution.

  6. Improving Low-Dose Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Quantification Using Sparse High-Dose Induced Prior for Patlak Model

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Karlsson, Kolbeinn; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain-barrier permeability (BBBP) measurements extracted from the perfusion computed tomography (PCT) using the Patlak model can be a valuable indicator to predict hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke. Unfortunately, the standard Patlak model based PCT requires excessive radiation exposure, which raised attention on radiation safety. Minimizing radiation dose is of high value in clinical practice but can degrade the image quality due to the introduced severe noise. The purpose of this work is to construct high quality BBBP maps from low-dose PCT data by using the brain structural similarity between different individuals and the relations between the high- and low-dose maps. The proposed sparse high-dose induced (shd-Patlak) model performs by building a high-dose induced prior for the Patlak model with a set of location adaptive dictionaries, followed by an optimized estimation of BBBP map with the prior regularized Patlak model. Evaluation with the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the shd-Patlak model can achieve more significant gains than the standard Patlak model with improved visual quality, higher fidelity to the gold standard and more accurate details for clinical analysis. PMID:24200529

  7. Single dose oral indometacin for the treatment of acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Mason, Lorna; McQuay, Henry J; Edwards, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2004. Indometacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used most commonly for the treatment of inflammation and pain resulting from rheumatic disease (arthritis), and less commonly in postoperative pain management. When taken for chronic pain conditions, indometacin has been associated with a high incidence of adverse events. The benefits and harms of orally-administered indometacin for postoperative pain are not clear. Objectives To determine the efficacy of a single dose of oral indometacin compared with placebo in treating acute postoperative pain in adults, and to analyse information relating to adverse events. Search methods We searched the Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for relevant studies in January 2002 and for the updated search in December 2007. Additional studies were sought from the reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria Studies were included in the review if they were randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials using a single oral dose of indometacin in adults with acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed independently by two review authors. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to give the number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours. The relative benefit for at least 50% pain relief was calculated. Main results In the original review one study of 59 women with post-episiotomy pain met the inclusion criteria. The dose of indometacin assessed against placebo was 50 mg, and the results concluded that indometacin was not significantly better than placebo for relieving postoperative pain at four to six hours. There was insufficient information to conduct further efficacy analyses or assess adverse events

  8. A Simple Low-dose X-ray CT Simulation from High-dose Scan

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Dong; Huang, Jing; Bian, Zhaoying; Niu, Shanzhou; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation from high-dose scan is required in optimizing radiation dose to patients. In this study, we propose a simple low-dose CT simulation strategy in sinogram domain using the raw data from high-dose scan. Specially, a relationship between the incident fluxes of low- and high- dose scans is first determined according to the repeated projection measurements and analysis. Second, the incident flux level of the simulated low-dose scan is generated by properly scaling the incident flux level of high-dose scan via the determined relationship in the first step. Third, the low-dose CT transmission data by energy integrating detection is simulated by adding a statistically independent Poisson noise distribution plus a statistically independent Gaussian noise distribution. Finally, a filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm is implemented to reconstruct the resultant low-dose CT images. The present low-dose simulation strategy is verified on the simulations and real scans by comparing it with the existing low-dose CT simulation tool. Experimental results demonstrated that the present low-dose CT simulation strategy can generate accurate low-dose CT sinogram data from high-dose scan in terms of qualitative and quantitative measurements. PMID:26543245

  9. COMPARING BEHAVIORAL DOSE-EFFECT CURVES FOR HUMANS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS ACUTELY EXPOSED TO TOLUENE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of laboratory animal data in toxicology depends upon the ability to generalize the results quantitatively to humans. To compare the acute behavioral effects of inhaled toluene in humans to those in animals, dose-effect curves were fitted by meta-analysis of published...

  10. Ultra-low dose comprehensive cardiac CT imaging in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Brand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been previously reported. We report a case of acute myocarditis with coronary CT angiography as well as "late enhancement" imaging with ultra-low effective radiation dose. PMID:25439792

  11. Effect of Beta-Blocker Dose on Survival after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J.; Bonow, Robert O.; Cuffe, Michael; Liu, Lei; Rosenberg, Yves; Shah, Prediman K.; Smith, Sidney C.; Subačius, Haris

    2015-01-01

    Background Beta-blocker therapy after acute myocardial infarction (MI) improves survival. Beta-blocker doses used in clinical practice are often substantially lower than those used in the randomized trials establishing their efficacy. Objective This study evaluated the association of beta-blocker dose with survival after acute MI, hypothesizing that higher dose beta-blocker therapy will be associated with increased survival. Methods A multicenter registry enrolled 7,057 consecutive patients with acute MI. Discharge beta-blocker dose was indexed to the target beta-blocker doses used in randomized clinical trials, grouped as >0% to 12.5%, >12.5% to 25%, >25% to 50%, and >50% of target dose. Follow-up vital status was assessed, with the primary endpoint of time-to-death right-censored at 2 years. Multivariable and propensity score analyses were used to account for group differences. Results Of 6,682 with follow-up (median 2.1 years), 91.5% were discharged on beta-blocker (mean dose 38.1%). Lower mortality was observed with all beta-blocker doses (p < 0.0002) versus no beta-blocker therapy. After multivariable adjustment, hazard ratios (HRs) for 2-year mortality compared with the >50% dose were 0.862 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.677 to 1.098), 0.799 (95% CI: 0.635 to 1.005), and 0.963 (95% CI: 0.765 to 1.213) for the >0% to 12.5%, >12.5% to 25%, and >25% to 50% of target dose, respectively. Multivariable analysis with an extended set of covariates and propensity score analysis also demonstrated that higher doses were not associated with better outcome. Conclusions These data do not demonstrate increased survival in patients treated with beta-blocker doses approximating those used in prior randomized clinical trials compared with lower doses. These findings provide the rationale to re-engage in research to establish appropriate beta-blocker dosing following MI to derive optimal benefit from this therapy. (The PACE-MI Registry Study - Outcomes of Beta-blocker Therapy

  12. Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gassmann, W.; Wottge, H.U.; von Kolzynski, M.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.

    1986-03-01

    Immune reactivity after total-body irradiation was investigated in rats using skin graft rejection as the indicator system. After sublethal irradiation with 10.5 Gy (approximately 50% lethality/6 weeks) the rejection of major histocompatibility complex allogeneic skin grafts was delayed significantly compared with nonirradiated control animals (28 versus 6.5 days). In contrast, skin grafts were rejected after 7.5 days in sublethally irradiated animals and 7 days in lethally irradiated animals if additional skin donor type alloantigens--namely, irradiated bone marrow cells--were given i.v. either simultaneously or with a delay of not more than 24 hr after the above conditioning regimen. These reactions were alloantigen-specific. They were observed in six different strain combinations with varying donors and recipients. Starting on day 2 after irradiation, i.v. injection of bone marrow gradually lost its effectivity and skin grafts were no longer rejected with uniform rapidity; skin donor marrow given on days 4 or 8 did not accelerate skin graft rejection at all. These data show that for approximately 1-2 days after high-dose total-body irradiation rats are still capable of starting a vigorous immune reaction against i.v.-injected alloantigens. The phenomenon of impaired rejection of skin grafted immediately after high-dose irradiation appears to result from the poor accessibility of skin graft alloantigens during the early postirradiation phase when vascularization of the grafted skin is insufficient.

  13. Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection Graphical User Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hateni N.; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The integration of human space applications risk projection models of organ dose and acute radiation risk has been a key problem. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model using the BRYNTRN with SUM DOSE computer codes, and a probabilistic model of Acute Radiation Risk (ARR). The codes BRYNTRN and SUM DOSE are a Baryon transport code and an output data processing code, respectively. The risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, the response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN. A GUI for the ARR and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations, which are required for operations of the ARRBOD modules. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations directorate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation. Only a graphical user interface (GUI) can handle input and output for BRYNTRN to the response models easily and correctly. The purpose of the GUI development for ARRBOD is to provide seamless integration of input and output manipulations for the operations of projection modules (BRYNTRN, SLMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model) in assessing the acute risk and the organ doses of significant Solar Particle Events (SPEs). The assessment of astronauts radiation risk from SPE is in support of mission design and operational planning to manage radiation risks in future space missions. The ARRBOD GUI can identify the proper shielding solutions using the gender-specific organ dose assessments in order to avoid ARR symptoms, and to stay within the current NASA short-term dose limits. The quantified evaluation of ARR severities based on any given shielding configuration and a specified EVA or other mission

  14. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  15. Dose rate in brachytherapy using after-loading machine: pulsed or high-dose rate?

    PubMed

    Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Peiffert, D

    2014-10-01

    Since February 2014, it is no longer possible to use low-dose rate 192 iridium wires due to the end of industrial production of IRF1 and IRF2 sources. The Brachytherapy Group of the French society of radiation oncology (GC-SFRO) has recommended switching from iridium wires to after-loading machines. Two types of after-loading machines are currently available, based on the dose rate used: pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate. In this article, we propose a comparative analysis between pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate brachytherapy, based on biological, technological, organizational and financial considerations.

  16. Dependence on dose of the acute effects of ethanol on liver metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Guynn, R W; Pieklik, J R

    1975-01-01

    The dose dependence of the acute effects of ethanol upon liver intermediary metabolism in vivo has been demonstrated in rats. Ethanol was given i.p. in doses of 0.69, 1.7, and 3.0 g/kg in equal volumes (20 ml/kg). The liver was freeze-clamped 120 min after injection, and multiple metabolites were measured in the perchloric acid extract of the tissue. Each group showed a significantly different pattern of metabolites, redox states, and phosphorylation potentials although the rate of ethanol disappearance, at least between the two highest dose groups, was not significantly different. The mitochondrial free [NAD+]/[NADH] ratios and the cytoplasmic free [NADP+]/[NADPH] ratio were paradoxically most reduced with the lowest dose of ethanol and became progressively more oxidized with increasing dose. Once established, the differences in these ratios between the groups tended to persist with time, relatively independent of the concentration of ethanol. In a somewhat different pattern, the phosphorylation potential ([ATP]/[ADP][P1]) remained at the control level in the low-dose group but was significantly elevated in the two higher-dose groups. The results, therefore, show distinct and complicated dose-dependent patterns of intermediary metabolism that cannot be explained completely by any one hypothesis but that imply significant dose-dependent effects of ethanol upon intermediary metabolism not directly related to NADH production. PMID:422

  17. Resource utilization. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastin, K; Buchler, D; Stitt, J; Shanahan, T; Pola, Y; Paliwal, B; Kinsella, T

    1993-06-01

    A comparative analysis of anesthesia use, perioperative morbidity and mortality, capital, and treatment cost of high dose rate versus low dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancy is presented. To assess current anesthesia utilization, application location, and high dose rate afterloader availability for gynecologic brachytherapy in private and academic practices, a nine-question survey was sent to 150 radiotherapy centers in the United States, of which 95 (63%) responded. Of these 95 respondents, 95% used low dose rate brachytherapy, and 18% possessed high dose rate capability. General anesthesia was used in 95% of programs for tandem + ovoid and in 31% for ovoids-only placement. Differences among private and academic practice respondents were minimal. In our institution, a cost comparison for low dose rate therapy (two applications with 3 hospital days per application, operating and recovery room use, spinal anesthesia, radiotherapy) versus high dose rate treatment (five outpatient departmental applications, intravenous anesthesia without an anesthesiologist, radiotherapy) revealed a 244% higher overall charge for low dose rate treatment, primarily due to hospital and operating room expenses. In addition to its ability to save thousands of dollars per intracavitary patient, high dose rate therapy generated a "cost-shift," increasing radiotherapy departmental billings by 438%. More importantly, perioperative morbidity and mortality in our experience of 500+ high dose rate applications compared favorably with recently reported data using low dose rate intracavitary treatment. Capital investment, maintenance requirements, and depreciation costs for high dose rate capability are reviewed. Application of the defined "revenue-cost ratio" formula demonstrates the importance of high application numbers and consistent reimbursement for parity in high dose rate operation. Logically, inadequate third-party reimbursement (e.g., Medicare) reduces high

  18. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of different β-cyclodextrin-based nanosponge formulations.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Gaud, R S; Deshmukh, Kiran; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    Nanosponges (NS) show promising results in different fields such as medicine, agriculture, water purification, fire engineering and so on. The present study was designed to evaluate toxicity of different NS formulations (namely, S1-S6) synthesized with different cross-linking agents such as carbonyl diimidazole, pyromellitic dianhydride and hexamethylene diisocynate; and preparation methods in experimental animals. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of formulations were carried out as per OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. For acute toxicity study, formulations were administered to female rats at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg orally. The general behaviour of the rats was continuously monitored for 1 h after dosing, periodically during the first 24 h and daily thereafter for a total of 14 days. On day 14, animals were fasted overnight, weighed, and sacrificed. After sacrification, animals were subjected to necropsy. For repeated dose toxicity study, rats of either sex were orally administered with formulations at the dose of 300 mg/kg per day for a period of 28 days. The maximally tolerated dose of all formulations was found to be 2000 mg/kg. Repeated administration of formulations for 28 days did not show any significant changes in haematological and biochemical parameters in experimental animals. These results indicate that the formulations are safe, when tested in experimental animals.

  19. Chick development and high dose of bendiocarb.

    PubMed

    Petrovova, Eva; Sedmera, David; Luptakova, Lenka; Mazensky, David; Danko, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Developmental data of carbamate pesticides are scarce although they generally possess low toxicity for vertebrates. The aim of the study was to investigate the toxicity of bendiocarb to liver and central nervous system of chick embryos. Bendiocarb (1600 μg/egg) was administered to the embryo through membrana papyracea on embryonic day 3 and 10. In the liver and central nervous system we observed no macroscopic or microscopic changes. These organs were also investigated for caspase activity in regard to application of bendiocarb and no differences in the caspase immunopositivity were observed in comparison with the control. The embryolethality after bendiocarb respective dose was high (94 %) on the embryonic day 3, though following results indicated no toxicity to investigated organs and no increase in the number of apoptotic cells in survived chick embryos on both the early (day 3 of incubation) and the later (day 10 of incubation) developmental stage. PMID:22540656

  20. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, Rajib Lochan; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri; Rao, Ramakrishna; Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  1. Overview of Graphical User Interface for ARRBOD (Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hatem; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Solar particle events (SPEs) pose the risk of acute radiation sickness (ARS) to astronauts be-cause organ doses from large SPEs may reach critical levels during extra vehicular activities (EVAs) or lightly shielded spacecraft. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model of Baryon transport code (BRYNTRN) with an output data processing module of SUMDOSE, and a probabilistic model of acute radiation risk (ARR). BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation, and the risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, these response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN in a user-friendly way. The GUI for the Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations required for operations of the ARRBOD modules: BRYNTRN, SUMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations direc-torate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. Assessment of astronauts' organ doses and ARS from the exposure to historically large SPEs is in support of mission design and opera-tion planning to avoid ARS and stay within the current NASA short-term dose limits. The ARRBOD GUI will serve as a proof-of-concept for future integration of other risk projection models for human space applications. We present an overview of the ARRBOD GUI prod-uct, which is a new self-contained product, for the major components of the overall system, subsystem interconnections, and external interfaces.

  2. Overview of Graphical User Interface for ARRBOD (Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hatem N.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) pose the risk of acute radiation sickness (ARS) to astronauts, because organ doses from large SPEs may reach critical levels during extra vehicular activities (EVAs) or lightly shielded spacecraft. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model of Baryon transport code (BRYNTRN) with an output data processing module of SUMDOSE, and a probabilistic model of acute radiation risk (ARR). BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation, and the risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, these response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN in a user friendly way. The GUI for the Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations required for operations of the ARRBOD modules: BRYNTRN, SUMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations directorate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. Assessment of astronauts organ doses and ARS from the exposure to historically large SPEs is in support of mission design and operation planning to avoid ARS and stay within the current NASA short-term dose limits. The ARRBOD GUI will serve as a proof-of-concept for future integration of other risk projection models for human space applications. We present an overview of the ARRBOD GUI product, which is a new self-contained product, for the major components of the overall system, subsystem interconnections, and external interfaces.

  3. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  4. Acute Dystonia Following a Switch in Treatment from Atomoxetine to Low-dose Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Başay, Ömer; Basay, Burge Kabukcu; Öztürk, Önder; Yüncü, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes the cases of a 17-year-old male patient and a 13-year-old female patient who developed acute dystonia following the administration of low-dose aripiprazole (5 mg/day) after the cessation of atomoxetine treatment. Although aripiprazole-induced dystonia has been previously reported in the literature, it is rare, and most of these cases were associated with doses higher than 5 mg/day. Furthermore, both of the patients in the present study discontinued atomoxetine prior to the initiation of aripiprazole treatment; thus, this report also discussed the possible mechanisms underlying the manifestation of dystonia from the perspective of neurotransmitter activity. PMID:27121436

  5. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings. PMID:26683233

  6. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings.

  7. The Comparison of Apotel plus Low Dose of Morphine and Full Dose of Morphine in Pain Relief in Patients with Acute Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Morteza-Bagi, Hamid Reza; Amjadi, Mohsen; Mirzaii-Sousefidi, Reyhaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background Renal colic is an acute flank pain which may radiate to the groin, lower abdomen, or external genitalia due to the passage of a urinary stones. Pain management is the most important task in emergency wards when a patient with renal colic attends. This study aims to compare intravenous acetaminophen plus a low dose of morphine with a full dose of morphine in renal colic. Methods In present randomized clinical trial, 100 patients with confirmed renal colic were recruited from the Emergency Ward of Imam Reza Teaching Hospital affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during a one-year period. These patients randomly received either intravenous acetaminophen (Apotel, 1 g) plus a low dose of morphine (n = 50), or a high dose of morphine (5 mg) (n = 50). Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used for reporting pain during 35 minutes. Side effects and rescue analgesic demand were recorded after 30 minutes. Findings The two groups were matched for the patients' age and gender. Intra-group analysis showed significant gradual decreases in pain intensity after 35 minutes for both groups. Inter-group analysis, however, did not show a significant difference between the two groups in this regard. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of side effects. The rate of rescue analgesic demand was 36% in the first and 40% in the second group (P = 0.68). Conclusion According to the results study, Apotel plus a low dose of morphine is at least as effective and safe as a full dose of morphine in patients with renal colic. PMID:26322213

  8. Outcomes for newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia dosed on actual or adjusted body weight

    PubMed Central

    Bivona, Cory; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, Dave; Grauer, Dennis; Abhyankar, Sunil; Aljitawi, Omar; Ganguly, Siddhartha; McGuirk, Joseph; Singh, Anurag; Lin, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data from solid tumor malignancies suggest that actual body weight (ABW) dosing improves overall outcomes. There is the potential to compromise efficacy when chemotherapy dosages are reduced, but the impact of dose adjustment on clinical response and toxicity in hematologic malignancies is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of utilizing a percent of ABW for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induction chemotherapy dosing. Methods This retrospective, single-center study included 146 patients who received 7 + 3 induction (cytarabine and anthracycline) for treatment of AML. Study design evaluated the relationship between percentage of ABW dosing and complete response (CR) rates in patients newly diagnosed with AML. Results Percentage of ABW dosing did not influence CR rates in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for AML (p = 0.83); nor did it influence rate of death at 30 days or relapse at 6 months (p = 0.94). When comparing patients dosed at 90–100 % of ABW compared to <90 % ABW, CR rates were not significantly different in patients classified as poor risk (p = 0.907). All favorable risk category patients obtained CR. Conclusions Preemptive dose reductions for obesity did not influence CR rates for patients with AML undergoing induction chemotherapy and did not influence the composite endpoint of death at 30 days or disease relapse at 6 months. PMID:26231954

  9. Pleiotrophin gene transcription in the rat nucleus accumbens is stimulated by an acute dose of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Le Grevès, Pierre

    2005-05-30

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding protein with diverse functions. For example, it stimulates neurite outgrowth, mitogenesis, repair and differentiation, effects that are similar to those of the neurotrophins. The neurotrophins have, in recent years, been implicated as mediators of structural plasticity, suggested to underlie the development of behavioural sensitisation to many drugs of abuse. Since NMDA receptor antagonists inhibit the underlying morphological changes, the mechanisms are thought to be highly dependent on the activation of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors. To investigate if PTN has a possible role in structural plasticity, its responsiveness to an acute dose of amphetamine was studied. Amphetamine is a well-characterised inducer of sensitisation. A group of rats was systemically treated with amphetamine (10 mg/kg) and the effect on the PTN gene transcription was studied 4 h later. A separate group of rats was pretreated with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.25 mg/kg) 30 min prior to the administration of amphetamine. Northern blot analysis revealed a significant increase of the PTN transcript after the administration of amphetamine. However, MK-801 pretreatment did not block this effect; in contrast, it further increased PTN mRNA levels. As the response to the two drugs resembles the one earlier reported on the gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the present results suggest that PTN may be an attractive protein to study further in the field of synaptic plasticity.

  10. Less Is More: Low-dose Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Effective in Acute Care Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Meyer, Jennifer M; Coughenour, Jeffrey P; Barnes, Stephen L

    2015-06-01

    Optimal dosing of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) has yet to be defined and varies widely due to concerns of efficacy and thrombosis. We hypothesized a dose of 15 IU/kg actual body weight of a three-factor PCC would effectively correct coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients. Retrospective review of 41 acute care surgery patients who received 15 IU/kg (± 10%) actual body weight PCC for correction of coagulopathy. Demographics, laboratory results, PCC dose, blood and plasma transfusions, and thrombotic complications were analyzed. We performed subset analyses of trauma patients and those taking warfarin. Mean age was 69 years (18-94 years). Thirty (73%) trauma patients, 8 (20%) emergency surgery patients, 2 (5%) burns, and 1 (2%) nontrauma neurosurgical patient were included. Mean PCC dose was 1305.4 IU (14.2 IU/kg actual body weight). Mean change in INR was 2.52 to 1.42 (p 0.00004). Successful correction (INR <1.5) was seen in 78 per cent. Treatment failures had a higher initial INR (4.3 vs 2.03, p 0.01). Mean plasma transfusion was 1.46 units. Mean blood transfusion was 1.61 units. Patients taking prehospital warfarin (n = 29, 71%) had higher initial INR (2.78 vs 1.92, p 0.05) and received more units of plasma (1.93 vs 0.33, p 0.01) than those not taking warfarin. No statistical differences were seen between trauma and nontrauma patients. One thrombotic event occurred. Administration of low-dose PCC, 15 IU/kg actual body weight, effectively corrects coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients regardless of warfarin use, diagnosis or plasma transfusion. PMID:26031281

  11. Diagnostic Performance on Low Dose Computed Tomography For Acute Appendicitis Among Attending and Resident Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Chen; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wu; Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Patricia Wanping; Irama, Wiwan; Chen, Wei Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) techniques can reduce exposure to radiation. Several previous studies have shown that radiation dose reduction in LDCT does not decrease the diagnostic performance for appendicitis among attending radiologists. But, the LDCT diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis in radiology residents with variable training levels has not been well discussed. Objectives To compare inter-observer and intra-observer differences of diagnostic performance on non-enhanced LDCT (NE-LDCT) and contrast-enhanced standard dose CT (CE-SDCT) for acute appendicitis among attending and resident radiologists. Patients and Methods This retrospective study included 101 patients with suspected acute appendicitis who underwent NE-LDCT and CE-SDCT. The CT examinations were interpreted and recorded on a five-point scale independently by three attending radiologists and three residents with 4, 1 and 1 years of training. Diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis of all readers on both examinations was represented by area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Inter-observer and intra-observer AUC values were compared using Jackknife FROC software on both modalities. The diagnostic accuracy of each reader on NE-LDCT was compared with body mass index (BMI) subgroups and noise using independent T test. Results Diagnostic performances for acute appendicitis were not statistically different for attending radiologists at both examinations. Better performance was noted on the CE-SDCT with a borderline significant difference (P = 0.05) for senior radiology resident. No statistical difference of AUC values was observed between attending radiologists and fourth year resident on both examinations. Statistically significant differences of AUC values were observed between attending radiologists and first year residents (P = 0.001 ~ 0.018) on NE-LDCT. Diagnostic accuracies of acute appendicitis on NE-LDCT for each reader were not significantly

  12. Dose Ranging, Expanded Acute Toxicity and Safety Pharmacology Studies for Intravenously Administered Functionalized Graphene Nanoparticle Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Lee, Stephen; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Lin, Richard Z.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoparticles dispersions show immense potential as multifunctional agents for in vivo biomedical applications. Herein, we follow regulatory guidelines for pharmaceuticals that recommend safety pharmacology assessment at least 10 – 100 times higher than the projected therapeutic dose, and present comprehensive single dose response, expanded acute toxicology, toxicokinetics, and respiratory/cardiovascular safety pharmacology results for intravenously administered dextran-coated graphene oxide nanoplatelet (GNP-Dex) formulations to rats at doses between 1–500 mg/kg. Our results indicate that the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of GNP-Dex is between 50 mg/kg ≤ MTD < 125 mg/kg, blood half-life < 30 minutes, and majority of nanoparticles excreted within 24 hours through feces. Histopathology changes were noted at ≥ 250 mg/kg in the heart, liver, lung, spleen, and kidney; we found no changes in the brain and no GNP-Dex related effects in the cardiovascular parameters or hematological factors (blood, lipid, and metabolic panels) at doses < 125 mg/kg. The results open avenues for pivotal preclinical single and repeat dose safety studies following good laboratory practices (GLP) as required by regulatory agencies for investigational new drug (IND) application. PMID:24854092

  13. Estimation of maximum tolerated dose for long-term bioassays from acute lethal dose and structure by QSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Gombar, V.K.; Enslein, K.; Hart, J.B.; Blake, B.W.; Borgstedt, H.H.

    1991-09-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model has been developed to estimate maximum tolerated doses (MTD) from structural features of chemicals and the corresponding oral acute lethal doses (LD50) as determined in male rats. The model is based on a set of 269 diverse chemicals which have been tested under the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program (NCI/NTP) protocols. The rat oral LD50 value was the strongest predictor. Additionally, 22 structural descriptors comprising nine substructural MOLSTAC(c) keys, three molecular connectivity indices, and sigma charges on 10 molecular fragments were identified as endpoint predictors. The model explains 76% of the variance and is significant (F = 35.7) at p less than 0.0001 with a standard error of the estimate of 0.40 in the log (1/mol) units used in Hansch-type equations. Cross-validation showed that the difference between the average deleted residual square (0.179) and the model residual square (0.160) was not significant (t = 0.98).

  14. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    body irradiation (TBI) with 250 kVp or 2 MeV x radiation, Co gamma radiation and reactor- and nuclear weapon-derived mixed gamma: neutron-radiation, delivered at various dose rates from a total body, bilateral, rotational, or unilateral exposure aspect. The DRRs established by a probit analysis vs. linear dose relationship were characterized by two main parameters or dependent variables: a slope and LD50/30. Respective LD50/30 values for studies that used 250 kVp x radiation (five primary studies combined, n = 338), 2 MeV x radiation, Co gamma radiation, and steady-state reactor-derived mixed gamma:neutron radiation for total body uniform exposures were 521 rad [498, 542], 671 rad [632, 715], 644 rad [613, 678], and 385 rad [357, 413]. The respective slopes were steep and ranged from 0.738 to 1.316. The DRR, LD50/30 values and slopes were also determined for total body, non-uniform, unilateral, pulse-rate exposures of mixed gamma:neutron radiation derived at reactor and nuclear weapon detonations. The LD50/30 values were, respectively, 395 rad [337, 432] and 412 rad [359, 460]. Secondary data sets of limited studies that did not describe a DRR were used to support the mid-to-high lethal dose range for the H-ARS and the threshold dose range for the concurrent acute GI ARS. The available evidence provided a reliable and extensive database that characterized the DRR for the H-ARS in young rhesus macaques exposed to 250 kVp uniform total body x radiation without the benefit of medical management. A less substantial but consistent database demonstrated the DRR for total body exposure of differing radiation quality, dose rate and non-uniform exposure. The DRR for the H-ARS is characterized by steep slopes and relative LD50/30 values that reflect the radiation quality, exposure aspect, and dose rate over a range in time from 1954-2012. PMID:26425897

  15. Development of Graphical User Interface for ARRBOD (Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hatem N.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The space radiation environment, particularly solar particle events (SPEs), poses the risk of acute radiation sickness (ARS) to humans; and organ doses from SPE exposure may reach critical levels during extra vehicular activities (EVAs) or within lightly shielded spacecraft. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model using the BRYNTRN with SUMDOSE computer codes, and a probabilistic model of Acute Radiation Risk (ARR). The codes BRYNTRN and SUMDOSE, written in FORTRAN, are a Baryon transport code and an output data processing code, respectively. The ARR code is written in C. The risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, the response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN in friendly way. A GUI for the Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations, which are required for operations of the ARRBOD modules: BRYNTRN, SUMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations directorate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. The ARRBOD GUI will serve as a proof-of-concept example for future integration of other human space applications risk projection models. The current version of the ARRBOD GUI is a new self-contained product and will have follow-on versions, as options are added: 1) human geometries of MAX/FAX in addition to CAM/CAF; 2) shielding distributions for spacecraft, Mars surface and atmosphere; 3) various space environmental and biophysical models; and 4) other response models to be connected to the BRYNTRN. The major components of the overall system, the subsystem interconnections, and external interfaces are described in this

  16. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  17. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric; Palmer, Joycelynne; Stein, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  18. Dose-Reduced Trastuzumab Emtansine: Active and Safe in Acute Hepatic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Adam; Johnston, Stephen R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. The majority of deaths attributed to breast cancer are a result of metastatic disease, and 30% of early breast cancers (EBC) will develop distant disease. The 5-year survival of patients with metastatic disease is estimated at 23%. Breast cancer subtypes continue to be stratified histologically on oestrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) receptor expression. HER2-positive breast cancers represent 25% of all breast cancer diagnoses. The therapies available for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are expanding, in particular within the field of HER2-positive disease, with the approval of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, lapatinib and trastuzumab emtansine (TDM-1). Recently, TDM-1 has been shown to improve progression-free survival in HER2 MBC when compared to capecitabine and lapatinib in clinical studies. Its main toxicities are deranged liver function tests and thrombocytopenia. There have also been cases of acute liver failure. Therefore, its use in acute hepatic dysfunction, to our knowledge, has been neither studied nor reported. We report a patient with progressive HER2-positive MBC who had previously responded to multiple HER2-targeted therapies that presented with acute hepatic dysfunction. She was treated with dose-reduced TDM-1 safely, with clear evidence of rapid biochemical, clinical and radiological response. This allowed dose escalation of TDM-1, and the patient maintains an ongoing response. PMID:25873876

  19. Pharmacodynamic effects of standard dose prasugrel versus high dose clopidogrel in non-diabetic obese patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Andrew; Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Rollini, Fabiana; Ueno, Masafumi; Ferreiro, José Luis; Patel, Ronakkumar; Desai, Bhaloo; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2014-02-01

    Increased body weight is independently associated with impaired clopidogrel pharmacodynamic (PD) response. Prasugrel has more potent PD effects compared with clopidogrel, although its PD effects in obese patients are unknown. The aim of this prospective, randomised, study was to compare the PD effects of standard-dose prasugrel [60 mg loading dose (LD)/10 mg daily maintenance dose (MD)] with high-dose clopidogrel (900 mg LD/150 mg daily MD) in non-diabetic obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m²] patients, with coronary artery disease (CAD) on aspirin therapy. PD assessments (baseline, 2 hours post-LD and 6 ± 2 days after MD) were conducted using four platelet function assays, and the platelet reactivity index (PRI) assessed by VASP was used for sample size estimation. A total of 42 patients with a BMI of 36.42 ± 5.6 kg/m² completed the study. There were no differences in baseline PD measures between groups. At 2 hours post-LD, prasugrel was associated with lower PRI compared with clopidogrel (24.3 ± 5.5 vs 58.7 ± 5.7, p≤0.001), with consistent findings for all assays. At one-week, PRI values on prasugrel MD were lower than clopidogrel MD without reaching statistical significance (34.7 ± 5.8 vs 42.9 ± 5.8, p=0.32), with consistent findings for all assays. Accordingly, rates of high on-treatment platelet reactivity were markedly reduced after prasugrel LD, but not after MD. In conclusion, in non-diabetic obese patients with CAD, standard prasugrel dosing achieved more potent PD effects than high-dose clopidogrel in the acute phase of treatment, but this was not sustained during maintenance phase treatment. Whether an intensified prasugrel regimen is required in obese patients warrants investigation.

  20. Low-dose radiation modifies skin response to acute gamma-rays and protons.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Pecaut, Michael J; Cao, Jeffrey D; Moldovan, Maria; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to obtain pilot data on the effects of protracted low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays on the skin, both with and without acute gamma or proton irradiation (IR). Six groups of C57BL/6 mice were examined: a) 0 Gy control, b) LDR, c) Gamma, d) LDR+Gamma, e) Proton, and f) LDR+Proton. LDR radiation was delivered to a total dose of 0.01 Gy (0.03 cGy/h), whereas the Gamma and Proton groups received 2 Gy (0.9 Gy/min and 1.0 Gy/min, respectively). Assays were performed 56 days after exposure. Skin samples from all irradiated groups had activated caspase-3, indicative of apoptosis. The significant (p<0.05) increases in immunoreactivity in the Gamma and Proton groups were not present when LDR pre-exposure was included. However, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay for DNA fragmentation and histological examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections revealed no significant differences among groups, regardless of radiation regimen. The data demonstrate that caspase-3 activation initially triggered by both forms of acute radiation was greatly elevated in the skin nearly two months after whole-body exposure. In addition, LDR γ-ray priming ameliorated this response.

  1. The acute lethal dose 50 (LD50) of caffeine in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Richard H

    2016-10-01

    An acute LD50 is a statistically derived amount of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of the animals when given by a specified route as a single dose and the animals observed for a specified time period. Although conducting routine acute toxicity testing in rodents has been criticized, it can serve useful functions and also have practical implications. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) will reflect the acute toxicity of a substance and may require workers to wear protective gear, if appropriate, based on the LD50. There is no information in the scientific published literature which calculates a mean LD50 and standard deviation for caffeine administered orally to rats, using studies performed under good laboratory practice (GLP) or equivalent. This report does that and should be useful to manufacturers, packagers, transporters and regulators of this material. Using data from studies that are reproducible and reliable, the most accurate estimate of the acute LD50 of caffeine administered orally in male albino rats is hereby reported to be 367/mg/kg.

  2. The acute lethal dose 50 (LD50) of caffeine in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Richard H

    2016-10-01

    An acute LD50 is a statistically derived amount of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of the animals when given by a specified route as a single dose and the animals observed for a specified time period. Although conducting routine acute toxicity testing in rodents has been criticized, it can serve useful functions and also have practical implications. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) will reflect the acute toxicity of a substance and may require workers to wear protective gear, if appropriate, based on the LD50. There is no information in the scientific published literature which calculates a mean LD50 and standard deviation for caffeine administered orally to rats, using studies performed under good laboratory practice (GLP) or equivalent. This report does that and should be useful to manufacturers, packagers, transporters and regulators of this material. Using data from studies that are reproducible and reliable, the most accurate estimate of the acute LD50 of caffeine administered orally in male albino rats is hereby reported to be 367/mg/kg. PMID:27461039

  3. Acute toxicity and the 28-day repeated dose study of a Siddha medicine Nuna Kadugu in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuna Kadugu (NK), a Siddha medicine prepared from leaves and fruits of Morinda Pubescens, used for the treatment of various skin diseases. Though NK has been widely used for several decades, no scientific report was available on its safety. Present study was undertaken to demonstrate the oral toxicity of NK in Sprague Dawley rats. Methods Acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively, with minor modifications. In acute oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 2000mg/kg b.wt., p.o and animals were observed for toxic signs at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, 24 h and for next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose, the 28- day oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg b.wt./p.o/day. Two satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of NK. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Haematology, clinical biochemistry, electrolytes, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed with NK administration. In the repeated dose study, no significant differences in body weight changes, food / water intake, haematology, clinical biochemistry and electrolytes content were observed between control and NK groups. No gross pathological findings and difference in relative organ weights were observed between control and NK treated rats. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities with NK treatment. Conclusion Acute study reveals that the LD50 of NK is greater than 2000mg/kg, b.wt. in fasted female rats and can be classified as Category 5. 28-day repeated oral toxicity demonstrates that the No Observed Adverse Effect Level of NK is greater than 900 mg/kg b.wt./day, p.o in rats. There were no delayed effects

  4. Administration of low dose estrogen attenuates gliosis and protects neurons in acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Matzelle, Denise C; Yu, Shan P; Wei, Ling; Varma, Abhay; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition with neurological deficits and loss of motor function that, depending on the severity, may lead to paralysis. The only treatment currently available is methylprednisolone, which is widely used and renders limited efficacy in SCI. Therefore, other therapeutic agents must be developed. The neuroprotective efficacy of estrogen in SCI was studied with a pre-clinical and pro-translational perspective. Acute SCI was induced in rats that were treated with low doses of estrogen (1, 5, 10, or 100 μg/kg) and compared with vehicle-treated injured rats or laminectomy control (sham) rats at 48 h post-SCI. Changes in gliosis and other pro-inflammatory responses, expression and activity of proteolytic enzymes (e.g., calpain, caspase-3), apoptosis of neurons in SCI, and cell death were monitored via Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Negligible pro-inflammatory responses or proteolytic events and very low levels of neuronal death were found in sham rats. In contrast, vehicle-treated SCI rats showed profound pro-inflammatory responses with reactive gliosis, elevated expression and activity of calpain and caspase-3, elevated Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, and high levels of neuronal death in lesion and caudal regions of the injured spinal cord. Estrogen treatment at each dose reduced pro-inflammatory and proteolytic activities and protected neurons in the caudal penumbra in acute SCI. Estrogen treatment at 10 μg was found to be as effective as 100 μg in ameliorating the above parameters in injured animals. Results from this investigation indicated that estrogen at a low dose could be a promising therapeutic agent for treating acute SCI. Experimental studies with low dose estrogen therapy in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrated the potential for multi-active beneficial outcomes. Estrogen has been found to ameliorate several degenerative pathways following SCI. Thus, such early protective effects may even lead to functional

  5. Dose characterization in the near-source region for two high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruqing; Li, X Allen

    2002-08-01

    High dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources are currently used in intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) for the peripheral arterial system. This poses a demand on evaluating accurate dose parameters in the near-source region for such sources. The purpose of this work is to calculate the dose parameters for the old VariSource HDR 192Ir source and the new microSelectron HDR 192Ir source, using Monte Carlo electron and photon transport simulation. The two-dimensional (2D) dose rate distributions and the air kerma strengths for the two HDR sources were calculated by EGSnrc and EGS4 Monte Carlo codes. Based on these data, the dose parameters proposed in the AAPM TG-60 protocol were derived. The dose rate constants obtained are 13.119+/-0.028 cGy h(-1) U(-1) for the old VariSource source, and 22.751+/-0.031 cGy h(-1) U(-1) for the new microSelectron source at the reference point (r0 = 2 mm, theta = pi/2). The 2D dose rate distributions, the radial dose functions, and the anisotropy functions presented for the two sources cover radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm. In the near-source region on the transverse plane, the dose effects of the charged particle nonequilibrium and the beta-particle dose contribution were studied. It is found that at radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm, these effects increase the calculated dose rates by up to 29% for the old VariSource source, and by up to 12% for the new microSelectron source, which, in turn, change values of the radial dose function and the anisotropy function. The present dose parameters, which account for the charged particle nonequilibrium and the beta particle contribution, may be used for accurate IVB dose calculation. PMID:12201413

  6. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling using spatial dose metrics and machine learning methods for severe acute oral mucositis resulting from head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe acute mucositis commonly results from head and neck (chemo)radiotherapy. A predictive model of mucositis could guide clinical decision-making and inform treatment planning. We aimed to generate such a model using spatial dose metrics and machine learning. Material and Methods Predictive models of severe acute mucositis were generated using radiotherapy dose (dose-volume and spatial dose metrics) and clinical data. Penalised logistic regression, support vector classification and random forest classification (RFC) models were generated and compared. Internal validation was performed (with 100-iteration cross-validation), using multiple metrics, including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and calibration slope, to assess performance. Associations between covariates and severe mucositis were explored using the models. Results The dose-volume-based models (standard) performed equally to those incorporating spatial information. Discrimination was similar between models, but the RFCstandard had the best calibration. The mean AUC and calibration slope for this model were 0.71 (s.d.=0.09) and 3.9 (s.d.=2.2), respectively. The volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses were associated with severe mucositis. Conclusions The RFCstandard model performance is modest-to-good, but should be improved, and requires external validation. Reducing the volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses may reduce mucositis incidence. PMID:27240717

  7. Delayed activation of human microglial cells by high dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxin; Chong, Zhao Zhong; De Toledo, Sonia M; Azzam, Edouard I; Elkabes, Stella; Souayah, Nizar

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that microglia affects the fate of neural stem cells in response to ionizing radiation, which suggests a role for microglia in radiation-induced degenerative outcomes. We therefore investigated the effects of γ-irradiation on cell survival, proliferation, and activation of microglia and explored associated mechanisms. Specifically, we evaluated cellular and molecular changes associated with exposure of human microglial cells (CHME5) to low and high doses of acute cesium-137 γ rays. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, cell cycle analyses revealed dose-dependent decreases in the fraction of cells in S and G2/M phase, which correlated with significant oxidative stress. By one week after irradiation, 20-30% of the cells exposed to high doses of γ rays underwent apoptosis, which correlated with significant concomitant decrease in metabolic activity as assessed by the MTT assay, and microglial activation as judged by both morphological changes and increased expression of Glut-5 and CR43. These changes were associated with increases in the mRNA levels for IL-1α, IL-10 and TNFα. Together, the results show that human CHME5 microglia are relatively resistant to low and moderate doses of γ rays, but are sensitive to acute high doses, and that CHME5 cells are a useful tool for in vitro study of human microglia. PMID:27265419

  8. High-Dose-Rate 192Ir Brachytherapy Dose Verification: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikoofar, Alireza; Hoseinpour, Zohreh; Rabi Mahdavi, Seied; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy might be an effective tool for palliation of dysphagia. Because of some concerns about adverse effects due to absorbed radiation dose, it is important to estimate absorbed dose in risky organs during this treatment. Objectives: This study aimed to measure the absorbed dose in the parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, eye, trachea, spinal cord, and manubrium of sternum in brachytherapy in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: To measure radiation dose, eye, parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, spine, and sternum, an anthropomorphic phantom was considered with applicators to set thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). A specific target volume of about 23 cm3 in the upper thoracic esophagus was considered as target, and phantom planned computed tomography (CT) for HDR brachytherapy, then with a micro-Selectron HDR (192Ir) remote after-loading unit. Results: Absorbed doses were measured with calibrated TLDs and were expressed in centi-Gray (cGy). In regions far from target (≥ 16 cm) such as submandibular, parotid and thyroid glands, mean measured dose ranged from 1.65 to 5.5 cGy. In closer regions (≤ 16 cm), the absorbed dose might be as high as 113 cGy. Conclusions: Our study showed similar depth and surface doses; in closer regions, the surface and depth doses differed significantly due to the role of primary radiation that had imposed a high-dose gradient and difference between the plan and measurement, which was more severe because of simplifications in tissue inhomogeneity, considered in TPS relative to phantom. PMID:26413250

  9. Dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium after acute tritiated water intakes in humans.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, A; Galeriu, D; Richardson, R B

    1997-10-01

    Urine samples from eight male radiation workers who had an unplanned acute tritiated water intake were measured for tritium-in-urine up to 300 d post-exposure. During the first month or so post-exposure, these individuals increased their fluid intakes to accelerate the turnover rate of tritium in the body for dose mitigation. Their daily fluid intakes reverted to normal levels in the latter period of the study. A non-linear regressional analysis of the tritium-in-urine data showed that the average biological half-life of tritium in body water, with standard deviation, was 6.3 +/- 1.0 d (range, 5.0-8.1 d) and 8.4 +/- 2.0 d (range, 6.2-12.8 d) during the respective periods of increased fluid intake and the later period of normal fluid intake. A longer term component of tritium excretion was also observed with average biological half-life of 74 +/- 18 d (range, 58-104 d), indicating the incorporation of tritium, and its retention, in the organic fractions of the body. A mathematical model was developed and used to estimate the dose increase from the metabolized organically bound tritium on the basis of the kinetics of tritium-in-urine. The model accounts for a change in the rates of urinary excretion caused by variable fluid intakes. The average dose to the body, for the eight male workers, due to the metabolized organically bound tritium was estimated to be 6.2 +/- 1.3% (range, 3.5% to 8.9%) of the committed effective dose due to tritium in the body water. This value for the dose increase from organically bound tritium is in the range of the current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, i.e., organically bound tritium incorporated into the body contributes about 10% of the dose to the body water following tritiated water intakes.

  10. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Buban, James P.; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D.; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM. PMID:19915208

  11. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  12. Clinical and In Vitro Studies on Impact of High-Dose Etoposide Pharmacokinetics Prior Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on the Risk of Post-Transplant Leukemia Relapse.

    PubMed

    Sobiak, Joanna; Kazimierczak, Urszula; Kowalczyk, Dariusz W; Chrzanowska, Maria; Styczyński, Jan; Wysocki, Mariusz; Szpecht, Dawid; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The impact of etoposide (VP-16) plasma concentrations on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) on leukemia-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was studied. In addition, the in vitro effects of VP-16 on the lymphocytes proliferation, cytotoxic activity and on Th1/Th2 cytokine responses were assessed. In 31 children undergoing allo-HSCT, VP-16 plasma concentrations were determined up to 120 h after the infusion using the HPLC-UV method. For mentioned in vitro studies, VP-16 plasma concentrations observed on allo-HSCT day were used. In 84 % of children, VP-16 plasma concentrations (0.1-1.5 μg/mL) were quantifiable 72 h after the end of the drug infusion, i.e. when allo-HSCT should be performed. In 20 (65 %) children allo-HSCT was performed 4 days after the end of the drug infusion, and VP-16 was still detectable (0.1-0.9 μg/mL) in plasma of 12 (39 %) of them. Post-transplant ALL relapse occurred in four children, in all of them VP-16 was detectable in plasma (0.1-0.8 μg/mL) on allo-HSCT day, while there was no relapse in children with undetectable VP-16. In in vitro studies, VP-16 demonstrated impact on the proliferation activity of stimulated lymphocytes depending on its concentration and exposition time. The presence of VP-16 in plasma on allo-HSCT day may demonstrate an adverse effect on graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reaction and increase the risk of post-transplant ALL relapse. Therefore, if 72 h after VP-16 administration its plasma concentration is still above 0.1 μg/mL then the postponement of transplantation for next 24 h should be considered to protect GvL effector cells from transplant material.

  13. Intravenous non-high-dose pantoprazole is equally effective as high-dose pantoprazole in preventing rebleeding among low risk patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer after initial endoscopic hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown that high-dose proton-pumps inhibitors (PPI) do not further reduce the rate of rebleeding compared to non-high-dose PPIs but we do not know whether intravenous non-high-dose PPIs reduce rebleeding rates among patients at low risk (Rockall score < 6) or among those at high risk, both compared to high-dose PPIs. This retrospective case-controlled study aimed to identify the subgroups of these patients that might benefit from treatment with non-high-dose PPIs. Methods Subjects who received high dose and non-high-dose pantoprazole for confirmed acute PU bleeding at a tertiary referral hospital were enrolled (n = 413). They were divided into sustained hemostasis (n = 324) and rebleeding groups (n = 89). The greedy method was applied to allow treatment-control random matching (1:1). Patients were randomly selected from the non-high-dose and high-dose PPI groups who had a high risk peptic ulcer bleeding (n = 104 in each group), and these were then subdivided to two subgroups (Rockall score ≥ 6 vs. < 6, n = 77 vs. 27). Results An initial low hemoglobin level, serum creatinine level, and Rockall score were independent factors associated with rebleeding. After case-control matching, the significant variables between the non-high-dose and high-dose PPI groups for a Rockall score ≥ 6 were the rebleeding rate, and the amount of blood transfused. Case-controlled matching for the subgroup with a Rockall score < 6 showed that the rebleeding rate was similar for both groups (11.1% in each group). Conclusion Intravenous non-high-dose pantoprazole is equally effective as high-dose pantoprazole when treating low risk patients with a Rockall sore were < 6 who have bleeding ulcers and high-risk stigmata after endoscopic hemostasis. PMID:22455511

  14. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  15. Dose-response characteristics of nebulized albuterol in the treatment of acutely ill, hospitalized asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Ciccolella, D E; Brennan, K; Kelsen, S G; Criner, G J

    1999-09-01

    We investigated the bronchodilator dose-response to nebulized albuterol and the dose of albuterol which produces maximal bronchodilation in the acutely ill, hospitalized asthmatic. Consecutively admitted patients from the emergency room in status asthmaticus who fulfilled the inclusion criteria (age <41 years old and <12 pack-years of smoking) were studied. Albuterol was administered by nebulizer (Puritan-Bennett Raindrop) in repeated 2.5-mg treatments up to a total dose of 10 mg and the bronchodilator response was measured by a computerized spirometer. Twenty-two patients were studied. Baseline spirometry showed a (mean +/- SE) forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) of 1.26 +/- 0.14 L (42 +/- 4.0% predicted), which increased significantly (p < 0.05) during albuterol titration to a maximum FEV1 of 1.70 +/- 0.19 L (57 +/- 5% of predicted). After cumulative doses of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mg of nebulized albuterol, 27%, 45%, 72%, and 77% of patients, respectively, attained maximum bronchodilation. The remaining 23% of patients did not respond to doses up to 10 mg of albuterol. The maximum FEV1 response to albuterol did not correlate with the initial severity of airflow obstruction (r = 0.36, p > 0.05). Pulse rate and arterial oxygen saturation were not significantly affected by nebulized albuterol up to a total dose of 10 mg. No arrhythmias were noted. In summary, most hospitalized asthmatics (72%) required a cumulative dose of 7.5 mg of nebulized albuterol to achieve maximum bronchodilation and a large fraction (50%) required higher albuterol doses than the standard 2.5 mg. The bronchodilatory response to nebulized albuterol varied widely among patients in status asthmaticus and could not be predicted from the initial severity of airflow obstruction. Because side effects were minimal, it would be reasonable to use 7.5 mg of nebulized albuterol as initial therapy. Alternatively, dose-response titration with albuterol would be advantageous.

  16. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMI<18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI >or= 18.5.

  17. Calculation of dose, dose equivalent, and relative biological effectiveness for high charge and energy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Chun, S. Y.; Reginatto, M.; Hajnal, F.

    1995-01-01

    The Green's function for the transport of ions of high charge and energy is utilized with a nuclear fragmentation database to evaluate dose, dose equivalent, and RBE for C3H10T1/2 cell survival and neo-plastic transformation as function of depth in soft tissue. Such evaluations are useful to estimates of biological risk for high altitude aircraft, space operations, accelerator operations, and biomedical application.

  18. Calculation of Dose, Dose Equivalent, and Relative Biological Effectiveness for High Charge and Energy Ion Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Reginatto, M.; Hajnal, F.; Chun, S. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Green's function for the transport of ions of high charge and energy is utilized with a nuclear fragmentation database to evaluate dose, dose equivalent, and RBE for C3H1OT1/2 cell survival and neoplastic transformation as a function of depth in soft tissue. Such evaluations are useful to estimates of biological risk for high altitude aircraft, space operations, accelerator operations, and biomedical applications.

  19. Differences in clinical disease and immune response of pigs challenged with a high-dose versus low-dose inoculum of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Loving, Crystal L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Vincent, Amy L; Lager, Kelly M; Sacco, Randy E

    2008-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continues to be an economically important infectious disease of swine. Mechanisms governing activation of the innate immune response to PRRSV remain to be elucidated. Virulence differences observed between PRRSV isolates have been attributed to replication ability in vivo, though immunogenic differences likely contribute to virulence also. The current study utilized a single PRRSV isolate given at two different challenge doses to investigate the effect of viral replication and load on immune responses, including type I interferon activation. Body temperature, viral load, antibody levels, cellular infiltration into pulmonary tissue, and the interferon response were measured in animals receiving either a low (10(2) CCID(50)) or high (10(6) CCID(50)) dose of inoculum to understand the role of challenge dose in acute immune responses. Initial PRRSV dose did not correlate with serum levels of PRRSV vRNA or antibody titers during the acute stage of infection (days 2-12 PI), but did have an effect on the immune response and mortality. Type I interferon responses, measured by transcriptional changes in IFN-beta, IFN-alpha, Mx, and PKR, were uniquely different when assessed relative to viral dose or cell type, but no overall trend existed to discern responses based on challenge dose. Serum IFN-gamma levels correlated with serum viral RNA load at day 19 PI. Overall, between days 2 and 12 PI, serum vRNA load was not significantly different between pigs challenged with a low or high dose of PRRSV. Animals receiving high-dose inoculum were viremic longer and eventually succumbed to respiratory disease. IFN-gamma may play a role in PRRSV pathogenesis, as serum levels increased significantly in pigs challenged with the high dose of PRRSV.

  20. Acute radiation enteritis caused by dose-dependent radiation exposure in dogs: experimental research.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Xu, Liu; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2014-12-01

    Accidental or intended radiation exposure in mass casualty settings presents a serious and on-going threat. The development of mitigating and treating agents requires appropriate animal models. Unfortunately, the majority of research on radiation enteritis in animals has lacked specific assessments and targeted therapy. Our study showed beagle dogs, treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for abdominal irradiation, were administered single X-ray doses of 8-30 Gy. The degree of intestinal tract injury for all of the animals after radiation exposure was evaluated with regard to clinical syndrome, endoscopic findings, histological features, and intestinal function. The range of single doses (8 Gy, 10-14 Gy, and 16-30 Gy) represented the degree of injury (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively). Acute radiation enteritis included clinical syndrome with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, hemafecia, and weight loss; typical endoscopic findings included edema, bleeding, mucosal abrasions, and ulcers; and intestinal biopsy results revealed mucosal necrosis, erosion, and loss, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and congestion. Changes in serum diamine oxides (DAOs) and d-xylose represented intestinal barrier function and absorption function, respectively, and correlated with the extent of damage (P < 0.05 and P < 0.05, respectively). We successfully developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis, thus obtaining a relatively objective evaluation of intestinal tract injury based on clinical performance and laboratory examination. The method of assessment of the degree of intestinal tract injury after abdominal irradiation could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for acute radiation enteritis.

  1. High-dose glucocorticoid aggravates TBI-associated corticosteroid insufficiency by inducing hypothalamic neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Zhao, Zilong; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Xin; Li, Ying; Liu, Xiao; Lu, Hujie; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning

    2013-12-01

    Emerging experimental and clinical data suggest that severe illness, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), can induce critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI). However, underlying mechanisms of this TBI-associated CIRCI remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that dexamethasone (DXM), a synthetic glucocorticoid, which was widely used to treat TBI, induces hypothalamic neuronal apoptosis to aggravate CIRCI. To test this hypothesis, we have evaluated the dose effect of DXM (1 or 10mg/kg) on the development of acute CIRCI in rats with fluid percussion injury-induced TBI and on cultured rat hypothalamic neurons in vitro (DXM, 10(-5)-10(-8)mol/L). Corticosterone Increase Index was recorded as the marker for CIRCI. In addition, MTT and TUNEL assays were used to measure the viability and apoptosis of hypothalamic neurons in primary culture. Moreover, high-resolution hopping probe ion conductance microscopy (HPICM) was used to monitor the DXM-induced morphological changes in neurons. The incidence of acute CIRCI was significantly higher in the high-dose DXM group on post-injury day 7. Cellular viability was significantly decreased from 12h to 24h after the treatment with a high-dose of DXM. A significantly increase in TUNEL positive cells were detected in cultured cells treated with a high-dose of DXM after 18h. Neurites of hypothalamic neuron were dramatically thinner and the numbers of dendritic beadings increased in neurons treated with the high dose of DXM for 12h. In conclusion, high-dose DXM induced hypothalamic neurons to undergo apoptosis in vivo and in vitro, which may aggravate TBI-associated CIRCI.

  2. Hyperfractionation versus single dose irradiation in human acute lymphocytic leukemia cells: application to TBI for marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shank, B

    1993-04-01

    A major purpose of total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation in leukemia patients is to help eradicate all leukemia cells; the ideal regimen has not yet been determined. To answer basic questions regarding leukemic cell survival kinetics, a human acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell line (Reh), with the common ALL antigen (CALLA-positive), has been used to assess in vitro the efficacy of one widely used hyperfractionated TBI (HTBI) regimen versus single dose TBI (SDTBI). The regimen studied in this model was 1.2-1.25 Gy/fraction, 3 fractions/day, 5 h apart each day, for 5 days (11-12 fractions) for a total dose of 13.2-15.0 Gy. It was found that: (i) cell survival was consistent with the linear-quadratic model for early responding tissues (alpha/beta = 7.0 Gy). (ii) The change in shape of the 'effective' cell survival curve for three fractions/day was consistent with the hypothesis that there was complete repair between fractions. (iii) Cell regrowth between fractions was minimal (< or = 5%). (iv) Division delay between fractions (2.9 h/Gy) could explain the small contribution to the survival curve of regrowth between fractions. (v) For a full HTBI course to 15 Gy, cell survival was predicted to be approximately 5 x 10(-5), compared with approximately 10(-3) for a low dose rate (0.04-0.07 Gy/min) SDTBI to 10 Gy; the latter projected from the initial slope of the high dose rate, single dose survival curve. PMID:8327730

  3. An acute dose of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol affects behavioral and neurochemical indices of mesolimbic dopaminergic activity.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Fernández-Ruiz, J J; de Miguel, R; Hernández, M L; Cebeira, M; Ramos, J A

    1993-10-21

    Cannabinoid consumption has been reported to affect several neurotransmitter systems and their related behaviors. The present study has been designed to examine cannabinoid effects on certain behaviors, which have been currently located in the limbic forebrain, in parallel to their effects on mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To this end, male rats treated with an oral dose of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or vehicle were used 1 h after treatment for two different behavioral tests or neurochemical analyses of mesolimbic dopaminergic activity. Treatments, behavioral tests and sacrifice were performed in the dark phase of photoperiod because it corresponds to the maximum behavioral expression in the rat. Behavioral tests were a dark-light emergence test, which allows measurements of emotional reactivity, and a socio-sexual approach behavior test, which allows measurements of sexual motivation and also of spontaneous and stereotypic activities. Neurochemical analyses consisted of measurements of dopamine (DA) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) contents, tyrosine hydroxylase activity, in vitro DA release and number and affinity of D1 receptors in the limbic forebrain. Results were as follows. THC exposure markedly altered the pattern executed by the animals in both tests. Concretely, THC-exposed animals exhibited a low number of visits to an incentive female in addition to high time spent in the vicinity of an incentive male, both observed in the socio-sexual approach behavior test, and an increased emergence latency to go out of a dark compartment in the dark-light emergence test. However, the fact that THC also decreased spontaneous activity and the frequency of rearing and self-grooming behaviors, in addition to the observations of either low total number of visits to both incentive sexual areas or high escape latency to go out of a light compartment, when the animal is placed in this compartment, also suggest the possible existence of an accompanying

  4. Blast cell methotrexate-polyglutamate accumulation in vivo differs by lineage, ploidy, and methotrexate dose in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Synold, T W; Relling, M V; Boyett, J M; Rivera, G K; Sandlund, J T; Mahmoud, H; Crist, W M; Pui, C H; Evans, W E

    1994-01-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) is a component of most treatment protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), yet recent studies of receptor-mediated transport and saturable polyglutamylation have questioned its rationale. To investigate this in vivo, methotrexate and its active polyglutamated metabolites (MTX-PG) were measured in bone marrow blasts obtained from 101 children randomized to single-agent therapy with either HDMTX (1 g/m2 per 24 h i.v., n = 47) or low-dose MTX (LDMTX, 30 mg/m2 by mouth every 6 h x 6, n = 54), before remission induction therapy. Blast concentrations of total MTX-PGs (median 460 vs 1380 pmol/10(9) cells) and of long-chain MTX-glu4-6 were both significantly higher after HDMTX (P < 0.001). With either treatment, MTX-PGs were significantly higher in B-lineage blasts than in T-lineage blasts (LDMTX P = 0.001, HDMTX P = 0.03). In a multiple regression analysis of B-lineage ALL, blast MTX-PG was significantly related to MTX dose (or plasma MTX concentration), lymphoblast ploidy (hyperdiploid > nonhyperdiploid), and percentage S-phase. This is the first evidence that HDMTX achieves higher MTX-PG concentrations in ALL blasts in vivo, establishing a rationale for HDMTX in the treatment of childhood ALL, especially T-lineage or nonhyperdiploid B-lineage ALL, disease characteristics associated with a poor prognosis on conventional therapy. Images PMID:7525652

  5. Single dose oral mefenamic acid for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Rachel; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Mefenamic acid is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is most often used for treating pain of dysmenorrhoea in the short term (seven days or less), as well as mild to moderate pain including headache, dental pain, postoperative and postpartum pain. It is widely available in many countries worldwide. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral mefenamic acid in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to December 2010. Selection criteria Single oral dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of mefenamic acid for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and the data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief (TOTPAR) or pain intensity difference (SPID) over 4 to 6 hours was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. These derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, the relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Four studies with 842 participants met the inclusion criteria; 126 participants were treated with mefenamic acid 500 mg, 67 with mefenamic acid 250 mg, 197 with placebo, and 452 with lignocaine, aspirin, zomepirac or nimesulide. Participants had pain following third molar extraction, episiotomy and orthopaedic surgery. The NNT for at least 50% pain relief over 6 hours with a single dose of mefenamic acid 500 mg compared to placebo was 4.0 (2

  6. Mood influences on acute smoking responses are independent of nicotine intake and dose expectancy.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Ciccocioppo, Melinda; Conklin, Cynthia A; Milanak, Melissa E; Grottenthaler, Amy; Sayette, Michael A

    2008-02-01

    Acute responses to smoking are influenced by nicotine and by nonpharmacological factors such as nicotine dose expectancy and sensory effects of smoke inhalation. Because negative mood increases smoking reinforcement, the authors examined whether these effects may be altered by mood context. Smokers (n=200) participated in 2 sessions, negative or positive mood induction, and were randomized to 1 of 5 groups. Four groups comprised the 2x2 balanced placebo design, varying actual (0.6 mg vs. 0.05 mg yield) and expected nicotine dose (expected nicotine vs. denicotinized [denic]) of cigarettes. A fifth group was a no-smoking control. Smoking, versus not smoking, attenuated negative affect, as well as withdrawal and craving. Negative mood increased smoking reinforcement. However, neither actual nor expected nicotine dose had much influence on these responses; even those smokers receiving and expecting a denic cigarette reported attenuated negative affect. A follow-up comparison suggested that the sensory effects of smoke inhalation, but not the simple motor effects of smoking behavior, were responsible. Thus, sensory effects of smoke inhalation had a greater influence on relieving negative affect than actual or expected nicotine intake.

  7. A Therapeutic Dose of Ketoprofen Causes Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Erosions, and Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine. PMID:23294892

  8. Mood influences on acute smoking responses are independent of nicotine intake and dose expectancy.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Ciccocioppo, Melinda; Conklin, Cynthia A; Milanak, Melissa E; Grottenthaler, Amy; Sayette, Michael A

    2008-02-01

    Acute responses to smoking are influenced by nicotine and by nonpharmacological factors such as nicotine dose expectancy and sensory effects of smoke inhalation. Because negative mood increases smoking reinforcement, the authors examined whether these effects may be altered by mood context. Smokers (n=200) participated in 2 sessions, negative or positive mood induction, and were randomized to 1 of 5 groups. Four groups comprised the 2x2 balanced placebo design, varying actual (0.6 mg vs. 0.05 mg yield) and expected nicotine dose (expected nicotine vs. denicotinized [denic]) of cigarettes. A fifth group was a no-smoking control. Smoking, versus not smoking, attenuated negative affect, as well as withdrawal and craving. Negative mood increased smoking reinforcement. However, neither actual nor expected nicotine dose had much influence on these responses; even those smokers receiving and expecting a denic cigarette reported attenuated negative affect. A follow-up comparison suggested that the sensory effects of smoke inhalation, but not the simple motor effects of smoking behavior, were responsible. Thus, sensory effects of smoke inhalation had a greater influence on relieving negative affect than actual or expected nicotine intake. PMID:18266487

  9. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Predicting Grade 3 Acute Diarrhea During Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer Using a Cutoff-Dose Logistic Regression Normal Tissue Complication Probability Model

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M.; Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Understanding the dose-volume relationship of small bowel irradiation and severe acute diarrhea may help reduce the incidence of this side effect during adjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients treated curatively for rectal cancer were reviewed, and the maximum grade of acute diarrhea was determined. The small bowel was outlined on the treatment planning CT scan, and a dose-volume histogram was calculated for the initial pelvic treatment (45 Gy). Logistic regression models were fitted for varying cutoff-dose levels from 5 to 45 Gy in 5-Gy increments. The model with the highest LogLikelihood was used to develop a cutoff-dose normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Results: There were a total of 152 patients (48% preoperative, 47% postoperative, 5% other), predominantly treated prone (95%) with a three-field technique (94%) and a protracted venous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (78%). Acute Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 21%. The largest LogLikelihood was found for the cutoff-dose logistic regression model with 15 Gy as the cutoff-dose, although the models for 20 Gy and 25 Gy had similar significance. According to this model, highly significant correlations (p <0.001) between small bowel volumes receiving at least 15 Gy and toxicity exist in the considered patient population. Similar findings applied to both the preoperatively (p = 0.001) and postoperatively irradiated groups (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of Grade 3 diarrhea was significantly correlated with the volume of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy using a cutoff-dose NTCP model.

  11. Single dose oral naproxen and naproxen sodium for acute postoperative pain (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Mason, L; Edwards, JE; Moore, RA; McQuay, HJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain is often poorly managed. Treatment options include a range of drug therapies such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) of which naproxen is one. Naproxen is used to treat a variety of painful conditions including acute postoperative pain, and is often combined with sodium to improve its solubility for oral administration. Naproxen sodium 550 mg (equivalent to 500 mg of naproxen) is considered to be an effective dose for treating postoperative pain but to date no systematic review of the effectiveness of naproxen/naproxen sodium at different doses has been published. Objectives To assess the efficacy, safety and duration of action of a single oral dose of naproxen or naproxen sodium for acute postoperative pain in adults. Search strategy We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for relevant studies. Additional studies were identified from the reference list of retrieved reports. The most recent search was undertaken in July 2004. Selection criteria Included studies were randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of a single dose of orally administered naproxen or naproxen sodium in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to give the number of patients with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours. Relative risk estimates (RR) and the number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for at least 50% pain relief were then calculated. Information was sought on the percentage of patients experiencing any adverse event, and the number-needed-to-harm was derived. Time to remedication was also estimated. Main results Ten trials (996 patients) met the inclusion criteria: nine assessed naproxen sodium; one combined the results from two small trials of naproxen alone. Included studies scored well for methodological quality. Meta-analysis of six trials (500

  12. Febuxostat exerts dose-dependent renoprotection in rats with cisplatin-induced acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Alaa N A; Shehatou, George S G; Shebl, Abdelhadi M; Salem, Hatem A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate possible renoprotective effects of febuxostat, a highly potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor, against cisplatin (CIS)-induced acute kidney injury in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into four groups of six rats each, as follows: normal control; CIS, received a single intraperitoneal injection of CIS (7.5 mg/kg); [febuxostat 10 + CIS] and [febuxostat 15 + CIS], received febuxostat (10 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively, orally) for 14 days, starting 7 days before CIS injection. At the end of experiment, 24-h urine output was collected and serum was separated for biochemical assessments. Kidney tissue homogenate was prepared for determination of oxidative stress-related parameters, nitric oxide (NO), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Moreover, histological alterations of kidney tissues were evaluated. Serum creatinine, blood urea, and urinary total protein were significantly elevated, while serum albumin and creatinine clearance were significantly reduced, in CIS-intoxicated rats, indicating depressed renal function. CIS administration also elicited renal oxidative stress, evidenced by increased malondialdehyde content and depleted levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, enhancement of renal levels of the pro-inflammatory TNF-α indicated renal inflammation. CIS-administered rats also showed increased serum lactate dehydrogenase activity and reduced renal NO bioavailability. Febuxostat dose-dependently improved or restored these changes to near-normal (e.g., mean ± SD of serum creatinine levels in control, CIS, [febuxostat 10 + CIS] and [febuxostat 15 + CIS] groups were 0.78 ± 0.19, 3.28 ± 2.0 (P < 0.01 versus control group), 1.03 ± 0.36 (P < 0.01 versus CIS group), and 0.93 ± 0.21 (P < 0.01 versus CIS group) mg/dl, respectively, and blood urea levels for the different groups were 36.80 ± 4.36, 236.10 ± 89.19 (P < 0

  13. Applying Pharmacokinetics to Optimize Dosing of Anti-TNF Biologics in Acute Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael J.; Minar, Philip; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC), the most aggressive presentation ulcerative colitis (UC), occurs in 15 percent of adults and children with UC. First line therapy with intravenous corticosteroids is ineffective in half of adults and one third of children. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against TNF (anti-TNF therapy) are emerging as a common treatment for ASUC due to their similar efficacy to calcineurin inhibitors and more favorable adverse effect profile. Aim To comprehensively review the evidence for anti-TNF therapy for ASUC in children and adults with regard to outcomes and pharmacokinetics. Methods PubMed and recent conference proceedings were searched using the terms “ulcerative colitis”, “acute severe ulcerative colitis”, “anti-TNF”, “pharmacokinetics”, and the generic names of specific anti-TNF agents. Results Outcomes after anti-TNF therapy for ASUC remain suboptimal with aboutone half of children and adults undergoing colectomy. While several randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-TNF therapy for ambulatory patients with moderate to severely active UC, patients in these studies were less ill than those with ASUC. Patients with ASUC may exhibit more rapid clearance of anti-TNF biologics due pharmacokinetic mechanisms influenced by disease severity. Conclusions Conventional weight-based dosing effective in patients with moderately to severely active UC, may not be equally effective in those with ASUC. Personalized anti-TNF dosing strategies that integratepatient factors and early measures of pharmacokinetics and response hold promise for ensuring sustained drug exposure and maximizing early mucosal healing in patients with ASUC. PMID:25809869

  14. Oxalate Nephropathy After Continuous Infusion of High-Dose Vitamin C as an Adjunct to Burn Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pamplin, Jeremy; Studer, Lynette; Hughes, Rhome L.; King, Booker T.; Graybill, John C.; Chung, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is the foundation of management in burn patients and is the topic of considerable research. One adjunct in burn resuscitation is continuous, high-dose vitamin C (ascorbic acid) infusion, which may reduce fluid requirements and thus decrease the risk for over resuscitation. Research in preclinical studies and clinical trials has shown continuous infusions of high-dose vitamin C to be beneficial with decrease in resuscitative volumes and limited adverse effects. However, high-dose and low-dose vitamin C supplementation has been shown to cause secondary calcium oxalate nephropathy, worsen acute kidney injury, and delay renal recovery in non-burn patients. To the best of our knowledge, the authors present the first case series in burn patients in whom calcium oxalate nephropathy has been identified after high-dose vitamin C therapy. PMID:25812044

  15. Prediction of Acute Radiation Mucositis using an Oral Mucosal Dose Surface Model in Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Musha, Atsushi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Yokoo, Satoshi; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dose-response relationship for development of acute radiation mucositis (ARM) using an oral mucosal dose surface model (OMDS-model) in carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for head and neck tumors. Methods Thirty-nine patients receiving C-ion RT for head and neck cancer were evaluated for ARM (once per week for 6 weeks) according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 4.0, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring systems. The irradiation schedule typically used was 64 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE)] in 16 fractions for 4 weeks. Maximum point doses in the palate and tongue were compared with ARM in each patient. Results The location of the ARM coincided with the high-dose area in the OMDS-model. There was a clear dose-response relationship between maximum point dose and ARM grade assessed using the RTOG criteria but not the CTCAE. The threshold doses for grade 2–3 ARM in the palate and tongue were 43.0 Gy(RBE) and 54.3 Gy(RBE), respectively. Conclusions The OMDS-model was useful for predicting the location and severity of ARM. Maximum point doses in the model correlated well with grade 2–3 ARM. PMID:26512725

  16. Efficacy of Single-Dose Azithromycin in Treatment of Acute Otitis Media in Children after a Baseline Tympanocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Michael W.; Khurana, Chandra; Mohs, Adriano Arguedas; Rodriguez, Adib; Arrieta, Antonio; McLinn, Samuel; Krogstad, Judy A.; Blatter, Mark; Schwartz, Richard; Vargas, Sergio L.; Emparanza, Paz; Fernandez, Pilar; Gooch III, Willis M.; Aspin, Mary; Podgore, John; Roine, Irmeli; Blumer, Jeffrey L.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Chow, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Children with acute otitis media underwent tympanocentesis and were given a single dose of 30 mg of azithromycin/kg of body weight. At day 28, the overall clinical cure rate was 206 of 242 (85%). Clinical cure rates for patients infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (67 of 76; 88%) and Haemophilus influenzae (28 of 44; 64%) were consistent with historical rates for the 5-day dosing regimen. PMID:12878537

  17. High-dose Extended-Field Irradiation and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Cervical Cancer With Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Young-Tak; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of extended-field radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with uterine cervical carcinoma and positive para-aortic nodes. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the results for 33 women with Stage IB-IVB cervical cancer. Each patient had received 59.4 Gy, including a three-dimensional conformal boost to the para-aortic lymph nodes and 41.4-50.4 Gy of external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis. Each patient also underwent six or seven applications of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (median, 5 Gy to point A at each session). Results: The median follow-up period of surviving patients was 39 months. The most common acute toxicity was hematologic, observed in 23 women. Severe acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in 3 and 4 patients, respectively. More than three-quarters of patients showed a complete response, encompassing the primary mass, metastatic pelvic, and para-aortic lymph nodes. Of the 33 women, 15 had no evidence of disease, 6 had persistent disease, 4 developed in-field failures, and 6 developed distant failures. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 42%, respectively. Conclusion: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with extended-field radiotherapy is feasible in women with uterine cervical carcinoma and positive para-aortic lymph nodes, with acceptable late morbidity and a high survival rate, although it was accompanied by substantial acute toxicity.

  18. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armpilia, C.; Dale, R. G.; Sandilos, P.; Vlachos, L.

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BEDeq) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component.

  19. Acute reinforcing effects of low-dose nicotine nasal spray in humans.

    PubMed

    Perkins, K A; Grobe, J E; Caggiula, A; Wilson, A S; Stiller, R L

    1997-02-01

    Tobacco smoking behavior is reinforced by nicotine intake, but there has been little human research examining self-administration of nicotine per se, isolated from tobacco. In this study, 10 smokers (5 men, 5 women) who wanted to quit smoking sampled 0 (placebo), 0.75, and 1.5 ug/kg/spray nicotine via nasal spray during separate lab sessions before engaging in a free choice session, involving ad lib access to all three spray doses. Subjects also ad lib smoked during another session. For the group as a whole, neither nicotine spray dose was self-administered significantly more than placebo during the free choice session, suggesting low abuse potential. However, 4 of 10 subjects self-administered 1.5 ug/kg/spray on more than 50% of all sprays (vs. 33% chance) and were designated nicotine "choosers," while the others were "nonchoosers." Choosers responded to initial nicotine spray exposure during sampling sessions with greater positive subjective effects (similar to their responses to tobacco smoking), smoked more during the ad lib smoking session (i.e., self-administered more nicotine via tobacco smoking), and tended to be more heavily dependent smokers. They did not report greater withdrawal relief or less aversive effects from nicotine, suggesting their greater nicotine choice reflected greater positive reinforcement rather than negative reinforcement. These results are consistent with the few existing studies demonstrating that acute nicotine intake per se, in the absence of tobacco, may be reinforcing in some smokers.

  20. Acute reinforcing effects of low-dose nicotine nasal spray in humans.

    PubMed

    Perkins, K A; Grobe, J E; Caggiula, A; Wilson, A S; Stiller, R L

    1997-02-01

    Tobacco smoking behavior is reinforced by nicotine intake, but there has been little human research examining self-administration of nicotine per se, isolated from tobacco. In this study, 10 smokers (5 men, 5 women) who wanted to quit smoking sampled 0 (placebo), 0.75, and 1.5 ug/kg/spray nicotine via nasal spray during separate lab sessions before engaging in a free choice session, involving ad lib access to all three spray doses. Subjects also ad lib smoked during another session. For the group as a whole, neither nicotine spray dose was self-administered significantly more than placebo during the free choice session, suggesting low abuse potential. However, 4 of 10 subjects self-administered 1.5 ug/kg/spray on more than 50% of all sprays (vs. 33% chance) and were designated nicotine "choosers," while the others were "nonchoosers." Choosers responded to initial nicotine spray exposure during sampling sessions with greater positive subjective effects (similar to their responses to tobacco smoking), smoked more during the ad lib smoking session (i.e., self-administered more nicotine via tobacco smoking), and tended to be more heavily dependent smokers. They did not report greater withdrawal relief or less aversive effects from nicotine, suggesting their greater nicotine choice reflected greater positive reinforcement rather than negative reinforcement. These results are consistent with the few existing studies demonstrating that acute nicotine intake per se, in the absence of tobacco, may be reinforcing in some smokers. PMID:9050080

  1. Interaction of 2-Gy Equivalent Dose and Margin Status in Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Moreno, Marta; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Julian, Mikel; Alcalde, Juan; Jurado, Matias

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors predictive of local control (LC) in a series of patients treated with either perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) alone (Group 1) or with PHDRB combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (Group 2). Patient and Methods: Patients (n = 312) enrolled in several PHDRB prospective Phase I-II studies conducted at the Clinica Universidad de Navarra were analyzed. Treatment with PHDRB alone, mainly because of prior irradiation, was used in 126 patients to total doses of 32 Gy/8 b.i.d. or 40 Gy/10 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections. Treatment with PHDRB plus EBRT was used in 186 patients to total doses of 16 Gy/4 b.i.d. or 24 Gy/6 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections along with 45 Gy of EBRT with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Results: No dose-margin interaction was observed in Group 1 patients. In Group 2 patients there was a significant interaction between margin status and 2-Gy equivalent (Eq2Gy) dose (p = 0.002): (1) patients with negative margins had 9-year LC of 95.7% at Eq2Gy = 62.9Gy; (2) patients with close margins of >1 mm had 9-year LC of 92.4% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy, and (3) patients with positive/close <1-mm margins had 9-year LC of 68.0% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy. Conclusions: Two-gray equivalent doses {>=}70 Gy may compensate the effect of close margins {>=}1 mm but do not counterbalance the detrimental effect of unfavorable (positive/close <1 mm) resection margins. No dose-margin interaction is observed in patients treated at lower Eq2Gy doses {<=}50 Gy with PHDRB alone.

  2. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  3. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-09-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long-term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization was also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals were observed for the 2.5 and 10.0mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure and

  4. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2016-01-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0 mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization were also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals was observed for the 2.5 and 10.0 mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5 mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0 mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0 mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure

  5. Influence of Dose on Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A.; Battermann, Jan J.; Deursen, Marijke J.H. van; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Visscher, Mareije I.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the influence of dose on the risk of acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2005 and December 2008, 714 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy at our department. All patients completed four imaging studies: magnetic resonance imaging before and 4 weeks after treatment and intraoperative three-dimensional transrectal ultrasonography before and after implantation. The development of AUR was prospectively recorded. The evaluated treatment and dosimetric parameters included prostate volume, number of needles and seeds used, intra- and postoperative prostate edema, percentage of prostate volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose to the prostate, minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate volume, and percentage of the urethra receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with AUR. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 (8.0%) developed AUR. On univariate analysis, the following treatment and dosimetric factors were significantly associated with AUR: International Prostate Symptom Score (odds ratio [OR], 2.07, per 10-point increase), preimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.06), postimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.04), number of needles used (OR, 1.09), and number of seeds used (OR, 1.03). On multivariate analysis, the only independent predictive factors for AUR were pretreatment prostate volume (OR, 1.05) and International Prostate Symptom Score (OR, 1.76, per 10-point increase). Patients with a pretreatment prostate volume >35 cm{sup 3} had a 10.4% risk of developing AUR compared with 5.4% for those with a prostate volume of {<=}35 cm{sup 3}. No association was found between any of the dosimetric parameters and the development of AUR. Conclusion: The radiation dose, within the range studied, did not influence the risk of AUR

  6. Low-dose CT for quantitative analysis in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The clinical use of serial quantitative computed tomography (CT) to characterize lung disease and guide the optimization of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is limited by the risk of cumulative radiation exposure and by the difficulties and risks related to transferring patients to the CT room. We evaluated the effects of tube current-time product (mAs) variations on quantitative results in healthy lungs and in experimental ARDS in order to support the use of low-dose CT for quantitative analysis. Methods In 14 sheep chest CT was performed at baseline and after the induction of ARDS via intravenous oleic acid injection. For each CT session, two consecutive scans were obtained applying two different mAs: 60 mAs was paired with 140, 15 or 7.5 mAs. All other CT parameters were kept unaltered (tube voltage 120 kVp, collimation 32 × 0.5 mm, pitch 0.85, matrix 512 × 512, pixel size 0.625 × 0.625 mm). Quantitative results obtained at different mAs were compared via Bland-Altman analysis. Results Good agreement was observed between 60 mAs and 140 mAs and between 60 mAs and 15 mAs (all biases less than 1%). A further reduction of mAs to 7.5 mAs caused an increase in the bias of poorly aerated and nonaerated tissue (-2.9% and 2.4%, respectively) and determined a significant widening of the limits of agreement for the same compartments (-10.5% to 4.8% for poorly aerated tissue and -5.9% to 10.8% for nonaerated tissue). Estimated mean effective dose at 140, 60, 15 and 7.5 mAs corresponded to 17.8, 7.4, 2.0 and 0.9 mSv, respectively. Image noise of scans performed at 140, 60, 15 and 7.5 mAs corresponded to 10, 16, 38 and 74 Hounsfield units, respectively. Conclusions A reduction of effective dose up to 70% has been achieved with minimal effects on lung quantitative results. Low-dose computed tomography provides accurate quantitative results and could be used to characterize lung compartment distribution and

  7. Acute Metabolic Effects of Olanzapine Depend on Dose and Injection Site

    PubMed Central

    Stipanovic, Michelle E.; Hajnal, Andras; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs), such as olanzapine (OLZ), are associated with metabolic side effects, including hyperglycemia. Although a central mechanism of action for the acute effects on glycemia has been suggested, evidence for peripheral versus central effects of AAPs has been mixed and has not been explored for an effect of OLZ on the respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Here, we tested the hypothesis that some inconsistencies in the glycemic responses are likely a result of different doses and central sites of injection. We also compared the effects of central versus peripherally administered OLZ on the RER of unsedated rats. Third ventricle infusion of OLZ at 0.3 mg/kg caused hyperglycemia within 30 minutes, with a higher dose (1.8 mg/kg) needed to elicit a similar response in the lateral ventricles. In contrast, 3 mg/kg of OLZ was needed to raise blood glucose within 30 minutes when given intragastrically, and 10 mg/kg resulted in a prolonged hyperglycemia lasting at least 60 minutes. Third ventricle injection of OLZ significantly decreased RER after 75 minutes, whereas intragastric OLZ resulted in a faster drop in RER after 30 minutes. Since changes in glycemia were most sensitive when OLZ was infused into the third ventricle, but effects on RER were more rapidly and efficaciously observed when the drug was given peripherally, these results raise the likelihood of a dual mechanism of action involving hypothalamic and peripheral mechanisms. Some discrepancies in the literature arising from central administration appear to result from the injection site and dose. PMID:26740814

  8. Metabonomics evaluation of urine from rats given acute and chronic doses of acetaminophen using NMR and UPLC/MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinchun; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Holland, Ricky D; Schmitt, Thomas C; Cantor, Glenn H; Dragan, Yvonne P; Beger, Richard D

    2008-08-15

    Urinary metabolic perturbations associated with acute and chronic acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) metabonomics approaches to determine biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. Acute and chronic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) were administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats. NMR and UPLC/MS were able to detect both drug metabolites and endogenous metabolites simultaneously. The principal component analysis (PCA) of NMR or UPLC/MS spectra showed that metabolic changes observed in both acute and chronic dosing of acetaminophen were similar. Histopathology and clinical chemistry studies were performed and correlated well with the PCA analysis and magnitude of metabolite changes. Depletion of antioxidants (e.g. ferulic acid), trigonelline, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and energy-related metabolites indicated that oxidative stress was caused by acute and chronic acetaminophen administration. Similar patterns of metabolic changes in response to acute or chronic dosing suggest similar detoxification and recovery mechanisms following APAP administration.

  9. High or low dose radioiodine ablation of thyroid remnants?

    PubMed

    Creutzig, H

    1987-01-01

    The need for high dose radioiodine for ablation of remnants in patients with thyroid cancer is still in question. We compared the effectiveness of high and low dose 131I for ablation in patients in a prospective randomized study after surgical thyroidectomy. Twenty patients with differentiated pT2-3NoMo thyroid cancer were studied. The uptake was 5%-10% at 24 h. Ten patients received 100 mCi, the others 30 mCi 131I. Three months later all patients received a therapeutic dose of 150 mCi 131I. Another twenty patients with known distant metastases (pulmonary and/or bone) of differentiated thyroid cancer were studied. The remnant uptake was between 4%-10%. Ten patients received 300 mCi and ten 30 mCi 131I as ablation dose. Three months later all received 300 mCi 131I. The uptake at day seven was calculated for the same metastases from a whole body scan after both treatments. If effective ablation was defined as 24 h uptake in the remnant of less than 1%, then the ablation was effective in eight out of ten of the high dose and in seven out of ten of the low dose group. In pT2-3, N X M1 patients the ablation was effective in seven out of ten cases in both groups. If "effective" ablation was defined as an uptake of less than 0.5%, then the ablation was effective both in NoMo and in N X M1 patients in five out of ten with low dose and in six out of ten with high dose ablation treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3569338

  10. Assessments for High Dose Radionuclide Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2003-10-01

    Advances in the biotechnology of cell-specific targeting of cancer, and the increased number of clinical trials involving treatment of cancer patients with radiolabeled antibodies, peptides, and similar delivery vehicles have led to an increase in the number of high-dose radionuclide therapy procedures. Optimized radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment is based on the concept of absorbed dose to the dose-limiting normal organ or tissue. The limiting normal tissue is often the red marrow, but it may sometimes be lungs, liver, intestinal tract, or kidneys. Appropriate treatment planning requires assessment of radiation dose to several internal organs and tissues, and usually involves biodistribution studies in the patient using a tracer amount of radionuclide bound to the targeting agent and imaged at sequential time points using a planar gamma camera. Time-activity curves are developed from the imaging data for the major organs tissues of concern, for the whole body, and sometimes for selected tumors. Patient-specific factors often require that dose estimates be customized for each patient. The Food and Drug Administration regulates the experimental use of investigational new drugs and requires reasonable calculation of radiation absorbed dose to the whole body and to critical organs using methods prescribed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Review of high-dose studies in the U.S. and elsewhere shows that 1) some studies are conducted with minimal dosimetry, 2) the marrow dose is difficult to establish and is subject to large uncertainties, and 3) despite the general availability of MIRD software, internal dosimetry methods are often inconsistent from one clinical center to another.

  11. Acute Effects of Classroom Exercise Breaks on Executive Function and Math Performance: A Dose-Response Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Schatz, Jeffrey; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute dose-response relationship of classroom exercise breaks with executive function and math performance in 9- to 12-year-old children by comparing 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min classroom exercise breaks to 10 min of sedentary classroom activity. Method: This study used a within-subjects…

  12. PREDICTING THE ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TOLUENE INHALED FOR 24 HRS IN RATS: DOSE METRICS, METABOLISM AND BEHAVIORAL TOLERANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose: Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) is improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration ( Br[ToI)] instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a...

  13. Chronic oral administration of low-dose combination of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin protects the rat heart against experimentally induced acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Garg, Monika; Khanna, Deepa; Kalra, Sanjeev; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2016-10-01

    Fenofibrate and rosuvastatin at low doses might have experimental pleiotropic benefits. This study investigated the combined effect of low doses of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin in isoproterenol-induced experimental myocardial infarction. Rats administered isoproterenol (85 mg/kg/day, s.c.) for 2 days (day 29 and day 30) of 30 days experimental protocol developed significant myocardial infarction that was accompanied with high myocardial oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, elevated serum markers of cardiac injury, lipid abnormalities, and elevated circulatory levels of C-reactive protein. Pretreatment with low doses of fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 30 days) and rosuvastatin (2 mg/kg/day p.o., 30 days) both alone or in combination markedly prevented isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction and associated abnormalities while the low-dose combination of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin was more effective. Histopathological study in isoproterenol control rat heart showed necrosis with edema and acute inflammation at the margins of necrotic area. The rat heart from low-dose fenofibrate and rosuvastatin pretreated group showed scanty inflammation and no ischemia. In conclusion, fenofibrate and rosuvastatin pretreatment in low doses might have a therapeutic potential to prevent the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction. Moreover, their combined treatment option might offer superior therapeutic benefits via a marked reduction in myocardial infarct size and oxidative stress, suggesting a possibility of their pleiotropic cardioprotective action at low doses. PMID:27148865

  14. Association of aspirin dose and vorapaxar safety and efficacy in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (from the TRACER Trial).

    PubMed

    Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Huang, Zhen; Wallentin, Lars; Storey, Robert F; Jennings, Lisa K; Tricoci, Pierluigi; White, Harvey D; Armstrong, Paul W; Aylward, Philip E; Moliterno, David J; Van de Werf, Frans; Chen, Edmond; Leonardi, Sergio; Rorick, Tyrus; Held, Claes; Strony, John; Harrington, Robert A

    2014-03-15

    Thrombin Receptor Antagonist for Clinical Event Reduction in Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRACER) trial compared vorapaxar and placebo in 12,944 high-risk patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. We explored aspirin (ASA) use and its association with outcomes. Kaplan-Meier event rates were compared in groups defined by ASA dose (low, medium, and high). Landmark analyses with covariate adjustment were performed for 0 to 30, 31 to 180, and 181 to 365 days. Of 12,515 participants, 7,523, 1,049, and 3,943 participants were treated with low-, medium-, and high-dose ASA at baseline, respectively. Participants enrolled in North America versus elsewhere were more often treated with a high dose at baseline (66% vs 19%) and discharge (60% vs 3%). Unadjusted cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for ischemia, or urgent revascularization event rates tended to be higher with higher baseline ASA (18.45% low, 19.13% medium, and 20.27% high; p for trend = 0.15573). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for effect of vorapaxar on cardiovascular (unadjusted p for interaction = 0.065; adjusted p for interaction = 0.140) and bleeding (unadjusted p for interaction = 0.915; adjusted p for interaction = 0.954) outcomes were similar across groups. Landmark analyses showed similar safety and efficacy outcomes with vorapaxar and placebo by ASA dose at each time point except for 0 to 30 days, when vorapaxar tended to be worse for efficacy (hazard ratio 1.13, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 1.44, p for interaction = 0.0157). In conclusion, most TRACER participants were treated with low-dose ASA, although a high dose was common in North America. High-dose participants tended to have higher rates of ischemic and bleeding outcomes. Although formal statistical testing did not reveal heterogeneity in vorapaxar's effect across dose subgroups, consistent trends support use of low-dose ASA with other antiplatelet therapies

  15. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  16. The effects of an acute dose of Rhodiola rosea on endurance exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Eric E; Buckley, James G; Lewis, Stephanie L; Brandauer, Josef; Stuempfle, Kristin J

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an acute oral dose of 3 mg·kg(-1) of Rhodiola rosea on endurance exercise performance, perceived exertion, mood, and cognitive function. Subjects (n = 18) ingested either R. rosea or a carbohydrate placebo 1 hour before testing in a double-blind, random crossover manner. Exercise testing consisted of a standardized 10-minute warm-up followed by a 6-mile time trial (TT) on a bicycle ergometer. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured every 5 minutes during the TT using a 10-point Borg scale. Blood lactate concentration, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase were measured before warm-up, 2 minutes after warm-up, and 2 minutes after TT (n = 15). A Profile of Mood States questionnaire and a Stroop Color Test were completed before warm-up and after TT. Testing was repeated 2-7 days later with the other condition. Rhodiola rosea ingestion significantly decreased heart rate during the standardized warm-up (R. rosea = 136 ± 17 b·min(-1); placebo = 140 ± 17 b·min(-1); mean ± SD; p = 0.001). Subjects completed the TT significantly faster after R. rosea ingestion (R. rosea = 25.4 ± 2.7 minutes; placebo = 25.8 ± 3.0 minutes; p = 0.037). The mean RPE was lower in the R. rosea trial (R. rosea = 6.0 ± 0.9; placebo = 6.6 ± 1.0; p = 0.04). This difference was even more pronounced when a ratio of the RPE relative to the workload was calculated (R. rosea = 0.048 ± 0.01; placebo = 0.057 ± 0.02; p = 0.007). No other statistically significant differences were observed. Acute R. rosea ingestion decreases heart rate response to submaximal exercise and appears to improve endurance exercise performance by decreasing the perception of effort.

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: potential benefit of medium-dose etoposide conditioning.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Masahiro; Shigematsu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with chemotherapy or autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are unsatisfactory. Therefore, allogeneic (allo) HSCT has been applied to those patients in first complete remission (CR1), and has shown a long-term survival rate of approximately 50 %. In terms of myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen, higher dose of cyclophosphamide (CY) and total body irradiation (TBI) (the standard CY + TBI) has been generally applied to allo HSCT. Other MAC regimens such as busulfan-based or etoposide-based regimens have also been used. Among those, medium-dose etoposide (ETP) in addition to the standard CY + TBI conditioning regimen appears to be promising for allo HSCT in adult ALL when transplanted in ALL patients aged under 50 years in CR1 and also in CR2, showing an excellent outcome without increasing relapse or transplant-related mortality (TRM) rates. By contrast, reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have also been applied to adult ALL patients and favorable outcomes have been obtained; however, relapse and TRM rates remain high. Therefore, an allo HSCT conditioning regimen which deserves further study for adult ALL patients aged under 50 years in CR1 and CR2 appears to be medium-dose ETP + CY + TBI and RIC is suitable for patients aged over 50 years or for younger patients with comorbid conditions. On the contrary, new therapeutic strategies for adult ALL patients are increasingly utilized with better outcomes; namely, various tyrosine kinase inhibitors for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive ALL, human leukocyte antigen-haploidentical HSCT, and pediatric-inspired regimens for Ph-negative ALL. Therefore, the optimal treatment modality should be selected considering patient's age, Ph-positivity, donor availability, risk classification, efficacy, and safety. PMID:26322249

  18. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  19. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  20. Acute Hematological Effects in Mice Exposed to the Expected Doses, Dose-rates, and Energies of Solar Particle Event-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Cengel, Keith A.; Wan, X. Steven; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during a SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hrs. post-radiation exposure. PMID:25202654

  1. Monte Carlo Study of Radiation Dose Enhancement by Gadolinium in Megavoltage and High Dose Rate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daniel G.; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G.; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed. PMID:25275550

  2. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daniel G; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed.

  3. Acute effect of pretreatment with single conventional dose of salmeterol on dose-response curve to oxitropium bromide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Cazzola, M.; Di, P; Centanni, S.; Califano, C.; Donner, C. F.; D'Amato, M.; D'Amato, G.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—An earlier study documented that, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), addition of ipratropium bromide at the clinically recommended dose (40 µg) does not produce any further bronchodilation than that achieved with salmeterol 50 µg alone. However, the dose of ipratropium bromide needed to produce near maximal bronchodilation is several times higher than the customary dosage. The full therapeutic potential of combined salmeterol plus an anticholinergic drug can therefore only be established using doses higher than those currently recommended in the marketing of these agents. A study was undertaken to examine the possible acute effects of higher than conventional doses of an anticholinergic agent on the single dose salmeterol induced bronchodilation in patients with stable and partially reversible COPD.
METHODS—Thirty two outpatients received 50 µg salmeterol or placebo. Two hours after inhalation a dose-response curve to inhaled oxitropium bromide (100 µg/puff) or placebo was constructed using one puff, one puff, two puffs, and two puffs—that is, a total cumulative dose of 600 µg oxitropium bromide. Dose increments were given at 20 minute intervals with measurements being made 15 minutes after each dose. On four separate days all patients received one of the following: (1) 50 µg salmeterol + 600 µg oxitropium bromide; (2) 50 µg salmeterol + placebo; (3) placebo + 600 µg oxitropium bromide; (4) placebo +placebo.
RESULTS—Salmeterol induced a good bronchodilation (mean increase 0.272 l; 95% CI 0.207 to 0.337) two hours after its inhalation. Oxitropium bromide elicited an evident dose-dependent increase in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and this occurred also after pretreatment with salmeterol with a further mean maximum increase of 0.152 l (95% CI of differences 0.124 to 0.180).
CONCLUSIONS—This study shows that acute pretreatment with 50 µg salmeterol does not block the possibility of

  4. Ocular toxicity following high dose chemotherapy and autologous transplant.

    PubMed

    Rubin, P; Hulette, C; Khawly, J A; Elkordy, M; Hussein, A; Vredenburgh, J J; Jaffe, G J; Peters, W P

    1996-07-01

    A 49-year-old woman received an autologous transplant for breast cancer. Six weeks later she noticed visual disturbance of the left eye which correlated with a visual field abnormality. There was a milder degree of visual disturbance in the right eye. Treatment with high-dose steroids partially stabilized the problem, which was felt to be an ischemic optic neuropathy. She ultimately died of respiratory failure. Pathology of the optic nerves revealed demyelination. Visual disturbances following high-dose chemotherapy are uncommon; the pathology to date has not been elucidated. Steroid therapy may be useful. PMID:8832031

  5. Hepatotoxicity of High Oral Dose (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Joshua D.; Kennett, Mary J.; Sang, Shengmin; Reuhl, Kenneth R.; Ju, Jihyeung; Yang, Chung S.

    2009-01-01

    The tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been studied for chronic disease preventive effects, and is marketed as part of many dietary supplements. However, case reports have associated the use of green tea-based supplements with liver toxicity. We studied the hepatotoxic effects of high dose EGCG in male CF-1 mice. A single dose of EGCG (1500 mg/kg, i.g.) increased plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) by 138-fold and reduced survival by 85%. Once-daily dosing with EGCG increased hepatotoxic response. Plasma ALT levels were increased 184-fold following two once-daily doses of 750 mg/kg, i.g. EGCG. Moderate to severe hepatic necrosis was observed following treatment with EGCG. EGCG hepatotoxicity was associated with oxidative stress including increased hepatic lipid peroxidation (5-fold increase), plasma 8-isoprostane (9.5-fold increase) and increased hepatic metallothionein and γ-histone 2AX protein expression. EGCG also increased plasma interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. Our results indicate that higher bolus doses of EGCG are hepatotoxic to mice. Further studies on the dose-dependent hepatotoxic effects of EGCG and the underlying mechanisms are important given the increasing use of green tea dietary supplements, which may deliver much higher plasma and tissue concentrations of EGCG than tea beverages. PMID:19883714

  6. Finnish spectrolite as high-dose gamma detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2015-11-01

    A natural material called spectrolite, from Finland, was studied in this work. The purpose was to test it in gamma radiation beams to verify its performance as a high-dose detector. From this material, pellets were manufactured with two different concentrations of Teflon and spectrolite, and their responses were verified using two luminescent techniques: thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The TL and OSL signals were evaluated by means of characterization tests of the material response, after exposure to a nominal absorbed dose interval of 5 Gy to 10 kGy. The results obtained, for both concentrations, showed a good performance of this material in beams of high-dose gamma radiation. Both techniques were utilized in order to investigate the properties of the spectrolite+Teflon samples for different applications.

  7. Dosimetric characteristics of jasper samples for high dose dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Maria Inês; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    Different colored jasper samples from Brazilian mines were powdered and mixed with teflon (composites jasper-teflonTM). This paper describes a preliminary study of a thermoluminescent method (TL) to verify the possibility of their use as high dose dosimeters or irradiation indicators in industrial areas. The jasper samples were exposed to different radiation doses, using the gamma-cell 220 system (60Co) of IPEN. The TL emission curves of samples presented two peaks at 130 °C and 190 °C. Calibration curves were obtained for the jasper samples between 50 Gy and 20 kGy. All five types of jasper samples showed their usefulness as irradiation indicators and as high-dose dosimeters.

  8. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tho, Lye Mun . E-mail: l.tho@beatson.gla.ac.uk; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V{sub 5}, V{sub 1}, etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p < 0.03), with strongest correlation at lowest doses. Median VSB differed significantly between patients experiencing Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-4 diarrhea (p {<=} 0.05). No correlation was found with anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, age, body mass index, sex, tumor position, or number of fields. Analysis of 8 patients showed that inverse planning reduced median dose to small bowel by 5.1 Gy (p = 0.008) and calculated late normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) by 67% (p = 0.016). We constructed a model using mathematical analysis to predict for acute diarrhea occurring at V{sub 5} and V{sub 15}. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further

  9. Mechanism of action for anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high-dose gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after high-dose gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naïve animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which they mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  10. High doses of dextromethorphan, an NMDA antagonist, produce effects similar to classic hallucinogens

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although reports of dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have increased recently, few studies have examined the effects of high doses of DXM. Objective This study in humans evaluated the effects of supratherapeutic doses of DXM and triazolam. Methods Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg/70kg), and placebo were administered to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Subjective, behavioral, and physiological effects were assessed repeatedly after drug administration for 6 hours. Results Triazolam produced dose-related increases in subject-rated sedation, observer-rated sedation, and behavioral impairment. DXM produced a profile of dose-related physiological and subjective effects differing from triazolam. DXM effects included increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and emesis, increases in observer-rated effects typical of classic hallucinogens (e.g. distance from reality, visual effects with eyes open and closed, joy, anxiety), and participant ratings of stimulation (e.g. jittery, nervous), somatic effects (e.g. tingling, headache), perceptual changes, end-of-session drug liking, and mystical-type experience. After 400 mg/70kg DXM, 11 of 12 participants indicated on a pharmacological class questionnaire that they thought they had received a classic hallucinogen (e.g. psilocybin). Drug effects resolved without significant adverse effects by the end of the session. In a 1-month follow up volunteers attributed increased spirituality and positive changes in attitudes, moods, and behavior to the session experiences. Conclusions High doses of DXM produced effects distinct from triazolam and had characteristics that were similar to the classic hallucinogen psilocybin. PMID:22526529

  11. Retinal risks of high-dose ornithine supplements: a review.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Seiji; Kodama, Tatsuo; Ohira, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We reviewed the literature on ornithine supplementation and related topics. Nutritionists and physicians have reported that ornithine supplementation is useful. Paediatricians and biochemists have reported that ornithine is supplemented for NH(3) detoxification in the hyperornithinaemia-hyperammonaemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome. In contrast, ophthalmic researchers have reported retinotoxicity associated with high-dose ornithine. In vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that high concentrations of ornithine or its metabolites are toxic to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Long-term (exceeding a few years) and high concentrations (exceeding 600 μmol/l) of ornithine in the blood induce retinal toxicity in gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina (GA). Intermittent high levels of ornithine do not lead to retinal lesions. Constant blood ornithine levels between 250 and 600 μmol/l do not induce retinal lesions or cause a very slowly progressive retinal degeneration. Blood ornithine levels below 250 μmol/l do not produce retinal alteration. We concluded that short-term, low-dose or transient high-dose ornithine intake is safe for the retina; its nutritional usefulness and effect on NH(3) detoxification are supported by many researchers, but the effect may be limited; and long-term, high-dose ornithine intake may be risky for the retina. Patients with GA should avoid taking ornithine; amino acid supplementation should be administered carefully for patients with the HHH syndrome, relatives of patients with GA (heterozygotes) and subjects with RPE lesions; and blood ornithine levels and retinal conditions should be evaluated in individuals taking long-term, high-dose ornithine. PMID:21767450

  12. High-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy inverse planning on dose-volume criteria by simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deist, T. M.; Gorissen, B. L.

    2016-02-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy is a tumor treatment method where a highly radioactive source is brought in close proximity to the tumor. In this paper we develop a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the dwell times at preselected dwell positions to maximize tumor coverage under dose-volume constraints on the organs at risk. Compared to existing algorithms, our algorithm has advantages in terms of speed and objective value and does not require an expensive general purpose solver. Its success mainly depends on exploiting the efficiency of matrix multiplication and a careful selection of the neighboring states. In this paper we outline its details and make an in-depth comparison with existing methods using real patient data.

  13. High-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy inverse planning on dose-volume criteria by simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Deist, T M; Gorissen, B L

    2016-02-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy is a tumor treatment method where a highly radioactive source is brought in close proximity to the tumor. In this paper we develop a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the dwell times at preselected dwell positions to maximize tumor coverage under dose-volume constraints on the organs at risk. Compared to existing algorithms, our algorithm has advantages in terms of speed and objective value and does not require an expensive general purpose solver. Its success mainly depends on exploiting the efficiency of matrix multiplication and a careful selection of the neighboring states. In this paper we outline its details and make an in-depth comparison with existing methods using real patient data. PMID:26760757

  14. Dose-related reversal of acute lung rejection by aerosolized cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Iacono, A T; Smaldone, G C; Keenan, R J; Diot, P; Dauber, J H; Zeevi, A; Burckart, G J; Griffith, B P

    1997-05-01

    .8 +/- 0.4 versus 0, p = 0.018) and reduced doses of oral prednisone (10.8 +/- 3.1 versus 6.1 +/- 4.2 mg/d, p = 0.026) were observed during treatment with aerosolized cyclosporine. Episodes of pneumonia also were reduced significantly during aerosol therapy (2.6 versus 0.95 episodes/100 d, p = 0.029). Nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity did not occur, and no patients withdrew from the study. Aerosolized cyclosporine appears to be safe and effective therapy for refractory acute rejection, but confirmation by a larger, randomized trial is necessary. The correlation observed between deposition of cyclosporine aerosol and physiologic improvement of lung function suggests that there is a dose-response relationship between the concentration of cyclosporine in the allograft and immunologic tolerance.

  15. Low-dose high-resolution CT of lung parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirewich, C.V.; Mayo, J.R.; Mueller, N.L. )

    1991-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the assessment of lung parenchyma, three observers reviewed the scans of 31 patients. The 1.5-mm-collimation, 2-second, 120-kVp scans were obtained at 20 and 200 mA at selected identical levels in the chest. The observers evaluated the visualization of normal pulmonary anatomy, various parenchymal abnormalities and their distribution, and artifacts. The low-dose and conventional scans were equivalent in the evaluation of vessels, lobar and segmental bronchi, and anatomy of secondary pulmonary lobules, and in characterizing the extent and distribution of reticulation, honeycomb cysts, and thickened interlobular septa. The low-dose technique failed to demonstrate ground-glass opacity in two of 10 cases (20%) and emphysema in one of nine cases (11%), in which they were evident but subtle on the high-dose scans. These differences were not statistically significant. Linear streak artifact was more prominent on images acquired with the low-dose technique, but the two techniques were judged equally diagnostic in 97% of cases. The authors conclude that HRCT images acquired at 20 mA yield anatomic information equivalent to that obtained with 200-mA scans in the majority of patients, without significant loss of spatial resolution or image degradation due to linear streak artifact.

  16. Acute reduction in blood pressure following consumption of anthocyanin-rich cherry juice may be dose-interval dependant: a pilot cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Kent, Katherine; Charlton, Karen E; Jenner, Andrew; Roodenrys, Steven

    2016-01-01

    A pilot cross-over study assessed the acute effects on blood pressure and plasma biomarkers associated with consumption of a 300 ml anthocyanin-rich fruit juice, provided in differing dose-intervals. Young adults (n = 6) and older adults (n = 7) received in random order, either a single 300 ml dose or 3 × 100 ml doses of high-flavonoid cherry juice provided at 0, 1 and 2 h. Blood pressure and plasma levels of phenolic metabolites were measured at 0, 2 and 6 h.The single 300 ml dose of cherry juice resulted in a significant reduction in systolic (p = 0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.008) and heart-rate (p = 0.033) 2 h after consumption, before returning to baseline levels at 6 h post-consumption. The 3 × 100 ml dose provided over 2 h did not result in significant blood pressure reductions. Plasma phenolic metabolites increased at 2 and 6 h; however, fluctuations were higher after the single 300 ml dose in older adults. These findings have implications for design of intervention studies that investigate vascular effects associated with flavonoid-rich foods. PMID:26654244

  17. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer: low dose rate to high dose rate.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2003-03-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n = 341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer.

  18. Radiation Dose Testing on Juno High Voltage Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Kirkham, Harold; Kim, Wousik; McAlpine, Bill

    2008-01-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter will have a highly elliptical orbit taking the spacecraft through the radiation belts surrounding the planet. During these passes through the radiation belts, the spacecraft will be subject to high doses of radiation from energetic electrons and protons with energies ranging from 10 keV to 1 GeV. While shielding within the spacecraft main body will reduce the total absorbed dose to much of the spacecraft electronics, instruments and cables on the outside of the spacecraft will receive much higher levels of absorbed dose. In order to estimate the amount of degradation to two such cables, testing has been performed on two coaxial cables intended to provide high voltages to three of the instruments on Juno. Both cables were placed in a vacuum of 5x10(exp -6) torr and cooled to -50(deg)C prior to exposure to the radiation sources. Measurements of the coaxial capacitance per unit length and partial discharge noise floor indicate that increasing levels of radiation make measurable but acceptably small changes to the F EP Teflon utilized in the construction of these cables. In addition to the radiation dose testing, observations were made on the internal electrostatic charging characteristics of these cables and multiple discharges were recorded.

  19. Radiation Dose Testing on Juno High Voltage Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Kirkham, Harold; Kim, Wousik; McAlpine, Bill

    2008-01-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter will have a highly elliptical orbit taking the spacecraft through the radiation belts surrounding the planet. During these passes through the radiation belts, the spacecraft will be subject to high doses of radiation from energetic electrons and protons with energies ranging from 10 keV to 1 GeV. While shielding within the spacecraft main body will reduce the total absorbed dose to much of the spacecraft electronics, instruments and cables on the outside of the spacecraft will receive much higher levels of absorbed dose. In order to estimate the amount of degradation to two such cables, testing has been performed on two coaxial cables intended to provide high voltages to three of the instruments on Juno. Both cables were placed in a vacuum of 5x10-6 torr and cooled to -50 C prior to exposure to the radiation sources. Measurements of the coaxial capacitance per unit length and partial discharge noise floor indicate that increasing levels of radiation make measurable but acceptably small changes to the F EP Teflon utilized in the construction of these cables. In addition to the radiation dose testing, observations were made on the internal electrostatic charging characteristics of these cables and multiple discharges were recorded.

  20. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  1. Impairment of memorization by high doses of pyridoxine in man.

    PubMed

    Molimard, R; Marillaud, A; Paille, A; Le Devehat, C; Lemoine, A; Dougny, M

    1980-05-01

    Two controlled trials were performed successively to evaluate the effect of high doses of oral pyridoxine on brain performance in man. In trial I, medical students volunteered to take 100 mg, 500 mg of pyridoxine a day or placebo for 10 days. A digit coding test was performed before, and at the end of the treatment period and a third 15 days later. The improvement of performance from the first to the third test (learning effect) was significantly better in the placebo group than in the B6 treated groups. This could be attributed to memorization of skills. Trial II was performed in obese patients starting a low calorie diet in whom vitamins are routinely prescribed. Performance in a work recognition test and in a visual retention test was lower for the group receiving 1 g of pyridoxine a day. Thus, high doses of oral pyridoxine are likely to impair memorization in man. Disturbances of neuro-transmitter metabolism such as increase of GABA production might explain the effect. As the benefit of high doses of pyridoxine has not been well-documented and as the study has suggested that undesired effects may indeed exist, the widespread use of such doses is questionable.

  2. Comparison of particulate matter dose and acute heart rate variability response in cyclists, pedestrians, bus and train passengers.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, Marguerite; McNabola, Aonghus; Misstear, Bruce

    2014-01-15

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) has been linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the change in cardiac autonomic function, and consistent links between PM exposure and decreased HRV have been documented in studies. This study quantitatively assesses the acute relative variation of HRV with predicted PM dose in the lungs of commuters. Personal PM exposure, HR and HRV were monitored in 32 young healthy cyclists, pedestrians, bus and train passengers. Inhaled and lung deposited PM doses were determined using a numerical model of the human respiratory tract which accounted for varying ventilation rates between subjects and during commutes. Linear mixed models were used to examine air pollution dose and HRV response relationships in 122 commutes sampled. Elevated PM2.5 and PM10 inhaled and lung deposited doses were significantly (p<0.05) associated with decreased HRV indices. Percent declines in SDNN (standard deviation of normal RR intervals) relative to resting, due to an inter-quartile range increase in PM10 lung deposited dose were stronger in cyclists (-6.4%, 95% CI: -11.7, -1.3) and pedestrians (-5.8%, 95% CI: -11.3, -0.5), in comparison to bus (-3.2%, 95% CI: -6.4, -0.1) and train (-1.8%, -7.5, 3.8) passengers. A similar trend was observed in the case of PM2.5 lung deposited dose and results for rMSSD (the square root of the squared differences of successive normal RR intervals) followed similar trends to SDNN. Inhaled and lung deposited doses accounting for varying ventilation rates between modes, individuals and during commutes have been neglected in other studies relating PM to HRV. The findings here indicate that exercise whilst commuting has an influence on inhaled PM and PM lung deposited dose, and these were significantly associated with acute declines in HRV, especially in pedestrians and cyclists.

  3. The effects of an acute dose of Rhodiola rosea on endurance exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Eric E; Buckley, James G; Lewis, Stephanie L; Brandauer, Josef; Stuempfle, Kristin J

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an acute oral dose of 3 mg·kg(-1) of Rhodiola rosea on endurance exercise performance, perceived exertion, mood, and cognitive function. Subjects (n = 18) ingested either R. rosea or a carbohydrate placebo 1 hour before testing in a double-blind, random crossover manner. Exercise testing consisted of a standardized 10-minute warm-up followed by a 6-mile time trial (TT) on a bicycle ergometer. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured every 5 minutes during the TT using a 10-point Borg scale. Blood lactate concentration, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase were measured before warm-up, 2 minutes after warm-up, and 2 minutes after TT (n = 15). A Profile of Mood States questionnaire and a Stroop Color Test were completed before warm-up and after TT. Testing was repeated 2-7 days later with the other condition. Rhodiola rosea ingestion significantly decreased heart rate during the standardized warm-up (R. rosea = 136 ± 17 b·min(-1); placebo = 140 ± 17 b·min(-1); mean ± SD; p = 0.001). Subjects completed the TT significantly faster after R. rosea ingestion (R. rosea = 25.4 ± 2.7 minutes; placebo = 25.8 ± 3.0 minutes; p = 0.037). The mean RPE was lower in the R. rosea trial (R. rosea = 6.0 ± 0.9; placebo = 6.6 ± 1.0; p = 0.04). This difference was even more pronounced when a ratio of the RPE relative to the workload was calculated (R. rosea = 0.048 ± 0.01; placebo = 0.057 ± 0.02; p = 0.007). No other statistically significant differences were observed. Acute R. rosea ingestion decreases heart rate response to submaximal exercise and appears to improve endurance exercise performance by decreasing the perception of effort. PMID:23443221

  4. Combined effects of acute, very-low-dose ethanol and delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in healthy human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; de Wit, Harriet

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Previous studies examining the combined effects of ethanol and cannabis, or its primary psychoactive ingredient, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), have provided mixed results. Data from an in vitro study suggests that combined, sub-threshold doses of these drugs may interact to produce synergistic effects. Very low doses of the two drugs in combination have not been tested in humans. Materials and Methods This study assessed whether combinations of acute, very-low doses of ethanol and THC produce synergistic effects on subjective, cognitive, and physiological measures. Healthy volunteers (n=11) received capsules containing placebo or THC (2.5mg), and beverages containing placebo or ethanol (0.1 and 0.2g/kg) alone, and in combination, across separate sessions, in a within-subjects, randomized, double-blind design. During each session, participants completed measures of working memory, psychomotor ability, and simple reaction time, and provided subjective mood and drug effect ratings. Cardiovascular measures were obtained at regular intervals. Results As intended, when administered alone, these very-low doses of ethanol and THC had only moderate effects on isolated measures. The combined effects of these drugs were not synergistic, and in some cases appeared to be less-than-additive. Conclusions Our data provide no evidence for synergistic effects of acute combinations of very-low-dose ethanol and THC on subjective or physiologic response, or on cognitive performance. PMID:21110996

  5. Expression of genes involved in mouse lung cell differentiation/regulation after acute exposure to photons and protons with or without low-dose preirradiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Zhao, WeiLing; Tian, Sisi; Slater, James M; Deng, Zhiyong; Gridley, Daila S

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of acute 2 Gy irradiation with photons (0.8 Gy/min) or protons (0.9 Gy/min), both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays (0.01 Gy at 0.03 cGy/h), on 84 genes involved in stem cell differentiation or regulation in mouse lungs on days 21 and 56. Genes with a ≥1.5-fold difference in expression and P < 0.05 compared to 0 Gy controls are emphasized. Two proteins specific for lung stem cells/progenitors responsible for local tissue repair were also compared. Overall, striking differences were present between protons and photons in modulating the genes. More genes were affected by protons than by photons (22 compared to 2 and 6 compared to 2 on day 21 and day 56, respectively) compared to 0 Gy. Preirradiation with low-dose-rate γ rays enhanced the acute photon-induced gene modulation on day 21 (11 compared to 2), and all 11 genes were significantly downregulated on day 56. On day 21, seven genes (aldh2, bmp2, cdc2a, col1a1, dll1, foxa2 and notch1) were upregulated in response to most of the radiation regimens. Immunoreactivity of Clara cell secretory protein was enhanced by all radiation regimens. The number of alveolar type 2 cells positive for prosurfactant protein C in irradiated groups was higher on day 56 (12.4-14.6 cells/100) than on day 21 (8.5-11.2 cells/100) (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results showed that acute photons and protons induced different gene expression profiles in the lungs and that pre-exposure to low-dose-rate γ rays sometimes had modulatory effects. In addition, proteins associated with lung-specific stem cells/progenitors were highly sensitive to radiation.

  6. High dose calibrations at the pacific northwest laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. C.; Fox, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    he need is increasing for both high radiation exposures and calibration measurements that provide traceability of such exposures to national standards. The applications of high exposures include: electronic component damage studies, sterilization of medical products and food irradiation. Accurate high exposure measurements are difficult to obtain and cannot, in general, be carried out with a single dose measurement system or technique because of the wide range of doses and the variety of materials involved. This paper describes the dosimetric measurement and calibration techniques used at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) that make use of radiochromic dye films, thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), ionization chambers and calorimetric dosimeters. The methods used to demonstrate the consistency of PNL calibrations with national standards will also be discussed.

  7. Hardening electronic devices against very high total dose radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, B.; Shedd, W.; Roosild, S.; Dolan, R.

    1972-01-01

    The possibilities and limitations of hardening silicon semiconductor devices to the high neutron and gamma radiation levels and greater than 10 to the eighth power rads required for the NERVA nuclear engine development are discussed. A comparison is made of the high dose neutron and gamma hardening potential of bipolar, metal insulator semiconductors and junction field effect transistors. Experimental data is presented on device degradation for the high neutron and gamma doses. Previous data and comparisons indicate that the JFET is much more immune to the combined neutron displacement and gamma ionizing effects than other transistor types. Experimental evidence is also presented which indicates that p channel MOS devices may be able to meet the requirements.

  8. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  9. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Reniers, Brigitte; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (Dm,m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (Dw,m). The relation between Dm,m and Dw,m for 192Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of Dw,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: Dm,m, Dw,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. Dw,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between Dw,m (SCT) and Dw,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources.

  10. Membrane Signaling Induced by High Doses of Ionizing Radiation in the Endothelial Compartment. Relevance in Radiation Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Corre, Isabelle; Guillonneau, Maëva; Paris, François

    2013-01-01

    Tumor areas can now be very precisely delimited thanks to technical progress in imaging and ballistics. This has also led to the development of novel radiotherapy protocols, delivering higher doses of ionizing radiation directly to cancer cells. Despite this, radiation toxicity in healthy tissue remains a major issue, particularly with dose-escalation in these new protocols. Acute and late tissue damage following irradiation have both been linked to the endothelium irrigating normal tissues. The molecular mechanisms involved in the endothelial response to high doses of radiation are associated with signaling from the plasma membrane, mainly via the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide pathway. This review describes this signaling pathway and discusses the relevance of targeting endothelial signaling to protect healthy tissues from the deleterious effects of high doses of radiation. PMID:24252908

  11. Acute exposure to acid fog: influence of breathing pattern on effective dose.

    PubMed

    Bowes, S M; Francis, M; Laube, B L; Frank, R

    1995-02-01

    Concern about the possible adverse health effects of acid fog has been fed by two observations: air pollution disasters earlier in this century were typically associated with fog, and current samples of fog water can be strongly acid. To study the acute effects of acid fog on the lung, the authors generated a monodisperse 10 microM MMAD aerosol of H2SO4 with a pH of 2.0 and a nominal concentration of 500 micrograms/m3. They exposed seven healthy young men on alternate days to acid or control equiosmolar NaCl aerosol during 40 min of resting ventilation and 20 min of exercise; the latter was sufficiently intense to induce oronasal breathing. Exposure was by means of a head dome, a head-only exposure device that permitted continuous measurement (unfettered breathing) of Vr, f, VE, and the onset and persistence of oronasal breathing. In this article the authors compare the relative importance of parameters contributing to the between-subject variability in estimated hydrogen ion dose to the lower airways (H+LAW), based on analysis of variance. Physiologic parameters accounted for 70% of the variability, of which 34% was due to differences in duration of oronasal breathing (tON) and 36% to differences in ventilation rate during oronasal breathing (VE(ON)); inhaled hydrogen ion concentration [H+], the environmental parameter, contributed only 30%. Minute ventilation at the time of transition from nasal to oronasal breathing varied significantly among subjects even if normalized to FVC, an index of lung size.

  12. Hyperglycemia related to high-dose glucocorticoid use in noncritically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids commonly cause drug-induced diabetes. This association is well recognized but available evidence does not answer clinically relevant issues in subjects without diabetes. Methods Thirty-five individuals without diabetes with a recent diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma on high-dose glucocorticoid therapy were studied. Close systematic monitoring of fasting and postprandial glycemia and fasting insulin determinations, HOMA-insulin resistance and HOMA β-cell function were performed. The primary objective was to define the incidence of secondary diabetes in patients treated with high-dose glucocorticoids. Secondary objectives were to specify the intensity, the moment it appears and the evolution of hyperglycemia, in addition to the risk factors, mechanisms and impact of continuous and cyclical glucocorticoids on the development of hyperglycemia. Results Mean age of patients was 38.4 ± 18.7 years. The incidence of diabetes was 40.6% and was found after the first week; half the time it occurred between the second and fourth. Two-thirds spontaneously normalized by eight weeks. Continuous glucocorticoid administration had a higher incidence of fasting hyperglycemia (P = 0.003). Mean peak insulin levels were significantly higher in cases of diabetes. Conclusions High-dose prednisone for 2 to 3 months produced an elevated incidence of diabetes, usually with mild hyperglycemia occurring between the second and fourth week, normalizing spontaneously in all cases. Hyperglycemia was more frequent with continuous doses and occurred in cases with increased insulin resistance. The clinical and therapeutic characteristics of our participants, who were otherwise healthy, could represent the clinical setting of many patients with illness from other medical areas that might require high doses of GC for six to twelve weeks. PMID:23557386

  13. Endothelial Effect of Statin Therapy at a High Dose Versus Low Dose Associated with Ezetimibe

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maristela Magnavita Oliveira; Varela, Carolina Garcez; Silva, Patricia Fontes; Lima, Paulo Roberto Passos; Góes, Paulo Meira; Rodrigues, Marilia Galeffi; Silva, Maria de Lourdes Lima Souza e; Ladeia, Ana Marice Teixeira; Guimarães, Armênio Costa; Correia, Luis Claudio Lemos

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of statins on the endothelial function in humans remains under discussion. Particularly, it is still unclear if the improvement in endothelial function is due to a reduction in LDL-cholesterol or to an arterial pleiotropic effect. Objective To test the hypothesis that modulation of the endothelial function promoted by statins is primarily mediated by the degree of reduction in LDL-cholesterol, independent of the dose of statin administered. Methods Randomized clinical trial with two groups of lipid-lowering treatment (16 patients/each) and one placebo group (14 patients). The two active groups were designed to promote a similar degree of reduction in LDL-cholesterol: the first used statin at a high dose (80 mg, simvastatin 80 group) and the second used statin at a low dose (10 mg) associated with ezetimibe (10 mg, simvastatin 10/ezetimibe group) to optimize the hypolipidemic effect. The endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMV) before and 8 weeks after treatment. Results The decrease in LDL-cholesterol was similar between the groups simvastatin 80 and simvastatin 10/ezetimibe (27% ± 31% and 30% ± 29%, respectively, p = 0.75). The simvastatin 80 group presented an increase in FMV from 8.4% ± 4.3% at baseline to 11% ± 4.2% after 8 weeks (p = 0.02). Similarly, the group simvastatin 10/ezetimibe showed improvement in FMV from 7.3% ± 3.9% to 12% ± 4.4% (p = 0.001). The placebo group showed no variation in LDL-cholesterol level or endothelial function. Conclusion The improvement in endothelial function with statin seems to depend more on a reduction in LDL-cholesterol levels, independent of the dose of statin administered, than on pleiotropic mechanisms. PMID:27142792

  14. Comparison of two commonly practiced atropinisation regimens in acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning, doubling doses vs ‘ad hoc’ - a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Perera, P.M.S.; Shahmy, S.; Gawarammana, I.; Dawson, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective There is wide variation and lack of evidence in current recommendations for atropine dosing schedules leading to subsequent variation in clinical practice. Therefore we sought to examine the safety and effectiveness of a titrated versus ‘ad hoc’ atropine treatment regimen in a cohort of patients with acute cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning. Design A prospective cohort study was conducted in 3 district secondary referral hospitals in Sri Lanka using a structured data collection form that collected details of clinical symptoms and outcomes of cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning, atropine doses and signs of atropinisation. We compared two hospitals that used a titrated dosing protocol based on a structured monitoring sheet for atropine infusion with another hospital using an ‘ad hoc’ regime. Findings During the study 272 symptomatic patients with anticholinesterase poisoning requiring atropine were admitted to the three hospitals. Outcomes of death and ventilation were analyzed for all patients, 226 patients were prospectively assessed for atropine toxicity. At baseline patients in the titrated dose cohort had clinical signs consistent with greater toxicity. This in part may be due to ingestion of more toxic OPs. They received less pralidoxime and atropine and were less likely to develop features of atropine toxicity such as delirium (1% vs 17%), hallucinations (1% vs 35%) or either (1% vs 35%) and need for patient restraint (3% vs 48%) compared with the ‘ad hoc’ dose regime. After adjusting for the pesticides ingested, there was no difference in mortality and ventilatory rates between protocols. Conclusions ‘Ad hoc’ high dose atropine regimens are associated with more frequent atropine toxicity without any obvious improvement in patient outcome compared with doses titrated to clinical effect. Atropine doses should be titrated against response and toxicity. Further education and the use of a structured monitoring sheet may

  15. Comparison of two commonly practiced atropinization regimens in acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning, doubling doses vs. ad hoc: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Perera, P M S; Shahmy, S; Gawarammana, I; Dawson, A H

    2008-06-01

    There is a wide variation and lack of evidence in current recommendations for atropine dosing schedules leading to subsequent variation in clinical practice. Therefore, we sought to examine the safety and effectiveness of a titrated vs. ad hoc atropine treatment regimen in a cohort of patients with acute cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning. A prospective cohort study was conducted in three district secondary referral hospitals in Sri Lanka using a structured data collection form that collected details of clinical symptoms and outcomes of cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning, atropine doses, and signs of atropinization. We compared two hospitals that used a titrated dosing protocol based on a structured monitoring sheet for atropine infusion with another hospital using an ad hoc regime. During the study, 272 symptomatic patients with anticholinesterase poisoning requiring atropine were admitted to the three hospitals. Outcomes of death and ventilation were analyzed for all patients, 226 patients were prospectively assessed for atropine toxicity. At baseline, patients in the titrated dose cohort had clinical signs consistent with greater toxicity. This in part may be due to ingestion of more toxic organophosphates. They received less pralidoxime and atropine, and were less likely to develop features of atropine toxicity, such as delirium (1% vs. 17%), hallucinations (1% vs. 35%), or either (1% vs. 35%) and need for patient restraint (3% vs. 48%) compared with the ad hoc dose regime. After adjusting for the pesticides ingested, there was no difference in mortality and ventilatory rates between protocols. Ad hoc high dose atropine regimens are associated with more frequent atropine toxicity without any obvious improvement in patient outcome compared with doses titrated to clinical effect. Atropine doses should be titrated against response and toxicity. Further education and the use of a structured monitoring sheet may assist in more appropriate

  16. Esophageal Toxicity From High-Dose, Single-Fraction Paraspinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brett W.; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, Margie; Bilsky, Mark; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report the esophageal toxicity from single-fraction paraspinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and identify dosimetric and clinical risk factors for toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 204 spinal metastases abutting the esophagus (182 patients) were treated with high-dose single-fraction SRS during 2003-2010. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Dose-volume histograms were combined to generate a comprehensive atlas of complication incidence that identifies risk factors for toxicity. Correlation of dose-volume factors with esophageal toxicity was assessed using Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. Clinical factors were correlated with toxicity. Results: The median dose to the planning treatment volume was 24 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-81). There were 31 (15%) acute and 24 (12%) late esophageal toxicities. The rate of grade {>=}3 acute or late toxicity was 6.8% (14 patients). Fisher's exact test resulted in significant median splits for grade {>=}3 toxicity at V12 = 3.78 cm{sup 3} (relative risk [RR] 3.7, P=.05), V15 = 1.87 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013), V20 = 0.11 cm{sup 3} (RR 6, P=0.01), and V22 = 0.0 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013). The median split for D2.5 cm{sup 3} (14.02 Gy) was also a significant predictor of toxicity (RR 6; P=.01). A highly significant logistic regression model was generated on the basis of D2.5 cm{sup 3}. One hundred percent (n = 7) of grade {>=}4 toxicities were associated with radiation recall reactions after doxorubicin or gemcitabine chemotherapy or iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus. Conclusions: High-dose, single-fraction paraspinal SRS has a low rate of grade {>=}3 esophageal toxicity. Severe esophageal toxicity is minimized with careful attention to esophageal doses during treatment planning. Iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus and systemic agents classically associated with radiation

  17. High-dose secondary calibration laboratory accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    There is a need for high-dose secondary calibration laboratories to serve the multi-billion dollar radiation processing industry. This need is driven by the desires of industry for less costly calibrations and faster calibration-cycle response time. Services needed include calibration irradiations of routine processing dosimeters and the supply of reference standard transfer dosimeters for irradiation in the production processing facility. In order to provide measurement quality assurance and to demonstrate consistency with national standards, the high-dose secondary laboratories would be accredited by means of an expansion of an existing National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. A laboratory performance criteria document is under development to implement the new program.

  18. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    2000-11-20

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide a dose consequence analysis of high-level waste (HLW) consisting of plutonium immobilized in vitrified HLW to be handled at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain for a beyond design basis event (BDBE) under expected conditions using best estimate values for each calculation parameter. In addition to the dose calculation, a plutonium respirable particle size for dose calculation use is derived. The current concept for this waste form is plutonium disks enclosed in cans immobilized in canisters of vitrified HLW (i.e., glass). The plutonium inventory at risk used for this calculation is selected from Plutonium Immobilization Project Input for Yucca Mountain Total Systems Performance Assessment (Shaw 1999). The BDBE examined in this calculation is a nonmechanistic initiating event and the sequence of events that follow to cause a radiological release. This analysis will provide the radiological releases and dose consequences for a postulated BDBE. Results may be considered in other analyses to determine or modify the safety classification and quality assurance level of repository structures, systems, and components. This calculation uses best available technical information because the BDBE frequency is very low (i.e., less than 1.0E-6 events/year) and is not required for License Application for the Monitored Geologic Repository. The results of this calculation will not be used as part of a licensing or design basis.

  19. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy quality assurance: a practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, DA

    2006-01-01

    The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy with its inherent dangers necessitates adoption of appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize risks to both patients and medical staff. This paper is aimed at assisting someone who is establishing a new program or revising one already in place into adhere to the recently issued Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USA) regulations and the guidelines from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. PMID:21614233

  20. High-dose versus low-dose valproate for the treatment of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: Going from low to high.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vanegas, Laura E; Jara-Prado, Aurelio; Ochoa, Adriana; Rodríguez Y Rodríguez, Nayelli; Durón, Reyna M; Crail-Meléndez, Daniel; Alonso, Ma Elisa; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E

    2016-08-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a genetic generalized epilepsy accounting for 3-12% of adult cases of epilepsy. Valproate has proven to be the first-choice drug in JME for controlling the most common seizure types: myoclonic, absence, and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC). In this retrospective study, we analyzed seizure outcome in patients with JME using valproate monotherapy for a minimum period of one year. Low valproate dose was considered to be 1000mg/day or lower, while serum levels were considered to be low if they were at or below 50mcg/dl. One hundred three patients met the inclusion criteria. Fifty-six patients (54.4%) were female. The current average age was 28.4±7.4years, while the age of epilepsy onset was 13.6±2.9years. Most patients corresponded to the subsyndrome of classic JME. Forty-six (44.7%) patients were free from all seizure types, and 76 (73.7%) patients were free from GTC seizures. No significant difference was found in seizure freedom among patients using a low dose of valproate versus a high dose (p=0.535) or among patients with low blood levels versus high blood levels (p=0.69). In patients with JME, it seems appropriate to use low doses of valproate (500mg to 1000mg) for initial treatment and then to determine if freedom from seizures was attained. PMID:27300146

  1. SU-E-T-315: The Change of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters (OSLDs) Sensitivity by Accumulated Dose and High Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S; Jung, H; Kim, M; Ji, Y; Kim, K; Choi, S; Park, S; Yoo, H; Yi, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to evaluate radiation sensitivity of optical stimulated luminance dosimeters (OSLDs) by accumulated dose and high dose. Methods: This study was carried out in Co-60 unit (Theratron 780, AECL, and Canada) and used InLight MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL) for reading. We annealed for 30 min using optical annealing system which contained fluorescent lamps (Osram lumilux, 24 W, 280 ∼780 nm). To evaluate change of OSLDs sensitivity by repeated irradiation, the dosimeters were repeatedly irradiated with 1 Gy. And whenever a repeated irradiation, we evaluated OSLDs sensitivity. To evaluate OSLDs sensitivity after accumulated dose with 5 Gy, We irradiated dose accumulatively (from 1 Gy to 5 Gy) without annealing. And OSLDs was also irradiated with 15, 20, 30 Gy to certify change of OSLDs sensitivity after high dose irradiation. After annealing them, they were irradiated with 1Gy, repeatedly. Results: The OSLDs sensitivity increased up to 3% during irradiating seven times and decreased continuously above 8 times. That dropped by about 0.35 Gy per an irradiation. Finally, after 30 times irradiation, OSLDs sensitivity decreased by about 7%. For accumulated dose from 1 Gy to 5 Gy, OSLDs sensitivity about 1 Gy increased until 4.4% after second times accumulated dose compared with before that. OSLDs sensitivity about 1 Gy decreased by 1.6% in five times irradiation. When OSLDs were irradiated ten times with 1Gy after irradiating high dose (10, 15, 20 Gy), OSLDs sensitivity decreased until 6%, 9%, 12% compared with it before high dose irradiation, respectively. Conclusion: This study certified OSLDs sensitivity by accumulated dose and high dose. When irradiated with 1Gy, repeatedly, OSLDs sensitivity decreased linearly and the reduction rate of OSLDs sensitivity after high dose irradiation had dependence on irradiated dose.

  2. High Homocysteine and Blood Pressure Related to Poor Outcome of Acute Ischemia Stroke in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Mo; Sun, Wenjie; Xu, Tan; Tong, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between plasma homocysteine (Hcy), blood pressure (BP) and poor outcome at hospital discharge among acute ischemic stroke patients, and if high Hcy increases the risk of poor outcome based on high BP status in a northern Chinese population. Methods Between June 1, 2009 and May 31, 2013, a total of 3695 acute ischemic stroke patients were recruited from three hospitals in northern Chinese cities. Demographic characteristics, lifestyle risk factors, medical history, and other clinical characteristics were recorded for all subjects. Poor outcome was defined as a discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≥3 or death. The association between homocysteine concentration, admission blood pressure, and risk of poor outcome following acute ischemic stroke was analyzed by using multivariate non-conditional logistic regression models. Results Compared with those in the lowest quartile of Hcy concentration in a multivariate-adjusted model, those in the highest quartile of Hcy concentration had increased risk of poor outcome after acute ischemic stroke, (OR = 1.33, P<0.05). The dose-response relationship between Hcy concentration and risk of poor outcome was statistically significant (p-value for trend  = 0.027). High BP was significantly associated with poor outcome following acute ischemic stroke (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95%CI, 1.19–1.74). Compared with non-high BP with nhHcy, in a multivariate-adjusted model, the ORs (95% CI) of non-high BP with hHcy, high BP with nhHcy, and high BP with hHcy to poor outcome were 1.14 (0.85–1.53), 1.37 (1.03–1.84) and 1.70 (1.29–2.34), respectively. Conclusion The present study suggested that high plasma Hcy and blood pressure were independent risk factors for prognosis of acute ischemic stroke, and hHcy may further increase the risk of poor outcome among patients with high blood pressure. Additionally, the results indicate that high Hcy with high BP may cause increased susceptibility

  3. Symptomatology of acute radiation effects in humans after exposure to doses of 0. 5-30 Gy

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, G.H.; Baum, S.J.; Withers, H.R.; Young, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    This article distills from available data descriptions of typical human symptoms in reaction to prompt total-body ionizing radiation in the dose range 0.5 to 30 Gy midline body tissue. The symptoms are correlated with dose and time over the acute postexposure period of 6 wk. The purpose is to provide a symptomatology basis for assessing early functional impairment of individuals who may be involved in civil defense, emergency medical care and various military activities in the event of a nuclear attack. The dose range is divided into eight subranges associated with important pathophysiological events. For each subrange, signs and symptoms are designated including estimates of symptom onset, severity, duration and incidence.

  4. High-dose neutron irradiation performance of dielectric mirrors

    DOE PAGES

    Nimishakavi Anantha Phani Kiran Kumar; Leonard, Keith J.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-05-01

    The study presents the high-dose behavior of dielectric mirrors specifically engineered for radiation-tolerance: alternating layers of Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 were grown on sapphire substrates and exposed to neutron doses of 1 and 4 dpa at 458 10K in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In comparison to previously reported results, these higher doses of 1 and 4 dpa results in a drastic drop in optical reflectance, caused by a failure of the multilayer coating. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors failed completely when exposed to 1 dpa, whereas the reflectance of Al2O3/SiO2 mirrors reduced to 44%, eventually failing at 4 dpa. Transmission electron microscopymore » (TEM) observation of the Al2O3/SiO2 specimens showed SiO2 layer defects which increases size with irradiation dose. The typical size of each defect was 8 nm in 1 dpa and 42 nm in 4 dpa specimens. Buckling type delamination of the interface between the substrate and first layer was typically observed in both 1 and 4 dpa HfO2/SiO2 specimens. Composition changes across the layers were measured in high resolution scanning-TEM mode using energy dispersive spectroscopy. A significant interdiffusion between the film layers was observed in Al2O3/SiO2 mirror, though less evident in HfO2/SiO2 system. Lastly, the ultimate goal of this work is the provide insight into the radiation-induced failure mechanisms of these mirrors.« less

  5. High-dose neutron irradiation performance of dielectric mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Nimishakavi Anantha Phani Kiran Kumar; Leonard, Keith J.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-05-01

    The study presents the high-dose behavior of dielectric mirrors specifically engineered for radiation-tolerance: alternating layers of Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 were grown on sapphire substrates and exposed to neutron doses of 1 and 4 dpa at 458 10K in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In comparison to previously reported results, these higher doses of 1 and 4 dpa results in a drastic drop in optical reflectance, caused by a failure of the multilayer coating. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors failed completely when exposed to 1 dpa, whereas the reflectance of Al2O3/SiO2 mirrors reduced to 44%, eventually failing at 4 dpa. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of the Al2O3/SiO2 specimens showed SiO2 layer defects which increases size with irradiation dose. The typical size of each defect was 8 nm in 1 dpa and 42 nm in 4 dpa specimens. Buckling type delamination of the interface between the substrate and first layer was typically observed in both 1 and 4 dpa HfO2/SiO2 specimens. Composition changes across the layers were measured in high resolution scanning-TEM mode using energy dispersive spectroscopy. A significant interdiffusion between the film layers was observed in Al2O3/SiO2 mirror, though less evident in HfO2/SiO2 system. Lastly, the ultimate goal of this work is the provide insight into the radiation-induced failure mechanisms of these mirrors.

  6. Mechanism of Action for Anti-Radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-Dose Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. We partially analyzed the biochemical characteristics of the SRDs. The SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  7. Mechanism of Action for Anti-radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-dose Gamma Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  8. Evaluation of High Performance Converters Under Low Dose Rate Total Ionizing Dose (TID) Testing for NASA Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Sahu, Kusum

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of low dose rate (0.01-0.18 rads(Si)/sec) total ionizing dose (TID) tests performed on several types of high performance converters. The parts used in this evaluation represented devices such as a high speed flash converter, a 16-bit ADC and a voltage-to-frequency converter.

  9. Germanium implanted with high dose oxygen and its optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi-Chu; Kelly, J. C.; Kenny, M. J.

    1990-05-01

    Single crystal n-type Ge samples are implanted with 1 × 10 17 to 1.5 × 10 18 cm -2 oxygen ions at 45 keV. Infrared and Rutherford backscattering measurements indicate that germanium dioxide is formed. The atomic ratio of oxygen to germanium is near the GeO 2 stoichiometric value of 2.0 from the surface down to a depth of 550 Å for germanium samples implanted to 1.5 × 10 18 cm -2. The excess oxygen is redistributed during the implantation. The results of optical reflectivity measurements indicate that the reflectivity of germanium in the 0.2-1.4 μm wavelength region is greatly reduced after high dose oxygen ion implantation. The reflectivity value at about 0.7 μm is near zero for germanium implanted to a dose of 1.5 × 10 18 cm -2.

  10. High dose rate endorectal brachytherapy as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vuong, T; Devic, S; Podgorsak, E

    2007-11-01

    In the era of total mesorectal surgery, the issue of radiation toxicity is raised. A novel endocavitary brachytherapy technique was tested as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with resectable rectal cancer. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the treatment-related toxicity and effects on local recurrence. A dose of 26 Gy was prescribed to the gross tumour volume and intramesorectal deposits seen on magnetic resonance imaging and given over four daily treatments, using the high dose rate delivery system followed by surgery 6-8 weeks later. The study included 93 T3, four T4 and three T2 tumours. Acute proctitis of grade 2 was observed in all patients, but one required transfusion. At a median follow-up time of 60 months, the 5-year actual local recurrence rate was 5%, disease-free survival was 65%, and overall survival was 70%. High dose rate endorectal brachytherapy seems to prevent local recurrence and has a favourable toxicity pattern compared with external beam radiotherapy. PMID:17714925

  11. Tolerance of high doses of amphotericin B by infusion of a liposomal formulation in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Emminger, W; Graninger, W; Emminger-Schmidmeier, W; Zoubek, A; Pillwein, K; Susani, M; Wasserer, A; Gadner, H

    1994-01-01

    Conventional amphotericin B (Amph-B) is the drug of choice for treating systemic fungal infections. Recently, a new formulation has become available, encapsulated in liposomes (Amph-lip). This new form of administration was developed in order to lower the acute side effects and to offer the possibility of administering high doses of amphotericin B. Experience with Amph-lip is limited, especially in children. We treated four children with documented systemic fungal infections with Amph-lip and administered it empirically to 12 children. Fifteen of these 16 children were severely granulocytopenic oncologic patients. One 3-month-old baby suffered from systemic candidiasis. Amph-lip was preferred to conventional Amph-B in children with organ dysfunction developing as a consequence of conventional chemotherapy or bone marrow transplantation, after failure of conventional Amph-B to improve a fungal infection, and after adverse drug reactions had occurred. The daily doses of Amph-lip ranged from 1 to 6 mg/kg (median 3 mg/kg), the cumulative doses from 13 to 311 mg/kg (median 75 mg/kg). Acute adverse reactions or organ function abnormalities attributable to Amph-lip did not occur in 402 administrations. Amph-lip has proven to be well tolerated by children in terms of acute toxicity and in the long term. Although large cumulative doses were given, organ function abnormalities attributable to Amph-lip doses were not detected in any of ten long-term survivors over a median observation time of 36 months (range 30-44 months). Amph-lip appears to be a promising alternative antifungal treatment, especially for patients with impaired organ function, when high doses of amphotericin B are necessary. PMID:8110875

  12. Effects of acute low doses of gamma-radiation on erythrocytes membrane.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Sherif S; El-Sakhawy, Eman; Abdel-Fatah, Eman S; Kelany, Adel M; Rizk, Rizk M

    2011-03-01

    It is believed that any dose of ionizing radiation may damage cells and that the mutated cells could develop into cancer cells. Additionally, results of research performed over the past century on the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on biological organisms show beneficial health effects, called hormesis. Much less is known about the cellular response to low doses of ionizing radiation, such as those typical for medical diagnostic procedures, normal occupational exposures or cosmic-ray exposures at flight altitudes. Extrapolating from the effects observed at higher doses to predict changes in cells after low-dose exposure is problematic. We examined the biological effects of low doses (0.01-0.3 Gy) of γ-radiation on the membrane characteristics of erythrocytes of albino rats and carried out osmotic fragility tests and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Our results indicate that the lowest three doses in the investigated radiation range, i.e., 0.01, 0.025 and 0.05 Gy, resulted in positive effects on the erythrocyte membranes, while a dose of 0.1 Gy appeared to represent the limiting threshold dose of those positive effects. Doses higher than 0.1 Gy were associated with the denaturation of erythrocyte proteins. PMID:20865271

  13. High-dose versus low-dose antivenom in the treatment of poisonous snake bites: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Sankar, Jhuma; Dev, Nishanth

    2015-01-01

    Though snake antivenom (SAV) is the mainstay of therapy for poisonous snake bites, there is no universally accepted standard regimen regarding the optimum dose (low vs. high). We therefore, undertook this systematic review to address this important research question. We searched all the published literature through the major electronic databases till August 2014. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included. Eligible trials compared low versus high dose SAV in poisonous snake bite. The review has been registered at PROSPERO (Registration number: CRD42014009700). Of 36 citations retrieved, a total of 5 RCTs (n = 473) were included in the final analyses. Three trials were open-label, 4 conducted in Indian sub-continent and 1 in Brazil. The doses of SAV varied in the high dose group from 40 ml to 550 ml, and in the low dose group from 20 ml to 220 ml. There was no significant difference between the two groups for any of the outcomes except duration of hospital stay, which was lower in the low dose group. The GRADE evidence generated was of “very low quality.” Low-dose SAV is equivalent or may be superior to high-dose SAV in management of poisonous snake bite. Low dose is also highly cost-effective as compared to the high dose. But the GRADE evidence generated was of “very low quality” as most were open label trials. Further trials are needed to make definitive recommendations regarding the dose and these should also include children <9 years of age. PMID:26195860

  14. Effects of moderate-dose versus high-dose trimethoprim on serum creatinine and creatinine clearance and adverse reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Naderer, O; Nafziger, A N; Bertino, J S

    1997-01-01

    The effects of a 10-day course of moderate-dose (10 mg/kg/day) or high-dose (20 mg/kg/day) trimethoprim therapy on serum creatinine, measured creatinine clearance, urinary creatinine excretion, and serum folate were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. Serum creatinine concentrations increased significantly during trimethoprim therapy, began to decrease near day 10, and returned to baseline during the washout phase at both dosage levels. At the same time, measured creatinine clearance and urine creatinine changed in the opposite direction. No clinical or statistical differences were noted between changes in the moderate- versus the high-dose phases. Serum folate concentration decreases during high-dose trimethoprim therapy were statistically significant. Adverse drug reactions in the two groups were statistically different during the first study period, with the high-dose group having a 75% incidence rate and the moderate-dose group having an 11% incidence rate (P < 0.02). Serum creatinine, measured creatinine clearance, and urinary creatinine excretion demonstrated statistically, but not clinically, significant changes during trimethoprim therapy. In addition, high-dose trimethoprim caused significantly more adverse drug reactions than moderate-dose trimethoprim in normal volunteers. PMID:9371351

  15. On carbon nitride synthesis at high-dose ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, E. A.; Bespalova, O. V.; Borisov, A. M.; Goryaga, N. G.; Kulikauskas, V. S.; Sukharev, V. G.; Zatekin, V. V.

    1998-04-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was used for the study of high dose 35 keV nitrogen ions implantation into graphites and glassy carbon. Quantitative data on depth profiles and its dependencies on irradiation fluence and ion beam density were obtained. The stationary dome-shaped depth profile with maximum nitrogen concentration 22-27 at.% and half-width more than twice exceeding projected range of ions is reached at fluence Φ ˜10 18 cm -2. The dependence of the maximum concentration in the profile on ion current density was studied. The largest concentration was obtained at reduced ion current density.

  16. Cation disorder in high-dose, neutron-irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Larson, A.C.; Yu, N.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine whether MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is a suitable ceramic for fusion applications. The crystal structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel single crystals irradiated to high neutron fluences [>5{times}10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E{sub n}>0.1 MeV)] were examined by neutron diffraction. Crystal structure refinement of the highese dose sample indicated that the average scattering strength of the tetrahedral crystal sites decreased by {approx}20% while increasing by {approx}8% on octahedral sites.

  17. The susceptibility of TaOx-based memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose

    DOE PAGES

    McLain, Michael Lee; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Mickel, Patrick R.; Hanson, Donald J.; McDonald, Joseph K.; Hughart, David Russell; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-11-11

    This paper investigates the effects of high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose (TID) on tantalum oxide (TaOx) memristors. Transient data were obtained during the pulsed exposures for dose rates ranging from approximately 5.0 ×107 rad(Si)/s to 4.7 ×108 rad(Si)/s and for pulse widths ranging from 50 ns to 50 μs. The cumulative dose in these tests did not appear to impact the observed dose rate response. Static dose rate upset tests were also performed at a dose rate of ~3.0 ×108 rad(Si)/s. This is the first dose rate study on any type of memristive memory technology. Inmore » addition to assessing the tolerance of TaOx memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation, we also evaluated their susceptibility to TID. The data indicate that it is possible for the devices to switch from a high resistance off-state to a low resistance on-state in both dose rate and TID environments. The observed radiation-induced switching is dependent on the irradiation conditions and bias configuration. Furthermore, the dose rate or ionizing dose level at which a device switches resistance states varies from device to device; the enhanced susceptibility observed in some devices is still under investigation. As a result, numerical simulations are used to qualitatively capture the observed transient radiation response and provide insight into the physics of the induced current/voltages.« less

  18. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of the Triple Angiokinase Inhibitor Nintedanib Combined with Low-Dose Cytarabine in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schliemann, Christoph; Gerss, Joachim; Wiebe, Stefanie; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Knoblauch, Nicola; Sauer, Tim; Angenendt, Linus; Kewitz, Tobias; Urban, Marc; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Edemir, Sabine; Vehring, Kerstin; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF 1120), a potent multikinase inhibitor of VEGFR-1/-2/-3, FGFR-1/-2/-3 and PDGFR-α/-β, exerts growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects in myeloid leukemic cells, especially when used in combination with cytarabine. This phase I study evaluated nintedanib in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in elderly patients with untreated or relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) ineligible for intensive chemotherapy in a 3+3 design. Nintedanib (dose levels 100, 150, and 200 mg orally twice daily) and LDAC (20 mg subcutaneous injection twice daily for 10 days) were administered in 28-day cycles. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as non-hematological severe adverse reaction CTC grade ≥ 4 with possible or definite relationship to nintedanib. Between April 2012 and October 2013, 13 patients (median age 73 [range: 62–86] years) were enrolled. One patient did not receive study medication and was replaced. Nine (69%) patients had relapsed or refractory disease and 6 (46%) patients had unfavorable cytogenetics. The most frequently reported treatment-related adverse events (AE) were gastrointestinal events. Twelve SAEs irrespective of relatedness were reported. Two SUSARs were observed, one fatal hypercalcemia and one fatal gastrointestinal infection. Two patients (17%) with relapsed AML achieved a complete remission (one CR, one CRi) and bone marrow blast reductions without fulfilling PR criteria were observed in 3 patients (25%). One-year overall survival was 33%. Nintedanib combined with LDAC shows an adequate safety profile and survival data are promising in a difficult-to-treat patient population. Continuation of this trial with a phase II recommended dose of 2 x 200 mg nintedanib in a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study is planned. The trial is registered to EudraCT as 2011-001086-41. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01488344 PMID:27716819

  19. High-dose mode of mortality in Tribolium: A model system for study of radiation injury and repair in non-proliferative tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chihing Christina.

    1989-01-01

    With appropriate doses of ionizing radiation, both the acute, or lethal-midlethal, dose-independent pattern of mortality, and the hyperacute, dose-dependent pattern, were demonstrated within a single insect genus (Tribolium). This demonstration provides resolution of apparently contradictory reports of insect radiation responses in terms of doses required to cause lethality and those based on survival time as a function of dose. A dose-dependent mortality pattern was elicited in adult Tribolium receiving high doses, viz., 300 Gy or greater; its time course was complete in 10 days, before the dose-independent pattern of mortality began. Visual observations of heavily-irradiated Tribolium suggested neural and/or neuromuscular damage, as had been previously proposed by others for lethally-irradiated wasps, flies, and mosquitoes. Results of experiments using fractionated high doses supported the suggestion that the hyperacute or high-dose mode of death is the result of damage to nonproliferative tissues. Relative resistance of a strain to the hyperacute or high-dose mode of death was not correlated with resistance to the midlethal mode, which is believed to be the result of damage to the proliferative cells of the midgut. Using the high-dose mode of death as a model of radiation damage to nonproliferative tissues, the effects of age, and of a moderate priming dose were assessed. Beetles showed age-related increase in sensitivity to the high-dose mode of death, suggesting a decline in capacity to repair radiation damage to postmitotic tissue. This correlated with a decrease (50%) in the amount of repair reflected in the sparing effect of dose-fractionation (SDF) between the age of 1 to 3 months. The age related increase in radiosensitivity was reduced by a moderate priming dose (40 or 65 Gy) given at a young age.

  20. Anti-angiogenic effect of high doses of ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Mikirova, Nina A; Ichim, Thomas E; Riordan, Neil H

    2008-01-01

    Pharmaceutical doses of ascorbic acid (AA, vitamin C, or its salts) have been reported to exert anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. One proposed mechanism involves direct cytotoxicity mediated by accumulation of ascorbic acid radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the extracellular environment of tumor cells. However, therapeutic effects have been reported at concentrations insufficient to induce direct tumor cell death. We hypothesized that AA may exert anti-angiogenic effects. To test this, we expanded endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) from peripheral blood and assessed, whether or not high dose AA would inhibit EPC ability to migrate, change energy metabolism, and tube formation ability. We also evaluated the effects of high dose AA on angiogenic activities of HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) and HUAECs (human umbilical arterial endothelial cells). According to our data, concentrations of AA higher than 100 mg/dl suppressed capillary-like tube formation on Matrigel for all cells tested and the effect was more pronounced for progenitor cells in comparison with mature cells. Co-culture of differentiated endothelial cells with progenitor cells showed that there was incorporation of EPCs in vessels formed by HUVECs and HUAECs. Cell migration was assessed using an in vitro wound healing model. The results of these experiments showed an inverse correlation between AA concentrations relative to both cell migration and gap filling capacity. Suppression of NO (nitric oxide) generation appeared to be one of the mechanisms by which AA mediated angiostatic effects. This study supports further investigation into non-cytotoxic antitumor activities of AA. PMID:18789157

  1. Isometric exercise and cognitive function: an investigation of acute dose-response effects during submaximal fatiguing contractions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Denver M Y; Bray, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between exercise and cognitive performance using an acute bout of isometric exercise. University students (N = 55) were randomly assigned to control, 30%, 50% and 70% of maximum voluntary handgrip contraction groups. Participants performed a modified Stroop task before and after completion of an isometric handgrip endurance trial at their assigned exercise intensity. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and forearm muscle activation (EMG) showed linear trends of progressively greater RPE and muscle activation at greater exercise intensity levels. Regression analysis showed significant (P < .05) linear degradations in frequency of errors on the Stroop task with increasing exercise intensity. We conclude that performing isometric exercise until exhaustion is associated with reduced cognitive performance and that higher intensity isometric exercise leads to greater performance impairments in a linear dose-response manner.

  2. Amifostine ameliorates recognition memory defect in acute radiation syndrome caused by relatively low-dose of gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Joong-Sun; Song, Myoung-Sub; Seo, Heung-Sik; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Jong Choon; Jo, Sung-Kee; Shin, Taekyun

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether amifostine (WR-2721) could attenuate memory impairment and suppress hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice with the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). These were assessed using object recognition memory test, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis [Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX)]. Amifostine treatment (214 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to irradiation significantly attenuated the recognition memory defect in ARS, and markedly blocked the apoptotic death and decrease of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in ARS. Therefore, amifostine may attenuate recognition memory defect in a relatively low-dose exposure of ARS in adult mice, possibly by inhibiting a detrimental effect of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:20195069

  3. Acute personalized habitual caffeine doses improve attention and have selective effects when considering the fractionation of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Lanini, Juliana; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes; Pompéia, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is widely used, often consumed with food, and improves simple and complex/executive attention under fasting conditions. We investigated whether these cognitive effects are observed when personalized habitual doses of caffeine are ingested by caffeine consumers, whether they are influenced by nutriments and if various executive domains are susceptible to improvement. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study including 60 young, healthy, rested males randomly assigned to one of four treatments: placebo fasting, caffeine fasting, placebo meal and caffeine meal. Caffeine doses were individualized for each participant based on their self-reported caffeine consumption at the time of testing (morning). The test battery included measures of simple and sustained attention, executive domains (inhibiting, updating, shifting, dual tasking, planning and accessing long-term memory), control measures of subjective alterations, glucose and insulin levels, skin conductance, heart rate and pupil dilation. Regardless of meal intake, acute habitual doses of caffeine decreased fatigue, and improved simple and sustained attention and executive updating. This executive effect was not secondary to the habitual weekly dose consumed, changes in simple and sustained attention, mood, meal ingestion and increases in cognitive effort. We conclude that the morning caffeine "fix" has positive attentional effects and selectively improved executive updating whether or not caffeine is consumed with food.

  4. Acute personalized habitual caffeine doses improve attention and have selective effects when considering the fractionation of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Lanini, Juliana; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes; Pompéia, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is widely used, often consumed with food, and improves simple and complex/executive attention under fasting conditions. We investigated whether these cognitive effects are observed when personalized habitual doses of caffeine are ingested by caffeine consumers, whether they are influenced by nutriments and if various executive domains are susceptible to improvement. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study including 60 young, healthy, rested males randomly assigned to one of four treatments: placebo fasting, caffeine fasting, placebo meal and caffeine meal. Caffeine doses were individualized for each participant based on their self-reported caffeine consumption at the time of testing (morning). The test battery included measures of simple and sustained attention, executive domains (inhibiting, updating, shifting, dual tasking, planning and accessing long-term memory), control measures of subjective alterations, glucose and insulin levels, skin conductance, heart rate and pupil dilation. Regardless of meal intake, acute habitual doses of caffeine decreased fatigue, and improved simple and sustained attention and executive updating. This executive effect was not secondary to the habitual weekly dose consumed, changes in simple and sustained attention, mood, meal ingestion and increases in cognitive effort. We conclude that the morning caffeine "fix" has positive attentional effects and selectively improved executive updating whether or not caffeine is consumed with food. PMID:26621326

  5. High-Dose Atomoxetine Treatment of ADHD in Youths with Limited Response to Standard Doses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Michelson, David; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Weiss, Margaret D.; Busner, Joan; Moore, Rodney J.; Ruff, Dustin D.; Ramsey, Janet; Dickson, Ruth; Turgay, Atilla; Saylor, Keith E.; Luber, Stephen; Vaughan, Brigette; Allen, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the utility and tolerability of higher than standard atomoxetine doses to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Two randomized, double-blind trials of atomoxetine nonresponders ages 6 to 16 years were conducted comparing continued treatment with same-dose atomoxetine to treatment using greater than…

  6. Improvements in dose calculation accuracy for small off-axis targets in high dose per fraction tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Bayliss, Adam; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: A recent field safety notice from TomoTherapy detailed the underdosing of small, off-axis targets when receiving high doses per fraction. This is due to angular undersampling in the dose calculation gantry angles. This study evaluates a correction method to reduce the underdosing, to be implemented in the current version (v4.1) of the TomoTherapy treatment planning software. Methods: The correction method, termed 'Super Sampling' involved the tripling of the number of gantry angles from which the dose is calculated during optimization and dose calculation. Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose to small targets at various off-axis distances receiving a minimum of 21 Gy in one fraction. Measurements were also performed for single small targets at the center of the Lucy phantom, using radiochromic film and the dose magnifying glass (DMG). Results: Without super sampling, the peak dose deficit increased from 0% to 18% for a 10 mm target and 0% to 30% for a 5 mm target as off-axis target distances increased from 0 to 16.5 cm. When super sampling was turned on, the dose deficit trend was removed and all peak doses were within 5% of the planned dose. For measurements in the Lucy phantom at 9.7 cm off-axis, the positional and dose magnitude accuracy using super sampling was verified using radiochromic film and the DMG. Conclusions: A correction method implemented in the TomoTherapy treatment planning system which triples the angular sampling of the gantry angles used during optimization and dose calculation removes the underdosing for targets as small as 5 mm diameter, up to 16.5 cm off-axis receiving up to 21 Gy.

  7. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  8. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bailleux, Caroline; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Chand-Fouche, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Barranger, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts) presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid) and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results Median age was 56.4 years (27-79). Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%), T3a = 1 pt (3%), T3b = 6 pts (18.2%), and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%). Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27). Median CTVCT (16 pts) and HR-CTVMRI (17 pts) were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3), 31.9 cc (17.1-58), respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5), 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4), respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI) for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9), 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4), and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1), respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51). Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pts, G3 infection = 2 pts), and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts), respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion); no bleeding was

  9. High-dose processing and application to Korean space foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kang, Sang-Wook; Choi, Gi-Hyuk; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Nutrition bar, Ramen (ready-to-cook noodle), and two Korean traditional foods ( Kimchi, fermented vegetable; Sujeonggwa, cinnamon beverage) have been developed as space foods using high-dose gamma irradiation. Addition of calcium lactate and vitamin C, a mild heating, deep-freezing, and gamma irradiation at 25 kGy were conducted to prepare Kimchi as a ready-to-eat space food. Sterilization of Space Kimchi (SK) was confirmed by a microbiological test. The hardness of the Space Kimchi was lower than the untreated Kimchi (CON), but higher than the irradiated only Kimchi. Sensory attributes of the SK were similar to CON, and maintained during preservation at 35 °C for 30 days. The optimal doses for eliminating the contaminated microbes and maintaining the qualities of the Nutrition bars, Ramen, and Sujeonggwa were determined at 15, 10 and 6 kGy, respectively. All the Korean space food were certificated for use in space flight conditions of 30 days by the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems.

  10. Shelf-stable food through high dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaček, V.; Svobodová, V.; Bartoníček, B.; Rosmus, J.; Čamra, M.

    2004-09-01

    Irradiation of food with high doses (radappertization) is a way, how to prepare shelf-stable ready-to-eat food. The radappertization process requires that the food be heated at first to an internal temperature of at least 75°C to inactivate autolytic enzyme, which could cause the spoilage during storage without refrigeration. In order to prevent radiation induced changes in sensory properties (off flavors, odors, undesirable color change, etc.) the food was vacuum packed and irradiated in frozen state at -30°C or less to a minimum dose of 35 kGy. Such products have characteristics of fresh food prepared for eating even if they are stored for long time under tropical conditions. The wholesomeness (safety for consumption) has been confirmed during 40 years of testing. Within the NRI Řež 10 kinds of shelf-stable meat products have been prepared. The meat was cooked, vacuum packed in SiO x-containing pouch, freezed in liquid nitrogen and irradiated with electron beam accelerator. The microbial, chemical, and organoleptic properties have been tested.

  11. High-dose oral ziprasidone versus conventional dosing in schizophrenia patients with residual symptoms: the ZEBRAS study.

    PubMed

    Goff, Donald C; McEvoy, Joseph P; Citrome, Leslie; Mech, Arnold W; Bustillo, Juan R; Gil, Roberto; Buckley, Peter; Manschreck, Theo C; Achtyes, Eric D; Macklin, Eric A

    2013-08-01

    Uncontrolled studies have suggested that increasing the dose of ziprasidone above the standard maximum daily dose of 160 mg may be more effective for some patients with schizophrenia. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an 8-week, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose escalation trial comparing ziprasidone 160 versus 320 mg/d in individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who remained symptomatic despite treatment with ziprasidone 160 mg/d for at least 3 weeks. Of 75 randomized patients, 42 completed the study. Serum ziprasidone concentrations increased significantly in the high-dose group compared with the standard-dose group at week 4 but did not differ between groups at week 8. Both treatment groups exhibited significant symptomatic improvement. Response did not differ between treatment groups; however, in the high-dose group, higher ziprasidone serum concentrations were associated with better response at a trend level. Higher ziprasidone concentrations were also associated with reductions in diastolic blood pressure and, at a trend level, with more prominent negative symptoms and greater QTc prolongation. In summary, increasing the ziprasidone dose to 320 mg/d did not produce a sustained elevation in serum concentrations or symptomatic improvement compared with a standard ziprasidone dose of 160 mg/d.

  12. Hypofractionated Boost With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Implants for Locally Aggressive Prostate Cancer: A Sequential Dose-Escalation Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, Carmen; Popowski, Youri; Pampallona, Sandro; Nouet, Philippe; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Bieri, Sabine; Ozsoy, Orhan; Rouzaud, Michel; Khan, Haleem; Miralbell, Raymond

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, tolerance, and preliminary outcome of an open MRI-guided prostate partial-volume high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) schedule in a group of selected patients with nonmetastatic, locally aggressive prostatic tumors. Methods and Materials: After conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal external radiotherapy to 64-64.4 Gy, 77 patients with nonmetastatic, locally aggressive (e.g., perineural invasion and/or Gleason score 8-10) prostate cancer were treated from June 2000 to August 2004, with HDR-BT using temporary open MRI-guided {sup 192}Ir implants, to escalate the dose in the boost region. Nineteen, 21, and 37 patients were sequentially treated with 2 fractions of 6 Gy, 7 Gy, and 8 Gy each, respectively. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation was given to 62 patients for 6-24 months. Acute and late toxicity were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring system. Results: All 77 patients completed treatment as planned. Only 2 patients presented with Grade >=3 acute urinary toxicity. The 3-year probability of Grade >=2 late urinary and low gastrointestinal toxicity-free survival was 91.4% +- 3.4% and 94.4% +- 2.7%, respectively. Rates of 3-year biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) and disease-specific survival were 87.1% +- 4.1% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Boosting a partial volume of the prostate with hypofractionated HDR-BT for aggressive prostate cancer was feasible and showed limited long-term toxicity, which compared favorably with other dose-escalation methods in the literature. Preliminary bDFS was encouraging if one considers the negatively selected population of high-risk patients in this study.

  13. Efficacy of low dose gabapentin in acute herpes zoster for preventing postherpetic neuralgia: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eo G; Lee, Hee J; Hyun, Dong J; Min, Kyunghoon; Kim, Dong H; Yoon, Moon S

    2016-05-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a sequela of herpes zoster that adversely affects quality of life seriously. The risk factors for PHN are well known but the effective interventions that reduce the incidence of PHN are less studied. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of treatment with gabapentin in patients with acute herpes zoster for preventing PHN. We performed a prospective randomized controlled study of 120 participants diagnosed with acute herpes zoster, aged 50 and over and complaining moderate to severe pain. All patients were treated with valacyclovir and acetaminophen. Half of the participants were assigned to the gabapentin group and received gabapentin 300 mg three times a day additionally. The intensity of pain at every visit and the incidence of PHN in both groups were measured. Total 52 and 49 patients in the gabapentin group and the control group, respectively, had completed 12 weeks of follow-up period. Although the incidence of PHN was higher in the control group, the difference was not statistically significant (6.1% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.67). Our results indicate that the use of low-dose gabapentin in acute herpes zoster seems not effective in the prevention of PHN.

  14. High Doses of Fish Oil Might Help Healing After Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160178.html High Doses of Fish Oil Might Help Healing After Heart Attack Study ... Heart attack patients who took high doses of fish oil supplements for six months showed improved heart ...

  15. Physiological and psychological effects of a high dose of alcohol in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Monleón, Santiago; Parra, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a high dose of alcohol on physiological and psychological parameters in young men and women with a previous history of alcohol consumption. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, state anxiety, attention, time estimation and manual dexterity were registered before (phase 1) and after (phase 2) intake of alcohol (38.4 g) or a non-alcoholic beverage. Trait anxiety was registered in phase 2 only. The results showed that acute consumption of a high dose of alcohol: i) improves attention in men (although the performance of alcohol consumers was not better than that of non-consumers); ii) blocks the systolic blood pressure habituation phenomenon (observed in controls) in women; and iii) blocks the improvement in manual dexterity (associated with experience in non-consumers) in both sexes. On the other hand, male consumers had a lower heart rate than non-consumers, independently of the phase, while female consumers had a higher state anxiety and performed worse in attention than controls, also independently of the phase. These results help to understand the extent of performance impairment of different tasks produced by risk alcohol consumption in young men and women.

  16. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  17. High-dose thiamine improves the symptoms of Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Antonio; Giorgi, Rafaela; D'Agostino, Sonia; Pala, Maria Immacolata

    2013-05-22

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterised by progressive gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, areflexia, loss of position sense and a progressive motor weakness of central origin. Some observations indicate that all symptoms of FRDA ataxia could be the manifestation of a thiamine deficiency because of enzymatic abnormalities. Two patients with FRDA were under rehabilitative treatment from February 2012 to February 2013. The scale for assessment and rating of ataxia was performed. The patient began an intramuscular therapy with 100 mg of thiamine every 3-5 days. Injection of high-dose thiamine was effective in reversing the motor failure. From this clinical observation, it is reasonable to infer that a thiamine deficiency due to enzymatic abnormalities could cause a selective neuronal damage in the centres that are typically affected by this disease.

  18. High-dose thiamine improves the symptoms of Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Antonio; Giorgi, Rafaela; D'Agostino, Sonia; Pala, Maria Immacolata

    2013-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterised by progressive gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, areflexia, loss of position sense and a progressive motor weakness of central origin. Some observations indicate that all symptoms of FRDA ataxia could be the manifestation of a thiamine deficiency because of enzymatic abnormalities. Two patients with FRDA were under rehabilitative treatment from February 2012 to February 2013. The scale for assessment and rating of ataxia was performed. The patient began an intramuscular therapy with 100 mg of thiamine every 3-5 days. Injection of high-dose thiamine was effective in reversing the motor failure. From this clinical observation, it is reasonable to infer that a thiamine deficiency due to enzymatic abnormalities could cause a selective neuronal damage in the centres that are typically affected by this disease. PMID:23704441

  19. DOSE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN FOREBRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE, LOW-LEVEL CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE IN NEONATAL RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anamika; Liu, Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide (OP) and putative developmental neurotoxicant in humans. The acute toxicity of CPF is elicited by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. We characterized dose-related (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) gene expression profiles and changes in cell signaling pathways 24 hr following acute CPF exposure in seven day-old rats. Microarray experiments indicated that approximately 9% of the 44,000 genes were differentially expressed following either one of the four CPF dosages studied (546, 505, 522, and 3,066 genes with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg CPF). Genes were grouped according to dose-related expression patterns using K-means clustering while gene networks and canonical pathways were evaluated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis®. Twenty clusters were identified and differential expression of selected genes was verified by RT-PCR. The four largest clusters (each containing from 276–905 genes) constituted over 50% of all differentially expressed genes and exhibited up-regulation following exposure to the highest dosage (2 mg/kg CPF). The total number of gene networks affected by CPF also rose sharply with the highest dosage of CPF (18, 16, 18 and 50 with 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg CPF). Forebrain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly reduced (26%) only in the highest dosage group. Based on magnitude of dose-related changes in differentially expressed genes, relative numbers of gene clusters and signaling networks affected, and forebrain ChE inhibition only at 2 mg/kg CPF, we focused subsequent analyses on this treatment group. Six canonical pathways were identified that were significantly affected by 2 mg/kg CPF (MAPK, oxidative stress, NFKB, mitochondrial dysfunction, arylhydrocarbon receptor and adrenergic receptor signaling). Evaluation of different cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes suggested changes related to olfactory receptors, cell adhesion/migration, synapse

  20. Dose-related gene expression changes in forebrain following acute, low-level chlorpyrifos exposure in neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Anamika; Liu Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-10-15

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide (OP) and putative developmental neurotoxicant in humans. The acute toxicity of CPF is elicited by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. We characterized dose-related (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) gene expression profiles and changes in cell signaling pathways 24 h following acute CPF exposure in 7-day-old rats. Microarray experiments indicated that approximately 9% of the 44,000 genes were differentially expressed following either one of the four CPF dosages studied (546, 505, 522, and 3,066 genes with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg CPF). Genes were grouped according to dose-related expression patterns using K-means clustering while gene networks and canonical pathways were evaluated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (registered) . Twenty clusters were identified and differential expression of selected genes was verified by RT-PCR. The four largest clusters (each containing from 276 to 905 genes) constituted over 50% of all differentially expressed genes and exhibited up-regulation following exposure to the highest dosage (2 mg/kg CPF). The total number of gene networks affected by CPF also rose sharply with the highest dosage of CPF (18, 16, 18 and 50 with 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg CPF). Forebrain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly reduced (26%) only in the highest dosage group. Based on magnitude of dose-related changes in differentially expressed genes, relative numbers of gene clusters and signaling networks affected, and forebrain ChE inhibition only at 2 mg/kg CPF, we focused subsequent analyses on this treatment group. Six canonical pathways were identified that were significantly affected by 2 mg/kg CPF (MAPK, oxidative stress, NF{Kappa}B, mitochondrial dysfunction, arylhydrocarbon receptor and adrenergic receptor signaling). Evaluation of different cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes suggested changes related to olfactory receptors, cell adhesion/migration, synapse

  1. Pretreatment by low-dose fibrates protects against acute free fatty acid-induced renal tubule toxicity by counteracting PPAR{alpha} deterioration

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kyoko; Kamijo, Yuji; Hora, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Higuchi, Makoto; Nakajima, Takero; Ehara, Takashi; Shigematsu, Hidekazu; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2011-05-01

    Development of a preventive strategy against tubular damage associated with proteinuria is of great importance. Recently, free fatty acid (FFA) toxicities accompanying proteinuria were found to be a main cause of tubular damage, which was aggravated by insufficiency of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), suggesting the benefit of PPAR{alpha} activation. However, an earlier study using a murine acute tubular injury model, FFA-overload nephropathy, demonstrated that high-dose treatment of PPAR{alpha} agonist (0.5% clofibrate diet) aggravated the tubular damage as a consequence of excess serum accumulation of clofibrate metabolites due to decreased kidney elimination. To induce the renoprotective effects of PPAR{alpha} agonists without drug accumulation, we tried a pretreatment study using low-dose clofibrate (0.1% clofibrate diet) using the same murine model. Low-dose clofibrate pretreatment prevented acute tubular injuries without accumulation of its metabolites. The tubular protective effects appeared to be associated with the counteraction of PPAR{alpha} deterioration, resulting in the decrease of FFAs influx to the kidney, maintenance of fatty acid oxidation, diminution of intracellular accumulation of undigested FFAs, and attenuation of disease developmental factors including oxidative stress, apoptosis, and NF{kappa}B activation. These effects are common to other fibrates and dependent on PPAR{alpha} function. Interestingly, however, clofibrate pretreatment also exerted PPAR{alpha}-independent tubular toxicities in PPAR{alpha}-null mice with FFA-overload nephropathy. The favorable properties of fibrates are evident when PPAR{alpha}-dependent tubular protective effects outweigh their PPAR{alpha}-independent tubular toxicities. This delicate balance seems to be easily affected by the drug dose. It will be important to establish the appropriate dosage of fibrates for treatment against kidney disease and to develop a novel PPAR

  2. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  3. Extensive Scalp Angioedema Following High-Dose Diphenylcyclopropenone for Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Rachel; Huynh, Gloria; Tanner, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe a case of an unusual adverse drug reaction to diphenylcyclopropenone for the treatment of alopecia areata. Case summary: A 31-year-old Caucasian male presented with extensive angioedema to the head with neck involvement 10 days following treatment with diphenylcyclopropenone 2% solution in acetone topically on his scalp to treat alopecia areata. Findings on patient presentation included edema of the soft tissues (deeper dermis and subcutaneous tissue) of the head and face with mild neck involvement, acute inflammatory changes from chemical-induced irritation, scalp erythema, and serous fluid drainage from inflamed and fissured edematous scalp. Acute treatments used for control of the reaction included intravenous steroids and antihistamines during hospitalization followed by oral steroids and antihistamines for maintenance during outpatient treatment of the resolving condition. Discussion: The role of topical diphenylcyclopropenone in this case of alopecia areata is probable according to the Naranjo criteria, with a score of 8. Diphenylcyclopropenone is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, but it has been used by many clinicians for the treatment of alopecia areata. Diphenylcyclopropenone causes an allergic contact dermatitis in the area of hair loss. In general, diphenylcyclopropenone is applied at a high concentration of 2% once and then at lower concentrations once weekly after the sensitization dose. This patient applied the 2% concentration on multiple consecutive days. Conclusion: Frequent use of topical diphenylcyclopropenone 2% applied to the scalp may cause scalp angioedema. PMID:24421563

  4. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, E. S.; Zeituni, C. A.; Sakuraba, R. K.; Gonçalves, V. D.; Cruz, J. C.; Júnior, D. K.; Souza, C. D.; Rostelato, M. E. C. M.

    2014-02-01

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used.

  5. Acute Normal Tissue Reactions in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With IMRT: Influence of Dose and Association With Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA DSB Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Werbrouck, Joke Ruyck, Kim de; Duprez, Frederic; Veldeman, Liv; Claes, Kathleen; Eijkeren, Marc van; Boterberg, Tom; Willems, Petra; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the association between dose-related parameters and polymorphisms in DNA DSB repair genes XRCC3 (c.-1843A>G, c.562-14A>G, c.722C>T), Rad51 (c.-3429G>C, c.-3392G>T), Lig4 (c.26C>T, c.1704T>C), Ku70 (c.-1310C>G), and Ku80 (c.2110-2408G>A) and the occurrence of acute reactions after radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 88 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-treated head-and-neck cancer patients. Mucositis, dermatitis, and dysphagia were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events v.3.0 scale. The population was divided into a CTC0-2 and CTC3+ group for the analysis of each acute effect. The influence of the dose on critical structures was analyzed using dose-volume histograms. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single base extension assays. Results: The mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the oral cavity and constrictor pharyngeus (PC) muscles was significantly associated with the development of mucositis and dysphagia, respectively. These parameters were considered confounding factors in the radiogenomics analyses. The XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes were significantly associated with the development of severe dysphagia (CTC3+). No association was found between the investigated polymorphisms and the development of mucositis or dermatitis. A risk analysis model for severe dysphagia, which was developed based on the XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes and the PC dose, showed a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 77.6%. Conclusions: The XRCC3c.722C>T and Ku70c.-1310C>G polymorphisms as well as the D{sub mean} to the PC muscles were highly associated with the development of severe dysphagia after IMRT. The prediction model developed using these parameters showed a high sensitivity and specificity.

  6. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-dose evaluation of the acute behavioural effects of guaraná in humans.

    PubMed

    Haskell, C F; Kennedy, D O; Wesnes, K A; Milne, A L; Scholey, A B

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed to systematically assess acute, dose-related behavioural effects of an extract of guaraná plant for the first time in humans. This double-blind, counterbalanced, placebo-controlled study (n=26) assessed the acute mood and cognitive effects throughout the day of four different doses (37.5 mg, 75 mg, 150 mg and 300 mg) of a standardised guaraná extract (PC-102). Assessment included the Cognitive Drug Research computerized test battery and Bond-Lader mood scales. Guaraná improved secondary memory performance and increased alert and content mood ratings. The two lower doses produced more positive cognitive effects than the higher doses. This research supports previous findings of cognitive improvements following 75 mg guaraná and provides the first exploration of different dose effects of guaraná in humans. The findings suggest that the effects cannot be attributed to caffeine alone.

  7. Safety and Tolerability of SBRT after High-Dose External Beam Radiation to the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Dawn; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Song, Limin; Mayo, Charles S.; Miller, Robert C.; Nelson, Kathryn; Bauer, Heather; Brown, Paul D.; Park, Sean S.; Ma, Daniel J.; Garces, Yolanda I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is commonly used to treat unresectable lung nodules. Given its relative safety and effective local control, SBRT has also been used to treat recurrent lung nodules after high-dose external beam radiation (EBRT) to the lung. The toxicity of such treatment is unknown. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2012, 18 subjects at the Mayo Clinic with 27 recurrent lung nodules were treated with SBRT after receiving EBRT to the lung. Median local control, overall survival, and progression-free survival (PFS) were described. Acute toxicity and late toxicity (defined as toxicity ≥ and >90 days, respectively) were reported and graded as per standardized CTCAE 4.0 criteria. Results: The median age of patients treated was 68 years. Fifteen patients had recurrent lung cancer as their primary histology. Twelve patients received ≥60 Gy of conventional EBRT prior to SBRT. SBRT dose and fractionation varied; the most common prescriptions were 48 Gy/4, 54 Gy/3, and 50 Gy/5 fractions. Only four patients had SBRT planning target volumes (PTVs) that overlapped more than 50% of their prior EBRT PTV. Two patients developed local recurrence following SBRT. With a median follow up of 21.2 months, median SBRT-specific overall survival and PFS were 21.7 and 12.3 months, respectively. No grade ≥3 acute or late toxicities were noted. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy may be a good salvage option for select patients with recurrent lung nodules following definitive EBRT to the chest. Toxicity is minimal and local control is excellent. PMID:25642416

  8. Acute hemolytic vascular inflammatory processes are prevented by nitric oxide replacement or a single dose of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Bononi; Souza, Lucas Eduardo Botelho; Leonardo, Flavia Costa; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Werneck, Claudio C; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Hemolysis and consequent release of cell-free hemoglobin (CFHb) impair vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cause oxidative and inflammatory processes. Hydroxyurea (HU), a common therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), induces fetal Hb production and can act as an NO donor. We evaluated the acute inflammatory effects of intravenous water-induced hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice and determined the abilities of an NO donor, diethylamine NONOate (DEANO), and a single dose of HU to modulate this inflammation. Intravenous water induced acute hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice, attaining plasma Hb levels comparable to those observed in chimeric SCD mice. This hemolysis resulted in significant and rapid systemic inflammation and vascular leukocyte recruitment within 15 minutes, accompanied by NO metabolite generation. Administration of another potent NO scavenger (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) to C57BL/6 mice induced similar alterations in leukocyte recruitment, whereas hemin-induced inflammation occurred over a longer time frame. Importantly, the acute inflammatory effects of water-induced hemolysis were abolished by the simultaneous administration of DEANO or HU, without altering CFHb, in an NO pathway-mediated manner. In vitro, HU partially reversed the Hb-mediated induction of endothelial proinflammatory cytokine secretion and adhesion molecule expression. In summary, pathophysiological levels of hemolysis trigger an immediate inflammatory response, possibly mediated by vascular NO consumption. HU presents beneficial anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting rapid-onset hemolytic inflammation via an NO-dependent mechanism, independently of fetal Hb elevation. Data provide novel insights into mechanisms of hemolytic inflammation and further support perspectives for the use of HU as an acute treatment for SCD and other hemolytic disorders.

  9. Equivalence of continuous flow nebulizer and metered-dose inhaler with reservoir bag for treatment of acute airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Turner, J R; Corkery, K J; Eckman, D; Gelb, A M; Lipavsky, A; Sheppard, D

    1988-03-01

    Traditionally, patients with acute airflow obstruction are treated with bronchodilator aerosols delivered by continuous flow nebulizers. While bronchodilator administration with the metered dose inhaler (MDI) and reservoir or spacer attachment is as effective as administration with the nebulizer in most settings, the former has not been widely accepted for treatment of acute airway obstruction in the emergency room. We compared the efficacy of the continuous flow nebulizer to that of the MDI with InspirEase (reservoir spacer) in 75 patients (45 men and 30 women), ages 18-73 (chi 44 years) who presented to the emergency room with acute asthma and COPD. Subjects in each group (22 COPD and 53 asthma) were randomly assigned to treatment with three puffs of metaproterenol (0.65 mg/puff) via the MDI with InspirEase plus nebulizer with placebo, or placebo MDI with InspirEase plus nebulizer with 15 mg metaproterenol in double blind fashion. Either treatment was given three times at 30 min intervals. The FEV1 and dyspnea scores according to the Borg scale were measured at baseline, 30 min after the first treatment, and 30 min after the third. There was no significant outcome difference between the two treatments in either diagnostic group. There also was no significant outcome difference for patients with baseline FEV1 less than 0.9L. Serum theophylline levels, the need for concomitant therapy with corticosteroids, or additional emergency room therapy after the study, hospitalizations and treatment side effects did not differ between treatment groups. We conclude that there is no demonstrable advantage of a continuous flow nebulizer over an MDI with InspirEase for the treatment of acute airflow obstruction.

  10. [Safety Evaluation of Rare Sugar Syrup: Single-dose Oral Toxicity in Rats, Reverse Mutation Assay, Chromosome Aberration Assay, and Acute Non-Effect Level for Diarrhea of a Single Dose in Humans].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Takamine, Satoshi; Hayashi, Noriko; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The safety of rare sugar syrup obtained from high-fructose corn syrup under slightly alkaline conditions was studied. Mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was assessed by a reverse mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, and an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay using Chinese hamster lung cell line (CHL/IU). No mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was detected under these experimental conditions. Oral administration of single dose (15,000 mg/kg) of rare sugar syrup to rats caused no abnormalities, suggesting no adverse effect of rare sugar syrup. In humans, the acute non-effect level of rare sugar syrup for causing diarrhea was estimated as 0.9 g/kg body weight as dry solid base in both males and females. PMID:26537651

  11. Bioequipotency of idraparinux and idrabiotaparinux after once weekly dosing in healthy volunteers and patients treated for acute deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Trellu, Marc; Fau, Jean-Baptiste; Cortez, Pierre; Cheng, Sue; Paty, Isabelle; Boëlle, Emmanuelle; Donat, François; Sanderink, Ger-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Aim To assess the bioequipotency of equimolar doses of idraparinux (2.5 mg) and idrabiotaparinux (3.0 mg). Method In a phase I study, 48 healthy male volunteers were randomized to a single subcutaneous injection of idrabiotaparinux or idraparinux, followed by plasma sampling over 27 days. In a prospective substudy of the phase III EQUINOX trial, 228 patients treated for acute symptomatic deep vein thrombosis received idrabiotaparinux or idraparinux once weekly for 6 months. Plasma sampling was performed within 5 days following the last injection. The primary pharmacodynamic endpoint was the inhibition of activated factor X (FXa) activity. Maximal anti-FXa activity (Amax) and area under anti-FXa activity vs. time curve (AAUC) were calculated. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Results In both studies, pharmacodynamic anti-FXa vs. time profiles of idrabiotaparinux and idraparinux were superimposable. Ratio estimates (90% confidence intervals [CIs]) for idrabiotaparinux : idraparinux were 0.96 (0.89, 1.04) for Amax and 0.95 (0.87, 1.04) for AAUC in the phase I study, and 1.11 (1.00, 1.22) for Amax and 1.06 (0.96, 1.16) for AAUC at month 6 in the EQUINOX substudy. Idrabiotaparinux and idraparinux were considered bioequipotent because 90% CIs were within the pre-specified interval (0.80, 1.25). Study treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion Pharmacodynamic parameters reported after single dose in healthy volunteers and after repeated once weekly dosing in patients demonstrated the bioequipotency of idrabiotaparinux and idraparinux based on FXa inhibition. These outcomes support the use of an idrabiotaparinux dose bioequipotent to an idraparinux dose in large clinical trials, and the possibility to substitute idrabiotaparinux to idraparinux for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. PMID:23078631

  12. Validation of a precision radiochromic film dosimetry system for quantitative two-dimensional imaging of acute exposure dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, J F; Low, D A; Mutic, S; Markman, J; Kirov, A S; Nussbaum, G H; Williamson, J F

    2000-10-01

    We present an evaluation of the precision and accuracy of image-based radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry performed using a commercial RCF product (Gafchromic MD-55-2, Nuclear Associates, Inc.) and a commercial high-spatial resolution (100 microm pixel size) He-Ne scanning-laser film-digitizer (Personal Densitometer, Molecular Dynamics, Inc.) as an optical density (OD) imaging system. The precision and accuracy of this dosimetry system are evaluated by performing RCF imaging dosimetry in well characterized conformal external beam and brachytherapy high dose-rate (HDR) radiation fields. Benchmarking of image-based RCF dosimetry is necessary due to many potential errors inherent to RCF dosimetry including: a temperature-dependent time evolution of RCF dose response; nonuniform response of RCF; and optical-polarization artifacts. In addition, laser-densitometer imaging artifacts can produce systematic OD measurement errors as large as 35% in the presence of high OD gradients. We present a RCF exposure and readout protocol that was developed for the accurate dosimetry of high dose rate (HDR) radiation sources. This protocol follows and expands upon the guidelines set forth by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 55 report. Particular attention is focused on the OD imaging system, a scanning-laser film digitizer, modified to eliminate OD artifacts that were not addressed in the AAPM Task Group 55 report. RCF precision using this technique was evaluated with films given uniform 6 MV x-ray doses between 1 and 200 Gy. RCF absolute dose accuracy using this technique was evaluated by comparing RCF measurements to small volume ionization chamber measurements for conformal external-beam sources and an experimentally validated Monte Carlo photon-transport simulation code for a 192Ir brachytherapy source. Pixel-to-pixel standard deviations of uniformly irradiated films were less than 1% for doses between 10 and 150 Gy; between 1% and 5% for lower

  13. Five-Year Outcomes of High-Dose Single-Fraction Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Moussazadeh, Nelson; Lis, Eric; Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Kahn, Sweena; Svoboda, Marek; DiStefano, Natalie M.; McLaughlin, Lily; Bilsky, Mark H.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Laufer, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To characterize local tumor control and toxicity risk in very long-term survivors (>5 years) after high-dose spinal image guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered as single-dose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Previously published spinal SRS outcome analyses have included a heterogeneous population of cancer patients, mostly with short survival. This is the first study reporting the long-term tumor control and toxicity profiles after high-dose single-fraction spinal SRS. Methods and Materials: The study population included all patients treated from June 2004 to July 2009 with single-fraction spinal SRS (dose 24 Gy) who had survived at least 5 years after treatment. The endpoints examined included disease progression, surgical or radiation retreatment, in-field fracture development, and radiation-associated toxicity, scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control and fracture development were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 278 patients, 31 (11.1%), with 36 segments treated for spinal tumors, survived at least 5 years after treatment and were followed up radiographically and clinically for a median of 6.1 years (maximum 102 months). The histopathologic findings for the 5-year survivors included radiation-resistant metastases in 58%, radiation-sensitive metastases in 22%, and primary bone tumors in 19%. In this selected cohort, 3 treatment failures occurred at a median of 48.6 months, including 2 recurrences in the radiation field and 1 patient with demonstrated progression at the treatment margins. Ten lesions (27.8%) were associated with acute grade 1 cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. Delayed toxicity ≥3 months after treatment included 8 cases (22.2%) of mild neuropathy, 2 (5.6%) of gastrointestinal discomfort, 8 (22.2%) of dermatitides, and 3 (8.3%) of myalgias/myositis. Thirteen

  14. Pellicle Life-Testing for High Exposure Dose Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurz, Dan L.; Flack, Warren W.

    2002-12-01

    There are an increasing number of microlithography applications such as advanced packaging, nanotechnology and thin film head production that require the use of thick photoresist materials. The exposure dose requirements for these applications dramatically increase as the photoresist thickness increases. For example, some positive acting novolak photoresists require exposures in excess of 5000 mJoules/cm2 for 100 μm thick films. When a single reticle is used to pattern many wafers, a significant amount of light and heat energy is transferred from the lithography tool illumination source to the pellicle protecting the reticle image. In high volume production environments, a pellicle can be subjected to accumulated dosages exceeding 500 kJoules/cm2 within a matter of weeks. Because thick photoresist applications benefit from using 1X broadband steppers with high wafer plane irradiance, life-testing results were reviewed for broadband pellicles designed for maximum transmission at g, h and i-line wavelengths of Hg. Historically, pellicle lifetime testing was typically carried out only to approximately 500 kJoules/cm2 . While this test limit may have been sufficient for thin photoresist applications used in semiconductor applications, longer lifetime studies are required to determine pellicle durability for thick photoresist applications. In this study, life testing was performed on multiple pellicle films designed for broadband illumination, including nitrocellulose, cellulose acetate, cellulose ester and fluoropolymer films. Spectroscopic transmission at g, h and i-line was first measured on unexposed pellicles. The pellicles were attached to test reticles and exposed to high-energy doses on an Ultratech broadband stepper, accumulating up to 3000 kJoules/cm2 . Transmission was periodically re-measured and the pellicle films were visually inspected for color change and any apparent physical damage. Results were compared to the expected optical properties for each

  15. Treatment of acute severe asthma with inhaled albuterol delivered via jet nebulizer, metered dose inhaler with spacer, or dry powder.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, A C; Schottlender, J; Lombardi, D; Molfino, N A

    1997-07-01

    Despite the increasing use of dry powder formulations in the ambulatory setting, there is a paucity of information on the efficacy of this therapeutic modality to treat acute severe asthma. In addition, studies that compared wet nebulization vs metered dose inhalers formulated with chlorofluorocarbon (CFCMDI) attached to holding chambers have yielded discrepant results. Thus, it is unclear which of the three delivery systems would elicit a superior bronchodilator response, particularly in patients with life-threatening asthma. In a prospective, randomized open design, we studied the response to inhaled albuterol (salbutamol) in 27 adult asthmatics presenting to the emergency department (ED) with an FEV1 <30% predicted. Subjects were treated with one of the following regimens (nine subjects in each group): group A, mean (SD) baseline FEV1 of 0.7 (0.2) L, received albuterol solution, 5 mg, via a nebulizer (Puritan-Bennett Raindrop; Lawrenceville, Ga) impelled with oxygen (O2) at 8 L/min; group B, baseline FEV1 of 0.6 (0.15) L, received albuterol, 400 microg, via a CFCMDI attached to a 145-mL valved aerosol holding chamber (Aerochamber; Trudell Medical; London, ON); and group C, baseline FEV1 of 0.6 (0.17) L, received albuterol powder, 400 microg, by another means (Rotahaler; Glaxo; Research Triangle Park, NC). All groups received the respective treatments on arrival in the ED, every 30 min during the first 2 h, and then hourly until the sixth hour. Clinical parameters and FEV1 were recorded on ED admission and 15 min after each dose of albuterol. At the time of ED admission, all patients also received continuous O2 and one dose of I.V. steroids (dexamethasone, 8 mg). The total dose of inhaled albuterol administered during the 6-h treatment was 45 mg of nebulized solution in group A and 3,600 microg of albuterol aerosol and dry powder in groups B and C, respectively. No significant differences were found in the population demographics, baseline FEV1, and arterial

  16. 'In vivo' Dose Measurements in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Treatments for Cervical Cancer: A Project Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Reynoso Mejia, C. A.; Buenfil Burgos, A. E.; Ruiz Trejo, C.; Mota Garcia, A.; Trejo Duran, E.; Rodriguez Ponce, M.; Gamboa de Buen, I.

    2010-12-07

    The aim of this thesis project is to compare doses calculated from the treatment planning system using computed tomography images, with those measured 'in vivo' by using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at different regions of the rectum and bladder of a patient during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma. The experimental dosimeters characterisation and calibration have concluded and the protocol to carry out the 'in vivo' measurements has been established. In this work, the calibration curves of two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters (rods and chips) are presented, and the proposed protocol to measure the 'in vivo' dose is fully described.

  17. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for liver metastases: first study from India

    PubMed Central

    Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Seema; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Haresh, Kunhi Parambath; Gupta, Subhash; Rath, Goura Kisor; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the safety and efficacy of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDRIBT) in patients with liver metastases (LM). Material and methods Between 2009 and 2011, 10 patients with 12 metastatic lesions in the liver were enrolled in this prospective trial. All patients had either refused surgery or found ineligible for surgery due to various factors. Under CT guidance, 16 gauze blind end stainless steel or rigid plastic brachytherapy needle was inserted in the center of lesion through the percutaneous route. Generally, a single interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) needle for lesions up to 3 cm and multiple needles for lesions more than 3 cm in diameter were inserted. Treatment was delivered with a single high-dose-rate (HDR) dose of 20 Gy prescribed to the target. The needles were removed immediately after the treatment. The endpoints of study were acute complications and local control of the disease. Results The median size of the lesion was 3.8 cm (2.7-7.0 cm). The average time for the entire IBT procedure was 65 minutes (50-105 minutes). Median follow up was 9 months (3-17 months). None of the patients had fatal complications. Minor complications like pain, nausea/vomiting, and asymptomatic pleural effusion were observed in 3, 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Local control rate at 12 months was 75%. The 1-year local progression free survival (LPFS) was 33%. Conclusion Although limited by small sample size, the results of our first study from India suggest that HDRIBT is a safe and effective non surgical option for LM. PMID:23878550

  18. Accelerated heavy particles and the lens. VIII. Comparisons between the effects of acute low doses of iron ions (190 keV/microns) and argon ions (88 keV/microns).

    PubMed

    Brenner, D J; Medvedovsky, C; Huang, Y; Worgul, B V

    1993-02-01

    The nature of the RBE-LET relationship for radiation-induced effects in vivo is not well known in the high-LET range above about 100 keV/microns. Here, we compare the cataractogenic effects of acute doses of 190 keV/microns iron ions on the eyes of rats with those of 88 keV/microns argon ions. The RBEs of the two radiations cannot be distinguished statistically, both being between 50 and 200 at our lowest dose of 0.01 Gy and decreasing to between 2 and 14 at our highest dose of 0.5 Gy; these values are consistent with results obtained in vivo, both for cataractogenesis and for oncogenesis. For this end point, therefore, the RBE-LET relationship probably varies very slowly between 88 and 190 keV/microns. On the basis of these studies with acute doses of 88 and 190 keV/microns particles, the detailed distribution in LET of the very high-LET galactic cosmic-ray dose to which astronauts in deep space are exposed may not be critical for the prediction of biological hazard. Such a conclusion might simplify the task of high-LET radiation risk estimation in space. PMID:8438061

  19. [Infection control in neutropenia induced by high-dose cytarabine chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masayuki; Senzaki, Kouji; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kohno, Shigekatu; Noda, Yukihiro; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    A high-dose cytarabine (Cylocide; Ara-C: HDAC) chemotherapy has been successfully used as a postremission consolidation therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Although this chemotherapy has been estimated to cause severe myelosuppression, there has been no report about infection risk relating to HDAC chemotherapy. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the infection risk in AML patients treated with HDAC (n = 18) compared to those treated with standard-dose Ara-C (SDAC, n = 18). The mean duration of severe neutropenia (neutrophils < 500/microl) in HDAC group and SDAC was 14.8 days and 10.4 days, respectively, indicating a significant prolongation in the HDAC group (p < 0.05). The frequency of febrile neutropenia in the HDAC group tended to increase compared to that in the SDAC group (p = 0.093). The average days of usage of quinolone antimicrobial prophylaxis and aminoglycoside antibiotic injection in febrile neutropenia in the HDAC group were significantly longer than those of the SDAC group (quinolone; p < 0.01, aminoglycoside; p < 0.05). The frequency of Streptococcus infection isolated from pharyngeal mucus in the HDAC group was significantly higher than that in the SDAC group (100% versus 75%; p < 0.05). These results suggest that HDAC chemotherapy increased the infection risk compared to SDAC, and especially patients who received HDAC need a further prevention plan against gram-positive bacteria.

  20. Treatment of acute asthmatic exacerbations with an increased dose of inhaled steroid

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J; Williams, S; Wong, C; Holdaway, D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the efficacy of an increased dose of inhaled steroid used within the context of an asthma self management plan for treating exacerbations of asthma.
DESIGN—Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, crossover trial.
METHODS—Twenty eight children aged 6-14 years with asthma of mild to moderate severity were studied for six months. Eighteen pairs of exacerbations were available for analysis, during which subjects took an increased dose of inhaled steroids or continued on the same dose.
RESULTS—There was no significant difference between increasing inhaled steroids or placebo on morning or evening peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs), diurnal peak flow variability, or symptom scores in the two weeks following an asthma exacerbation. Difference (95% confidence intervals) in baseline PEFR on days 1-3 were 3.4% (−3.5% to 10.4%) and −0.9% (−4.7% to 2.9%) for inhaled steroid and placebo, respectively. Spirometric function and the parents' opinion of the effectiveness of asthma medications at each exacerbation were also not significantly different between inhaled steroid or placebo.
CONCLUSION—This study suggests that increasing the dose of inhaled steroids at the onset of an exacerbation of asthma is ineffective and should not be included in asthma self management plans.

 PMID:9771245

  1. Low-Dose (10%) Computed Tomography May Be Inferior to Standard-Dose CT in the Evaluation of Acute Renal Colic in the Emergency Room Setting

    PubMed Central

    Han, Esther; Atalla, Christopher S.; Santucci, Richard A.; O'Neil, Brian; Wynberg, Jason B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Noncontrast CT is the standard of care to evaluate nephrolithiasis. We evaluated the performance of low-dose CT (LDCT) scan for evaluation of renal colic in the emergency room (ER). Materials and Methods: Patients visiting the ER with suspected nephrolithiasis received a standard-dose CT (SDCT) and an LDCT. Two urologists read the LDCTs and later they read SDCTs. Stone information was recorded on a diagram of the renal system. Findings on SDCTs and LDCTs were correlated through side-by-side comparison of the diagrams. Later, the two urologists adjudicated all nonconcordance between SDCTs and LDCTs in an unblinded manner. Results: Twenty-seven patients were included. SDCTs revealed 27 stones in 18 patients. Mean stone size was 3.81 mm. LDCTs revealed 27 stones in 18 patients with a mean stone size of 4.7 mm (p = 0.23). Overall sensitivity and specificity of LDCTs were 70% and 39%, respectively. There were eight false-positive and eight false-negative stones. All the false-positive stones on LDCTs were placed in the ureter, in which all of the corresponding SDCTs were visible calcifications outside the ureter. Of the eight false-negative stones on LDCTs, seven were visible calcifications on the SDCTs and the eighth stone was 1 mm and was not visible. Conclusion: LDCT may not perform well in the evaluation of suspected nephrolithiasis in the acute setting. LDCT scan accurately demonstrates calcifications; however, accurate placement of calcifications in or out of the urinary tract may be diminished due to impaired resolution of soft tissue structures. PMID:26728321

  2. SU-E-T-636: Investigation of Dose Variation in High Dose Radiation Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hyvarinen, M; Leventouri, T; Casey, C; Long, S; Pella, S; Dumitru, N; Herrera, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to revise most of the HDR types of treatments with their applicators and their localization challenges. Since every millimeter of misplacement counts the study will look into the necessity of increasing the immobilization for several types of applicators Methods: The study took over 136 plans generated by the treatment planning system (TPS) looking into the applicator's placement in regard to the organs at risk (OR) and simulated the three possible displacements at the hottest dose point on the critical organ for several accessories to evaluate the variation of the delivered dose at the point due to the displacement. Results: Significant dose variation was obtained for the Contura, Savi, MLM and Prostate applicators. Conclusion: This study data indicates that an improvement of the immobilization devices for HDR is absolutely necessary. Better applicator fixation devices are required too. Developing new immobilization devices for all the applicators is recommended. Florida Atlantic University may provide Travel reimbursements.

  3. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  4. High-dose beclometasone dipropionate/formoterol fumarate in fixed-dose combination for the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimo; Spinola, Monica; Petruzzelli, Stefano; Kuna, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    The high-strength formulation of extrafine beclometasone dipropionate/formoterol fumarate (BDP/Form) 200/6 µg has been developed to step up inhaled corticosteroid treatment, without increasing the dose of the bronchodilator, in patients who are not controlled with previous therapies. Two clinical studies have evaluated efficacy of high-strength BDP/Form as compared with another high-dose fixed combination and BDP monotherapy. Overall, data show that BDP/Form 200/6 μg improves lung function and has beneficial effects on symptoms, use of rescue medication and asthma control, with an acceptable safety profile comparable with that of high-dose fluticasone propionate/salmeterol. Therefore, BDP/Form 200/6 μg could be considered as an effective and safe treatment for patients with asthma who are not adequately controlled with high doses of inhaled corticosteroid monotherapy or medium doses of inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist combinations. PMID:27340255

  5. Desensitization Using Bortezomib and High-dose Immunoglobulin Increases Rate of Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Cheol; Jambaldorj, Enkthuya; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Im, Hye Jin; Jeon, Hee Jung; In, Ji Won; Han, Miyeun; Koo, Tai Yeon; Chung, Junho; Song, Eun Young; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Combination therapy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and rituximab showed a good transplant rate in highly sensitized wait-listed patients for deceased donor kidney transplantation (DDKT), but carried the risk of antibody-mediated rejection. The authors investigated the impact of a new combination therapy of bortezomib, IVIG, and rituximab on transplantation rate. This study was a prospective, open-labeled clinical trial. The desensitization regimen consisted of 2 doses of IVIG (2 g/kg), a single dose of rituximab (375 mg/m2), and 4 doses of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2). The transplant rate was analyzed. Anti-Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB antibodies were determined by a Luminex solid-phase bead assay at baseline and after 2, 3, and 6 months in the desensitized patients. There were 19 highly sensitized patients who received desensitization and 17 patients in the control group. Baseline values of class I and II panel reactive antibody (%, peak mean fluorescence intensity) were 83 ± 16.0 (14952 ± 5820) and 63 ± 36.0 (10321 ± 7421), respectively. Deceased donor kidney transplantation was successfully performed in 8 patients (42.1%) in the desensitization group versus 4 (23.5%) in the control group. Multivariate time-varying covariate Cox regression analysis showed that desensitization increased the probability of DDKT (hazard ratio, 46.895; 95% confidence interval, 3.468–634.132; P = 0.004). Desensitization decreased mean fluorescence intensity values of class I panel reactive antibody by 15.5% (20.8%) at 2 months. In addition, a liberal mismatch strategy in post hoc analysis increased the benefit of desensitization in donor-specific antibody reduction. Desensitization was well tolerated, and acute rejection occurred only in the control group. In conclusion, a desensitization protocol using bortezomib, high-dose IVIG, and rituximab increased the DDKT rate in highly sensitized, wait-listed patients. PMID:26844479

  6. Desensitization Using Bortezomib and High-dose Immunoglobulin Increases Rate of Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Cheol; Jambaldorj, Enkthuya; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Im, Hye Jin; Jeon, Hee Jung; In, Ji Won; Han, Miyeun; Koo, Tai Yeon; Chung, Junho; Song, Eun Young; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-02-01

    Combination therapy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and rituximab showed a good transplant rate in highly sensitized wait-listed patients for deceased donor kidney transplantation (DDKT), but carried the risk of antibody-mediated rejection. The authors investigated the impact of a new combination therapy of bortezomib, IVIG, and rituximab on transplantation rate.This study was a prospective, open-labeled clinical trial. The desensitization regimen consisted of 2 doses of IVIG (2  g/kg), a single dose of rituximab (375  mg/m), and 4 doses of bortezomib (1.3  mg/m). The transplant rate was analyzed. Anti-Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB antibodies were determined by a Luminex solid-phase bead assay at baseline and after 2, 3, and 6 months in the desensitized patients.There were 19 highly sensitized patients who received desensitization and 17 patients in the control group. Baseline values of class I and II panel reactive antibody (%, peak mean fluorescence intensity) were 83  ±  16.0 (14952  ±  5820) and 63  ±  36.0 (10321  ±  7421), respectively. Deceased donor kidney transplantation was successfully performed in 8 patients (42.1%) in the desensitization group versus 4 (23.5%) in the control group. Multivariate time-varying covariate Cox regression analysis showed that desensitization increased the probability of DDKT (hazard ratio, 46.895; 95% confidence interval, 3.468-634.132; P = 0.004). Desensitization decreased mean fluorescence intensity values of class I panel reactive antibody by 15.5% (20.8%) at 2 months. In addition, a liberal mismatch strategy in post hoc analysis increased the benefit of desensitization in donor-specific antibody reduction. Desensitization was well tolerated, and acute rejection occurred only in the control group.In conclusion, a desensitization protocol using bortezomib, high-dose IVIG, and rituximab increased the DDKT rate in highly sensitized, wait-listed patients.

  7. Increased oxidative stress following acute and chronic high altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Simoni, Jan; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Swenson, Erik R; Wesson, Donald E; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Johnson, Richard J; Hurtado, Abdias

    2004-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species is typically associated with hyperoxia and ischemia reperfusion. Recent evidence has suggested that increased oxidative stress may occur with hypoxia. We hypothesized that oxidative stress would be increased in subjects exposed to high altitude hypoxia. We studied 28 control subjects living in Lima, Peru (sea level), at baseline and following 48 h exposure to high altitude (4300 m). To assess the effects of chronic altitude exposure, we studied 25 adult males resident in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m). We also studied 27 subjects living in Cerro de Pasco who develop excessive erythrocytosis (hematocrit > 65%) and chronic mountain sickness. Acute high altitude exposure led to increased urinary F(2)-isoprostane, 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.31 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 2.15 +/- 1.1, p = 0.001) and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.37 +/- 0.09, p = 0.002), with a trend to increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 63.8 +/- 27, p = NS). High altitude residents had significantly elevated levels of urinary 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.3 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 4.1 +/- 3.4, p = 0.007), plasma TBARS (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 85 +/- 28, p = 0.008), and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.55 +/- 0.19, p < 0.0001) compared to sea level. High altitude residents with excessive erythrocytosis had higher levels of oxidative stress compared to high altitude residents with normal hematological adaptation. In conclusion, oxidative stress is increased following both acute exposure to high altitude without exercise and with chronic residence at high altitude.

  8. Collective radiation biodosimetry for dose reconstruction of acute accidental exposures: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Pass, B

    1997-01-01

    Quantification of the biologically relevant dose is required to establish cause and effect between radiation detriment or burden and important biological outcomes. Most epidemiologic studies of unanticipated radiation exposure fail to establish cause and effect because researchers have not been able to construct a valid quantification of dose for the exposed population. However, no one biodosimetric technique (biophysical or biological) meets all the requirements of an ideal dosimeter. This paper reviews how the collection of biodosimetric data for victims of radiation accidents can be used to create a dosimetric "gold standard." Particular emphasis is placed on the use of electron spin resonance, a standard for radiation accident dosimetry. As an example of this technique, a review will be presented of a previously reported study of an individual exposed to a 60Co sterilization source. PMID:9467051

  9. Cation disorder in high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Larson, A.C.; Yu, N.; Nastasi, M.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Garner, F.A.; Bradt, R.C.

    1994-06-01

    The crystal structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel single crystals irradiated to high neutron fluences (>5{center_dot}10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E{sub n}>0.1 MeV)), were examined by neutron diffraction. Crystal structure refinement of the highest dose sample indicated that the average scattering strength of the tetrahedral crystal sites decreased by {approximately}20% while increasing by {approximately}8% on octahedral sites. Since the neutron scattering length for Mg is considerably larger than for Al, this result is consistent with site exchange between Mg{sup 2+} ions on tetrahedral sites and Al{sup 3+} ions on octahedral sites. Least squares refinements also indicated that in all irradiated samples, at least 35% of Mg{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions in the crystal experienced disordering replacements. This retained dpa on the cation sublattices is the largest retained damage ever measured in an irradiated spinel material.

  10. Suitability of laser stimulated TLD arrays as patient dose monitors in high dose x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Geise, R A; Schueler, B A; Lien, W; Jones, S C

    1997-10-01

    Skin entrance doses of patients undergoing interventional x-ray procedures are capable of causing skin damage and should be monitored routinely. Single TLD chips are not suitable because the location of maximum skin exposure cannot be predicted. Most photographic films are too sensitive at diagnostic x-ray energies for dosimetry, exhibit temporal changes in response, and require special packaging by the user. We have investigated the suitability of laser heated MgB4O7 TLDs in a polyimide binder in the range of 0.2-20 Gy. These are available in radioluscent arrays up to 30 x 30 cm for direct measurement of patient skin dose. Dose response was compared with a calibrated ion chamber dosimeter. Exposures were made at 60, 90, and 120 kVp, at low (fluoroscopy) and high (DSA) dose rates, and at different beam incidence angles. Longitudinal reproducibility and response to temperature changes during exposure were also checked. The dose response is linear below approximately 6 Gy where the slope starts to increase 2% per Gy. Errors were less than +/- 2% over a 0-80 degrees range of beam incidence angles; less than +/- 3% for both dose rate variations and kVp differences between 70 and 120 kVp. The response was unaffected by temperature changes between 20 and 37 degrees C. Reproducibility is current +/- 7%. MgB4O7 TLD arrays are suitable for patient dosimetry in high dose fluoroscopy procedures if appropriate calibrations are used. Uncertainty in skin dose measurement is less than 10%, which is substantially better than film dosimetry. PMID:9350720

  11. High-Dose Rifapentine with Moxifloxacin for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jindani, Amina; Harrison, Thomas S.; Nunn, Andrew J.; Phillips, Patrick P.J.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Charalambous, Salome; Hatherill, Mark; Geldenhuys, Hennie; McIlleron, Helen M.; Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Mungofa, Stanley; Shah, Nasir A.; Zizhou, Simukai; Magweta, Lloyd; Shepherd, James; Nyirenda, Sambayawo; van Dijk, Janneke H.; Clouting, Heather E.; Coleman, David; Bateson, Anna L.E.; McHugh, Timothy D.; Butcher, Philip D.; Mitchison, Denny A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tuberculosis regimens that are shorter and simpler than the current 6-month daily regimen are needed. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with newly diagnosed, smear-positive, drug-sensitive tuberculosis to one of three regimens: a control regimen that included 2 months of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide administered daily followed by 4 months of daily isoniazid and rifampicin; a 4-month regimen in which the isoniazid in the control regimen was replaced by moxifloxacin administered daily for 2 months followed by moxifloxacin and 900 mg of rifapentine administered twice weekly for 2 months; or a 6-month regimen in which isoniazid was replaced by daily moxifloxacin for 2 months followed by one weekly dose of both moxifloxacin and 1200 mg of rifapentine for 4 months. Sputum specimens were examined on microscopy and after culture at regular intervals. The primary end point was a composite treatment failure and relapse, with noninferiority based on a margin of 6 percentage points and 90% confidence intervals. RESULTS We enrolled a total of 827 patients from South Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Zambia; 28% of patients were coinfected with the human immunodefiency virus. In the per-protocol analysis, the proportion of patients with an unfavorable response was 4.9% in the control group, 3.2% in the 6-month group (adjusted difference from control, −1.8 percentage points; 90% confidence interval [CI], −6.1 to 2.4), and 18.2% in the 4-month group (adjusted difference from control, 13.6 percentage points; 90% CI, 8.1 to 19.1). In the modified intention-to-treat analysis these proportions were 14.4% in the control group, 13.7% in the 6-month group (adjusted difference from control, 0.4 percentage points; 90% CI, −4.7 to 5.6), and 26.9% in the 4-month group (adjusted difference from control, 13.1 percentage points; 90% CI, 6.8 to 19.4). CONCLUSIONS The 6-month regimen that included weekly administration of high-dose rifapentine and

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Linking High Dose Medroxyprogesterone with HIV-1 Risk

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Susan C.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) may increase the risk of HIV-1. The current studies were designed to identify potential underlying biological mechanisms. Methods Human vaginal epithelial (VK2/E6E7), peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMC), and polarized endometrial (HEC-1-A) cells were treated with a range of concentrations of MPA (0.015-150 μg/ml) and the impact on gene expression, protein secretion, and HIV infection was evaluated. Results Treatment of VK2/E6E7 cells with high doses (>15μg/ml] of MPA significantly upregulated proinflammatory cytokines, which resulted in a significant increase in HIV p24 levels secreted by latently infected U1 cells following exposure to culture supernatants harvested from MPA compared to mock-treated cells. MPA also increased syndecan expression by VK2/E6E7 cells and cells treated with 15 μg/ml of MPA bound and transferred more HIV-1 to T cells compared to mock-treated cells. Moreover, MPA treatment of epithelial cells and PBMC significantly decreased cell proliferation resulting in disruption of the epithelial barrier and decreased cytokine responses to phytohaemagglutinin, respectively. Conclusion We identified several molecular mechanisms that could contribute to an association between DMPA and HIV including proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses that could activate the HIV promoter and recruit immune targets, increased expression of syndecans to facilitate the transfer of virus from epithelial to immune cells and decreased cell proliferation. The latter could impede the ability to maintain an effective epithelial barrier and adversely impact immune cell function. However, these responses were observed primarily following exposure to high (15-150 μg/ml) MPA concentrations. Clinical correlation is needed to determine whether the prolonged MPA exposure associated with contraception activates these mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25798593

  13. Conventional High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With Concomitant Complementary IMRT Boost: A Novel Approach for Improving Cervical Tumor Dose Coverage

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Jun; Kim, Robert Y. Elassal, Shaaban; Lin Huiyi; Shen Sui

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of combining conventional high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with a concomitant complementary intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost for improved target coverage in cervical cancers. Methods and Materials: Six patients with cervical cancer underwent conventional HDR (C-HDR) treatment. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired with a CT/MRI-compatible applicator in place. The clinical target volumes (CTVs), defined as the gross target volume with a 3-mm margin and the uterus, were delineated on the CT scans, along with the organs at risk (OARs). The IMRT plans were optimized to generate dose distributions complementing those of C-HDR to cover the CTV while maintaining low doses to the OARs (IMRT-HDR). For comparison, dwell-weight optimized HDR (O-HDR) plans were also generated to cover the CTV and spare the OARs. The three treatment techniques (C-HDR, O-HDR, and IMRT-HDR) were compared. The percentage of volume receiving 95% of the prescription dose (V{sub 95}) was used to evaluate dose coverage to the CTV, and the minimal doses in the 2.0-cm{sup 3} volume receiving the greatest dose were calculated to compare the doses to the OARs. Results: The C-HDR technique provided very poor CTV coverage in 5 cases (V{sub 95} <62%). Although O-HDR provided excellent gross tumor volume coverage (V{sub 95} {>=}96.9%), it resulted in unacceptably high doses to the OARs in all 6 cases and unsatisfactory coverage to the whole CTV in 3 cases. IMRT-HDR not only yielded substantially improved CTV coverage (average V{sub 95} = 95.3%), but also kept the doses to the bladder and rectum reasonably low. Conclusion: Compared with C-HDR and O-HDR, concomitant IMRT boost complementary to C-HDR not only provided excellent CTV coverage, but also maintained reasonably low doses to the OARs.

  14. Chemotherapy of onchocerciasis with high doses of diethylcarbamazine or a single dose of ivermectin: microfilaria levels and side effects.

    PubMed

    Albiez, E J; Newland, H S; White, A T; Kaiser, A; Greene, B M; Taylor, H R; Büttner, D W

    1988-03-01

    Fifty adult male subjects with moderate to heavy onchocerciasis from the Liberian rain forest were selected for a double-blind placebo-controlled chemotherapy study. The effects of high doses of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) - 30 mg/kg/d - over one week preceded by a one week initial treatment with normal oral doses of DEC or DEC lotion were compared with a single dose of ivermectin (150 micrograms/kg) and placebo. During the initial treatment DEC tablets or lotion caused distinctly more frequent and severe reactions than did invermectin. The reactions to ivermectin did not differ from those of the placebo patients. High doses of DEC caused, in about half of the patients, headache, dizziness, nausea or vomiting. DEC markedly increased the number of corneal microfilariae and of corneal opacities compared to ivermectin. All changes resolved with a return to pretreatment findings two months after treatment. The three treatment groups showed no differences at the ten months follow-up. In all treated patients skin microfilaria counts fell almost to zero by the end of the two week therapy. In the ivermectin group microfilaria counts remained significantly lower than in the DEC patients at the two and ten months examinations. In summary, ivermectin was much better tolerated than DEC and had a longer lasting effect on the microfilariae in the skin. Since high doses of DEC were less effective and caused more frequent and severe side effects, this approach cannot be recommended for treatment of onchocerciasis.

  15. Extrapolation of the dna fragment-size distribution after high-dose irradiation to predict effects at low doses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Sachs, R. K.; Brenner, D. J.; Peterson, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    The patterns of DSBs induced in the genome are different for sparsely and densely ionizing radiations: In the former case, the patterns are well described by a random-breakage model; in the latter, a more sophisticated tool is needed. We used a Monte Carlo algorithm with a random-walk geometry of chromatin, and a track structure defined by the radial distribution of energy deposition from an incident ion, to fit the PFGE data for fragment-size distribution after high-dose irradiation. These fits determined the unknown parameters of the model, enabling the extrapolation of data for high-dose irradiation to the low doses that are relevant for NASA space radiation research. The randomly-located-clusters formalism was used to speed the simulations. It was shown that only one adjustable parameter, Q, the track efficiency parameter, was necessary to predict DNA fragment sizes for wide ranges of doses. This parameter was determined for a variety of radiations and LETs and was used to predict the DSB patterns at the HPRT locus of the human X chromosome after low-dose irradiation. It was found that high-LET radiation would be more likely than low-LET radiation to induce additional DSBs within the HPRT gene if this gene already contained one DSB.

  16. Administration of high-dose ketoconazole, an inhibitor of steroid synthesis, prevents posttraumatic anxiety in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H; Benjamin, J; Kaplan, Z; Kotler, M

    2000-12-01

    Acute psychological stress is the presumed immediate cause of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and may also contribute to other anxiety disorders. Abnormal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been tentatively implicated in some of the features of these disorders. Ketoconazole (KTCZ), an imidazole derivative, is a potent inhibitor of gonadal and adrenal steroidogenesis. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of KTCZ blockade of adrenal steroidogenesis, and consequent elevation of adreno-corticotropic hormone (ACTH), on a model of chronic post-traumatic anxiety in rats. Amelioration of anxious behaviors after reduction of corticosterone would suggest that corticosterone (and by implication cortisol in humans) is an important mediator of anxious symptoms: exacerbation of such behaviors would suggest that corticosterone elevations are only secondary, and possibly implicate corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and/or ACTH in the pathogenesis of anxious symptoms. We exposed rats for 10 min to cat scent, a prima facie valid model for acute psychological stress, with and without high dose KTCZ for 14 days. Treatment with KTCZ abolished the chronic behavioral effects of acute exposure to a cat scent. Lower levels of anxious behavior in KTCZ-treated and exposed rats were accompanied by lower plasma corticosterone, ACTH and prolactin (PRL) levels compared to untreated exposed rats. Results in this model implicate corticosterone, but not ACTH, in the pathogenesis of chronic anxiety following acute psychological stress.

  17. Low-dose glimepiride with sitagliptin improves glycemic control without dose-dependency in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on high-dose glimepiride.

    PubMed

    Umayahara, Rieko; Yonemoto, Takako; Kyou, Chika; Morishita, Kae; Ogawa, Tatsuo; Taguchi, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Tatsuhide

    2014-01-01

    This randomized, prospective study was conducted in 76 subjects to assess whether low-dose (0.5-2 mg/day) glimepiride, in combination therapy with sitagliptin, improves glycemic control in a dose-dependent manner in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Eligible subjects had been treated with glimepiride at doses of 3-6 mg/day for at least 3 months and had a HbA1c level of ≥6.9%. Subjects were randomly assigned to three treatment groups of reduced doses of glimepiride (0.5 mg/day, 1 mg/day, or 2 mg/day) in addition to sitagliptin for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy analysis evaluated the change in HbA1c from baseline to week 24. Secondary efficacy endpoints included the changes in fasting plasma glucose, insulin secretion capacity, and β-cell function. Safety endpoints included hypoglycemia and any adverse event. Despite dose reduction of glimepiride, combination therapy with sitagliptin induced significant improvements in HbA1c levels (-0.8%, p < 0.001). Insulin secretion parameters (CPI, SUIT) also increased significantly. There were no significant differences between groups in changes from baseline HbA1c, insulin secretion capacity, and β-cell function (proinsulin/insulin) at 24 weeks of combination therapy. Multivariate analysis showed that baseline HbA1c was the only predictor for efficacy of combination therapy with sitagliptin and low-dose glimeripide. No changes in body weight were noted and no symptomatic hypoglycemia was documented. These findings indicate that combination therapy with sitagliptin and low-dose glimepiride (0.5 mg/day) is both effective for glycemic control and safe in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with high-dose glimepiride. PMID:25168659

  18. High doses of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in chicken meat are required to infect ferrets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) have caused fatal infections in mammals through consumption of infected bird carcasses or meat, but scarce information exists on the dose of virus required and the diversity of HPAIV subtypes involved. Ferrets were exposed to different HPAIV (H5 and H7 subtypes) through consumption of infected chicken meat. The dose of virus needed to infect ferrets through consumption was much higher than via respiratory exposure and varied with the virus strain. In addition, H5N1 HPAIV produced higher titers in the meat of infected chickens and more easily infected ferrets than the H7N3 or H7N7 HPAIV. PMID:24894438

  19. Enhanced Interaction between Warfarin and High-Dose Ketoconazole: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jackevicius, Cynthia A.; Ton, Mannhu N.

    2009-01-01

    This case describes the increased anticoagulation effect associated with the use of high-dose ketoconazole. A 59-year-old man treated with warfarin for aortic valve replacement was prescribed high-dose ketoconazole and hydrocortisone for the treatment of prostate cancer. Despite lowering the warfarin dosage by 35% during the start of high dose ketoconazole, an additional dose reduction was required subsequently when the INR rose from 2.62 to 3.82 within nine days. After a total dose reduction of 43%, the INR returned to therapeutic range within two weeks. The Naranjo probability scale revealed a probable adverse reaction of increased anticoagulant effect associated with high dose ketoconazole. Due to the inhibition of warfarin metabolism by ketoconazole, patients taking high dose ketoconazole concomitantly with warfarin may need their warfarin dosage reduced by more than is currently recommended, as well as receive more frequent INR monitoring to avoid over anticoagulation. PMID:20029646

  20. High frequency of acute promyelocytic leukemia among Latinos with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Douer, D; Preston-Martin, S; Chang, E; Nichols, P W; Watkins, K J; Levine, A M

    1996-01-01

    A high frequency (24%) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was noted among acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) cases at the Los Angeles County-University of Southern California (LAC-USC) Medical Center, in comparison with the expected frequency of 5% to 15%. Because of the high proportion of Latinos in this center, we questioned if APL is more common in this ethnic group. The proportion of APL among the 80 AML patients of Latino origin was significantly higher (30; 37.5%) when compared with the 62 non-Latinos (4; 6.5%) (P = .00001). In an attempt to verify this finding on a larger group of patients, we analyzed 276 pathologically verified cases of AML in patients aged 30 to 69 years from the entire County of Los Angeles, registered on an ongoing population-based epidemiologic study of AML. APL was more frequent among the 47 Latinos (24.3%) than in the 229 non-Latinos (8.3%) (P = .0075). APL is seen in younger patients with AML, but Latino AML patients also had a higher frequency of APL after accounting for their younger age (age-adjusted odds ratio for APL among Latinos in LAC-USC Medical Center, 9.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9, 30] P = .0002; among Latinos in the population-based study, 3.0 [95% CI 1.3 to 6.9] P = .01). The different ethnic distribution of AML was found to be due to a higher proportion of APL cases per se, and not to a lower proportion of any other French-American-British subtype (P = .0004). These results, from two different populations of AML patients, indicate that Latinos with AML have a higher likelihood of the APL subtype of disease, which may suggest a genetic predisposition to APL and/or exposure to distinct environmental factor(s).

  1. A Potential Mechanism of High-Dose Ticagrelor in Modulating Platelet Activity and Atherosclerosis Mediated by Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yi; Peng, Yudong; Zeng, Qiutang; Cheng, Longxian; Wang, Boyuan; Mao, Xiaobo; Meng, Kai; Liu, Yuzhou; Lian, Yitian; Li, Dazhu

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and its receptor (TSLPR) was found in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Ticagrelor, an oral platelet ADP P2Y12 receptor antagonist, is widely used in these patients. The aim of this study was to verify whether different doses of ticagrelor regulated plaque progression and platelet activity by modulating TSLP/TSLPR. Seventy-five ApoE-/- mice were randomly divided into five groups: (1) high-cholesterol diet (HCD, n = 15); (2) HCD plus ticagrelor 25 mg/kg/d (T1, n = 15); (3) HCD plus ticagrelor 50 mg/kg/d (T2, n = 15); (4) HCD plus ticagrelor 100 mg/kg/d (T3, n = 15); and (5) a normal diet group (ND, n = 15). At day 0 and at week 16, blood lipids and serum TSLP levels, expression of TSLPR, CD62, and CD63, platelet aggregation, platelet ATP release, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and plaque morphology were assessed. HCD increased TSLPR expression and atherosclerosis progression but high-dose ticagrelor (100 mg/kg) moderated this trend. TSLPR was positively correlated with Akt1, platelet aggregation, corrected plaque area, and vulnerability index in the T3 group (P<0.01). In conclusion, low-dose ticagrelor only inhibited platelet activity. Besides this inhibition, high-dose ticagrelor modulated platelet activity and atherosclerosis mediated by TSLPR, potentially through the PI3K/Akt signal pathway. PMID:26517374

  2. High Dose Intraveneous Vitamin C and Chikungunya Fever: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Michael J.; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R.; Berdiel, Miguel J.; Duconge, Jorge; Rodríguez-López, Joshua L.; Hunninghake, Ron; Cobas-Rosario, Vicente J.

    2015-01-01

    The Chikungunya (CHIKV) fever is a viral disease produced by a single-stranded RNA Alphavirus from the Togaviridae genus. Its transmission occurs only through mosquito vectors, principally Aedes aegypti. It requires a human-mosquito-human transmission cycle. It is associated with severe arthritis/arthralgias, myalgias, high fever, headache, and maculopapular rash. Joint ache appears to be symmetrical. The virus has an incubation period of 2 to 7 days, where the high fever is typically presented. It is followed by arthralgias and myalgias, and rashes, which last for 3 to 5 days. However, the arthralgias can persist for months after the infection, which can contribute to severe arthritis. As of now, no vaccine exists for the virus and no official treatment has been developed aside from standard procedures of the use of acetaminophen (paracetamol), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This is a case report of a 54-year old Hispanic individual that reported left shoulder pain, left knee pain and fever. The symptoms started on a Saturday in September 2014 in middle of the night. The patient was treated with high doses of intravenous vitamin C over two days. The symptoms resolved after the infusions without any side effects. Based on the positive outcome in this case, we propose that intravenous vitamin C should be studied further as a potential treatment for acute viral infections. PMID:25705076

  3. Cancer radiotherapy based on femtosecond IR laser-beam filamentation yielding ultra-high dose rates and zero entrance dose.

    PubMed

    Meesat, Ridthee; Belmouaddine, Hakim; Allard, Jean-François; Tanguay-Renaud, Catherine; Lemay, Rosalie; Brastaviceanu, Tiberius; Tremblay, Luc; Paquette, Benoit; Wagner, J Richard; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Lepage, Martin; Huels, Michael A; Houde, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    Since the invention of cancer radiotherapy, its primary goal has been to maximize lethal radiation doses to the tumor volume while keeping the dose to surrounding healthy tissues at zero. Sadly, conventional radiation sources (γ or X rays, electrons) used for decades, including multiple or modulated beams, inevitably deposit the majority of their dose in front or behind the tumor, thus damaging healthy tissue and causing secondary cancers years after treatment. Even the most recent pioneering advances in costly proton or carbon ion therapies can not completely avoid dose buildup in front of the tumor volume. Here we show that this ultimate goal of radiotherapy is yet within our reach: Using intense ultra-short infrared laser pulses we can now deposit a very large energy dose at unprecedented microscopic dose rates (up to 10(11) Gy/s) deep inside an adjustable, well-controlled macroscopic volume, without any dose deposit in front or behind the target volume. Our infrared laser pulses produce high density avalanches of low energy electrons via laser filamentation, a phenomenon that results in a spatial energy density and temporal dose rate that both exceed by orders of magnitude any values previously reported even for the most intense clinical radiotherapy systems. Moreover, we show that (i) the type of final damage and its mechanisms in aqueous media, at the molecular and biomolecular level, is comparable to that of conventional ionizing radiation, and (ii) at the tumor tissue level in an animal cancer model, the laser irradiation method shows clear therapeutic benefits. PMID:22927378

  4. Discussion on the usefulness of dose dynamic multi-leaf collimator-based plan to overcome dose limit of spinal cord in high-dose radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. C.; Cho, J. H.; Park, C. S.; Kim, D. H.; Choi, C. W.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the conventional plan was compared with the plan that was based on a dose dynamic multi-leaf collimator (MLC), and a dose dynamic MLC was used to evaluate its usefulness. Then, this study examined if it was possible to perform a high-dose radiation therapy by adjusting the dose limit of the spinal cord when the dose dynamic MLC-based plan was used. First of all, linear accelerator was used to compare the conventional plan with the dose dynamic MLC-based plan. Then, the study was conducted in two methods in order to examine the proper range of the shield for the spinal cord when the dose dynamic MLC was used to adjust the dose of the spinal cord. In the first method, X-omat film was used to perform film dosimetry. In the second method, radiation treatment planning (RTP) system was used to find out the proper range among 0, 3, 6, and 9 mm. When film scan was performed in the each range, respectively, from the spinal cord and under the same conditions, it was confirmed to be appropriate to use the range of 3 mm. When the RTP system was used to perform planning in the shield range of each range, respectively, from the spinal cord, dose-volume histogram (DVH) was a slight difference could be found in the region from 25% to 35%. On the contrary, no radiation exposure was found in the region of 35% or higher for all of the each range. Consequently, if MLC is selected in consideration of the planning target volume (PTV), the most proper value can be obtained by selecting the range of 3 mm. Next, the DVH was compared to examine the relationship in PTV when the each range was used for planning. All of the ranges showed the same pattern up to the point of 90%. However, the results were different in the region of higher than 90% because the dose was low for the spinal cord, and a relatively useful dose was used for PTV when the range was 3 mm.

  5. Effect of Single Dose Administration of Methylsulfonylmethane on Oxidative Stress Following Acute Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Nakhostin-Roohi, Babak; Niknam, Zahra; Vaezi, Nasrin; Mohammadi, Sadollah; Bohlooli, Shahab

    2013-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a sulfur-containing compound commonly found in diet and known to reduce oxidative stress. This trial was conducted to determine whether single dose supplementation with MSM attenuates post-exercise oxidative stress in healthy untrained young men. Sixteen untrained men volunteered for this study. Participants were randomized in a double-blind placebo-controlled fashion into 2 groups: Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) (n = 8) and placebo (n = 8). The participants took supplementation or placebo before running on treadmill for 45 min at 75% VO2max. The MSM supplementation was prepared in water as 100 mg/ kg body weight. The placebo group received water. Serum Malondealdehyde (MDA), uric acid, bilirubin, protein carbonyl (PC) and plasma vitamin E levels were determined as the markers of oxidative stress. Plasma GSH (reduced Glutathione) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured as markers of plasma antioxidant system. MSM supplementation successfully lowered serum PC 2 and 24 h after exercise. Plasma TAC in MSM group was higher at 24 h after exercise. Serum level of uric acid and bilirubin were significantly low immediately after exercise in MSM supplemented group. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of plasma GSH level. These results complement earlier studies showing anti-oxidant effect of MSM and suggest that single dose oral supplementation with MSM lowers exercise induced oxidative stress in healthy untrained young men, but is not adequate to significantly affect plasma GSH level. PMID:24523764

  6. Acute, low-dose methamphetamine administration improves attention/information processing speed and working memory in methamphetamine-dependent individuals displaying poorer cognitive performance at baseline.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, James J; Jackson, Brian J; Kalechstein, Ari D; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F

    2011-03-30

    Abstinent methamphetamine (Meth) dependent individuals demonstrate poorer performance on tests sensitive to attention/information processing speed, learning and memory, and working memory when compared to non-Meth dependent individuals. The poorer performance on these tests may contribute to the morbidity associated with Meth-dependence. In light of this, we sought to determine the effects of acute, low-dose Meth administration on attention, working memory, and verbal learning and memory in 19 non-treatment seeking, Meth-dependent individuals. Participants were predominantly male (89%), Caucasian (63%), and cigarette smokers (63%). Following a four day, drug-free washout period, participants were given a single-blind intravenous infusion of saline, followed the next day by 30 mg of Meth. A battery of neurocognitive tasks was administered before and after each infusion, and performance on measures of accuracy and reaction time were compared between conditions. While acute Meth exposure did not affect test performance for the entire sample, participants who demonstrated relatively poor performance on these tests at baseline, identified using a median split on each test, showed significant improvement on measures of attention/information processing speed and working memory when administered Meth. Improved performance was seen on the following measures of working memory: choice reaction time task (p≤0.04), a 1-back task (p≤0.01), and a 2-back task (p≤0.04). In addition, those participants demonstrating high neurocognitive performance at baseline experienced similar or decreased performance following Meth exposure. These findings suggest that acute administration of Meth may temporarily improve Meth-associated neurocognitive performance in those individuals experiencing lower cognitive performance at baseline. As a result, stimulants may serve as a successful treatment for improving cognitive functioning in those Meth-dependent individuals experiencing

  7. Reconstituted high-density lipoproteins acutely reduce soluble brain Aβ levels in symptomatic APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jérôme; Stukas, Sophie; Button, Emily; Cheng, Wai Hang; Lee, Michael; Fan, Jianjia; Wilkinson, Anna; Kulic, Iva; Wright, Samuel D; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2016-05-01

    Many lines of evidence suggest a protective role for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein (apo)A-I in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). HDL/apoA-I particles are produced by the liver and intestine and, in addition to removing excess cholesterol from the body, are increasingly recognized to have vasoprotective functions. Here we tested the ability of reconstituted HDL (rHDL) consisting of human apoA-I reconstituted with soy phosphatidylcholine for its ability to lower amyloid beta (Aβ) levels in symptomatic APP/PS1 mice, a well-characterized preclinical model of amyloidosis. Animals were treated intravenously either with four weekly doses (chronic study) or a single dose of 60mg/kg of rHDL (acute study). The major finding of our acute study is that soluble brain Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels were significantly reduced within 24h of a single dose of rHDL. By contrast, no changes were observed in our chronic study with respect to soluble or deposited Aβ levels in animals assessed 7days after the final weekly dose of rHDL, suggesting that beneficial effects diminish as rHDL is cleared from the body. Further, rHDL-treated animals showed no change in amyloid burden, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ levels, neuroinflammation, or endothelial activation in the chronic study, suggesting that the pathology-modifying effects of rHDL may indeed be acute and may be specific to the soluble Aβ pool. That systemic administration of rHDL can acutely modify brain Aβ levels provides support for further investigation of the therapeutic potential of apoA-I-based agents for AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

  8. Morphine with adjuvant ketamine versus higher dose of morphine alone for acute pain: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Niu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Xiang; Ren, Hao; Tong, Yao; Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ketamine is currently the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blocker in clinical use. Morphine in pain management is usually limited by adverse effect such as nausea and vomiting. Adjuvant treatment with ketamine may be value in giving better analgesia with fewer adverse effects. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the differences when patients received morphine with adjuvant ketamine (MK) compared with higher dose of morphine (MO) for acute pain. Methods: The PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library databases were searched (Last search performed on July 1, 2014) by two reviewers independently. Data were extracted independently by the same two individuals who searched the studies. Results: A total of 7 trials involving 492 patients were included in the current analysis. We found pain scores were lower in the MK group compared to the MO group [MD 2.19, 95% CI (1.24, 3.13) P<0.00001]. And more patients in the MO required diclofenac [OR 1.97, 95% CI (1.06, 3.67) P=0.03]. Furthermore, morphine plus ketamine can reduced post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) [OR 3.71, 95% CI (2.37, 5.80) P<0.00001]. Importantly, the wakefulness scores for the MK group were consistently and significantly better than those for the MO group [MD -1.53, 95% CI (-2.67, -0.40) P=0.008]. Conclusion: The use of ketamine plus 1/4~2/3 the dose of morphine is better than higher dose of morphine alone in reducing pain scores, and rescuing analgesic requirement. It also improved PONV and wakefulness. PMID:25356103

  9. ``In Vivo'' Dosimetry in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Azcorra, S. A.; Mota-García, A.; Poitevín-Chacón, M. A.; Santamaría-Torruco, B. J.; Rodríguez-Ponce, M.; Herrera-Martínez, F. P.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Ruíz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.

    2008-08-01

    In this prospective study, rectal dose was measured "in vivo" using TLD-100 crystals (3×3×1 mm3), and it has been compared to the prescribed dose. Measurements were performed in patients with cervical cancer classified in FIGO stages IB-IIIB and treated with high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INCan).

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy as Primary Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Report on Acute Toxicity After Dose Escalation With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Intraprostatic Lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Fonteyne, Valerie Villeirs, Geert; Speleers, Bruno; Neve, Wilfried de; Wagter, Carlos de; Lumen, Nicolas; Meerleer, Gert de

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report on the acute toxicity of a third escalation level using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer (PCa) and the acute toxicity resulting from delivery of a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to an intraprostatic lesion (IPL) detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without spectroscopy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and March 2007, we treated 230 patients with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a third escalation level as primary therapy for prostate cancer. If an IPL (defined by MRI or MRI plus spectroscopy) was present, a SIB was delivered to the IPL. To report on acute toxicity, patients were seen weekly during treatment and 1 and 3 months after treatment. Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity scale, supplemented by an in-house-developed scoring system. Results: The median dose to the planning target volume was 78 Gy. An IPL was found in 118 patients. The median dose to the MRI-detected IPL and MRI plus spectroscopy-detected IPL was 81 Gy and 82 Gy, respectively. No Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity developed. Grade 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was present in 26 patients (11%). Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was present in 15 patients (7%), and 95 patients developed Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity (41%). No statistically significant increase was found in Grade 2-3 acute gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity after a SIB to an IPL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that treatment-induced acute toxicity remains low when intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 80 Gy as primary therapy for prostate cancer is used. In addition, a SIB to an IPL did not increase the severity or incidence of acute toxicity.

  11. Effects of high doses of iodide on thyroid secretion: evidence for the presence of iodinated membrane tubulin

    SciTech Connect

    Santisteban, P.; Hargreaves, A.J.; Cano, J.; Avila, J.; Lamas, L.

    1985-08-01

    The transient inhibitory effect on thyroid secretion produced by high doses of iodide was investigated with respect to changes in the level of in vivo iodination of membrane tubulin. Iodinated tubulin, characterized by gel electrophoresis, immunoprecipitation, and peptide mapping, was shown to be associated with a thyroid membrane fraction, and totally absent from cytoplasmic proteins. The administration of an acute dose of 5 mg KI, although it inhibited thyroid secretion (as shown by an increase in TSH), did not have a significant effect on the level of iodination of membrane tubulin. Thus, the observed inhibition of thyroid secretion is probably unrelated to the level of iodination of tubulin. Although its function is not known at present, iodinated tubulin is probably involved in membrane-related phenomena.

  12. The eicosanoid response to high dose UVR exposure of individuals prone and resistant to sunburn.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Anna; Masoodi, Mojgan; Gledhill, Karl; Haylett, Ann Katarina; Thody, Anthony John; Tobin, Desmond John; Rhodes, Lesley Elizabeth

    2012-02-01

    High personal UVR doses can be gained during leisure activities, causing intense self-resolving inflammation (sunburn) of unprotected skin. UVR activates release of membrane fatty acids and upregulates their metabolism by cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX) to different eicosanoids. While COX-derived prostaglandin (PG)E(2) is a potent mediator of sunburn vasodilatation, LOX-derived 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) and its lipoxin metabolites may contribute to sunburn limitation. We explored the relationships between expression of these lipid mediators and the clinical and histological outcomes, comparing responses of individuals prone and more resistant to sunburn. An acute UVR exposure of 12 SED (standard erythema dose) was applied to buttock skin of 32 white Caucasians (n = 16 phototype I/II, n = 16 phototype III/IV), and over the subsequent 72 h assessments were made of skin erythema, immunohistochemical expression of leukocyte markers, COX-2, 12-LOX, 15-LOX and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and eicosanoid levels by LC/ESI-MS/MS. Evidence of a significant inflammatory response was seen earlier in phototype I/II with regard to expression of erythema (4 h, p < 0.001), neutrophil infiltration (24 h, p = 0.01), epidermal COX-2 (24 h, p < 0.05) and 12-LOX (24 h, p < 0.01), and dermal eNOS (24 h, p < 0.05) proteins, although CD3+ lymphocyte infiltration showed an earlier increase in phototype III/IV (24 h, p < 0.05). Although erythema was equivalent at 72 h in both groups, phototype I/II showed higher PGE(2) accompanied by elevated 15-HETE, and a strong positive correlation was seen between these mediators (n = 18, r = 0.805, p = 0.0001). Hence anti-inflammatory eicosanoid 15-HETE may temper the pro-inflammatory milieu in sunburn, having greater influence in those prone to sunburn than those more resistant, given the same high UVR exposure conditions.

  13. Extrapolating the Acute Behavioral Effects of Toluene from 1-Hour to 24-Hour Exposures in Rats: Roles of Dose Metric, and Metabolic and Behavioral Tolerance.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VQCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) may be improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration (Br[Tol]) instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a metri...

  14. Intermediate-dose versus high-dose prophylaxis for severe hemophilia: comparing outcome and costs since the 1970s

    PubMed Central

    Steen Carlsson, Katarina; Petrini, Pia; Holmström, Margareta; Ljung, Rolf; van den Berg, H. Marijke; Berntorp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia is very effective but is limited by cost issues. The implementation of 2 different prophylactic regimens in The Netherlands and Sweden since the 1970s may be considered a natural experiment. We compared the costs and outcomes of Dutch intermediate- and Swedish high-dose prophylactic regimens for patients with severe hemophilia (factor VIII/IX < 1 IU/dL) born between 1970 and 1994, using prospective standardized outcome assessment and retrospective collection of cost data. Seventy-eight Dutch and 50 Swedish patients, median age 24 years (range, 14-37 years), were included. Intermediate-dose prophylaxis used less factor concentrate (median: Netherlands, 2100 IU/kg per year [interquartile range (IQR), 1400-2900 IU/kg per year] vs Sweden, 4000 IU/kg per year [IQR, 3000-4900 IU/kg per year]); (P < .01). Clinical outcome was slightly inferior for the intermediate-dose regimen (P < .01) for 5-year bleeding (median, 1.3 [IQR, 0.8-2.7] vs 0 [IQR, 0.0-2.0] joint bleeds/y) and joint health (Haemophilia Joint Health Score >10 of 144 points in 46% vs 11% of participants), although social participation and quality of life were similar. Annual total costs were 66% higher for high-dose prophylaxis (mean, 180 [95% confidence interval, 163 - 196] × US$1000 for Dutch vs 298 [95% confidence interval, 271-325]) × US$1000 for Swedish patients; (P < .01). At group level, the incremental benefits of high-dose prophylaxis appear limited. At the patient level, prophylaxis should be tailored individually, and many patients may do well receiving lower doses of concentrate without compromising safety. PMID:23777770

  15. Intermediate-dose versus high-dose prophylaxis for severe hemophilia: comparing outcome and costs since the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kathelijn; Steen Carlsson, Katarina; Petrini, Pia; Holmström, Margareta; Ljung, Rolf; van den Berg, H Marijke; Berntorp, Erik

    2013-08-15

    Prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia is very effective but is limited by cost issues. The implementation of 2 different prophylactic regimens in The Netherlands and Sweden since the 1970s may be considered a natural experiment. We compared the costs and outcomes of Dutch intermediate- and Swedish high-dose prophylactic regimens for patients with severe hemophilia (factor VIII/IX < 1 IU/dL) born between 1970 and 1994, using prospective standardized outcome assessment and retrospective collection of cost data. Seventy-eight Dutch and 50 Swedish patients, median age 24 years (range, 14-37 years), were included. Intermediate-dose prophylaxis used less factor concentrate (median: Netherlands, 2100 IU/kg per year [interquartile range (IQR), 1400-2900 IU/kg per year] vs Sweden, 4000 IU/kg per year [IQR, 3000-4900 IU/kg per year]); (P < .01). Clinical outcome was slightly inferior for the intermediate-dose regimen (P < .01) for 5-year bleeding (median, 1.3 [IQR, 0.8-2.7] vs 0 [IQR, 0.0-2.0] joint bleeds/y) and joint health (Haemophilia Joint Health Score >10 of 144 points in 46% vs 11% of participants), although social participation and quality of life were similar. Annual total costs were 66% higher for high-dose prophylaxis (mean, 180 [95% confidence interval, 163 - 196] × US$1000 for Dutch vs 298 [95% confidence interval, 271-325]) × US$1000 for Swedish patients; (P < .01). At group level, the incremental benefits of high-dose prophylaxis appear limited. At the patient level, prophylaxis should be tailored individually, and many patients may do well receiving lower doses of concentrate without compromising safety.

  16. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Use Is Not Associated With Acute Pancreatitis in High-Risk Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Lin, Jou-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ting; Lai, Mei-Shu; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the association between use of DPP-4 inhibitors and acute pancreatitis in high-risk type 2 diabetic patients. A retrospective nationwide cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claim database. The risk associated with sitagliptin was compared to that with acarbose, a second-line antidiabetic drug prescribed for patients with similar diabetes severity and with a known neutral effect on pancreatitis. Between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010, a total of 8526 sitagliptin initiators and 8055 acarbose initiators who had hypertriglyceridemia or prior hospitalization history for acute pancreatitis were analyzed for the risk of hospitalization due to acute pancreatitis stratified for baseline propensity score. In the crude analysis, sitagliptin was associated with a decreased risk of acute pancreatitis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62–0.88) compared to acarbose in diabetic patients with prior history of hospitalization for pancreatitis or hypertriglyceridemia. The association was abolished after stratification for propensity score quintiles (adjusted HR 0.95; 95% CI: 0.79–1.16). Similar results were found separately in both patients’ histories of prior hospitalization of acute pancreatitis (adjusted HR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.76–1.24) and those with hypertriglyceridemia (adjusted HR 0.86; 95% CI: 0.65–1.13). No significant association was found for different durations or accumulative doses of sitagliptin. In the stratified analysis, no significant effect modification was found in relation to patients’ characteristics. Use of sitagliptin was not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis in high-risk diabetic patients with hypertriglyceridemia or with history of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26886601

  17. SU-C-12A-05: Radiation Dose in High-Pitch Pediatric Cardiac CTA: Correlation Between Lung Dose and CTDIvol, DLP, and Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Kino, A; Newman, B; Chan, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiation dose for pediatric high pitch cardiac CTA Methods: A total of 14 cases were included in this study, with mean age of 6.2 years (ranges from 2 months to 15 years). Cardiac CTA was performed using a dual-source CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens). Tube voltage (70, 80 and 100kV) was chosen based on patient weight. All patients were scanned using a high-pitch spiral mode (pitch ranges from 2.5 to 3) with tube current modulation technique (CareDose4D, Siemens). For each case, the three dimensional dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo software package (IMPACT-MC, CT Image GmbH). Scanning parameters of each exam, including tube voltage, tube current, beamshaping filters, beam collimation, were defined in the Monte Carlo calculation. Tube current profile along projection angles was obtained from projection data of each tube, which included data within the over-scanning range along z direction. The volume of lungs was segmented out with CT images (3DSlicer). Lung doses of all patients were calculated and compared with CTDIvol, DLP, and SSDE. Results: The average (range) of CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE of all patients was 1.19 mGy (0.58 to 3.12mGy), 31.54 mGy*cm (12.56 to 99 mGy*cm), 2.26 mGy (1.19 to 6.24 mGy), respectively. Radiation dose to the lungs ranged from 0.83 to 4.18 mGy. Lung doses correlated with CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE with correlation coefficients(k) at 0.98, 0.93, and 0.99. However, for the cases with CTDIvol less than 1mGy, only SSDE preserved a strong correlation with lung doses (k=0.83), while much weaker correlations were found for CTDIvol (k=0.29) and DLP (k=-0.47). Conclusion: Lung doses to pediatric patients during Cardiac CTA were estimated. SSDE showed the most robust correlation with lung doses in contrast to CTDIvol and DLP.

  18. Over-activation of TLR5 signaling by high-dose flagellin induces liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yang; Liu, Fang; Yang, Jingyi; Zhong, Maohua; Zhang, Ejuan; Li, Yaoming; Zhou, Dihan; Cao, Yuan; Li, Wei; Yu, Jie; Yang, Yi; Yan, Huimin

    2015-11-01

    Flagellin is a potent activator of a broad range of cell types that are involved in innate and adaptive immunity. Therefore, it is a good adjuvant candidate for vaccines, and it might function as a biological protectant against both major acute radiation syndrome during cancer radiotherapy and a mitigator of radiation emergencies. However, accumulating evidence has implicated flagellin in the occurrence of some inflammatory diseases, such as acute lung inflammation, cardiovascular collapse and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether only flagellin-TLR5 signaling activation plays a role in the pathophysiology of liver or whether some other flagellin activity also contributes to liver injury either via bacterial infections or during clinical applications. Recombinant flagellin proteins with or without TLR5-stimulating activity were used to evaluate the role of flagellin-TLR5 signaling in liver injury in wild-type and TLR5 KO mice. Gross lesions and large areas of hepatocellular necrosis were observed in liver tissue 12 h after the intraperitoneal administration of 100 or 200 µg flagellin (FliC) in a dose- and time-dependent manner in wild-type mice, but not in TLR5 KO mice. Deletion of the N-terminal or TLR5 binding domain of flagellin inhibited flagellin-induced inflammatory responses and the subsequent acute liver function abnormality and damage. These data confirmed that flagellin is an essential determinant of liver injury and demonstrated that the over-activation of TLR5 signaling by high-dose flagellin caused acute inflammatory responses, neutrophil accumulation and oxidative stress in the liver, which contributes to the progression and severity of flagellin-induced liver injury.

  19. An Absorbed-Dose/Dose-Rate Dependence for the Alanine-EPR Dosimetry System and Its Implications in High-Dose Ionizing Radiation Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, M. F.; Puhl, J. M.; Cooper, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    NIST developed the alanine dosimetry system in the early 1990s to replace radiochromic dye film dosimeters. Later in the decade the alanine system was firmly established as a transfer service for high-dose radiation dosimetry and an integral part of the internal calibration scheme supporting these services. Over the course of the last decade, routine monitoring of the system revealed a small but significant observation that, after examination, led to the characterization of a previously unknown absorbed-dose-dependent, dose-rate effect for the alanine system. Though the potential impact of this effect is anticipated to be extremely limited for NIST’s customer-based transfer dosimetry service, much greater implications may be realized for international measurement comparisons between National Measurement Institutes. PMID:27096113

  20. Pilot study of the safety of starting administration of low-dose aspirin and cilostazol in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Keishi; Komatsu, Yoji; Sato, Naoaki; Higuchi, Osamu; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Kamezaki, Takao; Suzuki, Kensuke; Matsumura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Progressive stroke is a serious problem due to the associated morbidity and mortality. Aspirin is recommended for acute ischemic stroke, but does not reduce the frequency of stroke progression. No standard treatment has been approved for the prevention of stroke progression. Cilostazol, which reduces platelet aggregation about 3 hours after single administration, does not increase the frequency of bleeding events when compared with aspirin or a placebo. Moreover, the combination of 100 mg aspirin and 200 mg cilostazol does not increase the frequency of bleeding events compared with only 100 mg aspirin, and thus is expected to prevent stroke progression with a high degree of safety. The present study investigated the safety of this combination of two drugs administered at the above concentrations in 54 patients with acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours of stroke onset. Modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) measurements were performed at baseline and again on day 4 to 7. Progressive stroke was defined as an increase greater than or equal to 1 point on NIHSS. Patient scores on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after enrollment. Stroke progression occurred in 11.1% of the patients. The percentages of patients with mRS score from 0 to 2 were 42.6% and 75% at baseline and 3 months, respectively. No symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or major extracranial hemorrhage occurred. These results suggest that administration of aspirin and cilostazol is safe for acute ischemic stroke.

  1. High-Dose Aspirin Is Associated with Anemia and Does Not Confer Benefit to Disease Outcomes in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Huang, Ying-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is also known as multiple mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome of systemic vasculitis and is a leading cause of coronary artery lesions (CAL) in childhood. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been proven to effectively reduce the incidence of CAL, but the role and effect dose of aspirin in KD is still unclear. Moreover, overt bleeding and anemia are associated with the use of aspirin, and anemia is common in patients with KD. Thus, the aim of this study was conducted to compare the treatment efficacy, degree of anemia and inflammation, and changes in serum hepcidin in children who received a combination of high-dose aspirin and IVIG in the acute stage of KD, and those who received IVIG alone. Materials and Methods KD patients from two medical centers were retrospectively analyzed from 1999–2009. All patients were initially treated with a single dose of IVIG (2 g/kg) as the standard care of treatment. In group 1, high-dose aspirin was prescribed (> 30 mg/kg/day) until the fever subsided, and then low-dose aspirin (3–5 mg/kg/day) was prescribed until all the inflammation signs had resolved. In group 2, low-dose aspirin was prescribed without high-dose aspirin. Laboratory data were collected for analysis in both groups. Results A total of 851 KD patients (group 1, N = 305, group 2, N = 546) were enrolled in this study. There were no significant differences between group 1 and group 2 in terms of gender (p = 0.51), IVIG resistance rate (31/305 vs. 38/546, p = 0.07), CAL formation (52/305 vs. 84/546, p = 0.67), and duration of hospitalization (6.3 ± 0.2 vs. 6.7 ± 0.2 days, p = 0.13). There were also initially no significant differences in total white blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count, and CRP before IVIG treatment between groups (all p>0.1). After IVIG treatment, group 1 had significantly lower levels of hemoglobin (p = 0.006) and higher CRP (p<0.001) as well as a smaller decrease in CRP level (p = 0

  2. Irradiation dose and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high dose HT9 steel from the fuel duct of FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-14

    To expand the knowledge base for fast reactor core materials, fracture toughness has been evaluated for high dose HT9 steel using miniature disk compact tension (DCT) specimens. The HT9 steel DCT specimens were machined from the ACO-3 fuel duct of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), which achieved high doses in the range of 3–148 dpa at 378–504 C. The static fracture resistance (J-R) tests have been performed in a servohydraulic testing machine in vacuum at selected temperatures including room temperature, 200 C, and each irradiation temperature. Brittle fracture with a low toughness less than 50 MPa pm occurred in room temperature tests when irradiation temperature was below 400 C, while ductile fracture with stable crack growth was observed when irradiation temperature was higher. No fracture toughness less than 100 MPa pm was measured when the irradiation temperature was above 430 C. It was shown that the influence of irradiation temperature was dominant in fracture toughness while the irradiation dose has only limited influence over the wide dose range 3–148 dpa. A slow decrease of fracture toughness with test temperature above room temperature was observed for the nonirradiated and high temperature (>430 *C) irradiation cases, which indicates that the ductile–brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) in those conditions are lower than room temperature. A comparison with the collection of existing data confirmed the dominance of irradiation temperature in the fracture toughness of HT9 steels.

  3. Bispectral EEG index monitoring of high-dose nitrous oxide and low-dose sevoflurane sedation.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David L.; Weaver, Joel; Ganzberg, Steven; Rashid, Robert; Wilson, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    This single-blind controlled clinical study characterized the effects of 30-70% nitrous oxide (N2O) and 0.2-0.8% sevoflurane conscious sedation on quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG) readings of 22 healthy dental students as measured by the bispectral index (BIS). The study verified the 2 previously published BIS/N2O investigations showing no correlation between N2O dosage up to 70% and BIS. Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation scores (OAA/S), however, correlated well with increasing doses of N2O from approximately 35 to 70%. A near linear dose-response relationship was established between OAA/S and end tidal (ET) sevoflurane concentrations of 0.4-0.7%. Only at the highest level of end tidal sevoflurane recorded, 0.7%, was statistically significant BIS depression seen. Subjects evaluated the acceptability of the sedative effect of the 2 gases, showing a slight preference for N2O. Comparable partial anterograde amnesia and sedation (OAA/S) were produced by both agents in administered concentrations of 40-70% N2O and 0.6-0.8% sevoflurane. Female subjects exhibited better memory and significantly less amnesia than males. No statistically significant changes occurred in any of the monitored vital signs. EMG readings demonstrated a statistically significant difference from control values only at the highest, 0.7%, ET concentration of sevoflurane. BIS does not appear useful for evaluating the level of nitrous oxide sedation in the dental setting but may have some value in assessing depth of sedation at deeper levels of sevoflurane sedation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15384293

  4. Estimation of potential health effects from acute exposure to hydrogen fluoride using a "benchmark dose" approach.

    PubMed

    Alexeeff, G V; Lewis, D C; Ragle, N L

    1993-02-01

    Communities across the United States are examining the manufacture, use, transport, and storage of hydrogen fluoride (HF) near residential areas as a consequence of a major release of HF in Texas in 1987. Reference exposure levels for routine and accidental HF emissions are calculated using existing animal and human data. The approach employs a log-probit extrapolation of concentration-response data to the 95% lower confidence limit on the toxic concentration producing a "benchmark dose" of 1% response (TC01), called a practical threshold. Species-specific and chemical-specific adjustment factors are applied to develop exposure levels applicable to the general public. Using this method, the 1-hr reference exposure level to protect the public against any irritation from a routine emission (REL-1) is 0.7 ppm and the level to protect against severe irritation from a once-in-a-lifetime (REL-2) release is 2 ppm. This approach is compared to a modified "uncertainty factor" approach. PMID:8451461

  5. Acute effects of a low-dose atropine/scopolamine mixture as a food contaminant in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Perharič, Lucija; Juvan, Katja Ažman; Stanovnik, Lovro

    2013-09-01

    To verify the assumptions in our previous risk assessment of an atropine/scopolamine mixture in buckwheat flour, we performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study in 20 healthy, adult volunteers. The volunteers ingested a traditional Slovenian buckwheat meal, made of boiled buckwheat flour to which alkaloids were added. In addition to the placebo they ingested 0.12/0.10, 0.37/0.29, 1.22/0.95, 3.58/2.81 and 12.10/9.50 µg kg(-1) body mass (BM) of the atropine/scopolamine mixture. The changes in body temperature, heart rate, salivary and sweat secretion, pupil size, near-point vision and subjective symptoms were recorded regularly for 4 h after the ingestion. Decreased salivary and sweat secretion, increased heart rate and pupil size and reduced near-point vision accompanied by characteristic subjective symptoms were observed at 12.10/9.50 µg kg(-1) BM. At doses of 0.37/0.29 and 1.22/0.95 µg kg(-1) BM, a significant decrease in the heart rate was noted, which we consider to be a critical effect of a low-dose exposure to the atropine/scopolamine mixture. Although this did not have any clinical relevance in our subjects, it may have serious implications if it occurred in people with pre-existent cardiac conditions or those on medications that may cause bradycardia. No significant changes in the observed end points were noted at 0.12/0.10 µg kg(-1) BM. We estimate that the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) for the atropine/scopolamine mixture lies between the lower two administered doses. Applying the uncertainty factor of 10, we propose a new provisional Acute Reference Doses (ARfDs) of the mixture, i.e. 0.01 µg kg(-1) BM for each alkaloid, and a further refinement using higher-tier approaches.

  6. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, Omar C-M Ma, Charlie

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  7. Acute Toxicity in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Androgen Suppression and Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pervez, Nadeem; Small, Cormac; MacKenzie, Marc; Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Ghosh, Sunita; Mihai, Alina; Amanie, John; Murtha, Albert; Field, Colin; Murray, David; Fallone, Gino; Pearcey, Robert

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To report acute toxicity resulting from radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation and hypofractionation using intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) treatment combined with androgen suppression in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients with a histological diagnosis of high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma (having either a clinical Stage of >=T3a or an initial prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of >=20 ng/ml or a Gleason score of 8 to 10 or a combination of a PSA concentration of >15 ng/ml and a Gleason score of 7) were enrolled. RT prescription was 68 Gy in 25 fractions (2.72 Gy/fraction) over 5 weeks to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles. The pelvic lymph nodes and distal seminal vesicles concurrently received 45 Gy in 25 fractions. The patients were treated with helical TomoTherapy-based IMRT and underwent daily megavoltage CT image-guided verification prior to each treatment. Acute toxicity scores were recorded weekly during RT and at 3 months post-RT, using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity scales. Results: All patients completed RT and follow up for 3 months. The maximum acute toxicity scores were as follows: 21 (35%) patients had Grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity; 4 (6.67%) patients had Grade 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity; and 30 (33.33%) patients had Grade 2 GU toxicity. These toxicity scores were reduced after RT; there were only 8 (13.6%) patients with Grade 1 GI toxicity, 11 (18.97%) with Grade 1 GU toxicity, and 5 (8.62%) with Grade 2 GU toxicity at 3 months follow up. Only the V60 to the rectum correlated with the GI toxicity. Conclusion: Dose escalation using a hypofractionated schedule to the prostate with concurrent pelvic lymph node RT and long-term androgen suppression therapy is well tolerated acutely. Longer follow up for outcome and late toxicity is required.

  8. Skin wound trauma, following high-dose radiation exposure, amplifies and prolongs skeletal tissue loss.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua M; Swift, Sibyl N; Smith, Joan T; Kiang, Juliann G; Allen, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the detrimental effects of non-lethal, high-dose (whole body) γ-irradiation on bone, and the impact that radiation combined with skin trauma (i.e. combined injury) has on long-term skeletal tissue health. Recovery of bone after an acute dose of radiation (RI; 8 Gy), skin wounding (15-20% of total body skin surface), or combined injury (RI+Wound; CI) was determined 3, 7, 30, and 120 days post-irradiation in female B6D2F1 mice and compared to non-irradiated mice (SHAM) at each time-point. CI mice demonstrated long-term (day 120) elevations in serum TRAP 5b (osteoclast number) and sclerostin (bone formation inhibitor), and suppression of osteocalcin levels through 30 days as compared to SHAM (p<0.05). Radiation-induced reductions in distal femur trabecular bone volume fraction and trabecular number through 120 days post-exposure were significantly greater than non-irradiated mice (p<0.05) and were exacerbated in CI mice by day 30 (p<0.05). Negative alterations in trabecular bone microarchitecture were coupled with extended reductions in cancellous bone formation rate in both RI and CI mice as compared to Sham (p<0.05). Increased osteoclast surface in CI animals was observed for 3 days after irradiation and remained elevated through 120 days (p<0.01). These results demonstrate a long-term, exacerbated response of bone to radiation when coupled with non-lethal wound trauma. Changes in cancellous bone after combined trauma were derived from extended reductions in osteoblast-driven bone formation and increases in osteoclast activity.

  9. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for female peri-urethral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Bhatla, Neerja; Kumar, Sunesh; Rath, Goura Kisor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peri-urethral cancer (PUC) in females is a rare malignancy. Surgery is not usually contemplated due to associated morbidity. Radiation therapy (RT) can be employed in the form of interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) alone for early lesions, and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without IBT for advanced lesions. We report our first experience in the literature to evaluate the role of high-dose-rate (HDR) IBT in female PUC. Material and methods Between 2008 and 2013, 10 female patients with PUC (5 primary and 5 recurrent) were treated with HDR-IBT with or without EBRT at our center. Size of the lesion ranged from 1.5 cm to 5.0 cm. A 2-3 plane free-hand implant was performed using plastic catheters. The prescribed dose of HDR-IBT was 42 Gy in 14 fractions for brachytherapy alone (5 patients), and 18-21 Gy for the boost along with EBRT (5 patients). Patients were followed up regularly for assessment of disease control and toxicity. Results At a median follow up of 25 months, six patients were disease free at their last follow up. Four patients developed recurrence: 2 at inguinal nodes, 1 at local site, and 1 at both local as well as inguinal nodes. Moist desquamation was the commonest acute toxicity observed in all 5 patients treated with IBT alone, which healed within 4 weeks’ time. Overall, grade II delayed complication rate was 30%. Conclusions Though small sample size, the results of our study have shown that HDR-IBT provides good loco-regional control with acceptable toxicity for female PUC. PMID:26985196

  10. An acute dose of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid alters gene expression in multiple mouse brain regions.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, B J; Saini, U T; Robinson, B L; Ali, S F; Patterson, T A

    2010-10-13

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is normally found in the brain in low concentrations and may function as a neurotransmitter, although the mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. GHB has been used as a general anesthetic and is currently used to treat narcolepsy and alcoholism. Recreational use of GHB is primarily as a "club drug" and a "date rape drug," due to its amnesic effects. For this study, the hypothesis was that behavioral and neurochemical alterations may parallel gene expression changes in the brain after GHB administration. Adult male C57/B6N mice (n=5/group) were administered a single dose of 500 mg/kg GHB (i.p.) and were sacrificed 1, 2 and 4 h after treatment. Control mice were administered saline. Brains were removed and regionally dissected on ice. Total RNA from the hippocampus, cortex and striatum was extracted, amplified and labeled. Gene expression was evaluated using Agilent whole mouse genome 4x44K oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray data were analyzed by ArrayTrack and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using P < or = 0.01 and a fold change > or = 1.7 as the criteria for significance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) showed that samples from each time point clustered into distinct treatment groups with respect to sacrifice time. Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) was used to identify involved pathways. The results show that GHB induces gene expression alterations in hundreds of genes in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum, and the number of affected genes increases throughout a 4-h time course. Many of these DEGs are involved in neurological disease, apoptosis, and oxidative stress.

  11. Use of high-dose epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate during neonatal resuscitation: is there proven benefit?

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Myra H; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2006-03-01

    For adults and pediatric age patients, high-dose intravenous epinephrine was recommended if standard-dose epinephrine failed to achieve return of spontaneous circulation. More recent trials suggest that high-dose epinephrine is not beneficial and may result in increased harm. There are no randomized clinical studies of high-dose versus standard-dose intravenous epinephrine in neonates. Routine use of high-dose epinephrine during neonatal resuscitation cannot be recommended. Although sodium bicarbonate has been used during neonatal resuscitation, the only randomized controlled trial of its use during brief neonatal resuscitation showed no benefit. Sodium bicarbonate infusion during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has several known and potential side effects. The use of sodium bicarbonate infusion should be discouraged during brief CPR. Whether sodium bicarbonate is beneficial for infants who require prolonged CPR despite adequate ventilation is unknown.

  12. PLUTONIUM/HIGH LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE - DBE OFFSITE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. O. Bader

    1999-09-20

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide a bounding dose consequence analysis of the immobilized plutonium (can-in-canister) waste form to be handled at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain. The current concept for the Plutonium Can-in-Canister waste form is provided in Attachment III. A typical design basis event (DBE) defines a scenario that generally includes an initiating event and the sequences of events that follow. This analysis will provide (1) radiological releases and dose consequences for a postulated, bounding DBE and (2) design-related assumptions on which the calculated dose consequences are based. This analysis is part of the safety design basis for the repository. Results will be used in other analyses to determine or modify the safety classification and quality assurance level of repository structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The Quality Assurance (QA) program applies to this calculation. The work reported in this document is part of the analysis of MGR DBEs and is performed using AP-3.12Q, Calculations. The work done for this analysis was evaluated according to QAP-2-0, Control of Activities. This evaluation determined that such activities are subject to DOE/RW/0333PY Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (DOE 1998), requirements. This calculation is quality affecting because the results may be used to support analyses of repository SSCs per QAP-2-3, Classification of Permanent Items.

  13. Acute single dose of ketamine relieves mechanical allodynia and consequent depression-like behaviors in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Fen; Wang, Jing; Han, Jin-Feng; Guo, Jie; Xie, Ze-Min; Pan, Wei; Yang, Jian-Jun; Sun, Kang-Jian

    2016-09-19

    Both chronic pain and depression are debilitating diseases, which often coexist in clinic. However, current analgesics and antidepressants exhibit limited efficacy for this comorbidity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine on the comorbidity of inflammatory pain and consequent depression-like behaviors in a rat model established by intraplantar administration of complete Freunds adjuvant (CFA). The mechanical withdrawal threshold, thermal withdrawal latency, open field test, forced swimming test, and sucrose preference test were evaluated after the CFA injection and ketamine treatment. The hippocampus was harvested to determine the levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), kynurenine (KYN), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and tryptophan (TRP). The inflammatory pain-induced depression-like behaviors presented on 7days and lasted to at least 14days after the CFA injection. Single dose of ketamine at 20mg/kg relieved both the mechanical allodynia and the associated depression-like behaviors as demonstrated by the attenuated mechanical withdrawal threshold, reduced immobility time in the forced swim test, and increased sucrose preference after ketamine treatment. The total distance had no significant change after the CFA injection or ketamine treatment in the open field test. Simultaneously, ketamine reduced the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, IDO, and KYN/TRP ratio and increased the 5-HT/TRP ratio in the hippocampus. In conclusion, acute single dose of ketamine can rapidly attenuate mechanical allodynia and consequent depression-like behaviors and down-regulate hippocampal proinflammatory responses and IDO/KYN signal pathway in rats. PMID:27497920

  14. Evidence of a treatment dose response in acute nonlymphocytic leukemias which occur after therapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.H.; Young, R.C.; Merrill, J.M.; DeVita, V.T.

    1983-04-01

    We evaluated the occurrence of second cancers among 517 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) treated at the National Cancer Institute. Nine cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANL) were observed compared to 0.08 cases expected (ratio of observed to expected cases, 105; 95% confidence limits, 48; 199). The excess risk of ANL was 4.1 cases per 1000 patients per year; the cumulative risk of ANL at 10 years was 7.9 +/- 3.2% (S.E.). A case-control study within the NHL cohort revealed that patients treated with both radiation and chemotherapy were at greater risk of ANL than were patients who received single-modality therapy (relative risk, 6.0; p less than 0.05), especially if the therapy included total-body or hemibody radiation. A positive correlation between cumulative radiation dose to the bone marrow and risk of ANL was demonstrated, independent of chemotherapy duration. A similar correlation between chemotherapy dose and risk of ANL was suggested but could not be proven with the available data. An apparent association between ANL risk and indolent NHL histological subtypes was due to the significantly larger amounts of potentially leukemogenic therapy to which these patients were repeatedly exposed. Only one case of ANL occurred among NHL patients whose initial therapy produced a durable complete remission. Our data are compatible with a multistep model of leukemogenesis and also underscore the need for curative NHL treatment regimens which minimize the duration and quantity of therapy required for optimum patient management.

  15. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  16. High-risk acute myelogenous leukemia: treatment today ... and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    High-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) constitutes a distinct subset of disease based on clinical and biological characteristics and comprises a significant percentage of all cases of adult AML. Biologic features such as distinct clonal cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities identify a subgroup of AML patients characterized by poor response to induction chemotherapy and poor long-term survival after treatment with consolidation chemotherapy. Clinical variables that predict for poor response include AML relapsed after less than 1 year of remission and AML characterized by resistance to conventional agents. We review here our understanding of the defining biologic subtypes of AML and discuss how adequate initial evaluation can be used to inform the choice of treatment. By defining high-risk biologic and clinical variables, a strong case can be made for treating patients with investigational agents, with treatment directed at distinct cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities. Allogeneic transplantation is the only form of therapy available outside of the setting of a clinical trial that may offer a chance for long-term survival for patients with high-risk AML.

  17. A computer simulation method for low-dose CT images by use of real high-dose images: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Tomomi; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Goto, Makoto; Hatemura, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Practical simulations of low-dose CT images have a possibility of being helpful means for optimization of the CT exposure dose. Because current methods reported by several researchers are limited to specific vendor platforms and generally rely on raw sinogram data that are difficult to access, we have developed a new computerized scheme for producing simulated low-dose CT images from real high-dose images without use of raw sinogram data or of a particular phantom. Our computerized scheme for low-dose CT simulation was based on the addition of a simulated noise image to a real high-dose CT image reconstructed by the filtered back-projection algorithm. First, a sinogram was generated from the forward projection of a high-dose CT image. Then, an additional noise sinogram resulting from use of a reduced exposure dose was estimated from a predetermined noise model. Finally, a noise CT image was reconstructed with a predetermined filter and was added to the real high-dose CT image to create a simulated low-dose CT image. The noise power spectrum and modulation transfer function of the simulated low-dose images were very close to those of the real low-dose images. In order to confirm the feasibility of our method, we applied this method to clinical cases which were examined with the high dose initially and then followed with a low-dose CT. In conclusion, our proposed method could simulate the low-dose CT images from their real high-dose images with sufficient accuracy and could be used for determining the optimal dose setting for various clinical CT examinations.

  18. Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-14

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

  19. Augmented hyper-CVAD based on dose-intensified vincristine, dexamethasone, and asparaginase in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia salvage therapy.

    PubMed

    Faderl, Stefan; Thomas, Deborah Ann; O'Brien, Susan; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Borthakur, Gautam; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Verstovsek, Srdan; Ayoubi, Mohamed; Rytting, Michael; Feliu, Jennie; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2011-02-01

    The prognosis of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Recent studies in adolescents and young adults reported better outcomes when therapy was intensified. Based on hyper-CVAD (cyclophosphamide/vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone) as a backbone, we designed an augmented version with intensified doses of vincristine, dexamethasone, and asparaginase (L-asparaginase in the first 62 patients and pegaspargase in the remainder) starting from course 1. Ninety patients have been enrolled, with a median age of 34 years (range, 14-70 years). Most patients (78%) had pre-B ALL and were in first salvage (76%), with a first remission duration of 12.6 months (range, 1-78 months). Ten patients had primary refractory disease. Of 88 evaluable patients, 41 (47%) achieved complete remission (CR), with a median time to CR of 29 days (range, 18-80 days). Eight patients (9%) died within the first 30 days. Median CR duration, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 5, 6.2, and 6 months, respectively. Median overall survival of CR patients was 10.2 months (range, 1.4-69.5+ months). Twenty-eight patients (32%) proceeded to stem cell transplantation. Myelosuppression-associated complications were frequent. Pegaspargase was equally effective and easier to administer than L-asparaginase. Augmented hyper-CVAD may be suitable to be studied in younger adults with untreated ALL. PMID:21454191

  20. No difference in frontal cortical activity during an executive functioning task after acute doses of aripiprazole and haloperidol

    PubMed Central

    Bolstad, Ingeborg; Andreassen, Ole A.; Groote, Inge R.; Haatveit, Beathe; Server, Andres; Jensen, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aripiprazole is an atypical antipsychotic drug that is characterized by partial dopamine D2 receptor agonism. Its pharmacodynamic profile is proposed to be beneficial in the treatment of cognitive impairment, which is prevalent in psychotic disorders. This study compared brain activation characteristics produced by aripiprazole with that of haloperidol, a typical D2 receptor antagonist, during a task targeting executive functioning. Methods: Healthy participants received an acute oral dose of haloperidol, aripiprazole or placebo before performing an executive functioning task while blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was carried out. Results: There was a tendency towards reduced performance in the aripiprazole group compared to the two other groups. The image analysis yielded a strong task-related BOLD-fMRI response within each group. An uncorrected between-group analysis showed that aripiprazole challenge resulted in stronger activation in the frontal and temporal gyri and the putamen compared with haloperidol challenge, but after correcting for multiple testing there was no significant group difference. Conclusion: No significant group differences between aripiprazole and haloperidol in frontal cortical activation were obtained when corrected for multiple comparisons. This study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: 2009-016222-14).1 PMID:26074803

  1. Comparison of high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fayed, Alaa; Mutch, David G.; Rader, Janet S.; Gibb, Randall K. |; Powell, Matthew A. |; Wright, Jason D.; El Naqa, Issam; Zoberi, Imran |; Grigsby, Perry W. |||. E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes for endometrial carcinoma patients treated with either high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 1,179 patients divided into LDR (1,004) and HDR groups (175). Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical Stages I-III were included. All patients were treated with postoperative irradiation. In the LDR group, the postoperative dose applied to the vaginal cuff was 60-70 Gy surface doses to the vaginal mucosa. The HDR brachytherapy prescription was 6 fractions of 2 Gy each to a depth of 0.5 cm from the surface of the vaginal mucosa. Overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, and complications were endpoints. Results: For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the LDR group were 70%, 69%, and 81%, respectively. For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the HDR group were 68%, 62%, and 78%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early or late Grade III and IV complications in the HDR or LDR groups. Conclusion: Survival outcomes, pelvic tumor control, and Grade III and IV complications were not significantly different in the LDR brachytherapy group compared with the HDR group.

  2. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  3. Predicting the acute behavioral effects in rats inhaling toluene (or up to 24 hrs: Inhaled vs. internal dose metrics.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute toxicity oftoluene, a model volatile organic compound (VOC), depends on the concentration (C) and duration (t) ofexposure, and guidelines for acute exposures have traditionally used ext relationships to extrapolate protective and/or effective concentrations across durat...

  4. Proton Radiotherapy for High-Risk Pediatric Neuroblastoma: Early Outcomes and Dose Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Rombi, Barbara; Yock, Torunn I.; Broussard, George; Friedmann, Alison M.; Huang, Mary; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for children with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiotherapy (RT) and to compare the dose distributions for intensity-modulated photon RT (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton RT (3D-CPT), and intensity-modulated proton RT to the postoperative tumor bed. Methods and Materials: All patients with high-risk (International Neuroblastoma Staging System Stage III or IV) neuroblastoma treated between 2005 and 2010 at our institution were included. All patients received induction chemotherapy, surgical resection of residual disease, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue, and adjuvant 3D-CPT to the primary tumor sites. The patients were followed with clinical examinations, imaging, and laboratory testing every 6 months to monitor disease control and side effects. IMRT, 3D-CPT, and intensity-modulated proton RT plans were generated and compared for a representative case of adjuvant RT to the primary tumor bed followed by a boost. Results: Nine patients were treated with 3D-CPT. The median age at diagnosis was 2 years (range 10 months to 4 years), and all patients had Stage IV disease. All patients had unfavorable histologic characteristics (poorly differentiated histologic features in 8, N-Myc amplification in 6, and 1p/11q chromosomal abnormalities in 4). The median tumor size at diagnosis was 11.4 cm (range 7-16) in maximal dimension. At a median follow-up of 38 months (range 11-70), there were no local failures. Four patients developed distant failure, and, of these, two died of disease. Acute side effects included Grade 1 skin erythema in 5 patients and Grade 2 anorexia in 2 patients. Although comparable target coverage was achieved with all three modalities, proton therapy achieved substantial normal tissue sparing compared with IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton RT allowed additional sparing of the kidneys, lungs, and heart. Conclusions: Preliminary outcomes reveal excellent local control with proton therapy

  5. TLD efficiency of 7LiF for doses deposited by high-LET particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of 7 LiF TLDs (TLD-700) in registering dose from high-LET (> or = 10 keV/micrometers) charged particles (relative to 137Cs gamma rays) has been measured for a number of accelerated heavy ions at various particle accelerator facilities. These measured efficiency values have been compared with similar results obtained from the open literature and a dose efficiency function has been fitted to the combined data set. While it was found that the dose efficiency is not only a function of LET, but also of the charge of the incident particle, the fitted function can be used to correct the undermeasured value of dose from exposures made in mixed radiation fields where LET information is available. This LET-dependent dose efficiency function is used in our laboratory in determining total absorbed dose and dose equivalent from combined TLD and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector measurements.

  6. Fixed low-dose ultrasound-assisted catheter-directed thrombolysis followed by routine stenting of residual stenosis for acute ilio-femoral deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Engelberger, Rolf P; Fahrni, Jennifer; Willenberg, Torsten; Baumann, Frederic; Spirk, David; Diehm, Nicolas; Do, Dai-Do; Baumgartner, Iris; Kucher, Nils

    2014-06-01

    Patients with ilio-femoral deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) are at high risk of developing the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). In comparison to anticoagulation therapy alone, extended venography-guided catheter-directed thrombolysis without routine stenting of venous stenosis in patients with ilio-femoral DVT is associated with an increased risk of bleeding and a moderate reduction of PTS. We performed a prospective single-centre study to investigate safety, patency and incidence of PTS in patients with acute ilio-femoral DVT treated with fixed-dose ultrasound-assisted catheter-directed thrombolysis (USAT; 20 mg rt-PA during 15 hours) followed by routing stenting of venous stenosis, defined as residual luminal narrowing >50%, absent antegrade flow, or presence of collateral flow at the site of suspected stenosis. A total of 87 patients (age 46 ± 21 years, 60% women) were included. At 15 hours, thrombolysis success ≥50% was achieved in 67 (77%) patients. Venous stenting (mean 1.9 ± 1.3 stents) was performed in 70 (80%) patients, with the common iliac vein as the most frequent stenting site (83%). One major (1%; 95% CI, 0-6%) and 6 minor bleedings (7%; 95%CI, 3-14%) occurred. Primary and secondary patency rates at 1 year were 87% (95% CI, 74-94%) and 96% (95% CI, 88-99%), respectively. At three months, 88% (95% CI, 78-94%) of patients were free from PTS according to the Villalta scale, with a similar rate at one year (94%, 95% CI, 81-99%). In conclusion, a fixed-dose USAT regimen followed by routine stenting of underlying venous stenosis in patients with ilio-femoral DVT was associated with a low bleeding rate, high patency rates, and a low incidence of PTS.

  7. Phase II trial to assess the safety and efficacy of clofarabine in combination with low-dose cytarabine in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Montesinos, Pau; Oriol, Albert; Salamero, Olga; Vidriales, Belén; Bergua, Juan; Herrera, Pilar; Vives, Susanna; Sanz, Jaime; Carpio, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) could induce roughly 60 % of complete remissions (CR) with acceptable toxicity and induction mortality in elderly acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients not suitable for intensive chemotherapy. The Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología group conducted a trial for patients diagnosed with untreated AML aged 60 years and older, using the combination of clofarabine (20 mg/m(2) × 5 days) plus low-dose cytarabine (20 mg/m(2) × 14 days). The protocol was flexible regarding the use of antifungal and antibacterial prophylaxis, and outpatient induction therapy was allowed. Although the planned recruitment goal was 75 patients, only 11 patients were enrolled (median age, 74 years) after observing high toxicity and unacceptable mortality (46 and 73 % at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively). The response assessment showed three CR (27 %), three resistant diseases (27 %), and five induction deaths (46 %). Induction was administered in an outpatient modality in five patients, while antifungal and antibacterial prophylaxis was not given in seven and five patients, respectively. In our context, induction therapy with the combination of clofarabine (20 mg/m(2)) plus LDAC was associated with high toxicity and unacceptable mortality in elderly AML patients, leading to the early interruption of the trial. Tight patients' clinical monitoring, follow-up, and intensive supportive care seem crucial to achieve at least acceptable clinical outcomes in elderly AML patients receiving clofarabine plus LDAC. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as no. NCT01193400.

  8. Fractionated gemtuzumab ozogamicin and standard dose cytarabine produced prolonged second remissions in patients over the age of 55 years with acute myeloid leukemia in late first relapse.

    PubMed

    Pilorge, Sylvain; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Rabian, Florence; Sarkozy, Clémentine; Taksin, Anne L; Farhat, Hassan; Merabet, Fathia; Ghez, Stéphanie; Raggueneau, Victoria; Terré, Christine; Garcia, Isabelle; Renneville, Aline; Preudhomme, Claude; Castaigne, Sylvie; Rousselot, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (fGO), a humanized anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody linked to calicheamicin in combination with intensive chemotherapy gives high response rates in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients in relapse. However, reduced intensity chemotherapy in combination with fractionated GO has not been tested in aged relapsing patients. Patients from our institution with CD33+ AML aged 55 years or more in first late relapse (≥ 6 months) were proposed participation in a GO compassionate use program. Induction therapy consisted in fractionated GO (fGO; 3 mg/m², days 1, 4, 7) with standard-dose cytarabine (200 mg/m² /day, 7 days). Patients were consolidated with two courses of GO and intermediate dose cytarabine. Twenty-four patients (median age 68 years) received fGO with cytarabine. Median follow-up was 42 months. The response rate was 75%, including complete remission (CR) in 16 patients and CR with incomplete platelet recovery (CRp) in two patients. Two-year overall survival (OS) was 51% (95% CI: 28-69) and 2 years relapse-free survival (RFS) was 51% (95%CI: 25-72). Duration of second CR (CR2) was longer than first CR (CR1) in 9 out of 18 patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD) was negative in evaluable patients in CR2, particularly in NPM1 mutated cases. Toxicity was in line with that of the same fractionated single agent GO schedule. Fractionated GO with low intensity chemotherapy produced high response rates and prolonged CR2 in aged AML patients in first late relapse. PMID:24375467

  9. Arterial thromboembolism in cats: acute crisis in 127 cases (1992-2001) and long-term management with low-dose aspirin in 24 cases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephanie A; Tobias, Anthony H; Jacob, Kristin A; Fine, Deborah M; Grumbles, Pamela L

    2003-01-01

    Records of 127 cats with arterial thromboembolism (ATE) were reviewed. Abyssinian, Birman, Ragdoll, and male cats were overrepresented. Tachypnea (91%), hypothermia (66%), and absent limb motor function (66%) were common. Of 90 cats with diagnostics performed, underlying diseases were hyperthyroidism (12), cardiomyopathy (dilated [8], unclassified [33], hypertrophic obstructive [5], hypertrophic [19]), neoplasia (6), other (4), and none (3). Common abnormalities were left atrial enlargement (93%), congestive heart failure (CHF, 44%), and arrhythmias (44%). Of cats without CHF, 89% were tachypneic. Common biochemical abnormalities were hyperglycemia, azotemia, and abnormally high serum concentrations of muscle enzymes. Of 87 cats treated for acute limb ATE, 39 (45%) survived to be discharged. Significant differences were found between survivors and nonsurvivors for temperature (P < .00001), heart rate (P = .038), serum phosphorus concentration (P = .024), motor function (P = .008), and number of limbs affected (P = .001). No significant difference was found between survivors and nonsurvivors when compared by age, respiratory rate, other biochemical analytes, or concurrent CHE A logistic regression model based on rectal temperature predicted a 50% probability of survival at 98.9 degrees F (37.2 degrees C). Median survival time (MST) for discharged cats was 117 days. Eleven cats had ATE recurrences, and 5 cats developed limb problems. Cats with CHF (MST: 77 days) had significantly shorter survival than cats without CHF (MST: 223 days; P = .016). No significant difference was found in survival or recurrence rate between cats receiving high-dose aspirin (> or = 40 mg/cat q72h) and cats receiving low-dose aspirin (5 mg/cat q72h). Adverse effects were less frequent and milder for the lower dosage.

  10. Impact of conventional fractionated RT to pelvic lymph nodes and dose-escalated hypofractionated RT to prostate gland using IMRT treatment delivery in high-risk prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, Nadeem

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian men. The standard treatment in high-risk category is radical radiation, with androgen suppression treatment (AST). Significant disease progression is reported despite this approach. Radiation dose escalation has been shown to improve disease-free survival; however, it results in higher toxicities. Hypofractionated radiation schedules (larger dose each fraction in shorter overall treatment time) are expected to deliver higher biological doses. A hypofractionated scheme was used in this study to escalate radiation doses with AST. Treatment was well tolerated acutely. Early results of self-administered quality of life reported by patients shows a decrease in QOL which is comparable to other treatment schedules. Significant positional variation of the prostate was observed during treatment. Therefore, we suggest daily target verification to avoid a target miss. Initial late effects are reasonable and early treatment outcomes are promising. Longer follow-up is required for full outcomes assessments.

  11. Pressor recovery after acute stress is impaired in high fructose-fed Lean Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer A; D'Angelo, Gerard; Mintz, James D; Fulton, David J; Stepp, David W

    2016-06-01

    Insulin resistance is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular disease; however, the mechanistic link remains unclear. This study aims to determine if early cardiovascular changes associated with short-term fructose feeding in the absence of obesity manifest as abnormal blood pressure control. Metabolic dysfunction was induced in Lean Zucker rats by short-term high-fructose feeding. Rats were implanted with telemetry devices for the measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and subjected to air jet stress at 5 and 8 weeks after feeding. Additional animals were catheterized under anesthesia for the determination of MAP and blood flow responses in the hind limb and mesenteric vascular beds to intravenous injection of isoproterenol (0.001-0.5 μm), a β-adrenergic agonist. Metabolic dysfunction in high-fructose rats was not accompanied by changes in 24-h MAP Yet, animals fed a high-fructose diet for 8 weeks exhibited a marked impairment in blood pressure recovery after air-jet stress. Dose-dependent decreases in MAP and peripheral blood flow in response to isoproterenol treatment were significantly attenuated in high-fructose rats. These data suggest that impaired blood pressure recovery to acute mental stress precedes the onset of hypertension in the early stages of insulin resistance. Further, blunted responses to isoproterenol implicate β2-adrenergic sensitivity as a possible mechanism responsible for altered blood pressure control after short-term high-fructose feeding.

  12. High-dose-rate brachytherapy delivered in two fractions as monotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alwers, Elizabeth; Cifuentes, Javier; Bobadilla, Ivan; Torres, Felipe; Arbelaez, Juan; Gaitan, Armando; Cortes, Helber; Acevedo, Yenny; Quintero, Paulo; Vasquez, Jaider

    2015-01-01

    Purpose High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been accepted as an effective and safe method to treat prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to describe acute toxicity following HDR brachytherapy to the prostate, and to examine the association between dosimetric parameters and urinary toxicity in low-risk prostate cancer patients. Material and methods Patients with low-risk prostate cancer were given HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy in two 12.5 Gy fractions. Planning objectives for the planning target volume (PTV) were V100% ≥ 90% and V150% ≤ 35%. Planning objectives for organs at risk were V75% ≤ 1 cc for the bladder, rectum and perineum, and V125% ≤ 1 cc for the urethra. Toxicity was assessed three months after treatment using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results Seventy-three patients were included in the analysis. Thirty-three patients (45%) reported having any type of toxicity in the three months following HDR brachytherapy. Most toxicity cases (26%) were grade 1 urinary toxicity. Mean coverage index was 0.89 and mean V100 was 88.85. Doses administered to the urethra were associated with urinary toxicity. Patients who received more than 111.3% of the prescribed dose in 1 cc of the urethra were four times more likely to have urinary toxicity compared to patients receiving less than 111.3% (OR = 4.71, 95% CI: 1.43-15.6; p = 0.011). Conclusions High-dose-rate brachytherapy administered as monotherapy for prostate cancer proved to be a safe alternative treatment for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Urinary toxicity was associated with the dose administered to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of the urethra and was remarkably inferior to the reported toxicity in similar studies. PMID:25829931

  13. Late side effects of high-dose steroid therapy on skeletal system in children with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Zühal Keskin; Büyükavci, Mustafa; Eren, Suat; Orbak, Zerrin; Sahin, Ali; Karakelleoğlu, Cahit

    2008-10-01

    Corticosteroids have been widely used in the treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). We evaluated the late side effects of high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) therapy on bone metabolism in children with ITP. Twenty-eight children with acute ITP treated with HDMP (30 mg/kg/d for 3 d then 20 mg/kg/d for 4 d) and 28 controls were enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density (BMD), urinary calcium creatinine ratio, urinary levels of deoxypyridinoline, serum levels of calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, total alkaline phosphatase, and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase were measured in both groups. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head was performed only in study group. The mean levels of serum phosphate, parathyroid hormone, urinary deoxypyridinoline, and calcium creatinine ratio were significantly increased in the study group. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of serum calcium, total alkaline phosphatase, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and BMD values. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between cumulative steroid dose and BMD values in study group (r = -0.379). Osteonecrosis was observed in 3 of 25 patients by magnetic resonance imaging. In conclusion, HDMP therapy, especially in high cumulative doses, increases the bone resorption and may cause osteonecrosis in children with ITP.

  14. [Treatment of parturient paresis with high-dose calcium].

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Jehle, W; Siegwart, N; Bleul, U; Hässig, M

    2006-03-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate a calcium dose that was higher than the conventional dose for treatment of parturient paresis in cows. Thirty cows with parturient paresis received 1000 ml of 40 per cent calcium borogluconate solution supplemented with 6 per cent magnesium hypophosphite. Cows in group A received 200 ml of the solution intravenously over a 10-minute period, and the remaining 800 ml via a slow intravenous drip over a six-hour period. Cows in group B received 500 ml of the solution intravenously over a 20-minute period, and the remaining 500 ml via a slow intravenous drip over a six-hour period. Afterwards, the cows were monitored continuously and examined every hour for eight hours. Samples of blood were collected from all the cows before treatment and at 10, 20, 40, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, 420 and 480 minutes and 24, 48 and 72 hours after treatment. The concentrations of total calcium, ionised calcium, inorganic phosphorus and magnesium were determined. Cows that did not stand within 12 hours of treatment received one or more additional treatments. There was no significant difference in the recovery rate between the two groups. Of the 30 cows, 14 (47 per cent) rised after one treatment and 15 others (50 per cent) were cured after two or more treatments. One cow did not respond to repeated treatments and was euthanased four days after the start of treatment. The results of electrolyte analyses before treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups. In 27 (90 per cent) cows, the concentrations of calcium and inorganic phosphorus were lower than normal and in 3 (10 per cent) cows, only the concentration of inorganic phosphorus was lower than normal. The concentration of total calcium increased markedly ten minutes after the start of treatment in both groups, and at eight hours, the mean concentration of calcium was within the normal range. At 24 and 48 hours, the mean concentration of calcium was below normal, but at

  15. Effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the functional characteristics of amniotic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Purohit, Sumita; Chacharkar, M. P.

    2007-06-01

    The effect of different doses of gamma radiation viz. 25, 36 and 50 kGy on the chemical and functional characteristics of the amniotic membrane was studied. The change in the chemical structure of amniotic membranes at high doses of gamma irradiation was evaluated by means of Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy. The degradation of amnion on irradiation with gamma rays could produce a relative variation in IR absorption troughs. This kind of variation was absent in the samples irradiated to doses of 25, 36 and 50 kGy indicating no qualitative change in the material property of amnion. No significant differences in the water absorption capacity and water vapour transmission rate of amniotic membranes irradiated to different doses were observed. Impermeability of the amniotic membranes to different microorganisms was also not affected at high doses of gamma radiation. Gamma irradiation at doses of 25-50 kGy did not evoke undesirable changes in the functional properties of the amniotic membrane.

  16. TMPyP4 promotes cancer cell migration at low doses, but induces cell death at high doses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Nie, Xin; Liu, Hai-Ying; Fang, Yi-Ming; Zhao, Yong; Xia, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    TMPyP4 is widely considered as a potential photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy and a G-quadruplex stabilizer for telomerase-based cancer therapeutics. However, its biological effects including a possible adverse-effect are poorly understood. In this study, whole genome RNA-seq analysis was used to explore the alteration in gene expression induced by TMPyP4. Unexpectedly, we find that 27.67% of changed genes were functionally related to cell adhesion. Experimental evidences from cell adhesion assay, scratch-wound and transwell assay indicate that TMPyP4 at conventional doses (≤0.5 μM) increases cell-matrix adhesion and promotes the migration of tumor cells. In contrast, a high dose of TMPyP4 (≥2 μM) inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell death. The unintended “side-effect” of TMPyP4 on promoting cell migration suggests that a relative high dose of TMPyP4 is preferred for therapeutic purpose. These findings contribute to better understanding of biological effects induced by TMPyP4 and provide a new insight into the complexity and implication for TMPyP4 based cancer therapy. PMID:27221067

  17. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian; Chen, Lee-May; Littell, Ramey; Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A.; Chan, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  18. Efficacy of multiple exposure with low level He-Ne laser dose on acute wound healing: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for wound healing especially with the red laser light have demonstrated its pro-healing potential on a variety of pre-clinical and surgical wounds. However, until now, in LLLT the effect of multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation on acute wound healing on well-designed pre-clinical model is not much explored. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of multiple exposure of low dose Helium Neon laser on healing progression of full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice. Further, the efficacy of the multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation was compared with the single exposure of optimum dose. Full thickness excision wounds (circular) of 15 mm diameter were created, and subsequently illuminated with the multiple exposures (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 exposure/ week until healing) of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 4.02 mWcm-2) laser at 0.5 Jcm-2 along with single exposure of optimum laser dose (2 J/cm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Classical biophysical parameters such as contraction kinetics, area under the curve and the mean healing time were documented as the assessment parameters to examine the efficacy of multiple exposures with low level laser dose. Experimental findings substantiated that either single or multiple exposures of 0.5 J/cm2 failed to produce any detectable alterations on wound contraction, area under the curve and mean healing time compared to single exposure of optimum dose (2 Jcm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Single exposure of optimum, laser dose was found to be ideal for acute wound healing.

  19. Plasma Doping - Enabling Technology for High Dose Logic and Memory Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.; Godet, L.; Papasouliotis, G. D.; Singh, V.

    2008-11-03

    As logic and memory device dimensions shrink with each generation, there are more high dose implants at lower energies. Examples include dual poly gate (also referred to as counter-doped poly), elevated source drain and contact plug implants. Plasma Doping technology throughput and dopant profile benefits at these ultra high dose and lower energy conditions have been well established [1,2,3]. For the first time a production-worthy plasma doping implanter, the VIISta PLAD tool, has been developed with unique architecture suited for precise and repeatable dopant placement. Critical elements of the architecture include pulsed DC wafer bias, closed-loop dosimetry and a uniform low energy, high density plasma source. In this paper key performance metrics such as dose uniformity, dose repeatability and dopant profile control will be presented that demonstrate the production-worthiness of the VIISta PLAD tool for several high dose applications.

  20. Infused vincristine and adriamycin with high dose methylprednisolone (VAMP) in advanced previously treated multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Forgeson, G. V.; Selby, P.; Lakhani, S.; Zulian, G.; Viner, C.; Maitland, J.; McElwain, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma received continuous infusions of vincristine (0.4 mg total dose daily for 4 days) and adriamycin (9 mg m-2 daily for 4 days) with a high dose of methylprednisolone (1 g m-2 i.v. or p.o. daily by 1 h infusion), the VAMP regimen. Sixteen (36%) responded, with a median duration of remission of 11 months and median survival of 20 months. Major toxicities encountered were infective and cardiovascular. Two smaller groups of myeloma patients were treated with high dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) alone, or VAMP plus weekly low dose cyclophosphamide (Cyclo-VAMP). HDMP produced short responses in 25% of patients with less toxicity than VAMP. Cyclo-VAMP was used in a highly selected group of patients who had previously responded to high dose melphalan. It was well tolerated and produced responses in 61% of this group. PMID:3207601

  1. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  2. Higher Dose of Mycophenolate Mofetil Reduces Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Reduced Intensity Conditioning Double Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bejanyan, Nelli; Rogosheske, John; DeFor, Todd; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Esbaum, Kelli; Holtan, Shernan; Arora, Mukta; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Weisdorf, Daniel; Jacobson, Pamala; Wagner, John; Brunstein, Claudio G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is frequently used in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis and to facilitate engraftment. We previously reported that a higher level of mycophenolic acid can be achieved with an MMF dose of 3 g/day as compared to 2g/day. Here, we retrospectively compared clinical outcomes of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) double umbilical cord blood (dUCB) HCT recipients receiving cyclosporine A with MMF 2g (n=93) vs. 3g (n=175) daily. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for ATG in the conditioning revealed that MMF 3g/day led to a 49% relative risk reduction in grade II–IV acute GVHD rate (RR=0.51, 95%CI 0.36–0.72; p<0.01). However, the higher MMF dose was not protective for chronic GVHD. Additionally, MMF dose was not an independent predictor of neutrophil engraftment, treatment-related mortality at 6 months, or 2-year post-transplant disease relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival. Higher MMF dose did not increase risk of infectious complications and infection-related mortality was similar for both MMF doses. Our data indicate that MMF 3g/day reduces the risk of acute GVHD without affecting other clinical outcomes and should be used for GVHD prophylaxis after RIC dUCBT. PMID:25655791

  3. Gene expression profiling in undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma induced by high-dose radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Choi, Moo Hyun; Kim, Cha Soon; Choi, Seung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Published gene expression studies for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis have used various methodologies. In this study, we identified differential gene expression in a human thyroid epithelial cell line after exposure to high-dose γ-radiation. HTori-3 cells were exposed to 5 or 10 Gy of ionizing radiation using two dose rates (high-dose rate: 4.68 Gy/min, and low-dose rate: 40 mGy/h) and then implanted into the backs of BALB/c nude mice after 4 (10 Gy) or 5 weeks (5 Gy). Decreases in cell viability, increases in giant cell frequency, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo were observed. Particularly, the cells irradiated with 5 Gy at the high-dose rate or 10 Gy at the low-dose rate demonstrated more prominent tumorigenicity. Gene expression profiling was analyzed via microarray. Numerous genes that were significantly altered by a fold-change of >50% following irradiation were identified in each group. Gene expression analysis identified six commonly misregulated genes, including CRYAB, IL-18, ZNF845, CYP24A1, OR4N4 and VN1R4, at all doses. These genes involve apoptosis, the immune response, regulation of transcription, and receptor signaling pathways. Overall, the altered genes in high-dose rate (HDR) 5 Gy and low-dose rate (LDR) 10 Gy were more than those of LDR 5 Gy and HDR 10 Gy. Thus, we investigated genes associated with aggressive tumor development using the two dosage treatments. In this study, the identified gene expression profiles reflect the molecular response following high doses of external radiation exposure and may provide helpful information about radiation-induced thyroid tumors in the high-dose range. PMID:27006382

  4. Immunotherapy with low-dose recombinant interleukin 2 after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pession, A; Prete, A; Locatelli, F; Pierinelli, S; Pession, A L; Maccario, R; Magrini, E; De Bernardi, B; Paolucci, P; Paolucci, G

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in a phase I-II trial whether low doses of recombinant human interleukin 2 (rHuIL-2) over a prolonged period of time are safe and effective in eradicating or controlling minimal residual disease in children with neuroblastoma given high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). From January 1992 to July 1996, 17 consecutive patients, with either stage IV or relapsed neuroblastoma, were enrolled. Patients received rHuIL-2 after a median time interval (min-max) of 105 days (56-153) after HDCT and ASCT. The protocol consisted of 2 'priming' courses of rHuIL-2 at escalating doses administered intravenously at 72-h intervals, followed by 'maintenance' with 11 monthly and six bimonthly boosting 5-day courses administered subcutaneously on an outpatient basis. At April 1997, 7 out of the 17 patients had completed the treatment schedule, four had discontinued treatment because of toxicity and four because of relapse; the remaining two patients are still on treatment, having completed 15 courses. Expansion of T lymphocytes, together with an increase in both natural killer cells and in activated T lymphocytes was evidenced. After a median (min-max) follow-up time of 30 (16-64) months, 12 out of 17 patients are alive and well. Two patients relapsed and died 14 and 35 months after transplant. Three patients are alive after having relapsed at 41, 21 and 13 months. The actuarial 2-year event-free survival and overall survival are 67% and 92% respectively. Intermittent administration of low doses of rHuIL-2 given for a long period of time is well tolerated and seems capable of controlling minimal residual disease after HDCT and ASCT in children with high-risk neuroblastoma.

  5. Escalating dose pretreatment induces pharmacodynamic and not pharmacokinetic tolerance to a subsequent high-dose methamphetamine binge.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Meghan L; Kuczenski, Ronald; Segal, David S; Cho, Arthur K; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P

    2006-11-01

    A major feature of human methamphetamine (METH) abuse is the gradual dose escalation that precedes high-dose exposure. The period of escalating doses (EDs) is likely associated with development of tolerance to aspects of METH's pharmacologic and toxic effects but the relative contributions of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors have not been well defined. In our prior studies in rats, we showed that pretreatment with an ED-METH regimen (0.1-4.0 mg/kg over 14 days) attenuated the toxicity of a subsequently administered high-dose METH binge (4 x 6 mg/kg at 2 h interval) that itself produced behavioral stereotypy, increases in core temperature, and decreases in DA system phenotypic markers in caudate-putamen (CP). Using those ED-METH and binge protocols in the present studies, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters that may have contributed to the apparent neuroprotection afforded by ED-METH were assessed. The ED-METH regimen itself reduced [(3)H]WIN35,428 (WIN) binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT) by 15% in CP, but did not affect DA content. During the METH binge, ED-METH pretreated animals showed attenuated increases in core temperature while concurrent microdialysis studies in CP showed a reduced DA response despite unaltered extracellular levels of METH. At 1 h after the binge, concentrations of METH and its metabolite amphetamine in brain and plasma were unaffected by the ED-METH. The results show that ED-METH pretreatment produces reductions in DAT binding and the DA response during a subsequent METH binge by altering pharmacodynamic and not pharmacokinetic parameters.

  6. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Crosbie, J. C.; Cornelius, I.; Berkvens, P.; Donzelli, M.; Clavel, A. H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.

    2016-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called ‘current ramping’ method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials.

  7. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Crosbie, J C; Cornelius, I; Berkvens, P; Donzelli, M; Clavel, A H; Rosenfeld, A B; Petasecca, M; Lerch, M L F; Bräuer-Krisch, E

    2016-07-21

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency's TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called 'current ramping' method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials. PMID:27366861

  8. A comparative analysis of radiobiological models for cell surviving fractions at high doses.

    PubMed

    Andisheh, B; Edgren, M; Belkić, Dž; Mavroidis, P; Brahme, A; Lind, B K

    2013-04-01

    For many years the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been widely used to describe the effects of total dose and dose per fraction at low-to-intermediate doses in conventional fractionated radiotherapy. Recent advances in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have increased the interest in finding a reliable cell survival model, which will be accurate at high doses, as well. Different models have been proposed for improving descriptions of high dose survival responses, such as the Universal Survival Curve (USC), the Kavanagh-Newman (KN) and several generalizations of the LQ model, e.g. the Linear-Quadratic-Linear (LQL) model and the Pade Linear Quadratic (PLQ) model. The purpose of the present study is to compare a number of models in order to find the best option(s) which could successfully be used as a fractionation correction method in SRT. In this work, six independent experimental data sets were used: CHOAA8 (Chinese hamster fibroblast), H460 (non-small cell lung cancer, NSLC), NCI-H841 (small cell lung cancer, SCLC), CP3 and DU145 (human prostate carcinoma cell lines) and U1690 (SCLC). By detailed comparisons with these measurements, the performance of nine different radiobiological models was examined for the entire dose range, including high doses beyond the shoulder of the survival curves. Using the computed and measured cell surviving fractions, comparison of the goodness-of-fit for all the models was performed by means of the reduced χ (2)-test with a 95% confidence interval. The obtained results indicate that models with dose-independent final slopes and extrapolation numbers generally represent better choices for SRT. This is especially important at high doses where the final slope and extrapolation numbers are presently found to play a major role. The PLQ, USC and LQL models have the least number of shortcomings at all doses. The extrapolation numbers and final slopes of these models do not depend on dose. Their asymptotes

  9. Whole-pelvic volumetric-modulated arc therapy for high-risk prostate cancer: treatment planning and acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kentaro; Ogino, Ryo; Hosokawa, Yukinari; Fujioka, Chiaki; Okada, Wataru; Nakahara, Ryota; Kawamorita, Ryu; Tada, Takuhito; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate dosimetric quality and acute toxicity of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and daily image guidance in high-risk prostate cancer patients. A total of 100 consecutive high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with definitive VMAT with prophylactic whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) were enrolled. All patients were treated with a double-arc VMAT plan delivering 52 Gy to the prostate planning target volume (PTV), while simultaneously delivering 46.8 Gy to the pelvic nodal PTV in 26 fractions, followed by a single-arc VMAT plan delivering 26 Gy to the prostate PTV in 13 fractions. Image-guided RT was performed with daily cone-beam computed tomography. Dose-volume parameters for the PTV and the organs at risk (OARs), total number of monitor units (MUs) and treatment time were evaluated. Acute toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. All dosimetric parameters met the present plan acceptance criteria. Mean MU and treatment time were 471 and 146 s for double-arc VMAT, respectively, and were 520 and 76 s for single-arc VMAT, respectively. No Grade 3 or higher acute toxicity was reported. Acute Grade 2 proctitis, diarrhea, and genitourinary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (12%), 6 patients (6%) and 13 patients (13%), respectively. The present study demonstrated that VMAT for WPRT in prostate cancer results in favorable PTV coverage and OAR sparing with short treatment time and an acceptable rate of acute toxicity. These findings support the use of VMAT for delivering WPRT to high-risk prostate cancer patients.

  10. Results of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation After Treatment With Different High-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Regimens in Five Dutch Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Loes van Kempen-Harteveld, M. Brand, Ronald; Kal, Henk B.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Hofman, Pieter; Schattenberg, Anton V.; Maazen, Richard W. van der; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Eijkenboom, Wil M.H.; Lelie, Johannes P. van der; Oldenburger, Foppe; Barge, Renee M.; Biezen, Anja van; Vossen, Jaak M.J.J.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Struikmans, Henk

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate results of high-dose total-body irradiation (TBI) regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,032 patients underwent TBI in one or two fractions before autologous or allogeneic hematologic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The TBI regimens were normalized by using the biological effective dose (BED) concept. The BED values were divided into three dose groups. Study end points were relapse incidence (RI), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Multivariate analysis was performed, stratified by disease. Results: In the highest TBI dose group, RI was significantly lower and NRM was higher vs. the lower dose groups. However, a significant influence on RFS and OS was not found. Relapses in the eye region were found only after shielding to very low doses. Age was of significant influence on OS, RFS, and NRM in favor of younger patients. The NRM of patients older than 40 years significantly increased, and OS decreased. There was no influence of age on RI. Men had better OS and RFS and lower NRM. Type of transplantation significantly influenced RI and NRM for patients with acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was no influence on RFS and OS. Conclusions: Both RI and NRM were significantly influenced by the size of the BED of single-dose or two-fraction TBI regimens; OS and RFS were not. Age was of highly significant influence on NRM, but there was no influence of age on RI. Hyperfractionated TBI with a high BED might be useful, assuming NRM can be reduced.

  11. A Naturalistic, Single-blind Comparison of Rapid Dose Administration of Divalproex ER Versus Quetiapine in Patients with Acute Bipolar Mania

    PubMed Central

    Galangue, Barbara; MacDonald, Kai; Cobb, Patrice; Dinca, Ana; Becker, Olga; Cooper, J.; Hadley, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Objective: When treating acute bipolar mania, the speed of onset of anti-manic effects is crucial. Quetiapine and divalproex ER are widely used agents to treat acute mania. Rapid dose administration regimens for divalproex ER and for quetiapine have been described. We conducted a naturalistic, head-to-head, pilot study comparing the efficacy and safety of rapidly titrated divalproex ER and quetiapine in acutely manic inpatients, with the primary outcome being improvement within the first seven days. Method: Thirty consenting bipolar patients with acute mania (Young Mania Rating Scale >17 ) needing hospitalization due to acute mania were randomized to receive rapidly loaded divalproex ER (30mg/kg/day) or rapidly titrated quetiapine (200mg Day 1, raised by 200mg/day up to 800mg as tolerated). Assessments were made on Day 1 (baseline), Day 3, Day 7, Day 14, and Day 21 and included Young Mania Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impressions-Severity, Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement, and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Raters but not patients or treating physicians were blinded (single-blinded study). Results: Subjects in both treatment groups exhibited significant and rapid improvement in their mania starting at Day 3 with few significant adverse effects; however, there were no significant differences in the degree or rate of improvement between the two treatment groups in any of the efficacy or adverse effects scales. Conclusion: Results of this small study indicate that rapid-dose administration of both quetiapine and divalproex ER produce rapid improvement in acute mania within the first seven days and both seem to be well tolerated. PMID:21311705

  12. Dosimetry and preliminary acute toxicity in the first 100 men treated for prostate cancer on a randomized hypofractionation dose escalation trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, Alan . E-mail: Alan.Pollack@FCCC.edu; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Konski, Andre A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Greenberg, Richard E.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; McNeeley, Shawn W.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Price, Robert A.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: The {alpha}/{beta} ratio for prostate cancer is postulated to be between 1 and 3, giving rise to the hypothesis that there may be a therapeutic advantage to hypofractionation. The dosimetry and acute toxicity are described in the first 100 men enrolled in a randomized trial. Patients and Methods: The trial compares 76 Gy in 38 fractions (Arm I) to 70.2 Gy in 26 fractions (Arm II) using intensity modulated radiotherapy. The planning target volume (PTV) margins in Arms I and II were 5 mm and 3 mm posteriorly and 8 mm and 7 mm in all other dimensions. The PTV D95% was at least the prescription dose. Results: The mean PTV doses for Arms I and II were 81.1 and 73.8 Gy. There were no differences in overall maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity acutely. However, there was a slight but significant increase in Arm II GI toxicity during Weeks 2, 3, and 4. In multivariate analyses, only the combined rectal DVH parameter of V65 Gy/V50 Gy was significant for GI toxicity and the bladder volume for GU toxicity. Conclusion: Hypofractionation at 2.7 Gy per fraction to 70.2 Gy was well tolerated acutely using the planning conditions described.

  13. [High-dose buprenorphine for outpatient palliative pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Gastmeier, K; Freye, E

    2009-04-01

    The case of a 78-year-old patient with cancer-related pain and additionally mixed-pain syndrome is presented. Pain therapy with buprenorphine TTS 210 microg/h every 3 days was sufficient in the beginning, later the therapy was changed because of increasing problems of tape fixing during fever periods under chemotherapy to a continuous infusion of buprenorphine intravenously via an external medication pump. During the course of therapy it became necessary to increase the dose to 99.9 mg/day buprenorphine. Under this medication a sufficient pain reduction (median NRS 2-3) over a period of 135 days could be achieved. At the same time the patient was vigilant and cooperative without signs of intoxication until the end of life at home in the presence of his family.If no signs of intoxication occur under extreme opioid therapy and a sufficient pain therapy can be achieved, a rotation to another opioid is not necessary. However, outpatient palliative care requires a frequent adaptation to the individually varying opioid demand of the patient and time-consuming nursing care. PMID:19066981

  14. [High-dose buprenorphine for outpatient palliative pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Gastmeier, K; Freye, E

    2009-04-01

    The case of a 78-year-old patient with cancer-related pain and additionally mixed-pain syndrome is presented. Pain therapy with buprenorphine TTS 210 microg/h every 3 days was sufficient in the beginning, later the therapy was changed because of increasing problems of tape fixing during fever periods under chemotherapy to a continuous infusion of buprenorphine intravenously via an external medication pump. During the course of therapy it became necessary to increase the dose to 99.9 mg/day buprenorphine. Under this medication a sufficient pain reduction (median NRS 2-3) over a period of 135 days could be achieved. At the same time the patient was vigilant and cooperative without signs of intoxication until the end of life at home in the presence of his family.If no signs of intoxication occur under extreme opioid therapy and a sufficient pain therapy can be achieved, a rotation to another opioid is not necessary. However, outpatient palliative care requires a frequent adaptation to the individually varying opioid demand of the patient and time-consuming nursing care.

  15. [Biochemical modulation of 5-fluorouracil by high-dose leucovorin].

    PubMed

    Aiba, K

    1988-03-01

    The biochemical modulation of 5-fluorouracil (FU) by using it in combination with leucovorin (LV) is reviewed. One of the mechanisms of action of FU is inhibition of thymidylate synthase (TS), a critical enzyme in the de novo synthesis of thymidylate required for DNA repair and synthesis. In the presence of 5, 10-methylene tetrahydrofolate, 5-fluoro-deoxyuridine monophosphate (FdUMP), which is an active nucleotide of FU, forms a ternary complex with TS, resulting in enzyme inhibition. The rationale for the use of LV with FU is to increase of formation and stability of catalytically inactive ternary complexes. In clinical trials, the dose schedules of 500 mg/m2 iv bolus or 500 mg/m2 continuously iv infusion is frequently used in order to obtain an ideal plasma concentration of active LV metabolites. Preliminary clinical trials using the combination of FU and LV appear to be capable of increasing of the clinical activity of FU for colorectal and breast cancers. Several randomized studies have supported the increase in response rates seen in the uncontrolled trials but additional studies are required to demonstrate a positive impact on the survival of treated patients.

  16. Dose rate dependence of the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector in high dose-per-pulse pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Pombar, Miguel; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Recombination effects can affect the detectors used for the dosimetry of radiotherapy fields. They are important when using ionization chambers, especially in liquid-filled ionization chambers, and should be corrected for. The introduction of flattening-filter-free accelerators increases the typical dose-per-pulse used in radiotherapy beams, which leads to more important recombination effects. Diamond detectors provide a good solution for the dosimetry and quality assurance of small radiotherapy fields, due to their low energy dependence and small volume. The group of Università di Roma Tor Vergata has developed a synthetic diamond detector, which is commercialized by PTW as microDiamond detector type 60019. In this work we present an experimental characterization of the collection efficiency of the microDiamond detector, focusing on high dose-per-pulse FFF beams. The collection efficiency decreases with dose-per-pulse, down to 0.978 at 2.2 mGy/pulse, following a Fowler-Attix-like curve. On the other hand, we have found no significant dependence of the collection efficiency on the pulse repetition frequency (or pulse period).

  17. High dose of tigecycline for extremely resistant Gram-negative pneumonia: yes, we can

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Few antimicrobials are currently active to treat infections caused by extremely resistant Gram-negative bacilli (ERGNB), which represent a serious global public health concern. Tigecycline, which covers the majority of these ERGNB (with the exception of Pseudomonas aeruginosa), is not currently approved for hospital-acquired pneumonia, and several meta-analyses have suggested an increased risk of death in patients receiving this antibiotic. Other studies suggest that the use of high-dose tigecycline may represent an alternative in daily practice. De Pascale and colleagues report that the clinical cure rate in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia is significantly higher with a high dose of tigecycline than with the conventional dose, although mortality was unaffected. This high dose is safe; no patients required discontinuation or dose reduction. PMID:25043402

  18. A New Model of Biodosimetry to Integrate Low and High Doses

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Mònica; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Puig, Pedro; Puig, Roser; Caballín, María Rosa; Barrios, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Biological dosimetry, that is the estimation of the dose of an exposure to ionizing radiation by a biological parameter, is a very important tool in cases of radiation accidents. The score of dicentric chromosomes, considered to be the most accurate method for biological dosimetry, for low LET radiation and up to 5 Gy, fits very well to a linear-quadratic model of dose-effect curve assuming the Poisson distribution. The accuracy of this estimation raises difficulties for doses over 5 Gy, the highest dose of the majority of dose-effect curves used in biological dosimetry. At doses over 5 Gy most cells show difficulties in reaching mitosis and cannot be used to score dicentric chromosomes. In the present study with the treatment of lymphocyte cultures with caffeine and the standardization of the culture time, metaphases for doses up to 25 Gy have been analyzed. Here we present a new model for biological dosimetry, which includes a Gompertz-type function as the dose response, and also takes into account the underdispersion of aberration-among-cell distribution. The new model allows the estimation of doses of exposures to ionizing radiation of up to 25 Gy. Moreover, the model is more effective in estimating whole and partial body exposures than the classical method based on linear and linear-quadratic functions, suggesting their effectiveness and great potential to be used after high dose exposures of radiation. PMID:25461738

  19. Childhood mortality after a high dose of vitamin A in a high risk population.

    PubMed Central

    Daulaire, N. M.; Starbuck, E. S.; Houston, R. M.; Church, M. S.; Stukel, T. A.; Pandey, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine whether a single high dose of vitamin A given to all children in communities with high mortality and malnutrition could affect mortality and to assess whether periodic community wide supplementation could be readily incorporated into an ongoing primary health programme. DESIGN--Opportunistic controlled trial. SETTING--Jumla district, Nepal. SUBJECTS--All children aged under 5 years; 3786 in eight subdistricts given single dose of vitamin A and 3411 in remaining eight subdistricts given no supplementation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Mortality and cause of death in the five months after supplementation. RESULTS--Risk of death for children aged 1-59 months in supplemented communities was 26% lower (relative risk 0.74, 95% confidence interval 0.55 to 0.99) than in unsupplemented communities. The reduction in mortality was greatest among children aged 6-11 months: death rate (deaths/1000 child years at risk) was 133.8 in supplemented children and 260.8 in unsupplemented children (relative risk 0.51, 0.30 to 0.89). The death rate from diarrhoea was also reduced (63.5 supplemented v 97.5 unsupplemented; relative risk 0.65, 0.44 to 0.95). The extra cost per death averted was about $11. CONCLUSION--The results support a role for Vitamin A in increasing child survival. The supplementation programme was readily integrated with the ongoing community health programme at little extra cost. PMID:1739794

  20. Estimating Toxicity Pathway Activating Doses for High Throughput Chemical Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating a Toxicity Pathway Activating Dose (TPAD) from in vitro assays as an analog to a reference dose (RfD) derived from in vivo toxicity tests would facilitate high throughput risk assessments of thousands of data-poor environmental chemicals. Estimating a TPAD requires def...

  1. Acute and chronic intakes of fallout radionuclides by Marshallese from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak and related internal radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L; Weinstock, Robert M

    2010-08-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  2. ACUTE AND CHRONIC INTAKES OF FALLOUT RADIONUCLIDES BY MARSHALLESE FROM NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTING AT BIKINI AND ENEWETAK AND RELATED INTERNAL RADIATION DOSES

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L.; Weinstock, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  3. Acute and chronic intakes of fallout radionuclides by Marshallese from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak and related internal radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L; Weinstock, Robert M

    2010-08-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  4. A randomised comparison of the novel nucleoside analogue sapacitabine with low-dose cytarabine in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Burnett, A K; Russell, N; Hills, R K; Panoskaltsis, N; Khwaja, A; Hemmaway, C; Cahalin, P; Clark, R E; Milligan, D

    2015-06-01

    The development of new treatments for older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is an active area, but has met with limited success. Sapacitabine is a novel orally administered nucleoside analogue that has shown encouraging activity in unrandomised early-stage trials. We randomised 143 untreated patients with AML or with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (>10% marrow blasts) between sapacitibine and low-dose ara-C (LDAC) in our 'Pick a Winner' trial design. At the planned interim analysis there was no difference between LDAC and sapacitibine in terms of remission rate (CR/CRi, 27% vs 16% hazard ratio (HR) 1.98(0.90-4.39) P=0.09), relapse-free survival (10% vs 14% at 2 years, HR 0.73(0.33-1.61) P=0.4) or overall survival (OS; 12% vs 11% at 2 years, HR 1.24(0.86-1.78) P=0.2). Sapacitibine was well tolerated, apart from more grade 3/4 diarrhoea. On the basis of these findings sapacitibine did not show sufficient evidence of benefit over LDAC for the trial to be continued.

  5. High dose compressive loads attenuate bone mineral loss in humans with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, S.; Saha, P. K.; Liang, G.; Li, C.; Gao, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Summary People with spinal cord injury (SCI) lose bone and muscle integrity after their injury. Early doses of stress, applied through electrically induced muscle contractions, preserved bone density at high-risk sites. Appropriately prescribed stress early after the injury may be an important consideration to prevent bone loss after SCI. Introduction Skeletal muscle force can deliver high compressive loads to bones of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effective osteogenic dose of load for the distal femur, a chief site of fracture, is unknown. The purpose of this study is to compare three doses of bone compressive loads at the distal femur in individuals with complete SCI who receive a novel stand training intervention. Methods Seven participants performed unilateral quadriceps stimulation in supported stance [150% body weight (BW) compressive load—“High Dose” while opposite leg received 40% BW—“Low Dose”]. Five participants stood passively without applying quadriceps electrical stimulation to either leg (40% BW load—“Low Dose”). Fifteen participants performed no standing (0% BW load—“Untrained”) and 14 individuals without SCI provided normative data. Participants underwent bone mineral density (BMD) assessment between one and six times over a 3-year training protocol. Results BMD for the High Dose group significantly exceeded BMD for both the Low Dose and the Untrained groups (p<0.05). No significant difference existed between the Low Dose and Untrained groups (p>0.05), indicating that BMD for participants performing passive stance did not differ from individuals who performed no standing. High-resolution CT imaging of one High Dose participant revealed 86% higher BMD and 67% higher trabecular width in the High Dose limb. Conclusion Over 3 years of training, 150% BW compressive load in upright stance significantly attenuated BMD decline when compared to passive standing or to no standing. High-resolution CT indicated that

  6. Sputtering of HOPG under high-dose ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. M.; Mashkova, E. S.; Nemov, A. S.; Virgiliev, Yu. S.

    2007-03-01

    The dependences of sputtering yield Y of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite under high fluences (1018-1019 ion/cm2) 30 keV N2+ irradiation at ion incidence angles from θ = 0 (normal incidence) to θ = 80° at room temperature (RT) and T = 400 °C have been measured to trace the radiation damage influence on angular behavior of sputtering yield. A difference has been found between angular dependences of sputtering yields at RT, when the irradiation leads to a high degree of disorder, and at temperatures, larger than the temperature Ta responsible for annealing the radiation damage at continuous ion bombardment.

  7. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  8. Shortening Infusion Time for High-Dose Methotrexate Alters Antileukemic Effects: A Randomized Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Torben S.; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Yinmei; Boyett, James M.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Panetta, John C.; Bowman, W. Paul; Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether shortening the infusion duration of high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX; 1 g/m2) affects the in vivo accumulation of active methotrexate polyglutamates (MTXPG1-7) in leukemia cells and whether this differs among major acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subtypes. Methods From June 2000 through October 2007, 356 children with ALL were randomly assigned to receive initial single-agent treatment with HDMTX (1 g/m2) as either a 24-hour infusion or a 4-hour infusion at two pediatric hospitals in the United States. The primary outcome measures were the accumulation of MTXPG1-7 in leukemia cells and the antileukemic effects (eg, inhibition of de novo purine synthesis in bone marrow ALL cells, and decrease in circulating ALL cells). Results The 24-hour infusion resulted in significantly higher amounts of MTXPG1-7 in bone marrow leukemia cells (median: 1,695 v 1,150 pmol/109 cells, P = .0059), and better antileukemic effects. The 24-hour infusion had the greatest effect on MTXPG1-7 accumulation in hyperdiploid ALL (median: 3,919 v 2,417 pmol/109 cells, P = .0038); T-cell ALL exhibited smaller differences in MTXPG1-7 but greater antileukemic effects with the longer infusion (median decrease in leukemia cells: 88.4% v 51.8%, P = .0075). In contrast, infusion duration had no significant impact on MTXPG1-7 accumulation or antileukemic effects in ALL with the t(12;21)/(ETV6-RUNX1) chromosomal translocation. Conclusion Shortening the infusion time of HDMTX reduces accumulation of active methotrexate in leukemia cells and decreases antileukemic effects, with differing consequences among major ALL subtypes. PMID:21444869

  9. Single fraction multimodal image guided focal salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Hans-Christian; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Knobe, Sven; Volgeova-Neher, Natalja; Kollefrath, Michael; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Grosu, Anca Ligia; Baltas, Dimos; Kroenig, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a novel method for treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) following radiation therapy: focal, multimodal image guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Material and methods We treated two patients with recurrent PCa after primary (#1) or adjuvant (#2) external beam radiation therapy. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), choline, positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT), or prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-PET combined with CT identified a single intraprostatic lesion. Positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging – transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion guided transperineal biopsy confirmed PCa within each target lesion. We defined a PET and mpMRI based gross tumor volume (GTV). A 5 mm isotropic margin was applied additionally to each lesion to generate a planning target volume (PTV), which accounts for technical fusion inaccuracies. A D90 of 18 Gy was intended in one fraction to each PTV using ultrasound guided HDR brachytherapy. Results Six month follow-up showed adequate prostate specific antygen (PSA) decline in both patients (ΔPSA 83% in patient 1 and ΔPSA 59.3% in patient 2). Follow-up 3-tesla MRI revealed regressive disease in both patients and PSMA-PET/CT showed no evidence of active disease in patient #1. No acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions Single fraction, focal, multimodal image guided salvage HDR brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer is a feasible therapy for selected patients with single lesions. This approach has to be evaluated in larger clinical trials. PMID:27504134

  10. Serum Creatinine Versus Plasma Methotrexate Levels to Predict Toxicities in Children Receiving High-dose Methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Priya; Thomas, M K; Pathania, Subha; Dhawan, Deepa; Gupta, Y K; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Facilities for measuring methotrexate (MTX) levels are not available everywhere, potentially limiting administration of high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX). We hypothesized that serum creatinine alteration after HDMTX administration predicts MTX clearance. Overall, 122 cycles in 50 patients of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia aged ≤18 years receiving HDMTX were enrolled prospectively. Plasma MTX levels were measured at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours; serum creatinine was measured at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Correlation of plasma MTX levels with creatinine levels and changes in creatinine from baseline (Δ creatinine) were evaluated. Plasma MTX levels at 72 hours showed positive correlation with serum creatinine at 48 hours (P = .011) and 72 hours (P = .013) as also Δ creatinine at 48 hours (P = .042) and 72 hours (P = .045). However, cut-off value of either creatinine or Δ creatinine could not be established to reliably predict delayed MTX clearance. Greater than 50% Δ creatinine at 48 and 72 hours significantly predicted grade 3/4 leucopenia (P = .036 and P = .001, respectively) and thrombocytopenia (P = .012 and P = .009, respectively) but not mucositis (P = .827 and P = .910, respectively). Delayed MTX elimination did not predict any grade 3/4 toxicity. In spite of demonstration of significant correlation between serum creatinine and Δ creatinine with plasma MTX levels at 72 hours, cut-off value of either variable to predict MTX delay could not be established. Thus, either of these cannot be used as a surrogate for plasma MTX estimation. Interestingly, Δ creatinine effectively predicted hematological toxicities, which were not predicted by delayed MTX clearance.

  11. Thermoluminescence glow-curve characteristics of LiF phosphors at high doses of gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benny, P. G.; Khader, S. A.; Sarma, K. S. S.

    2013-05-01

    High doses of ionising radiation are becoming increasingly common for radiation-processing applications of various medical, agricultural and polymer products using gamma and electron beams. The objective of this work was to study thermoluminescence (TL) glow-curve characteristics of commonly used commercial LiF TL phosphors at high doses of radiation with a view to use them in dosimetry of radiation-processing applications. The TL properties of TLD 100 and 700 phosphors, procured from the Thermo-Scientific (previously Harshaw) company, have been studied in the dose range of 1-60 kGy. The shift in glow peaks was observed in this dose range. Integral TL responses of TLD 100 and TLD 700 were found to decrease as a linear function of dose in the range of 5-50 kGy. The paper describes initial results related to the glow-curve characteristics of these phosphors.

  12. The OVLT initiates the fall in arterial pressure evoked by high dose lipopolysaccharide: Evidence that dichotomous, dose-related mechanisms mediate endotoxic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Feleder, Carlos; Yilmaz, M. Sertac; Peng, Jianya; Göktalay, Gökhan; Millington, William R.

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) lowers arterial pressure through two different mechanisms depending on the dose. Previously, we found that a low hypotensive dose of LPS (1 mg/kg) lowers arterial pressure by activating vagus nerve afferents. Here we report that hypotension evoked by high dose LPS (15 mg/kg) can be prevented by injecting lidocaine into the OVLT but not by vagotomy or inactivation of the NTS. The hypotension produced by both LPS doses was correlated with elevated extracellular norepinephrine concentrations in the POA and prevented by blocking alpha-adrenergic receptors. Thus, initiation of endotoxic hypotension is dose-related, mechanistically. PMID:26198924

  13. Evaluating the consistency of location of the most severe acute skin reaction and highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter during radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this prospective study to evaluate whether the location of the most severe acute skin reaction matches the highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer after breast conservative surgery. To determine whether TLD measurement can reflect the location of the most severe acute skin reaction, 80 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided the irradiated field into breast, axillary, inframammary fold, and areola/nipple areas. In 1 treatment session when obvious skin reaction occurred, we placed the TLD chips onto the 4 areas and measured the skin dose. We determined whether the highest measured skin dose area is consistent with the location of the most severe skin reaction. The McNemar test revealed that the clinical skin reaction and TLD measurement are more consistent when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the axillary area, and the p = 0.0108. On the contrary, TLD measurement of skin dose is less likely consistent with clinical observation when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the inframammary fold, breast, and areola/nipple areas (all the p > 0.05). Considering the common site of severe skin reaction over the axillary area, TLD measurement may be an appropriate way to predict skin reaction during RT.

  14. High-dose insulin therapy in beta-blocker and calcium channel-blocker poisoning.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Kristin M; Kaczmarek, Kathleen M; Morgan, Jenifer; Holger, Joel S

    2011-04-01

    INTRODUCTION. High-dose insulin therapy, along with glucose supplementation, has emerged as an effective treatment for severe beta-blocker and calcium channel-blocker poisoning. We review the experimental data and clinical experience that suggests high-dose insulin is superior to conventional therapies for these poisonings. PRESENTATION AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT. Hypotension, bradycardia, decreased systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and cardiogenic shock are characteristic features of beta-blocker and calcium-channel blocker poisoning. Initial treatment is primarily supportive and includes saline fluid resuscitation which is essential to correct vasodilation and low cardiac filling pressures. Conventional therapies such as atropine, glucagon and calcium often fail to improve hemodynamic status in severely poisoned patients. Catecholamines can increase blood pressure and heart rate, but they also increase SVR which may result in decreases in cardiac output and perfusion of vascular beds. The increased myocardial oxygen demand that results from catecholamines and vasopressors may be deleterious in the setting of hypotension and decreased coronary perfusion. METHODS. The Medline, Embase, Toxnet, and Google Scholar databases were searched for the years 1975-2010 using the terms: high-dose insulin, hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia, beta-blocker, calcium-channel blocker, toxicology, poisoning, antidote, toxin-induced cardiovascular shock, and overdose. In addition, a manual search of the Abstracts of the North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology and the Congress of the European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists published in Clinical Toxicology for the years 1996-2010 was undertaken. These searches identified 485 articles of which 72 were considered relevant. MECHANISMS OF HIGH-DOSE INSULIN BENEFIT. There are three main mechanisms of benefit: increased inotropy, increased intracellular glucose transport, and vascular dilatation. EFFICACY OF HIGH-DOSE

  15. The effects of high dose and highly fractionated radiation on distraction osteogenesis in the murine mandible.

    PubMed

    Monson, Laura A; Cavaliere, Christi M; Deshpande, Sagar S; Ayzengart, Alexander L; Buchman, Steven R

    2012-09-07

    The ability of irradiated tissue to support bony growth remains poorly defined, although there are anecdotal cases reported showing mixed results for the use of mandibular distraction osteogenesis after radiation for head and neck cancer. Many of these reports lack objective measures that would allow adequate analysis of outcomes or efficacy. The purpose of this experiment was to utilize a rat model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis after high dose and highly fractionated radiation therapy and to evaluate and quantify distracted bone formation under these conditions. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 12 fractions of external beam radiation (48 Gray) of the left mandible. Following a two week recovery period, an external frame distractor was applied and gradual distraction of the mandible was performed. Tissue was harvested after a twenty-eight day consolidation period. Gross, radiologic and histological evaluations were undertaken. Those animals subjected to pre-operative radiation showed severe attenuation of bone formation including bone atrophy, incomplete bridging of the distraction gap, and gross bony defects or non-union. Although physical lengthening was achieved, the irradiated bone consistently demonstrated marked damaging effects on the normal process of distraction osteogenesis. This murine model has provided reliable evidence of the injurious effects of high dose radiation on bone repair and regeneration in distraction osteogenesis utilizing accurate and reproducible metrics. These results can now be used to assist in the development of therapies directed at mitigating the adverse consequences of radiation on the regeneration of bone and to optimize distraction osteogenesis so it can be successfully applied to post-oncologic reconstruction.

  16. Gene Expression Profiles in Zebrafish Brain after Acute Exposure to Domoic Acid at Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Doses

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Kathi A.; Tilton, Susan C.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Srinouanprachan, Sengkeo; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Farin, Federico M.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2009-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neuroexcitatory amino acid that is naturally produced by some marine diatom species of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Ingestion of DA-contaminated seafood by humans results in a severe neurotoxic disease known as amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP). Clinical signs of ASP include seizures and neuronal damage from activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. However, the impacts of DA exposure at levels below those known to induce outward signs of neurobehavioral exicitotoxicity have not been well characterized. To further understand the mechanisms of neurotoxic injury associated with DA exposure, we examined the transcriptome of whole brains from zebrafish (Danio rerio) receiving intracoelomic (IC) injection of DA at both symptomatic and asymptomatic doses. A majority of zebrafish exposed to high-dose DA (1.2 μg DA/g) exhibited clinical signs of neuroexcitotoxicity (EC50 of 0.86 μg DA/g) within 5–20 min of IC injection. All zebrafish receiving low-dose DA (0.47 μg DA/g) or vehicle only maintained normal behavior. Microarray analysis of symptomatic and asymptomatic exposures collectively yielded 306 differentially expressed genes (1.5-fold, p ≤ 0.05) predominately represented by signal transduction, ion transport, and transcription factor functional categories. Transcriptional profiles were suggestive of neuronal apoptosis following an overwhelming of protective adaptive pathways. Further, potential molecular biomarkers of neuropathic injury, including the zebrafish homolog of human NDRG4, were identified and may be relevant to DA exposure levels below that causing neurobehavioral injury. In general, DA-modulated gene expression was consistent with other model species thereby validating zebrafish as an appropriate vertebrate model to study mechanisms of DA neurotoxicity. These data provide a basis for identifying pathways of DA-induced injury as well as biomarkers of asymptomatic and symptomatic DA exposure levels. PMID:18936300

  17. [A Case of a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Serious Hand-Foot Syndrome Induced by High-Dose Cytarabine Therapy].

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Hiroaki; Aoi, Miki; Yuge, Masaaki; Sugimura, Yuriko; Kitamura, Kunio; Yamamura, Masumi; Tachi, Tomoya; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2016-07-01

    A 40's year-old female patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia received high-dose cytarabine(HD-Ara-C)as her third induction therapy. Because the pharmacist in charge noticed on a prior interview that she had experienced a mild skin eruption similar to hand-foot syndrome(HFS)in the previous round oftherapy(idarubicin and cytarabine), heparinoid lotion and hypoallergenic soap were used to prevent HFS. However, HFS occurred on day 3, and further developed on day 6 to grade 3 with painful erythema, swelling, and paresthesia affecting the entire surface of both hands. We cared for her with moisturization, lifestyle guidance, rotation of steroid ointment, and occlusive dressing techniques according to a multidisciplinary team approach composed ofa hematologist, dermatologist, pharmacist, and nurse. Her symptoms resolved on day 40.

  18. [A Case of a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Serious Hand-Foot Syndrome Induced by High-Dose Cytarabine Therapy].

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Hiroaki; Aoi, Miki; Yuge, Masaaki; Sugimura, Yuriko; Kitamura, Kunio; Yamamura, Masumi; Tachi, Tomoya; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2016-07-01

    A 40's year-old female patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia received high-dose cytarabine(HD-Ara-C)as her third induction therapy. Because the pharmacist in charge noticed on a prior interview that she had experienced a mild skin eruption similar to hand-foot syndrome(HFS)in the previous round oftherapy(idarubicin and cytarabine), heparinoid lotion and hypoallergenic soap were used to prevent HFS. However, HFS occurred on day 3, and further developed on day 6 to grade 3 with painful erythema, swelling, and paresthesia affecting the entire surface of both hands. We cared for her with moisturization, lifestyle guidance, rotation of steroid ointment, and occlusive dressing techniques according to a multidisciplinary team approach composed ofa hematologist, dermatologist, pharmacist, and nurse. Her symptoms resolved on day 40. PMID:27431642

  19. An Alternative to the Use of High-Dose Estrogens for Postcoital Contraception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Research is reported on the use of ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel for contraception after intercourse. This treatment is offered as an alternative to high doses of estrogen and appears to be successful in preventing unwanted pregnancies. (JMF)

  20. Osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus develops very early after starting high dose corticosteroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, K; Harada, Y; Nawata, Y; Takabayashi, K; Abe, I; Kamikawa, K; Moriya, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the actual time of onset of osteonecrosis (ON) after high dose corticosteroid treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
METHODS—72 patients with active SLE, who received high dose corticosteroid for the first time, for the development of ON at hips and knees were monitored by magnetic resonance imaging for at least 12 months.
RESULTS—ON lesions were detected in 32/72 patients (44%) between one and five months (3.1 months on average) after starting high dose corticosteroid treatment. No osteonecrotic lesion was newly detected from the sixth month of treatment until the end of the follow up period.
CONCLUSION—The findings suggested that the actual time of onset of ON in SLE is within the first month of high dose corticosteroid treatment.

 PMID:11709458

  1. High-Dose Ketamine Sedation of an Agitated Patient During Air Medical Transport.

    PubMed

    Reicher, David

    2016-01-01

    We report a case in which a high-dose ketamine infusion was used to sedate an agitated patient for air medical transport, avoiding the risks of general anesthesia and causing no exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27021674

  2. Assessment of Targeted and Non-Targeted Responses in Cells Deficient in ATM Function following Exposure to Low and High Dose X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Heinävaara, Sirpa; Pylkäs, Katri; Chapman, Kim; Koivistoinen, Armi; Parviainen, Teuvo; Winqvist, Robert; Kadhim, Munira; Launonen, Virpi; Lindholm, Carita

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation) lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of radiation hypersensitivity was observed at doses of 0.01 Gy or 0.1 Gy for the ATM mutation carrier LCL. The A-T patient cells also did not show low-dose response. There was significant increase in unstable CA yields for both ATM mutation carrier and A-T LCLs at 1 and 2 Gy, the A-T cells displaying more distinct dose dependency. Both chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were induced at an increased rate in the irradiated A-T cells, whereas for ATM carrier cells, only unstable chromosomal aberrations were increased above the level observed in the wild type cell line. No bystander effect could be demonstrated in any of the cell lines or doses applied. Characteristics typical for the A-T cell line were detected, i.e., high baseline frequency of CA that increased with dose. In addition, dose-dependent loss of cell viability was observed. In conclusion, CA analysis did not demonstrate low-dose (≤100 mGy) radiosensitivity in ATM mutation carrier cells or A-T patient cells. However, both cell lines showed increased radiosensitivity at high dose exposure. PMID:24681528

  3. Assessment of targeted and non-targeted responses in cells deficient in ATM function following exposure to low and high dose X-rays.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Anne; Kämäräinen, Meerit; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Pylkäs, Katri; Chapman, Kim; Koivistoinen, Armi; Parviainen, Teuvo; Winqvist, Robert; Kadhim, Munira; Launonen, Virpi; Lindholm, Carita

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation) lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of radiation hypersensitivity was observed at doses of 0.01 Gy or 0.1 Gy for the ATM mutation carrier LCL. The A-T patient cells also did not show low-dose response. There was significant increase in unstable CA yields for both ATM mutation carrier and A-T LCLs at 1 and 2 Gy, the A-T cells displaying more distinct dose dependency. Both chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were induced at an increased rate in the irradiated A-T cells, whereas for ATM carrier cells, only unstable chromosomal aberrations were increased above the level observed in the wild type cell line. No bystander effect could be demonstrated in any of the cell lines or doses applied. Characteristics typical for the A-T cell line were detected, i.e., high baseline frequency of CA that increased with dose. In addition, dose-dependent loss of cell viability was observed. In conclusion, CA analysis did not demonstrate low-dose (≤100 mGy) radiosensitivity in ATM mutation carrier cells or A-T patient cells. However, both cell lines showed increased radiosensitivity at high dose exposure.

  4. SU-E-J-93: Parametrisation of Dose to the Mucosa of the Anterior Rectal Wall in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkenhead, A; Hamlett, L; Wood, D; Choudhury, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the prostate, radiation is delivered from a number of radioactive sources which are inserted via catheter into the target volume. The rectal mucosa also receives dose during the treatment, which may lead to late toxicity effects. To allow possible links between rectal dose and toxicity to be investigated, suitable methods of parametrising the rectal dose are needed. Methods: During treatment of a series of 95 patients, anatomy and catheter locations were monitored by transrectal ultrasound, and target volume positions were contoured on the ultrasound scan by the therapist. The anterior rectal mucosal wall was identified by contouring the transrectal ultrasound balloon within the ultrasound scan. Source positions and dwell times, along with the dose delivered to the patient were computed using the Oncentra Prostate treatment planning system (TPS). Data for the series of patients were exported from the TPS in Dicom format, and a series of parametrisation methods were developed in a Matlab environment to assess the rectal dose. Results: Contours of the anterior rectal mucosa were voxelised within Matlab to allow the dose to the rectal mucosa to be analysed directly from the 3D dose grid. Dose parametrisations based on dose-surface (DSH) and dose-line (DLH) histograms were obtained. Both lateral and longitudinal extents of the mucosal dose were parametrised using dose-line histograms in the relevant directions. Conclusion: We have developed a series of dose parametrisations for quantifying the dose to the rectal mucosa during HDR prostate brachytherapy which are suitable for future studies investigating potential associations between mucosal dose and late toxicity effects. The geometry of the transrectal probe standardises the rectal anatomy, making this treatment technique particularly suited to studies of this nature.

  5. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  6. High-dose MVCT image guidance for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chao, Edward; Lucas, Dan; Flynn, Ryan T.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a potent treatment for early stage primary and limited metastatic disease. Accurate tumor localization is essential to administer SBRT safely and effectively. Tomotherapy combines helical IMRT with onboard megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging and is well suited for SBRT; however, MVCT results in reduced soft tissue contrast and increased image noise compared with kilovoltage CT. The goal of this work was to investigate the use of increased imaging doses on a clinical tomotherapy machine to improve image quality for SBRT image guidance. Methods: Two nonstandard, high-dose imaging modes were created on a tomotherapy machine by increasing the linear accelerator (LINAC) pulse rate from the nominal setting of 80 Hz, to 160 Hz and 300 Hz, respectively. Weighted CT dose indexes (wCTDIs) were measured for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes in a 30 cm solid water phantom using a calibrated A1SL ion chamber. Image quality was assessed from scans of a customized image quality phantom. Metrics evaluated include: contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), high-contrast spatial resolution, image uniformity, and percent image noise. In addition, two patients receiving SBRT were localized using high-dose MVCT scans. Raw detector data collected after each scan were used to reconstruct standard-dose images for comparison. Results: MVCT scans acquired using a pitch of 1.0 resulted in wCTDI values of 2.2, 4.7, and 8.5 cGy for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes respectively. CNR values for both low and high-contrast materials were found to increase with the square root of dose. Axial high-contrast spatial resolution was comparable for all imaging modes at 0.5 lp/mm. Image uniformity was improved and percent noise decreased as the imaging dose increased. Similar improvements in image quality were observed in patient images, with decreases in image noise being the most notable. Conclusions: High-dose imaging modes are made possible on a

  7. Utility of the sore throat pain model in a multiple-dose assessment of the acute analgesic flurbiprofen: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The sore throat pain model has been conducted by different clinical investigators to demonstrate the efficacy of acute analgesic drugs in single-dose randomized clinical trials. The model used here was designed to study the multiple-dose safety and efficacy of lozenges containing flurbiprofen at 8.75 mg. Methods Adults (n = 198) with moderate or severe acute sore throat and findings of pharyngitis on a Tonsillo-Pharyngitis Assessment (TPA) were randomly assigned to use either flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges (n = 101) or matching placebo lozenges (n = 97) under double-blind conditions. Patients sucked one lozenge every three to six hours as needed, up to five lozenges per day, and rated symptoms on 100-mm scales: the Sore Throat Pain Intensity Scale (STPIS), the Difficulty Swallowing Scale (DSS), and the Swollen Throat Scale (SwoTS). Results Reductions in pain (lasting for three hours) and in difficulty swallowing and throat swelling (for four hours) were observed after a single dose of the flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge (P <0.05 compared with placebo). After using multiple doses over 24 hours, flurbiprofen-treated patients experienced a 59% greater reduction in throat pain, 45% less difficulty swallowing, and 44% less throat swelling than placebo-treated patients (all P <0.01). There were no serious adverse events. Conclusions Utilizing the sore throat pain model with multiple doses over 24 hours, flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges were shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for sore throat pain. Other pharmacologic actions (reduced difficulty swallowing and reduced throat swelling) and overall patient satisfaction from the flurbiprofen lozenges were also demonstrated in this multiple-dose implementation of the sore throat pain model. Trial registration This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01048866, registration date: January 13, 2010. PMID:24988909

  8. High-dose tocopherol acetate therapy in epidermolysis bullosa siblings of the Cockayne-Touraine type.

    PubMed

    Shirakata, Y; Shiraishi, S; Sayama, K; Shinmori, H; Miki, Y

    1993-11-01

    We have employed a successful therapy for epidermolysis bullosa with high-dose oral tocopherol acetate. Two siblings with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa of the Cockayne-Touraine type were reported. Both siblings suffered from tense blisters and erosions healing with scars and transient milia on the extremities. Electron microscopic study of the blisters revealed a cleavage beneath the lamina densa in both siblings. High-dose oral tocopherol acetate therapy was administered to them with satisfactory clinical reduction of the blister formation.

  9. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  10. Evaluation of High Ipsilateral Subventricular Zone Radiation Therapy Dose in Glioblastoma: A Pooled Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Percy; Eppinga, Wietse; Lagerwaard, Frank; Cloughesy, Timothy; Slotman, Benjamin; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Demarco, John; Selch, Michael T.; Steinberg, Michael; Kang, Jung Julie

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a role in the recurrence of glioblastoma. They are believed to originate from neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ). Because of their radioresistance, we hypothesized that high doses of radiation (>59.4 Gy) to the SVZ are necessary to control CSCs and improve progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: 173 patients with glioblastoma pooled from 2 academic centers were treated with resection followed by chemoradiation therapy. The SVZ was segmented on computed tomography to calculate radiation doses delivered to the presumptive CSC niches. The relationships between high SVZ doses and PFS and OS were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. Five covariates were included to estimate their impact on PFS or OS: ipsilateral and contralateral SVZ doses, clinical target volume dose, age, and extent of resection. Results: Median PFS and OS were 10.4 and 19.6 months for the cohort. The mean ipsilateral SVZ, contralateral SVZ, and clinical target volume doses were 49.2, 35.2, and 60.1 Gy, respectively. Twenty-one patients who received high ipsilateral SVZ dose (>59.4 Gy) had significantly longer median PFS (12.6 vs 9.9 months, P=.042) and longer OS (25.8 vs 19.2 months, P=.173). On multivariate analysis, high radiation therapy doses to ipsilateral SVZ remained a statistically significant independent predictor of improved PFS but not of OS. The extent of surgery affected both PFS and OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: High radiation therapy doses to ipsilateral CSC niches are associated with improved PFS in glioblastoma.

  11. In-phantom neutron dose distribution for bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, N. E.; Attalla, E. M.; Ammar, H.; Khalil, W.

    2011-06-01

    This work presents an estimation of the neutron dose distribution for common bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons of 15 MV therapy accelerators. Neutron doses were measured in an Alderson phantom, using TLD 700 and 600 thermoluminescence dosimeters, resembling bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons from 15 MV LINAC and having a treatment plan using the four-field pelvic box technique. Thermal neutron dose distribution in the target area and the surrounding tissue was estimated. The sensitivity of all detectors for both gamma and neutrons was estimated and used for correction of the TL reading. TLD detectors were irradiated with a Co60 gamma standard source and thermal neutrons at the irradiation facility of the National Institute for Standards (NIS). The TL to dose conversion factor was estimated in terms of both Co60 neutron equivalent dose and thermal neutron dose. The dose distribution of photo-neutrons throughout each target was estimated and presented in three-dimensional charts and isodose curves. The distribution was found to be non-isotropic through the target. It varied from a minimum of 0.23 mSv/h to a maximum of 2.07 mSv/h at 6 cm off-axis. The mean neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.63 mSv/h, which agrees with other published literature. The estimated average neutron equivalent to the bladder per administered therapeutic dose was found to be 0.39 mSv Gy-1, which is also in good agreement with published literature. As a consequence of a complete therapeutic treatment of 50 Gy high-energy photons at 15 MV, the total thermal neutron equivalent dose to the abdomen was found to be about 0.012 Sv.

  12. Tissue responses to low protracted doses of high LET radiations or photons: Early and late damage relevant to radio-protective countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.; Afzal, S. M. J.; Crouse, D. A.; Hanson, W. R.; Fry, R. J. M.

    Early and late murine tissue responses to single or fractionated low doses of heavy charged particles, fission-spectrum neutrons or gamma rays are considered. Damage to the hematopoietic system is emphasized, but results on acute lethality, host response to challenge with transplanted leukemia cells and life-shortening are presented. Low dose rates per fraction were used in some neutron experiments. Split-dose lethality studies (LD 50/30) with fission neutrons indicated greater accumulation of injury during a 9 fraction course (over 17 days) than was the case for γ-radiation. When total doses of 96 or 247 cGy of neutrons or γ rays were given as a single dose or in 9 fractions, a significant sparing effect on femur CFU-S depression was observed for both radiation qualities during the first 11 days, but there was not an earlier return to normal with dose fractionation. During the 9 fraction sequence, a significant sparing effect of low dose rate on CFU-S depression was observed in both neutron and γ-irradiated mice. CFU-S content at the end of the fractionation sequence did not correlate with measured LD 50/30. Sustained depression of femur and spleen CFU-S and a significant thrombocytopenia were observed when a total neutron dose of 240 cGy was given in 72 fractions over 24 weeks at low dose rates. The temporal aspects of CFU-S repopulation were different after a single versus fractionated neutron doses. The sustained reduction in the size of the CFU-S population was accompanied by an increase in the fraction in DNA synthesis. The proliferation characteristics and effects of age were different for radial CFU-S population closely associated with bone, compared with the axial population that can be readily aspirated from the femur. In aged irradiated animals, the CFU-S proliferation/redistribution response to typhoid vaccine showed both an age and radiation effect. After high single doses of neutrons or γ rays, a significant age- and radiation-related deficiency

  13. Dose Control System in the Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Shu; Yoon, Jongyoon; David, Jonathan

    2011-01-07

    Photoresist outgassing can significantly compromise accurate dosimetry of high energy implants. High energy implant even at a modest beam current produces high beam powers which create significantly worse outgassing than low and medium energy implants and the outgassing continues throughout the implant due to the low dose in typical high energy implant recipes. In the previous generation of high energy implanters, dose correction by monitoring of process chamber pressure during photoresist outgassing has been used. However, as applications diversify and requirements change, the need arises for a more versatile photoresist correction system to match the versatility of a single wafer high energy ion implanter. We have successfully developed a new dosimetry system for the Optima XE single wafer high energy ion implanter which does not require any form of compensation due to the implant conditions. This paper describes the principles and performance of this new dose system.

  14. IUdR polymers for combined continuous low-dose rate and high-dose rate sensitization of experimental human malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Dillehay, L E; Williams, J R; Shastri, V R; Williams, J A

    2001-04-20

    Local polymeric delivery enhances IUdR radiosensitization of human malignant gliomas (MG). The combined low-dose rate (LDR) (0.03 Gy/h) and fractionated high-dose rate (HDR) treatments result in cures of experimental MGs. To enhance efficacy, we combined polymeric IUdR delivery, LDR, and HDR for treatments of both subcutaneous and intracranial MGs. In vitro: Cells (U251 MG) were trypsinized and replated in triplicate 1 day prior to LDR irradiation in media either without (control) or with 10 microM IUdR. After 72 hr, LDR irradiation cells were acutely irradiated (1.1 Gy/min) with increasing (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, or 10 Gy) single doses. Implantable IUdR polymers [(poly(bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-propane) (PCPP): sebaic acid (PCPP:SA), 20:80] (50% loading; 10 mg) were synthesized. In vivo: For flank vs. intracranial tumors, mice had 6 x 10(6) subcutaneous vs. 2 x 10(5) intracranial cells. For intracranial or subcutaneous MGs, mice had intratumoral blank (empty) vs. IUdR polymer treatments. One day after implantation, mice had immediate external LDR (3 cGy/h x 3 days total body irradiation) or HDR (2 Gy BID x 4 days to tumor site) or concurrent treatments. For the in vitro IUdR treatments, LDR resulted in a striking increase in cell-killing when combined with HDR. For the in vivo LDR treatments of flank tumors, the growth delay was greater for the IUdR vs. blank polymer treatments. For the combined LDR and HDR, the IUdR treatments resulted in a dramatic decrease in tumor volumes. On day 60 the log V/V0 were -1.7 +/- 0.22 for combined LDR + HDR + IUdR polymer (P < 0.05 vs. combined LDR + HDR + blank polymer). Survival for the intracranial controls was 22.9 +/- 1.2 days. For the blank polymer + LDR vs. blank polymer + LDR + HDR treatments, survival was 25.3 +/- 1.7 (P = NS) vs. 48.1 +/- 3.5 days (P < 0.05). For IUdR polymer + LDR treatment survival was 27.3 +/- 2.3 days (P = NS). The most striking improvement in survival followed the IUdR polymer + LDR + HDR treatment: 66

  15. High doses of cobalt induce optic and auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Zaghini, Anna; Mariotti, Andrea; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Vielmi, Valentina; Semeraro, Francesco; Duse, Sarah; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Padovani, Alessandro; Rizzetti, Maria Cristina; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    The adverse biological effects of continuous exposure to cobalt and chromium have been well defined. In the past, this toxicity was largely an industrial issue concerning workers exposed in occupational setting. Nevertheless, recent reports have described a specific toxicity mediated by the high levels of cobalt and chromium released by metallic prostheses, particularly in patients who had received hip implants. Clinical symptoms, including blindness, deafness and peripheral neuropathy, suggest a specific neurotropism. However, little is known about the neuropathological basis of this process, and experimental evidence is still lacking. We have investigated this issue in an experimental setting using New Zealand White rabbits treated with repeated intravenous injections of cobalt and chromium, alone or in combination. No evident clinical or pathological alterations were associated after chromium administration alone, despite its high levels in blood and tissue while cobalt-chromium and cobalt-treated rabbits showed clinical signs indicative of auditory and optic system toxicity. On histopathological examination, the animals showed severe retinal and cochlear ganglion cell depletion along with optic nerve damage and loss of sensory cochlear hair cells. Interestingly, the severity of the alterations was related to dosages and time of exposure. These data confirmed our previous observation of severe auditory and optic nerve toxicity in patients exposed to an abnormal release of cobalt and chromium from damaged hip prostheses. Moreover, we have identified the major element mediating neurotoxicity to be cobalt, although the molecular mechanisms mediating this toxicity still have to be defined.

  16. Elastic stability of high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Chan, S.K.; Garner, F.A.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to identify ceramic materials that are suitable for fusion reactor applications. Elastic constants (C{sub 11}, C{sub 12}, and C{sub 44}) of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) single crystals irradiated to very high neutron fluences have geen measured by an ultrasonic technique. Although results of a neutron diffraction study show that cation occupation sites are significantly changed in the irradiated samples, no measurable differences occurred in their elastic properties. In order to understand such behavior, the elastic properties of a variety of materials with either normal or inverse spinel structures were studied. The cation valence and cation distribution appear to have little influence on the elastic properties of spinel materials.

  17. Successful treatment of persistent MRSA bacteremia using high-dose daptomycin combined with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kosuke; Satou, Asuka; Asano, Kikuko; Waseda, Koichi; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Otsuka, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a case of persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia that was successfully treated with combination therapy consisting of high-dose daptomycin (DAP, 10 mg/kg) and rifampicin. The patient's condition was complicated with multiple infectious foci, including an iliopsoas abscess and epidural abscess, as well as discitis and spondylitis at the cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels. Monotherapy treatments with vancomycin, linezolid and usual-dose DAP were all ineffective. It has been shown that usual-dose DAP administration may result in the emergence of a resistant strain and treatment failure. We would like to emphasize the importance of high-dose DAP therapy for MRSA bacteremia, a condition with a potentially high mortality rate. PMID:25224207

  18. High and low dose radiation effects on mammary adenocarcinoma cells – an epigenetic connection

    PubMed Central

    Luzhna, Lidia; Filkowski, Jody; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of cancer, including breast cancer, depends largely on radiation therapy and proper diagnostics. The effect of ionizing radiation on cells and tissues depends on the radiation dose and energy level, but there is insufficient evidence concerning how tumor cells respond to the low and high doses of radiation that are often used in medical diagnostic and treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate radiation-induced gene expression changes in the MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell line. Using microarray technology tools, we were able to screen the differential gene expressions profiles between various radiation doses applied to MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the substantial alteration in the expression level of genes after high-dose treatment. In contrast, no dramatic gene expression alterations were noticed after the application of low and medium doses of radiation. In response to a high radiation dose, MCF-7 cells exhibited down-regulation of biological pathways such as cell cycle, DNA replication, and DNA repair and activation of the p53 pathway. Similar dose-dependent responses were seen on the epigenetic level, which was tested by a microRNA expression analysis. MicroRNA analysis showed dose-dependent radiation-induced microRNA expression alterations that were associated with cell cycle arrest and cell death. An increased rate of apoptosis was determined by an Annexin V assay. The results of this study showed that high doses of radiation affect gene expression genetically and epigenetically, leading to alterations in cell cycle, DNA replication, and apoptosis. PMID:27226982

  19. A radiobiological model for the relative biological effectiveness of high-dose-rate 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Melhus, Christopher S; Zinkin, Heather D; Stapleford, Liza J; Evans, Krista E; Wazer, David E; Odlozilíková, Anna

    2005-09-01

    While there is significant clinical experience using both low- and high-dose-rate 252Cf brachytherapy, there are minimal data regarding values for the neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with both modalities. The aim of this research was to derive a radiobiological model for 252Cf neutron RBE and to compare these results with neutron RBE values used clinically in Russia. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was used as the basis to characterize cell survival after irradiation, with identical cell killing rates (S(N) = S(gamma)) between 252Cf neutrons and photons used for derivation of RBE. Using this equality, a relationship among neutron dose and LQ radiobiological parameter (i.e., alpha(N), beta(N), alpha(gamma), beta(gamma)) was obtained without the need to specify the photon dose. These results were used to derive the 252Cf neutron RBE, which was then compared with Russian neutron RBE values. The 252Cf neutron RBE was determined after incorporating the LQ radiobiological parameters obtained from cell survival studies with fast neutrons and teletherapy photons. For single-fraction high-dose-rate neutron doses of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Gy, the total biologically equivalent doses were 1.8, 3.4, 4.7 and 6.0 RBE Gy with 252Cf neutron RBE values of 3.2, 2.9, 2.7 and 2.5, respectively. Using clinical data for late-responding reactions from 252Cf, Russian investigators created an empirical model that predicted high-dose-rate 252Cf neutron RBE values ranging from 3.6 to 2.9 for similar doses and fractionation schemes and observed that 252Cf neutron RBE increases with the number of treatment fractions. Using these relationships, our results were in general concordance with high-dose-rate 252Cf RBE values obtained from Russian clinical experience.

  20. Split-Course, High-Dose Palliative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Progressive Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gogna, Nirdosh Kumar; Baxi, Siddhartha; Hickey, Brigid; Baumann, Kathryn; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Holt, Tanya

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local progression, in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, often causes significant morbidity. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) provides effective palliation in this setting, with most published studies supporting the use of high-dose regimens. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of split-course hypofractionated RT used at our institution in treating this group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 men with locoregionally progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer, treated with a split course of pelvic RT (45-60 Gy in 18-24 fractions) between 2000 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary endpoints were the response rate and actuarial locoregional progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, compliance, and acute and late toxicity. Results: The median age was 71 years (range, 53-88). Treatment resulted in an overall initial response rate of 91%, a median locoregional progression-free survival of 43 months, and median overall survival of 28 months. Compliance was excellent and no significant late toxicity was reported. Conclusions: The split course pelvic RT described has an acceptable toxicity profile, is effective, and compares well with other high-dose palliative regimens that have been previously reported.

  1. Venous thrombosis in multiple sclerosis patients after high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone: the preventive effect of enoxaparin.

    PubMed

    Kalanie, Hossein; Harandi, Ali Amini; Alidaei, Shapoor; Heidari, Daryoosh; Shahbeigi, Saeed; Ghorbani, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Aim. This study was designed to examine the possible role of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) in the development of venous thrombosis (VT). The cerebral one anecdotally had been reported in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in acute attacks and the possible preventive role of enoxaparin. Material and Methods. From a pool of 520 patients, 388 patients with definite RRMS who fulfilled entry characteristics were selected and randomly received either a 5-day course of daily 1 gr IVMP or the aforementioned plus 5 days of daily subcutaneous 40 units of enoxaparin according to a predefined protocol. Results. Mean age, gender ratio, mean relapse rate, and EDSS were similar in both groups of patients (P > 0.05). Finally, 366 patients remained in the study. Of 188 patients treated with IVMP with 855 relapses, 5 developed VT (0.37% per patient per year and 0.58% per each course of IVMP) within 3 to 15 days of starting therapy. None of the 178 patients who experienced 809 relapses who received IVMP plus enoxaparin developed such complications. Conclusion. The study implies that high-dose IVMP in MS exacerbation may increase the risk of VT and prophylactic anticoagulant treatment in this setting is warranted. PMID:22242201

  2. Venous Thrombosis in Multiple Sclerosis Patients after High-Dose Intravenous Methylprednisolone: The Preventive Effect of Enoxaparin

    PubMed Central

    Kalanie, Hossein; Harandi, Ali Amini; Alidaei, Shapoor; Heidari, Daryoosh; Shahbeigi, Saeed; Ghorbani, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Aim. This study was designed to examine the possible role of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) in the development of venous thrombosis (VT). The cerebral one anecdotally had been reported in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in acute attacks and the possible preventive role of enoxaparin. Material and Methods. From a pool of 520 patients, 388 patients with definite RRMS who fulfilled entry characteristics were selected and randomly received either a 5-day course of daily 1 gr IVMP or the aforementioned plus 5 days of daily subcutaneous 40 units of enoxaparin according to a predefined protocol. Results. Mean age, gender ratio, mean relapse rate, and EDSS were similar in both groups of patients (P > 0.05). Finally, 366 patients remained in the study. Of 188 patients treated with IVMP with 855 relapses, 5 developed VT (0.37% per patient per year and 0.58% per each course of IVMP) within 3 to 15 days of starting therapy. None of the 178 patients who experienced 809 relapses who received IVMP plus enoxaparin developed such complications. Conclusion. The study implies that high-dose IVMP in MS exacerbation may increase the risk of VT and prophylactic anticoagulant treatment in this setting is warranted. PMID:22242201

  3. Neutron spectra and dose equivalents calculated in tissue for high-energy radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Followill, David S.

    2009-04-15

    Neutrons are by-products of high-energy radiation therapy and a source of dose to normal tissues. Thus, the presence of neutrons increases a patient's risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer. Although neutrons have been thoroughly studied in air, little research has been focused on neutrons at depths in the patient where radiosensitive structures may exist, resulting in wide variations in neutron dose equivalents between studies. In this study, we characterized properties of neutrons produced during high-energy radiation therapy as a function of their depth in tissue and for different field sizes and different source-to-surface distances (SSD). We used a previously developed Monte Carlo model of an accelerator operated at 18 MV to calculate the neutron fluences, energy spectra, quality factors, and dose equivalents in air and in tissue at depths ranging from 0.1 to 25 cm. In conjunction with the sharply decreasing dose equivalent with increased depth in tissue, the authors found that the neutron energy spectrum changed drastically as a function of depth in tissue. The neutron fluence decreased gradually as the depth increased, while the average neutron energy decreased sharply with increasing depth until a depth of approximately 7.5 cm in tissue, after which it remained nearly constant. There was minimal variation in the quality factor as a function of depth. At a given depth in tissue, the neutron dose equivalent increased slightly with increasing field size and decreasing SSD; however, the percentage depth-dose equivalent curve remained constant outside the primary photon field. Because the neutron dose equivalent, fluence, and energy spectrum changed substantially with depth in tissue, we concluded that when the neutron dose equivalent is being determined at a depth within a patient, the spectrum and quality factor used should be appropriate for depth rather than for in-air conditions. Alternately, an appropriate percent depth-dose equivalent curve should be

  4. Tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: calculation of dose based on estimated patient weight can increase the risk of cerebral bleeding.

    PubMed

    García-Pastor, Andrés; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Funes-Molina, Carmen; Benito-Conde, Beatriz; Grandes-Velasco, Sandra; Sobrino-García, Pilar; Vázquez-Alén, Pilar; Fernández-Bullido, Yolanda; Villanueva-Osorio, Jose Antonio; Gil-Núñez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    A dose of 0.9 mg/kg of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) has proven to be beneficial in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Dosing of t-PA based on estimated patient weight (PW) increases the likelihood of errors. Our objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of estimated PW and assess the effectiveness and safety of the actual applied dose (AAD) of t-PA. We performed a prospective single-center study of AIS patients treated with t-PA from May 2010 to December 2011. Dose was calculated according to estimated PW. Patients were weighed during the 24 h following treatment with t-PA. Estimation errors and AAD were calculated. Actual PW was measured in 97 of the 108 included patients. PW estimation errors were recorded in 22.7 % and were more frequent when weight was estimated by stroke unit staff (44 %). Only 11 % of patients misreported their own weight. Mean AAD was significantly higher in patients who had intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after t-PA than in patients who did not (0.96 vs. 0.92 mg/kg; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of ICH for each 10 % increase in t-PA dose above the optimal dose of 0.90 mg/kg (OR 3.10; 95 % CI 1.14-8.39; p = 0.026). No effects of t-PA misdosing were observed on symptomatic ICH, functional outcome or mortality. Estimated PW is frequently inaccurate and leads to t-PA dosing errors. Increasing doses of t-PA above 0.90 mg/kg may increase the risk of ICH. Standardized weighing methods before t-PA is administered should be considered.

  5. X-ray storage performance of KCl:Eu2+ with high cumulated dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Rachael A.; Xiao, Zhiyan; Zhang, Lei; Li, H. Harold

    2014-05-01

    The effects of high cumulative radiation dose on the luminescence properties of KCl:Eu2+ are investigated. Pellet samples of KCl:Eu2+ were given doses of up to 200 kGy at the Louisiana State University Synchrotron facility. After synchrotron irradiation, samples were optically bleached and given a clinical dose of 2 Gy from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. Optical properties were evaluated using photostimulated luminescence (PSL), photoluminescence (PL), and temperature-dependent PSL measurements. For a cumulated dose of up to 5-10 kGy, the PSL emission intensity increased by 15% compared to the PSL signal with no radiation history. For doses higher than 10 kGy, the PSL emission intensity retained at least 70% of the original intensity. Spatial correlation of the charge storage centers increased for doses up to 5 kGy and then decreased for higher cumulative doses. Emission band at 975 nm was attributed to transitions of Eu1+. PL spectra showed an intense peak centered at 420 nm for all cumulative doses. The results of this work show that KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphors are excellent reusable materials for radiation therapy dosimetry.

  6. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  7. Analysis of renal impairment in MM-003, a phase III study of pomalidomide + low - dose dexamethasone versus high - dose dexamethasone in refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Katja C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Moreau, Philippe; Lacy, Martha Q.; Song, Kevin W.; Delforge, Michel; Karlin, Lionel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Banos, Anne; Oriol, Albert; Alegre, Adrian; Chen, Christine; Cavo, Michele; Garderet, Laurent; Ivanova, Valentina; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Knop, Stefan; Yu, Xin; Hong, Kevin; Sternas, Lars; Jacques, Christian; Zaki, Mohamed H.; Miguel, Jesus San

    2016-01-01

    Pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone is effective and well tolerated for refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma after bortezomib and lenalidomide failure. The phase III trial MM-003 compared pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone with high-dose dexamethasone. This subanalysis grouped patients by baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (n=93, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=56, high-dose dexamethasone) or ≥ 60 mL/min (n=205, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=93, high-dose dexamethasone). Median progression-free survival was similar for both subgroups and favored pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone: 4.0 versus 1.9 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (P<0.001) and 4.0 versus 2.0 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 60 mL/min (P<0.001). Median overall survival for pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone was 10.4 versus 4.9 months (P=0.030) and 15.5 versus 9.2 months (P=0.133), respectively. Improved renal function, defined as an increase in creatinine clearance from < 60 to ≥ 60 mL/min, was similar in pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone and high-dose dexamethasone patients (42% and 47%, respectively). Improvement in progression-free and overall survival in these patients was comparable with that in patients without renal impairment. There was no increase in discontinuations of therapy, dose modifications, and adverse events in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pomalidomide at a starting dose of 4 mg + low-dose dexamethasone is well tolerated in patients with refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma, and of comparable efficacy if moderate renal impairment is present. This trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov identifier 01311687 and EudraCT identifier 2010-019820-30. PMID:27081177

  8. Gene interaction network analysis suggests differences between high and low doses of acetaminophen

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi . E-mail: toyoshiba.hiroyoshi@nies.go.jp; Sone, Hideko; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Parham, Frederick M.; Irwin, Richard D.; Boorman, Gary A.; Portier, Christopher J.

    2006-09-15

    Bayesian networks for quantifying linkages between genes were applied to detect differences in gene expression interaction networks between multiple doses of acetaminophen at multiple time points. Seventeen (17) genes were selected from the gene expression profiles from livers of rats orally exposed to 50, 150 and 1500 mg/kg acetaminophen (APAP) at 6, 24 and 48 h after exposure using a variety of statistical and bioinformatics approaches. The selected genes are related to three biological categories: apoptosis, oxidative stress and other. Gene interaction networks between all 17 genes were identified for the nine dose-time observation points by the TAO-Gen algorithm. Using k-means clustering analysis, the estimated nine networks could be clustered into two consensus networks, the first consisting of the low and middle dose groups, and the second consisting of the high dose. The analysis suggests that the networks could be segregated by doses and were consistent in structure over time of observation within grouped doses. The consensus networks were quantified to calculate the probability distribution for the strength of the linkage between genes connected in the networks. The quantifying analysis showed that, at lower doses, the genes related to the oxidative stress signaling pathway did not interact with the apoptosis-related genes. In contrast, the high-dose network demonstrated significant interactions between the oxidative stress genes and the apoptosis genes and also demonstrated a different network between genes in the oxidative stress pathway. The approaches shown here could provide predictive information to understand high- versus low-dose mechanisms of toxicity.

  9. High-dose chemotherapy: is it standard management for any common solid tumor?

    PubMed

    MacNeil, M; Eisenhauer, E A

    1999-10-01

    High-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell support had as its basis the observation of dose-response relationships for many chemotherapeutic agents in laboratory models. The rationale to explore high-dose treatment in the clinic was further enhanced by several retrospective reviews in the 1980s which suggested delivered dose intensity of treatment was an important determinant of patient outcome. The availability of hematopoietic growth factors and technologic advances in the efficiency of stem-cell collection and administration have made the evaluation of exploring high-dose therapy safe and feasible. However, real questions remain regarding the apparently superior results of this treatment in the management of solid tumors. This paper reviews the results of high-dose chemotherapy in breast, ovarian and small cell lung cancers. Firstly the evidence for a dose-response relationship to chemotherapeutic agents in the 'standard' dosage range is examined. Secondly results of non-randomized and, where available, randomized trials of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with stem-cell support are summarized and finally conclusions regarding the weight of the evidence for use of HDCT as 'standard' treatment are given. In none of these tumors is there sufficient evidence from randomized trials to consider HDCT a standard to be offered to all patients with a given stage of disease. The apparent benefit of HDCT seen in phase II trials could well be explained by such phenomena as stage shifts and patient selection. Many randomized trials in ovary and breast cancer are either ongoing or presented only as abstracts so final results must be awaited to quantify the benefit, if any of HDCT. It is acknowledged, however, that some practitioners already utilize this treatment. We speculate about the differences in philosophical approaches to cancer treatment which might contribute to early acceptance of novel therapies in the absence of adequate randomized data.

  10. Effects of high and low 17β-estradiol doses on focal cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ingberg, Edvin; Theodorsson, Elvar; Theodorsson, Annette; Ström, Jakob O.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of the numerous animal studies of the effects of estrogens on cerebral ischemia have reported neuroprotective results, but a few have shown increased damage. Differences in hormone administration methods, resulting in highly different 17β-estradiol levels, may explain the discrepancies in previously reported effects. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that it is the delivered dose per se, and not the route and method of administration, that determines the effect, and that high doses are damaging while lower doses are protective. One hundred and twenty ovariectomized female Wistar rats (n = 40 per group) were randomized into three groups, subcutaneously administered different doses of 17β-estradiol and subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. The modified sticky tape test was performed after 24 h and the rats were subsequently sacrificed for infarct size measurements. In contrast to our hypothesis, a significant negative correlation between 17β-estradiol dose and infarct size was found (p = 0.018). Thus, no support was found for the hypothesis that 17β-estradiol can be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic merely depending on dose. In fact, on the contrary, the findings indicate that the higher the dose of 17β-estradiol, the smaller the infarct. PMID:26839007

  11. High doses of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride accelerate onset of CNS oxygen toxicity seizures in unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Pilla, R; Held, H E; Landon, C S; Dean, J B

    2013-08-29

    Pseudoephedrine (PSE) salts (hydrochloride and sulfate) are commonly used as nasal and paranasal decongestants by scuba divers. Anecdotal reports from the Divers Alert Network suggest that taking PSE prior to diving while breathing pure O₂ increases the risk for CNS oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which manifests as seizures. We hypothesized that high doses of PSE reduce the latency time to seizure (LS) in unanesthetized rats breathing 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) of hyperbaric oxygen. Sixty-three male rats were implanted with radio-transmitters that recorded electroencephalogram activity and body temperature. After ≥7-day recovery, and 2 h before "diving", each rat was administered either saline solution (control) or PSE hydrochloride intragastrically at the following doses (mg PSE/kg): 0, 40, 80, 100, 120, 160, and 320. Rats breathed pure O₂ and were dived to 5ATA until the onset of behavioral seizures coincident with neurological seizures. LS was the time elapsed between reaching 5ATA and exhibiting seizures. We observed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the LS at doses of 100-320 mg/kg, whereas no significant differences in LS from control value were observed at doses ≤80 mg/kg. Our findings showed that high doses of PSE accelerate the onset of CNS-OT seizures in unanesthetized rats breathing 5ATA of poikilocapnic hyperoxia. Extrapolating our findings to humans, we conclude that the recommended daily dose of PSE should not be abused prior to diving with oxygen-enriched gas mixes or pure O₂.

  12. A Phase II Study of High-Dose-Rate Afterloading Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Corner, Carie Rojas, Ana Maria; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hoskin, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: A Phase II dose escalation study has been undertaken to evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) monotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 110 patients have been entered, all with locally advanced cancer. Three dose levels have been used; 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, and 31.5 Gy in three fractions. These equate to 226Gy{sub 1.5}, 252Gy{sub 1.5}, and 252Gy{sub 1.5}, respectively. Thirty patients have received 34 Gy, 25 received 36 Gy, and 55 patients received 31.5 Gy. Acute and late toxicity was analyzed using the International Prostate Symptom Score, and urologic and rectal events were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria scoring systems. Results: Seven patients required urethral catheterization at 2 weeks; 3 receiving 34 Gy, 1 receiving 36 Gy, and 3 receiving 31.5 Gy. Only 3 patients remained catheterized at 12 weeks. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1 and 2 gastrointestinal toxicity at 2 weeks was seen in 61%, 68%, and 77%, respectively. Grade 3 bladder toxicity was seen in 2 patients at 6 months, 1 each from the 36 Gy and 31.5 Gy arms. One patient from the 31.5-Gy cohort reported Grade 2 bowel toxicity at 6 months. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), stratified for androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and no-ADT patients ranged from 16.1-22.9 {mu}g/L and 11.1-12.5 {mu}g/L, respectively. This fell at 12 months to 0.2-0.6 {mu}g/L and 0.5-1.4 {mu}g/L, respectively. No PSA relapses have yet been seen with a median follow-up of 30 months (34 Gy), 18 months (36 Gy), and 11.8 months (31.5 Gy). Conclusions: Early results suggest an excellent biochemical response with no differences seen in acute and late toxicity between doses of 34 Gy/four fractions, 36 Gy/four fractions, or 31.5 Gy/three fractions.

  13. The Potential Role of an Extended-Release, Abuse-Deterrent Oxycodone/Acetaminophen Fixed-Dose Combination Product for the Treatment of Acute Pain.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Raffa, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Acute pain, prevalent as part of postoperative and traumatic pain, is often sub-optimally or inadequately treated. Fixed-dose combination analgesic products that combine a reduced amount of opioid with a nonopioid analgesic such as acetaminophen (paracetamol) in a single tablet offer potential pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic benefits, and may also result in an opioid-sparing effect. A new analgesic product (XARTEMIS™ XR, Mallinckrodt Brand Pharmaceuticals, Dublin, Ireland) combines oxycodone (7.5 mg) with acetaminophen (325 mg) in an immediate-release/extended-release (ER) formulation that is indicated for the treatment of acute pain. The ER formulation of this product provides stable serum drug concentrations that in this case lasts 12 h. Oxycodone/acetaminophen is a drug combination that offers safe and effective pain relief in a variety of acute pain syndromes such as postoperative pain. The combination formulation allows a smaller amount of oxycodone per tablet and the biphasic-layered matrix of the pill for ER may present obstacles to potential abusers. No opioid is totally abuse resistant, but the lower opioid content and tamper-resistant formulation of this product might discourage abuse. Clinicians must still be mindful of the acetaminophen part of this product in the patient's overall daily intake (in light of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity). The new product appears to provide an important new choice in the armamentarium against acute pain.

  14. Application of jade samples for high-dose dosimetry using the EPR technique.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Maria Inês; Melo, Adeilson P; Ferraz, Gilberto M; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    The dosimeter characteristics of jade samples were studied for application in high-dose dosimetry. Jade is the common denomination of two silicates: jadeite and actinolite. The EPR spectra of different jade samples were obtained after irradiation with absorbed doses of 100 Gy up to 20 kGy. The jade samples present signals that increase with the absorbed dose (g-factors around 2.00); they can be attributed to electron centers. The EPR spectra obtained for the USA jade samples and their main dosimetric properties as reproducibility, calibration curves and energy dependence were investigated.

  15. A high-dose dosimeter-based polyvinyl chloride dyed with malachite green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattan, M.; Daher, Y.; Alkassiri, H.