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Sample records for acute hip fracture

  1. Acute renal dysfunction following hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Simon J; Berry, Olivia M B; Goddard, Jane; Keating, John F

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the incidence, risk factors and outcome of acute renal dysfunction (ARD) in patients with a fractured neck of femur. 170 consecutive patients were prospectively included in the Scottish Hip Fracture Audit database and retrospectively analysed. Historically, lack of consensus definition has hindered accurate reporting of ARD. ARD was defined using the 'RIFLE' criteria. 27 patients (16%) developed ARD. Risk factors were male sex, vascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and pre-morbid use of nephrotoxic medications (p<0.01). Inpatient, 30- and 120-day mortality was higher in the ARD group 19%, 22% and 41% respectively, versus 0%, 4% and 13% in the non-ARD group (p<0.01). Length of hospital stay was significantly longer in the ARD group. Pre- and post-operative complications were 12 and 5 times more frequent respectively in the ARD group (p<0.01). Awareness of risk factors and serial measurements of renal function allow early identification and focused monitoring of these patients. PMID:19729159

  2. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge

  3. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis-hip ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  4. Translating Research into Practice Intervention Improves Management of Acute Pain in Older Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Titler, Marita G; Herr, Keela; Brooks, John M; Xie, Xian-Jin; Ardery, Gail; Schilling, Margo L; Marsh, J Lawrence; Everett, Linda Q; Clarke, William R

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test an interdisciplinary, multifaceted, translating research into practice (TRIP) intervention to (a) promote adoption, by physicians and nurses, of evidence-based (EB) acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults, (b) decrease barriers to use of EB acute pain management practices, and (c) decrease pain intensity of older hospitalized adults. Study Design Experimental design with the hospital as the unit of randomization. Study Setting Twelve acute care hospitals in the Midwest. Data Sources (a) Medical records (MRs) of patients ≥65 years or older with a hip fracture admitted before and following implementation of the TRIP intervention and (b) physicians and nurses who care for those patients. Data Collection Data were abstracted from MRs and questions distributed to nurses and physicians. Principal Findings The Summative Index for Quality of Acute Pain Care (0–18 scale) was significantly higher for the experimental (10.1) than comparison group (8.4) at the end of the TRIP implementation phase. At the end of the TRIP implementation phase, patients in the experimental group had a lower mean pain intensity rating than those in the comparison group (p<.0001). Conclusion The TRIP intervention improved quality of acute pain management of older adults hospitalized with a hip fracture. PMID:19146568

  5. Effect of extended physiotherapy and high-dose vitamin D on rate of falls and hospital re-admission after acute hip fracture: a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines for post-fracture care of elderly hip fracture patients are not established despite the significant socio-economic burden of post hip fracture morbidity and mortality. Using a factorial design, we studied the effects of extended physiotherapy (supervised 1 hour per day during acute care p...

  6. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  7. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3–32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  8. Routine functional assessment for hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Tonny J; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Pre-fracture functional level has been shown to be a consistent predictor of rehabilitation outcomes in older hip fracture patients. We validated 4 overall pre-fracture functional level assessment instruments in patients aged 65 or more, used the prediction of outcome at 4 months post-fracture, and assessed cutoff values for decision making in treatment and rehabilitation. Patients and methods - 165 consecutive patients with acute primary hip fracture were prospectively included in the study. Pre-fracture Barthel-20, Barthel-100, cumulated ambulation score, and new mobility score were scored immediately after admission. Outcome defined as mortality, residential status, and independent walking ability was assessed at 4 months. Results - 3 of the assessment instruments, namely Barthel-20, Barthel-100, and new mobility score, correlated with outcome at 4 months post-fracture and were valid predictors. Thresholds were estimated. We found no evidence that Barthel-100, with its finer granularity, performs better than Barthel-20 as a predictor. Interpretation - Our findings indicate that pre-fracture scores of Barthel-20 and new mobility score have predictive ability, and further investigation of usage for guidance of clinical and rehabilitation decisions concerning hip fracture patients is warranted. PMID:27329799

  9. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, Daniel Godoy; Iserson, Kenneth V.; Jauregui, José; Musso, Carlos; Piccaluga, Francisco; Buttaro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to determine the dislocation and reoperation rate, functional outcomes, and the survival rate of the unique subset of very old but lucid and independent patients with hip fractures following a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and geriatric team-coordinated perioperative care. Method: Between 2000 and 2006, previously independent ambulatory patients ≥80 years old presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture were given THAs under the care of an integrated orthopedic surgery–geriatric service. Their fracture-related complications, ambulation, mental status, and survival were followed for 5 to 11 years postinjury. Results: Five years postinjury, 57 (61.3%) patients of the original study group were living. In all, 3 (3.2%) patients had postoperative hip dislocations (and 2 patients had dislocation twice) and 2 reoperations were needed within the first postoperative month. There were no hip dislocations or reoperations after the first year. Radiographs obtained on 88% of the surviving patients at 5 years postoperatively showed that all remained unchanged from their immediate postoperative images. Nearly half of the patients were still able to ambulate as they did preoperatively and their mixed-model equation was statistically unchanged. Conclusion: This study of patients >80 years old with previously good functional status demonstrates that with appropriate surgical (best prosthesis, good operating technique, and regional anesthesia) and geriatric (pre- and postoperative assessments, close follow-up, medication adjustments, and fall-prevention instruction) care, they have few hip dislocations and reoperations, survive postfracture at least as long as their noninjured contemporaries, and continue to function and ambulate as they did prior to their injury. PMID:24660092

  10. Red Flags Are Missed in the Prevention of Hip Fractures: Baseline Results of the Zurich Hip Fracture Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From January 2005 to December 2007, we recruited 173 patients age 65 and older with acute hip fracture and a Folstein mini mental score of at least 15 into an ongoing double-blind RCT with vitamin D. 69% of hip fracture patients were admitted from home and 31% from institutions, 79% were women. Mean...

  11. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemiarthroplasty to replace the ball part of your hip joint. You should have received physical therapy while you were in the hospital or at a rehabilitation center before going home from the hospital.

  12. [Hip fracture: call the geriatrician? ].

    PubMed

    Coutaz, M

    2014-11-01

    Hip fracture management by the geriatrician demands a close cooperation with orthopedic surgeons and a interdisciplinary approach with the implementation of protocole-driven care to standardize the care of most patients. From admission to discharge this orthogeriatric management is based on the comprehensive geriatric assessment to reduce the delays in surgery, the occurence of delirium or the most postoperative complications. This collaborative model of care seems to have the potential to improve function, admissions to nursing homes and mortality outcomes compared with usual care of geriatric patient with hip fracture. PMID:25536828

  13. Exploration of Informal Caregiving Following Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay; DeGrezia, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Hip fracture, a significant health issue for older adults, is an acute event in which older adults can recover their prefracture functional abilities. The recovery phase is often difficult for older adults, and the role of informal caregivers is particularly important. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore informal caregivers' experiences with providing care to older adults over the first 6-month trajectory of hip fracture recovery and their support needs. Participants (N = 10) were interviewed twice at 0–2 and 5–6 months. Analyses of the verbatim transcripts revealed multiple shared themes. Some themes were consistent across phases, such as hip fracture as a turning point toward a frailer state, feeling tired, frustration with communication issues in health care delivery, and lack of information about caregiving-related activities. Certain themes were phase-specific. For instance, in the early phase, management of hospital bills and transitions between care settings were especially burdensome. The caregiving situation, however, was viewed as an opportunity to spend more time with their loved ones. Findings from this study revealed unmet support needs expressed by caregivers of older adult hip fracture patients. Ongoing research and clinical interventions are needed to establish effective methods to empower these caregivers. PMID:20682403

  14. Sliding screw implants for extracapsular hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kouvidis, George; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Stavrakakis, Loannis; Katonis, Pavlos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures are associated with significant mortality and morbidity for the patients, more dependent residual status, and increased socio-economic cost. Many hip-fracture patients experience severe functional impairment, and most never recover their pre-fracture level of function. Current research has sought to identify the most effective treatments to reduce the incidence of hip fractures, improve survival and quality of life, and minimize complications and disability. The treatment of these fractures in the elderly aims to return these people to their pre-fracture mobility and functional level. This article reviews the surgical treatment options for extracapsular hip fractures and discusses their associated advantages, disadvantages, and complications. Two types of implants are currently available: the dynamic hip screw (DHS), and the intramedullary hip nail with one or two sliding screws. In this review, no clear advantage of one implant over another for the treatment of extracapsular hip fractures was evident. Both the DHS and hip nails can be used successfully for the treatment of stable hip fractures; for unstable fractures and low subtrochanteric fractures, hip nails are preferred. Although hip nails are associated with limited exposure, lower blood loss and transfusion requirements, and shorter operative time, complications are more common with hip nails. Long-term survival and function are similar in the two approaches. Hip nails with two sliding screws do not seem to make the difference in clinical practice that is reported in biomechanical studies. PMID:23016784

  15. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  16. [Delirium prevention and treatment in elderly hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Robles, María José; Formiga, Francesc; Vidán, M Teresa

    2014-04-22

    The fracture of the proximal femur or hip fracture in the elderly usually happens after a fall and carries a high morbidity and mortality. One of the most common complications during hospitalization for hip fracture is the onset of delirium or acute confusional state that in elderly patients has a negative impact on the hospital stay, and prognosis, worsening functional ability, cognitive status and mortality. Also the development of delirium during hospitalization increases health care costs. Strategies to prevent and treat delirium during hospitalization for hip fracture have been less studied. In this context, this paper aims to conduct a review of the literature on strategies that exist in the prevention and treatment of delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture. PMID:23790577

  17. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers. PMID:24579222

  18. Medical problems in hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Chong, Carol Pei Wei; Savige, Judith A; Lim, Wen Kwang

    2010-11-01

    Increasing number of older patients are admitted to hospital with hip fractures. This review evaluates the common medical problems that arise as a consequence of having a hip fracture. Older patients with fractures commonly have co-morbidities that require evaluation prior to and after surgery. Joint acute orthopaedic-geriatric units have been established to provide comprehensive orthopaedic and medical care with some studies showing a reduction in postoperative complications and mortality. Recommendations surrounding the care of the older orthopaedic patient include early surgical fixation, the use of prophylactic antibiotics and thromboembolic prophylaxis, good perioperative pain control to improve ambulation, delirium detection and management to decrease the risk complications, such as institutionalisation, the avoidance of malnutrition, urinary tract management, osteoporosis management and the promotion of early mobilisation to improve functional recovery. Physicians are well placed to manage these patients with orthopaedic surgeons during the perioperative period. Sufficient evidence exists for most recommendations for fracture patients, but further research is needed in most areas. PMID:20049603

  19. Acute abdominal complications following hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Deleanu, B; Prejbeanu, R; Vermesan, D; Haragus, H; Icma, I; Predescu, V

    2014-01-01

    Hip surgeries are some of the most common and successful orthopedic procedures. Although rarely, abdominal complications do occur and are associated with unfavorable outcomes.We aimed to identify and describe the severe abdominal complications that appear in patients under-going elective or traumatic hip surgery. A four year retrospective electronic database research identified 408 elective primary hip replacements,51 hip revisions and 1040 intra and extracapsular proximal femur fractures. Out of these, three males and 4 females between 64 - 84 years old were identified to have developed acute abdominal complications: perforated acute ulcer (3),acute cholecystitis (2), volvulus (1), toxic megacolon with peritonitis (1) and acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (1).Complications debuted 3 - 10 days after index orthopedic surgery. Acute perioperative abdominal complications are rarely encountered during orthopedic surgery. When these do occur, they do so almost exclusively in patients with hippathology, comorbidities and most often lead to life threatening situations. We thus emphasize the need for early identification and appropriate management by both orthopedic and general surgery doctors in order to improve patient safety. PMID:24742414

  20. [Treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hack, Juliana; Bliemel, Christopher; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bücking, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Hip fractures are among the most common fractures in elderly people. The annual number of femoral fractures is even expected to increase because of an aging society. Due to the high number of comorbidities, there are special challenges in treating geriatric hip fracture patients, which require a multidisciplinary management. This includes surgical treatment allowing full weight bearing in the immediate postoperative period, osteoporosis treatment and falls prevention as well as an early ortho-geriatric rehabilitation program. PMID:25919823

  1. Hip fracture programs: are they effective?

    PubMed

    Kates, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript will evaluate the published evidence on efficacy of organized hip fracture programs to determine if they improve patient outcomes. A detailed literature search was conducted to find manuscripts published in the past 20 years about organized hip fracture care programs. Seventeen programs with published results were identified from this detailed search and these were evaluated and synthesized in the following manuscript. Organized hip fracture programs offer significant benefits to patients, care providers and health systems. The more complex program designs have a more profound effect on improvement in outcomes for hip fracture patients. Most programs have reported reduced length of stay, reduced in-hospital mortality rates, and reduced complications. Some programs have reported reduced costs and reduced readmission rates after implementing an organized hip fracture program. PMID:26768285

  2. [Update on current care guidelines: Hip fracture].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    In Finland approximately 7,000 hip fractures occurred annually during 1996-2008. Risk of hip fracture can be diminished through efforts to prevent falls and osteoporosis. A hip fracture is treated operatively, with the aim of early mobilisation and full weight bearing. Postoperative care and rehabilitation requires multidisciplinary and multifaceted management, focusing on improvement of the patient's physical condition, appropriate pain management, the prevention of delirium and other possible complications. Rehabilitation should be centralised in specialised rehabilitation centres for the elderly. Secondary prevention of future fractures should include management of osteoporosis and fall prevention. PMID:21888050

  3. Hip fracture as the tracer condition.

    PubMed

    Kassim Javaid, M; Chana, Jasroop; Cooper, Cyrus

    2013-12-01

    Hip fractures represent the most severe complication of osteoporosis from the perspectives of the patient, carer, health care system and society. Given the strong association with age, numbers are set to rise significantly in the next few decades despite evidence that the age adjusted rates in some countries are either plateauing or falling. Given the almost invariable need for inpatient admission, hospital administrative data for hip fractures remain a robust measure of number of hip fractures in the community and can be extrapolated to determine the total expected number of clinical fragility fractures from the same population. Both process and outcome standards have now been developed to benchmark clinical quality in the care of patients with hip fractures and fragility fractures at other sites. PMID:24836330

  4. [Multidisciplinary approach of hip fractures based on Hungarian data].

    PubMed

    Juhász, Krisztina; Turchányi, Béla; Mintál, Tibor; Somogyi, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Hip fractures are described by increased mortality, loss of quality of life, functional decline and burden of diseases. They show a growing number worldwide. The aim of the present study is to summarise the existing data on the incidence, mortality, complications and rehabilitation of hip fractures, which relevance is reported only by few studies. To reduce mortality and complications of hip fractures the authors emphasize the importance of primary treatment within 12 hours, appropriate selection of surgical methods corresponding to the fracture type after the assessment of femoral head viability, vitamin D supplementation, same conditions for primary treatment during everyday of the week, and an adequate acute treatment and rehabilitation for patient's general health status. In the future integrated processing of multidisciplinary results of hip fractures based on Hungarian data can support the development of efficient treatment and prevention strategies, which can be advantageous for the patient, families, health care system, and the society, too, by the reduction of costly complications of hip fracture healing and mortality. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(37), 1469-1475. PMID:27615197

  5. Acute coronary syndromes with significant troponin increase in patients with hip fracture prior to surgical repair: differential diagnosis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Carlo; Cammilli, Alessandra; Di Cristo, Annalaura; Polidori, Gian Luca; Ranalli, Claudia; Cartei, Alessandro; Buzzi, Roberto; Prisco, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial infarction after hip fracture but before surgical repair is associated with a 30-day mortality as high as 30 % at 1 month. In Florence, since 2011, hip fractures are referred to a multidisciplinary hip fracture team including internal medicine specialists, anesthesiologists, and orthopaedic surgeons. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with hip fracture who had at hospital admission a significant increase of troponin (>10 times reference levels), the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies adopted, and overall 1-year survival. Protocol at admission included careful clinical evaluation (including bedside echocardiography) in order to stratify surgical risk and schedule surgery and anaesthesiology strategy. 21/1025 patients had preoperative significant troponin increase. In sixteen patients, a diagnosis of NSTEMI was made, five presented with ST elevation. In five patients with NSTEMI considered at very high surgical risk (ASA ≥ 3, severe cognitive and functional impairment), surgery was not performed. None survived at 1 year. Hip surgery was performed in the other 11. Four underwent coronary revascularization after hip surgery. In this group, 1-year survival was 80 %. Four of five ST elevation patients fulfilled criteria for stress cardiomyopathy confirmed by angiography. Hip surgery was performed, and the patients are alive at 1-year follow-up. Close to 2 % of patients with hip fracture are found to have a significant troponin increase before surgery. Three out of four have an NSTEMI diagnosis. In patients undergoing hip surgery, survival at 1 year is close to 80 %. In patients with ST elevation at admission, stress cardiomyopathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. This clinical condition is associated with a favourable prognosis after hip surgery. PMID:26563767

  6. Celiac Disease in Women with Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cobb, Haley; Gao, Lisa Y.; Hawkes, William; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Kolatkar, Nikheel S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Methods Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and the control group (n=51), all of whom were from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Results Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (p< 0.0001) in the hip fracture cohorts compared to the elective joint replacement cohort (14.1 ng/ml vs. 21.3 ng/ml, respectively). There were no differences in the percentage of subjects with a positive tissue transglutaminase in the women with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.61%, respectively). Conclusion Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not prove useful, although larger prospective studies among hip fracture subjects are needed. PMID:23732553

  7. Geriatric Patients With Fractures Below the Hip are Medically Similar to Geriatric Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Harmeeth S.; Copeland, Marilyn E.; Crist, Brett D.; Volgas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated fractures below the hip to a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated hip fractures. All patients greater than 59 years of age admitted to our institution for surgical care of an isolated lower extremity fracture during a 3-year period were included. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: BTH (fracture below the subtrochanteric region of the femur) and HIP (proximal femoral fracture at subtrochanteric region or proximal). We identified 141 patients included in cohort BTH and 205 patients included in cohort HIP. HIP patients were older (P < .01) and less obese (P < .01) but were otherwise very similar. An extensive comorbidity review revealed that the 2 cohorts were similar, with the exception of an increased incidence of dementia (P = .012) or glaucoma (P = .04) in HIP patients and of peripheral neuropathy (P = .014) in BTH patients. HIP patients were more likely to be under active antiosteoporotic medication management and were more likely to be receiving pharmacological anticoagulation at the time of admission. HIP patients and BTH patients were similar with regard to necessity of assistance with ambulation preinjury, but HIP patients were less likely to reside independently at home than were BTH patients (P < .001). HIP patients were also less likely to be discharged directly home from the hospital (P < .001). Geriatric patients with fractures below the hip are medically similar to geriatric patients with hip fracture. Medical comanagement protocols have been extensively published that improve care of geriatric patients with hip fracture; consideration should be given to similar protocol-driven medical comanagement programs for geriatric patients with fractures below the hip. PMID:26246950

  8. Mortality after hip fracture with vertebral compression fracture is poor.

    PubMed

    Imai, Norio; Endo, Naoto; Hoshino, Tadashi; Suda, Ken; Miyasaka, Dai; Ito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing elderly population, the prevalence of osteoporotic hip fractures in Japanese patients continues to rise. It is well established that patients with either hip fracture or both symptomatic and asymptomatic morphometric vertebral compression fracture (VCF) have a poor health prognosis compared with the general population. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate vertebral fracture rates among patients with hip fracture and their influence on mortality. We examined 182 cases of osteoporotic hip fracture in patients admitted to our institution between January 2009 and May 2011. The average age at the time of fracture was 85 years. Radiographs of the lumbar spine were obtained from all of the participants and the lateral spinal radiographs were examined for evidence of VCF. The patients were classified into two groups, those with VCF and those without. A VCF was identified in approximately 78 % of the patients. The mortality rate 1 year after the hip fracture was approximately 22 % and it was significantly higher in patients with VCF. Through multivariate statistics we found that VCF, post-operative complication, loss of ambulation after operation and medication for osteoporosis were statistically significant. In other words, VCF, post-operative complication and loss of ambulation were considered to be poor prognostic factors and medication for osteoporosis was likely to improve the prognosis. We concluded that the risk of mortality after hip fracture is significantly greater in patients who also have VCF compared to patients without VCF, and that medication for osteoporosis is likely to improve prognosis. PMID:25501699

  9. Modeling climate effects on hip fracture rate by the multivariate GARCH model in Montreal region, Canada.

    PubMed

    Modarres, Reza; Ouarda, Taha B M J; Vanasse, Alain; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Gosselin, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Changes in extreme meteorological variables and the demographic shift towards an older population have made it important to investigate the association of climate variables and hip fracture by advanced methods in order to determine the climate variables that most affect hip fracture incidence. The nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous variable-generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARMAX-GARCH) and multivariate GARCH (MGARCH) time series approaches were applied to investigate the nonlinear association between hip fracture rate in female and male patients aged 40-74 and 75+ years and climate variables in the period of 1993-2004, in Montreal, Canada. The models describe 50-56% of daily variation in hip fracture rate and identify snow depth, air temperature, day length and air pressure as the influencing variables on the time-varying mean and variance of the hip fracture rate. The conditional covariance between climate variables and hip fracture rate is increasing exponentially, showing that the effect of climate variables on hip fracture rate is most acute when rates are high and climate conditions are at their worst. In Montreal, climate variables, particularly snow depth and air temperature, appear to be important predictors of hip fracture incidence. The association of climate variables and hip fracture does not seem to change linearly with time, but increases exponentially under harsh climate conditions. The results of this study can be used to provide an adaptive climate-related public health program and ti guide allocation of services for avoiding hip fracture risk. PMID:23722925

  10. Modeling climate effects on hip fracture rate by the multivariate GARCH model in Montreal region, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, Reza; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Vanasse, Alain; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Gosselin, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Changes in extreme meteorological variables and the demographic shift towards an older population have made it important to investigate the association of climate variables and hip fracture by advanced methods in order to determine the climate variables that most affect hip fracture incidence. The nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous variable-generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARMA X-GARCH) and multivariate GARCH (MGARCH) time series approaches were applied to investigate the nonlinear association between hip fracture rate in female and male patients aged 40-74 and 75+ years and climate variables in the period of 1993-2004, in Montreal, Canada. The models describe 50-56 % of daily variation in hip fracture rate and identify snow depth, air temperature, day length and air pressure as the influencing variables on the time-varying mean and variance of the hip fracture rate. The conditional covariance between climate variables and hip fracture rate is increasing exponentially, showing that the effect of climate variables on hip fracture rate is most acute when rates are high and climate conditions are at their worst. In Montreal, climate variables, particularly snow depth and air temperature, appear to be important predictors of hip fracture incidence. The association of climate variables and hip fracture does not seem to change linearly with time, but increases exponentially under harsh climate conditions. The results of this study can be used to provide an adaptive climate-related public health program and ti guide allocation of services for avoiding hip fracture risk.

  11. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were

  12. Complications of hip fractures: A review.

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-09-18

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  13. Trajectories of depressive symptoms after hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cristancho, P.; Lenze, E. J.; Avidan, M. S.; Rawson, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hip fracture is often complicated by depressive symptoms in older adults. We sought to characterize trajectories of depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture and examine their relationship with functional outcomes and walking ability. We also investigated clinical and psychosocial predictors of these trajectories. Method We enrolled 482 inpatients, aged ≥60 years, who were admitted for hip fracture repair at eight St Louis, MO area hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants with current depression diagnosis and/or notable cognitive impairment were excluded. Depressive symptoms and functional recovery were assessed with the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Functional Recovery Score, respectively, for 52 weeks after fracture. Health, cognitive, and psychosocial variables were gathered at baseline. We modeled depressive symptoms using group-based trajectory analysis and subsequently identified correlates of trajectory group membership. Results Three trajectories emerged according to the course of depressive symptoms, which we termed ‘resilient’, ‘distressed’, and ‘depressed’. The depressed trajectory (10% of participants) experienced a persistently high level of depressive symptoms and a slower time to recover mobility than the other trajectory groups. Stressful life events prior to the fracture, current smoking, higher anxiety, less social support, antidepressant use, past depression, and type of implant predicted membership of the depressed trajectory. Conclusions Depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture are associated with poorer functional status. Clinical and psychosocial variables predicted membership of the depression trajectory. Early identification and intervention of patients in a depressive trajectory may improve functional outcomes after hip fracture. PMID:27032698

  14. Nonsurgical Treatment Strategies after Osteoporotic Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kwang-Soon; Bae, Ki-Cheor; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Son, Eun-Suck; Lee, Kyung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic disease that is increasing in prevalence as people live longer. Because the orthopedic surgeon is frequently the first and often the only physician to manage patients with osteoporotic hip fractures, every effort should be made to prevent future fractures. A multidisciplinary approach is essential in treatment of osteoporotic fractures. Basic treatment includes calcium and vitamin D supplementation, fall prevention, hip protection, and balance and exercise programs. Currently available pharmacologic agents are divided into antiresorptive and anabolic groups. Antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates limit bone resorption through inhibition of osteoclastic activity. Anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone promote bone formation.

  15. Impact of hip fracture on mortality: a cohort study in hip fracture discordant identical twins.

    PubMed

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Nordström, Peter; Nordström, Anna; Garmo, Hans; Byberg, Liisa; Pedersen, Nancy L; Melhus, Håkan

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have shown a long-lasting higher mortality after hip fracture, but the reasons for the excess risk are not well understood. We aimed to determine whether a higher mortality after hip fracture exists when controlling for genetic constitution, shared environment, comorbidity, and lifestyle by use of a nationwide cohort study in hip fracture discordant monozygotic twins. All 286 identical Swedish twin pairs discordant for hip fracture (1972 to 2010) were identified. Comorbidity and lifestyle information was retrieved by registers and questionnaire information. We used intrapair Cox regression to compute multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for death. During follow-up, 143 twins with a hip fracture died (50%) compared with 101 twins (35%) without a hip fracture. Through the first year after hip fracture, the rate of death increased fourfold in women (HR = 3.71; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-10.40) and sevenfold in men (HR = 6.67; 95% CI 1.47-30.13). The increased rate in women only persisted during the first year after hip fracture (HR after 1 year = 0.99; 95% CI 0.66-1.50), whereas the corresponding HR in men was 2.58 (95% CI 1.02-6.62). The higher risk in men after the hip fracture event was successively attenuated during follow-up. After 5 years, the hazard ratio in men with a hip fracture was 1.19 (95% CI 0.29-4.90). On average, the hip fracture contributed to 0.9 years of life lost in women (95% CI 0.06-1.7) and 2.7 years in men (95% CI 1.7-3.7). The potential years of life lost associated with the hip fracture was especially pronounced in older men (>75 years), with an average loss of 47% (95% CI 31-61) of the expected remaining lifetime. We conclude that both women and men display a higher mortality after hip fracture independent of genes, comorbidity, and lifestyle. PMID:23821464

  16. Risk Factors for Severity and Type of the Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Jane A.; Lui, Li-Yung; Genant, Harry K.; Salamone, Loran; Browner, Warren; Fink, Howard A.; Cohen, Peter; Hillier, Teresa; Bauer, Doug C.; Cummings, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    More severe hip fractures such as displaced femoral neck (FN) fractures and unstable intertrochanteric (IT) fractures lead to poorer outcomes, but risk factors for severe fractures have not been studied. To identify risk factors for severe types of hip fracture, we performed a prospective cohort study and obtained preoperative hip radiographs from women who sustained an incident hip fracture (excluding traumatic fractures). A single radiologist scored the severity of FN fractures by the Garden System: grades I and II, undisplaced; grades III and IV, displaced. The severity of IT hip fractures was rated by the Kyle System: grades I and II, stable; grades III and IV, unstable. A total of 249 women had FN fractures: 75 (30%) were undisplaced. A total of 213 women had IT fractures: 59 (28%) were stable. Both types of hip fracture increased with age, but older age was even more strongly associated with more severe hip fractures. Low BMD was more strongly related to undisplaced FN fractures (p interaction BMD × FN type, p = 0.0008) and stable IT fractures (p interaction BMD × IT type, p = 0.04). Similar findings were observed for estimated volumetric BMD and hip geometric parameters. Corticosteroid use was only associated with displaced FN fractures, and Parkinson's disease was only associated with stable IT fractures. Little difference was reported in the self-reported circumstances surrounding each type of fracture. In conclusion, the lower the BMD, the greater the likelihood of experiencing a hip fracture that is less displaced and more stable. PMID:19113930

  17. High Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Levels in Older Patients with Acute Hip Fracture Are Correlated with Worse Function and Increased Bone Resorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies suggested that higher SHBG levels are associated with an increased hip fracture risk and that higher testosterone levels may reduce the odds of falling among men and women age 65 and older. The objective of this study is to examine the correlation of serum testosterone and SHBG with...

  18. Clinical effectiveness of orthogeriatric and fracture liaison service models of care for hip fracture patients: population-based longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Samuel; Javaid, M. Kassim; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Lippett, Janet; Sheard, Sally; Arden, Nigel K.; Cooper, Cyrus; Judge, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to evaluate orthogeriatric and nurse-led fracture liaison service (FLS) models of post-hip fracture care in terms of impact on mortality (30 days and 1 year) and second hip fracture (2 years). Setting: Hospital Episode Statistics database linked to Office for National Statistics mortality records for 11 acute hospitals in a region of England. Population: patients aged over 60 years admitted for a primary hip fracture from 2003 to 2013. Methods: each hospital was analysed separately and acted as its own control in a before–after time-series design in which the appointment of an orthogeriatrician or set-up/expansion of an FLS was evaluated. Multivariable Cox regression (mortality) and competing risk survival models (second hip fracture) were used. Fixed effects meta-analysis was used to pool estimates of impact for interventions of the same type. Results: of 33,152 primary hip fracture patients, 1,288 sustained a second hip fracture within 2 years (age and sex standardised proportion of 4.2%). 3,033 primary hip fracture patients died within 30 days and 9,662 died within 1 year (age and sex standardised proportion of 9.5% and 29.8%, respectively). The estimated impact of introducing an orthogeriatrician on 30-day and 1-year mortality was hazard ratio (HR) = 0.73 (95% CI: 0.65–0.82) and HR = 0.81 (CI: 0.75–0.87), respectively. Following an FLS, these associations were as follows: HR = 0.80 (95% CI: 0.71–0.91) and HR = 0.84 (0.77–0.93). There was no significant impact on time to second hip fracture. Conclusions: the introduction and/or expansion of orthogeriatric and FLS models of post-hip fracture care has a beneficial effect on subsequent mortality. No evidence for a reduction in second hip fracture rate was found. PMID:26802076

  19. Ipsilateral Intracapsular Hip Fracture 2 Years after Fixation of Extracapsular Fracture by Dynamic Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Farhan; Nunag, Perrico; Mustafa, Abubakar; Pillai, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sustaining an intracapsular fracture in a hip which was previously fixed with dynamic hip screw for extracapsular fracture, is a very rarely reported occurrence. We present one such case in order to discuss the presentation and management of this fracture. We have also reviewed the literature and pooled the previously reported cases to look at potential cause & risk factors. Case Report: A 92 year old female, presented with new onset hip pain following a trivial injury. Couple of years back, she had sustained an extracapsular fracture on same side which was treated by DHS fixation. Further investigations confirmed a de-novo fracture which was treated by removal of DHS and cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Conclusion: This complication might not be as rare as earlier thought to be. All patients, especially elderly females who present with new onset hip pain following DHS fixation of their hip fracture previously must be evaluated for a de-novo intracapsular fracture. On confirmation of diagnosis, they can be treated by removal of dynamic hip screw and hemiarthroplasty as most of these are low demand elderly patients. PMID:27299034

  20. Volume Matters: Returning Home After Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo, Pedro; Leland, Natalie E.; Christian, Thomas J.; Mor, Vincent; Teno, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the effect of the relationship between volume (number of hip fracture admissions during the 12 months before participant’s fracture) and other facility characteristics on outcomes. DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING U.S. skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) admitting individuals discharged from the hospital after treatment for hip fracture between 2000 and 2007 (N = 15,439). PARTICIPANTS Community-dwelling fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries aged 75 and older admitted to U.S. hospitals for their first hip fracture and discharged to a SNF for postacute care from 2000 to 2007 (N = 512,967). MEASUREMENTS Successful discharge from SNF to community, defined as returning to the community within 30 days of hospital discharge to the SNF and remaining in the community without being institutionalized for at least 30 days, was examined using Medicare administrative data, propensity score matching, and instrumental variables. RESULTS The overall rate of successful discharge to the community was 31%. Of the 15,439 facilities, the facility interquartile range varied from 0% (25th percentile) to 42% (75th percentile). An important determinant of variation in discharge rate was SNF volume of hip fracture admissions. Unadjusted successful discharge from SNF to community was 43.7% in high-volume facilities (>24 admissions/year), versus 18.8% in low-volume facilities (1–6 admissions/year). This facility volume effect persisted after adjusting for participant and facility characteristics associated with outcomes (e.g., adjusted odds ratio = 2.06, 95% confidence interval = 1.91–2.21 for volume of 25 vs 3 admissions per year). CONCLUSION In community-dwelling persons with their first hip fracture, successful return to the community varies substantially according to SNF provider volume and staffing characteristics. PMID:26424223

  1. [Hip Fracture--Epidemiology, Management and Liaison Service. Risk factor for hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2015-04-01

    Many risk factors have been identified for hip fracture, including female, advanced age, osteoporosis, previous fractures, low body weight or low body mass index, alcohol drinking, smoking, family history of fractures, use of glucocorticoid, factors related to falls, and bone strength. The factors related to falls are number of fall, frail, post stroke, paralysis, muscle weakness, anti-anxiety drugs, anti-depression drugs, and sedatives. Dementia and respiratory disease and others have been reported to be risk factors for secondary hip fracture. PMID:25814010

  2. Preventable mortality in geriatric hip fracture inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, S. M.; Hardy, B. M.; Byth, P. L.; Brown, T. L.; Attia, J.; Balogh, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a high rate of mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip. We aimed to determine the rate of preventable mortality and errors during the management of these patients. A 12 month prospective study was performed on patients aged > 65 years who had sustained a fracture of the hip. This was conducted at a Level 1 Trauma Centre with no orthogeriatric service. A multidisciplinary review of the medical records by four specialists was performed to analyse errors of management and elements of preventable mortality. During 2011, there were 437 patients aged > 65 years admitted with a fracture of the hip (85 years (66 to 99)) and 20 died while in hospital (86.3 years (67 to 96)). A total of 152 errors were identified in the 80 individual reviews of the 20 deaths. A total of 99 errors (65%) were thought to have at least a moderate effect on death; 45 reviews considering death (57%) were thought to have potentially been preventable. Agreement between the panel of reviewers on the preventability of death was fair. A larger-scale assessment of preventable mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip is required. Multidisciplinary review panels could be considered as part of the quality assurance process in the management of these patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:1178–84. PMID:25183587

  3. Multimodal Analgesia in the Hip Fracture Patient.

    PubMed

    Fabi, David W

    2016-05-01

    Hip fracture is one of the most common injuries among the elderly and, because the population is aging, it is expected to remain a major clinical challenge and public health problem for the foreseeable future. The clinical importance of early mobilization and prompt participation in physical therapy after hip fracture surgery is now widely recognized. Because postoperative pain can impair mobility and delay physical therapy, much attention is now being paid to finding more effective ways of controlling pain after hip fracture. Oversedation with opioid drugs inhibits communication between the patient and the health care team, can delay ambulation and rehabilitation therapy, and may increase the probability of the patient requiring a skilled nursing facility, which adds further cost to the overall health care system. Multiple pain pathways contribute to the perception of postoperative pain, and although opioids are highly effective in blocking nociceptive pain through inhibition of the mu receptors, they do not block other pain pathways. Multimodal analgesia involves the use of several anesthetic and analgesic modalities that are strategically combined to block pain perception at different sites in the peripheral and central nervous systems. This balanced, multifaceted approach provides more effective control of postoperative pain than opioid drugs alone, allows lower doses of opioids to be used as part of the multimodal regimen (thereby reducing the risk of opioid-related adverse events and complications), and may facilitate more rapid recovery and improve certain outcome measures related to recovery time. One prospective randomized study evaluating the clinical value of multimodal pain management in elderly patients undergoing bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty found that a multimodal regimen, including preemptive pain medication and intraoperative periarticular injections, reduced pain on postoperative days 1 and 4, and reduced overall opioid use. This article describes

  4. Assessment of outcome after hip fracture: development of a universal assessment system for hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Thomas M.; Parker, Martyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to refine current evaluation systems used to assess outcome after a hip fracture and to devise a simple and practical system to assess all hip fracture patients. Methods: Three continuous scales were defined for pain, mobility and functional independence. These were all found to have an acceptable degree of inter-observer agreement. The pre-fracture mobility and independence scores were related to the one-year mortality for a consecutive series of 381 patients. Results: Scores for mobility and functional independence were highly predictive of mortality (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: It is recommended that the outcome after hip fracture should be standardised to these principle outcomes of pain, regain of mobility and independence and mortality. These scores can be use to assess progress and identify those who may require additional assessment or intervention. PMID:27259572

  5. Minimally invasive dynamic hip screw for fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Michael; Garau, Giorgio; Walley, Gayle; Oliva, Francesco; Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Longo, Umile Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compared a minimally invasive surgical technique to the conventional (open approach) surgical technique used in fixation of hip fractures with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) device. Using a case-control design (44 cases and 44 controls), we tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the two techniques in the following outcome measures: duration of surgery, time to mobilisation and weight bearing postoperatively, length of hospital stay, mean difference of pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels, position of the lag screw of the DHS device in the femoral head, and the tip–apex distance. The minimally invasive DHS technique had significantly shorter duration of surgery and length of hospital stay. There was also less blood loss in the minimally invasive DHS technique. The minimally invasive DHS technique produces better outcome measures in the operating time, length of hospital stay, and blood loss compared to the conventional approach while maintaining equal fixation stability. PMID:18478227

  6. Incidence and direct hospitalisation costs of hip fractures in Vilnius, capital of Lithuania, in 2010

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few epidemiological data on hip fractures were previously available in Lithuania. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence and hospital costs of hip fractures in Vilnius in 2010. Methods Data were collected from the medical charts of all patients admitted to hospitals in Vilnius (population, 548,835) due to new low-energy trauma hip fracture, during 2010. The estimated costs included ambulance transportation and continuous hospitalisation immediately after a fracture, which are covered by the Lithuanian healthcare system. Results The incidence of new low-energy trauma hip fractures was 252 (308 women and 160 men) per 100,000 inhabitants of Vilnius aged 50-years or more. There was an exponential increase in the incidence with increasing age. The overall estimated cost of hip fractures in Vilnius was 1,114,292 EUR for the year 2010. The greatest part of the expenditure was accounted for by fractures in individuals aged 65-years and over. The mean cost per case was 2,526.74 EUR, and cost varied depending on the treatment type. Hip replacement did not affect the overall mean costs of hip fracture. The majority of costs were incurred for acute (53%) and long-term care (35%) hospital stays, while medical rehabilitation accounted for only 12% of the overall cost. The costs of hip fracture were somewhat lower than those found in other European countries. Conclusion The data on incidence and costs of hip fractures will help to assess the importance of interventions to reduce the number of fractures and associated costs. PMID:22747915

  7. Hip fractures in extremely old patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapicioglu, Mehmet; Ersen, Ali; Saglam, Yavuz; Akgul, Turgut; Kizilkurt, Taha; Yazicioglu, Onder

    2014-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to report a less seen age-group (>90) of hip fractures and to assess the predictors of functional loss, complications and mortality. Methods Thirty-two patients at a mean age of 92.8 (±2.7) were treated in a single institution and reported at a mean follow-up of 2.02 (±1.35) years. Results Mortality was similar between proximal femoral nailing (PFN) and bipolar cemented hemiarthroplasty (BCH) in first year (p = 0.17) but significantly high in following years in BCH (p = 0.035) and patients with cardiac disease (p = 0.054). Conclusion Hip fractures are challenging in extremely old patients and associated with increased mortality and disability. PMID:25264408

  8. Improving Hip Fracture Care in Ireland: A Preliminary Report of the Irish Hip Fracture Database

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Adam; Brent, Louise; Hurson, Conor; Ahern, Emer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Hip fractures are common injuries in the older persons, with significant associated morbidity and mortality. The Irish Hip Fracture Database (IHFD) was implemented to monitor standards of care against international standards. Methods. The IHFD is a clinically led web-based audit. We summarize the data collected on hip fractures from April 2012 to March 2013 from 8 centres. Results. There were 843 patients with the majority being (70%) female. The 80–89-year age group accounted for the majority of fractures (44%). Most (71%) sustained a fall at home. Intertrochanteric fractures (40%) were most common. Only 28% were admitted to an orthopaedic ward within 4 hours. The majority (97%) underwent surgery with 44% having surgery within 36 hours. Medical optimization (35%) and lack of theatre space (26%) accounted for most of the surgical delay. While 29% were discharged home, 33% were discharged to a nursing home or other long-stay facilities. There was a 4% in-hospital mortality rate. Conclusions. Several key areas in both the database and aspects of patient care needing improvement have been highlighted. The implementation of similar databases has led to improved hip fracture care in other countries and we believe this can be replicated in Ireland. PMID:25548713

  9. Hip Surgery Candidates: A Comparative Study of Hip Osteoarthritis and Prior Hip Fracture Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess similarities and differences in patient-related characteristics before and after surgery for painful disabling hip osteoarthritis among elderly subgroups with and without a trauma history. Method: First, a cohort of 1000 hospitalized patients were assessed for trends in: perceived duration of the condition, pain intensity, functional performance ability, walking distance, body mass, and comorbidity characteristics among other factors. Then, the most salient of these patient-related characteristics were compared between 42 cases of hip osteoarthritis without a trauma history and 42 cases with a trauma history matched for age and gender, using medical records and standard data recording and analysis procedures. Results: Hip osteoarthritis cases with a prior hip fracture history had a longer duration of disability, and were more impaired functionally before surgery (p < 0.05) than those with no such history. They also had lower leg muscle strength and used more assistive devices. Conclusion: Patients undergoing hip replacement surgery for painful hip osteoarthritis who have a hip fracture history are likely to be more impaired and disabled than those with no such history. PMID:19478931

  10. The impact and consequences of hip fracture in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Jaglal, Susan B.; Sherry, Paul G.; Schatzker, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude and the burden of hip fracture on the health care system, including time trends in hip fracture rates, in-hospital death rates, length of hospital stay (LHS) and discharge destination. Design A retrospective study of discharge abstracts. Setting The Province of Ontario. Patients All patients (n = 93 660) over the age of 50 years and with a diagnosis of hip fracture discharged from hospital between 1981 and 1992 (excluding transfers). Main Outcome Measures Age-sex standardized hip fracture rates per 1000 population, in-hospital death rates and age-adjusted mean LHS. Results The overall hip fracture rate was 3.3 per 1000 persons (1.7 per 1000 men and 4.6 per 1000 women). There was no change in rates between 1981 and 1992 (p = 0.089), but there have been increases in the numbers of hip fractures. There was no change in the in-hospital death rate over time (p = 0.78). The age-adjusted mean LHS in 1981 was 28.6 days compared with 22.2 days in 1992. The numbers of hip fractures will increase from 8490 in 1990 to 16 963 in 2010. Conclusions Despite stable age-adjusted rates of hip fractures, the doubling of the number of hip fractures by the year 2010 due to an aging population will become an increasing burden on the health care system. PMID:8769920

  11. Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk Swedish study found that people with new knees had slight uptick in spinal fractures, too To use the sharing features on this ...

  12. Fat embolism in patients with fractured hips.

    PubMed

    Sevitt, S

    1972-04-29

    Fat embolism was assessed at necropsy and correlated with clinical findings in the patients who died among 854 with fractured hips admitted to hospital between 1967 and August 1971. Sixteen cases of clinical importance were found, eight of which were judged to have been fatal or to have seriously contributed to death. Frequencies were as follows: 2.4 to 3.3% among 424 patients with subcapital fractures; 0.7 to 0.8% in the 405 with trochanteric fractures; 4.1 to 7% among subjects treated without operation, representing 30% of those who died within seven days; and 0.9 to 1.1% among patients treated by pinning, nailing, or nail-plating. The higher frequency in the conservatively treated group is probably related to selection of poor-risk subjects. Fat embolism was found in 6.8 to 8.0% of those with subcapital fractures treated by primary Thompson's arthroplasty which utilizes acrylic cement, and in none of those given Moore's prostheses for which cement is not used. Study of a larger group after Moore's prosthesis is required to establish its lack of special risk. Fat embolism accounted for all the deaths within seven days of Thompson's arthroplasty and for most within 14 days; it was clearly related to surgery in some cases.A possible explanation of the hazard of Thompson's arthroplasty is that fat globule entry is enhanced by a rise of intramedullary pressure due to proximal occlusion of the reamed marrow cavity. A controlled trial of the effect of venting the marrow cavity on the frequency of fat embolism is warranted. It is possible that the acrylic monomer may also contribute to venous entry of medullary fat. The higher-age group of those with subcapital fractures and associated chronic cardiac and pulmonary disease might make them more susceptible to fat embolization than those in whom arthroplasty is also carried out for chronic hip disease. PMID:5022012

  13. Fat Embolism in Patients with Fractured Hips

    PubMed Central

    Sevitt, Simon

    1972-01-01

    Fat embolism was assessed at necropsy and correlated with clinical findings in the patients who died among 854 with fractured hips admitted to hospital between 1967 and August 1971. Sixteen cases of clinical importance were found, eight of which were judged to have been fatal or to have seriously contributed to death. Frequencies were as follows: 2·4 to 3·3% among 424 patients with subcapital fractures; 0·7 to 0·8% in the 405 with trochanteric fractures; 4·1 to 7% among subjects treated without operation, representing 30% of those who died within seven days; and 0·9 to 1·1% among patients treated by pinning, nailing, or nail-plating. The higher frequency in the conservatively treated group is probably related to selection of poor-risk subjects. Fat embolism was found in 6·8 to 8·0% of those with subcapital fractures treated by primary Thompson's arthroplasty which utilizes acrylic cement, and in none of those given Moore's prostheses for which cement is not used. Study of a larger group after Moore's prosthesis is required to establish its lack of special risk. Fat embolism accounted for all the deaths within seven days of Thompson's arthroplasty and for most within 14 days; it was clearly related to surgery in some cases. A possible explanation of the hazard of Thompson's arthroplasty is that fat globule entry is enhanced by a rise of intramedullary pressure due to proximal occlusion of the reamed marrow cavity. A controlled trial of the effect of venting the marrow cavity on the frequency of fat embolism is warranted. It is possible that the acrylic monomer may also contribute to venous entry of medullary fat. The higher-age group of those with subcapital fractures and associated chronic cardiac and pulmonary disease might make them more susceptible to fat embolization than those in whom arthroplasty is also carried out for chronic hip disease. PMID:5022012

  14. Current Challenges in Pain Management in Hip Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Sanzone, Anthony G

    2016-05-01

    The high incidence of hip fracture, together with considerable associated morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, makes this injury a major clinical challenge. Of particular importance is the pain associated with hip fracture, which can have potentially severe consequences and may lead to delayed recovery. The prevailing opioid-dependent model of analgesia, however, presents multiple drawbacks and risks that can compromise outcomes in the hip fracture population. The pain management process has essential preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative components, yet data on the comparative effectiveness of different pain management interventions in patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture are not clear cut. A Cochrane database review that included 83 different pain management studies indicated that there are not enough well-designed studies to show unequivocally which pain management approaches work well after hip fracture surgery. Yet a growing body of data on certain interventions, such as nerve blocks and multimodal analgesia, supports consideration of these options. PMID:27101319

  15. Hip fractures in the elderly: operative versus nonoperative management

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hip fractures are common in the elderly. Published studies have not shown significant differences in mortality rates between hip fracture patients who were managed nonoperatively and operatively. This retrospective study looked at 340 patients with hip fractures who were admitted to a local hospital over one year, and compared the long-term mortality between those treated operatively and nonoperatively. METHODS All patients with hip fractures were identified retrospectively from the hospital’s hip registry. Mortality data was collected through nationwide electronic medical records and telephone interviews. RESULTS Overall mortality rates at one (14.4%) and two years (24.4%) were comparable to those of other studies. Hip fracture patients who were treated nonoperatively had a higher risk of mortality at both one (29.8%) and two years (45.6%) after fracture (p < 0.05). Their risk of mortality was four times higher at one year and three times higher at two years after fracture than the operative group. Patients with a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade did not show an increased risk in mortality compared to patients with a lower ASA grade at both one year (p = 0.072) and two years (p = 0.360) after fracture. CONCLUSION Elderly patients with hip fractures should be managed surgically and counselled regarding the increased risk of mortality if treated nonoperatively. PMID:27075376

  16. Mortality and Readmissions After Cervical Fractures From Falls In Older Adults: A Comparison To Hip Fractures Using National Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zara; Mitchell, Susan L.; Lipsitz, Stuart; Ayanian, John Z.; Bernacki, Rachelle E.; Harris, Mitchel B.; Jha, Ashish K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical fractures from falls are a potentially lethal injury in older patients. Little is known about their epidemiology and outcomes. Objectives To examine the prevalence of cervical spine fractures after falls among older Americans and show changes in recent years. Further, to compare 12-month outcomes in patients with cervical and hip fracture after falls. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective study of Medicare data from 2007–2011 including patients ≥65 with cervical fracture and hip fracture after falls treated at acute care hospitals. Measurements Rates of cervical fracture, 12-month mortality and readmission rates after injury. Results Rates of cervical fracture increased from 4.6/10,000 in 2007 to 5.3/10,000 in 2011, whereas rates of hip fracture decreased from 77.3/10,000 in 2007 to 63.5/10,000 in 2011. Patients with cervical fracture without and with spinal cord injury (SCI) were more likely than patients with hip fracture, respectively, to receive treatment at large hospitals (54.1%, 59.4% vs. 28.1%, p< 0.001), teaching hospitals (40.0%, 49.3% vs. 13.4%, p< 0.001), and regional trauma centers (38.5%, 46.3% vs. 13.0%, p< 0.001). Patients with cervical fracture, particularly those with SCI, had higher risk-adjusted mortality rates at one year than those with hip fracture (24.5%, 41.7% vs. 22.7%, p<0.001). By one year, more than half of patients with cervical and hip fracture died or were readmitted to the hospital (59.5%, 73.4% vs. 59.3%, p<0.001). Conclusion Cervical spine fractures occur in one of every 2,000 Medicare beneficiaries annually and appear to be increasing over time. Patients with cervical fractures had higher mortality than those with hip fractures. Given the increasing prevalence and the poor outcomes of this population, hospitals need to develop processes to improve care for these vulnerable patients. PMID:26456855

  17. Prevention and treatment of senile osteoporosis and hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Duque, G; Demontiero, O; Troen, B R

    2009-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health issue worldwide, with significant economic consequences and adverse impacts on the quality of life. Hip fractures are the most devastating complication of osteoporosis, are likely to increase exponentially with an increasingly aged population, are associated with high recurrence rate, and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of hip fractures, the assessment of fracture risk, fall prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis with emphasis on evidence for hip fracture reduction among the various agents currently available. The aim is to provide recommendations to optimize hip fracture prevention and treatment. Ample evidence exists in the literature of many other risk factors independent from bone mineral density that increase fracture risk. These clinical risk factors have been validated in large cohorts and are incorporated into clinical tools that are invaluable in treatment decisions. In addition, strategies to prevent or reduce falls are integral to comprehensive osteoporosis management. Vitamin D combined with calcium has a role in primary prevention. Alendronate, residronate, strontium and zoledronic acid have proven efficacy in primary and secondary hip fracture prevention. An aggressive approach to investigate, assess and manage an individual's fracture risk and fall risk is paramount to reduce the high morbidity and mortality associated with hip fractures. The choice of therapy should be determined by the patient's calculated fracture risk and efficacy of the potential treatment, including long term compliance associated with the agent of choice. PMID:19277006

  18. Traumatic Hip Dislocation with Associated Femoral Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Dortaj, H.; Emamifar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the hip is a critical injury that results from high-energy trauma. This paper describes a case of posterior dislocation of the right hip in a 35-year-old woman with associated ipsilateral femoral head fracture. Initial treatment included reduction of the right hip through posterior approach and fixation of the femoral head fracture with three absorbable screws. After 15-month follow-up, a full range of motion has been achieved and there are no signs of avascular necrosis, hip instability, or limping. The authors describe their method of surgery. PMID:25874147

  19. Influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the different types of hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizhong; Lin, Jinkuang; Cai, Siqing; Yan, Lisheng; Pan, Yuancheng; Yao, Xuedong; Zhuang, Huafeng; Wang, Peiwen; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were 95 menopausal females of age ≥ 50 years with fragility fracture of hip, including 55 cases of femoral neck fracture and 40 cases of trochanteric fracture. Another 63 non-fractured females with normal bone mineral density (BMD) were chosen as control. BMD, hip axis length, neck-shaft angle and structural parameters including cross surface area, cortical thickness and buckling ratio were detected and compared. Compared with control group, the patients with femoral neck fracture or trochanteric fractures had significantly lower BMD of femoral neck, as well as lower cross surface area and cortical thickness and higher buckling ratio in femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were no significant differences of BMD and structural parameters in the femoral neck fracture group and intertrochanteric fracture group. Hip axis length and neck-shaft angle were not significantly different among three groups. The significant changes of BMD and proximal femur geometry were present in the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. The different types of hip fractures cannot be explained by these changes. PMID:26773177

  20. Current and projected rates of hip fracture in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitropoulos, E A; Coyte, P C; Josse, R G; Greenwood, C E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the current values and estimate the projected values (to the year 2041) for annual number of proximal femoral fractures (PFFs), age-adjusted rates of fracture, rates of death in the acute care setting, associated length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and seasonal variation by sex and age in elderly Canadians. DESIGN: Hospital discharge data for fiscal year 1993-94 from the Canadian Institute for Health Information were used to determine PFF incidence, and Statistics Canada population projections were used to estimate the rate and number of PFFs to 2041. SETTING: Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Canadian patients 65 years of age or older who underwent hip arthroplasty. OUTCOME MEASURES: PFF rates, death rates and LOS by age, sex and province. RESULTS: In 1993-94 the incidence of PFF increased exponentially with increasing age. The age-adjusted rates were 479 per 100,000 for women and 187 per 100,000 for men. The number of PFFs was estimated at 23,375 (17,823 in women and 5552 in men), with a projected increase to 88,124 in 2041. The rate of death during the acute care stay increased exponentially with increasing age. The death rates for men were twice those for women. In 1993-94 an estimated 1570 deaths occurred in the acute care setting, and 7000 deaths were projected for 2041. LOS in the acute care setting increased with advancing age, as did variability in LOS, which suggests a more heterogeneous case mix with advancing age. The LOS for 1993-94 and 2041 was estimated at 465,000 and 1.8 million patient-days respectively. Seasonal variability in the incidence of PFFs by sex was not significant. Significant season-province interactions were seen (p < 0.05); however, the differences in incidence were small (on the order of 2% to 3%) and were not considered to have a large effect on resource use in the acute care setting. CONCLUSIONS: On the assumption that current conditions contributing to hip fractures will remain constant, the number of PFFs will rise

  1. Can bundled payment improve quality and efficiency of care for patients with hip fractures?

    PubMed

    Antonova, Evgeniya; Boye, Mark E; Sen, Namrata; O'Sullivan, Amy K; Burge, Russel

    2015-01-01

    The current Medicare reimbursement for hip fractures lacks accountability and promotes cost cutting. A bundled payment system-analogous to the Medicare Acute Care Episodes Demonstration for Orthopedic and Cardiovascular Surgery-may help curtail costs, foster communication among health care providers, and improve their accountability for patient outcomes. In hip fracture care, bundled payment may spur development of multidisciplinary best practice guidelines, quality assessment, and reporting, and result in benchmarking and best practices sharing. However, its implementation may face challenges: the need for quality assessment criteria and risk adjustment methods and possible risks of pushing costs outside of Medicare boundaries. PMID:25299851

  2. Hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Carmelo; Perugia, Dario; Carcangiu, Alessandro; Monaco, Edoardo; Speranza, Attilio; Ferretti, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture typically leads to profound functional disability and pain. Salvage treatment with hip arthroplasty may be considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of hip arthroplasty performed as a salvage procedure after the failed treatment of an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Twenty-one patients were treated in our hospital with hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of intertrochanteric hip fracture. There were sixteen women and five men with a mean age of 75.8 years (range 61-85 years). Fourteen patients had failure of a previous nail fixation procedure, five had failure of a plate fixation, one of hip screws fixation and one of Ender nail fixation. In 19 out of 21 patients we performed a total hip arthroplasty-14 cases used modular implants with long-stems and five cases used a standard straight stem. In 2 of 21 cases we used a bipolar hemiarthroplasty. A statistically significant improvement was found comparing pre and postoperative conditions (p < 0.05). Our experience confirms that total hip arthroplasty is a satisfactory salvage procedure after failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture in elderly patients with few serious orthopaedic complications and acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:19572131

  3. Traumatic inferior hip dislocation: a rare adult case with ipsilateral bifocal hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj Moussa, Majd; Tawk, Charbel; Hoyek, Fadi; Lahoud, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Inferior dislocation is a rare type of hip dislocation, especially in adults. Few cases have been reported; most of them were isolated. This is the case of a traumatic adult hip dislocation after a road traffic accident. Reduction was made under general anaesthesia; a CT-Scan after the reduction showed a bifocal non-displaced hip fracture. In this article, we present a small review of the literature and we discuss the possible mechanism of hip dislocation. We found through our case study that this condition is not exclusive to children and CT-Scan is mandatory after the reduction of hip dislocation to eliminate any associated injury. To our knowledge, a bifocal hip fracture has not previously been documented, in the English language literature. PMID:27141043

  4. Management of hip fracture: the family physician's role.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha S; Cherukuri, Manjula

    2006-06-15

    The incidence of hip fracture is expected to increase as the population ages. One in five persons dies in the first year after sustaining a hip fracture, and those who survive past one year may have significant functional limitation. Although surgery is the main treatment for hip fracture, family physicians play a key role as patients' medical consultants. Surgical repair is recommended for stable patients within 24 to 48 hours of hospitalization. Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated to prevent infection after surgery. Thromboprophylaxis has become the standard of care for management of hip fracture. Effective agents include unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, fondaparinux, and warfarin. Optimal pain control, usually with narcotic analgesics, is essential to ensure patient comfort and to facilitate rehabilitation. Rehabilitation after hip fracture surgery ideally should start on the first postoperative day with progression to ambulation as tolerated. Indwelling urinary catheters should be removed within 24 hours of surgery. Prevention, early recognition, and treatment of contributing factors for delirium also are crucial. Interventions to help prevent future falls, exercise and balance training in ambulatory patients, and the treatment of osteoporosis are important strategies for the secondary prevention of hip fracture. PMID:16836036

  5. Undertreatment of Osteoporosis Following Hip Fractures in Jeju Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Rim; Park, Yong-Geun; Kang, Soo Yong; Nam, Kwang Woo; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis treatment following hip fracture is well known to not enough. We previously performed intervention study for orthopaedic surgeon's education and reported twofold increase in osteoporosis detection and treatment rate observed between 2005 and 2007. This follow-up observational study was conducted to find out the rate in which a diagnostic workup and treatment for osteoporosis were done in patients with hip fracture. Methods Medical records and radiographs in patients who were older than 50 years and diagnosed as having femoral neck or intertrochanteric fractures at 8 hospitals in Jeju island, South Korea from 2008 to 2011 were reviewed. The numbers of patients who were studied with bone densitometry and who were treated for osteoporosis after the diagnosis of hip fracture were analyzed. Results Nine hundred forty five hip fractures (201 in 2008, 257 in 2009, 265 in 2010, and 304 in 2011) occurred in 191 men and 754 women during the study periods. The mean age of the patients was 79.7 years. The mean rate of osteoporosis detection using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was 36.4% (344/945 hips) (ranged from 24.2% in 2009 to 40.5% in 2011). The mean initiation rate of osteoporosis treatment was 23.1% (218/945 hips) (ranged from 20% in 2009 to 29% in 2008). Conclusions Detection and treatment rate of osteoporosis following hip fracture during follow-up periods was still not enough. Additional intervention studies are required to further improvement of osteoporosis treatment rates after hip fracture. PMID:25489575

  6. Adverse event recording post hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Doody, K; Mohamed, K M S; Butler, A; Street, J; Lenehan, B

    2013-01-01

    Accurate recording of adverse events post hip fracture surgery is vital for planning and allocating resources. The purpose of this study was to compare adverse events recorded prospectively at point of care with adverse recorded by the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) System. The study examined a two month period from August to September 2011 at University Hospital Limerick. Out of a sample size of 39, there were 7 males (17.9%) and 32 females (82.1%) with an age range of between 53 and 98 years. The mean age was 80.5 years. 55 adverse events were recorded, in contrast to the HIPE record of 13 (23.6%) adverse events. The most common complications included constipation 10 (18.2%), anaemia 8 (14.5%), urinary retention 8 (14.50%), pneumonia 5 (9.1%) and delirium 5 (9.1%). Of the female cohort, 24 (68.8%) suffered an adverse event, while only 4 (57%) males suffered an adverse event. PMID:24579408

  7. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency in Swiss Hip Fracture Patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Based on evidence for fall and fracture prevention, most clinical guidelines for the prevention of hip fractures recommend 800 IU vitamin D per day. This dose shifted 25(OH)D levels in previous studies to between 60-100 nmol/l. Aim: As a direct test of clinical guideline practice in Swi...

  8. Cost-Utility Analysis of Osteoporotic Hip Fractures in Thais.

    PubMed

    Wajanavisit, Wiwat; Woratanarat, Patarawan; Sawatriawkul, Sansanee; Lertbusayanukul, Chatchawal; Ongphiphadhanakul, Boonsong

    2015-09-01

    A prospective study was conducted among osteoporotic hip fracture in 2008. It was aimed to assess cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) of hip fracture in the context of a developing country. The patients who were diagnosed as hip fracture and admitted to the orthopedic wards were included. Any pathological fractures or missing data were discarded from the analysis. Median cost was evaluated from a societal perspective. EQ-5D was used to assess health utility state and then converted into a time trade off Cost per QALYwas estimated at one year of follow-up. Forty-two patients completed a quality of life assessment. The average age was 75.6 years old and 71% were female. Most of them were undergone either hemiarthroplasty or internal fixation. The median total cost per year was US$ 4,210.60. The median QALY was 0.636 and cost per QALY was US$ 6,620.52. Cost utility of a hip fracture in Thai setting was lower than other developed countries due to strong family support and insufficient rehabilitation. However it has high impact on 78.8% of the Thai Gross National Product. Prevention of hip fracture is needed in underdeveloped countries as much as others, worldwide. PMID:26529817

  9. Periprosthetic fractures in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Flandern, Geoffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Periprosthetic fractures can be discussed in many formats. In this article, epidemiology, classification, and treatment are divided into the following three categories of periprosthetic fracture: intraoperative fractures detected at the time of surgery; intraoperative fractures undetected at the time of surgery, but detected postoperatively; and postoperative fractures occurring late after the arthroplasty procedure. PMID:16190043

  10. Expectations and outcomes after hip fracture among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Borkan, J M; Quirk, M

    1992-01-01

    Hip fractures among the elderly are a common occurrence, with high social and personal costs. Sequelae not infrequently include loss of independent functioning, permanent disability, and death. This prospective study of a cohort of eighty recently diagnosed "hardy" hip fracture patients examines initial rehabilitation expectations using a combination of methods. The study addresses the relationship between initial expectations and changes in ambulatory status from prefracture to three months post-fracture. The importance of previous experience with illness is also explored. Participants who had positive expectations for recovery and those who had greater previous experience were likely to have less negative change in ambulation from prefracture to three months, and better overall ambulation at three months. The findings suggest a relationship between patient expectations for recovery and actual recovery of ambulation, and support the heretofore "clinical impression" that cognition and affect influence the course of rehabilitation after hip fracture. PMID:1607220

  11. Mortality after hip fracture in Austria 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Brozek, Wolfgang; Reichardt, Berthold; Kimberger, Oliver; Zwerina, Jochen; Dimai, Hans Peter; Kritsch, Daniela; Klaushofer, Klaus; Zwettler, Elisabeth

    2014-09-01

    Osteoporosis-related hip fractures represent a substantial cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries like Austria. Identification of groups at high risk for mortality after hip fracture is crucial for health policy decisions. To determine in-hospital, long-term, and excess mortality after osteoporosis-related hip fracture in Austrian patients, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of pseudonymized invoice data from Austrian social insurance authorities covering roughly 98 % of the entire population. The data set included 31,668 subjects aged 50 years and above sustaining a hip fracture between July 2008 and December 2010 with follow-up until June 2011, and an age-, gender-, and regionally matched control population without hip fractures (56,320 subjects). Kaplan-Meier and Cox hazard regression analyses served to determine unadjusted and adjusted mortality rates: Unadjusted all-cause 1-year mortality amounted to 20.2 % (95 % CI: 19.7-20.7 %). Males had significantly higher long-term, in-hospital, and excess mortality rates than females, but younger males exhibited lower excess mortality than their female counterparts. Advanced age correlated with increased long-term and in-hospital mortality, but lower excess mortality. Excess mortality, particularly in males, was highest in the first 6 months after hip fracture, but remained statistically significantly elevated throughout the observation period of 3 years. Longer hospital stay per fracture was correlated with mortality reduction in older patients and in patients with more subsequent fractures. In conclusion, more efforts are needed to identify causes and effectively prevent excess mortality especially in male osteoporosis patients. PMID:24989776

  12. Molecular mechanisms of osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Föger-Samwald, Ursula; Vekszler, György; Hörz-Schuch, Edith; Salem, Sylvia; Wipperich, Markus; Ritschl, Peter; Mousavi, Mehdi; Pietschmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A common manifestation of age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis are fractures of the hip. Age-related osteoporosis is thought to be determined by a number of intrinsic factors including genetics, hormonal changes, changes in levels of oxidative stress, or an inflammatory status associated with the aging process. The aim of this study was to investigate gene expression and bone architecture in bone samples derived from elderly osteoporotic women with hip fractures (OP) in comparison to bone samples from age matched women with osteoarthritis of the hip (OA). Femoral heads and adjacent neck tissue were collected from 10 women with low-trauma hip fractures (mean age 83±6) and consecutive surgical hip replacement. Ten bone samples from patients undergoing hip replacement due to osteoarthritis (mean age 80±5) served as controls. One half of each bone sample was subjected to gene expression analysis. The second half of each bone sample was analyzed by microcomputed tomography. From each half, samples from four different regions, the central and subcortical region of the femoral head and neck, were analyzed. We could show a significantly decreased expression of the osteoblast related genes RUNX2, Osterix, Sclerostin, WNT10B, and Osteocalcin, a significantly increased ratio of RANKL to Osteoprotegerin, and a significantly increased expression of the enzymes superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase GPX3, and of the inflammatory cytokine IL6 in bone samples from hip fracture patients compared to controls. Major microstructural changes in OP bone were seen in the neck and were characterized by a significant decrease of bone volume, trabecular number, and connectivity density and a significant increase of trabecular separation. In conclusion, our data give evidence for a decreased expression of osteoblast related genes and increased expression of osteoclast related genes. Furthermore, increased expression of SOD2 and GPX3 suggest increased

  13. Association of ABO blood group with fracture pattern and mortality in hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Smith, RP; Khan, A; Aghedo, D; Venkatesan, M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mechanism of falling has been proposed as the exclusive explanation for hip fracture pattern. Evidence exists that other genetic factors also influence proximal femoral fracture configuration. The ABO blood group serotype has been associated with other pathologies but any role in hip fracture has yet to be definitively characterised. Methods Our National Hip Fracture Database was interrogated over a four-year period. All patients had their blood group retrieved, and this was compared with hip fracture pattern and mortality rates. Confounding factors were accounted for using logistic regression and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results A total of 2,987 consecutive patients presented to our institution. Those with blood group A were significantly more likely to sustain intracapsular fractures than ‘non-A’ individuals (p=0.009). The blood group distribution of patients with intracapsular fractures was identical to that of the national population of England. However, blood group A was less common in patients with intertrochanteric fractures than in the general population (p=0.0002). Even after correction for age and sex, blood group A was associated with a decrease in the odds of suffering an intertrochanteric fracture to 80% (p=0.002). Blood group A had inferior survivorship correcting for age, sex and hip fracture pattern (hazard ratio: 1.14, p=0.035). This may be due to associated increased prevalence of co-morbid disease in this cohort. Conclusions Blood group is an independent predictor of hip fracture pattern, with group A patients more likely to sustain an intracapsular fracture and non-A individuals more likely to sustain an intertrochanteric fracture. The determinants of fracture pattern are likely to be related to complex interactions at a molecular level based on genetic susceptibility. The mechanism of fall may not be the only aetiological determinant of proximal femoral fracture configuration. PMID:25198976

  14. Overcoming barriers to osteoporosis care in vulnerable elderly patients with hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Julie A; Jaglal, Susan; Bogoch, Earl R

    2009-07-01

    Indications for and benefits of providing osteoporosis (OP) care for hip fracture patients have become widely understood. The hip fracture patient is frequently over age 80 years, minimally ambulatory, has multiple medical comorbidities, and has cognitive impairment. Patient barriers to initiation of effective OP treatment include: age, dementia, medical comorbidities, polypharmacy, lack of adherence with treatment, alcohol abuse, postoperative delirium, language barriers, inadequate social support, and socioeconomic status. In a large teaching hospital, 244 patients presented with hip fracture over 2 years: 72% were female and 64% were over age 80. Forty percent had been diagnosed with dementia; another 29% had other severe medical comorbidities.Opportunities for OP diagnosis and treatment are numerous. In acute care hospitals, coordinator facilitated programs are effective for identification, education, assessment, referral, and treatment of underlying OP in fracture patients. System modifications may include an automated care path or automatic specialist referral for hip fracture patients. In the rehabilitation hospital, the patients are in a more stable condition, there is a focus on the recent fracture, and there are opportunities to initiate OP treatment and to promote adherence. In long-term care, dietary intake including calcium and vitamin D supplementation and persistence with pharmacotherapy can be monitored. Patient education and referral to the family physician for osteoporosis investigation and treatment have improved patient knowledge and diagnosis, but the reported impact on treatment has been limited.Effective OP care for the vulnerable hip fracture patient should be initiated early but may be complex and require coordination. In addition to calcium and vitamin D supplementation, most patients in this category have an indication for aminobisphosphonate therapy. Liaison between the orthopaedic team and the discharge destination caregivers, an

  15. Predictors of Gait Speed in Patients after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Rebecca L.; Lopopolo, Rosalie; Tomlinson, James D.; Brenneman, Susan K.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Following hip fracture, patients demonstrate greatly reduced walking speeds 1 year later compared with age-matched elders. The purpose of our study was to examine the factors that relate to gait speed in patients after hip fracture. Methods: Forty-two men and women (mean age 79 ± 7.5 years) who sustained a hip fracture participated in this study. Linear regression analysis was used to determine a statistical model that best predicted gait speed, the dependent variable. Gait speed was measured with a computerized gait mat. The independent variables were age, sex, height, weight, time post-fracture, medications, mental status, depression, balance confidence, Medical Outcome Studies, Short Form (SF-36), balance, and lower extremity isometric force. All subjects were discharged from physical therapy services, and measurements were taken, on average, 17 weeks post-fracture. Results: Using stepwise regression, 72% of the variance in gait speed was explained by summed lower extremity strength normalized by body weight, general health (SF-36), and balance confidence (Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale). Conclusions: Impairments (summed lower extremity strength) and risk factors (perception of general health and balance confidence) are important predictors of gait speed in elders after hip fracture. PMID:20145738

  16. Hip fractures and dementia: clinical decisions for the future

    PubMed Central

    Waran, Eswaran; William, Leeroy

    2016-01-01

    Severe dementia is a life-limiting condition; hip fractures are more common in patients who have dementia. This study outlines the case of a 92-year-old female with severe dementia who sustained a hip fracture. Despite having a terminal diagnosis (severe dementia and hip fracture) and poor premorbid quality of life, she had a life-prolonging surgery. The report outlines issues around treatment options in such circumstances, informed consent and substitute decision-making. The authors propose a ‘goals of care’ approach to manage patients in whom the best treatment is unclear, during their attendance to the emergency department. It is suggested that utilization of such a model may help with substitute decision-making and true informed consent. PMID:26949537

  17. Preoperative cognitive impairment and psychological distress in hospitalized elderly hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Daiello, Lori A; Lareau, Craig R; Robidoux, Kathryn A; Luo, Wylie; Ott, Brian; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-07-01

    We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the prevalence of cognitive impairment (CI) in elderly inpatients awaiting surgery for hip fracture, and to compare CI and normal cognition (NC) patients with respect to preoperative pain, fear, and anxiety. The study included patients who were older than 65 years when admitted to a hospital after acute hip fracture. Preoperative assessment involved use of Confusion Assessment Method-Short Form, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), visual analog scales for anxiety and fear, and Wong-Baker Faces Pain Scale. Patients with delirium were excluded from the study. Patients with CI and NC, as determined by MoCA score, were compared for each assessment. Of the 65 hip fracture patients enrolled, 62 had evaluable cognitive data. Of these 62 patients, 23 (37.1%) had NC (MoCA score, ≥ 23) and 39 (62.9%) had CI (MoCA score, < 23). Only 5 (7.7%) of the 65 patients had a documented diagnosis of CI or dementia at time of hospitalization. Mean preoperative pain scores were significantly (P < .001) higher for CI patients (5.3) than for NC patients (2.8). Our study results showed that many elderly hip fracture patients had unrecognized CI before surgery, and CI patients had significantly more pain than NC patients did. Appropriate identification of preoperative CI and treatment of pain are crucial in optimizing patient outcomes. PMID:25046191

  18. Maximising functional recovery following hip fracture in frail seniors.

    PubMed

    Beaupre, Lauren A; Binder, Ellen F; Cameron, Ian D; Jones, C Allyson; Orwig, Denise; Sherrington, Cathie; Magaziner, Jay

    2013-12-01

    This review discusses factors affecting recovery following hip fracture in frail older people as well as interventions associated with improved functional recovery. Prefracture function, cognitive status, co-morbidities, depression, nutrition and social support impact recovery and may interact to affect post-fracture outcome. There is mounting evidence that exercise is beneficial following hip fracture with higher-intensity/duration programmes showing more promising outcomes. Pharmacologic management for osteoporosis has benefits in preventing further fractures, and interest is growing in pharmacologic treatments for post-fracture loss of muscle mass and strength. A growing body of evidence suggests that sub-populations - those with cognitive impairment, residing in nursing homes or males - also benefit from rehabilitation after hip fracture. Optimal post-fracture care may entail the use of multiple interventions; however, more work is needed to determine optimal exercise components, duration and intensity as well as exploring the impact of multimodal interventions that combine exercise, pharmacology, nutrition and other interventions. PMID:24836335

  19. Elderly patients with a hip fracture: the risk for delirium.

    PubMed

    Schuurmans, Marieke J; Duursma, Sijmen A; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M; Clevers, Gert-Jan; Pel-Littel, Ruth

    2003-05-01

    This prospective study investigated risk factors for delirium in elderly hip fracture patients that could be recognized by nurses. Data were collected on predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium from 92 elderly patients with a hip fracture. Predisposing factors included age, gender, sensory impairments, functional impairment before the hip fracture, residency before admission, pre-existing cognitive impairment, comorbidities, and medication use. Precipitating factors included factors related to surgery and to the postoperative period. Factors related to surgery included time between admission and surgery, type of surgery, type of anesthesia, duration of surgery and anesthesia, and complications during surgery. Factors studied in the postoperative period were slow recovery, malnutrition, dehydration, addition of three or more medications, introduction of bladder catheter, infections, complications and falls, and use of morphine. Eighteen patients developed delirium, as diagnosed by a geriatrician by using the Diagnostic Statistical Manual-IV criteria. Data on delirious patients were compared with the data on non-delirious patients. The findings confirm that elderly hip fracture patients with premorbid ADL dependency, psychiatric comorbidities (including dementia), and a high number of other comorbid problems are at risk for the development of delirium. Based on these findings, it is recommended that nurses should assess patients' pre-fracture functional and cognitive capacities in an early stage of the hospital stay. Nurses should also be alert to postoperative delirium in "healthy elderly" patients. Monitoring of symptoms postoperatively in all elderly patients is advised. PMID:12764718

  20. Chronic NSAIDs Use Increases the Risk of a Second Hip Fracture in Patients After Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Chin; Huang, Tsan-Wen; Yang, Tien-Yu; Lee, Mel S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) control musculoskeletal pain, but they also cause adverse side effects. The aim of this study is to explore the impact of chronic NSAIDs use on the risk of a second hip fracture (SHFx) after hip fracture surgery. This population-based case-cohort study used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), which contains data from >99% of the population. From a random sample of 1 million enrollees, we identified 34,725 patients ≥40 years who sustained a first hip fracture and underwent hip fracture surgery between 1999 and 2009. Chronic NSAIDs use is defined as taking NSAIDs for at least 14 days a month for at least 3 months. The main outcome measure is an SHFx. Propensity-score matching was used to control for confounding. Our results revealed that chronic NSAIDs use was a significant risk factor for an SHFx in patients after hip fracture surgery and for adverse side effects that might last for 12 months. Compared with the nonchronic-use cohort (n = 29,764), the adjusted hazard ratio of an SHFx was 2.15 (95% CI: 2.07–2.33) for the chronic-use cohort (n = 4961). The 10-year Kaplan–Meier survival analyses showed that chronic NSAIDs use presented a positive year-postsurgery-dependency effect on the risk of an SHFx in all the selected subgroups of patients (all P ≤ 0.011). In conclusion, chronic NSAIDs use increases the risk of an SHFx after hip fracture surgery. Avoiding chronic NSAIDs use must be emphasized in clinical practice. PMID:26402817

  1. Role of Mental Disorders in Nosocomial Infections after Hip Fracture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Cano, Juan Ramon; Cruz, Encarnacion; Benitez-Parejo, Nicolás; Perea-Milla, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    The association between mental disorders (MDs) and iatrogenic complications after hip fracture surgery has been poorly studied. Among iatrogenic complications, nosocomial infections (NIs) are a major factor in hip fracture surgery. The aim of this paper was to determine whether patients with a MD and a hip fracture develop more NIs after hip surgery than patients with no MD. We studied 912 patients who underwent surgery for a hip fracture (223 patients with a MD who underwent surgery for a hip fracture and 689 control patients without a MD who also underwent surgery for a hip fracture) and followed them after surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using simple and multiple logistic regression analysis (confidence interval, crude and adjusted odds ratios, and P value). We found that MDs, gender, and comorbidities were not associated with a higher risk of developing a NI after surgery for a hip fracture. Only age increases the risk of a NI. PMID:20628560

  2. Height Loss in Older Women: Risk of Hip Fracture and Mortality Independent of Vertebral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, Teresa A.; Lui, Li-Yung; Kado, Deborah M.; LeBlanc, ES; Vesco, Kimberly K; Bauer, Douglas C.; Cauley, Jane A.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Black, Dennis M.; Hochberg, Marc C.; Cummings, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined if height loss in older women predicts risk of hip fractures, other non-spine fractures, and mortality, and whether this risk is independent of both vertebral fractures (VFx) and bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Among 3,124 women age 65 and older in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures, we assessed the association with measured height change between Year 0 (1986–1988) and Year 15 (2002–2004) and subsequent risk of radiologically confirmed hip fractures, other non-spine fractures, and mortality assessed via death certificates. Follow-up occurred every 4 months for fractures and vital status (>95% contacts complete). Cox proportional hazards models assessed risk of hip fracture, non-spine fracture, and mortality over a mean of 5 years after height change was assessed (i.e, after final height measurement). After adjustment for VFx, BMD and other potential covariates, height loss >5 cm was associated with a marked increased risk of hip fracture (HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.06, 2.12), non-spine fracture (HR 1.48; 95% CI 1.20, 1.83), and mortality (1.45; 95% CI 1.21, 1.73). Although primary analyses were a subset of 3,124 survivors healthy enough to return for a Year 15 height measurement, a sensitivity analysis in the entire cohort (n=9,677) using initial height in earlier adulthood (self-reported height at age 25 [−40 years] to measured height age >65 years [Year 0]) demonstrated consistent results. Height loss >5 cm (2”) in older women was associated with a nearly 50% increased risk of hip fracture, non-spine fracture, and mortality—independent of incident VFx and BMD. PMID:22072593

  3. An Unusual Variant of Pipkin's Fracture Dislocation of Hip: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jangir, Rajat; Mishra, Diwakar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Injuries of the hip joint from pure hip dislocations to fracture dislocations have been described and classified by various authors. These descriptions do not include fracture dislocation of hip associated with fracture of the greater trochanter. Case Report: We report an unusual case of fracture dislocation of hip in which posterior dislocation of hip was associated with fracture of acetabulum, femoral head, femoral neck, greater trochanter and ipsilateral shaft of tibia. The fracture dislocation was managed with open reduction and internal fixation. Such fracture dislocation has not been reported in literature to the best of our knowledge. Conclusion: We believe that fracture dislocations associate with fractures of greater trochanter should be included in current classification systems of fracture dislocations of hip. PMID:27298974

  4. Fixation versus hemiarthroplasty for undisplaced intracapsular hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Parker, Martyn J; White, Andrew; Boyle, Adrian

    2008-07-01

    The conventional treatment for an undisplaced intracapsular hip fracture is internal fixation. A possible alternative treatment is replacement hemiarthroplasty. We have compared the outcomes of an age, sex and co-morbidity matched cohort of 346 patients who have had their undisplaced intracapsular hip fracture treated using cannulated screws with a group of 346 patients who have had a displaced intracapsular fracture treated using a hemiarthroplasty. Patients treated by internal fixation had a shorter operation time (43 versus 67 min), reduced orthopaedic ward stay (11 versus 15 days), lower incidence of peri-operative complications (24 versus 81), and a lower 1-year mortality (19% versus 26%). Additional benefits for the fixation group were less pain at 1 year, less reduction in mobility and lower dependence on walking aids. All these differences were statistically significant. Hemiarthroplasty had a lower re-admission rate (43 versus 14 cases) and re-operation rate (59 versus 22 cases). These results support the use of internal fixation for undisplaced intracapsular fractures and confirm that the final outcome for an undisplaced intracapsular hip fracture is significantly better than for a displaced intracapsular fracture, despite a higher re-operation rate after internal fixation. PMID:18407277

  5. Reducing mortality from hip fractures: a systematic quality improvement programme.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Radcliffe; Yeong, Keefai

    2014-01-01

    Hip fracture is one of the most serious consequences of falls in the elderly, with a mortality of 10% at one month and 30% at one year. Elderly patients with hip fractures have complex medical, surgical, and rehabilitation needs, and a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team approach is essential for the best outcome. The model of best practice for hip fracture care is set out in the Orthopaedic Blue Book and is incentivised by the best practice tariff. In 2009 to 2010, only 39.6% of our patients were being operated on within 36 hours, 19% achieved best practice tariff [1], and mortality was 7.8%. We were ranked as one of the worst hospitals to achieve best practice tariff [1] and our mortality was average. The orthogeriatrics team at Ashford & St Peter's NHS Trust (SPH) was implemented in 2010. Through a system redesign, regular governance meetings, audits and quality improvement projects, we have managed to improve care for our patients and reduce mortality. Over the last three years we have successfully achieved best care for our hip fracture patients, demonstrating a steady improvement in our attainment of the best practice tariff and a reduction in mortality to 5.3% in 2013, which ranks us amongst the best trusts nationally. PMID:27493729

  6. Reducing mortality from hip fractures: a systematic quality improvement programme

    PubMed Central

    Lisk, Radcliffe; Yeong, Keefai

    2014-01-01

    Hip fracture is one of the most serious consequences of falls in the elderly, with a mortality of 10% at one month and 30% at one year. Elderly patients with hip fractures have complex medical, surgical, and rehabilitation needs, and a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team approach is essential for the best outcome. The model of best practice for hip fracture care is set out in the Orthopaedic Blue Book and is incentivised by the best practice tariff. In 2009 to 2010, only 39.6% of our patients were being operated on within 36 hours, 19% achieved best practice tariff [1], and mortality was 7.8%. We were ranked as one of the worst hospitals to achieve best practice tariff [1] and our mortality was average. The orthogeriatrics team at Ashford & St Peter's NHS Trust (SPH) was implemented in 2010. Through a system redesign, regular governance meetings, audits and quality improvement projects, we have managed to improve care for our patients and reduce mortality. Over the last three years we have successfully achieved best care for our hip fracture patients, demonstrating a steady improvement in our attainment of the best practice tariff and a reduction in mortality to 5.3% in 2013, which ranks us amongst the best trusts nationally. PMID:27493729

  7. Acute polyethylene fracture in an uncemented acetabular cup

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Allan E.; Dust, William N.

    1997-01-01

    The smaller acetabular components used in total hip replacement may have a polyethylene liner that is too thin, resulting in higher polyethylene stress and an increased potential for wear. The authors present a case that highlights the problem of acute polyethylene fracture. To compensate for the thinness of the polyethylene, the authors recommend the use of a smaller head size to allow polyethylene thickness of at least 8 mm. PMID:9267302

  8. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD. PMID:27622182

  9. The initiative on hip fractures of the Veneto Region

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Maurizio; Caimmi, Cristian; Giannini, Sandro; Sella, Stefania; Mattarei, Alberto; Lovato, Roberto; Piazza, Ilaria; Fassio, Angelo; Persi, Pierluigi; Benetollo, Pier Paolo; Adami, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective: to assess the prevalence of the most relevant environmental and individual risk factors in subjects with a recent hip fracture was the aim of this observational study promoted by the Health Authorities of the Regione Veneto (Italy). Methods: patients aged > 60 years of both genders with a recent hip fracture not associated with malignancies, were administered questionnaires on dietary habits, sun exposure, disability score. A complete family, pharmacological and pathology history was collected together with previous falls, details of the fracture index, anthropometric data. In a subgroup of patients blood was taken for the measurements of serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD). Results: the study includes 704 patients (573 women and 131 men). Mean age was 81±8 years (range 60–102). Severe pre-fracture disability was a common feature (58%) associated with multiple co-morbidities (84%), more frequently cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and specific medications. In a large proportion (86%) of the patients environmental or individual risk factors for falling were found. Vitamin D insufficiency was quite common, particularly in the regional Health Districts were strategies for preventing vitamin D deficiency were not implemented. Only a small proportion (17%) of the study population had been evaluate and treated for osteoporosis. Conclusions: in senile patients with a recent hip fracture pre-existing disability, multiple co-morbidities, high risk of falling and inadequate intake of calcium and vitamin D was quite common. Community and case-finding interventions are highly warranted. PMID:22783336

  10. [Procedural organisation: surgical and anaesthesiological management in hip fractures].

    PubMed

    Müller, Ernst J; Gerstorfer, Ingeborg; Dovjak, Peter; Iglseder, Bernhard; Pinter, Georg; Müller, Walter; Pils, Katharina; Mikosch, Peter; Zmaritz, Michaela; Weissenberger-Leduc, Monique; Gosch, Markus; Thaler, Heinrich W

    2013-10-01

    In patients with hip fractures, in order to reduce the high number of general complications and those associated with the specific treatment, the functional loss and cognitive impairment, implementation of co-ordinated, multidisciplinary treatment pathways, and rehabilitation, is mandatory. The imminent treatment of proximal femoral fracture consists of major orthopaedic surgery in most cases (total or partial hip arthroplasty, osteosynthesis). After the diagnosis of a hip fracture, an adequate pain medication should be initiated. The decision making for the fracture treatment includes fracture type, patient's age, cognitive function, mobility before the fall and functional demands of the patient in the context of patients life expectancy and goals of care. The anaesthesiological evaluation focuses on risk assessment. Medical abnormalities should be optimized within 24 to 48 h, or an increased perioperative risk due to comorbidities has to be accepted. The timing and the course of further preoperative diagnostic examinations and therapeutic interventions should be co-ordinated between the involved medical disciplines. After the operation a structured screening for delirium should be initiated and further evaluation of patient's nutrition, fall-associated medication, living conditions and osteoporosis treatment has to be performed. PMID:24201598

  11. Geographic Variation in Hip Fracture Among United States Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Geetanjoli; Zullo, Andrew R.; Berry, Sarah D.; Lee, Yoojin; McConeghy, Kevin; Kiel, Doug P.; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite high rates of hip fracture among United States (US) nursing home (NH) residents, little is known about geographic variation in hip fracture incidence. We used nationally representative data to identify geographic variation in hip fracture among US NH residents. Design and setting Retrospective cohort study using Part A claims for a 100% of Medicare enrollees in 15,289 NHs linked to NH minimum data set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting databases. Participants A total of 891,085 long-stay (continuous residence of ≥100 days) NH residents ≥65 years old. Measurements Medicare Part A claims documenting a hip fracture. Mean incidence rates of hip fracture for long-stay NH residents were calculated for each state and US Census Division from 2007 to 2010. Results The age-, sex-, and race-adjusted incidence rate of hip fracture ranged from 1.49 hip fractures/100 person-years (Hawaii) to 3.60 hip fractures/100 person-years (New Mexico), with a mean of 2.38 (standard deviation 0.43) hip fractures/100 person-years. The mean incidence of hip fracture was 1.7-fold greater in the highest quintile than the lowest. Conclusions We observed modest US state and regional variation in hip fracture incidence among long-stay NH residents. Future studies should assess whether state policies or NH characteristics explain the variation. PMID:27461867

  12. Inequalities in use of total hip arthroplasty for hip fracture: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, David; Griffin, Xavier L; Costa, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) among individuals with a displaced intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck is based on national guidelines or if there are systematic inequalities. Design Observational cohort study using the National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD). Setting All hospitals that treat adults with hip fractures in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Participants Patients within the national database (all aged ≥60) who received operative treatment for a non-pathological displaced intracapsular hip fracture from 1 July 2011 to 31 April 2015. Main outcome measures Provision of THA to patients considered eligible under criteria published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Results 114 119 patients with hip fracture were included, 11 683 (10.2%) of whom underwent THA. Of those who satisfied the NICE criteria, 32% (6780)received a THA. Of patients who underwent THA, 42% (4903) did not satisfy the NICE criteria. A recursive partitioning algorithm found that the NICE eligibility criteria did not optimally explain which patients underwent THA. A model with superior explanatory power drew distinctions that are not supported by NICE, which were an age cut off at 76 and a different ambulation cut off. Among patients who satisfied the NICE eligibility, the use of THA was less likely with higher age (odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.87 to 0.88), worsening abbreviated mental test scores (0.49 (0.41 to 0.58) for normal cognition v borderline cognitive impairment)), worsening American Society of Anesthesiologists score (0.74, 0.66 to 0.84), male sex (0.85, 0.77 to 0.93), worsening ambulatory status (0.32, 0.28 to 0.35 for walking with a stick v independent ambulation), and fifths of worsening socioeconomic area deprivation (0.76 (0.66 to 0.88) for least v most deprived fifth). Patients receiving treatment during the working week were more likely to receive THA than at the

  13. Understanding the pathogenesis of hip fracture in the elderly, osteoporotic theory is not reflected in the outcome of prevention programmes

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Sandalio, Rosa M; Caracuel, Zaira; Caso, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are an acute and worsening public health problem. They mainly affect elderly people, a population group that is highly vulnerable to disease and accidents, and to falls in particular. Although it has been suggested that osteoporosis is the cause of hip fractures, they mainly occur after a fall has been suffered. The underlying causes of a fall are not related to osteoporosis, although pharmaceutical companies have coined the term “osteoporotic fracture” for hip fractures in the elderly. Drug treatments for osteoporosis have not diminished the frequency of these injuries, nor have they prevented the occurrence of a subsequent fracture. Since pharmaceutical interests require osteoporosis to be considered a disease, rather than a normal condition of senescence, they go further by assuming that treatment for osteoporosis is essential, and that this policy will diminish the incidence of hip fractures. On the other hand, the origin and treatment of conditions that may be conducive to provoking falls are very difficult to elucidate. In this paper, we consider some of the medical and social problems that arise in this area, as well as conflicts of interest regarding the aetiopathogenesis and prevention of hip fracture, and propose a new paradigm for the prevention of falls. PMID:27114929

  14. Are Hip-Specific Items Useful in a Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Hip Fractures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Tsauo, Jau-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Researchers measure the significance of hip fracture by the patient's impairment. The patient's quality of life (QOL) is usually also substantially affected. However, there is no specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with hip fractures. This study was designed to determine whether adding a new set of specific questions about…

  15. Undetected fracture of an alumina ceramic on ceramic hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Sariali, Elhadi; Stewart, Todd; Mamoudy, Patrick; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2010-06-01

    An unusual case of undetected ceramic fracture was discovered by coincidence during total hip arthroplasty revision for sepsis. To our knowledge, this kind of fracture has never been described before. The cup liner was broken in 2 parts, consisting of a large outer annulus and a smaller round central piece that was detached from the superior and posterior part of the cup, creating a hole in the cup. The analysis of the retrievals suggests that the fracture occurred during walking at the contact point between the head and the cup. The ceramic breakage was asymptomatic with no mechanical disorder, suggesting that some ceramic fracture may be tolerated in vivo. However, any evidence of a fractured ceramic component should cause the surgeon to strongly consider revision. PMID:19577892

  16. Role of Fracture and Repair Type on Pain and Opioid Use After Hip Fracture in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Strike, Sophia A.; Sieber, Frederick E.; Gottschalk, Allan; Mears, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Pain after hip fracture repair is related to worse functional outcomes and higher fracture care costs than that for patients with no or less pain. However, to our knowledge, few studies have examined the roles of hip fracture type or surgical procedure as factors influencing postoperative pain or opioid analgesic requirements. Our goal was to determine whether the type of hip fracture or hip fracture repair affects postoperative pain or opioid analgesic requirements in the elderly patient. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 231 patients ≥65 years old admitted to a hip fracture center for surgical repair. Fracture patterns were classified into femoral neck (FN) versus intertrochanteric (IT), stable versus unstable, and type of surgical repair. Demographic and intraoperative variables, postoperative pain scores, and opioid analgesic use data were collected and analyzed according to the type of hip fracture and type of surgical repair. Results: There were no differences in postoperative pain when comparing FN versus IT fractures, stable versus unstable fractures, or type of surgical repair. Patients with FN fractures had higher analgesic requirements on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. There was no difference in postoperative analgesic requirements among patients with stable versus unstable fractures or type of surgical repair. Otherwise, there were no differences in postoperative pain or opioid analgesic use based on the surgical repair or fracture type. Overall, patients with hip fracture experienced low levels of pain. PMID:24600530

  17. Intra-Pelvic Migration of Sliding Hip Screw During Osteosynthesis of Hip Fracture: A Rare Avoidable Intraoperative Complication

    PubMed Central

    Zarattini, G.; Breda, L.; Zacharia, M.; Sibona, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fractures, which are common among old patients, are classified into two groups: intracapsular and extracapsular fractures. Extracapsular fractures can be treated with extramedullary implants [e.g. dynamic hip screw (DHS)] or intramedullary nails. Dynamic hip screw is the treatment of choice in stable pertrochanteric fractures. Intrapelvic migration of the sliding screw is a very rare complication. Case Report: We report a case of a 90-year old Caucasian woman who had an unusual intraoperative complication during osteosynthesis procedure for extracapsular hip fracture fixation. In fact, the sliding hip screw went deep into the pelvis during surgery. This mishap required an abdominal surgical approach by the general surgeon to remove the screw. Conclusion: Taking into consideration the poor quality of the bone in very old patients, we emphasize the importance of following every single step of the surgical procedure, in order to minimize the risk of this complication. PMID:27299061

  18. Usefulness of Arthroscopic Treatment of Painful Hip after Acetabular Fracture or Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Kim, Dong-Yeol; Zheng, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background Painful hip following hip dislocation or acetabular fracture can be an important signal for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis due to intraarticular pathology. However, there is limited literature discussing the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of painful hip. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effectiveness and benefit of arthroscopic treatment for patients with a painful hip after major trauma. Methods From July 2003 to February 2013, we reviewed 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation and were followed up for a minimum of 2 postoperative years. The degree of osteoarthritis based on the Tonnis classification pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up was determined. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) and modified Harris hip score (MHHS), and range of motion (ROM) of the hip pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up. Results There were nine male and four female patients with a mean age at surgery of 28 years (range, 20 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period of the patients was 59.8 months (range, 24 to 115 months), and the mean interval between initial trauma and arthroscopic treatment was 40.8 months (range, 1 to 144 months). At the final follow-up, VAS and MHHS improved significantly from 6.3 and 53.4 to 3.0 and 88.3, respectively (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in hip flexion, abduction, adduction, external rotation, and internal rotation as minor improvements from 113.1°, 38.5°, 28.5°, 36.5°, and 22.7° to 118.5°, 39.0°, 29.2°, 38.9°, and 26.5° were observed, respectively (p = 0.070, p = 0.414, p = 0.317, p = 0.084, and p = 0.136, respectively). None of the patients exhibited progression of osteoarthritis of the hip at the final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation is effective and delays

  19. Effects of Hip Geometry on Fracture Patterns of Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Seyyed Morteza; Qoreishy, Mohamad; Keipourfard, Ali; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza Minator; Shokraneh, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some studies have previously shown that geometry of proximal femur can affect the probability of fracture and type of fracture. It happens since the geometry of the proximal femur determines how a force is applied to its different parts. In this study, we have compared proximal femur’s geometric characteristics in femoral neck (FNF), intertrochanteric (ITF) and Subtrochanteric (STF) fractures. Methods: In this study, 60 patients who had hip fractures were studied as case studies. They were divided into FNF, ITF and STF groups based on their fracture types (20 patients in each group). Patients were studied with x-ray radiography and CT scans. Radiological parameters including femoral neck length from lateral cortex to center of femoral head (FNL), diameter of femoral head (FHD), diameter of femoral neck (FND), femoral head neck offset (FHNO), neck-shaft angle (alpha), femoral neck anteversion (beta) were measured and compared in all three groups. Results: Amount of FNL was significantly higher in STF group compared to FNF (0.011) while ITF and STF as well as FNT and ITF did not show a significant different. Also, FND in FNF group was significantly lower than the other two groups, i.e. ITF and STF. In other cases there were no instances of significant statistical difference. Conclusion: Hip geometry can be used to identify individuals who are at the risk of fracture with special pattern. Also, it is important to have more studies in different populations and more in men. PMID:27517071

  20. The Impact of Race/Ethnicity on Preoperative Time to Hip Stabilization Procedure after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Oghalai, Tracy U.; Kuo, Yong-fang; Wu, Helen; Shokar, Navkiran K.; Grecula, Michael; Tincher, Steven; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    Background We sought to examine the preoperative time for hip stabilization procedure among Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks (blacks) and non-Hispanic whites (whites). Methods This was a secondary data analysis using Medicare claims data. Our analysis included 40,321 patients admitted for hip fracture hospitalization from 2001-2005. Our primary analysis was generalized linear modeling, and our dependent variable was preoperative time. Our independent variable was race/ethnicity (Hispanics, blacks versus whites), and covariates were age, gender, income, type of hip fracture and comorbidities. Results Bivariate analyses showed that both Hispanics and blacks experienced a longer preoperative time (P<0.01). The average (mean) of days to surgery was 1.2 for whites, 1.6 for blacks and 1.7 for Hispanics. The delayed preoperative time among Hispanics and blacks persisted after adjusting for covariates. Conclusions The delayed preoperative time among minorities suggests the need to closely monitor care among minorities with hip fracture to determine how to best address their developing needs. PMID:20375948

  1. Historical vignette #8. General Ulysses S. Grant's hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G B

    1987-11-01

    Many biographers have discussed the throat cancer that plagued General Ulysses S. Grant toward the end of his life. However, little attention has been focused on his orthopaedic problems. On Christmas Eve in 1883, Grant slipped on an icy walk and fell. Following this accident he was bedridden for weeks and orthopaedically disabled for the remainder of his life. Although biographers have documented this incident, the outcome of the accident has been variously attributed to a sprain, muscle rupture, or simply a lack of exercise. The history of the injury and the nature of the symptoms and disability, which suggest that the General may have sustained a hip fracture, are reviewed with a discussion of the state of hip fracture diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis taken from the textbooks of the period. PMID:3332717

  2. Use of DXA-Based Structural Engineering Models of the Proximal Femur to Discriminate Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lang; Peel, Nicola; Clowes, Jackie A; McCloskey, Eugene V; Eastell, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several DXA-based structural engineering models (SEMs) of the proximal femur have been developed to estimate stress caused by sideway falls. Their usefulness in discriminating hip fracture has not yet been established and we therefore evaluated these models. The hip DXA scans of 51 postmenopausal women with hip fracture (30 femoral neck, 17 trochanteric, and 4 unspecified) and 153 age-, height-, and weight-matched controls were reanalyzed using a special version of Hologic’s software that produced a pixel-by-pixel BMD map. For each map, a curved-beam, a curved composite-beam, and a finite element model were generated to calculate stress within the bone when falling sideways. An index of fracture risk (IFR) was defined over the femoral neck, trochanter, and total hip as the stress divided by the yield stress at each pixel and averaged over the regions of interest. Hip structure analysis (HSA) was also performed using Hologic APEX analysis software. Hip BMD and almost all parameters derived from HSA and SEM were discriminators of hip fracture on their own because their ORs were significantly >1. Because of the high correlation of total hip BMD to HSA and SEM-derived parameters, only the bone width discriminated hip fracture independently from total hip BMD. Judged by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve, the trochanteric IFR derived from the finite element model was significant better than total hip BMD alone and similar to the total hip BMD plus bone width in discriminating all hip fracture and femoral neck fracture. No index was better than total hip BMD for discriminating trochanteric fractures. In conclusion, the finite element model has the potential to replace hip BMD in discriminating hip fractures. PMID:18767924

  3. Postoperative management of hip fractures: interventions associated with improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S

    2012-01-01

    The annual number of hip fractures worldwide is expected to exceed 6 million by 2050. Currently, nearly 50% of hip fracture patients will develop at least one short-term complication including infection, delirium, venous thromboembolism (VTE), pressure ulcers or cardiovascular events. More than half will experience an adverse long-term outcomes including worsened ambulation or functional status, additional fractures and excess mortality. This paper summarizes current evidence for postoperative interventions attempting to improve these outcomes, including pain management, anemia management, delirium prevention strategies, VTE prophylaxis, rehabilitation type, nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids and secondary fracture prevention. Models of care that have been tested in this population including interdisciplinary orthogeriatric services, clinical pathways and hospitalist care are summarized. In general, good quality evidence supports routine use of VTE prophylaxis, and moderate quality evidence supports multifactorial delirium prevention protocols, and a conservative transfusion strategy. Aggressive pain control with higher doses of opiates and/or regional blocks are associated with lower delirium rates. Low-moderate quality evidence supports the use of clinical pathways, and dedicated orthogeriatric consultative services or wards. After hospital discharge, good quality evidence supports the use of bisphosphonates for secondary fracture prevention and mortality reduction. Rehabilitation services are important, but evidence to guide quantity, type or venue is lacking. Additional research is needed to clarify the role of nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids, home care and psychosocial interventions. PMID:24340216

  4. Changing trends in the epidemiology of hip fracture in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Azagra, R.; López-Expósito, F.; Martin-Sánchez, JC.; Aguyé, A.; Moreno, N.; Cooper, C.; Díez-Pérez, A.; Dennison, EM.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Temporal trends in hip fracture incidence have recently been reported in some developed countries. Such data in Spain has previously been incomplete; this study reports the stratified incidence of hip fractures in people over 65 in Spain during the last 14 years. Introduction The main objective is to establish whether temporal trends in hip fracture incidence in Spain exist. Methods Ecological study with data from hospital discharges nationwide. The study includes patients aged ≥ 65 years during a 14-year period (1997-2010). The analysis compares two periods of four years: 1997-2000 (P1) and 2007-2010 (P2). Results There were 119,857 fractures in men and 415,421 in women. Comparing periods (P1 vs P2), over ten years the crude incidence rate/100,000 inhabitant/year increased an average of 2.3%/year in men and 1.4% in women. After adjustment, the rate increased an average of 0.4%/year in men (p<0.0001), but decreased 0.2%/year in women (p<0.0001). In men younger than 85, the decrease was not significant except in 70-74 years and from 80 years the adjusted rate increases significantly (p<0.0001). In women under 80 years of age, the decrease in adjusted rate was significant, there was no change in 80-84 years and the adjusted rate increased significantly in individuals 85 years and older (p<0.0001). Mortality rates declined by 22% in both sexes and the index of overaging population rises 30.1% in men and 25.2% in women. Conclusions This study supports other international studies by showing changes in the incidence of hip fractures after age-population adjustment, which denotes a decrease in the younger age groups and among women and shows an increase in both groups over 85 years. The increase in the crude incidence rate of hip fracture in Spain reflects changes in population structure. PMID:24322478

  5. Risk factors of morbidity and mortality following hip fracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Dong; Park, Sang Jin; Lee, Deok Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background The preoperative coexisting chronic systemic illness, delay in surgery, gender, and age were considered as risk factors for the complications after hip fracture surgery. The wider range of surgical delay and immobility-related pulmonary morbidity may affect postoperative complications and mortality. This study examined the risk factors for morbidity and mortality following the hip fracture surgery. Methods The patient data was collected retrospectively. The consecutive 506 patients with hip fracture surgery, aged 60 years or older, were included. The patients' age, gender, preexisting diseases, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, delay in surgical repair, duration of surgical procedure, and methods of anesthesia were noted. The thirty-day postoperative complications were reviewed, and cardiac complications, pulmonary complications, delirium, and death were recorded. The data was analyzed for postoperative complications and risk factors. Results Atelectasis was associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. Male gender and age ≥ 80 years were associated with an increased incidence of postoperative delirium. ASA classification 3 was associated with death. A delay in surgery was not associated with any complications. Preexisting diseases and methods of anesthesia did not affect mortality and postoperative complications. Conclusions The results suggest that a delay in surgery did not affect the postoperative complications and morbidity. PMID:23814650

  6. Hip Fractures: The St Ann's Bay Regional Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, I; McDowell, D; Barnes, D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To study the outcome of hip fractures in a cohort of patients from two different time periods (2002–2003 and 2006–2008). Methods: Patients treated for hip fractures at the St Ann's Bay Regional Hospital, which provides orthopaedic care for the parishes of St Ann, St Mary and Portland, were retrospectively analysed between 2002–2003 and 2006–2008. Results: A significant increase in the recorded incidence of hip fractures, from 19 in the 2002–2003 time period to 101 in the 2006–2008 time period was noted. There was a drastic fall in the in-hospital mortality rate (43% in the 2002–2003 time period compared to 4.5% in the 2006–2008 time period). In the 2006–2008 period, 82.9% of patients were ambulant at discharge compared to 36% from the 2002–2003 time period. Conclusion: Early surgical fixation is necessary to allow rapid mobilization in these patients for whom the consequences of bed rest would otherwise be devastating. PMID:25303247

  7. Accelerated care versus standard care among patients with hip fracture: the HIP ATTACK pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: A hip fracture causes bleeding, pain and immobility, and initiates inflammatory, hypercoagulable, catabolic and stress states. Accelerated surgery may improve outcomes by reducing the duration of these states and immobility. We undertook a pilot trial to determine the feasibility of a trial comparing accelerated care (i.e., rapid medical clearance and surgery) and standard care among patients with a hip fracture. Methods: Patients aged 45 years or older who, during weekday, daytime working hours, received a diagnosis of a hip fracture requiring surgery were randomly assigned to receive accelerated or standard care. Our feasibility outcomes included the proportion of eligible patients randomly assigned, completeness of follow-up and timelines of accelerated surgery. The main clinical outcome, assessed by data collectors and adjudicators who were unaware of study group allocations, was a major perioperative complication (i.e., a composite of death, preoperative myocardial infarction, myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, stroke, and life-threatening or major bleeding) within 30 days of randomization. Results: Of patients eligible for inclusion, 80% consented and were randomly assigned to groups (30 to accelerated care and 30 to standard care) at 2 centres in Canada and 1 centre in India. All patients completed 30-day follow-up. The median time from diagnosis to surgery was 6.0 hours in the accelerated care group and 24.2 hours in the standard care group (p < 0.001). A major perioperative complication occurred in 9 (30%) of the patients in the accelerated care group and 14 (47%) of the patients in the standard care group (hazard ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.26–1.39). Interpretation: These results show the feasibility of a trial comparing accelerated and standard care among patients with hip fracture and support a definitive trial. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01344343. PMID:24246589

  8. Use of the talon hip compression screw in intertrochanteric fractures of the hip.

    PubMed

    Bramlet, Dale G

    2004-08-01

    A retrospective analysis of a compression hip screw with four reversibly deployable talons was done. Fifty-four patients had sufficient radiographs to be included in this analysis. One-year mortality was 17% and increased to 41% by 2 years. No lag screws cut out, and postoperative slide was reduced compared with that in many published series. Three patients had revision of a failed alternate-type hip pin with the Talon hip compression screw. Previous studies showed the talons provide the definitive difference in allowing enhanced compression at the time of surgery, preventing cut-out by enhanced rotational stability, and allowing immediate postoperative weightbearing without excessive limb shortening. The failure mode of the Talon compression hip screw seems to be side-plate loosening rather than varus deformity and lag screw cut-out. The Talon compression hip screw especially is effective with weak, osteoporotic bone and in unstable, three-part and four-part fractures. A previous study showed that Talon deployment notably improved interfragment compression and torsional strength, and that engagement or penetration into or through the cortical bone at the base of the femoral head-neck junction in the inferior lag screw position was the critical technical step to maximize the talon lag screw purchase. PMID:15292793

  9. The annual number of hip fractures in Sweden will double from year 2002 to 2050

    PubMed Central

    Rosengren, Björn E; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose The incidence and annual number of hip fractures have increased worldwide during the past 50 years, and projections have indicated a further increase. During the last decade, however, a down-turn in the incidence of hip fracture has been seen in the western world. We predicted the development of hip fractures in Sweden until the year 2050. Methods We reviewed surgical records for the period 2002–2012 in the city of Malmö, Sweden, and identified patients aged 50 years or more with a hip fracture. We estimated incidence rates by using official population figures as denominator and applied the rates to population projections each year until 2050. We also made projections based on our previously published nationwide Swedish hip fracture rates for the period 1987–2002. Since the projections are based on estimates, no confidence limits are given. Results During the period 2002–2012, there were 7,385 hip fractures in Malmö. Based on these data, we predicted that there would be approximately 30,000 hip fractures in Sweden in the year 2050. Use of nationwide rates for 2002 in the predictive model gave similar results, which correspond to an increase in the number of hip fractures by a factor of 1.9 (1.7 for women and 2.3 for men) compared to 2002. Interpretation The annual number of hip fractures will almost double during the first half of the century. Time trends in hip fractures and also changes in population size and age distribution should be continuously monitored, as such changes will influence the number of hip fractures in the future. Our results indicate that we must optimize preventive measures for hip fractures and prepare for major demands in resources. PMID:24786906

  10. Simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following a simple fall in an elderly patient without predilecting comorbidities.

    PubMed

    van der Zeeuw, Frederique T; Weeda, Víola B; Vrouenraets, Bart C

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral hip fractures are rare, mostly being caused by violent forces or in patients with bone metabolism disorders. We present the case of an elderly patient who sustained simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following a simple fall without having any known predilecting comorbidities other than advanced age. Only four cases have been described of elderly patients without comorbidity with simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following low-energy traumas. This rareness potentially leads to misses of this diagnosis. PMID:27161143

  11. Simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following a simple fall in an elderly patient without predilecting comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    van der Zeeuw, Frederique T.; Weeda, Víola B.; Vrouenraets, Bart C.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral hip fractures are rare, mostly being caused by violent forces or in patients with bone metabolism disorders. We present the case of an elderly patient who sustained simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following a simple fall without having any known predilecting comorbidities other than advanced age. Only four cases have been described of elderly patients without comorbidity with simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following low-energy traumas. This rareness potentially leads to misses of this diagnosis. PMID:27161143

  12. Percutaneous screw fixation of acetabular fractures: applicability of hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Chouhan, Devendra Kumar; Oh, Kwang-Jun

    2010-11-01

    Percutaneous screw fixation of the anterior column of the acetabulum has been a challenging task because of its unique anatomy and a risk of intra-articular penetration. Evidence is lacking for any tools to provide visual scrutiny of fracture reduction and intra-articular screw penetration. We report 2 cases of fracture of the acetabulum that developed in young female athletes, in which the anterior column was fixed with a percutaneous screw by use of hip arthroscopy as an assisting tool for intra-articular observation. In our experience this method was found to be promising in terms of anatomic reduction of the fracture site, avoiding articular penetration during screw insertion, with additional advantages of joint debridement, lavage, and reduction in radiation exposure. PMID:20888169

  13. Geriatric orthopedic co-management of older adults with hip fracture: an emerging standard

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture, a common complication of fall injuries in older adults, often results in high rate of mortality, increased debility, functional loss, and worse quality of life. The value of geriatric teams and model of care for the hip fracture patients have been examined in a number of studies, and even though most studies have demonstrated potential impact in improving outcomes for the hip fracture patients, they are often observational or quasi-experimental designs that are prone to bias. In this editorial, we review the Lancet article by Prestmo and colleagues, a randomized controlled trial that demonstrated improved outcomes for hip fracture patients managed in a geriatric unit. PMID:26539441

  14. Zoledronic Acid in Reducing Clinical Fracture and Mortality after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lyles, Kenneth W.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Magaziner, Jay S.; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Pieper, Carl F.; Mautalen, Carlos; Hyldstrup, Lars; Recknor, Chris; Nordsletten, Lars; Moore, Kathy A.; Lavecchia, Catherine; Zhang, Jie; Mesenbrink, Peter; Hodgson, Patricia K.; Abrams, Ken; Orloff, John J.; Horowitz, Zebulun; Eriksen, Erik Fink; Boonen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mortality is increased after a hip fracture, and strategies that improve outcomes are needed. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 1065 patients were assigned to receive yearly intravenous zoledronic acid (at a dose of 5 mg), and 1062 patients were assigned to receive placebo. The infusions were first administered within 90 days after surgical repair of a hip fracture. All patients received supplemental vitamin D and calcium. The median follow-up was 1.9 years. The primary end point was a new clinical fracture. RESULTS The rates of any new clinical fracture were 8.6% in the zoledronic acid group and 13.9% in the placebo group, a 35% risk reduction (P = 0.001); the respective rates of a new clinical vertebral fracture were 1.7% and 3.8% (P = 0.02), and the respective rates of new nonvertebral fractures were 7.6% and 10.7% (P = 0.03). In the safety analysis, 101 of 1054 patients in the zoledronic acid group (9.6%) and 141 of 1057 patients in the placebo group (13.3%) died, a reduction of 28% in deaths from any cause in the zoledronic-acid group (P = 0.01). The most frequent adverse events in patients receiving zoledronic acid were pyrexia, myalgia, and bone and musculoskeletal pain. No cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw were reported, and no adverse effects on the healing of fractures were noted. The rates of renal and cardiovascular adverse events, including atrial fibrillation and stroke, were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS An annual infusion of zoledronic acid within 90 days after repair of a low-trauma hip fracture was associated with a reduction in the rate of new clinical fractures and improved survival. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00046254.) PMID:18427590

  15. Early Results of a Geriatric Hip Fracture Program in India for Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepak; Sidhu, Guraziz Singh; Mears, Simon C.; Yamin, Mohammad; Mahindra, Pankaj; Pannu, Harminder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are a challenging clinical problem throughout the world. Hip fracture services have been shown to shorten time to surgery, decrease the cost of admissions, and improve the outcomes. We instituted a geriatric hip fracture program for comanagement of these injuries by orthopedic and internal medicine teams at our hospital in India. From January 2010 till December 2011, 119 patients with a femoral neck fracture were treated with cemented modular hemiarthroplasty under this program using a cost-effective Indian implant. The cohort included 63 males and 56 females with a mean age of 70.7 years (range 55-98 years). Hypertension (n = 42) and diabetes mellitus (n = 29) were the most common comorbidities. The follow-up period ranged from 12 to 37 months with an average of 24 months. The surgery was performed within 24 hours of admission in 60.5% (n = 72) patients. The use of antiplatelet drugs was the most common reason for delay of surgery. The mean length of hospital stay was 10.4 days (range 3-24 days) with 77% (n = 92) of patients discharged within 1 week of admission. On follow-up, good to excellent Harris hip scores were seen in 88% of patients with 76% of patients returning to the preinjury ambulatory status. The mortality rate was 6% at 6 months follow-up and 10.9% at 2 years. Our study shows that a hip fracture program can be instituted in India. The program helped us in achieving the goal of early surgery, mobilization, and discharge from hospital with decreased mortality. PMID:26246953

  16. Celiac disease autoimmunity and hip fracture risk: findings from a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Heliövaara, Markku; Impivaara, Olli; Kröger, Heikki; Knekt, Paul; Rissanen, Harri; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2015-04-01

    The impact of celiac disease autoimmunity on bone health is unclear. We investigated the associations of seropositivity for tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGA) and endomysial antibodies (EMA) with incident hip fractures using data from a prospective cohort study, Mini-Finland Health Survey. Baseline serum samples, taken in 1978-80, were tested for tTGA and EMA. Incident hip fractures up to the year 2011 were ascertained from a national hospitalization register. Associations between seropositivity and hip fractures were modeled using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, vitamin D, gamma-glutamyl transferase, smoking, and self-rated health. Our analyses were based on 6919 men and women who had no record of celiac disease or hip fracture before the study baseline. A total of 382 individuals had a hip fracture during a median follow-up of 30 years. Compared with the tTGA-negative individuals (n = 6350), tTGA-positive participants (n = 569; with hip fracture, n = 51) had a higher risk of hip fractures (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17, 2.14). The findings were similar for another tTGA test (n 200; with hip fracture, n = 26; HR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.49, 3.34). We found no evidence for an association between EMA positivity and hip fracture risk (HR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.34, 2.47; n = 74; with hip fracture, n = 4). In our prospective population-based study of Finnish adults, seropositivity for tTGA was associated with an increased hip fracture risk. PMID:25270967

  17. A Scoping Review of Strategies for the Prevention of Hip Fracture in Elderly Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Sawka, Anna M.; Ismaila, Nofisat; Cranney, Ann; Thabane, Lehana; Kastner, Monika; Gafni, Amiram; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Crilly, Richard; Cheung, Angela M.; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Josse, Robert G.; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Background Elderly nursing home residents are at increased risk of hip fracture; however, the efficacy of fracture prevention strategies in this population is unclear. Objective We performed a scoping review of randomized controlled trials of interventions tested in the long-term care (LTC) setting, examining hip fracture outcomes. Methods We searched for citations in 6 respective electronic searches, supplemented by hand searches. Two reviewers independently reviewed all citations and full-text papers; consensus was achieved on final inclusion. Data was abstracted in duplicate. Findings We reviewed 22,349 abstracts or citations and 949 full-text papers. Data from 20 trials were included: 7 - vitamin D (n = 12,875 participants), 2 - sunlight exposure (n = 522), 1 - alendronate (n = 327), 1 - fluoride (n = 460), 4 – exercise or multimodal interventions (n = 8,165), and 5 - hip protectors (n = 2,594). Vitamin D, particularly vitamin D3 ≥800 IU orally daily, reduced hip fracture risk. Hip protectors reduced hip fractures in included studies, although a recent large study not meeting inclusion criteria was negative. Fluoride and sunlight exposure did not significantly reduce hip fractures. Falls were reduced in three studies of exercise or multimodal interventions, with one study suggesting reduced hip fractures in a secondary analysis. A staff education and risk assessment strategy did not significantly reduce falls or hip fractures. In a study underpowered for fracture outcomes, alendronate did not significantly reduce hip fractures in LTC. Conclusions The intervention with the strongest evidence for reduction of hip fractures in LTC is Vitamin D supplementation; more research on other interventions is needed. PMID:20209088

  18. Fracture of Fully-coated Femoral Stem after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty for Nonunion of Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young Soo; Juh, Hyung Suk; Cho, Yoon Je

    2015-01-01

    Femoral stem fracture is an uncommon reason for the failure of total hip arthroplasty, with only 16 cases of fully coated stem fractures reported to date. Here we report a case in which a fully coated primary femoral stem fracture occurred after conversion to total hip arthroplasty for the non-union of an intertrochanteric fracture of the femur. Metallurgic evaluation of the etiology and mechanism revealed that the fracture was initiated by fatigue-related failure and completed by ductile failure on the posterior side of the fracture. Considering the recent trend of treating an intertrochanteric fracture with hip arthroplasty, possible stem failure should be considered, since most patients will have at least one of the known risk factors for stem fracture. PMID:27536622

  19. Trabecular mineral content of the spine in women with hip fracture: CT measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Schwartz, M.S.; Ort, P.

    1986-06-01

    The trabecular bone mineral content (BMC) of the spine was measured by computed tomography in 185 women aged 47-84 years with vertebral fracture (n = 74), hip fracture (n = 83), and both vertebral and hip fracture (n = 28). Eighty-seven percent of vertebral-fracture patients, 38% of hip-fracture patients, and 82% of vertebral- and hip-fracture patients had spinal BMC values below the fifth percentile for healthy premenopausal women and values 64%, 9%, and 68% below the fifth percentile for age-matched control subjects. No significant loss of spinal trabecular bone was seen in patients with hip fracture. If it is assumed that the rate of trabecular bone loss is the same in the spine and femoral neck, then hip fracture (unlike osteoporotic vertebral fracture) is not associated with disproportionate loss of trabecular bone. Hip fracture occurs secondary to weakening of bone and increased incidence of falls. Bone weakening may be due to disproportionate loss of trabecular or cortical bone, proportionate loss of both, or other as yet undetermined qualitative changes in bone.

  20. Hip fracture risk estimation based on principal component analysis of QCT atlas: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjun; Kornak, John; Harris, Tamara; Lu, Ying; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Lang, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    We aim to capture and apply 3-dimensional bone fragility features for fracture risk estimation. Using inter-subject image registration, we constructed a hip QCT atlas comprising 37 patients with hip fractures and 38 age-matched controls. In the hip atlas space, we performed principal component analysis to identify the principal components (eigen images) that showed association with hip fracture. To develop and test a hip fracture risk model based on the principal components, we randomly divided the 75 QCT scans into two groups, one serving as the training set and the other as the test set. We applied this model to estimate a fracture risk index for each test subject, and used the fracture risk indices to discriminate the fracture patients and controls. To evaluate the fracture discrimination efficacy, we performed ROC analysis and calculated the AUC (area under curve). When using the first group as the training group and the second as the test group, the AUC was 0.880, compared to conventional fracture risk estimation methods based on bone densitometry, which had AUC values ranging between 0.782 and 0.871. When using the second group as the training group, the AUC was 0.839, compared to densitometric methods with AUC values ranging between 0.767 and 0.807. Our results demonstrate that principal components derived from hip QCT atlas are associated with hip fracture. Use of such features may provide new quantitative measures of interest to osteoporosis.

  1. The Exercise Plus Program for Older Women Post Hip Fracture: Participant Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Wehren, Lois; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Simpson, Marjorie; Magaziner, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of older women post hip fracture who were exposed to a motivational intervention, the Exercise Plus Program, intended to increase adherence to exercise. Design and Methods: This study used a naturalistic inquiry. We interviewed a total of 70 older women, 12 months post hip fracture,…

  2. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bones or cartilage of your hip, including: Hip fractures – can cause sudden hip pain. These injuries can be serious and lead to major problems. Hip fractures are more common as people get older because ...

  3. The Patient's View of Nursing Care after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Ami; Kock, Marie-Louise; Persson, Jeanette; Werntoft, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pathway for patients with a hip fracture described in this study is a fast track. Many studies have focused on prevention of various complications but, so far, the patient's view of nursing care has not been highlighted. Aim. The aim of the study is to illuminate the patient's view on nursing care when treated for a hip fracture. Method. Ten patients were interviewed. A content analysis design was conducted. Findings. From the analysis, four main categories emerged: waiting times; pain/pain relief and mobilisation; attitude/information and sense of security; complications. Conclusion. Patients generally felt satisfied with the nursing provided. The staff created a feeling of security and showed interest and empathy for the patient. However, patients experienced a stressful waiting for surgery, and patients who developed confusion waited more than 24 hours for surgery. Therefore, waiting time must be decreased. Furthermore, patients' descriptions of a variety of pain problem show, for example, that good collaboration between the nurse and physiotherapist is critical for achieving good pain relief before mobilisation. Nursing staff need to be attentive and should elicit the patient's feelings through patient-focused communication in order to relieve anxiety about going home. PMID:22811933

  4. European Regional Differences in All-Cause Mortality and Length of Stay for Patients with Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Medin, Emma; Goude, Fanny; Melberg, Hans Olav; Tediosi, Fabrizio; Belicza, Eva; Peltola, Mikko

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare healthcare performance for the surgical treatment of hip fractures across and within Finland, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Scotland, and Sweden. Differences in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted 30-day and one-year all-cause mortality rates following hip fracture, as well as the length of stay of the first hospital episode in acute care and during a follow up of 365 days, were investigated, and associations between selected country-level and regional-level factors with mortality and length of stay were assessed. Hungary showed the highest one-year mortality rate (mean 39.7%) and the lowest length of stay in one year (12.7 days), whereas Italy had the lowest one-year mortality rate (mean 19.1 %) and the highest length of stay (23.3 days). The observed variations were largely explained by country-specific effects rather than by regional-level factors. The results show that there should still be room for efficiency gains in the acute treatment of hip fracture, and clinicians, healthcare managers, and politicians should learn from best practices. This study demonstrates that an international comparison of acute hospital care is possible using pooled individual-level administrative data. PMID:26633868

  5. Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Wook; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). Materials and Methods From June 2002 to May 2012, 40 patients who could be followed-up for more than 1 year after surgery were enrolled in this study. The mean duration of follow-up was 28.5 months (range, 15-97 months) and the average age at the time of surgery was 71.5 years (range, 38-89 years). The fracture types were determined by using the Vancouver classification. Among intraoperative fractures, there were type A in 3 hips, type B2 in 2 hips and type B3 in one. Among postoperative fractures, type AG was present in 5 hips, type AL in 2 hips, type B1 in 15 hips, type B2 in 6 hips, type B3 in 3 hips, and type C in 3 hips. Evaluation of the results was based on bony union, stability of the prosthesis, postoperative complications, and Harris hip score at the final follow-up. Results Bony union was achieved in all but one case and the average time for bony union was 21 weeks. The mean Harris hip score was 86 at the final follow-up. Clinical results were above good in 34 of 40 hips (85.0%). Stem loosening occurred in one patient with a type B1 fracture treated with open reduction and plate fixation. Nonunion was observed in 1 patient with an AG type fracture. Conclusion Open reduction and fixation using a plate with a screw and cerclage wiring provided good results for periprosthetic fractures in patients who had a stable femoral stem without bone defects. Revision surgery with a cementless long stem should be considered in patients with an unstable stem or suspected stability in B1 type of THA using a proximal fixation type. PMID:27536618

  6. The effect of latitude on the risk and seasonal variation in hip fracture in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Odén, Anders; Kanis, John A; McCloskey, Eugene V; Johansson, Helena

    2014-10-01

    Although the optimal requirement of vitamin D for skeletal health in the general community is controversial, vitamin D deficiency impairs bone mineralization and increases bone turnover via secondary hyperparathyroidism, thus accelerating bone loss and increasing fracture risk. Support for a role of vitamin D deficiency in the epidemiology of hip fracture is found in the seasonal variation of hip fracture incidence that is reported in several studies. If the association were causal, then the incidence and amplitude of the seasonal variation in hip fracture risk should vary by latitude. We addressed this hypothesis by examining the incidence of hip fracture in men and women aged 50 years or more from Sweden (latitudes 55 to 69°) between 1987 and 2009. In order to reduce double counting, only one fracture in a period of a year was counted per individual. Men contributed 104,888 fractures in 33,313,065 person years and women 264,362 fractures in 38,387,660 person years. The effects of season and latitude were examined by Poisson regression. As expected, hip fracture rates were higher in women than in men. After adjustment for age, season and population density, hip fracture incidence increased by 3.0% (95% CI: 2.7-3.2%) per degree increase in latitude for men and by 1.9% (95% CI: 1.8-2.1%) for women. There was a marked seasonal variation of hip fracture with the highest risk in February and lower by 37.5% in men and by 23.5% women during the summer. There were significant interactions of amplitude of the seasonal variation with latitude (p < 0.001 for both men and women), indicating that seasonal variation during the year was more pronounced in the north of Sweden than in the south. The associations found with latitude and season is consistent with a role of vitamin D in hip fracture causation. PMID:24715585

  7. Ipsilateral Traumatic Posterior Hip Dislocation, Posterior Wall and Transverse Acetabular Fracture with Trochanteric Fracture in an adult: Report of First Case

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Skand; Naik, Ananta k; Arya, Rajendra K; Jain, Vijay K

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior dislocation of the hip joint with associated acetabular and intertrochanteric fracture is a complex injury. Early recognition, prompt and stable reduction is needed of successful outcome. Case Report: 45 year old male patient presented with posterior dislocation of the hip with transverse fracture with posterior wall fracture of acetabulam and intertrochanteric fracture on the ipsilateral side. The complex fracture geometry was confirmed by CT scan. The patient was successfully managed by open reduction and internal fixation of intertrochanteric fracture was achieved with dynamic hip screw (DHS) plate fixation followed by fixation of acetabular fracture with reconstruction plate. Conclusion: Hip dislocation combined with acetabular fracture is an uncommon injury; this article presents a unique case of posterior wall and transverse fractures of ipsilateral acetabulum with intertrochanteric fracture in a patient who sustained traumatic posterior hip dislocation. Early surgical intervention is important for satisfactory outcomes of such complex fracture-dislocation injuries. PMID:27298928

  8. Dislocation of a dual mobility total hip replacement following fracture of the polyethylene liner.

    PubMed

    Vedrine, Bertrand; Guillaumot, Pierre; Chancrin, Jean-Luc

    2016-05-18

    An eight-year-old male English Setter was referred for management of a dislocation of a cemented dual mobility canine total hip prosthesis that occurred four months after the initial surgery. Revision surgery showed that the dislocation was associated with fracture of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene liner. The dislocation was successfully reduced after replacing the liner. A dual mobility acetabular component is composed of a mobile polyethylene liner inside a metallic cemented cup. Chronic wear of the components of a canine dual mobility total hip replacement has not been described previously. The use of this type of implant is fairly recent and limited long term follow-up of the implanted cases may be the explanation. Acute rupture of a polyethylene liner has never been described in humans, the only case of rupture of a polyethylene liner occurred 10 years after implantation. The case presented here of rupture of the polyethylene liner of a dual mobility total hip replacement is a hitherto unreported failure mode in this model of acetabular cup in the dog. PMID:26991949

  9. Comparing Methods to Identify Hip Fracture in a Nursing Home Population Using Medicare Claims

    PubMed Central

    Rigler, Sally K.; Ellerbeck, Edward; Whittle, Jeffrey; Mahnken, Jonathan; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives to examine the impact of varied operational definitions for identifying hip fracture hospitalizations in administrative claims data. Design retrospective examination of Medicare inpatient and outpatient claims data. Setting nursing home population. Participants Medicaid- and Medicare-eligible nursing home residents in 1999 in CA, FL, MO, NJ, and PA (n=197,514). Measurements number of hip fractures identified in using inpatient (Medicare A) diagnoses codes, subjected to definitions varying according to whether or not hip fracture was required to be the principal diagnosis and whether or not confirmatory imaging and procedure codes were identified in other (Medicare B) claims files. Results Hip fractures were found in any inpatient diagnosis position in 4,680 subjects, with 4,479 of these found in the principal diagnosis position. With either approach to diagnosis position, confirmatory imaging and procedure codes were identified for 95% of persons hospitalized with hip fracture. Conclusion The principal diagnosis alone will identify 96% of hip fracture diagnoses in hospitalized nursing home residents. Such diagnoses are confirmed at very high rates by other sources of claims data. Researchers may be confident using a simple approach to identifying hip fracture hospitalizations in this population, using inpatient claims alone and interrogating only the principal diagnosis position. PMID:20503037

  10. Effects of a social cognitive theory-based hip fracture prevention web site for older adults.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Barker, Bausell; Resnick, Barbara; Covington, Barbara; Magaziner, Jay; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a Social Cognitive Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site for older adults and conduct a preliminary evaluation of its effectiveness. The Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site is composed of learning modules and a moderated discussion board. A total of 245 older adults recruited from two Web sites and a newspaper advertisement were randomized into the Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site and the conventional Web sites groups. Outcomes included (1) knowledge (hip fractures and osteoporosis), (2) self-efficacy and outcome expectations, and (3) calcium intake and exercise and were assessed at baseline, end of treatment (2 weeks), and follow-up (3 months). Both groups showed significant improvement in most outcomes. For calcium intake, only the Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site group showed improvement. None of the group and time interactions were significant. The Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site group, however, was more satisfied with the intervention. The discussion board usage was significantly correlated with outcome gains. Despite several limitations, the findings showed some preliminary effectiveness of Web-based health interventions for older adults and the use of a Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site as a sustainable Web structure for online health behavior change interventions. PMID:20978408

  11. A Biomechanical Approach to Assessing Hip Fracture Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss in microgravity is well documented, but it is difficult to quantify how declines in bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to an astronaut's overall risk of fracture upon return. This study uses a biomechanical approach to assessing hip fracture risk, or Factor of Risk (Phi), which is defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expeditions 1-18 were included in this study (n=25), while crewmembers who flew twice (n=2) were treated as separate subjects. Bone strength was estimated based on an empirical relationship between areal BMD at the hip, as measured by DXA, and failure load, as determined by mechanical testing of cadaver femora. Fall load during a sideways fall was calculated from a previously developed biomechanical model, which takes into account body weight, height, gender, and soft tissue thickness overlying the lateral aspect of the hip that serves to attenuate the impact force. While no statistical analyses have been performed yet, preliminary results show that males in this population have a higher FOR than females, with a post- flight Phi of 0.87 and 0.36, respectively. FOR increases 5.1% from preflight to postflight, while only one subject crossed the fracture "threshold" of Phi = 1, for a total of 2 subjects with a postflight Phi > 1. These results suggest that men may be at greater risk for hip fracture due largely in part to their relatively thin soft tissue padding as compared to women, since soft tissue thickness has the highest correlation (R(exp 2)= .53) with FOR of all subject-specific parameters. Future work will investigate changes in FOR during recovery to see if baseline risk levels are restored upon return to 1-g activity. While dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used clinical measure of bone health, it fails to provide compartment-specific information that is useful in assessing changes to bone quality as a result of microgravity exposure. Peripheral

  12. Testing of the SEE and OEE post-hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Hawkes, William; Golden, Justine; Werner-Bronzert, Michelle; Magaziner, Jay

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise (SEE) and the Outcome Expectations for Exercise (OEE) scales in a sample of 166 older women post-hip fracture. There was some evidence of validity of the SEE and OEE based on confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch model testing, criterion based and convergent validity, and evidence of internal consistency based on alpha coefficients and separation indices and reliability based on R2 estimates. Rasch model testing demonstrated that some items had high variability. Based on these findings suggestions are made for how items could be revised and the scales improved for future use. PMID:16829639

  13. [Preoperative management to reduce morbidity and mortality of hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Ferré, F; Minville, V

    2011-10-01

    Hip femur is extremely common in the elderly and is one of the most common reasons for admission in trauma care. The main reported causes of death after hip fracture were cardiovascular (29%), neurological (20%) and pulmonary. Large epidemiological studies have shown a relatively small decrease in mortality for 20 years despite an active approach to medical and surgical management. Yet 57% of deaths occurring within 30 days post-surgery are preventable because they are not related to a pre-existing disease. Preoperative management to optimize these patients could help to reduce morbidity and mortality and is thus a crucial issue. The anesthesia consultation is used to evaluate the perioperative risk, treat pain, manage treatment and stabilize the patient. An operative delay of more than 48hours after admission increases mortality. This period should not be prolonged by unnecessary investigations that will not change the perioperative management. The preoperative period is a key moment because it allows to choose the anesthetic technique. Even if this choice is controversial, continuous spinal anesthesia (titrated) do not modify the cardiovascular and neurological physiological balance of these precarious patients. PMID:21945704

  14. Survival and Functional Outcomes after Hip Fracture among Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Following the implementation of a long-term care insurance system for the elderly in Korea, many nursing homes have been established and many more patients than ever before have been living at nursing homes. Despite the fact that this is a high-risk group vulnerable to hip fractures, no study has yet been conducted in Korea on hip fracture incidence rates and prognoses among patients residing at nursing homes. We recently studied 46 cases of hip fracture in nursing homes; more specifically, we investigated the most common conditions under which fractures occur, and examined the degree of recovery of ambulatory ability and the mortality within 1 yr. Among those who had survived after 1 yr, the number of non-functional ambulators increased from 8 hips before hip fracture to 19 hips at final post-fracture follow-up. These individuals showed poor recovery of ambulatory ability, and the number who died within one year was 11 (23.9%), a rate not significantly different from that among community-dwelling individuals. It was evident that hip-joint-fracture nursing home residents survived for similar periods of time as did those dwelling in the community, though under much more uncomfortable conditions. The main highlight of this report is that it is the first from Korea on nursing home residents' ambulatory recovery and one-year mortality after hip fracture. The authors believe that, beginning with the present study, the government should collect and evaluate the number of hips fractured at nursing facilities in order to formulate criteria that will help to enable all patients to select safer and better-quality nursing facilities for themselves or their family members. PMID:26770043

  15. Sense of coherence, quality of life, and function among elderly hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Johansson, I; Larsson, G; Hamrin, E

    1998-10-01

    The aim was to study whether sense of coherence (SOC) had any predictive power in patients with hip fractures regarding length of stay in hospital, state of confusion and health, functional ability, quality of life, and municipal home-help service. A total of 73 patients admitted from their own homes participated (mean age 80.4 years). The patients were followed during a 4-month period. Acute confusional state was diagnosed using a Swedish version of the NEECHAM Confusion Scale. SOC and self-rated functional health status were assessed during the hospitalization period and one month after discharge; Quality of Life Index (QLI) and instrumental daily activities (SPE) were assessed four months after discharge. Focusing on the differences in outcome between persons with a stronger vs a weaker SOC, there were few significant differences in physical status between the subgroups. However, the persons with a weaker SOC stayed longer in the hospital and reported a significantly lower score on the NEECHAM Confusion Scale, as well as more discomfort and disability symptoms related to communication, mental, and emotional status. Furthermore, these persons had less favorable scores on the overall QLI and subscales respectively, and on all subscales measuring instrumental daily activities. The persons with a weaker SOC were significantly more dependent on assistance before admission to the hospital than those with a stronger SOC. The conclusions drawn from the study indicate that persons with a stronger SOC seem to cope in a better way with their situation after a hip fracture. PMID:9932141

  16. The Determinants of Costs and Length of Stay for Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Adriana; Daidone, Silvio; Jacobs, Rowena; Kasteridis, Panagiotis; Street, Andrew David

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose An ageing population at greater risk of proximal femoral fracture places an additional clinical and financial burden on hospital and community medical services. We analyse the variation in i) length of stay (LoS) in hospital and ii) costs across the acute care pathway for hip fracture from emergency admission, to hospital stay and follow-up outpatient appointments. Patients and Methods We analyse patient-level data from England for 2009/10 for around 60,000 hip fracture cases in 152 hospitals using a random effects generalized linear multi-level model where the dependent variable is given by the patient’s cost or length of stay (LoS). We control for socio-economic characteristics, type of fracture and intervention, co-morbidities, discharge destination of patients, and quality indicators. We also control for provider and social care characteristics. Results Older patients and those from more deprived areas have higher costs and LoS, as do those with specific co-morbidities or that develop pressure ulcers, and those transferred between hospitals or readmitted within 28 days. Costs are also higher for those having a computed tomography (CT) scan or cemented arthroscopy. Costs and LoS are lower for those admitted via a 24h emergency department, receiving surgery on the same day of admission, and discharged to their own homes. Interpretation Patient and treatment characteristics are more important as determinants of cost and LoS than provider or social care factors. A better understanding of the impact of these characteristics can support providers to develop treatment strategies and pathways to better manage this patient population. PMID:26204450

  17. The role of sarcopenia in the risk of osteoporotic hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A; Vaz, C

    2015-10-01

    Several common age-related mechanisms and factors influence muscle and bone, affecting functionality of both tissues. Sarcopenia is closely linked with osteoporosis, and their combined effect may exacerbate negative health outcomes. Fall-related fractures are some of the most serious consequences of these two systemic pathologies, with hip fracture being a major complication affecting osteoporotic and sarcopenic elderly. This work aims to review the literature on the current state of knowledge about the relations between sarcopenia and osteoporosis and to present the association between sarcopenia and osteoporosis and the risk of hip fracture. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Scopus databases for articles with the predefined terms "sarcopenia," "muscular atrophy," "femoral fractures," "hip fractures," "osteoporosis," and "bone density." There is a growing and significant interest being directed to sarcopenia and associated risk for osteoporotic hip fracture, but there still is a notorious heterogeneity in the methodology and cohort size of the available studies. Collectively, most of the studies herein analyzed indicate that sarcopenia could be a predictor of risk for hip fracture. The simultaneous evaluation of sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be of importance in identifying those patients in higher risk of suffering an osteoporotic hip fracture and who could benefit from preventive or therapeutic interventions, or both. PMID:25912213

  18. Perioperative implications of surgery in elderly patients with hip fractures: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    White, Jonathan J E; Khan, Wasim S; Smitham, Peter J

    2011-06-01

    Hip fracture is a major cause of morbidity, mortality and loss of independence for the elderly. Surgical fixation of the fractured hip remains the standard of care to allow for early mobilisation and a return to independence. Operative management in this population carries its own set of problems. The altered physiological state of the older person, often coupled with significant comorbidity, can present challenges for the anaesthetist, the surgeon and the rest of the perioperative team. This article provides an evidence-based review of the important perioperative factors associated with hip fractures in the older person and their management. PMID:21823308

  19. The Effectiveness of a Geriatric Hip Fracture Clinical Pathway in Reducing Hospital and Rehabilitation Length of Stay and Improving Short-Term Mortality Rates

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tak-Wing; Fang, Christian; Leung, Frankie

    2013-01-01

    Background: A geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway, led by an orthopedic surgeon, was developed in 2007. This clinical pathway team is multidisciplinary and consists of surgeons, physicians, anesthetists, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, medical social workers, dieticians as well as voluntary support groups. Methods: From early 2007 onward, all patients older than 65 years with acute isolated hip fractures were included. During the whole inpatient treatment, all relevant data were captured prospectively. The data in 2006, before the implementation of the clinical pathway, were collected retrospectively through computer record system. A study of the length of stay in acute and rehabilitation hospital and also the short-term mortality rate was carried out to compare the difference before and after the implementation of the pathway. Results: From 2007 onward, more than 1300 hip fractures were treated. After the implementation of the pathway, the preoperative length of stay was markedly shortened by 4 days, from an average of 6.1 days in 2006 to 1.5 days in 2011 (P < .05). The postoperative length of stay and the overall acute hospital length of stay also improved significantly. The length of stay in rehabilitation hospital was also significantly shorter in the 4-year period. Although the number of hip fractures increased annually with increased age and number of comorbidities each year, the inpatient mortality rate showed a gradual decrease from 2.7% in 2006 to 1.25% in 2010. The 30 days mortality rate also showed a decrease from 3.65% in 2006 to 2.75% in 2010. Conclusion: Geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway is an excellent approach to the geriatric hip fracture service. The most significant improvement is the dramatic shortening of the length of hospital stay. Our success in the past 5 years has proven its value and sustainability. PMID:23936733

  20. A Dual Biomechanical Failure: Exeter Stem and Pubic Rami Insufficiency Fracture, following Hybrid Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Inderpaul; Paliobeis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Incidence of Exeter stem fracture is extremely uncommon. Pubic rami insufficiency fractures following arthroplasty are also rare. To our knowledge no cases of spontaneous stem failure with previous insufficiency fractures have yet been reported. Case Presentation. This report describes a case of spontaneous fracture through a cemented Exeter stem in a 66-year-old patient who had previously undergone a hybrid total hip replacement and was found to have bifocal pubic rami insufficiency fractures. The patient presented 18-year postprimary surgery with spontaneous fracture of the middle third of the cemented femoral stem and adjacent proximal femur. Conclusion. This report demonstrates a unique case of Exeter stem fracture with previous pelvic insufficiency fractures. The case adds to the rare occurrences of Exeter stem failure in the literature and highlights the risk of potential insufficiency fractures in patients undergoing total hip replacement. PMID:26236519

  1. Factors Influencing The Six-Month Mortality Rate In Patients With A Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ristic, Branko; Rancic, Nemanja; Bukumiric, Zoran; Zeljko, Stepanovic; Ignjatovic-Ristic, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background There are several potential risk factors in patients with a hip fracture for a higher rate of mortality that include: comorbid disorders, poor general health, age, male gender, poor mobility prior to injury, type of fracture, poor cognitive status, place of residence. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of potential risk factors for six-month mortality in hip fracture patients. Methods The study included all patients with a hip fracture older than 65 who had been admitted to the Clinic for orthopaedic surgery during one year. One hundred and ninety-two patients were included in the study. Results Six months after admission due to a hip fracture, 48 patients had died (6-month mortality rate was 25%). The deceased were statistically older than the patients who had survived. Univariate regression analysis indicated that six variables had a significant effect on hip fracture patients’ survival: age, mobility prior to the fracture, poor cognitive status, activity of daily living, comorbidities and the place where they had fallen. Multivariate regression modelling showed that the following factors were independently associated with mortality at 6 months post fracture: poor cognitive status, poor mobility prior to the fracture, comorbid disease. Conclusion Poor cognitive status appeared to be the strongest mortality predictor. The employment of brief tests for cognitive status evaluation would enable orthopaedists to have good criteria for the choice of treatment for each patient screened. PMID:27284379

  2. Evaluating recovery following hip fracture: a qualitative interview study of what is important to patients

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Frances; Mason, Victoria; Boardman, Felicity; Dennick, Katherine; Haywood, Kirstie; Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nicholas; Griffin, Xavier; Costa, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore what patients consider important when evaluating their recovery from hip fracture and to consider how these priorities could be used in the evaluation of the quality of hip fracture services. Design Semistructured interviews exploring the experience of recovery from hip fracture at two time points—4 weeks and 4 months postoperative hip fixation. Two approaches to analysis: thematic analysis of data specifically related to recovery from hip fracture; summarising the participant's experience overall. Participants 31 participants were recruited, of whom 20 were women and 12 were cognitively impaired. Mean age was 81.5 years. Interviews were provided by 19 patients, 14 carers and 8 patient/carer dyad; 10 participants were interviewed twice. Setting Single major trauma centre in the West Midlands of the UK. Results Stable mobility (without falls or fear of falls) for valued activities was considered most important by participants who had some prefracture mobility and were able to articulate what they valued during recovery. Mobility was important for managing personal care, for day-to-day activities such as shopping and gardening, and for maintenance of mental well-being. Some participants used assistive mobility devices or adapted to their limitations. Others maintained their previous limited function through increased care provision. Many participants were unable to articulate what they valued as hip fracture was perceived as part of their decline with age. The fracture and problems from other health conditions were an inseparable part of one health experience. Conclusions Prefracture mobility, adaptations to reduced mobility before or after fracture, and whether or not patients perceive themselves to be declining with age influence what patients consider important during recovery from hip fracture. No single patient-reported outcome measure could evaluate quality of care for all patients following hip fracture. General health

  3. Risk factors for hip fracture among elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Kanoko, Tomohiro; Satoh, Kei; Iwamoto, Jun

    2004-08-30

    Incidence of hip fracture among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially in elderly patients, is high. To analyze risk factors of hip fracture, we prospectively studied a cohort of elderly female patients with AD. Subjects studied were 225 female patients with AD, and the average age was 76 years old. At baseline, we recorded body mass index (BMI), a score of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and bone mineral density (BMD), and measured serum concentrations of ionized calcium, intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), intact bone Gla protein (BGP), 25-hydroxyvitamin (25-OHD) and 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1, 25-[OH]2D). The patients were followed for 2 years. During the 2-year study, hip fractures occurred in 29 patients. We compared baseline variables between the 29 patients with and 176 patients without hip fracture. AD patients with lower BMD, low concentrations of serum ionized calcium and 25-OHD (mean 3.0 ng/ml) with compensatory hyperparathyroidism were found to have an increased risk of hip fracture. Also, concentrations of serum ICTP and BGP were higher in the fracture group than in the nonfracture group. Elderly female AD patients with low BMD and serum 25-OHD concentrations <5 ng/ml with secondary hyperparathyroidism have a high risk of hip fracture, and the risk may be reduced by vitamin D supplementation. PMID:15337610

  4. Treatment of Intertrochanteric Fractures Using the Compression Hip Nail

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Je-Min; Kim, Keun Woo; Ryu, Chang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical and radiologic outcomes following treatment of intertrochanteric fractures using the Compression Hip Nail® (CHN), which has a sliding lag screw. Materials and Methods Twenty-eight cases of intertrochanteric fractures treated with CHN from November 2012 to October 2013 and followed-up for >6 months were included. The patient population consisted of 11 men and 17 women with a mean age of 75.2 years at the time of surgery. For the initial 11 cases, 10 mm sliding lag screws were used; the remaining 17 cases used 20 mm sliding lag screws. Clinical variables including operation time, amount of transfusion, weight-bearing start time, postoperative physical activity, and complications were investigated. The average sliding of lag screws and the average union were investigated radiologically at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Results In an analysis of 23 cases (exclusion of 3 cases of lag screw cutout and 2 cases of nonunion), 11 (48%) recovered their pre-injury activity level. In an analysis of 25 cases (exclusion of 3 cases of cutout), 17 (68%) and 23 (92%) showed radiological union at postoperative months 3 and 6, respectively. Seven complications were noted. Cutout of the lag screw and the lateral protrusion of barrels were significantly greater in the group with 10 mm sliding lag screws as compared to the group using 20 mm sliding lag screws. Conclusion The use of CHN for the treatment of intertrochanteric fracture yielded poor results. However, results from patients in the 20 mm sliding lag screw group were better than for the 10 mm sliding lag screw group. Therefore, use of the 20 mm sliding lag screw is advisable.

  5. Hip Fractures in a Geriatric Population - Rehabilitation Based on Patients Needs

    PubMed Central

    Radosavljevic, Natasa; Nikolic, Dejan; Lazovic, Milica; Jeremic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    With an increased life expectancy in humans and thus an increase in the number of the elderly population, the frequency of hip fractures will rise as well. Aside from a higher incidence, hip fractures in a geriatric population is a significant problem due to the possible onset of severe and in some cases dramatic complications and consequences. The primary purpose of treatment and rehabilitation in the elderly after a hip fracture is to improve an individual’s quality of life. It is important to underline that principles and methods of functional restoration after hip fracture should consider careful planning of a rehabilitation program individually for every patient and its implementation with respect to decisions made by the rehabilitation team. PMID:24900940

  6. Senior Managed Care System for Hip Fracture in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Eleby R.; Shamie, Arya Nick; Madadi, Firooz; Washington, Eleby R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It is debatable whether a managed care model would affect the quality of care and length of hospital stay in the treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients. Methods This prospective study was undertaken to determine whether or not a managed care critical pathway tool shortened hospital stay in a group of 102 senior patients with fractures of the hip during follow-up. We compared our study findings with two equivalent populations of senior hip fracture patients not treated using a critical care pathway concerning specific markers of quality. Results The managed care group had a 9% mortality rate, 95% return to prefracture living and 63% return to ambulatory status. The rates compared favorably with previous studies. The quality of care provided before and after the critical pathway was equivalent, while the post-pathway length of stay dropped 30%. Conclusions The proposed care protocol is recommended to shorten hospital stay in elderly patients with hip fractures. PMID:26929795

  7. The relevance of gender in the care of hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; Tutton, Liz; Wright, Julie

    2016-08-01

    As in many conditions, gender interplays with other social structures of inequality to impact upon women's and men's health and healthcare. This narrative review examines knowledge about sex, gender and hip fracture and suggests ways of highlighting the influence of gender in hip fracture healthcare. These will be considered in relation to two areas. Firstly the multifactorial dimension of hip fractures which identifies ethnicity, marital status, lifestyle, co-morbidities, environment in relation to falls and osteoporosis as important factors influencing the experience of hip fracture. Secondly the importance of acknowledging gender as a key element within research and management of care. Implications for practice are that we need a raised awareness of gender when we assess and care for patients, to ask critical questions about the gender bias in the evidence we use and reflect on how services and care practices may be biased towards gendered assumptions. PMID:27215748

  8. Design and Implementation of a Home-Based Exercise Program Post-Hip Fracture: The Baltimore Hip Studies Experience

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Yahiro, Janet A.; Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Hicks, Gregory; Magaziner, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objectives are to describe for the first time a home-based exercise intervention for frail elderly hip fracture patients and to describe the feasibility of this exercise program. Design A home-based exercise program was used in a randomized controlled trial in which the authors investigated exercise intervention versus no exercise intervention in patients after hip fracture. Setting This program was implemented at the patients’ own home or place of residence after discharge. Participants Women 65 years of age or older were recruited within 15 days of hip fracture. Eligible patients were those with a nonpathologic fracture who were admitted within 72 hours of injury, had surgical repair of the hip fracture, and met medical inclusion criteria. Participants initially were randomized to exercise groups and then assigned to exercise trainers. Intervention The exercise contained strength training and aerobic components. Participants were expected to exercise 5 days per week by performing a combination of supervised and independently performed exercise sessions. Intensity and duration were increased gradually by trainers in a standardized way. The frequency of the supervised sessions decreased as participants became more independent. Treatment fidelity visits ensured that the intervention was being delivered as intended across trainers and across participants. Main Outcome Measurement This work describes the feasibility and challenges of administering an intensive home-based exercise program in this population of older adults. Results Of those patients randomized to exercise, 82% were followed by a trainer and almost all advanced to higher levels in both aerobic and strength programs. Overall, participants received an average of 44 (78.5%) of the prescribed visits by the trainer. Conclusions This study showed that it was possible to engage a frail older population of post-hip fracture patients in a program of aerobic and strength training exercise with a

  9. Functional Recovery of Older Hip-Fracture Patients after Interdisciplinary Intervention Follows Three Distinct Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Ming-Yueh; Shyu, Yea-Ing L.; Liang, Jersey

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effects of an interdisciplinary intervention on the trajectories of functional recovery among older patients with hip fracture during 2 years after hospitalization. Design and Methods In a randomized controlled trial with 24-month follow-up, 162 patients [greater than or equal to]60 years were enrolled after hip-fracture…

  10. The Aftermath of Hip Fracture: Discharge Placement, Functional Status Change, and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Bentler, Suzanne E.; Liu, Li; Obrizan, Maksym; Cook, Elizabeth A.; Wright, Kara B.; Geweke, John F.; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A.; Pavlik, Claire E.; Wallace, Robert B.; Ohsfeldt, Robert L.; Jones, Michael P.; Rosenthal, Gary E.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors prospectively explored the consequences of hip fracture with regard to discharge placement, functional status, and mortality using the Survey on Assets and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD). Data from baseline (1993) AHEAD interviews and biennial follow-up interviews were linked to Medicare claims data from 1993–2005. There were 495 postbaseline hip fractures among 5,511 respondents aged ≥69 years. Mean age at hip fracture was 85 years; 73% of fracture patients were white women, 45% had pertrochanteric fractures, and 55% underwent surgical pinning. Most patients (58%) were discharged to a nursing facility, with 14% being discharged to their homes. In-hospital, 6-month, and 1-year mortality were 2.7%, 19%, and 26%, respectively. Declines in functional-status-scale scores ranged from 29% on the fine motor skills scale to 56% on the mobility index. Mean scale score declines were 1.9 for activities of daily living, 1.7 for instrumental activities of daily living, and 2.2 for depressive symptoms; scores on mobility, large muscle, gross motor, and cognitive status scales worsened by 2.3, 1.6, 2.2, and 2.5 points, respectively. Hip fracture characteristics, socioeconomic status, and year of fracture were significantly associated with discharge placement. Sex, age, dementia, and frailty were significantly associated with mortality. This is one of the few studies to prospectively capture these declines in functional status after hip fracture. PMID:19808632

  11. Increased infection risk after hip hemiarthroplasty in institutionalized patients with proximal femur fracture.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Calero, Irene; Larrainzar-Coghen, Thais; Rodriguez-Pardo, Dolors; Pigrau, Carles; Sánchez-Raya, Judith; Amat, Carles; Lung, Maily; Carrera, Luis; Corona, Pablo S

    2016-04-01

    In patients undergoing hip hemiarthroplasty (HHA) secondary to proximal femur fracture, acute periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most important complications. We have detected an increased risk of PJI in chronic institutionalized patients (CIPs), and a higher number of early postoperative infections are caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), not covered by the current prophylaxis (cefazolin in noninstitutionalized patients (NIPs) and cotrimoxazole in CIPs). We sought to compare infection characteristics between NIPs and CIPs, analyzing predisposing factors, causative pathogens, and antibiotic prophylaxis-related microbiological characteristics. We performed a retrospective review of our prospective institutional database to identify all patients consecutively admitted for HHA to treat proximal femur fracture at our centre between 2011 and 2013. PJI was diagnosed in 21 of 381 (5.51%) patients, with 10 of 105 (9.52%) in the CIP group and 11 of 276 (3.99%) in the NIP group, and statistical significance was achieved. GNB accounted for PJI in 14 (66.67%) patients. We detected a single case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in the NIP group. We confirm a higher risk of acute PJI among institutionalized patients, commonly caused by Gram-negative microorganisms, which are not covered by the current prophylaxis. New prophylactic strategies should be investigated in order to reduce this problem. PMID:26857632

  12. Factors that influence exercise activity among women post hip fracture participating in the Exercise Plus Program

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; D’Adamo, Christopher; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Hawkes, William; Shardell, Michelle; Golden, Justine; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Magaziner, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Using a social ecological model, this paper describes selected intra- and interpersonal factors that influence exercise behavior in women post hip fracture who participated in the Exercise Plus Program. Model testing of factors that influence exercise behavior at 2, 6 and 12 months post hip fracture was done. The full model hypothesized that demographic variables; cognitive, affective, physical and functional status; pain; fear of falling; social support for exercise, and exposure to the Exercise Plus Program would influence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and stage of change both directly and indirectly influencing total time spent exercising. Two hundred and nine female hip fracture patients (age 81.0 ± 6.9), the majority of whom were Caucasian (97%), participated in this study. The three predictive models tested across the 12 month recovery trajectory suggest that somewhat different factors may influence exercise over the recovery period and the models explained 8 to 21% of the variance in time spent exercising. To optimize exercise activity post hip fracture, older adults should be helped to realistically assess their self-efficacy and outcome expectations related to exercise, health care providers and friends/peers should be encouraged to reinforce the positive benefits of exercise post hip fracture, and fear of falling should be addressed throughout the entire hip fracture recovery trajectory. PMID:18044192

  13. Differences in the trajectory of bone mineral density change measured at the total hip and femoral neck between men and women following hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, Alan M.; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hebel, J. Richard; Hicks, Gregory E.; Beck, Thomas; Hochberg, Marc C.; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Summary Research has not examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD) between men and women following hip fracture. The aim was to evaluate sex differences in BMD following hip fracture. Men experienced significant declines in BMD, while not statistically greater than women, underscoring the necessity for better osteoporosis care in men. Introduction Each year in the USA, approximately 260,000 older adults experience a hip fracture. Women experiencing hip fracture have excess decline in BMD in the year following fracture compared to expected decrements due to aging, but few studies have assessed sex differences in the sequelae of hip fracture. Thus, our objective was to examine sex differences in BMD change in the year after hip fracture. Methods The sample (n = 286) included persons enrolled in the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort, a study that matched (1:1) men and women experiencing hip fracture. Weighted estimating equations that accounted for missing data and selective survival were used to estimate sex differences in 12-month total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD changes. Results Men had larger average adjusted percent decline in TH and FN BMD. Adjusted 12-month decreases at the FN showed a statistically significant decline of −4.60 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] −7.76 %, −0.20 %) in men and an insignificant change of-1.62 % (95 % CI −4.57 %, 1.32 %) in women. Yet, the difference in change between men and women was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The estimated sex differences for TH BMD loss were smaller in magnitude. Conclusions There is evidence of significant BMD loss among men at the FN in the year after hip fracture. Although not statistically greater than women, these clinically significant findings highlight the need for improved osteoporosis care among men prior to and after hip fracture. PMID:26847627

  14. Are low-energy open ankle fractures in the elderly the new geriatric hip fracture?

    PubMed

    Toole, William P; Elliott, Mark; Hankins, David; Rosenbaum, Corey; Harris, Anthony; Perkins, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    As the geriatric population in the United States continues to increase, ankle fractures in the elderly are predicted to exponentially increase in the future. As such, these injuries will become a common injury seen by physicians in various fields. Currently, no studies discussing low-energy open ankle fractures in the elderly and/or the mortality rate associated with these devastating injuries have been published. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively review the morality rate associated with low-energy open ankle fractures in the elderly. We retrospectively identified 11 patients >60 years old who had sustained low-energy open ankle fractures and been treated at our institution. The patient demographics, mechanism of injury, wound size, medical comorbidities, treatment, follow-up data, and outcomes were recorded. Low-energy falls were defined as ground level falls from sitting or standing. The mean age of the patients was 70.72 years, with a mean body mass index of 35.93 ± 10.24. Of the 11 patients, 9 (81.81%) had ≥3 comorbidities (i.e., hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The mean size of the medially based ankle wound was 14.18 ± 4.12 cm; 10 (90.90%) were Gustilo and Anderson grade IIIA open ankle fractures. In our study, low-energy open ankle fractures in the elderly, very similar to hip fractures, were associated with a high mortality incidence (27.27%) at a mean of 2.67 ± 2.02 months, and 81.81% of our patients had ≥3 medical comorbidities. PMID:25488597

  15. Use of osteoporosis medications after hospitalization for hip fracture: a cross-national study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seoyoung C.; Kim, Mi-Sook; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Song, Hong Ji; Liu, Jun; Hurtado, Isabel; Peiró, Salvador; Lee, Joongyub; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Park, Byung-Joo; Avorn, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While current osteoporosis management guidelines recommend use of pharmacologic treatment following hip fracture, the care of such patients has been suboptimal. The objective of this cross-national study is to quantify the use of and adherence to osteoporosis medication following hip fracture in three countries with different health care systems- the United States, Korea and Spain. Methods In three cohorts of patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized for hip fracture, we calculated the proportion receiving ≥1 osteoporosis drug after discharge. Adherence to osteoporosis treatment was measured as the proportion of days covered (PDC) during the first year following the hip fracture. Results We identified 86,202 patients with a hip fracture - 4,704 (U.S. Medicare), 6,700 (U.S. commercial), 57,631(Korea), and 17,167 (Spain). The mean age was 77–83 years and 74–78% were women. In the year prior to the index hip fracture, 16–18% were taking an osteoporosis medication. Within 3 months following the index hip fracture, 11% (U.S. Medicare), 13% (U.S. commercial), 39% (Korea), and 25% (Spain) of patients filled ≥1 prescription for osteoporosis medication. For those who filled one or more prescriptions for an osteoporosis medication, the mean PDC in the year following the fracture was 0.70 (U.S. Medicare), 0.67 (U.S. commercial), 0.43 (Korea) and 0.66 (Spain). Conclusions Regardless of differences in health care delivery systems and medication reimbursement plans, the use of osteoporosis medications for the secondary prevention of osteoporotic fracture was low. Adherence to osteoporosis treatment was also suboptimal with the PDC<0.70 in all three countries. PMID:25660252

  16. Incidence, Morbidity and Mortality in Patients Older than 50 Years with Second Hip Fracture in a Jeju Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Geun; Jang, Sunmee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although the incidence of a second hip fracture is relatively well described, mortality and morbidity after a second hip fracture are seldom evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, morbidity, and mid-term mortality of a second hip fracture and evaluate the cause of death after a second hip fracture. Materials and Methods Information on patients older than 50 years, who sustained a subsequent hip fracture, were obtained from the records of eight Jeju Island hospitals between 2002 and 2011 to calculate the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of hip fractures in this age group. All patients were followed a minimum of 2 years. A systemic search for death certificates at the National Statistical Office was conducted for patients who were lost to follow-up. Results Of 2,055 hip fractures (419 men and 1,636 women), 98 were second hip fractures (13 men and 85 women) during the study period. The mean ages of the patients at the time of the first and second fractures were 78.8 and 80.8 years, respectively. The incidence of a subsequent hip fracture among the first hip fracture was 4.8%. Mean mortality rates at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years were 10.5%, 15.2%, 23.5%, and 42.0% respectively. Cumulative mortality after the second hip fracture at the 5 years follow-up was 41.8%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that a secondary fracture prevention program is necessary to prevent second hip fractures in elderly patients.

  17. Systematic review of the association between climate and hip fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román Ortiz, Carmen; Tenías, José María; Estarlich, Marisa; Ballester, Ferran

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to systematically review epidemiological studies that evaluate the relationship between meteorology and the incidence of hip fracture (HF). After a search in Scopus, PubMed, and Embase, two independent authors assessed the relevance of studies and extracted data for description. From each study, we extracted the geographic and temporal scope, design, study variables (meteorological and related to HF), statistical analysis, and estimated associations. Of a total of 134 works, 20 studies were selected. All use an ecological design but one case-crossover. Most studies have been conducted in northern latitudes. The analysis methodology did not take into account the temporal structure of the data in 10 studies (regression and linear correlations); the rest used Poisson regression (7) and ARIMA model (3). Most studies showed significant positive associations with rainfall, especially in the form of snow: HF relative risk (RR) on days with precipitation vs. days without precipitation that ranged from 1.14 (95 % confidence interval (CI)1.04 to 1.24) to 1.60 (95 % CI 1.06 to 2.41), the temperature, with RR by one degree Celsius decline from 1.012 (95 % CI 1.004 to 1.020) to 1.030 (95 % CI 1.023 to 1.037), and wind (3) RR FC windiest days vs. calm days: 1.32 (95 % CI 1.10 to 1.58) to 1.35 (95 % CI 0.88 to 2.08). This review shows that analytic methods are very heterogeneous and poorly adapted to the temporary nature of the data. Studies confirm a certain seasonality, with more fractures in winter and meaningful relationships with meteorological conditions typical of this season.

  18. Trabecular Plate Loss and Deteriorating Elastic Modulus of Femoral Trabecular Bone in Intertrochanteric Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Zhou, Bin; Parkinson, Ian; Thomas, C. David L.; Clement, John G.; Fazzalari, Nick; Guo, X. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporotic hip fracture is associated with significant trabecular bone loss, which is typically characterized as low bone density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and altered microstructure by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Emerging morphological analysis techniques, e.g. individual trabecula segmentation (ITS), can provide additional insights into changes in plate-like and rod-like trabeculae, two major microstructural types serving different roles in determining bone strength. Using ITS, we evaluated trabecular microstructure of intertrochanteric bone cores obtained from 23 patients undergoing hip replacement surgery for intertrochanteric fracture and 22 cadaveric controls. Micro-finite element (μFE) analyses were performed to further understand how the abnormalities seen by ITS might translate into effects on bone strength. ITS analyses revealed that, near fracture site, plate-like trabeculae were seriously depleted in fracture patients, but trabecular rod volume was maintained. Besides, decreased plate area and rod length were observed in fracture patients. Fracture patients also showed decreased elastic moduli and shear moduli of trabecular bone. These results provided evidence that in intertrochanteric hip fracture, preferential loss of plate-like trabeculae led to more rod-like microstructure and deteriorated mechanical competence adjacent to the fracture site, which increased our understanding of the biomechanical pathogenesis of hip fracture in osteoporosis. PMID:26273512

  19. Thirty-day mortality after hip fractures: has anything changed?

    PubMed

    Giannoulis, Dionysios; Calori, Giorgio M; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2016-05-01

    Bone density insufficiency is the main cause for significant musculoskeletal trauma in the elderly population following low-energy falls. Hip fractures, in particular, represent an important public health concern taking into account the complicated needs of the patients due to their medical comorbidities as well as their rehabilitation and social demands. The annual cost for the care of these patients is estimated at around 2 billion pounds (£) in the UK and is ever growing. An increased early and late mortality rate is also recognised in these injuries together with significant adversities for the patients. Lately, in order to improve the outcomes of this special cohort of patients, fast-track care pathways and government initiatives have been implemented. It appears that these measures have contributed in a steady year-by-year reduction of the 30-day mortality rates. Whether we have currently reached a plateau or whether an ongoing reduction in mortality rates will continue to be observed is yet to be seen. PMID:26943870

  20. Effect of postoperative delirium on outcome after hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, David M; Aharonoff, Gina B; Karp, Adam; Capla, Edward L; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Koval, Kenneth J

    2004-05-01

    Nine-hundred twenty-one community-dwelling patients 65 years of age or older, who sustained an operatively treated hip fracture from July 1, 1987 to June 30, 1998 were followed up for the development of postoperative delirium. The outcomes examined in the current study were postoperative complication rates, in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay, hospital discharge status, 1-year mortality rate, place of residence, recovery of ambulatory ability, and activities of daily living 1 year after surgery. Forty-seven (5.1%) patients were diagnosed with postoperative delirium. Patients who had delirium develop were more likely to be male, have a history of mild dementia, and have had surgery under general anesthesia. Patients who had postoperative delirium develop had a significantly longer length of hospitalization. They also had significantly higher rates of mortality at 1 year, were less likely to recover their prefracture level of ambulation, and were more likely to show a decline in level of independence in basic activities of daily living at the 1-year followup. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative complications, in-hospital mortality, discharge residence, and recovery of instrumental activities of daily living at 1 year. PMID:15187857

  1. A Review of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures Associated With Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Marsland, Daniel; Mears, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur in association with total hip arthroplasty are increasingly common and often difficult to treat. Patients with periprosthetic fractures are typically elderly and frail and have osteoporosis. No clear consensus exists regarding the optimal management strategy because there is limited high-quality research. The Vancouver classification facilitates treatment decisions. In the presence of a stable prosthesis (type-B1 and -C fractures), most authors recommend surgical stabilization of the fracture with plates, strut grafts, or a combination thereof. In up to 20% of apparent Vancouver type-B1 fractures, the femoral stem is loose, which may explain the high failure rates associated with open reduction and internal fixation. Some authors recommend routine opening and dislocation of the hip to perform an intraoperative stem stability test to rule out a loose component. Advances in plating techniques and technology are improving the outcomes for these fractures. For fractures around a loose femoral prosthesis (types B2 and 3), revision using an extensively porous-coated uncemented long stem, with or without additional fracture fixation, appears to offer the most reliable outcome. Cement-in-cement revision using a long-stem prosthesis is feasible in elderly patients with a well-fixed cement mantle. It is essential to treat the osteoporosis to help fracture healing and to prevent further fractures. We provide an overview of the causes, classification, and management of periprosthetic femoral fractures around a total hip arthroplasty based on the current best available evidence. PMID:23569704

  2. Anterior Hip Fracture Dislocation with Intrapelvic Retention of the Femoral Head and Ureter Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Patrascanu, Calin; Cibu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The anterior dislocation of the hip represents only a small percentage of all hip dislocations: 85% are posterior. Most commonly associated with this dislocation is a fracture of the femoral head and, in rare cases, a femoral neck fracture. We have found in literature no report of an anterior dislocation of the hip associated with femoral neck fracture, pelvic retention of the head and ureteral fistula. We report such a case of a 68 year old male. Case Report: A 68 year old male was presented to our attention, following a severe injury of the hip when falling from a high bridge, with severe pain in the hip and a clinical aspect of femoral neck fracture. The X-ray confirmed the femoral neck fracture but following an anterior dislocation with the head retained into the pelvis. The patient also had hematuria. An Austin Moore prosthesis was implanted for the femoral neck fracture and the head was extracted by the urologist by a new abdominal incision. Urological evaluation revealed a fistula of the ureter, treated by an internal drainage for three months. One month later the Moore prosthesis was extracted and the patient had a Girldestone hip for 5 months. Revision with a Muller cemented prosthesis had a normal evolution. Conclusion: The anterior fracture dislocation of the hip with pelvic retention of the femoral head and ureteral fistula is a rare condition resulting from high energy trauma. A multidisciplinary team is necessary to diagnose and treat fracture and soft tissue lesions. Early diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid septic complications. PMID:27298980

  3. Multiple approaches to assessing the effects of delays for hip fracture patients in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, V.; Hamilton, B. H.; Roos, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the determinants of postsurgery length of stay (LOS) and inpatient mortality in the United States (California and Massachusetts) and Canada (Manitoba and Quebec). DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Patient discharge abstracts from the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research Nationwide Inpatient Sample and from provincial health ministries. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive statistics by state or province, pooled competing risks hazards models (which control for censoring of LOS and inpatient mortality data), and instrumental variables (which control for confounding in observational data) were used to analyze the effect of wait time for hip fracture surgery on postsurgery outcomes. DATA EXTRACTIONS: Data were extracted for patients admitted to an acute care hospital with a primary diagnosis of hip fracture who received hip fracture surgery, were admitted from home or the emergency room, were age 45 or older, stayed in the hospital 365 days or less, and were not trauma patients. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The descriptive data indicate that wait times for surgery are longer in the two Canadian provinces than in the two U.S. states. Canadians also have longer postsurgery LOS and higher inpatient mortality. Yet the competing risks hazards model indicates that the effect of wait time on postsurgery LOS is small in magnitude. Instrumental variables analysis reveals that wait time for surgery is not a significant predictor of postsurgery length of stay. The hazards model reveals significant differences in mortality across regions. However, both the regressions and the instrumental variables indicate that these differences are not attributable to wait time for surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Statistical models that account for censoring and confounding yield conclusions that differ from those implied by descriptive statistics in administrative data. Longer wait time for hip fracture surgery does not explain the difference in postsurgery outcomes across countries. PMID:10737450

  4. A New Case of Fracture of a Modular Femoral Neck Device After a Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Trieb, Klemens; Stadler, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This report addresses a new case of a modular femoral neck fracture after total hip arthroplasty. A now seventy-three-year- old overweight female underwent total hip replacement of the right hip because of osteoarthritis in the year 2002. Then, years later, the head and the polyethylene were changed due to wear. In October 2014, the patient was transferred from the trauma department of her hometown to our department after she had slipped and fallen directly on her right hip. The x-rays done at the trauma department have shown no periprosthetic fracture but a fracture of the modular neck. Therefore, the patient was transferred to our department in order to undergo a revision arthroplasty with change of the stem and head after splitting the femur. PMID:26157528

  5. Social Support for Exercise by Experts in Older Women Post–Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    CASADO, BANGHWA LEE; RESNICK, BARBARA; ZIMMERMAN, SHERYL; NAHM, EUN-SHIM; ORWIG, DENISE; MACMILLAN, KELLEY; MAGAZINER, JAY

    2009-01-01

    Using the data of the Baltimore Hip Study 5 (a home-based exercise intervention), this study examined how social support for exercise by experts (SSE-E) affected the self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and exercise behavior among older women following a hip fracture. The total sample included 164 females aged 65 years (M = 81.0; SD = 6.9) who had surgical repair of a non-pathologic hip fracture. Model testing showed a direct relationship between SSE-E and outcome expectations for exercise. There was, however, no direct or indirect relationship between SSE-E and self-efficacy or exercise behavior. The positive effect of SSE-E on the outcome expectations for exercise in older women recovering from a hip fracture provides an opportunity for health care providers in improving physical activity in this population. PMID:19199153

  6. High hip fracture risk in men with severe aortic calcification: MrOS study.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Pawel; Blackwell, Terri; Schousboe, John T; Bauer, Douglas C; Cawthon, Peggy; Lane, Nancy E; Cummings, Steven R; Orwoll, Eric S; Black, Dennis M; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2014-04-01

    A significant link between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis is established in postmenopausal women, but data for men are scarce. We tested the hypothesis that greater severity of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) was associated with an increased risk of nonspine fracture in 5994 men aged ≥ 65 years. AAC was assessed on 5400 baseline lateral thoracolumbar radiographs using a validated visual semiquantitative score. Total hip bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Incident nonspine fractures were centrally adjudicated. After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), total hip BMD, fall history, prior fracture, smoking status, comorbidities, race, and clinical center, the risk of nonspine fracture (n=805) was increased among men with higher AAC (hazard ratio [HR] quartile 4 [Q4] [AAC score ≥ 9] versus quartile 1 [Q1] [0-1], 1.36; 96% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.68). This association was due to an increased risk of hip fracture (n=178) among men with higher AAC (HR Q4 versus Q1, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.41-3.87). By contrast, the association between AAC and the risk of nonspine, nonhip fracture was weaker and not significant (HR Q4 versus Q1, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.96-1.55). The findings regarding higher AAC and increased risk of fracture were not altered in additional analyses accounting for degree of trauma, estimated glomerular filtration rate, presence of lumbar vertebral fractures (which may bias AAC assessment), preexisting cardiovascular disease, ankle brachial index, or competing risk of death. Thus, in this large cohort of elderly men, greater AAC was independently associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, but not with other nonspine fractures. These findings suggest that AAC assessment may be a useful method for identification of older men at high risk of hip fracture. PMID:23983224

  7. Depressive symptoms are associated with reduced neutrophil function in hip fracture patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Niharika Arora; Upton, Jane; Phillips, Anna C.; Hampson, Peter; Lord, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Hip fracture is a common trauma in older adults with a high incidence of depression, which relates to poorer prognosis including increased risk of infection. Ageing is accompanied by reduced immunity, termed immunesenescence, resulting in increased susceptibility to infection. We examined whether physical trauma (hip fracture) and psychological distress (depressive symptoms) had additive effects upon the aged immune system that might contribute to poor outcomes after injury. Neutrophil function was assessed in 101 hip fracture patients (81 female) 6 weeks and 6 months after injury and 43 healthy age-matched controls (28 female). Thirty eight fracture patients had depressive symptoms at 6 weeks. No difference in neutrophil phagocytosis of Escherichia coli was observed between controls and hip fracture patients, but superoxide production was significantly reduced in hip fracture patients with depressive symptoms compared with patients without symptoms (p = .001) or controls (p = .004) at 6 weeks. Superoxide production improved 6 months following fracture to the level seen in controls. We detected elevated serum cortisol, reduced dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and an increased cortisol:DHEAS ratio in fracture patients with depressive symptoms compared with patients without depressive symptoms or controls at 6 weeks and 6 months after injury. Serum IL6, TNFα and IL10 were higher among patients with depressive symptoms at 6 weeks. The cortisol:DHEAS ratio and IL6 levels related to depressive symptom scores but not to neutrophil function. In conclusion, depressive symptoms related to poorer neutrophil function after hip fracture, but this was not driven by changes in stress hormone or cytokine levels. PMID:23876747

  8. Effect of Implementing a Discharge Plan on Functional Abilities of Geriatric Patients with Hip Fractures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AL Khayya, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; Ibrahim, Hanaa; Kassem, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hip fracture is considered one of the most fatal fractures for elderly people, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality and impaired functional capacity, particularly for basic and instrumental activities of daily living. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of implementing a discharge plan on functional abilities of geriatric…

  9. Fracture of the femoral alignment stem of a hip resurfacing arthroplasty. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mohammed A; Shah, Vinod B

    2011-02-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of osteoarthritis in a younger patient population. While the initial complication of femoral neck fracture is being addressed, we describe a fracture of the femoral alignment stem in a component two years from the primary procedure. PMID:21473460

  10. Orthopedic Surgeon's Awareness Can Improve Osteoporosis Treatment Following Hip Fracture: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Rim; Park, Yong-Geun; Lee, Sung-Rak; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2011-01-01

    Through retrospective Jeju-cohort study at 2005, we found low rates of detection of osteoporosis (20.1%) and medication for osteoporosis (15.5%) in those who experienced hip fracture. This study was to determine the orthopedic surgeons' awareness could increase the osteoporosis treatment rate after a hip fracture and the patient barriers to osteoporosis management. We prospectively followed 208 patients older than 50 yr who were enrolled for hip fractures during 2007 in Jeju-cohort. Thirty four fractures in men and 174 in women were treated at the eight hospitals. During the study period, orthopedic surgeons who worked at these hospitals attended two education sessions and were provided with posters and brochures. Patients were interviewed 6 months after discharge using an evaluation questionnaire regarding their perceptions of barriers to osteoporosis treatment. The patients were followed for a minimum of one year. Ninety-four patients (45.2%) underwent detection of osteoporosis by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and 67 (32.2%) were prescribed medication for osteoporosis at the time of discharge. According to the questionnaire, the most common barrier to treatment for osteoporosis after a hip fracture was patients reluctance. The detection and medication rate for osteoporosis after hip fracture increased twofold after orthopedic surgeons had attended the intervention program. Nevertheless, the osteoporosis treatment rate remains inadequate. PMID:22065908

  11. Older Male Physicians Have Lower Risk of Trochanteric but Not Cervical Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsiu-Nien; Lin, Wei-Ting; Lu, Chin-Li; Li, Chung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is pathophysiologically related to trochanteric fractures, and this condition is more preventable by lifestyle modifications than cervical fractures. We investigated whether older physicians, who are health-conscious people, are at a lower risk of hip fractures because of fewer trochanteric fractures. Methods: Data regarding older (≥65 years) physicians (n = 4303) and matched non-medical persons (control) were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance claims. All of the subjects were obtained from NHIRD with index dates from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008. Cox proportional hazard and competing risk regression models were established to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of hip fracture associated with older physicians. Results: The incidence rates of trochanteric fractures were lower in older physicians than in controls (1.73 and 3.07 per 1000 person-years, respectively), whereas the rates of cervical fractures were similar between the two groups (2.45 and 2.12 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Older physicians yielded 46% lower hazard of trochanteric fractures than controls (adjusted HR 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.79); by contrast, hazards of cervical fractures were comparable between the two groups. The HRs estimated from the competing risk models remained unchanged. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that health risk awareness may pose a significant preventive effect on trochanteric hip fractures. PMID:25689999

  12. Hip Fracture in People with Erectile Dysfunction: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Chai, Chee-Yin; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lu, Ying-Yi; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the risk of hip fracture and contributing factors in patients with erectile dysfunction(ED). This population-based study was performed using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The analysis included4636 patients aged ≥ 40 years who had been diagnosed with ED (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 302.72, 607.84) during 1996–2010. The control group included 18,544 randomly selected age-matched patients without ED (1:4 ratio). The association between ED and hip fracture risk was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, 59 (1.27%) patients in the ED group and 140 (0.75%) patients in the non-ED group developed hip fracture. After adjusting for covariates, the overall incidence of hip fracture was 3.74-times higher in the ED group than in the non-ED group (2.03 vs. 0.50 per 1000 person-years, respectively). The difference in the overall incidence of hip fracture was largest during the 3-year follow-up period (hazard ratio = 7.85; 95% confidence interval = 2.94–20.96; P <0.0001). To the best of our knowledge, this nationwide population-based study is the first to investigate the relationship between ED and subsequent hip fracture in an Asian population. The results showed that ED patients had a higher risk of developing hip fracture. Patients with ED, particularly those aged 40–59 years, should undergo bone mineral density examinations as early as possible and should take measures to reduce the risk of falls. PMID:27078254

  13. What happens to patients when they fracture their hip during a skilled nursing facility stay?

    PubMed Central

    Leland, Natalie E.; Gozalo, Pedro; Bynum, Julie; Mor, Vincent; Christian, Thomas J.; Teno, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize outcomes of patients experiencing a fall and subsequent hip fracture while in a nursing home (NH) receiving skilled nursing facility (SNF) services. Design Observational study. Participants Short-stay fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who experienced their first hip fracture during a SNF stay. Measurements Outcomes measured in the 90 days after the hip fracture hospitalization included community discharge (with a stay in the community < 30 days), successful community discharge (in the community ≥30 days), death, and institutionalization. Results Between 1999 and 2007, 27,305 hip fractures occurred among short-stay nursing home patients receiving SNF care. After surgical repair of the hip fracture, 83.9% of these patients were discharged from the hospital back to a SNF, with most (99%) returning to the facility where the hip fracture occurred. In the first 90 days after hospitalization, 24.1% of patients died, 7.3% were discharged to the community but remained less than 30 days, 14.0% achieved successful community discharge, and 54.6% were still in a health care institution with almost 46.4% having transitioned to long-term care. Conclusion SNF care aims to maximize the short-stay patient’s independence and facilitate a safe community transition. However, experiencing a fall and hip fracture during the SNF stay was a sentinel event that limited the achievement of this goal. There is an urgent need to ensure the integration of fall prevention into the patient’s plan of care. Further, falls among SNF patients may serve as indicator of quality, which consumers and payers can use to make informed healthcare decisions. PMID:25944177

  14. 'Hip' pain.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Josef; Gursche, Angelika

    2003-02-01

    'Hip' pain is usually located in the groin, upper thigh or buttock and is a common complaint. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis, avascular femoral head necrosis and apophyseal avulsion are the most common diagnoses in childhood and adolescents. Strains and fractures are common in sport-active adults. Osteoarthritis occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Trauma may result in femoral head fracture or typical muscle and tendon sprains and bursitis. Septic or inflammatory arthritis can occur at every age. Septic arthritis, fractures and acute epiphyseal slipping are real emergency cases. Congenital dysplasia of the hip joint may lead to labral tears and early osteoarthritis. The most important hip problems in children, adolescents, adult and older people are discussed; these problems originate from intra-articular disorders and the surrounding extra-articular soft tissues. Medical history, clinical examination and additional tests, including imaging, will be demonstrated. Principles of treatment are given for specific disorders. PMID:12659822

  15. Subgroup Variations in Bone Mineral Density Response to Zoledronic Acid After Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Magaziner, Jay S; Orwig, Denise L; Lyles, Kenneth W; Nordsletten, Lars; Boonen, Steven; Adachi, Jonathan D; Recknor, Chris; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Mesenbrink, Peter; Bucci-Rechtweg, Christina; Su, Guoqin; Johnson, Rasheeda; Pieper, Carl F

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing post-fracture bone loss is an important aspect of recovery from hip fracture, and determination of factors that affect bone mineral density (BMD) response to treatment after hip fracture may assist in the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. A post hoc analysis of the HORIZON Recurrent Fracture Trial was done to determine the effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) on total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD in subgroups with low-trauma hip fracture. A total of 2127 patients were randomized (1:1) to yearly infusions of ZOL 5 mg (n = 1065) or placebo (n = 1062) within 90 days of operation for low-trauma hip fracture. The 1486 patients with a baseline and at least one post-baseline BMD assessment at TH or FN (ZOL = 745, placebo = 741) were included in the analyses. Percentage change from baseline in TH and FN BMD was assessed at months 12 and 24 and compared across subgroups of hip fracture patients. Percentage change from baseline in TH and FN BMD at months 12 and 24 was greater (p < 0.05) in ZOL-treated patients compared with placebo in most subgroups. Treatment-by-subgroup interactions (p < 0.05) indicated that a greater effect on BMD was observed for TH BMD at month 12 in females, in patients in the lower tertile body mass index at baseline (≤22.6 kg/m2), and in patients with baseline FN BMD T-score of ≤ –2.5; for FN BMD in patients who received ZOL for >6 weeks post-surgery; and for TH and FN BMD in patients with a history of one or more prior fractures. All interactions were limited to the first 12 months after treatment with none observed for the 24-month comparisons. (Clinical trial registration number NCT00046254.) PMID:24839241

  16. Is a Sliding Hip Screw or IM Nail the Preferred Implant for Intertrochanteric Fracture Fixation?

    PubMed Central

    Aros, Brian; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to determine whether patients who sustain an intertrochanteric fracture have better outcomes when stabilized using a sliding hip screw or an intramedullary nail. A 20% sample of Part A and B entitled Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older was used to generate a cohort of patients who sustained intertrochanteric femur fractures between 1999 and 2001. Two fracture implant groups, intramedullary nail and sliding hip screw, were identified using Current Procedural Terminology and International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes. The cohort consisted of 43,659 patients. Patients treated with an intramedullary nail had higher rates of revision surgery during the first year than those treated with a sliding hip screw (7.2% intramedullary nail versus 5.5% sliding hip screw). Mortality rates at 30 days (14.2% intramedullary nail versus 15.8% sliding hip screw) and 1 year (30.7% intramedullary nail versus 32.5% sliding hip screw) were similar. Adjusted secondary outcome measures showed significant increases in the intramedullary nail group relative to the sliding hip screw group for index hospital length of stay, days of rehabilitation services in the first 6 months after discharge, and total expenditures for doctor and hospital services. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18465180

  17. Tea drinking habits and osteoporotic hip/femur fractures: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chenshu; Tang, Rongrui

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between tea drinking habits and osteoporotic hip/femur fractures. Methods: Paired case-control method was used for face-to-face interviews from January 2010 to June 2014. Patients (n=435) with newly osteoporotic hip/femur fracture and 435 controls with the same gender and age (±3) were given questionnaire survey. The survey content included general situation, detailed tea drinking and other diet condition, health-related behavior and family history of fractures, etc. Results: Single factor logistic analysis showed that the habit of drinking tea can significantly reduce the risk of hip/femur fracture. Cumulative year of tea drinking, the cumulative amount of tea and tea concentration (low dose group) have the maximum protection for fracture, while the high dose group is weaker in protection (trend test, P<0.05). After adjustment for age, energy, BMI, education degree, parents’ history of fracture, second hand smoke exposure, calcium supplements, and equivalent energy consumption of physical activity, etc, the above association still showed significant linear trend, but the associated strength was slightly reduced. But stratified analysis found that the effect of tea drinking was only statistically significant in men. And there were no statistically significant differences of people with different education degree. Conclusions: Regular tea drinking can reduce the risk of osteoporotic hip/femur fractures in middle-aged and elderly men. PMID:27182250

  18. The weekend effect: short-term mortality following admission with a hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C J; Smith, R P; Uzoigwe, C E; Braybrooke, J R

    2014-03-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 2989 consecutive patients with a mean age of 81 (21 to 105) and a female to male ratio of 5:2 who were admitted to our hip fracture unit between July 2009 and February 2013. We compared weekday and weekend admission and weekday and weekend surgery 30-day mortality rates for hip fractures treated both surgically and conservatively. After adjusting for confounders, weekend admission was independently and significantly associated with a rise in 30-day mortality (odds ratio (OR) 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02 to 1.9; p = 0.039) for patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. There was no increase in mortality associated with weekend surgery (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8 to 1.7; p = 0.39). All hip fracture patients, whether managed surgically or conservatively, were more likely to die as an inpatient when admitted at the weekend (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.80; p = 0.032), despite our unit having a comparatively low overall inpatient mortality (8.7%). Hip fracture patients admitted over the weekend appear to have a greater risk of death despite having a consultant-led service. PMID:24589794

  19. Frontal Lobe Function and Risk of Hip Fracture in Patient With Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hyun Woong; Hong, Chang Hyung; Lee, SooJin; Lee, Yunhwan; Lee, Kang Soo; Chang, Ki Jung; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Choi, Seong Hye; Kim, Seong Yoon; Back, Joung Hwan; Chung, Young Ki; Lim, Ki Young; Noh, Jai Sung; Son, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the association between frontal lobe function and risk of hip fracture in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Retrospective cohort study using multicenter hospital-based dementia registry and national health insurance claim data was done. Participants who had available data of neuropsychological test, national health insurance claim, and other covariates were included. A total of 1660 patients with AD were included based on Stroop Test results. A total of 1563 patients with AD were included based on the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) results. Hip fracture was measured by validated identification criteria using national health insurance claim data. Frontal lobe function was measured by Stroop Test and COWAT at baseline. After adjusting for potential covariates, including cognitive function in other domains (language, verbal and nonverbal memory, and attention), the Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed that risk of a hip fracture was decreased with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.98 per one point of increase in the Stroop Test (adjusted HR = 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.97–1.00) and 0.93 per one point increase in COWAT (adjusted HR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88–0.99). The risk of hip fracture in AD patients was associated with baseline frontal lobe function. The result of this research presents evidence of association between frontal lobe function and risk of hip fracture in patients with AD. PMID:26559259

  20. Dietary patterns and risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women and men over 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Teresa T.; Feskanich, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the association between predominant dietary patterns and risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women and men over 50 years. Methods We used data from 74,540 women in the Nurses’ Health Study followed between 1980 and 2010, and 35,451 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study followed between 1986 and 2012 for this analysis. Health and lifestyle information was assessed every two years. Diet was assessed approximately every four years with a food frequency questionnaire. Two major dietary patterns were previously derived using principal component analysis. The Prudent pattern is characterized by higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and poultry, and the Western pattern is characterized by higher intakes of red and processed meats, sweets, and refined grains. We computed relative risks (RR) for hip fracture by dietary pattern scores using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for potential confounders. Results During follow-up, there were 1891 hip fractures in women and 596 in men. No association was observed between the Prudent or Western pattern and risk of hip fractures in either men or women. We also did not find an association among lean (BMI<25) or overweight (BMI >=25) individuals or among those with higher or lower levels of physical activity. Conclusion Neither the Prudent nor the Western dietary pattern was associated with risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women or men over 50 years of age. PMID:25731807

  1. Effect of Oral Taurine on Morbidity and Mortality in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Stijn, Mireille F. M.; Bruins, Arnoud A.; Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Witlox, Joost; Teerlink, Tom; Schoorl, Margreet G.; De Bandt, Jean Pascal; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture patients represent a large part of the elderly surgical population and face severe postoperative morbidity and excessive mortality compared to adult surgical hip fracture patients. Low antioxidant status and taurine deficiency is common in the elderly, and may negatively affect postoperative outcome. We hypothesized that taurine, an antioxidant, could improve clinical outcome in the elderly hip fracture patient. A double blind randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted on elderly hip fracture patients. Supplementation started after admission and before surgery up to the sixth postoperative day. Markers of oxidative status were measured during hospitalization, and postoperative outcome was monitored for one year after surgery. Taurine supplementation did not improve in-hospital morbidity, medical comorbidities during the first year, or mortality during the first year. Taurine supplementation lowered postoperative oxidative stress, as shown by lower urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels (Generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis average difference over time; regression coefficient (Beta): −0.54; 95% CI: −1.08–−0.01; p = 0.04), blunted plasma malondialdehyde response (Beta: 1.58; 95% CI: 0.00–3.15; p = 0.05) and a trend towards lower lactate to pyruvate ratio (Beta: −1.10; 95% CI: −2.33–0.12; p = 0.08). We concluded that peri-operative taurine supplementation attenuated postoperative oxidative stress in elderly hip fracture patients, but did not improve postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:26035756

  2. Hemoglobin and hip fracture risk in older non-Hispanic white adults1

    PubMed Central

    Looker, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The few studies to date that have examined the relationship between hemoglobin and fracture risk have focused on low hemoglobin values. The present study examined hip fracture risk across the hemoglobin distribution in older non-Hispanic white adults from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, 1988–1994). Methods Hemoglobin was measured using a Coulter S-plus Jr.® (Coulter Electronics, Hialeah, FL) in 2122 non-Hispanic whites age 65 years and older. Hip fracture cases were identified using linked Medicare and mortality records obtained through 2007. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the best-fitting model and to estimate the hazards ratio (HR) for hip fracture by hemoglobin decile before and after adjusting for selected confounders. Results There were 239 hip fracture cases in the analytic sample. The best fitting model was quadratic. When compared to values in the middle of the distribution, those with hemoglobin in the lowest and highest deciles had increased hip fracture risk (HRlowest decile =2.96, 95% CI 1.44–6.08; HRhighest decile = 2.06, 95% CI 1.09–3.92) after adjusting for age and sex. Both HRs remained significant after adjusting for additional confounders (HRlowest decile =2.24, 95% CI 1.09–3.92; HRhighest decile = 2.37, 95% CI 1.35–4.16). Conclusions Both low and high hemoglobin values were associated with increased hip fracture risk. The mechanism underlying the relationship is not clear, but there was some suggestion that it may differ for low versus high hemoglobin. PMID:24938506

  3. Assessment of Hip Fracture Risk Using Cross-Section Strain Energy Determined by QCT-Based Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kheirollahi, Hossein; Luo, Yunhua

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of hip fracture risk is very important to prevent hip fracture and to monitor the effect of a treatment. A subject-specific QCT-based finite element model was constructed to assess hip fracture risk at the critical locations of femur during the single-leg stance and the sideways fall. The aim of this study was to improve the prediction of hip fracture risk by introducing a novel failure criterion to more accurately describe bone failure mechanism. Hip fracture risk index was defined using cross-section strain energy, which is able to integrate information of stresses, strains, and material properties affecting bone failure. It was found that the femoral neck and the intertrochanteric region have higher fracture risk than other parts of the femur, probably owing to the larger content of cancellous bone in these regions. The study results also suggested that women are more prone to hip fracture than men. The findings in this study have a good agreement with those clinical observations reported in the literature. The proposed hip fracture risk index based on strain energy has the potential of more accurate assessment of hip fracture risk. However, experimental validation should be conducted before its clinical applications. PMID:26601105

  4. Hip fracture evaluation with alternatives of total hip arthroplasty versus hemiarthroplasty (HEALTH): protocol for a multicentre randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, P J; Einhorn, Thomas A; Thabane, Lehana; Schemitsch, Emil H; Koval, Kenneth J; Frihagen, Frede; Poolman, Rudolf W; Tetsworth, Kevin; Guerra-Farfán, Ernesto; Madden, Kim; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures are a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide, and the number of hip fractures is expected to rise to over 6 million per year by 2050. The optimal approach for the surgical management of displaced femoral neck fractures remains unknown. Current evidence suggests the use of arthroplasty; however, there is lack of evidence regarding whether patients with displaced femoral neck fractures experience better outcomes with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hemiarthroplasty (HA). The HEALTH trial compares outcomes following THA versus HA in patients 50 years of age or older with displaced femoral neck fractures. Methods and analysis HEALTH is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial where 1434 patients, 50 years of age or older, with displaced femoral neck fractures from international sites are randomised to receive either THA or HA. Exclusion criteria include associated major injuries of the lower extremity, hip infection(s) and a history of frank dementia. The primary outcome is unplanned secondary procedures and the secondary outcomes include functional outcomes, patient quality of life, mortality and hip-related complications—both within 2 years of the initial surgery. We are using minimisation to ensure balance between intervention groups for the following factors: age, prefracture living, prefracture functional status, American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class and centre number. Data analysts and the HEALTH Steering Committee are blinded to the surgical allocation throughout the trial. Outcome analysis will be performed using a χ2 test (or Fisher's exact test) and Cox proportional hazards modelling estimate. All results will be presented with 95% CIs. Ethics and dissemination The HEALTH trial has received local and McMaster University Research Ethics Board (REB) approval (REB#: 06-151). Results Outcomes from the primary manuscript will be disseminated through publications in academic journals and presentations

  5. A polyethylene liner scratch after revision hip arthroplasty performed to repair ceramic fracture.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Sheng, Puyi; Kanoh, Toshiya; Seki, Taisuke; Matsuoka, Atsushi

    2012-05-01

    A 61-year-old man who had undergone revision total hip arthroplasty in 2000 was evaluated at our clinic in 2008, 1 day after feeling an abnormal clicking sensation in his left hip. Radiographs showed a fracture of the alumina ceramic liner of his acetabular component. A second revision total hip arthroplasty was performed with a 28-mm highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular liner and an alumina femoral head. Sixteen months after the second revision, the patient experience sudden-onset hip pain. Radiographs revealed a fatigue fracture of the neck of a displaced stem. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the surface of the retrieved alumina ceramic femoral head revealed no scratches or wear, but analysis of the highly crosslinked polyethylene socket revealed third-body wear, scratches, irregularly shaped dips, and white ceramic particles. Elemental analysis of the white particles by an x-ray microanalyzer revealed the presence of aluminum and oxygen. PMID:21958938

  6. Risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture in cementless total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Simo S A; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Kostensalo, Inari; Mäkelä, Keijo; Huhtala, Heini; Kettunen, Jukka S; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Intraoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture is a known complication of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). We determined the incidence of—and risk factors for—intraoperative calcar fracture, and assessed its influence on the risk of revision. Patients and methods — This retrospective analysis included 3,207 cementless THAs (in 2,913 patients). 118 intraoperative calcar fractures were observed in these hips (3.7%). A control group of 118 patients/hips without calcar fractures was randomly selected. The mean follow-up was 4.2 (1.8–8.0) years. Demographic data, surgical data, type of implant, and proximal femur morphology were evaluated to determine risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. Results — The revision rates in the calcar fracture group and the control group were 10% (95% CI: 5.9–17) and 3.4% (CI: 1.3–8.4), respectively. The revision rate directly related to intraoperative calcar fracture was 7.6%. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for calcar fracture. In the fracture group, 55 of 118 patients (47%) had at least one risk factor, while only 23 of118 patients in the control group (20%) had a risk factor (p = 0.001). Radiological analysis showed that in the calcar fracture group, there were more deviated femoral anatomies and proximal femur bone cortices were thinner. Interpretation — Intraoperative calcar fracture increased the risk of revision. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. To avoid intraoperative fractures, special attention should be paid when cementless stems are used with deviant-shaped proximal femurs and with thin cortices. PMID:26541230

  7. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur

    PubMed Central

    Lord, James K.; Langton, David J.; Nargol, Antoni V.F.; Meek, R.M. Dominic; Joyce, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN). Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into “worn” and “unworn”. Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture. PMID:26501331

  8. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur.

    PubMed

    Lord, James K; Langton, David J; Nargol, Antoni V F; Meek, R M Dominic; Joyce, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN). Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into "worn" and "unworn". Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture. PMID:26501331

  9. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Junichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga. PMID:27293934

  10. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Nakamura, Junichi; Iida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chiho; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga. PMID:27293934

  11. A Community-Based Hip Fracture Registry: Population, Methods, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Inacio, Maria C S; Weiss, Jennifer M; Miric, Alex; Hunt, Jessica J; Zohman, Gary L; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fracture is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. A large integrated health care system developed a registry to characterize its current patient population with hip fractures. This report describes the population, methods used, and outcomes of patients registered during the initial three years (2009–2011). Methods: Cases of hip fracture recorded from January 2009 through December 2011 were ascertained using the Kaiser Permanente Hip Fracture Registry. The registry collects information on patient, procedure, surgeon, facility, and surgical outcomes. Outcomes monitored included length of stay, readmissions, mortality, revisions, surgical site infections, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, pressure ulcers, dislocations, and myocardial infarction. Results: The population (N = 12,562) was predominantly white (77.8%), women (68.6%), and older (71.6% aged ≥ 75 years), and 32% had at least 5 comorbidities. The average length of follow-up was 1.1 years (standard deviation = 0.9). The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (70.8%) and anemia (29.4%). Femoral neck fractures (54.6%) were the most common fracture type. Hemiarthroplasty was the most common procedure (33.1%). Most fractures were treated by medium-volume (10 to 29 cases per year) surgeons (68.4%) at high-volume (≥ 130 cases per year) facilities (63.0%). The 90-day readmission rate was 22.1%, and the mortality rate was 12.3%. The most common postoperative complications were pneumonia (11.4%) and pressure ulcers (2.9%). There were 2.2 revisions per 100 observation years. Conclusion: A hip fracture registry provides important information regarding patient characteristics, intraoperative practices, and postoperative outcomes, which can be analyzed, interpreted, and used to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26057682

  12. Accelerated bone mineral loss following a hip fracture: a prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Dirschl, D R; Henderson, R C; Oakley, W C

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to monitor the bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and contralateral femoral neck in the first year following an osteoporosis-related fracture of the hip. Eighty-three elderly patients (mean age 77 years) who had sustained a hip fracture had determinations of BMD made at the time of fracture; 49 of these patients were available for reassessment of BMD 1 year later. The change in BMD was correlated with pre- and postinjury variables, such as ambulatory ability, dietary intake of calcium, serum vitamin D levels, mental status, and routine serologies. The mean decrease in BMD in the year following fracture was 5.4% from the contralateral femoral neck and 2.4% from the lumbar spine. Calcium intake correlated with the loss of BMD from the femoral neck (p = 0.015), but not the lumbar spine. Patients with daily calcium intakes of less than 500 mg/day had a more than 10% decrease in femoral neck BMD in the year following their hip fracture. Serum 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D level correlated with loss of MBD from the lumbar spine (p = 0.001), but not from the femoral neck. There was no correlation between the loss of bone mineral from either measurement site and age, sex, level of ambulation, or mental status. The loss of BMD from the femoral neck in the year following a hip fracture is more than five times that reported in the nonfractured population. This accelerated rate of loss can have drastic consequences in an elderly population already exhibiting osteopenia and propensity to fall. Investigation of pharmacologic or other interventions in the first critical year following a hip fracture may potentially blunt this accelerated rate of bone loss and lessen the risk of subsequent fractures. PMID:9213011

  13. Adherence to an Exercise Intervention Among Older Women Post Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Barbara; D’Adamo, Christopher; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Hebel, J. Richard; Golden, Justine; Magaziner, Jay; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Yu-Yahiro, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to home-based exercise interventions among older women post hip fracture that were randomized to one of three exercise intervention groups or a routine care group. A total of 157 female hip fracture patients provided data for the intervention analysis. Factors evaluated baseline, 2, 6, and 12 months post hip fracture included demographic variables, adherence to treatment visits, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, stage of change for exercise, social support for exercise, mood, health status, pain, and fear of falling. The hypothesized model tested the direct and indirect impact of all study variables on adherence to exercise intervention sessions. Different factors appeared to influence adherence to visits across the recovery trajectory. PMID:20428489

  14. Clinical Outcomes Following Arthroscopic Micro Fracture of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Begly, John P.; Ryan, Michael K.; Capogna, Brian; Youm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Objective and clinical results of microfracture for treatment of chondral defects of the knee is well documented, yet outcomes for microfracture of the hip have not been extensively studied. Recently, several studies demonstrated clinical improvements in patients treated with microfracture of the hip. The purpose of this study is to examine clinical outcomes and survivorship in patients who underwent microfracture during arthroscopic hip surgery. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database was performed. Thirty-eight patients with a mean age of 41 (range, 17-64) who underwent microfracture during arthroscopic hip surgery by a single surgeon (senior author) were identified. Demographic data, diagnosis, and details regarding operative procedures were collected. All patients were indicated for hip arthroscopy based on standard pre-operative examination as well as routine and advanced imaging. Baseline pre-operative modified Harris Hip Scores (mHHS) and Non-Arthritic Hip Scores (NAHS) were compared to mHHS and NAHS at two-year follow-up. Additionally, survivorship data was assessed to determine failure, defined as any subsequent revision arthroscopic surgery and/or hip arthroplasty of the same hip. Results: Thirty-four of the 38 (89.5%) patients were available for two-year clinical follow-up. Baseline mean mHHHS and NAHS for all patients improved from 50.6 (+/- 12.7) and 46.9 (+/-12.8) to 84.7 (+/- 12.5) and 85.6 (+/- 11.2) respectively. Both improvements were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Eight patients (23.5%) met failure criteria and underwent additional surgery at an average of 23.9 months. Two patients (5.8%) underwent revision arthroscopic surgery, and six patients (17.7%) underwent hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Significant improvements in clinical outcomes are seen at two-year follow-up after microfracture treatment of chondral lesions of the hip. Despite overall success, failure rates are relatively high. As with

  15. Increased 1-year survival and discharge to independent living in overweight hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Flodin, Lena; Laurin, Agnes; Lökk, Johan; Cederholm, Tommy; Hedström, Margareta

    2016-04-01

    Background and purpose - Hip fracture patients usually have low body mass index (BMI), and suffer further postoperative catabolism. How BMI relates to outcome in relatively healthy hip fracture patients is not well investigated. We investigated the association between BMI, survival, and independent living 1 year postoperatively. Patients and methods - This prospective multicenter study involved 843 patients with a hip fracture (mean age 82 (SD 7) years, 73% women), without severe cognitive impairment and living independently before admission. We investigated the relationship between BMI and both 1-year mortality and ability to return to independent living. Results - Patients with BMI > 26 had a lower mortality rate than those with BMI < 22 and those with BMI 22-26 (6%, 16%, and 18% respectively; p = 0.006). The odds ratio (OR) for 1-year survival in the group with BMI > 26 was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2-5.5) after adjustment for age, sex, and physical status. Patients with BMI > 26 were also more likely to return to independent living after the hip fracture (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-5.0). Patients with BMI < 22 had similar mortality and a similar likelihood of independent living to those with BMI 22-26. Interpretation - In this selected group of patients with hip fracture, the overweight and obese patients (BMI > 26) had a higher survival rate at 1 year, and returned to independent living to a higher degree than those of normal (healthy) weight. The obesity paradox and the recommendations for optimal BMI need further consideration in patients with hip fracture. PMID:26986549

  16. Antioxidant intake and risk of osteoporotic hip fracture in Utah: an effect modified by smoking status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjun; Munger, Ronald G; West, Nancy A; Cutler, D Richard; Wengreen, Heidi J; Corcoran, Christopher D

    2006-01-01

    The role of antioxidant intake in osteoporotic hip fracture risk is uncertain and may be modified by smoking. In the Utah Study of Nutrition and Bone Health, a statewide, population-based case-control study, the authors investigated whether antioxidant intake was associated with risk of osteoporotic hip fracture and whether this association was modified by smoking status. The analyses included data on 1,215 male and female cases aged > or = 50 years who incurred a hip fracture during 1997-2001 and 1,349 age- and sex-matched controls. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaire. Among ever smokers, participants in the highest quintile of vitamin E intake (vs. the lowest) had a lower risk of hip fracture after adjustment for confounders (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16, 0.52; p-trend < 0.0001). The corresponding odds ratio for beta-carotene intake was 0.39 (95% CI: 0.23, 0.68; p-trend = 0.0004), and for selenium intake it was 0.27 (95% CI: 0.12, 0.58; p-trend = 0.0003). Vitamin C intake did not have a significant graded association with hip fracture risk among ever smokers. Similar findings were obtained when an overall antioxidant intake score was used (odds ratio = 0.19, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.37; p-trend < 0.0001). No similar associations were found in never smokers. Antioxidant intake was associated with reduced risk of osteoporotic hip fracture in these elderly subjects, and the effect was strongly modified by smoking status. PMID:16306312

  17. Increased 1-year survival and discharge to independent living in overweight hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Flodin, Lena; Laurin, Agnes; Lökk, Johan; Cederholm, Tommy; Hedström, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Hip fracture patients usually have low body mass index (BMI), and suffer further postoperative catabolism. How BMI relates to outcome in relatively healthy hip fracture patients is not well investigated. We investigated the association between BMI, survival, and independent living 1 year postoperatively. Patients and methods — This prospective multicenter study involved 843 patients with a hip fracture (mean age 82 (SD 7) years, 73% women), without severe cognitive impairment and living independently before admission. We investigated the relationship between BMI and both 1-year mortality and ability to return to independent living. Results — Patients with BMI > 26 had a lower mortality rate than those with BMI < 22 and those with BMI 22–26 (6%, 16%, and 18% respectively; p = 0.006). The odds ratio (OR) for 1-year survival in the group with BMI > 26 was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2–5.5) after adjustment for age, sex, and physical status. Patients with BMI > 26 were also more likely to return to independent living after the hip fracture (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4–5.0). Patients with BMI < 22 had similar mortality and a similar likelihood of independent living to those with BMI 22–26. Interpretation — In this selected group of patients with hip fracture, the overweight and obese patients (BMI > 26) had a higher survival rate at 1 year, and returned to independent living to a higher degree than those of normal (healthy) weight. The obesity paradox and the recommendations for optimal BMI need further consideration in patients with hip fracture. PMID:26986549

  18. Study of sex differences in the association between hip fracture risk and body parameters by DXA-based biomechanical modeling.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Masoud; Luo, Yunhua

    2016-09-01

    There is controversy about whether or not body parameters affect hip fracture in men and women in the same way. In addition, although bone mineral density (BMD) is currently the most important single discriminator of hip fracture, it is unclear if BMD alone is equally effective for men and women. The objective of this study was to quantify and compare the associations of hip fracture risk with BMD and body parameters in men and women using our recently developed two-level biomechanical model that combines a whole-body dynamics model with a proximal-femur finite element model. Sideways fall induced impact force of 130 Chinese clinical cases, including 50 males and 80 females, were determined by subject-specific dynamics modeling. Then, a DXA-based finite element model was used to simulate the femur bone under the fall-induced loading conditions and calculate the hip fracture risk. Body weight, body height, body mass index, trochanteric soft tissue thickness, and hip bone mineral density were determined for each subject and their associations with impact force and hip fracture risk were quantified. Results showed that the association between impact force and hip fracture risk was not strong enough in both men (r=-0.31,p<0.05) and women (r=0.42,p<0.001) to consider the force as a sole indicator of hip fracture risk. The correlation between hip BMD and hip fracture risk in men (r=-0.83,p<0.001) was notably stronger than that in women (r=-0.68,p<0.001). Increased body mass index was not a protective factor against hip fracture in men (r=-0.13,p>0.05), but it can be considered as a protective factor among women (r=-0.28,p<0.05). In contrast to men, trochanteric soft tissue thickness can be considered as a protective factor against hip fracture in women (r=-0.50,p<0.001). This study suggested that the biomechanical risk/protective factors for hip fracture are sex-specific. Therefore, the effect of body parameters should be considered differently for men and women in hip

  19. Predictors of Postoperative Cognitive Decline in Very Old Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Stephan; Kammerlander, Christian; Gosch, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate incidence and predictors of the various postoperative cognitive declines in old patients with hip fracture. Methods: This retrospective chart study evaluated 411 patients (age ≥80 years, follow-up 5 years). After exclusion of 82 patients (preexisting dementia or delirium), 70 patients showing either diagnosed postoperative delirium (POD; group 1; N = 18, 5.5%) or an unspecified cognitive dysfunction and behavior (group 2; N = 52, 15.8%) were analyzed and compared with those without any acute postoperative cerebral impairment (control group; N = 259, 78.7%). Medical history, anesthesiological, orthopedic, and rehabilitation data were assessed using the medical database of the hospital information system. Relative ratio was calculated with Fisher exact test: P value Bonferroni corrected ≤.003. Results: Acute cognitive complications were observed in 70 (21.3%) patients. Our data in group 1 showed that patients with a medical history of stroke (relative risk [RR] = 16.2, P = .0001) or nicotine abuse (RR = 14.4, P = .001) and perioperative surgical bleeding (RR = 6.54, P = .002) are more likely to develop POD. Unspecified cognitive dysfunction and behavior (group 2) was significantly associated with a medical history of stroke (RR = 12.5, P = .0001) and postoperatively with depression (RR = 3.32, P = .001). In the follow-up, significantly more patients in group 1 (55.6%, RR = 21.8, P = .0001) and group 2 (13.5%, RR = 3.88, P = .001) developed dementia as compared to controls (1.9%). Mortality did not differ significantly between the groups (group 1: RR = 1.75, P = .5 and group 2: RR = 0.66, P = 1.0). Conclusion: These data show that various predictors can identify a greater likelihood of developing postoperative cognitive decline in very old patients with hip fracture. Not identifying or labeling of POD limits the opportunity for evaluation, treatment, and planning. Thus, routine cognitive assessments need to be performed in the scope of

  20. Effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bi-Hua; Chen, Pau-Chung; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ko-En; Chen, Vincent C

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture. The database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance with medical records of more than 1,000,000 individuals was searched for patients who had hip fracture with or without depression from 1998 to 2009. Patients with the following conditions were excluded: hip fracture due to cancer or traffic accidents, hip fracture that occurred before the diagnosis of depression, and use of antidepressants before the diagnosis of depression. A matched cohort of 139,110 patients was investigated, including 27,822 (17,309 females; 10,513 males) with depression and 111,288 (69,236 females; 42,052 males) without depression (1:4 randomly matched with age, sex, and index date). Among these patients, 232 (158 females and 74 males) had both hip fracture and depression, and 690 (473 females and 217 males) had hip fracture only. The Cox proportional-hazards regression method was used to determine the effect of depression on hip fracture. The hazard ratio (HR) for each clinical parameter was calculated after adjusting for confounders including sex, age, Charlson comorbidity index, urbanization, osteoporosis, and antidepressants. Results showed that patients with major depressive disorder had a 61% higher incidence of hip fracture than those without depression (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-2.18, P = 0.002). The risk of hip fracture for patients with less severe depressive disorder (dysthymia or depressive disorder, not otherwise specified) was not statistically higher than that of patients with no depression (HR 1.10, 95% CI = 0.91-1.34, P = 0.327). Among the patients with depression, females had a 49% higher incidence for hip fracture than males (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.30-1.72, P < 0.001). The incidence of hip fracture also increased with age and Charlson comorbidity index scores. Analyses of both all (139,110) patients and only patients (27,822) with depression

  1. Changing trends in the management of intertrochanteric hip fractures - A single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Page, Piers R J; Lord, Roxana; Jawad, Ahsin; Dawe, Edward; Stott, Philip; Rogers, Benedict; Gill, Richie

    2016-07-01

    With an annual incidence greater than 65,000 in the United Kingdom, hip fractures are a common but debilitating injury predominantly affecting those over 65. Treatment is based on the anatomical location of the fracture relative to the capsule of the hip joint - fractures occurring within it are treated by arthroplasty, while extracapsular fractures are an indication for fixation. Intertrochanteric fractures are further grouped as stable (AO/OTA 31A1/A2) or unstable (31A3) which in turn governs in the current UK guidelines whether this fixation is achieved with a dynamic hip screw or intramedullary device. Anecdotally, some units are tending towards intramedullary devices for 31A2 fractures as well, a practice which from the evidence does not appear to confer benefit and carries an excess cost. We reviewed our data submitted to the National Hip Fracture Database over the last five years and identified all intertrochanteric fractures, from which cohort we identified all patients with 31A2 fractures by review of radiographs. The cohort comprised 370 patients. We then recorded age, gender, ASA grade, abbreviated mental test score, residence from where admitted, length of stay, destination on discharge and whether any further operations were required. There was no significant difference in the demographics of the groups, year-on-year, except gender mix. There was a significant, twenty-fold rise in the use of intramedullary devices between 2011 and 2015. Length of stay, length of overall episode of care, revision rates, mortality and destination on discharge were unchanged. This use is not supported by NICE guidelines and this study offers no evidence to contradict this position. We advocate all centres examine their practice to avoid a costly intervention without clinical benefit. PMID:27222104

  2. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN) Versus Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS)

    PubMed Central

    Jonnes, Cyril; SM, Shishir; Najimudeen, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) is still considered the gold standard for treating intertrochanteric fractures by many. Not many studies compare the DHS with Proximal femoral nail (PFN), in Type II intertrochanteric fractures (Boyd and Griffin classification). This study was done to compare the functional and radiological outcome of PFN with DHS in treatment of Type II intertrochanteric fractures. Methods: From October 2012 to March 2015, a prospective comparative study was done where 30 alternative cases of type II intertrochanteric fractures of hip were operated using PFN or DHS. Intraoperative complications were noted. Functional outcome was assessed using Harris Hip Score and radiological findings were compared at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results: The average age of the patients was 60 years. In our series we found that patients with DHS had increased intraoperative blood loss (159ml), longer duration of surgery (105min), and required longer time for mobilization while patients who underwent PFN had lower intraoperative blood loss (73ml), shorter duration of surgery (91min), and allowed early mobilization. The average limb shortening in DHS group was 9.33 mm as compared with PFN group which was only 4.72 mm. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early post-op period. At the end of 12th month, there was not much difference in the functional outcome between the two groups. Conclusion: PFN is better than DHS in type II intertrochanteric fractures in terms of decreased blood loss, reduced duration of surgery, early weight bearing and mobilization, reduced hospital stay, decreased risk of infection and decreased complications. PMID:26894214

  3. Hip Fractures: What Information Does the Evidence Show That Patients and Families Need to Decrease 30-Day Readmission?

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kristin OʼMara

    2015-01-01

    The current bundled payment reimbursement from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will not cover the additional cost of hospital readmission for the same diagnosis, and patients with hip fractures have one of the highest cost-saving opportunities when compared with other admission reasons. Common reasons for readmission to the hospital after hip fracture include pneumonia, dehydration, and mobility issues. The learning modalities including visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic were used to make recommendations on how the education can be incorporated into the instruction of patients with hip fractures and their families. These learning techniques can be used to develop education to decrease possibility of 30-day readmission after hip fracture. Nurses must focus their education to meet the needs of each individual patient, adapting to different types of adult learners to increase the health literacy of patients with hip fractures and their families. PMID:26575502

  4. Development of depressive symptoms post hip fracture is associated with altered immunosuppressive phenotype in regulatory T and B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Niharika Arora; Upton, Jane; Phillips, Anna C; Lord, Janet M

    2016-02-01

    Hip fracture is a common physical trauma in older adults that is also associated with a high incidence of new onset depression. The immune system declines with age and is also compromised by physical and psychological stress. This study examined whether hip fracture and depressive symptoms had additive effects upon the aged immune system that might contribute to poor health outcomes after hip fracture. We assessed the frequency of regulatory T cells, Tregs (CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) and IL10 production by CD4 T cells, and the frequency and IL10 production by regulatory B cells, Bregs (CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi)) in 101 hip fracture patients (81 female) 6 weeks after injury and 43 healthy age-matched controls (28 female). 38 hip fracture patients (37%) developed depressive symptoms. Hip fracture did not have an effect on circulating Tregs frequency but a significant reduction in the frequency of Bregs was observed in patients who developed depression compared with non-depressed patients (p = 0.001) or healthy controls (p < 0.001). Bregs also showed a significant decline in IL10 production in depressed hip fracture patients compared with controls (p = 0.04) and non-depressed patients (p = 0.01). In contrast, there was an increase in IL10 production by CD4 T cells in hip fracture patients with new onset depression compared to hip fracture patients without depression (p = .04) and healthy controls (p = .02). We conclude that the reduced immunity associated with new onset depression post hip fracture could include a contribution by heightened Tregs function. PMID:26112234

  5. Failure of intertrochanteric fracture fixation with a dynamic hip screw in relation to pre-operative fracture stability and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Y; Han, C H; Park, J I; Kim, J Y

    2001-01-01

    We have reviewed 178 intertrochanteric fractures treated by dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation between March 1995 and December 1999 and followed for a minimum of 1 year. We used Singh's classification of the trabecular bone structure in the proximal femur as a measure of osteoporosis and also classified the fractures according to three different systems (Boyd-Griffin, Evans, AO). The postoperative radiographs were examined for loss of reduction, i.e. varus angulation >100, perforation of the femoral head, more than 20-mm extrusion of a lag screw or metal failure. We found 49 cases which showed radiographic failures. Two were stable fractures and 47 unstable fractures (Evans' classification). Unstable fractures with osteoporosis had a failure rate of more than 50%. In such cases DHS should not be the first choice for treatment. PMID:11820441

  6. Fracture of the Greater Trochanter during Closed Reduction of Obturator Type Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Pandher, Dilbans Singh

    2014-01-01

    Obturator (Inferior) type dislocation of the hip joint is a rare and the fracture of greater trochanter during closed reduction for it has never been reported in literature. In this report, we present a case of a fracture of greater trochanter during difficult closed reduction which required operative fixation. Surgeons need to be aware of this complication and excessive force for reduction should be avoided when treating of this type dislocation.

  7. High Prevalence of Sarcopenia in Korean Patients after Hip Fracture: a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Il; Ha, Yong Chan; Kwon, Hyeok Bin; Lee, Young Kyun; Koo, Kyung Hoi; Yoo, Moon Jib

    2016-09-01

    Sarcopenia-related falls and fractures are increasing worldwide due to the aging population. The purpose of this study was to 1) evaluate anthropometric characteristics related to hip fracture in Korean patients, 2) investigate sarcopenia prevalence in hip fracture (HF) and non-hip fracture (NF) groups, and 3) investigate the correlation between sarcopenia and osteoporosis. This case-control study examined 359 HF and 1,614 NF normal populations using Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. We performed whole-body dual energy X-ray absorptiometry to analyze body composition using the skeletal muscle mass index (SMI: lean mass/height²) and bone mineral density (BMD). In the HF group, using the AWGS definition, the prevalence of sarcopenia in women and men was 44.3% and 68.2%, respectively; in the NF group, it was 7.1% and 16.1%, respectively. Lower appendicular SMI (P < 0.001), leg muscle mass (P < 0.001), and higher prevalence of sarcopenia (P < 0.001) were observed in the HF group after adjustment for age and gender. In multivariate analysis, sarcopenia (OR = 6.52; 95% CI = 4.67-9.09), age (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.13-1.17), and osteoporosis (OR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.35-2.58) were associated with the occurrence of a hip fracture. This study showed a higher prevalence of sarcopenia in patients with hip fractures compared with a normal population, and higher prevalence of sarcopenia in men. PMID:27510394

  8. Risk of Hip Fracture Associated with Untreated and Treated Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Dana D.; Newcomb, Craig W.; Carbonari, Dena M.; Nezamzadeh, Melissa S.; Leidl, Kimberly B. F.; Herlim, Maximilian; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Hennessy, Sean; Kostman, Jay R.; Leonard, Mary B.; Localio, A. Russell; Lo Re, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is associated with reduced bone mineral density, but its association with fractures is unknown. Our objectives were to determine whether untreated or treated CHB-infected persons are at increased risk for hip fracture compared to uninfected persons. Methods We conducted a cohort study among 18,796 untreated CHB-infected, 7,777 treated CHB-infected, and 979,751 randomly sampled uninfected persons within the U.S. Medicaid populations of California, Florida, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania (1999 – 2007). CHB infection was defined by two CHB diagnoses recorded >6 months apart and was classified as treated if a diagnosis was recorded and antiviral therapy was dispensed. After propensity score matching of CHB-infected and uninfected persons, Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incident hip fracture in: 1) untreated CHB-infected versus uninfected, and 2) treated CHB-infected versus uninfected patients. Results Untreated CHB-infected patients of black race had a higher rate of hip fracture than uninfected black persons (HR, 2.55 [95% CI, 1.42 – 4.58]). Compared to uninfected persons, relative hazards of hip fracture were increased for untreated white (HR, 1.26 [95% CI, 0.98 – 1.62]) and Hispanic (HR, 1.36 [95% CI, 0.77 – 2.40]) CHB-infected patients, and treated black (HR, 3.09 [95% CI, 0.59 – 16.22) and white (HR, 1.90 [95% CI, 0.81 – 4.47]) CHB-infected patients, but these associations were not statistically significant. Conclusions Among U.S. Medicaid enrollees, untreated CHB-infected patients of black race had a higher risk of hip fracture than uninfected black persons. PMID:24713185

  9. Increased Fracture Collapse after Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated by the Dynamic Hip Screw Adversely Affects Walking Ability but Not Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Christian; Gudushauri, Paata; Wong, Tak-Man; Lau, Tak-Wing; Pun, Terence; Leung, Frankie

    2016-01-01

    In osteoporotic hip fractures, fracture collapse is deliberately allowed by commonly used implants to improve dynamic contact and healing. The muscle lever arm is, however, compromised by shortening. We evaluated a cohort of 361 patients with AO/OTA 31.A1 or 31.A2 intertrochanteric fracture treated by the dynamic hip screw (DHS) who had a minimal follow-up of 3 months and an average follow-up of 14.6 months and long term survival data. The amount of fracture collapse and shortening due to sliding of the DHS was determined at the latest follow-up and graded as minimal (<1 cm), moderate (1-2 cm), or severe (>2 cm). With increased severity of collapse, more patients were unable to maintain their premorbid walking function (minimal collapse = 34.2%, moderate = 33.3%, severe = 62.8%, and p = 0.028). Based on ordinal regression of risk factors, increased fracture collapse was significantly and independently related to increasing age (p = 0.037), female sex (p = 0.024), A2 fracture class (p = 0.010), increased operative duration (p = 0.011), poor reduction quality (p = 0.000), and suboptimal tip-apex distance of >25 mm (p = 0.050). Patients who had better outcome in terms of walking function were independently predicted by younger age (p = 0.036), higher MMSE marks (p = 0.000), higher MBI marks (p = 0.010), better premorbid walking status (p = 0.000), less fracture collapse (p = 0.011), and optimal lag screw position in centre-centre or centre-inferior position (p = 0.020). According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, fracture collapse had no association with mortality from 2.4 to 7.6 years after surgery. In conclusion, increased fracture collapse after fixation of geriatric intertrochanteric fractures adversely affected walking but not survival. PMID:26955637

  10. Increased Fracture Collapse after Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated by the Dynamic Hip Screw Adversely Affects Walking Ability but Not Survival.

    PubMed

    Fang, Christian; Gudushauri, Paata; Wong, Tak-Man; Lau, Tak-Wing; Pun, Terence; Leung, Frankie

    2016-01-01

    In osteoporotic hip fractures, fracture collapse is deliberately allowed by commonly used implants to improve dynamic contact and healing. The muscle lever arm is, however, compromised by shortening. We evaluated a cohort of 361 patients with AO/OTA 31.A1 or 31.A2 intertrochanteric fracture treated by the dynamic hip screw (DHS) who had a minimal follow-up of 3 months and an average follow-up of 14.6 months and long term survival data. The amount of fracture collapse and shortening due to sliding of the DHS was determined at the latest follow-up and graded as minimal (<1 cm), moderate (1-2 cm), or severe (>2 cm). With increased severity of collapse, more patients were unable to maintain their premorbid walking function (minimal collapse = 34.2%, moderate = 33.3%, severe = 62.8%, and p = 0.028). Based on ordinal regression of risk factors, increased fracture collapse was significantly and independently related to increasing age (p = 0.037), female sex (p = 0.024), A2 fracture class (p = 0.010), increased operative duration (p = 0.011), poor reduction quality (p = 0.000), and suboptimal tip-apex distance of >25 mm (p = 0.050). Patients who had better outcome in terms of walking function were independently predicted by younger age (p = 0.036), higher MMSE marks (p = 0.000), higher MBI marks (p = 0.010), better premorbid walking status (p = 0.000), less fracture collapse (p = 0.011), and optimal lag screw position in centre-centre or centre-inferior position (p = 0.020). According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, fracture collapse had no association with mortality from 2.4 to 7.6 years after surgery. In conclusion, increased fracture collapse after fixation of geriatric intertrochanteric fractures adversely affected walking but not survival. PMID:26955637

  11. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Increases the Risk of Hip Fracture: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Chou, Lin-Chuan; Chen, Hung-Chou; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures can lead to functional disability and high mortality rates among elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a risk factor for hip fracture. A retrospective population-based 4-year cohort study was conducted using case-control matched analysis of data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID2005). Patients with a diagnosis of COPD between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2007 were enrolled. A 2-stage approach and data from the National Health Interview Survey 2005 were applied to adjust for missing confounders in the LHID2005 cohort. Hazard ratios (HRs) and adjusted HRs were estimated hip fracture risk for the COPD. We enrolled 16,239 patients in the COPD cohort and 48,747 (1:3) patients in non-COPD cohort. The hip fracture incidences were 649 per 100,000 person-years in the study cohort and 369 per 100,000 person-years in non-COPD cohort. The hip fracture HR during the follow-up period was 1.78 (P < 0.001) and the adjusted hip fracture HR was 1.57 (P < 0.001) after adjustment for covariates by using the 2-stage approach method. Patients with COPD were at hip fracture risk and fracture-prevention strategies are essential for better quality of care. PMID:26987933

  12. Short-Term Relationship between Hip Fracture and Weather Conditions in Two Spanish Health Areas with Different Climates

    PubMed Central

    Tenías, José María; Estarlich, Marisa; Crespo, Eusebio; Román-Ortiz, Carmen; Arias-Arias, Angel; Ballester, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate differences in the short-term relationship between weather conditions and the incidence of hip fracture in people aged 65 and over among two regions of Spain. Methods. Hip fracture incidence was calculated for the years 2000–2008 for residents of Health Area 14 in Valencian Community (Mediterranean climate) and the “Mancha Centro” Health Area in Castilla-La Mancha (inland climate), Spain. The relationship between hip fracture incidence and weather was analyzed with a case-crossover design and explored in subgroups defined by sex, age, and fracture type. Results. In the inland area, a positive and significant tendency for hip fracture incidence was observed (annual increase: 1.5%) whereas in the Mediterranean area a seasonal increase of 9% was noted in autumn and winter with respect to spring. Weather conditions, especially wind, were significantly associated with hip fracture incidence: days with more frequent windy periods and/or a greater wind velocity were associated with an increase in hip fracture incidence of 51% in the Mediterranean area and 44% in the inland area. Conclusions. Hip fracture incidence exhibits seasonal changes that differ between the Mediterranean and inland areas. The short-term relationship with climate, although similar in both areas, may partly explain these seasonal changes. PMID:25759722

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Increases the Risk of Hip Fracture: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Chou, Lin-Chuan; Chen, Hung-Chou; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures can lead to functional disability and high mortality rates among elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a risk factor for hip fracture. A retrospective population-based 4-year cohort study was conducted using case–control matched analysis of data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID2005). Patients with a diagnosis of COPD between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2007 were enrolled. A 2-stage approach and data from the National Health Interview Survey 2005 were applied to adjust for missing confounders in the LHID2005 cohort. Hazard ratios (HRs) and adjusted HRs were estimated hip fracture risk for the COPD. We enrolled 16,239 patients in the COPD cohort and 48,747 (1:3) patients in non-COPD cohort. The hip fracture incidences were 649 per 100,000 person-years in the study cohort and 369 per 100,000 person-years in non-COPD cohort. The hip fracture HR during the follow-up period was 1.78 (P < 0.001) and the adjusted hip fracture HR was 1.57 (P < 0.001) after adjustment for covariates by using the 2-stage approach method. Patients with COPD were at hip fracture risk and fracture-prevention strategies are essential for better quality of care. PMID:26987933

  14. Hip fracture incidence among Caucasians in Hawaii is similar to Japanese. A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D; Huang, C

    2000-10-01

    Age-specific hip fracture incidence has been increasing in some parts of the world. The incidence of hip fractures among Japanese on the island of Oahu, Hawaii in 1979-1981 was approximately half that of Caucasians in North America, but similar to the incidence in Japan. We surveyed the incidence on Oahu again in 1991-1995 for all races to compare the incidence among Japanese to the earlier rates, and to other populations, including Caucasians on Oahu. The incidence of hip fracture among Japanese in Hawaii between 1991-1995 had not changed appreciably (compared to 1979-1981), and was similar to that among Caucasians on Oahu. The incidence among Hawaii Japanese and Caucasians was similar to, or lower than Japan overall, and much lower (one-third to one-half) than that reported for Caucasians in North America and Northern Europe, suggesting that the prevalence of certain risk factors may be lower in Hawaii. These findings confirm other studies suggesting that nongenetic factors may be responsible for much of the observed differences in hip fracture incidence between countries, and between races. PMID:11126521

  15. Effects of continuous fascia iliaca compartment blocks for postoperative analgesia in patients with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hongling; Yang, Ya-Xiong; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Bin; Luan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Effective analgesia is essential for the postoperative care of orthopedic patients. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of continuous fascia iliaca compartment block (FIB) as postoperative analgesia after hip fracture surgery, and to compare FIB with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) using fentanyl for 48 h postoperatively. METHODS: Patients with hip fractures who were scheduled for open reduction and internal fixation surgery using the antirotation proximal femoral nail technique were randomly assigned to the FIB or PCIA groups. Postoperative pain was assessed using a numeral rating scale at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after analgesia was started. Delirium, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and pruritus were also monitored. RESULTS: Patients in the FIB group reported less pain than those in the PCIA group (P=0.039, d=−0.3). The change in pain scores over time was similar between the two groups. There were six patients with PONV and five patients with pruritus in the PCIA group, while no PONV or pruritus was noticed in the FIB group (P=0.013). Ten (19.6%) patients in the FIB group and three (5.7%) patients in the PCIA group developed postoperative delirium (P=0.032, d=0.77). CONCLUSION: Continuous FIB is a safe and effective technique for postoperative analgesia after hip fracture surgery, making it an option for pain management in elderly patients with hip fractures. PMID:26125194

  16. Rehabilitation in Patients with Dementia Following Hip Fracture: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jennifer; Koziak, Adriana; Buddingh, Sarah; Liang, Jieyun; Buckingham, Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Best rehabilitation practices after hip fracture for people with dementia have not been established. A systematic review was conducted to determine current evidence for rehabilitation in this population, including residents in continuing care. Methods: Standardized review methodology was used to search eight databases for literature on hip-fracture rehabilitation for people with dementia. Eligible studies included participants with dementia who had a hip fracture; performed a rehabilitation intervention; and evaluated one or more of function, ambulation, discharge location, or falls. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale was used to assess validity. Results: A total of 13 studies were included: five randomized controlled trials (RCTs), seven prospective cohort series, and one retrospective cohort study. Average quality ratings for RCTs and cohort studies were good and fair respectively. Participants with mild to moderate dementia receiving rehabilitation showed similar relative gains in function to those without dementia. Only one study examined the effect of rehabilitation among residents in continuing care. Conclusions: People with mild or moderate dementia may show improved function and ambulation and decreased fall risk after rehabilitation post hip fracture, similar to gains achieved by those without dementia. More research is required to ascertain the effect of rehabilitation in people with moderate to severe dementia, including those residing in continuing-care settings. PMID:23449813

  17. Adverse sequelae following revision of a total hip replacement for a fractured ceramic component: case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ling Hong; Langton, David; Green, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Revision total hip replacement following a fractured ceramic bearing component presents a challenge in the choice of the new bearing implant. A femoral head made of equal or harder material should be implanted to prevent catastrophic wear. Despite this, patients and surgeons must be wary of potential complications. PMID:27163083

  18. Adverse sequelae following revision of a total hip replacement for a fractured ceramic component: case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ling Hong; Langton, David; Green, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Revision total hip replacement following a fractured ceramic bearing component presents a challenge in the choice of the new bearing implant. A femoral head made of equal or harder material should be implanted to prevent catastrophic wear. Despite this, patients and surgeons must be wary of potential complications. PMID:27163083

  19. The Prevention and Treatment of Delirium in Elderly Patients Following Hip Fracture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, Antonio; Curto, Martina; Comite, Fabrizia; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Girardi, Paolo; Ferracuti, Stefano; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Falaschi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporotic hip fracture needs a specific approach and treatment, since elderly patients are at high risk for adverse outcomes after surgery. In particular, delirium often occurs in the peri-operative period, and it is associated with death, hospital-acquired complications, persistent cognitive impairments, poor functional recovery after surgery and increased healthcare costs. The pre-operative assessment of the risk factors for delirium improves the preventive measures. The delirium diagnostic tools should be included in the standard of orthogeriatric cure for hip fracture. Given the increasing complexity of the clinical pictures, we present a review of the available treatment options for delirium in patients with hip fracture. The metabolic pre-operative disorders and the management of co-morbid diseases are specific targets of treatment in order to optimize the outcomes after surgery. In particular, elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease are highly vulnerable to hip fracture and delirium, and they are severely frail with reduced physiologic reserves. An integrated approach combining environmental and pharmacological strategies is useful in the delirium treatment, with a close collaboration between the orthopedic and geriatric team. PMID:25687439

  20. Risk factors associated with outcomes of hip fracture surgery in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Yoo, Byunghoon; Lee, Woo Yong; Lim, Yunhee; Kim, Mun-Cheol; Yon, Jun Heum

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip fracture surgery on elderly patients is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors related to the postoperative mortality and complications following hip fracture surgery on elderly patients. Methods In this retrospective study, the medical records of elderly patients (aged 65 years or older) who underwent hip fracture surgery from January 2011 to June 2014 were reviewed. A total of 464 patients were involved. Demographic data of the patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, preoperative comorbidities, type and duration of anesthesia and type of surgery were collected. Factors related to postoperative mortality and complications; as well as to intensive care unit admission were analyzed using logistic regression. Results The incidence of postoperative mortality, cardiovascular complications, respiratory complications and intensive care unit (ICU) admission were 1.7, 4.7, 19.6 and 7.1%, respectively. Postoperative mortality was associated with preoperative respiratory comorbidities, postoperative cardiovascular complications (P < 0.05). Postoperative cardiovascular complications were related to frequent intraoperative hypotension (P <0.05). Postoperative respiratory complications were related to age, preoperative renal failure, neurological comorbidities, and bedridden state (P < 0.05). ICU admission was associated with the time from injury to operation, preoperative neurological comorbidities and frequent intraoperative hypotension (P < 0.05). Conclusions Adequate treatment of respiratory comorbidities and prevention of cardiovascular complications might be the critical factors in reducing postoperative mortality in elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. PMID:26634079

  1. Tranexamic acid in hip fracture patients: a protocol for a randomised, placebo controlled trial on the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Gausden, Elizabeth Bishop; Garner, Matthew R; Warner, Stephen J; Levack, Ashley; Nellestein, Andrew M; Tedore, Tiffany; Flores, Eva; Lorich, Dean G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a high incidence of blood transfusion following hip fractures in elderly patients. Tranexamic acid (TXA) has proven efficacy in decreasing blood loss in general trauma patients as well as patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. A randomised controlled trial will measure the effect of TXA in a population of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. Methods This is a double-blinded, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Patients admitted through the emergency room that are diagnosed with an intertrochanteric or femoral neck fracture will be eligible for enrolment and randomised to either treatment with 1 g of intravenous TXA or intravenous saline at the time of skin incision. Patients undergoing percutaneous intervention for non-displaced or minimally displaced femoral neck fractures will not be eligible for enrolment. Postoperative transfusion rates will be recorded and blood loss will be calculated from serial haematocrits. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and is registered with clinicaltrials.gov. The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT01940536. PMID:27329438

  2. Delivery and Outcomes of a Yearlong Home Exercise Program After Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Orwig, Denise L.; Hochberg, Marc; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Resnick, Barbara; Hawkes, William G.; Shardell, Michelle; Hebel, J. Richard; Colvin, Perry; Miller, Ram R.; Golden, Justine; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Magaziner, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Background Hip fracture affects more than 1.6 million persons worldwide and causes substantial changes in body composition, function, and strength. Usual care (UC) has not successfully restored function to most patients, and prior research has not identified an effective restorative program. Our objective was to determine whether a yearlong home-based exercise program initiated following UC could be administered to older patients with hip fracture and improve outcomes. Methods A randomized controlled trial of 180 community dwelling female patients with hip fracture, 65 years and older, randomly assigned to intervention (n=91) or UC (n=89). Patients were recruited within 15 days of fracture from 3 Baltimore-area hospitals from November 1998 through September 2004. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 2, 6, and 12 months after fracture. The Exercise Plus Program was administered by exercise trainers that included supervised and independently performed aerobic and resistive exercises with increasing intensity. Main outcome measures included bone mineral density of the contralateral femoral neck. Other outcomes included time spent and kilocalories expended in physical activity using the Yale Physical Activity Scale, muscle mass and strength, fat mass, activities of daily living, and physical and psychosocial functioning. The effect of intervention for each outcome was estimated by the difference in outcome trajectories 2 to 12 months after fracture. Results More than 80% of participants received trainer visits, with the majority receiving more than 3 quarters (79%) of protocol visits. The intervention group reported more time spent in exercise activity during follow-up (P<.05). Overall, small effect sizes of 0 to 0.2 standard deviations were seen for bone mineral density measures, and no significant patterns of time-specific between-group differences were observed for the remaining outcome measures. Conclusion Patients with hip fracture who participate in a yearlong

  3. A biomechanical comparison of composite femurs and cadaver femurs used in experiments on operated hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Basso, Trude; Klaksvik, Jomar; Syversen, Unni; Foss, Olav A

    2014-12-18

    Fourth generation composite femurs (4GCFs, models #3406 and #3403) simulate femurs of males <80 years with good bone quality. Since most hip fractures occur in old women with fragile bones, concern is raised regarding the use of standard 4GCFs in biomechanical experiments. In this study the stability of hip fracture fixations in 4GCFs was compared to human cadaver femurs (HCFs) selected to represent patients with hip fractures. Ten 4GCFs (Sawbones, Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc., Vashon, WA, USA) were compared to 24 HCFs from seven females and five males >60 years. Proximal femur anthropometric measurements were noted. Strain gauge rosettes were attached and femurs were mounted in a hip simulator applying a combined subject-specific axial load and torque. Baseline measurements of resistance to deformation were recorded. Standardized femoral neck fractures were surgically stabilized before the constructs were subjected to 20,000 load-cycles. An optical motion tracking system measured relative movements. Median (95% CI) head fragment migration was 0.8mm (0.4 to 1.1) in the 4GCF group versus 2.2mm (1.5 to 4.6) in the cadaver group (p=0.001). This difference in fracture stability could not be explained by observed differences in femoral anthropometry or potential overloading of 4GCFs. 4GCFs failed with fracture-patterns different from those observed in cadavers. To conclude, standard 4GCFs provide unrealistically stable bone-implant constructs and fail with fractures not observed in cadavers. Until a validated osteopenic or osteoporotic composite femur model is provided, standard 4GCFs should only be used when representing the biomechanical properties of young healthy femurs. PMID:25468304

  4. Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Miranda E G; Cairns, Benjamin J; Banks, Emily; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    While increasing age, decreasing body mass index (BMI), and physical inactivity are known to increase hip fracture risk, whether these factors have similar effects on other common fractures is not well established. We used prospectively-collected data from a large cohort to examine the role of these factors on the risk of incident ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women. 1,155,304 postmenopausal participants in the Million Women Study with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years, provided information about lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors at recruitment in 1996-2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions. During follow-up for an average of 8.3 years per woman, 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 an incident hip fracture. Adjusted absolute and relative risks (RRs) for incident ankle, wrist, and hip fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. Age-specific rates for wrist and hip fractures increased sharply with age, whereas rates for ankle fracture did not. Cumulative absolute risks from ages 50 to 84 years per 100 women were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2-2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4-5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5-7.0) for hip fracture. Compared with lean women (BMI<20 kg/m(2)), obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR=3.07; 95%CI 2.53-3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR=0.57; 0.51-0.64 and 0.23; 0.21-0.27, respectively). Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk. Ankle, wrist and hip fractures are extremely common in postmenopausal women, but the associations with age, adiposity, and physical activity differ substantially between the three fracture sites. PMID:22465850

  5. Sex effects on short-term complications after hip fracture: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ekström, Wilhelmina; Samuelsson, Bodil; Ponzer, Sari; Cederholm, Tommy; Thorngren, Karl-Göran; Hedström, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate potential sex differences and other factors associated with complications within 4 months after a hip fracture. Methods A total of 1,915 patients ≥65 years (480 men) with hip fracture were consecutively included in a prospective multicenter cohort study. A review of medical records and patient interviews according to a study protocol based on the Standardized Audit of Hip Fractures in Europe (SAHFE, RIKSHÖFT) was performed. Sex differences in comorbidity according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists score and complications 4 months after a hip fracture were registered. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to complications. Results Male sex was associated with worse general health according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification (P=0.005) and with more comorbidities (P<0.001). Male sex emerged as a risk factor for developing pneumonia (P<0.001), and additionally, 18% of the men suffered from cardiac complications compared with 13% of the females (P=0.018). Female sex was predisposed for urinary tract infections, 30% vs 23% in males (P=0.001). Mortality was higher in the male vs female group, both within 30 days (15% vs 10%, P=0.001) and at 4 months (24% vs 14%, P=0.001). Conditions associated with pneumonia were male sex, pulmonary disease, and cognitive impairment. Cardiac complications were associated with delayed surgery and cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. Conclusion Before surgery, men with hip fracture already have a poorer health status and higher comorbidity rate than women, thus resulting in a twofold increased risk of pneumonia. Cognitive dysfunction and pulmonary disease contributed to pneumonia in men. Delayed surgery seems to increase the risk for cardiac complications. It is important to consider the sex perspective early on together with cardiopulmonary comorbidity and cognitive dysfunction to be able to counteract serious complications that may

  6. Use of early indicators in rehabilitation process to predict one-year mortality in elderly hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Dubljanin-Raspopović, Emilija; Markovic Denić, Ljiljana; Marinković, Jelena; Grajić, Mirko; Tomanovic Vujadinović, Sanja; Bumbaširević, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures remain one of the most devastating injuries in the elderly. Early prediction of outcome following hip fracture potentially results in more efficient health care. The aims of this study were to explore predictors of ambulation status at hospital discharge in patients ≥65 years of age operated on for fracture of the hip, and to investigate the impact of ambulation status at hospital discharge on 1-year mortality after hip fracture. We studied 344 patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture during a 12 month period. Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore predictive factors for ambulatory status at discharge, and 1-year mortality adjusted on important baseline variables. Cumulative 1-year mortality was significantly lower for patients in the ambulatory group when compared to patients in the non-ambulatory group. Patients who were older, had severe cognitive impairment, lower functional level before injury, and in whom postoperative delirium and pressure ulcers occurred had a higher chance of not recovering their gait ability at hospital discharge, and being dead 1 year after hip fracture. Inability to walk at hospital discharge and presence of delirium are independent predictors of 1-year mortality. Every effort should be made to assure early mobilisation after hip fracture surgery, and prevention, prompt recognition and treatment of postoperative complications is important in order to facilitate better short-and long-term outcome. PMID:23233176

  7. Prognostic Factors Predicting Early Recovery of Pre-fracture Functional Mobility in Elderly Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daegu; Jo, Jae Yong; Jung, Ji Sun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prognostic factors predicting the recovery of pre-fracture functional mobility, we evaluated this by the use of ambulatory assistive devices in short-term follow-up. Methods Five hundred and fifty-three elderly patients who had undergone hip fracture operations from January 2006 to June 2013 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Clinical characteristics and predicted factors affecting functional recovery, such as the delay of rehabilitation after the operation, were reviewed. The functional status of the gait was classified as either a bedridden state, wheelchair-bound state, walker gait, single cane gait, and self-gait without any ambulatory assistance device. When this functional grade in patients who recovered after the surgery was compared to before the surgery, this state was considered 'functional recovery'. Results One hundred and ninety-two patients (34.7%) showed recovery of preoperative mobility in the first month after their operation. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified that the following four factors were significantly associated with a deterioration of functional recovery: old age (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-0.97), delays in rehabilitation after operation (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.89-0.98), the presence of cognitive dysfunction (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.18-0.71), and trochanteric fracturing (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.36-0.94). Conclusion We found that old age, cognitive dysfunction, trochanteric fracture type, and delay of rehabilitation were associated with the deterioration of functional recovery after a hip fracture operation in the short-term. Therefore, early rehabilitation was required to acquire functional recovery after a hip fracture operation in the short-term. PMID:25566483

  8. Incidental discovery of an undisplaced ceramic liner fracture at total hip arthroplasty revision for squeaking.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, C; Bocquet, D; Migaud, H; Girard, J

    2013-09-01

    Squeaking has been reported after ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA), but its pathomechanics is not fully understood. Impaired lubrication is suspected to be the main reason. The management of patients impacted by this phenomenon is not well defined and, as it is not considered to be cause for alarm, revision is not strongly recommended. Here, we describe a ceramic insert fracture discovered during revision surgery performed to correct severe squeaking. Preoperative investigation (plain X-rays, ultrasound and computed tomography) did not reveal ceramic fracture or definite component malposition. To date, there are no other published cases of incidental discovery of a bearing component fracture during revision of ceramic-on-ceramic hip replacement due to squeaking. We believe that squeaking is not a trivial phenomenon and recommend careful management of patients suffering with this symptom. PMID:23911133

  9. Local Anaesthetic Infiltration and Indwelling Postoperative Wound Catheters for Patients with Hip Fracture Reduce Death Rates and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Lees, Deborah; A'Court, Jamie; Ankers, Thomas; Harper, Ian; Inman, Dominic; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An analgesic enhanced recovery (ER) protocol for patients with a hip fracture was introduced. It was hypothesised that the ER would reduce pain, length of stay and improve clinical outcomes. The protocol used intraoperative infiltration of levobupivacaine followed by ongoing wound infusions. Methods. Consecutive patients admitted to two hospitals were eligible for the ER protocol. Numerical Reporting Scale pain scores (0–10) were recorded alongside opiate requirements. 434 patients in the ER group (316 full ER, 90 partial ER, and 28 no ER) were compared to a control group (CG) of 100 consecutive patients managed with traditional opiate analgesia. Results. Mean opiate requirement was 49.2 mg (CG) versus 32.5 mg (ER). Pain scores were significantly reduced in the full ER group, p < 0.0001. Direct discharge home and mean acute inpatient stay were significantly reduced (p = 0.0031 and p < 0.0001, resp.). 30-day mortality was 15% (CG) versus 5.5% (ER), p = 0.0024. Conclusions. This analgesic ER protocol for patients with a hip fracture was safe and effective and was associated with reduced inpatient stay and mortality. PMID:26649330

  10. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  11. Patient Participation and Physical Activity during Rehabilitation and Future Functional Outcomes in Patients following Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Eric J.; Munin, Michael C.; Harrison, Christopher C; Brach, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the association between physical activity recorded by Actigraphy during therapy sessions (therapy) to therapist rated patient participation and self reported future functional outcomes. We hypothesized those participants who were more active during rehab would have higher participation scores and better functional outcomes following hip fracture compared to those who were less active. Design Longitudinal study with 3 and 6 month follow-up. Setting Participants were recruited from skilled nursing (SN) and inpatient rehabilitation (IR) facilities. Participants Participants included 18 community dwelling older adults admitted to SN or IR facilities after hip fracture. Participants were included if they were ≥ 60 years of age and ambulatory with or without assistance from a device or another person. Intervention Not Applicable Main Outcome Measure Physical activity was quantified during participants’ rehab using the Actigraph accelerometer worn consecutively over 5 days. The Pittsburgh Participation Rating Scale was used to quantify patient participation during their inpatient therapy sessions. Self reported functional outcomes were measured by the Hip Fracture Functional Recovery Scale (HFRS) at baseline, 3 and 6 months following fracture. Results Participants with higher Actigraphy counts during rehab were ranked by their therapists as having excellent participation compared to those who were less active. Participants who were more active reported better functional abilities at both 3 and 6 month time points and achieved 78% and 91% recovery of self reported pre-fracture function compared to those who were less active achieving 64% and 73% recovery. Conclusion Actigraphy provides an objective measure of physical activity exhibiting predictive validity for future functional outcomes and concurrent validity against patient participation in patients after hip fracture. PMID:19345777

  12. Prediction of Ambulatory Status After Hip Fracture Surgery in Patients Over 60 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To predict ambulatory capacity, 1 month after physical therapy following hip fracture surgery. Methods A retrospective chart review was carried out. Patients more than 60 years old, who underwent hip fracture surgery and received physical therapies, were selected (n=548). Age, gender, presence of cognitive dysfunction, combined medical diseases, combined fractures, previous history of hip surgery, prefracture ambulatory capacity, days from the fracture to surgery, type of fracture, type of surgery, presence of postoperative complications, days from the surgery to physical therapy, and total admission period, were collected. Prefracture ambulatory capacity and postoperative ambulatory capacity were classified into non-ambulatory status (NA), ambulation with assistive device (AA), and independent-ambulation without any assistive device (IA). Multiple-logistic regression analysis was performed for the prediction of postoperative ambulatory capacity. Results Age (odds ratio [OR]=0.94 for IA and 0.96 for IA or AA), gender (OR=1.64 for IA and 0.98 for IA or AA), prefracture ambulatory capacity (OR of IA=19.17 for IA; OR of IA=16.72 for IA or AA; OR of AA=1.26 for IA, OR of AA=9.46 for IA or AA), and combined medical disease (OR=2.02) were found to be the factors related to postoperative ambulatory capacity and the prediction model was set up using these four factors. Conclusion Using this model, we can predict the ambulatory capacity following hip fracture surgery. Further prospective studies should be constructed to improve postoperative ambulatory capacity. PMID:27606273

  13. Hip Fracture Types in Canadian Men and Women Change Differently with Age: A Population-Level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, Richard G.; Kloseck, Marita; Mequanint, Selam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have previously reported a gender difference in the occurrence of hip fracture type with age in our local population. In the current report, we have explored this phenomenon in a Canadian population using five years of data from a national administrative database. We have compared community-dwelling and institutionalized individuals to determine if frailty is important and has a differential effect on the type of hip fracture experienced. METHODS Hospitalization records from 2005 to 2009, in which the most responsible diagnosis, that is the diagnosis causing the admission to hospital, was a hip fracture, were obtained from the Discharge Abstract Database of the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Hip fracture type was identified using the Canadian Classification of Health Interventions and the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision, Canada (ICD-10-CA). Hip fracture proportions were calculated for the study period and stratified by age group and sex. RESULTS The relative proportion of intertrochanteric fractures in women rose from 35% in the youngest group (55–59 years) to 51% in the oldest group (84+ years; P < 0.0001). In men, the proportions remain relatively stable (47% and 44%, respectively). Community and institutionalized patients showed the same pattern. CONCLUSIONS The change in the proportion of the two hip fracture types that occur in women but not men may point to differences in the etiology and consequently the approaches to prevention for the two fracture types. Level of frailty did not seem to be important. PMID:27158225

  14. Geographic variations in orthopedic trauma billing and reimbursements for hip and pelvis fractures in the Medicare population.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ashley C; Lakomkin, Nikita; Bulka, Catherine; Thakore, Rachel; Collinge, Cory A; Sethi, Manish K

    2016-12-01

    We investigated geographic variations in Medicare spending for DRG 536 (hip and pelvis fracture). We identified 22,728 patients. The median number of charges, discharges, and payments were recorded. Hospitals were aggregated into core based statistical (CBS) areas and the coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated for each area. On average, hospitals charged 3.75 times more than they were reimbursed. Medicare charges and reimbursements demonstrated variability within each area. Geographic variation in Medicare spending for hip fractures is currently unexplained. It is imperative for orthopedists to understand drivers behind such high variability in hospital charges for management of hip and pelvis fractures. PMID:27408500

  15. Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... result of the knee replacement surgery," said Dr. Caroline Messer, who specializes in bone loss at Lenox ... is a risk factor for future fractures." SOURCES: Caroline Messer, M.D., director, Center for Pituitary and ...

  16. Non-hip, non-spine fractures drive healthcare utilization following a fracture: the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW)

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, G.; Flahive, J.; Pickard, L.; Papaioannou, A.; Chapurlat, R. D.; Saag, K. G.; Silverman, S.; Anderson, F. A.; Gehlbach, S. H.; Hooven, F. H.; Boonen, S.; Compston, J. E.; Cooper, C.; Díez-Perez, A.; Greenspan, S. L.; LaCroix, A. Z.; Lindsay, R.; Netelenbos, J. C.; Pfeilschifter, J.; Rossini, M.; Roux, C.; Sambrook, P. N.; Siris, E. S.; Watts, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We evaluated healthcare utilization associated with treating different fracture types in over 51,000 women aged ≥55 years. Over the course of 1 year, there were five times more non-hip, non-spine fractures than hip or spine fractures, resulting in twice as many days of hospitalization and rehabilitation/nursing home care for non-hip, non-spine fractures. Purpose To evaluate the medical healthcare utilization associated with treating several types of fractures in women aged 55 years or older from various geographic regions. Methods Information from the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) was collected via self-administered patient questionnaires at baseline and year 1 (n=51,491). Self-reported clinically recognized low-trauma fractures at year 1 were classified as incident spine, hip, wrist/hand, arm/shoulder, pelvis, rib, leg, and other fractures. Healthcare utilization data were self-reported and included whether the fracture was treated at a doctor’s office/clinic or at a hospital. Patients were also asked if they had undergone surgery or been treated at a rehabilitation center or nursing home. Results Over the 1-year study period, there were 195 spine, 134 hip, and 1,654 non-hip, non-spine fractures. In the GLOW cohort, clinical vertebral fractures resulted in 617 days of hospitalization and 512 days of rehabilitation/nursing home care, while hip fractures accounted for 1,306 days of hospitalization and 1,650 days of rehabilitation/nursing home care. Of particular interest is the result that non-hip, non-spine fractures resulted in 3,805 days in hospital and 5,186 days of rehabilitation/nursing home care. Conclusions While hip and vertebral fractures are well recognized for their associated increase in health resource utilization, non-hip, non-spine fractures, by virtue of their 5-fold greater number, require significantly more healthcare resources. PMID:22525976

  17. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Min, Byung-Woo; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature. PMID:27536624

  18. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature.

  19. Rotational osteoplasty and bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation in Pipkin type 2 fracture with acute osteochondral defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Tommaso; Micheloni, Gian Mario; Sandri, Andrea; Regis, Dario; Costanzo, Alessandro; Magnan, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Pipkin fractures are relative rare high-energy lesions characterized by an intra-articular fracture of the femoral head after posterior hip dislocation. Early anatomic reduction and stable fixation are the main goals of treatment. This case evaluates the outcome of managing Pipkin type 2 fracture with acute osteochondral defect of the femoral head using "rotational osteoplasty" and bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation. 24-year-old male patient was involved in a motorcycle accident, suffering from a left hip fracture-dislocation, and pelvic Computed Tomography revealed a Pipkin type 2 lesion. An open urgent treatment was performed. After  anatomic reduction of the femoral head fragment a large osteochondral defect in the anterior-superior weight bearing surface was evident. The pattern of the fracture allowed us to perform a "rotational osteoplasty" including rotation of the femoral head fragment, to obtain an osteochondral cartilage congruence of the anterior-superior surface. Stable fixation was obtained by three bioabsorbable polylactate pins. At four-year follow up the patient had an excellent outcome and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed fracture healing, minimal signs of arthritis, excluding osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The reported case confirms that Pipkin fractures are very insidious surgical urgencies. In selected cases, "rotational osteoplasty" may be an alternative to osteochondral transplant for acute osteochondral defect of the femoral head. Bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation allowed us to have a stable fixation evaluating the bone healing process and vitality of femoral head by MRI. PMID:27104330

  20. Predictors of hip fracture mortality at a general hospital in South Brazil: an unacceptable surgical delay

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tiango Aguiar; Premaor, Melissa Orlandin; Larangeira, João Alberto; Brito, Luiz Giulian; Luft, Michel; Guterres, Leonardo Waihrich; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hip fractures have been associated with increased mortality in the elderly. Several risk factors such as the time between the insult and the surgical repair have been associated with hip fracture mortality. Nevertheless, the risk of delayed surgical repair remains controversial. Few studies have examined this issue in Brazil. The aim of this study was to study the risk factors for death one year after hip fracture and in-hospital stay at a tertiary hospital in South Brazil. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was carried out from April 2005 to April 2011 at a tertiary university hospital at Santa Maria, Brazil. Subjects admitted for hip fracture who were 65 years of age or older were followed for one year. Information about fracture type, age, gender, clinical comorbidities, time to surgery, discharge, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score were recorded. Death was evaluated during the hospital stay and at one year. RESULTS: Four hundred and eighteen subjects were included in the final analysis. Of these, 4.3% died in-hospital and 15.3% were dead at one year. Time to surgery, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Ischemic Heart Disease, and in-hospital stay were associated with death at one year in the univariate analysis. The American Society of Anesthesiologists score and time to surgery were one-year mortality predictors in the final regression model. In-hospital death was associated with American Society of Anesthesiologists score and age. CONCLUSION: Time to surgery is worryingly high at the South Brazil tertiary public health center studied here. Surgical delay is a risk factor that has the potential to be modified to improve mortality. PMID:24714833

  1. [Association between hip fractures and risk factors for osteoporosis. Multivariate analysis].

    PubMed

    Masoni, Ana; Morosano, Mario; Tomat, María Florencia; Pezzotto, Stella M; Sánchez, Ariel

    2007-01-01

    In this observational, case-control study, 376 inpatients were evaluated in order to determine the association of risk factors (RF) and hip fracture; 151 patients had osteoporotic hip fracture (cases); the remaining were controls. Data were obtained from medical charts, and through a standardized questionnaire about RF. Mean age of the sample (+/- SD) was 80.6 +/- 8.1 years, without statistically significant difference between cases and controls; the female:male ratio was 3:1 in both groups. Fractured women were older than men (82.5 +/- 8.1 vs. 79.7 +/- 7.2 years, respectively; p < 0.01). Physical activity, intake of alcohol and tobacco, and sun exposure were low in all patients. Falls among cases happened predominantly at home (p < 0.001). Among female cases, time spent in household duties was a RF (p = 0.007), which was absent in males. In multivariate analysis, the following RF were significantly more frequent: Cognitive impairment (p = 0.001), and previous falls (p < 0.0001); whereas the following protective factors were significantly different from controls: Calcium intake during youth (p < 0.0001), current calcium intake (p < 0.0001), and mechanical aid for walking (p < 0.0001). Evaluation of RF and protective factors may contribute to diminish the probability of hip fracture, through a modification of personal habits, and measures to prevent falls among elderly adults. Present information can help to develop local and national population-based strategies to diminish the burden of hip fractures for the health system. PMID:18051223

  2. Primary Cementless Hip Arthroplasty in Unstable Intertrochanteric Femur Fracture in Elderlys: Short-term Results

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyung Lae; Cho, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed to explore and report the short term results of primary cementless hip arthroplasty in treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fracture in elderlys. Materials and Methods Between March 2009 and Feburary 2012, 35 arthroplasty cases performed by single surgeon and followed up for more than one year were evaluated. They were 21 females and 14 males with mean age of 78 years (range, 71-92 years). Preoperative evaluation was performed by American Society of Anesthesia score. Retrospective evaluation was performed by operative time, transfusion amount, time to operation days, hospital stay and time to full weight bearing. Clinically, ambulatory ability was checked by Parker and Palmer (P&P) score and function of hip was appraised by Harris hip score (HSS). Radiologically, bone healing of fractured trochanteric fragment and presence of subsidence, stress shielding or osteolysis were checked. Results Fracture type was 11 cases of A2.2, 18 cases of A2.3 and 6 cases of A3.3. Femoral stems used were 8 cases of rectangular tapered wedge type and 27 cases of fluted modular distal fixation type. P&P score improved from mean preinjury score of 7.1 to mean postoperative last follow-up score of 6.5. Median HHS at last follow-up was 75. Mean time to full weight bearing was 47 days (24-79 days). Postoperative complications were one case of linear periprosthetic femoral fracture and one case of postoperative dislocation. Conclusion Cementless hip replacement arthroplasty could be a good option for unstable intertrochanteric femoral fracture in elderlys.

  3. Robust QCT/FEA Models of Proximal Femur Stiffness and Fracture Load During a Sideways Fall on the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Buijs, Jorn Op Den; McEligot, Sean; Dai, Yifei; Entwistle, Rachel C.; Salas, Christina; Melton, L. Joseph; Bennet, Kevin E.; Khosla, Sundeep; Amin, Shreyasee

    2013-01-01

    Clinical implementation of quantitative computed tomography-based finite element analysis (QCT/FEA) of proximal femur stiffness and strength to assess the likelihood of proximal femur (hip) fractures requires a unified modeling procedure, consistency in predicting bone mechanical properties, and validation with realistic test data that represent typical hip fractures, specifically, a sideways fall on the hip. We, therefore, used two sets (n = 9, each) of cadaveric femora with bone densities varying from normal to osteoporotic to build, refine, and validate a new class of QCT/FEA models for hip fracture under loading conditions that simulate a sideways fall on the hip. Convergence requirements of finite element models of the first set of femora led to the creation of a new meshing strategy and a robust process to model proximal femur geometry and material properties from QCT images. We used a second set of femora to cross-validate the model parameters derived from the first set. Refined models were validated experimentally by fracturing femora using specially designed fixtures, load cells, and high speed video capture. CT image reconstructions of fractured femora were created to classify the fractures. The predicted stiffness (cross-validation R2 = 0.87), fracture load (cross-validation R2 = 0.85), and fracture patterns (83% agreement) correlated well with experimental data. PMID:21052839

  4. Quantitative local topological texture properties obtained from radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with pertrochanteric and transcervical hip fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Lutz, J.; Koerner, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.

    2009-02-01

    The incidence of osteoporosis and associated fractures becomes an increasingly relevant issue for the public health institutions of industrialized nations. Fractures of the hip represent the worst complication of osteoporosis with a significantly elevated rate of mortality. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus of osteoporosis research and, over the years, has been approched from different angles. There exist two distinct subtypes of transcervical and pertrochanteric hip fracture that can be distinguished on the basis of the anatomical location of the injury. While the epidemiology of hip fractures has been well described, typically, little or no distinction is made between the subtypes. The object of this study was to determine whether local topological texture properties based on the Minkowski Functionals (MF) obtained from standard radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with hip fracture can be used to differentiate between the two types of fracture pattern. The texture features were extracted from standardized regions of interest (femoral head, neck, and pertrochanteric region) in clinical radiographs of the hip obtained from 90 post-menopausal women (69.8 +/- 7.9 yrs). 30 of the women had sustained pertrochanteric fractures, 30 had transcervical hip fractures and 30 were age-matched controls. We determined an optimized topological parameter MF2Dloc using an integrative filtering procedure based on a sliding-windows algorithm. Statistical relationship between the fracture type (pertrochanteric/transcervical) and the value of MF2Dloc was assessed by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. Depending on the anatomical location of the region of interest for texture analysis correct classification of tanscervial and pertrochanteric fractures ranged from AUC = 0.79 to 0.98. In conclusion, quantitative texture properties of trabecular bone extracted from radiographs of the hip can be used to identify patients with hip fracture and to distinguish

  5. Adherence to guidelines regarding total hip replacement for fractured neck of femur.

    PubMed

    Fishlock, A; Scarsbrook, C; Marsh, R

    2016-07-01

    Introduction In 2011 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published guidelines suggesting that clinicians offer total hip replacement (THR) to patients with displaced intracapsular hip fractures who could walk independently outside with no aids or one stick, who are not cognitively impaired and are ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade ≤2. They also stated that best practice is operating within 36 hours of presentation. This audit aimed to determine whether Scarborough Hospital was following these guidelines and compared the results with the national average. Methods Two years of data (January 2012 - December 2013) were collected retrospectively from Scarborough Hospital's hip fracture database on all patients presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture. Data were analysed to determine whether patients who had a THR fulfilled NICE criteria. Furthermore, patients with hemiarthroplasties who were eligible for THRs were identified. Finally, the time to surgery was calculated to examine whether patients receiving THRs waited longer than patients receiving hemiarthroplasties. Results In 2012, 48.6% of all eligible patients received a THR while in 2013 the figure was 55.9%. These percentages are much higher than the national average. However, 36 (53.7%) of the 67 patients who received a THR did not fulfil all the NICE criteria, mainly owing to high ASA grade. The mean time from presentation to theatre for THR was 8 hours and 37 minutes longer for THR patients than for hemiarthroplasty in 2012. This difference was reduced to 2 hours and 12 minutes in 2013. Conclusions Small general hospitals can meet and even exceed the standards regarding treatment strategies for hip factures. However, there is still room for improvement. Departmental training may be useful in achieving this aim. The anaesthetic team should be involved at the earliest opportunity, to help optimise patients preoperatively and determine whether patients listed for

  6. Surgical dislocation of the hip for the fixation of acetabular fractures.

    PubMed

    Tannast, M; Krüger, A; Mack, P W; Powell, J N; Hosalkar, H S; Siebenrock, K A

    2010-06-01

    Surgical dislocation of the hip in the treatment of acetabular fractures allows the femoral head to be safely displaced from the acetabulum. This permits full intra-articular acetabular and femoral inspection for the evaluation and potential treatment of cartilage lesions of the labrum and femoral head, reduction of the fracture under direct vision and avoidance of intra-articular penetration with hardware. We report 60 patients with selected types of acetabular fracture who were treated using this approach. Six were lost to follow-up and the remaining 54 were available for clinical and radiological review at a mean follow-up of 4.4 years (2 to 9). Substantial damage to the intra-articular cartilage was found in the anteromedial portion of the femoral head and the posterosuperior aspect of the acetabulum. Labral lesions were predominantly seen in the posterior acetabular area. Anatomical reduction was achieved in 50 hips (93%) which was considerably higher than that seen in previous reports. There were no cases of avascular necrosis. Four patients subsequently required total hip replacement. Good or excellent results were achieved in 44 hips (81.5%). The cumulative eight-year survivorship was 89.0% (95% confidence interval 84.5 to 94.1). Significant predictors of poor outcome were involvement of the acetabular dome and lesions of the femoral cartilage greater than grade 2. The functional mid-term results were better than those of previous reports. Surgical dislocation of the hip allows accurate reduction and a predictable mid-term outcome in the management of these difficult injuries without the risk of the development of avascular necrosis. PMID:20513883

  7. Increasing Level of Leisure Physical Activity Could Reduce the Risk of Hip Fracture in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Ke; Liu, Xiao-yu; Wu, Xu-hua; Li, Xiao-liu; Xia, Qing-quan; Chen, Jiong; Yin, Xiao-fan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We carried out the study to investigate and quantitatively assess the potential association between current level of physical activity and the risk of osteoporosis hip fracture in older women. Relevant publications before October 2015 were identified using the PubMed and Ovid searching tools. A dose–response meta-analysis was carried out to combine and analysis results. Fourteen prospective studies were included in the meta-analysis. A general analysis of 9 studies showed a significant inverse relationship between increasing level of physical activity and risk of hip fracture in older women [relative risk (RR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.91–0.96]. The result of a sensitivity analysis was consistent with the general analysis (RR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.93–0.96). The association between increasing level of physical activity and risk of wrist fracture was not statistically significant in a general analysis of three studies (RR = 1.004, 95% CI: 0.98–1.03). A potential direct association between increasing level of physical activity and risk of wrist fracture was observed after removing 1 study with the greatest weight (RR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.03). No significant publication bias was observed in our analysis. Our results show that increasing level of physical activity within an appropriate range may reduce the risk of hip fracture but not the risk of wrist fracture in older women. PMID:26986111

  8. Venous thromboembolism knowledge among older post-hip fracture patients and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Ah; Donaldson, Jill; Drake, Diane; Johnson, Linda; van Servellen, Gwen; Reed, Preston L.; Mulnard, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Patient education about venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention is needed to prevent complications and costly re-hospitalization. Nurses are uniquely positioned to provide vital education as patients transition from the inpatient setting to after discharge. Still, little is known about patient knowledge deficits and those of their caregivers. The purpose of this study was to explore VTE prevention knowledge in a sample of older hip fracture patients and family caregivers. At the time of hospital discharge, surveys were completed by hip fracture surgery patients (≥65; n=30) and family caregivers (n=30). Participants reported needs for more prophylactic anticoagulation and side effects education. Mean education satisfaction was 3.49 out of 5 among patients and 3.83 among caregivers. Focused patient education regarding the wisdom of VTE prevention, potential risks involved, and patient and care giver roles in advocating for better prevention measures is needed for these patients at risk for hospital readmission secondary to VTE. PMID:25012989

  9. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of Femoral head: Uncommon cause of Hip pain in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ghate, Sushant D; Samant, Ashwin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of femoral head is not very common cause of hip pain. This usually occurs in elderly osteoporotic patients or fatigue fracture in young military recruits. Case Report: We report a case of hip pain in an osteoporotic male which was diagnosed on MRI after the condition was missed by two physicians initially. Patient responded well to conservative treatment and was asymptomatic at one year follow up. Conclusion: Purpose of this case is to highlight clinical and radiological features of this entity and to discuss the prognosis and treatment. This case should increase awareness of this rare condition amongst treating physicians. This may facilitate early diagnosis and successful outcome with conservative treatment in selected sub-group of patients having SIF of femoral head.

  10. Implant failure in a proximal femoral fracture treated with dynamic hip screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Dabis, John; Abdul-Jabar, Hani B.; Dabis, Hosam

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw fixation is a common orthopaedic procedure and to date, still can cause difficulties to the senior trauma surgeon. We present a case where an extra-capsular fracture of the proximal femur was managed with a dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation. She proceeded to the operating theatre, where the fracture was stabilized with a 75-mm DHS and short-barrelled plate. The implant position was checked with intraoperative screening and the position accepted. Following attempted mobilization at 11 days post-operatively, the patient developed a recurrence of her preoperative pain. X-ray showed that the implant screw had separated from the barrel. Later scrutiny of the intraoperative screening films revealed that the barrel and screw were not engaged at the time of surgery. Intraoperative screening films should be carefully checked to ensure congruity of implant components. PMID:26136561

  11. Implant failure in a proximal femoral fracture treated with dynamic hip screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Dabis, John; Abdul-Jabar, Hani B; Dabis, Hosam

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw fixation is a common orthopaedic procedure and to date, still can cause difficulties to the senior trauma surgeon. We present a case where an extra-capsular fracture of the proximal femur was managed with a dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation. She proceeded to the operating theatre, where the fracture was stabilized with a 75-mm DHS and short-barrelled plate. The implant position was checked with intraoperative screening and the position accepted. Following attempted mobilization at 11 days post-operatively, the patient developed a recurrence of her preoperative pain. X-ray showed that the implant screw had separated from the barrel. Later scrutiny of the intraoperative screening films revealed that the barrel and screw were not engaged at the time of surgery. Intraoperative screening films should be carefully checked to ensure congruity of implant components. PMID:26136561

  12. Clinical outcomes of total hip arthroplasty for fractured neck of femur in patients over 75 years.

    PubMed

    Travis, Elizabeth C; Tan, Ruth S; Funaki, Penisimani; McChesney, Steve J; Patel, Sandeep C; Brogan, Kit

    2015-02-01

    To date, there has been little research into the clinical outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for intracapsular neck of femur (NOF) fracture in the very elderly. 44 patients over 75years underwent THA for an intracapsular NOF fracture over a two year period. Oxford Hip Scores were obtained from 37 patients with a mean score of 39.7 (range 11-47). Katz Index Scores were collected from 36 patients with a mean pre-operative score of 5.9 and post operative score of 5.7. THA in this population gives patients the best opportunity to return to premorbid function. When complications occur there is a catastrophic effect on independence. Therefore it is important to select these patients' appropriately and to optimise their medical condition peri-operatively. PMID:25311164

  13. Percutaneous compression plating versus gamma nail for the treatment of pertrochanteric hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Guido; Delle Rose, Giacomo; Crippa, Cornelio

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare percutaneous compression plating (PCCP) device with standard gamma nail (GN). A sample was prospectively followed and compared to a historical cohort: 82 intertrochanteric hip fractures in 81 patients treated with PCCP in 2004 versus 51 hip fractures treated with GN in 2003 (AO type 31A1, 31 A2). The main outcome measures were: surgery times, blood loss (Hb serum level and transfusions), complication, costs, for a 1-year follow-up. The minimally invasive PCCP technique resulted in a lower blood loss and consequently lower transfusion need (statistically significant), fewer implant-related complications and comparable surgery times. Overall surgical costs were lower for a comparable outcome in terms of healing and surgical time. PMID:18427918

  14. Recent advances in the treatment of hip fractures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Rozell, Joshua C.; Hasenauer, Mark; Donegan, Derek J.; Neuman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of hip fractures in the elderly represents a major public health priority and a source of ongoing debate among orthopaedic surgeons and anesthesiologists. Most of these injuries are treated with surgery in an expedient fashion. From the surgical perspective, there are certain special considerations in this population including osteoporosis, pre-existing arthritis, age, activity level, and overall health that contribute to the type of surgical fixation performed. Open reduction and internal fixation versus arthroplasty remain the two major categories of treatment. While the indications and treatment algorithms still remain controversial, the overall goal for these patients is early mobilization and prevention of morbidity and mortality. The use of preoperative, regional anesthesia has aided in this effort. The purpose of this review article is to examine the various treatment modalities for hip fractures in the elderly and discuss the most recent evidence in the face of a rapidly aging population. PMID:27547384

  15. Evaluation of the patient with hip pain.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John J; Furukawa, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Hip pain is a common and disabling condition that affects patients of all ages. The differential diagnosis of hip pain is broad, presenting a diagnostic challenge. Patients often express that their hip pain is localized to one of three anatomic regions: the anterior hip and groin, the posterior hip and buttock, or the lateral hip. Anterior hip and groin pain is commonly associated with intra-articular pathology, such as osteoarthritis and hip labral tears. Posterior hip pain is associated with piriformis syndrome, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, lumbar radiculopathy, and less commonly ischiofemoral impingement and vascular claudication. Lateral hip pain occurs with greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Clinical examination tests, although helpful, are not highly sensitive or specific for most diagnoses; however, a rational approach to the hip examination can be used. Radiography should be performed if acute fracture, dislocations, or stress fractures are suspected. Initial plain radiography of the hip should include an anteroposterior view of the pelvis and frog-leg lateral view of the symptomatic hip. Magnetic resonance imaging should be performed if the history and plain radiograph results are not diagnostic. Magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for the detection of occult traumatic fractures, stress fractures, and osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance arthrography is the diagnostic test of choice for labral tears. PMID:24444505

  16. Unstable Intertrochanteric Fracture Fixation – Is Proximal Femoral Locked Compression Plate Better Than Dynamic Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Qureshi, Owais Ahmad; Jilani, Latif Zafar; Hamesh, Tajdar; Jameel, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Background Intertrochanteric fractures are one of the most common fractures encountered in our practice. Most of them need operative intervention and union is achieved. As per the literature dynamic hip screw (DHS) is the gold standard for the treatment of these fractures, however problem arises with maintenance of neck shaft angle and proper reduction in unstable intertrochanteric fractures. The situation gets more complex when “cut out” of femoral head screw occurs either alone or in combination with varus collapse when they are treated with DHS. Here we are giving results of unstable intertrochanteric fractures treated with Proximal Femoral Locked Compression Plate (PFLCP) as compared with similar patients treated with Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS). Materials and Methods The study included a total of 27 patients (17 males, 10 females) with unstable intertrochanteric fractures who were subjected to PFLCP treatment from March 2011 to November 2012 in one group. Another was a similar group of 35 patients treated with DHS from March 2008 to February 2010. Results of group 1 were compared with group 2. Detailed clinical conditions of all patients, duration of surgery, blood loss, length of incision and duration of image intensifier use were recorded. Patients were revisited at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after operation. Results were evaluated clinically by Harris hip Score and radiologically for fracture union. Progress of union and complications (limb shortening, varus collapse, cut out of femoral head screw and medialization of distal fragment) were recorded. Results Among 27 patients treated with PFLCP, one patient expired 6 week postoperatively and one patient lost to follow up, so 25 patients were evaluated for final outcome of which 23 (92%) showed union at follow up of 12 months. One patient developed bending of proximal screws and three developed varus collapse. Among the group treated with DHS, eight patients developed varus collapse, seven

  17. Mortality Following Hip Fracture Surgery in Patients with Recent Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Komarasamy, Baskaran; Forster, Mark C; Esler, Colin N; Harper, William M; Hall, Andrew P

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In an elective setting, surgery is best avoided for at least 6 months following myocardial infarction. However, in the presence of a femoral neck fracture, this would most probably lead to significant complications in relation to prolonged immobilisation. There is no published mortality data for patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture following a recent myocardial infarction. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the mortality of hip fracture patients with a recent myocardial infarction that have undergone surgery at our institution. PATIENTS AND METHODS Between January 2003 and October 2005, 2270 patients were admitted to our unit with a proximal femoral fracture. Of these, 11 patients were found to have a recent myocardial infarction. RESULTS Of these 11 patients, 8 were female. The average age was 78.2 years (range, 59–90 years). Average delay from the time of infarction to operation was 11.2 days (range, 3–23 days). Mortality at 1 and 6 months was 45.4% and 63.5%, respectively. DISCUSSION This is much higher than the overall reported mortality following proximal femur fracture. This information may be useful when planning future peri-operative care and discussing overall prognosis with patients and their relatives. PMID:17688728

  18. Association of home care needs and functional recovery among community-dwelling elderly hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Chu; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Yu-Te; Ku, Yan-Chiou; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the home care needs and task difficulty of community-dwelling aged hip fracture and the association of functional recovery with care received. A cohort of hip fracture patients admitted to orthopedic wards for surgery was collected from August 2009 to December 2010. Patients transferred to long-term care facilities after surgery were excluded. Functional status (feeding, clothing, grooming, bathing, getting in/out of bed, walking, toileting, standing up/sitting down, and walking up/down stairs) and task difficulty for caregivers were recorded at discharge, one week and one month after discharge. In total, 116 patients (mean age: 79.4 ± 8.5 years, 51.7% males) were enrolled. The mean age of primary caregivers was 53.4 ± 14.2 years, and most were daughters or sons (54.3%), spouses (34.5%) or foreign workers (11.0%). The most common care needs were wound care (95.7%), medical visits (94.8%), cleaning and maintaining living quarters (92.2%) and vigilance to ensure patient safety (92.2%). The care needs and task difficulty significantly correlated with physical function before, one week and one month after discharge (r=-0.530, p<0.001; r=-0.326, p=0.001; r=-0.432, p<0.001; r=-0.684, p<0.001; and r=-0.475, p<0.001, respectively). The complex and taxing home care needs of community-dwelling elderly hip fracture patients were significantly associated with functional recovery. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and related special medical services may greatly help caregivers and promote the practice of aging in place. Further study is needed to develop appropriate caregiver education to promote the functional recovery of elderly hip fracture patients at home. PMID:23746577

  19. Optimal hip fracture management in high-risk frail older adults.

    PubMed

    McNicoll, Lynn; Fitzgibbons, Peter G

    2009-07-01

    Management of high-risk hip fracture patients is complicated. The optimal surgical decision must be individualized and made promptly, with the assistance of all important team members, including primary care doctors, patient, family, and the orthopedic team. The risks of delaying surgery are significant and should be avoided if possible. Strategies for improving outcomes in these patients include collaborations with medicine and delirium prevention protocols, especially with early ambulation. PMID:19685643

  20. Similar mortality with general or regional anesthesia in elderly hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Brox, W Timothy; Chan, Priscilla H; Cafri, Guy; Inacio, Maria C S

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — There is continuing confusion among practitioners with regard to the optimal choice of anesthetic type for repair of hip fractures. We investigated whether type of anesthetic was associated with short-term mortality after hip fracture surgery. Patients and methods — We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with surgically treated hip fractures, performed between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. Exposure of interest was anesthesia type (general, spinal/neuroaxial, and mixed). Endpoints were 30-, 90-, and 365-day post-surgery mortality. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are reported. Results — Of the 7,585 participants, 5,412 (71%) were women and the median age was 80 (IQR: 72–85) years old. Of the total cohort, 4,257 (56%) received general anesthesia, 3,059 (40%) received spinal/neuroaxial, and 269 (4%) received mixed anesthesia. Overall, the incidence of 30-, 90-, and 365-day mortality was 4% (n = 307), 8% (n = 583), and 15% (n = 1,126), respectively. When compared with general anesthesia, the 365-day odds of mortality was marginally lower in patients with spinal/neuroaxial anesthesia (OR = 0.84, CI: 0.70–1.0), but it was similar in patients with mixed anesthesia (OR = 1.3, CI: 0.70–2.3). No other statistically significant differences were observed. Interpretation — Regarding mortality, this study does not support specific recommendations regarding the type of anesthetic in surgery of fractured hips. PMID:26986550

  1. "Early Trigger" Intravenous Vitamin K: Optimizing Target-Driven Care in Warfarinised Patients With Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Diament, Marina; MacLeod, Kirsty; O'Hare, Jonathan; Tate, Anne; Eardley, Will

    2015-12-01

    Best practice tariff (BPT) was introduced as a financial incentive model to improve compliance with evidence-based care, such as operation for hip fracture within 36 hours of admission. We previously evaluated the impact of warfarin on patients with hip fracture, revealing significant delay to operation and subsequent loss of revenue. As a result of this, an "early trigger" intravenous vitamin K (IVK) pathway was introduced and the service reaudited a year later. The first cycle was a retrospective audit of all cases with hip fracture against BPT standards over a 32-month period. Subsequent protocol change resulted in all warfarinised cases being given 2 mg IVK in the emergency department prior to blood testing. This protocol was reaudited against the same BPT standards 12 months later. An intention-to-treat approach was used, despite breaches of protocol and other reasons for patients not progressing to theater. The data were analyzed with parametric tools to establish true clinical and statistical impact of the introduction of the protocol. In the first cycle, 80 patients were admitted on warfarin with a mean time to theater of 53.71 hours. Of these patients, 79% breached BPT due to anticoagulation. Twelve months following protocol introduction, 42 patients had a mean time to theater of 37.61 hours. Of these patients, 34% breached BPT due to anticoagulation. These data are both clinically and statistically significant (P < .001). No adverse events occurred. We have shown for the first time that "early-trigger" IVK can reduce delay to theater and maximize tariff payments in warfarinised patients with hip fracture. This is in addition to other established benefits associated with early surgery such as decreasing risk of pressure lesions and pneumonia. It affords high-quality patient-centered care while ensuring trauma units achieve maximal financial reimbursement through pay for improved performance and supports a culture of change behavior. PMID:26623160

  2. Serum lactate as a marker of mortality in patients with hip fracture: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, M; Smith, R P; Balasubramanian, S; Khan, A; Uzoigwe, C E; Coats, T J; Godsiff, S

    2015-11-01

    Outcomes from patients suffering hip fracture remain poor, with 9% mortality at 30 days and 35% at 1 year. Despite robust guidelines these mortality rates have undergone little change. Admission serum lactate in patients with sepsis or suffering general trauma has been shown to be an indicator of adverse clinical outcomes. We investigated whether venous lactate can predict mortality for hip fracture patients. Over a 12-month period the admission venous lactate of all patients presenting to our institution with hip fractures was prospectively collated. Demographic and patient survivorship data were also prospectively recorded. Multivariate binary logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards ratio analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between admission venous lactate and 30-day mortality and early survivorship, whilst adjusting for age and gender. 770 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 80 years. The overall 30-day mortality for this cohort was 9.5%. Admission venous lactate was associated with early death. A 1mmol/L increase in venous lactate resulted in a 1.9 (95% CI 1.5-2.3 p<0.0001) fold increase in the odds of 30-day mortality and a 1.4 (95% CI: 1.2-1.6 p<0.0001) factor increase in the risk of death at any time after hip fracture. Admission venous lactate remained a predictor of mortality despite adjustment for patients American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade. Those with an admission serum lactate of 3mmol/L or greater were particularly at risk. This cohort had a 30-day mortality odds that was 5-fold higher than those whose level was less than 3mmol/L (p<0.0001) and at any-time risk of death that was 1.9 times higher (p<0.0001). Those with a level of less than 3mmol/L had a 30-day mortality of 6.8%. For those with an admission venous lactate of 3mmol/L or greater this was four times higher at 28%. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.0001). Elevated admission venous lactate following hip fracture is a

  3. Delirium detection and improved delirium management in older patients hospitalized for hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Todd, Kristine S; Barry, Jean; Hoppough, Susan; McConnell, Eleanor

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is a common and potentially devastating problem for older patients following hip fracture. Although early detection is recommended, description and evaluation of standardized approaches are scarce. The aims of this quality improvement project were to: (1) implement a clinical algorithm for improving delirium detection and management and (2) assess the impact of the clinical algorithm on length of stay, discharge disposition and patient satisfaction. The pilot study was implemented on an orthopedic unit to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical protocol for delirium detection and management to improve outcomes. Outcomes of 33 elderly post-operative hip fracture patients were compared to historical controls from the same unit. Delirium was detected in 18% of patients. Length of stay was reduced by 22% (P < .001), discharge disposition showed a 13% improvement (P = .17) and patient satisfaction scores showed a 15% (P = .15) improvement post-intervention. Implementation of a clinical algorithm to promote early detection and treatment of delirium in post-operative hip fracture patients is feasible and associated with improved outcomes. PMID:26547684

  4. Serum albumin and fixation failure with cannulated hip screws in undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Riaz, O; Arshad, R; Nisar, S; Vanker, R

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Internal fixation of undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures with cannulated hip screws is a widely accepted surgical technique, despite reported failure rates of 12%-19%. This study determined whether preoperative serum albumin levels are linked to fixation failure. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 251 consecutive undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fracture patients treated with cannulated hip screws in a district general hospital. Preoperative albumin levels were measured, and the fixation technique, classification and posterior tilt on radiography assessed. Fixation failure was defined as a screw cut, avascular necrosis (AVN) or non-union. Results Of the patients, 185 were female and 66 male. The mean age was 77 years (range 60-101 years). Thirty seven (15%) patients had fixation failure: 10 (4%) due to AVN; 12 (5%) due to non-union; and 15 (6%) due to fixation collapse. Low serum albumin levels were significantly associated with failure (p=0.01), whereas gender (p=0.56), operated side (p=0.62), age (p=0.34) and screw configuration (p=0.42) were not. A posterior tilt angle greater than 20° on lateral radiography significantly predicted failure (p=0.002). Conclusions Preoperative serum albumin is an independent predictor of cannulated hip screw fixation failure in undisplaced femoral neck fractures. Nutritional status should therefore be considered when deciding between surgical fixation and arthroplasty to avoid the possibility of revision surgery, along with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. PMID:27055409

  5. Bias towards dementia: are hip fracture trials excluding too many patients? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Laflamme, G-Yves; Rouleau, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Patients with hip fractures are older and often present many co-morbidities, including dementia. These patients cannot answer quality of life questionnaires and are generally excluded from trials. We hypothesized that a significant number of patients are being excluded from these studies and this may impact outcomes. This was a two part study; the first analyzing databases of two ongoing large-scale multi-centred hip fracture trials and the second being a systematic review. The FAITH and HEALTH studies were analyzed for exclusion incidence directly related to dementia. The second part consisted of a systematic search of all relevant studies within the last 20 years. In the FAITH study, a total of 1690 subjects were excluded, 375 (22.2%) of which were due to dementia or cognitive impairment. In the HEALTH study, 575 were excluded with dementia/cognitive impairment representing 207 patients (36%). Following the systematic review, 251 articles were identified 17 of which were retained. The overall prevalence of dementia was 27.9% (range 2-51%). Only two studies compared demented and non-demented groups. In these studies significant increases in both mortality and complications were found. In summary, when investigating hip fractures, choosing appropriate objective endpoints is essential to ensure results are also applicable to patients with dementia. PMID:22999009

  6. Postoperative Delirium in Elderly Patients Undergoing Hip Fracture Surgery in the Sugammadex Era: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chung-Sik; Rhee, Ka Young; Yoon, Tae-Gyoon; Woo, Nam-Sik; Hong, Seung Wan; Kim, Seong-Hyop

    2016-01-01

    Background. Residual neuromuscular block (NMB) after general anesthesia has been associated with pulmonary dysfunction and hypoxia, which are both associated with postoperative delirium (POD). We evaluated the effects of sugammadex on POD in elderly patients who underwent hip fracture surgery. Methods. Medical records of 174 consecutive patients who underwent hip fracture surgery with general anesthesia were reviewed retrospectively to compare the perioperative incidence of POD, pulmonary complications, time to extubation, incidence of hypoxia, and laboratory findings between patients treated with sugammadex and those treated with a conventional cholinesterase inhibitor. Results. The incidence of POD was not significantly different between the two groups (33.3% versus 36.5%, resp.; P = 0.750). Postoperative pulmonary complications and laboratory findings did not showed significant intergroup difference. However, time to extubation (6 ± 3 versus 8 ± 3 min; P < 0.001) and the frequency of postoperative hypoxia were significantly lower (23% versus 43%; P = 0.010) in the sugammadex group than in the conventional cholinesterase inhibitor group. Conclusion. Sugammadex did not reduce POD or pulmonary complications compared to conventional cholinesterase inhibitors, despite reducing time to extubation and postoperative hypoxia in elderly patients who underwent hip fracture surgery under general anesthesia. PMID:26998480

  7. A comparison of general versus regional anesthesia for hip fracture surgery: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Di; Jin, Chunyu; Shan, Minhong; Zhou, Lijuan; Li, Yanshuang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the effect of general versus regional anesthesia on postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgical repair of hip fracture. Randomized controlled trials, prospective studies and retrospective observational studies were searched in PubMed, Medline and Embase database published between January 2005 and March 2014. The overall outcome was measured by odds ratios (ORs) and risk ratios (RRs) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 7 trials, involving 36448 patients received general anesthesia and 33952 patients received regional anesthesia, were included in present meta-analysis. We found that the 30-day mortality rate was lower in general anesthesia cases than that in regional cases (5.3% vs. 6.3%). Overall, our results demonstrated that there was no significant difference in 30-day mortality between two types of anesthesia in patients with hip fracture surgery (RR=0.98, 95% CI=0.92-1.04, P=0.48), indicating that types of anesthesia might not be a risk factor for hip fracture surgery. No statistically significant difference was observed in other outcome measures (P>0.05). In conclusion, our results suggested that the choice of anesthesia (general or regional) should be made by the anesthesiologist on an individual basis and based on the patient’s medical conditions. Further research is still needed to evaluate the effect of these two anesthesia methods. PMID:26884943

  8. Postoperative Delirium in Elderly Patients Undergoing Hip Fracture Surgery in the Sugammadex Era: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chung-Sik; Rhee, Ka Young; Yoon, Tae-Gyoon; Woo, Nam-Sik; Hong, Seung Wan; Kim, Seong-Hyop

    2016-01-01

    Background. Residual neuromuscular block (NMB) after general anesthesia has been associated with pulmonary dysfunction and hypoxia, which are both associated with postoperative delirium (POD). We evaluated the effects of sugammadex on POD in elderly patients who underwent hip fracture surgery. Methods. Medical records of 174 consecutive patients who underwent hip fracture surgery with general anesthesia were reviewed retrospectively to compare the perioperative incidence of POD, pulmonary complications, time to extubation, incidence of hypoxia, and laboratory findings between patients treated with sugammadex and those treated with a conventional cholinesterase inhibitor. Results. The incidence of POD was not significantly different between the two groups (33.3% versus 36.5%, resp.; P = 0.750). Postoperative pulmonary complications and laboratory findings did not showed significant intergroup difference. However, time to extubation (6 ± 3 versus 8 ± 3 min; P < 0.001) and the frequency of postoperative hypoxia were significantly lower (23% versus 43%; P = 0.010) in the sugammadex group than in the conventional cholinesterase inhibitor group. Conclusion. Sugammadex did not reduce POD or pulmonary complications compared to conventional cholinesterase inhibitors, despite reducing time to extubation and postoperative hypoxia in elderly patients who underwent hip fracture surgery under general anesthesia. PMID:26998480

  9. Is the ASA Score in Geriatric Hip Fractures a Predictive Factor for Complications and Readmission?

    PubMed Central

    Rosiadis, M.; Balalis, K.

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are the second cause of hospitalization in geriatric patients. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification scheme is a scoring system for the evaluation of the patients' health and comorbidities before an operative procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ASA score is a predictive factor for perioperative and postoperative complications and a cause of readmission of geriatric patients with hip fractures. The study included 198 elderly patients. The mean values of hospitalization were 6.4 ± 2.1 days for the patients with ASA II, 10.4 ± 3.4 days for the patients with ASA III, and 13.5 ± 4.4 days for the patients with ASA IV. The patients with ASA II exhibited minor complications, while patients with ASA III presented cutaneous ulcer and respiratory dysfunction. Five patients with ASA IV had pulmonary embolism, two patients had myocardial infarction, and three patients died. The ASA score seems to have direct correlation with multiple factors, such as the hospitalization days, the severity of the complications, and the total hospitalization costs. The treatment of geriatrics hip fractures in patients with a high ASA score requires a multidisciplinary approach and a special assessment in order to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality and offer optimal functionality. PMID:27293978

  10. Effect of a Home-Based Exercise Program on Functional Recovery Following Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Nancy K.; Harris, Bette Ann; Bean, Jonathan F.; Heeren, Timothy; Goodyear, Christine; Zawacki, Stacey; Heislein, Diane M.; Mustafa, Jabed; Pardasaney, Poonam; Giorgetti, Marie; Holt, Nicole; Goehring, Lori; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For many older people, long-term functional limitations persist after a hip fracture. The efficacy of a home exercise program with minimal supervision after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ends has not been established. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a home exercise program with minimal contact with a physical therapist improved function after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ended. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial conducted from September 2008 to October 2012 in the homes of 232 functionally limited older adults who had completed traditional rehabilitation after a hip fracture. INTERVENTIONS The intervention group (n = 120) received functionally oriented exercises (such as standing from a chair, climbing a step) taught by a physical therapist and performed independently by the participants in their homes for 6 months. The attention control group (n = 112) received in-home and telephone-based cardiovascular nutrition education. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Physical function assessed at baseline, 6 months (ie, at completion of the intervention), and 9 months by blinded assessors. The primary outcome was change in function at 6 months measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range 0-12, higher score indicates better function) and the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care (AM-PAC) mobility and daily activity (range, 23-85 and 9-101, higher score indicates better function). RESULTS Among the 232 randomized patients, 195 were followed up at 6 months and included in the primary analysis. The intervention group (n=100) showed significant improvement relative to the control group (n=95) in functional mobility (mean SPPB scores for intervention group: 6.2 [SD, 2.7] at baseline, 7.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; control group: 6.0 [SD, 2.8] at baseline, 6.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; and between-group differences: 0.8 [95% CI, 0.4 to 1.2], P < .001; mean AM-PAC mobility scores for intervention group: 56.2 [SD, 7.3] at baseline, 58

  11. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  12. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Elaine W.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D.; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A.; Giles, Graham G.; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M.; Guymer, Robyn H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003–2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001–2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00–1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25–12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur

  13. The effect of a pre- and post-operative orthogeriatric service on cognitive function in patients with hip fracture. The protocol of the Oslo Orthogeriatrics Trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hip fractures mainly affect older people. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality, and in particular a high frequency of delirium. Incident delirium following hip fracture is associated with an increased risk of dementia in the following months, but it is still not firmly established whether this is an association or a causal relationship. Orthogeriatric units vary with respect to content and timing of the intervention. One main effect of orthogeriatric care may be the prevention of delirium, especially if preoperative and postoperative care are provided. Thus, the aim of Oslo Orthogeriatric Trial, is to assess whether combined preoperative and postoperative orthogeriatric care can reduce the incidence of delirium and improve cognition following hip fracture. Methods/design Inclusion and randomisation will take place in the Emergency Department, as soon as possible after admission. All patients with proximal femur fractures are eligible, irrespective of age, pre-fracture function and accommodation, except if the fracture is caused by a high energy trauma or the patient is terminally ill. The intervention is pre-and post-operative orthogeriatric care delivered on a dedicated acute geriatric ward. The primary outcome measure is a composite endpoint combining the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) and the 10 word memory task at four months after surgery. Secondary outcomes comprise incident delirium, length of stay, cognition, mobility, place of residence, activities of daily living and mortality, measured at 4 and 12 months after surgery. We have included 332 patients in the period 17th September 2009 to 5th January 2012. Discussion Our choice of outcome measures and our emphasis of orthogeriatric care in the preoperative as well as the postoperative phase will enable us to provide new knowledge on the impact of orthogeriatric care on cognition. Trials registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01009268 PMID:22817102

  14. Outcome Analysis of Hemiarthroplasty vs. Total Hip Replacement in Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Bhanu; Kumar, Krishna; Kohli, Navneet; Katoch, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of displaced fracture neck femur in the elderly population is frequently done by Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Replacement (THR). It avoids high rates of nonunion and avascular necrosis which usually occur after internal fixation of neck femur fractures in this age group. Aim The present study aimed to evaluate patient function and complications following hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in elderly population with displaced femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods Patients above 60 years of age with displaced fracture neck femur were studied over the period of four years. All the clinical parameters and co-morbid conditions were noted at the time of presentation. The patients associated with co-morbid conditions and underlying pathology were excluded from study. Garden’s classification was used for classification of neck femur fractures. After due informed consent patients of displaced fracture neck femur were randomized by simple randomization and allocated for hemiarthroplasty or THR. Antibiotics were given preoperatively at the time of induction and postoperatively for 5-7 days. Surgery was carried out by Modified Gibson approach. Any complications during pre and postoperative period were noted. Follow-up of patients was done 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year interval with the help of Harris hip score. Results Total 80 patients were enrolled in the study group, with 40 patients in each group. The mean age of patients was 73 years in hemiarthroplasty group and 78 years in THR group. Female to male ratio was 55:45. Mean operative time was 35 minutes in hemiarthroplasty group and 45 minutes in THR. Average intraoperative blood loss was 200cc and 300cc in hemiarthroplasty and THR respectively. The mean hospital stay was 14 days in both the groups. Superficial wound infection was noted in hemiarthroplasty group while in THR group deep wound infection (n=1) and prolonged ICU stay (n=1) were noted. The mean Harris hip score

  15. Prediction of Mortality in Nonagenarians Following the Surgical Repair of Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fansa, Ashraf; Ebraheim, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to report on the mortality of nonagenarians who underwent surgical treatment for a hip fracture, specifically in regards to preexisting comorbidities. Furthermore, we assessed the effectiveness of the Deyo score in predicting such mortality. Methods Thirty-nine patients over the age of 90 who underwent surgical repair of a hip fracture were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-six patients (66.7%) suffered femoral neck fractures, while the remaining 13 (33.3%) presented with trochanteric type fractures. Patient charts were examined to determine previously diagnosed patient comorbidities as well as living arrangements and mobility before and after surgery. Results Deyo index scores did not demonstrate statistically significant correlations with postoperative mortality or functional outcomes. The hazard of in-hospital mortality was found to be 91% (p = 0.036) and 86% (p = 0.05) less in patients without a history of congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic pulmonary disease (CPD), respectively. Additionally, the hazard of 90-day mortality was 88% (p = 0.01) and 81% (p = 0.024) less in patients without a history of dementia and CPD, respectively. The hazard of 1-year mortality was also found to be 75% (p = 0.01) and 80% (p = 0.01) less in patients without a history of dementia and CPD, respectively. Furthermore, dementia patients stayed in-hospital postoperatively an average of 5.3 days (p = 0.013) less than nondementia patients and only 38.5% returned to preoperative living conditions (p = 0.036). Conclusions Nonagenarians with a history of CHF and CPD have a higher risk of in-hospital mortality following the operative repair of hip fractures. CPD and dementia patients over 90 years old have higher 90-day and 1-year mortality hazards postoperatively. Dementia patients are also discharged more quickly than nondementia patients. PMID:27247737

  16. Preoperative Incidence of Deep Vein Thrombosis after Hip Fractures in Korean

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Young-Soo; Jeong, Dae-Geun; Han, In-Ho; Park, Young-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of the current study was to investigate the incidence of preoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) after hip fractures in Korea. Methods In this prospective study, we enrolled 152 Korean geriatric patients who had suffered hip fractures due to a simple fall and were hospitalized between January 2013 and December 2013. There were 52 male and 100 female patients, and their mean age was 78.2 years. There were 96 trochanteric fractures and 56 femoral neck fractures. All patients were examined for DVT: 26 by ultrasonography and 126 by computed tomography venography. The patients having DVT underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion before the surgical intervention. Results Preoperatively, none of the patients had any signs or symptoms of DVT; however, 4 patients were identified as having asymptomatic DVT. The overall incidence of DVT was 2.6% (4/152). The mean time to arrival at emergency room after injury was 32.6 hours. Mean time elapsed to undergo surgery after hospitalization was 24.9 hours. The average time to hospitalization after injury was 237 hours for patients with DVT versus 27.5 hours for patients without DVT. DVT developed within 72 hours in two of the 137 patients (1.4%) and after 72 hours in two of the remaining 15 patients (13.3%) hospitalized. Conclusions While the preoperative incidence of DVT after hip fractures was relatively low (2.6%) in the Korean geriatric population, we confirmed that getting no treatment within 72 hours after injury increased the incidence of DVT. Thus, we conclude from this study that a workup for DVT should be considered in cases where admission or surgery has been delayed for more than 72 hours after injury. PMID:26330950

  17. Ipsilateral obturator type of hip dislocation with fracture shaft femur in a child: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Arjun, R H H; Kumar, Vishal; Saibaba, Balaji; John, Rakesh; Guled, Uday; Aggarwal, Sameer

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of traumatic hip dislocations in children is rising in this fast developing world along with increasing numbers of high-velocity road traffic accidents. Anterior dislocation of the hip has a lower incidence compared with posterior dislocation of the hip. We encountered a rare case of the obturator type of anteriorly dislocated hip associated with ipsilateral fracture of the shaft femur in an 11-year-old child. This is a highly unusual injury combination and the mechanism of injury is obscure. Only two similar cases have been reported in the English literature to date. Closed reduction of the hip using a hitherto undescribed technique and an intramedullary interlocking nail was performed in this case. At 6 months of follow-up, the fracture shaft femur has united and the child is bearing full weight on the limb. PMID:27128394

  18. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  19. A RANDOMIZED, PROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING INTERTROCHANTERIC HIP FRACTURE FIXATION WITH THE DYNAMIC HIP SCREW AND THE DYNAMIC HELICAL HIP SYSTEM IN A COMMUNITY PRACTICE

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel C; Sheerin, Daniel V; Wolf, Brian R; Wuest, Thomas K

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical performance of the Dynamic Helical Hip System (DHHS) spiral blade relative to the Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) lag screw. Design Randomized prospective study. Setting One level-2 trauma center and one level-3 trauma center. Patients Fifty-one consecutive patients were recruited into the trial. Inclusion criteria included patients over 50 years of age with AO/OTA 31A1 or 31A2 fracture. Intervention Surgeries were performed by one of 15 participating community orthopaedic surgeons. The patients were randomized to either a DHHS or DHS implant. Follow-up occurred at two weeks and six weeks and then at six-week intervals until healing occurred. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcome variables included sliding of die implant on the final AP radiographs, failure by cut-out and implant failure. Results There were 24 patients in the DHS group and 27 in the DHHS group. There was no difference in age, gender, ASA score, fracture classification or in the quality of reduction measured on the immediate postoperative radiographs (p=0.28) between the two groups. The tip apex distance was 18.7 mm in the DHHS group and 18.5 mm in the DHS group (p=0.40). The DHHS group had average blade sliding of 7.4 mm while the DHS group had an average lag-screw sliding of 7.7 (p=0.45). The DHHS group had two failures by central protrusion of the blade through the femoral head without significant varus collapse or superior migration. One was revised to a DHS and healed, the other was revised to a proximal femoral locking plate, which also failed and eventually required revision to a total hip arthroplasty. Investigation of the implants post failure showed evidence of binding of the blade shaft in the barrel as a mechanism of failure in both cases. No DHS implants cut out in this series, although one patient was revised to a total hip arthroplasty for symptomatic segmental osteonecrosis. Conclusion Both implants performed well in a majority of cases. The higher

  20. Cystatin-C, Renal Function and Incidence of Hip Fracture in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Lee, Jennifer S.; Wu, LieLing; Cauley, Jane A.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Ott, Susan M.; Robbins, John; Curb, J. David; Leboff, Meryl; Bauer, Douglas C.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles L.; Cummings, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the association of chronic kidney disease with incident hip fracture using serum cystatin-C as a biomarker of renal function calculated without reference to muscle mass. DESIGN Case-control study nested within a prospective study. SETTING The Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study conducted at 40 US clinical centers. PARTICIPANTS From 93,676 women ages 50–79 years followed for an average of 7 years, 397 incident hip fracture cases and 397 matched controls were studied. MEASUREMENTS Cystatin-C levels were measured on baseline serum using a particle-enhanced immunonepholometric assay. Estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRcys-c) were calculated with a validated equation and categorized into three groups: 1) eGFRcys-c >90 mL/min/1.73 m2; 2) eGFRcys-c 60–90 mL/min/1.73 m2; or 3) eGFRcys-c <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 indicating chronic kidney disease Stages 3–4. RESULTS The odds ratio (OR) for hip fracture was 2.50 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32–4.72) for eGFRcys-c <60 ml/min/1.73 m2 compared to Stages 0–1 after adjustment for body mass, parental hip fracture, smoking, alcohol consumption and physical function. No association was observed for eGFRcys-c 60–90 mL/min/1.73 m2 (OR=1.04; CI 0.66–1.64). These associations were unaffected by additional adjustment for poor health status, hemoglobin, serum 25hydroxyvitamin D, or bone metabolism markers. Adjustment for plasma homocysteine reduced the OR for eGFRcys-c <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 1.83 (CI 0.93–3.61). CONCLUSION Women with cystatin-C eGFR levels <60 have a substantially increased risk of hip fracture. This association may be partially mediated, or accompanied by, effects of renal function on homocysteine levels. PMID:18662213

  1. Effectiveness of treatment of transtrochanteric fractures with Dynamic Hip Screws using minimally invasive access☆

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Eduardo Lima; Sena, Caroline Brum; Saldanha Rodrigues Filho, Sergio Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the short-term results from treating unstable intertrochanteric fractures with Dynamic Hip Screws (DHS), using a minimally invasive route, focusing on the functional aspects and complication and mortality rates of the method. Methods This was a prospective longitudinal study on 140 patients who underwent fixation of transtrochanteric fractures with the DHS system with a lateral minimally invasive access in the hip, between January and December 2013. The patients were evaluated pre and postoperatively (after six months of follow-up) by means of the Parker and Palmer mobility score. Women comprised 65.7% of the sample, and 54.3% of the fractures were on the right side. The patients’ mean age was 80 years, ranging from 60 to 93 years. Results We observed an overall decrease in the mobility score and an increase in the degree of dependence over the short term. However, we encountered only two deaths in the study sample and there were no cases of infection or nonunion. Conclusion Despite the efficacy of the treatment with DHS, with high rates of fracture consolidation and a low mortality rate, we noted that the patients still showed significant functional limitation at the follow-up six months after the operation. PMID:27069880

  2. Effects of Zoledronate on Mortality and Morbidity after Surgical Treatment of Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Ömer; Polat, Gökhan; Karademir, Gökhan; Tunç, Oytun Derya; Erdil, Mehmet; Tuncay, İbrahim; Şen, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of intertrochanteric femoral fractures on mortality, morbidity, and cost of zoledronate treatment in elderly patients treated by osteosynthesis. Based on Evans classification, 114 patients with unstable intertrochanteric femoral fractures were treated with osteosynthesis. After the surgical treatment of intertrochanteric fractures, the treatment group (M/F, 24/32; mean age, 76.7 ± SD years) received zoledronate infusion, and the control group (M/F, 20/38; mean age, 80.2 ± SD years) received placebo. Postoperative control visits were performed at 6-week, 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month time points. Functional level of patients was evaluated by the modified Harris hip score and Merle d'Aubigné hip score. By 12 months, the mean HHS in treatment and control groups was 81.93 and 72.9, respectively. For time of death of the patients, mortality was found to be 57.1% (16/28) on the first 3 months and 92.9% (26/28) on the first six months. The mortality rate in the treatment and control groups was 14.3% (8/56) and 34.5% (20/58), respectively. The use of zoledronic acid after surgical treatment of intertrochanteric femoral fractures in osteoporotic elderly patients is a safe treatment modality which helps to reduce mortality, improves functional outcomes, and has less side effects with single dose use per year. PMID:27092280

  3. Pain, Genes, and Function in the Post-Hip Fracture Period.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Magaziner, Jay; Orwig, Denise; Hochberg, Marc C; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Hicks, Gregory E; Dorsey, Susan G

    2016-06-01

    Post-hip fracture generalized pain can lead to a progressive decline in function and greater disability. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors that influence pain among older adults post-hip fracture, including genetic variability, and evaluate whether pain directly or indirectly influenced upper and lower extremity function. This was a secondary data analysis using data from the first 200 participants in a Baltimore Hip Study (BHS), BHS-7. Assessments were done at 2 months post-hip fracture and included age, sex, marital status, education, cognitive status, comorbidities, body mass index (BMI), upper and lower extremity function, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 10 candidate genes, and total areas of pain and pain intensity. Model testing was done using the AMOS statistical program. The full sample included 172 participants with an average age of 81. Fifty percent were female and the majority was Caucasian (93%). Model testing was done on 144 individuals who completed 2 month surveys. Across all models, age, cognition, and BMI were significantly associated with total areas of pain. Thirty SNPs from five genes (BDNF, FKBP5, NTRK2, NTRK3, and OXTR) were associated with areas of pain and/or pain intensity. Together, age, cognition, BMI, and the SNP from one of the five genes explained 25% of total areas of pain and 15% of pain intensity. Only age and cognition were significantly associated with lower extremity function, and only cognition was significantly associated with upper extremity function. The full model was partially supported in this study. Our genetic findings related to pain expand prior reports related to BDNF and NTRK2. PMID:27283266

  4. Trends in the incidence of hip fracture in Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain: 2007–2011 versus 1989–1993

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, P.; de Tejada, M. J. G.; Navarro, M.; Cabrera, D.; Melton, L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hip fracture incidence in the Canaries was studied in two 5-year periods (1989–1993 and 2008–2011). The incidence in 2007–2011 was 24 % higher than in 1989, but did not differ between 2007–2011 and 1993. These findings suggest a trend to stabilize the incidence of hip fracture. Introduction A dramatic increase in hip fractures between 1988 and 2002 was reported in Northern Spain. We performed the present study in Gran Canaria, the Canary Islands, to compare changes in the incidence of hip fracture between 1989–1993 and 2007–2011. Methods We recorded every osteoporotic hip fracture admitted to any hospital in Gran Canaria in the population 50 years of age or older. Results In 1989–1993, we collected 1175 hip fractures (72 % women; mean age 78.2±9.9 years), and the total incidence rate was 152.1 cases/100,000 population/year. In 2007–2011, we collected 2222 hip fracture cases (71 % women; mean age 79±9.8 years). The total incidence was 180.9/100,000/year. A Poisson model showed that the incidence of fractures increased by 7.1 % (95 % CI=3.1 %; 11.8 %) each year in 1989–1993, while there was no statistically significant variation (p=0.515) during the period 2007–2011. The incidence in 2007–2011 was 24 % higher than in 1989 (first year in the first period) but did not differ between 2007–2011 and 1993 (the last year of the first period). Incidence rates were 76.7 % (95 % CI=63.9 %; 90.5 %) higher in women than in men, but the female/male ratio remained unchanged. The age-adjusted incidence of hip fractures increased by 7.3 % each year from 1989 to 1993. The proportions of trochanter and cervical fractures were similar in the two time periods, but the mean hospital stay was reduced from 11 days in 1989–1993 to 7 days in 2007–2011. Conclusions These findings suggest a trend to stabilize the incidence of hip fracture in the Canary Islands due to a decrease in men, while in women, the incidence increased. PMID:25572042

  5. Plasma B vitamins, homocysteine and their relation with bone loss and hip fracture in elderly men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated homocysteine is a strong risk factor for osteoporotic fractures among elders, yet it may be a marker for low B vitamin status. Objective: To examine the associations of plasma concentrations of folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6 and homocysteine with bone loss and hip fracture risk in elderly...

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for periprosthetic fracture in older recipients of total hip replacement: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing utilization of total joint replacement will increase the frequency of its complications, including periprosthetic fracture. The prevalence and risk factors of periprosthetic fracture require further study, particularly over the course of long-term follow-up. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors for periprosthetic fractures occurring in recipients of total hip replacement. Methods We identified Medicare beneficiaries who had elective primary total hip replacement (THR) for non-fracture diagnoses between July 1995 and June 1996. We followed them using Medicare Part A claims data through 2008. We used ICD-9 codes to identify periprosthetic femoral fractures occurring from 2006–2008. We used the incidence density method to calculate the annual incidence of these fractures and Cox proportional hazards models to identify risk factors for periprosthetic fracture. We also calculated the risk of hospitalization over the subsequent year. Results Of 58,521 Medicare beneficiaries who had elective primary THR between July 1995 and June 1996, 32,463 (55%) survived until January 2006. Of these, 215 (0.7%) developed a periprosthetic femoral fracture between 2006 and 2008. The annual incidence of periprosthetic fracture among these individuals was 26 per 10,000 person-years. In the Cox model, a greater risk of periprosthetic fracture was associated with having had a total knee replacement (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.30, 2.55) or a revision total hip replacement (HR1.40, 95% CI 0.95, 2.07) between the primary THR and 2006. Compared to those without fractures, THR recipients who sustained periprosthetic femoral fracture had three-fold higher risk of hospitalization in the subsequent year (89% vs. 27%, p < 0.0001). Conclusion A decade after primary THR, periprosthetic fractures occur annually in 26 per 10,000 persons and are especially frequent in those with prior total knee or revision total hip replacements. PMID:24885707

  7. Pain treatment in post-traumatic hip fracture in the elderly: regional block vs. systemic non-steroidal analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Jorge; Jauregui, José R.; Iserson, Kenneth V.

    2010-01-01

    Background This prospective, randomized double-blind study, conducted over 19 months in a tertiary care ED, sought to determine if a fascia-iliaca regional anesthetic block provides better and safer pain relief than does parenteral analgesia. Aims This study also aimed to determine the effectiveness of parenteral NSAID analgesia for acute hip fractures. Methods Patients >65 years old presenting at an adult ED with acute hip fractures were randomized upon presentation to the ED into two groups (A and B) using numbers generated by the EPI-INFO™ (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) program. The randomization list was kept by one of the authors who did not interact with the patients. Two groups of patients were to receive either (A) a fascia-iliaca block with bupivacaine and parenteral saline injection, or (B) the same block with saline and an IV NSAID injection. Upon admission to the study, vital signs such as blood pressure, mean blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and pain-intensity measurements [using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)] were obtained and repeated at 15 min, 2 h and at8 h. The occurrence of complications was registered. Results One hundred seventy-five patients were randomized, and 21 were excluded from participation. The remaining 154 patients were grouped as: group A (n = 62) or group B (n = 92). The mean pain level on admission to the ED for all patients, assessed with the VAS, was 8.21 ± 0.91 (CI 95%: 6.43–9.99); in group A the VAS was 7.6 ± 0.22 and in group B 8.5 ± 0.72 (p = 0.411). At 15-min evaluation, values were: group A 6.24 ± 0.17 and group B 2.9 ± 0.16 (p < 0.001). At the 2-h assessment, values were: group A 1.78 ± 0.11 and group B 2.3 ± 1.16 (p = 0.764). At 8 h the VAS for group A was 2.03 ± 0.12 and for group B 4.4 ± 0.91 (p = 0.083). Conclusion This study demonstrates that: (1) parenteral NSAIDs are very effective as

  8. Hip fracture management for the hospital-based clinician: a review of the evidence and best practices.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Jason; Newman, Jonathan; Pendleton, Robert C

    2011-02-01

    Hip fracture is an unfortunate and common health problem in the elderly that is associated with a 1-year mortality of 10% to 35%. Further, only 50% of these patients regain their pre-fracture level of mobility and functional status. Hospital-based clinicians are increasingly asked to comanage these patients. The purpose of this article is to summarize evidence-based clinical management practices that are relevant to hospitalist clinicians who manage hip fracture patients, and to highlight the current evidence for implementing a formal hospitalist and orthopedic comanagement care model. PMID:21441759

  9. Concomitant Posterior Hip Dislocation, Ipsilateral Intertrochanteric- and Proximal Tibial- Fractures with Popliteal Artery Injury: A Challenging Trauma Mélange

    PubMed Central

    Chotai, Pranit N.; Hart, Ryan; Wassef, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Constellation of ipsilateral posterior hip dislocation, intertrochanteric- and proximal tibial fracture with popliteal artery injury is rare. Management of this presentation is challenging. A motor vehicle accident victim presented with these injuries, but without any initial signs of vascular compromise. Popliteal artery injury was diagnosed intra-operatively and repaired. This was followed by external fixation of tibial fracture, open reduction of dislocated hip and internal fixation of intertrochanteric fracture. Patient regained bilateral complete weight bearing and returned to pre-accident activity level. Apt surgical management including early repair of vascular injury in such a trauma mélange allows for a positive postoperative outcome. PMID:26918095

  10. Fusion of clinical and stochastic finite element data for hip fracture risk prediction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Missoum, Samy; Chen, Zhao

    2015-11-26

    Hip fracture affects more than 250,000 people in the US and 1.6 million worldwide per year. With an aging population, the development of reliable fracture risk models is therefore of prime importance. Due to the complexity of the hip fracture phenomenon, the use of clinical data only, as it is done traditionally, might not be sufficient to ensure an accurate and robust hip fracture prediction model. In order to increase the predictive ability of the risk model, the authors propose to supplement the clinical data with computational data from finite element models. The fusion of the two types of data is performed using deterministic and stochastic computational data. In the latter case, uncertainties in loading and material properties of the femur are accounted for and propagated through the finite element model. The predictive capability of a support vector machine (SVM) risk model constructed by combining clinical and finite element data was assessed using a Women׳s Health Initiative (WHI) dataset. The dataset includes common factors such as age and BMD as well as geometric factors obtained from DXA imaging. The fusion of computational and clinical data systematically leads to an increase in predictive ability of the SVM risk model as measured by the AUC metric. It is concluded that the largest gains in AUC are obtained by the stochastic approach. This gain decreases as the dimensionality of the problem increases: a 5.3% AUC improvement was achieved for a 9 dimensional problem involving geometric factors and weight while a 1.3% increase was obtained for a 20 dimensional case including geometric and conventional factors. PMID:26482733

  11. Economic analysis of surgical treatment of hip fracture in older adults.

    PubMed

    Loures, Fabiano Bolpato; Chaoubah, Alfredo; Oliveira, Valdeci Manoel de; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Campos, Estela Márcia de Saraiva; Paiva, Elenir Pereira de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the incremental cost-utility ratio for the surgical treatment of hip fracture in older patients. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study of a systematic sample of patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture at a central hospital of a macro-region in the state of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011. A decision tree creation was analyzed considering the direct medical costs. The study followed the healthcare provider's perspective and had a one-year time horizon. Effectiveness was measured by the time elapsed between trauma and surgery after dividing the patients into early and late surgery groups. The utility was obtained in a cross-sectional and indirect manner using the EuroQOL 5 Dimensions generic questionnaire transformed into cardinal numbers using the national regulations established by the Center for the Development and Regional Planning of the State of Minas Gerais. The sample included 110 patients, 27 of whom were allocated in the early surgery group and 83 in the late surgery group. The groups were stratified by age, gender, type of fracture, type of surgery, and anesthetic risk. RESULTS The direct medical cost presented a statistically significant increase among patients in the late surgery group (p < 0.005), mainly because of ward costs (p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality was higher in the late surgery group (7.4% versus 16.9%). The decision tree demonstrated the dominance of the early surgery strategy over the late surgery strategy: R$9,854.34 (USD4,387.17) versus R$26,754.56 (USD11,911.03) per quality-adjusted life year. The sensitivity test with extreme values proved the robustness of the results. CONCLUSIONS After controlling for confounding variables, the strategy of early surgery for hip fracture in the older adults was proven to be dominant, because it presented a lower cost and better results than late surgery. PMID:25741654

  12. Dependence for basic and instrumental activities of daily living after hip fractures.

    PubMed

    González-Zabaleta, Jorge; Pita-Fernandez, Salvador; Seoane-Pillado, Teresa; López-Calviño, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Zabaleta, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to determine basic activities of daily living (Barthel Index) and instrumental activities of daily living (Lawton-Brody Index) before and after hip fracture. Follow-up study of patients (n=100) with hip fracture, operated at Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de A Coruña (Spain). Period January/2009-December/2011. Demographic characteristic of the patients, Charlson Index, Glomerular filtration rate, Barthel index, Lawton index, type of proximal femur fracture and surgical treatment delay were recorded. Multivariate regression was performed. Informed patient consent and ethical review approval were obtained. Before fracture were independent for activities of daily living (ADL) a 38.0%, at 90 days were 15.4%. The Barthel index score decreased from 75.2±28.2 to 56.5±31.8) (p<0.0001). If we consider the age, gender, comorbidity (Charlson index), renal function, fracture type and surgical delay objectify the only independent variable to predict dependency effect is age. If we also consider the Barthel score objectify the variable that significantly modifies that score at 90 days is the baseline value of the index. The prevalence of independence for instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) at the baseline moment is 11% and at 90 days is decreased to 2.2%. There is a decrease in the independence effect in all activities. The variable predictor of independence for all activities after taking into consideration age, sex, comorbidity, fracture type, surgical delay and renal function is the baseline score of the Barthel and Lawton index. PMID:25465506

  13. Comparing the Intramedullary Nailing Method Versus Dynamic Hip Screw in Treatment of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Ali; Taghavi, Roozbeh; Moghtadaei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Hip Screw fixation is currently considered as a standard treatment for pre-trochanteric fractures; however, due to the long-term hospitalization and some other complications, some researchers have proposed intramedullary nailing as the alternative surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to compare and examine the consequences of the using intramedullary nailing method versus Dynamic Hip Screw. Methods: In this study 114 patients with unstable Intertrochanteric fracture refer to Rasoul Akram hospital during 2011 to 2013 has been selected. After reduction, fixation surgery with PFN nail (60 patients) and Dynamic Hip Screw (54 patients) has been performed. All patients were screen during surgery and six months after surgery and some parameters like, bleeding, union, as well as complications such as collapse, varus and medialization of the distal fragment were record and patients. Results: About some parameters like cutting length, surgery duration, bleeding there were significant differences between two groups. In six months follow up period 2 patinas from nail and 8 patients from DHS group had non-union. Also from the point of radiologic and clinical parameters, like anterior thigh pain, cut out, medialization of the distal fragment, collapse of the neck, walking recovery and daily activities were significant between two groups. Conclusion: Due to the reduced hospital stay in intramedullary nailing method and the necessity of doing repeated surgery and applying intramedullary nailing when the patients are not treated with external fixation, the researchers recommend intramedullary nailing as the first option in treating such patients. PMID:26980933

  14. What is the risk of death or severe harm due to bone cement implantation syndrome among patients undergoing hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur? A patient safety surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, Paul D; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Darzi, Ara; Donaldson, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of death or severe harm due to bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) among patients undergoing hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur. Setting Hospitals providing secondary and tertiary care throughout the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. Participants Cases reported to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) in which the reporter clearly describes severe acute patient deterioration associated with cement use in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur (assessed independently by two reviewers). Outcome measures Primary—number of reported deaths, cardiac arrests and periarrests per year. Secondary—timing of deterioration and outcome in relation to cement insertion. Results Between 2005 and 2012, the NRLS received 62 reports that clearly describe death or severe harm associated with the use of cement in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur. There was one such incident for every 2900 hemiarthroplasties for fractured neck of femur during the period. Of the 62 reports, 41 patients died, 14 were resuscitated from cardiac arrest and 7 from periarrest. Most reports (55/62, 89%) describe acute deterioration occurring during or within a few minutes of cement insertion. The vast majority of deaths (33/41, 80%) occurred on the operating table. Conclusions These reports provide narrative evidence from England and Wales that cement use in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur is associated with instances of perioperative death or severe harm consistent with BCIS. In 2009, the National Patient Safety Agency publicised this issue and encouraged the use of mitigation measures. Three-quarters of the deaths in this study have occurred since that alert, suggesting incomplete implementation or effectiveness of those mitigation measures. There is a need for stronger evidence that weighs the risks and benefits of cement in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur. PMID

  15. A Continuous Infusion Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block in Hip Fracture Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dulaney-Cripe, Elizabeth; Hadaway, Scott; Bauman, Ryan; Trame, Cathy; Smith, Carole; Sillaman, Becky; Laughlin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Background Hip fractures account for 350,000 fractures annually and the projected incidence is expected to exceed 6.3 million by 2050. As the number of hip fractures continues to increase as a result of the aging American population, the importance of limiting and preventing complications is magnified. Methods This study demonstrated the clinical effects of a continuous fascia iliaca compartment block placed pre-operatively when combined with a comprehensive pain protocol. All patients who presented to our institution with a hip fracture were given the option of having a continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for pain control versus usual pain management (non-opioids, opioids, and ice therapy). The block was monitored by the pain service until the day of discharge from the hospital. Data was collected regarding mean pain scores, average length of stay and opioid medication use. Results There were eighteen males and twenty four females. The pain score on post-operative day zero was reduced from a 2010 annual average of 4.1 to 1.7 in the pilot study group on the visual analog score. On post-operative day one, the 2010 annual average was 2.9 compared to 1.4 in the pilot study group. The length of stay was decreased from the 2010 annual average of 5.9 days to 4.8 days in the pilot study group. The patients used an average of 18mg of morphine equivalent medications during the average infusion time of 40.7 hours. There were no falls or infections noted within our pilot study group. Conclusions Overall, it has been noticed that the reduction in opioid usage in this elderly patient population, with an average age of seventy five years, has produced alert and mobile patients often as early as post-operative day one. The length of stay has decreased along with the average pain score in the pilot sample of forty two patients. Keywords Hip fracture; Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block; Pain Score PMID:22383926

  16. The use of damage control orthopaedics to minimize negative sequelae of surgery delay in elderly comorbid patients with hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Dong, C-H; Wang, Z-M; Zhao, X-L; Wang, A-M

    2016-06-01

    Hip surgeries count to the most frequent orthopaedic operations in older patients. Nonelective surgeries for hip fractures cause substantial economic burden because of high costs of medical treatment and high associated mortality. Surgery for hip fracture in the elderly comorbid patient still presents a challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. It is recommended that this surgery is performed within 48 hours after sustaining the hip fracture to decrease mortality. Yet the recommended early surgery (i.e. 48 hours after the incident) is not always feasible due to the frequent overall frailty of the patients or conditions of concomitant disease. The care of patients unfit for early surgery has been not adequately addressed in the literature. We have previously introduced an algorithm based on ASA-PS and P-POSSUM scores to stratify elderly comorbid patients for early vs delayed hip surgery, and used principles of Damage Control Orthopaedics to minimized negative sequelae of surgery delay (Dong C et al., PLoS One 2016). In this paper, we elaborate on Damage Control Orthopaedics and the proposed approach in the context of frequent comorbidities in the elderly orthopaedic patients. Further studies on this subject are urgently needed to establish international consensus on hip fracture surgery delayed due to overall patient frailty or extensive comorbidities. PMID:27383299

  17. One-Year Outcome of Geriatric Hip-Fracture Patients following Prolonged ICU Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Eschbach, Daphne; Bliemel, Christopher; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Aigner, Rene; Hack, Juliana; Bockmann, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Buecking, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Incidence of geriatric fractures is increasing. Knowledge of outcome data for hip-fracture patients undergoing intensive-care unit (ICU) treatment, including invasive ventilatory management (IVM) and hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), is sparse. Methods. Single-center prospective observational study including 402 geriatric hip-fracture patients. Age, gender, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, and the Barthel index (BI) were documented. Underlying reasons for prolonged ICU stay were registered, as well as assessed procedures like IVM and CVVHDF. Outcome parameters were in-hospital, 6-month, and 1-year mortality and need for nursing care. Results. 15% were treated > 3 days and 68% < 3 days in ICU. Both cohorts had similar ASA, BI, and age. In-hospital, 6-month, and 12-month mortality of ICU > 3d cohort were significantly increased (p = 0.001). Most frequent indications were cardiocirculatory pathology followed by respiratory failure, renal impairment, and infection. 18% of patients needed CVVHDF and 41% IVM. In these cohorts, 6-month mortality ranged > 80% and 12-month mortality > 90%. 100% needed nursing care after 6 and 12 months. Conclusions. ICU treatment > 3 days showed considerable difference in mortality and nursing care needed after 6 and 12 months. Particularly, patients requiring CVVHDF or IVM had disastrous long-term results. Our study may add one further element in complex decision making serving this vulnerable patient cohort. PMID:26881228

  18. The unfavorable nature of preoperative delirium in elderly hip fractured patients.

    PubMed

    Adunsky, Abraham; Levy, Rami; Heim, Michael; Mizrahi, Eliyahu; Arad, M

    2003-01-01

    The onset of delirium is frequent in elderly patients who sustain hip fractures. The purpose of this study was to characterize different patterns of preoperative and postoperative delirium, to study factors associated with preoperative delirium and to evaluate the possible different outcome of these patients. This retrospective study comprised 281 elderly patients with hip fractures undergoing surgical fixation. Data collection included age, sex, length of stay, type of fracture, cognitive status by mini mental state examination (MMSE), assessment of possible delirium by the confusion assessment method (CAM) and functional outcome assessed by functional independence measure (FIM). A database search was conducted to identify whether delirium onset occurred prior to or following surgery. About 31% of the total sample developed delirium. Delirious patients tended to be more disabled (P = 0.03) and cognitively impaired (P = 0.018), compared with non-delirious patients. Most delirious cases (53%) had their onset in the preoperative period. Patients with preoperative delirium were older (P = 0.03), had a lower prefracture mobility (P < 0.01), impaired cognition (P = 0.04) and showed an adverse functional outcome in terms of FIM score. Regression analysis showed that prefracture dementia, prefracture mobility and low MMSE scores were strongly associated with higher probability of having preoperative delirium, with no additional effect of other variables. It is concluded that preoperative delirium should be viewed as a separate entity with unfavorable nature and adverse outcome. Careful preventive measures and better treating strategies should be employed to avoid this clinical condition. PMID:12849100

  19. One-Year Outcome of Geriatric Hip-Fracture Patients following Prolonged ICU Treatment.

    PubMed

    Eschbach, Daphne; Bliemel, Christopher; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Aigner, Rene; Hack, Juliana; Bockmann, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Buecking, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Incidence of geriatric fractures is increasing. Knowledge of outcome data for hip-fracture patients undergoing intensive-care unit (ICU) treatment, including invasive ventilatory management (IVM) and hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), is sparse. Methods. Single-center prospective observational study including 402 geriatric hip-fracture patients. Age, gender, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, and the Barthel index (BI) were documented. Underlying reasons for prolonged ICU stay were registered, as well as assessed procedures like IVM and CVVHDF. Outcome parameters were in-hospital, 6-month, and 1-year mortality and need for nursing care. Results. 15% were treated > 3 days and 68% < 3 days in ICU. Both cohorts had similar ASA, BI, and age. In-hospital, 6-month, and 12-month mortality of ICU > 3d cohort were significantly increased (p = 0.001). Most frequent indications were cardiocirculatory pathology followed by respiratory failure, renal impairment, and infection. 18% of patients needed CVVHDF and 41% IVM. In these cohorts, 6-month mortality ranged > 80% and 12-month mortality > 90%. 100% needed nursing care after 6 and 12 months. Conclusions. ICU treatment > 3 days showed considerable difference in mortality and nursing care needed after 6 and 12 months. Particularly, patients requiring CVVHDF or IVM had disastrous long-term results. Our study may add one further element in complex decision making serving this vulnerable patient cohort. PMID:26881228

  20. Are the High Hip Fracture Rates Among Norwegian Women Explained by Impaired Bone Material Properties?

    PubMed

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Vilaplana, Laila; Güerri, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Wang-Fagerland, Morten; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; F Eriksen, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture rates in Norway rank among the highest in the world, more than double that of Spanish women. Previous studies were unable to demonstrate significant differences between the two populations with respect to bone mass or calcium metabolism. In order to test whether the difference in fracture propensity between both populations could be explained by differences in bone material quality we assessed bone material strength using microindentation in 42 Norwegian and 46 Spanish women with normal BMD values, without clinical or morphometric vertebral fractures, no clinical or laboratory signs of secondary osteoporosis, and without use of drugs with known influence on bone metabolism. Bone material properties were assessed by microindentation of the thick cortex of the mid tibia following local anesthesia of the area using the Osteoprobe device (Active Life Scientific, Santa Barbara, CA, USA). Indentation distance was standardized against a calibration phantom of methylmethacrylate and results, as percentage of this reference value, expressed as bone material strength index units (BMSi). We found that the bone material properties reflected in the BMSi value of Norwegian women was significantly inferior when compared to Spanish women (77 ± 7.1 versus 80.7 ± 7.8, p < 0.001). Total hip BMD was significantly higher in Norwegian women (1.218 g/cm(2) versus 0.938 g/cm(2) , p < 0.001) but regression analysis revealed that indentation values did not vary with BMD r(2)  = 0.03 or age r(2)  = 0.04. In conclusion Norwegian women show impaired bone material properties, higher bone mass, and were taller than Spanish women. The increased height will increase the impact on bone after falls, and impaired bone material properties may further enhance the risk fracture after such falls. These ethnic differences in bone material properties may partly explain the higher propensity for fracture in Norwegian women. PMID:25900016

  1. Non-Operative Care for Hip Fracture in the Elderly: The Influence of Race, Income, and Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Mark D.; Fleisher, Lee A.; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Mi, Lanyu; Silber, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Context Hip fracture occurs in 340,000 older adults each year. Operative repair is the standard of care, maximizing the chances of functional recovery. Not receiving operative care may condemn patients to a lifetime of pain and potential immobility. Objective To measure the incidence of non-operative treatment for first-time hip fracture in a population-based cohort and to measure the odds of non-operative treatment of hip fracture among patients of differing race and income. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study of 165,861 Medicare beneficiaries admitted for hip fracture between March 31, 2002 and December 31, 2006 to hospitals in New York, Illinois, and Texas. Main Outcome Measures Odds of non-operative management of hip fracture, adjusted for fracture characteristics, comorbidities, source of admission, age, sex, race, income, and individual hospital effects. Results Non-operative management occurred in 6.2% of patients (N=10,283). After adjustment, black patients had a 79% increase in the odds of non-operative management as compared to whites (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.64-1.95). Low income itself was not associated with a change in the odds of non-operative care. Among patients not receiving operative repair, blacks demonstrated lower mortality than whites at 7 days (7.96% vs. 20.17%, p < 0.0001) and 30 days (24.14% vs. 38.22%, p<0.0001). Conclusions Black race predicts an increased odds of non-operative care for hip fracture. Among patients receiving non-operative care, black patients demonstrated increased survival compared to whites. These results are consistent with differential selection of operative candidates by patient race. PMID:20355262

  2. HIP FRACTURE: POST-OPERATIVE EVALUATION OF CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Marcelo Teodoro Ezequiel; Thober, Thomas Alexandre; Bigolin, André Vicente; de Souza, Marcos Paulo; Echeveste, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from patients undergoing surgery to treat hip fractures, with regard to the ASA score and time spent waiting for definitive surgical treatment. Method: Over a one-year period, 154 patients with hip fractures, aged 65 years and over, underwent operations. Data on the preoperative ASA score and the time spent waiting for the operation were obtained. Two years after the operation, Zuckerman‘s Functional Recovery Score (FRS) questionnaire was used to assess the patients' current functional capacity. Results: Mortality during the first postoperative year differed between patients with ASA 3 or 4 and those classified as ASA 1 or 2 (significant data; p < 0.05). Mortality up to the end of the second postoperative year was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the ASA 3 or 4 group. The preoperative ASA score did not demonstrate any significant relationship with the patients' current functional capacity (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference between the group operated within 48 hours of admission and the group operated after 48 hours, in relation to mortality or current functional capacity (p > 0.05). The group aged 80 years and over showed significantly higher mortality (p < 0.05) than the group aged 65 to 79 years up to the end of the second postoperative year. Conclusion: The preoperative ASA score and an age of 80 years or over may be considered to be factors associated with higher mortality two years after hip fracture surgery. In isolation, time spent waiting for surgery was not significant. PMID:27026967

  3. Addition of an anti-rotation screw to the dynamic hip screw for femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Makki, Daoud; Mohamed, Ahmed M; Gadiyar, Rajeev; Patterson, Marc

    2013-07-01

    The authors investigated the use of an anti-rotation screw with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) during internal fixation of Garden I and II femoral neck fractures. Sixty-five patients with Garden I and II femoral neck fractures (mean age, 70 years) were treated with internal fixation at the authors' institution. In 31 patients, a 2-hole DHS was used alone (group 1), and in 34 patients, the DHS was combined with an anti-rotation screw placed in the cranial part of femoral head and neck (group 2). Patients' preinjury function and mental level were assessed using the Barthel index and the Abbreviated Mental test, respectively. The outcome measures included cost implications, operative time, and intraoperative radiation dose. The modified Harris Hip Score and a radiological assessment were performed at a mean of 11 months (range, 8-24 months) postoperatively. The use of the anti-rotation screw was associated with a longer operative time (mean, 44.54 minutes in group 1 vs 51.52 minutes in group 2; P<.0001) and more fluoroscopy screening (mean dose area product, 28.39 cGy/cm(2) in group 1 vs 44.33 cGy/cm(2) in group 2; P=.03). The additional cost of using an anti-rotation screw was £106 ($170) per case. No difference existed between the 2 groups with regard to radiological union, onset of avascular necrosis, and rate of revision surgeries. An anti-rotation screw, used with the dynamic hip screw, involves extra costs, prolongs operative time, and requires more intraoperative fluoroscopy screening but offers no advantages with regard to fracture union. PMID:23823042

  4. Analgesia in hip fractures. Do fascia-iliac blocks make any difference?

    PubMed Central

    Callear, Jacqueline; Shah, Ku

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent national advances in the care for the hip fracture patient, significant morbidity and mortality persists. Some of this morbidity is attributable to the analgesia provided in the hospital setting. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence and the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland recommend the use of simple oral analgesia including opioids, with fascia-iliac blocks (FIB) used as an adjunct. Literature review reveals a paucity of evidence on this. The aim of this project was to evaluate the proportion of patients receiving a fascia-iliac block prior to operative intervention. A secondary aim was to evaluate the efficacy of these blocks through analysis of pre and post-operative opioid usage, post-operative delirium, time to bowel opening, and naloxone use. Patients who received a fascia-iliac block received significantly less post-operative and total analgesia (p=0.04, p=0.03), had lower rates of delirium (p=0.03) and those patients which were discharged directly home had a shorter inpatient stay (p=0.03). No patients who received a fascia-iliac block (FIB) needed naloxone to reverse opioid toxicity, whilst two without fascia-iliac block did. The results of the project eventually led to the introduction of a hip fracture care pathway which incorporates a single shot fascia-iliac block for all patients who are eligible. Within a two year study period, compliance with fascia-iliac blocks improved from 54% to 90%. Our experience shows a great improvement in compliance with fascia-iliac blocks in the pre-operative period. This work has also underpinned the introduction of a new hip fracture care pathway ultimately to better patient care and outcomes. PMID:26893899

  5. Analgesic Efficacy of Ultrasound Guided FICB in Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Sarla; Kiran, Shashi; Devi, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures are often encountered in the elderly and present special problems to the anaesthesiologist. Fascia iliaca compartment block is another technique with the intent to block all the three nerves like 3-in-1 nerve block. Aim To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound guided fascia iliaca compartment block to facilitate positioning of patients with hip fracture for spinal anaesthesia. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted in 50 patients aged between 40-80 years, belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I-III undergoing surgery for hip fracture. All 50 patients received an ultrasound guided Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block (FICB) in the premedication room with 30 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine by 23G spinal needle. Sensory blockade was evaluated 5, 10 and 20 minutes after ropivacaine administration using loss of perception to cold in the lateral, anterior and medial part of the thigh. Visual analogue scale scores were noted before the block, 20 minutes after block and during positioning for spinal anaesthesia. Patient’s acceptance for FICB was evaluated 24 hour after arriving back to the orthopaedics ward using a two-point score. Any episode of hypotension or bradycardia was noted and managed accordingly. Results In lateral part of thigh, at 5 minutes sensory blockade was present in 33 patients (66%) and at 10 minutes sensory blockade was present in 45 cases (90%). In anterior part of thigh, sensory blockade was present in 34 cases (68%) at 5 minutes time interval and at 10 minutes sensory blockade was present in 48 cases (96%). In medial part of thigh, 28 cases (56%) had sensory blockade at 5 minutes and at 10 minutes in 43 cases (86%). Sensory blockage was same at 20 minutes as on 10 minutes interval in all thigh parts. Before FIC block average VAS was 7.5 which was decreased to average of 2.94 at 20 minutes after block which was statistically significant (p<0.01). During positioning for

  6. The economic impact of medical complications in geriatric patients with hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Khasraghi, Fardin A; Lee, Eu Jin; Christmas, Colleen; Wenz, James F

    2003-01-01

    The records of 510 elderly patients with hip fractures admitted to our institution between January 1995 and December 2000 were retrospectively reviewed to determine the incidence and type of developed medical complications and their economic implications. Of those 510 patients, 217 (43%) developed at least 1 medical complication, most frequently electrolyte imbalance (11%), urinary tract infection (10%), respiratory failure (10%), and delirium (9%). Patients who developed medical complications had significantly longer mean hospital stays (10 days) and higher mean hospital costs ($16,203) than patients without such complications (5 days and $10,284, respectively) (P<.001). PMID:12555834

  7. Is there an association between body temperature and serum lactate levels in hip fracture patients?

    PubMed

    Murtuza, F; Farrier, A J; Venkatesan, M; Smith, R; Khan, A; Uzoigwe, C E; Chami, G

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Hyperlactataemia is associated with adverse outcomes in trauma cases. It is thought to be the result of anaerobic respiration during hypoperfusion. This produces much less energy than complete aerobic glycolysis. Low body temperature in the injured patient carries an equally poor prognosis. Significant amounts of energy are expended in maintaining euthermia. Consequently, there may be a link between lactate levels and dysthermia. Hyperlactataemia may be indicative of inefficient energy production and therefore insufficient energy to maintain euthermia. Alternatively, significant amounts of available oxygen may be sequestered in thermoregulation, resulting in anaerobic respiration and lactate production. Our study investigated whether there is an association between lactate levels and admission body temperature in hip fracture patients. Furthermore, it looked at whether there is a difference in the mean lactate levels between hip fracture patients with low (<36.5°C), normal (36.5-37.5°C) and high (>37.5°C) body temperature on admission, and for patients who have low body temperature, whether there is a progressive rise in serum lactate levels as body temperature falls. Methods The admission temperature and serum lactate of 1,162 patients presenting with hip fracture were recorded. Patients were divided into the euthermic (body temperature 36.5-37.5°C), the pyrexial (>37.5°C) and those with low body temperature (<36.5°C). Admission lactate and body temperature were compared. Results There was a significant difference in age between the three body temperature groups (p=0.007). The pyrexial cohort was younger than the low body temperature group (mean: 78 vs 82 years). Those with low body temperature had a higher mean lactate level than the euthermic (2.2mmol/l vs 2.0mmol/l, p=0.03). However, there was no progressive rise in serum lactate level as admission temperature fell. Conclusions The findings suggest that in hip fracture patients, the body

  8. Incidence And Risk Factors For 30-Day Readmissions After Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T; Gao, Yubo; Pugely, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unplanned hospital readmission following orthopedic procedures results in significant expenditures for the Medicare population. In order to reduce expenditures, hospital readmission has become an important quality metric for Medicare patients. The purpose of the present study is to determine the incidence and risk factors for 30-day readmissions after hip fracture surgery. Methods Patients over the age of 18 years who underwent hip fracture surgery, including open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), intramedullary nailing, hemi-arthroplasty, or total hip arthroplasty, between the years 2012 and 2013 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Overall, 17,765 patients were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed in order to determine patient and surgical factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results There were 1503 patients (8.4%) readmitted within 30-days of their index procedure. Of the patients with a reason listed for readmission, 27.4% were for procedurally related reasons, including wound complications (16%), peri-prosthetic fractures (4.5%) and prosthetic dislocations (6%). 72.6% of readmissions were for medical reasons, including sepsis (7%), pneumonia (14%), urinary tract infection (6.3%), myocardial infarction (2.7%), renal failure (2.7%), and stroke (2.3%). In the subsequent multivariate analysis, pre-operative dyspnea, COPD, hypertension, disseminated cancer, a bleeding disorder, pre-operative hematocrit of <36, pre-operative creatinine of >1.2, an ASA class of 3 or 4, and the operative procedure type were each independently associated with readmissions risk (p<0.05 for each). Conclusions The overall rate of readmission following hip fracture surgery was moderate. Surgeons should consider discharge optimization in the at risk cohorts identified here, particularly patients with multiple medical comorbidities or an elevated ASA class, and

  9. The effects of once-weekly teriparatide on hip geometry assessed by hip structural analysis in postmenopausal osteoporotic women with high fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Sone, Teruki; Ito, Masako; Fukunaga, Masao; Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Shiraki, Masataka; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2014-07-01

    Weekly administration of teriparatide has been shown to reduce the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in patients with osteoporosis at higher fracture risk in Japan. However, its efficacy for hip fracture has not been established. To gain insight into the effect of weekly teriparatide on the hip, hip structural analysis (HSA) based on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed using the data of 209 postmenopausal osteoporotic women who had participated in the original randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial assessing the effects of once-weekly 56.5 μg teriparatide for 72 weeks. The DXA scans, obtained at baseline, 48 weeks and 72 weeks, were analyzed to extract bone mineral density (BMD) and cross-sectional geometrical indices at the narrowest point on the neck (NN), the intertrochanteric region (IT), and the proximal shaft. Compared with placebo after 72 weeks, the teriparatide group showed significantly higher BMD, average cortical thickness, bone cross-sectional area, and section modulus, and lower buckling ratio at both the NN and IT regions. No significant expansion of periosteal diameter was observed at these regions. There were no significant differences in BMD and HSA indices at the shaft region. The results indicate that overall structural strength in the proximal femur increased compared to placebo, suggesting that once-weekly teriparatide effectively reverses changes in hip geometry and strength with aging. PMID:24727160

  10. Could Patient Undergwent Surgical Treatment for Periprosthetic Femoral Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty Return to Their Status before Trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Long; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Noh, Chang-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare preoperative clinical outcomes before occurrence of periprosthetic femoral fracture (status before trauma) with postoperative clinical outcomes (status after operation) in patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of all periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty treated surgically at our institution from January 2010 to January 2014. Among 29 patients who underwent surgical treatment for periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty, 3 patients excluded because of non-union of the fracture site. The clinical outcomes were determined by using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS), Harris hip score (HHS), and ambulatory ability using Koval classification. VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability was assessed for all the included patients at the last follow-up of status before trauma and after operation. Results The mean VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability at the last follow-up of status before trauma was 2.2 (range, 0-4), 78.9 (range, 48-92) and 1.9 (range, 1-5), respectively. The mean VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability at the last follow-up of status after operation was 3.1 (range, 1-5), 68.4 (range, 46-81) and 2.9 (range, 2-6), respectively. The clinical outcome of VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability were significantly worsened after surgical treatment for periprosthetic femoral fracture (P=0.010, P=0.001, and P=0.002, respectively). Conclusion Patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty could not return to their status before trauma, although patients underwent appropriate surgical treatment and the fracture union achieved. PMID:27536650

  11. Hip fracture risk estimation based on bone mineral density of a biomechanically guided region of interest: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjun; Kornak, John; Li, Caixia; Koyama, Alain; Saeed, Isra; Lu, Ying; Lang, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    We aim to define a biomechanically-guided region of interest inside the proximal femur for improving fracture risk prediction based on bone density measurements. The central hypothesis is that by identifying and focusing on the proximal femoral tissues strongly associated with hip fracture risk, we can provide a better densitometric evaluation of fracture risk compared to current evaluations based on anatomically defined regions of interest using DXA or CT. To achieve this, we have constructed a hip statistical atlas of quantitative computed tomography (QCT) images by applying rigid and non-rigid inter-subject image registration to transform hip QCT scans of 15 fractured patients and 15 controls into a common reference space, and performed voxel-by-voxel t-tests between the two groups to identify bone tissues that showed the strongest relevance to hip fracture. Based on identification of this fracture-relevant tissue volume, we have generated a biomechanically-guided region of interest (B-ROI). We have applied BMD measured from this new region of interest to discriminate the fractured patients and controls, and compared it to BMD measured in the total proximal femur. For the femur ROI approach, the BMD values of the fractured patients and the controls had an overlap of 60 mg/cm 3, and only 1 out of 15 fractured patients had BMD below the overlap region; for the B-ROI approach, a much narrower BMD overlap region of 28 mg/cm 3 was observed, and 11 out of 15 fractured patients had BMDs below the overlap region.

  12. Trends in Media Reports, Oral Bisphosphonate Prescriptions, and Hip Fractures 1996-2012: An Ecological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Smita; Wang, Zhong; Laucis, Nicholas; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    Bisphosphonates are effective for the treatment of osteoporosis despite recent reports of safety concerns such as atypical femur fracture. We conducted an ecological analysis of relevant media reports, oral bisphosphonate use, and fracture outcomes in the United States. Trends in media reports and public interest of bisphosphonates were quantified using data from Google Trends. Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) were used to estimate the trends in oral bisphosphonate use among patients aged 55 years and older and hospitalizations for intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures, respectively. These trends in the prevalence of oral bisphosphonate use and the age-adjusted incidence rate of intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures were examined from 1996 to 2012. A series of spikes in Internet search activity for alendronate (Fosamax) occurred between 2006 and 2010 immediately following media reports of safety concerns. Oral bisphosphonate use declined by greater than 50% between 2008 and 2012 (p < 0.001) after increasing use for more than a decade. The decline was more common in patients with lower education levels. Intertrochanteric hip fractures declined from 1996 through 2006 (p < 0.001) and continued to decline from 2008 to 2012 (p < 0.05). Subtrochanteric and diaphyseal fractures showed a steady and significant increase from 2002 to 2011 (p < 0.05). However, the incidence decreased from a peak of 30.5 per 100,000 in 2011 to 26.7 per 100,000 in 2012. The plateauing and subsequent decline in oral bisphosphonate use since 2006 coincided with reports of safety concerns of bisphosphonates, despite the fact that U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and American Society of Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) reports did not recommend any safety restrictions on their use. This decline in oral bisphosphonate use was followed by the decline in the incidence of subtrochanteric and diaphyseal fractures

  13. Burden of non-hip, non-vertebral fractures on quality of life in postmenopausal women: the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW)

    PubMed Central

    Roux, C.; Wyman, A.; Hooven, F. H.; Gehlbach, S. H.; Adachi, J. D.; Chapurlat, R. D.; Compston, J. E.; Cooper, C.; Díez-Pérez, A.; Greenspan, S. L.; LaCroix, A. Z.; Netelenbos, J. C.; Pfeilschifter, J.; Rossini, M.; Saag, K. G.; Sambrook, P. N.; Silverman, S.; Siris, E. S.; Watts, N. B.; Boonen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Most fracture studies have focused on hip and vertebral fractures, but there is growing evidence that non-hip, non-vertebral (NHNV) fractures also result in substantial morbidity and healthcare costs. We sought to assess the effect of NHNV fractures on quality of life. Methods We analyzed 1-year incidences of hip, spine, major NHNV (pelvis/leg, shoulder/arm) and minor NHNV (wrist/hand, ankle/foot, rib/clavicle) fractures among women from the GLOW registry, a prospective, multinational, observational cohort study. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) was analyzed using EuroQol EQ-5D and the SF-36 health survey. Results Among 50,461 women analyzed, there were 1,822 fractures (57% minor NHNV, 26% major NHNV, 10% spine, 7% hip) over 1 year. Spine fractures had the greatest detrimental effect on EQ-5D summary scores, followed by major NHNV and hip fractures. The amount of women with mobility problems increased most for those with major NHNV and spine fractures (both +8%); spine fractures were associated with the largest increases in problems with self care (+11%), activities (+14%), and pain/discomfort (+12%). Decreases in physical function and health status were greatest for women with spine or hip fractures. Multivariable modeling found that EQ-5D reduction was greatest for spine fractures, followed by hip and major/minor NHNV. Significant reductions in SF-36 physical function were found only for spine and major NHNV fractures. Conclusion This prospective study shows that NHNV fractures have a detrimental effect on HRQL. As NHNV fractures account for >80% of incident fractures, efforts to optimize osteoporosis care should include prevention of NHNV fractures. PMID:22398855

  14. Short versus long intramedullary nails for the treatment of intertrochanteric hip fractures in patients older than 65 years

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Yueju; Liang, Yi; Zhao, Changping; Zhang, Yingze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare failure rates between short and long intramedullary nails used for the treatment of intertrochanteric hip fractures in patients over 65 years of age. Methods: A retrospective review of 156 patients aged more than 65 years with femoral intertrochanteric fractures from December 2010 to December 2012 was performed. The patients were allocated to two groups: those treated with long nail (n=59) and short nail (n=97). Relevant patient variables and medical comorbidities were collected. Medical comorbidities were evaluated according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification and medical records were also reviewed for age, sex, intraoperative blood loss, operative time, length of stay, time to fracture union, hip pain, Harris Hip Score 1 year postoperatively, and failure rates. The failure rate was defined as periprosthetic fracture or reoperation requiring removal or revision of nail. Variables were statistically compared between the two groups, with statistical significance at P<0.05. Results: Patients treat with long nails and short nails were comparable for all assessed clinical variables (P>0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between these groups in intraoperative blood loss, time to fracture union and Harris Hip Score at 1 year postoperatively (P>0.05). The long nail group had significantly less failure rate (0/59) and hip pain rate (3/59) than those with short nail (3/97 and 13/97, respectively) (P < 0.05), but the operative time was significantly longer in the former (60.60 ± 11.43 minutes) than the latter (53.10 ± 8.51 minutes) group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Both the long and short intramedullary nails are the optional internal fixation choices for femoral intertrochanteric fracture in the aged patients older than 65 years. But the long nail could avoid the refracture of femur and reduced postoperative hip pain. PMID:26131244

  15. Data Mining Activity for Bone Discipline: Calculating a Factor of Risk for Hip Fracture in Long-Duration Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, R.; Sibonga, J. D.; Bouxsein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    The factor-of-risk (Phi), defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength, is a biomechanical approach to hip fracture risk assessment that may be used to identify subjects who are at increased risk for fracture. The purpose of this project was to calculate the factor of risk in long duration astronauts after return from a mission on the International Space Station (ISS), which is typically 6 months in duration. The load applied to the hip was calculated for a sideways fall from standing height based on the individual height and weight of the astronauts. The soft tissue thickness overlying the greater trochanter was measured from the DXA whole body scans and used to estimate attenuation of the impact force provided by soft tissues overlying the hip. Femoral strength was estimated from femoral areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurements by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which were performed between 5-32 days of landing. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expedition 1 to 18 were included in this study, where repeat flyers were treated as separate subjects. Male astronauts (n=20) had a significantly higher factor of risk for hip fracture Phi than females (n=5), with preflight values of 0.83+/-0.11 and 0.36+/-0.07, respectively, but there was no significant difference between preflight and postflight Phi (Figure 1). Femoral aBMD measurements were not found to be significantly different between men and women. Three men and no women exceeded the theoretical fracture threshold of Phi=1 immediately postflight, indicating that they would likely suffer a hip fracture if they were to experience a sideways fall with impact to the greater trochanter. These data suggest that male astronauts may be at greater risk for hip fracture than women following spaceflight, primarily due to relatively less soft tissue thickness and subsequently greater impact force.

  16. Use of proton pump inhibitors and risk of hip/femur fracture: a population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pouwels, S.; Lalmohamed, A.; Souverein, P.; Cooper, C.; Veldt, B. J.; Leufkens, H. G.; de Boer, A.; van Staa, T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Previous studies evaluated the association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and subsequent fracture risk, but they showed ambiguous results. Therefore, the objective was to evaluate this association in a different study population. Our findings show that there is probably no causal relationship between PPI use and hip fracture risk. Introduction Previous studies evaluated the association between PPI use and subsequent fracture risk, but they showed ambiguous results. To further test these conflicting results, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association between the use of PPIs and the risk of hip/femur fracture in a different study population. Methods A case-control study was conducted using data from the Dutch PHARMO record linkage system. The study population included 6,763 cases aged 18 years and older with a first hip/femur fracture during enrolment and 26,341 age-, gender- and region-matched controls. Results Current users of PPIs had an increased risk of hip/femur fracture yielding an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 1.20 (95% CI 1.04–1.40). Fracture risk attenuated with increasing durations of use, resulting in AORs of 1.26 (95% CI 0.94–1.68) in the first 3 months, 1.31 (95% CI 0.97–1.75) between 3 and 12 months, 1.18 (95% CI 0.92–1.52) between 13 and 36 months and 1.09 (95% CI 0.81–1.47) for use longer than 36 months. Conclusion Our findings show that there is probably no causal relationship between PPI use and hip fracture risk. The observed association may be the result of unmeasured distortions: although current use of PPIs was associated with a 1.2-fold increased risk of hip/femur fracture, the positive association was attenuated with longer durations of continuous use. Our findings do not support that discontinuation of PPIs decreases risk of hip fracture in elderly patients. PMID:20585937

  17. Evidence-based clinical audit criteria for the prevention and management of delirium in the postoperative patient with a hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Holly, Cheryl; Rittenmeyer, Leslie; Weeks, Susan Mace

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a frequent, yet often unrecognized, occurrence in elderly hospitalized patients. In patients with hip fracture, the incidence of delirium is reported to be as high as 62% and even greater if over 65 years of age. One approach to the prevention and management of postoperative delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture is the clinical audit. A clinical audit is a retrospective assessment of clinical care of patients and is guided by criteria that are evidence-based statements of best practice. The use of measurable, objective criterion, with an agreed standard of performance is the hallmark of an audit. The clinical audit criteria presented in this article for the prevention and management of delirium in hospitalized elderly with hip fracture were determined by a compilation of systematic reviews and existing evidence-based clinical guidelines. The following 5 audit criteria are discussed: (1) All elderly patients with a hip fracture are assessed for risk factors for developing delirium daily using a valid and reliable tool; (2) the environment of the patient with hip fracture is assessed daily for conduciveness to maintaining sensory orientation; (3) all patients with hip fracture receive essential nursing care; (4) appropriate clinical criteria are applied to confirm a diagnosis of delirium in patients with hip fracture; and (5) nonpharmacologic interventions are employed before pharmacologic interventions in patients with hip fracture with a diagnosis of delirium. PMID:24457386

  18. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  19. Calcium intake and risk of hip fracture in men and women a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of total calcium intake for the prevention of hip fracture risk has not been well established. The objective of this analysis was to assess the relation of calcium intake to risk of hip fracture based on meta-analyses of cohort studies and clinical trials. In cohort studies in women (7 stu...

  20. Malunited anterior inferior iliac spine fracture as a cause of hip impingement: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pingal, Desai; Marqueen, Timothy; Prakash, Karanvir

    2016-04-01

    Apophyseal injuries of the pelvis have increased recently with increased participation of teenagers in contact sports. Apophyseal fractures of the pelvis should be ruled out from apophysitis, os acetabuli and bony tumors. We report a case of fracture of anterior-inferior iliac spine following indirect injury to the hip in a young football player. The patient failed to get better with nonoperative management and continued to have pain in the left hip and signs and symptoms of impingement. He improved following surgical excision of the heterotopic bone and did not have any evidence of recurrence at 2 years follow- up. PMID:27140222

  1. Geriatric Hip Fractures and Inpatient Services: Predicting Hospital Charges Using the ASA Score.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Rachel V; Lee, Young M; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if the American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) score can be used to predict hospital charges for inpatient services. Materials and Methods. A retrospective chart review was conducted at a level I trauma center on 547 patients over the age of 60 who presented with a hip fracture and required operative fixation. Hospital charges associated with inpatient and postoperative services were organized within six categories of care. Analysis of variance and a linear regression model were performed to compare preoperative ASA scores with charges and inpatient services. Results. Inpatient and postoperative charges and services were significantly associated with patients' ASA scores. Patients with an ASA score of 4 had the highest average inpatient charges of services of $15,555, compared to $10,923 for patients with an ASA score of 2. Patients with an ASA score of 4 had an average of 45.3 hospital services compared to 24.1 for patients with a score of 2. Conclusions. A patient's ASA score is associated with total and specific hospital charges related to inpatient services. The findings of this study will allow payers to identify the major cost drivers for inpatient services based on a hip fracture patient's preoperative physical status. PMID:24876836

  2. Home-Based Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation following Hip Fracture Surgery: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Kathleen; Hoevenaars, Richelle; McEachern, Jocelyn; Zeman, Erica; Mehta, Saurabh

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effects of multidisciplinary home rehabilitation (MHR) on functional and quality of life (QOL) outcomes following hip fracture surgery. Methods. Systematic review methodology suggested by Cochrane Collboration was adopted. Reviewers independently searched the literature, selected the studies, extracted data, and performed critical appraisal of studies. Summary of the results of included studies was provided. Results. Five studies were included. Over the short-term, functional status and lower extremity strength were better in the MHR group compared to the no treatment group (NT). Over the long-term, the MHR group showed greater improvements in balance confidence, functional status, and lower extremity muscle strength compared to NT group, whereas the effect on QOL and mobility was inconsistent across the studies. Several methodological issues related to study design were noted across the studies. Conclusion. The MHR was found to be more effective compared to the NT in improving functional status and lower extremity strength in patients with hip fracture surgery. Results of this review do not make a strong case for MHR due to high risk of bias in the included studies. Further research is required to accurately characterize the types of disciplines involved in MHR and frequency and dosage of intervention. PMID:24455275

  3. Treatment and prevention of postoperative complications in hip fracture patients: infections and delirium.

    PubMed

    Dovjak, Peter; Iglseder, Bernhard; Mikosch, Peter; Gosch, Markus; Müller, Ernst; Pinter, Georg; Pils, Katharina; Gerstofer, Inge; Thaler, Heinrich; Zmaritz, Michaela; Weissenberger-Leduc, Monique; Müller, Walter

    2013-10-01

    The course of older patients with hip fractures is often complicated by infections and delirium. Accurate care and high suspicion for these complications are essential, since these conditions are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay and nursing home placement, poorer mobility, and functional decline. Because of immunosenescence and higher infection rates, older patients need specific care, immediate diagnosis, and treatment of infections. Numerous guidelines of various medical societies outline the management of nosocomial infections, but there is a need of an individualized treatment plan because of comorbidities and polypharmacy. Hygiene measures have first priority to reduce the rate of infections. Treatment of geriatric syndromes like malnutrition, exsiccosis, gait disorders, falls, delirium, urine incontinence, and organ insufficiency are as important as immunization against pneumococci and influenza. Advanced age, cognitive impairment, hearing loss, peripheral vascular disease, prior delirium episodes, sight disorders, and polypharmacy are established risk factors for delirium; thus, older people with several chronic diseases are prone to delirium. A multifactorial approach, comprising standardized screening, oxygen support, intravenous fluid administration and augmented nutrition, monitoring of vital signs, pain treatment, optimized medication, and modification in perioperative management, significantly reduces delirium incidence during hospitalization for hip fracture. An interdisciplinary approach between surgeons and geriatricians may warrant optimized satisfaction of patients' needs. PMID:23949565

  4. Do severity measures explain differences in length of hospital stay? The case of hip fracture.

    PubMed Central

    Shwartz, M; Iezzoni, L I; Ash, A S; Mackiernan, Y D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether judgments about hospital length of stay (LOS) vary depending on the measure used to adjust for severity differences. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Data on admissions to 80 hospitals nationwide in the 1992 MedisGroups Comparative Database. STUDY DESIGN: For each of 14 severity measures, LOS was regressed on patient age/sex, DRG, and severity score. Regressions were performed on trimmed and untrimmed data. R-squared was used to evaluate model performance. For each severity measure for each hospital, we calculated the expected LOS and the z-score, a measure of the deviation of observed from expected LOS. We ranked hospitals by z-scores. DATA EXTRACTION: All patients admitted for initial surgical repair of a hip fracture, defined by DRG, diagnosis, and procedure codes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 5,664 patients had a mean (s.d.) LOS of 11.9 (8.9) days. Cross-validated R-squared values from the multivariable regressions (trimmed data) ranged from 0.041 (Comorbidity Index) to 0.165 (APR-DRGs). Using untrimmed data, observed average LOS for hospitals ranged from 7.6 to 23.9 days. The 14 severity measures showed excellent agreement in ranking hospitals based on z-scores. No severity measure explained the differences between hospitals with the shortest and longest LOS. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitals differed widely in their mean LOS for hip fracture patients, and severity adjustment did little to explain these differences. PMID:8885854

  5. The Verbal Rating Scale Is Reliable for Assessment of Postoperative Pain in Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bech, Rune Dueholm; Lauritsen, Jens; Ovesen, Ole; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hip fracture patients represent a challenge to pain rating due to the high prevalence of cognitive impairment. Methods. Patients prospectively rated pain on the VRS. Furthermore, patients described the changes in pain after raising their leg, with one of five descriptors. Agreement between paired measures on the VRS at rest and by passive straight leg raise with a one-minute interval between ratings at rest and three-minute interval for straight leg raise was expressed by kappa coefficients. Reliability of this assessment of pain using the VRS was compared to the validity of assessing possible change in pain from the selected descriptors. Cognitive status was quantified by the short Orientation-Memory-Concentration Test. Results. 110 patients were included. Paired scores with maximum disagreement of one scale point reached 97% at rest and 95% at straight leg raise. Linear weighted kappa coefficients ranged from 0.68 (95% CI = 0.59–0.77) at leg raise to 0.75 (95% CI = 0.65–0.85) at rest. Unweighted kappa coefficients of agreement in recalled pain compared to agreement of paired VRS scores ranged from 0.57 (95% CI = 0.49–0.65) to 0.36 (95% CI = 0.31–0.41). Interpretation. The VRS is reliable for assessment of pain after hip fracture. The validity of intermittent questioning about possible change in pain intensity is poor. PMID:26078880

  6. The impact of the prospective payment system on the treatment of hip fractures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R M; Saywell, R M; Zollinger, T W; Erner, B K; LaBov, A D; Freund, D A; Garber, J E; Misamore, G W; Throop, F B

    1989-10-01

    A review of 386 Medicare patients with hip fractures admitted to a private, suburban, teaching hospital from 1981 through 1987 revealed that since the implementation of the prospective payment system in 1984, average hospital stays declined from 17.0 days to 12.9 days (24.1%). Although the mean number of physical therapy sessions declined from 11.1 to 9.8 (11.7%), the average number of treatments per day during the physical therapy phase actually increased from 1.2 before to 1.4 after the prospective payment system. The proportion of patients discharged to nursing homes remained the same (52.9% vs 53.6%); the proportion of patients remaining in a nursing home 6 months after hospital discharge did not differ significantly (22.6% vs 19.9%). Furthermore, there were no differences in the 6-month ambulation status. Total adjusted average hospital charges for the pre- and post-prospective payment system groups did not increase significantly ($7295 vs $7565). These findings do not support the contention that the quality of care provided Medicare patients with hip fractures has deteriorated in this hospital environment. PMID:2802890

  7. Frequent manual repositioning and incidence of pressure ulcers among bedbound elderly hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Shayna E.; Margolis, David; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G.; Miller, Ram R.; Amr, Sania; Baumgarten, Mona

    2010-01-01

    Frequent manual repositioning is an established part of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention, but there is little evidence for its effectiveness. This study examined the association between repositioning and PU incidence among bedbound elderly hip fracture patients, using data from a 2004–2007 cohort study in nine Maryland and Pennsylvania hospitals. Eligible patients (n=269) were age≥65 years, underwent hip fracture surgery, and were bedbound at index study visits (during the first five days of hospitalization). Information about repositioning on the days of index visits was collected from patient charts; study nurses assessed presence of PU stage 2+ two days later. The association between frequent manual repositioning and PU incidence was estimated, adjusting for PU risk factors using generalized estimating equations and weighted estimating equations. Patients were frequently repositioned (at least every two hours) on only 53% (187/354) of index visit days. New PU developed at 12% of visits following frequent repositioning versus 10% following less frequent repositioning; the incidence rate of PU per person-day did not differ between the two groups (incidence rate ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.5–2.4). No association was found between frequent repositioning of bedbound patients and lower PU incidence, calling into question the allocation of resources for repositioning. PMID:21134034

  8. Information sharing with rural family caregivers during care transitions of hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jacobi; Forbes, Dorothy; Chesworth, Bert M.; Ceci, Christine; Stolee, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Following hip fracture surgery, patients often experience multiple transitions through different care settings, with resultant challenges to the quality and continuity of patient care. Family caregivers can play a key role in these transitions, but are often poorly engaged in the process. We aimed to: (1) examine the characteristics of the family caregivers’ experience of communication and information sharing and (2) identify facilitators and barriers of effective information sharing among patients, family caregivers and health care providers. Methods Using an ethnographic approach, we followed 11 post-surgical hip fracture patients through subsequent care transitions in rural Ontario; in-depth interviews were conducted with patients, family caregivers (n = 8) and health care providers (n = 24). Results Priority areas for improved information sharing relate to trust and respect, involvement, and information needs and expectations; facilitators and barriers included prior health care experience, trusting relationships and the rural setting. Conclusion As with knowledge translation, effective strategies to improve information sharing and care continuity for older patients with chronic illness may be those that involve active facilitation of an on-going partnership that respects the knowledge of all those involved. PMID:24959113

  9. Perioperative management of proximal hip fractures in the elderly: the surgeon and the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Sciard, D; Cattano, D; Hussain, M; Rosenstein, A

    2011-07-01

    The comprehensive management of proximal hip fractures in elderly patients requires dedicated and responsive teamwork. Elderly patients often present with several comorbidities and the immediate treatment of a fracture has to optimize both medical therapy and analgesic control in order to reduce surgical and anesthetic complications and to preserve as much cognitive functioning as possible. The elderly are uniquely exposed to complications related to bed rest, delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), which appear to be independent factors of morbidity. Anesthetic management that includes good perioperative pain management can influence the patient's inflammatory response and possibly decrease the incidence of POCD. The best choice of surgical treatment depends on the type of fracture as well as the patient's age and medical condition. However, the type of anesthesia management, which includes neuraxial blocks, peripheral nerve blocks and/or general anesthesia, has to be tailored towards generated the best outcome. We present a review from a surgical and anesthetic perspective on the most common perioperative issues in proximal fracture repair. PMID:21283071

  10. Alternative techniques in trochanteric hip fracture surgery. Clinical and biomechanical studies on the Medoff sliding plate and the Twin hook.

    PubMed

    Olsson, O

    2000-10-01

    In allowing compression along the femoral shaft (uniaxial dynamization) and optional compression along the femoral neck (biaxial dynamization), the Medoff sliding plate (MSP) represents a new principle in the fixation of trochanteric hip fractures. The Twin hook with 2 apical hooks was designed as an alternative to the lag screw. In 3 prospective consecutive case series and 1 prospective randomized study together comprising 342 trochanteric fractures, these alternative techniques were investigated. 3 postoperative fixation failures occurred in the unstable intertrochanteric fractures treated with biaxial dynamization with the MSP (n = 194), and 5 in those treated with the sliding hip screw (n = 62) (p = 0.04). A mean femoral shortening of 15 mm with the MSP and 11 mm with the sliding hip screw was found (p = 0.03). More medialization of the femoral shaft occurred with the sliding hip screw (26%) than with the MSP (12%) in patients with marked femoral shortening (p = 0.03). 3 postoperative fixation failures occurred in subtrochanteric fractures treated with uniaxial dynamization (n = 29) and 2 in those treated with biaxial dynamization (n = 19). Medialization of the femoral shaft occurred in 9 of the 19 biaxially dynamized fractures. The Twin hook was used in 50 patients and appeared to provide similar fixation stability as the lag screw. Biomechanical tests confirmed improved stress transmission over the fracture area with the MSP compared to the sliding hip screw in intertrochanteric fractures, and similar fixation stability with the MSP and the Intramedullary Hip Screw in subtrochanteric fractures. In axial and torsional loading, the Twin hook demonstrated gradually increasing resistance to migration. With the lag screw, the peak load was higher, but after migration with failure of the support by the threads, the loads were similar. Biaxial dynamization with the MSP appears to control fracture impaction effectively and minimizes the rate of postoperative fixation

  11. Economic analysis of surgical treatment of hip fracture in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Loures, Fabiano Bolpato; Chaoubah, Alfredo; de Oliveira, Valdeci Manoel; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Campos, Estela Márcia de Saraiva; de Paiva, Elenir Pereira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the incremental cost-utility ratio for the surgical treatment of hip fracture in older patients. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study of a systematic sample of patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture at a central hospital of a macro-region in the state of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011. A decision tree creation was analyzed considering the direct medical costs. The study followed the healthcare provider’s perspective and had a one-year time horizon. Effectiveness was measured by the time elapsed between trauma and surgery after dividing the patients into early and late surgery groups. The utility was obtained in a cross-sectional and indirect manner using the EuroQOL 5 Dimensions generic questionnaire transformed into cardinal numbers using the national regulations established by the Center for the Development and Regional Planning of the State of Minas Gerais. The sample included 110 patients, 27 of whom were allocated in the early surgery group and 83 in the late surgery group. The groups were stratified by age, gender, type of fracture, type of surgery, and anesthetic risk. RESULTS The direct medical cost presented a statistically significant increase among patients in the late surgery group (p < 0.005), mainly because of ward costs (p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality was higher in the late surgery group (7.4% versus 16.9%). The decision tree demonstrated the dominance of the early surgery strategy over the late surgery strategy: R$9,854.34 (USD4,387.17) versus R$26,754.56 (USD11,911.03) per quality-adjusted life year. The sensitivity test with extreme values proved the robustness of the results. CONCLUSIONS After controlling for confounding variables, the strategy of early surgery for hip fracture in the older adults was proven to be dominant, because it presented a lower cost and better results than late surgery. PMID:25741654

  12. Frailty and Short-Term Outcomes in Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Joseph A.; Kates, Stephen L.; Friedman, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of frailty and its ability to predict short-term outcomes in older patients with hip fracture. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: University-affiliated community hospital. Participants: Thirty-five patients aged ≥65 treated with hip fracture. Measurements: Frailty was assessed using the 5 criteria of the Fried Frailty Index, modified for a post-fracture population. Cognitive impairment was assessed with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). The primary outcome was overall hospital complication rate. Secondary outcomes were length of stay (LOS) and specific complications. Differences between the frail and the non-frail were identified using chi-square analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Results: Eighteen (51%) participants were frail. Seventeen (49%) had ≥1 hospital complication. Twelve (67%) frail patients versus 5 (29%) non-frail patients had a complication (P = .028). Mean LOS was longer in patients with frailty (7.3 ± 5.9 vs 4.1 ± 1.2 days, P = .038). Most were frail for the weakness criterion (94%), and few were frail for the physical activity criterion (9%). Excluding these criteria, we developed a 3-criteria frailty index (shrinking, exhaustion, and slowness) that identified an increased risk of complications (64.7% vs 33.3%, P = .061) and LOS (7.4 ± 6.1 vs 4.2 ± 1.3 days, P = .040) in participants with frailty. Among non-frail participants with a high MoCA score of ≥20 (n = 12), 2 (17%) had complications compared to 10 (71%) frail participants with a low MoCA score (n = 14). Conclusion: Frailty is common in older patients with hip fracture and associated with increased LOS and postoperative complications. A low MoCA score, a hypothesized marker of more advanced cognitive frailty, may further increase risk. Frailty assessment has a role in prognostic discussion and care planning. The 3-criteria frailty index is an easily used tool with

  13. Anemia on Admission Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Mortality in Hip Fracture Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Licheng; Yin, Pengbin; Lv, Houchen; Long, Anhua; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is a disputable factor for long-term mortality in hip fracture population in previous studies. Previous studies indicated that the level of hemoglobin (Hb) might fluctuate due to various factors, such as comorbidities and in-hospital interventions, and the changing level of Hb, may lead to discordance diagnosis of anemia and thus to the conflicting conclusions on prognostic value of anemia. So in this study, we aim to compare factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia at different time-points, admission, postoperation, and discharge, and to determine which the time point is most suitable for mortality prediction. This prospective cohort study included 1330 hip fracture patients from 1 January 2000 to 18 November 2012. Hb levels at 3 different time points, such as admission, postoperation, and discharge, were collected and used to stratify the cohort into anemia and nonanemia groups. Candidate factors including commodities, perioperative factors, blood transfusion, and other in-hospital interventions were collected before discharge. Logistic regression analyses were performed to detect risk factors for anemia for the 3 time points separately. Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between anemia and 2-year mortality. Factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia were different for the 3 time points. Age, female sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA), and intertrochanteric fracture were associated with admission anemia, while surgical procedure, surgical duration, blood transfusion, blood loss during the operation, and drainage volume were major risk factors for postoperation anemia. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis suggested that the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the anemia group on admission (1.680, 95%CI: 1.201–2.350, P < 0.01), but not postoperation or on discharge, after adjustment for confounding factors. Our study showed that risk factors for anemia

  14. Effect of melatonin on incidence of delirium among patients with hip fracture: a multicentre, double-blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    de Jonghe, Annemarieke; van Munster, Barbara C.; Goslings, J. Carel; Kloen, Peter; van Rees, Carolien; Wolvius, Reinder; van Velde, Romuald; Levi, Marcel; de Haan, Rob J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disturbance of the sleep–wake cycle is a characteristic of delirium. In addition, changes in melatonin rhythm influence the circadian rhythm and are associated with delirium. We compared the effect of melatonin and placebo on the incidence and duration of delirium. Methods: We performed this multicentre, double-blind, randomized controlled trial between November 2008 and May 2012 in 1 academic and 2 nonacademic hospitals. Patients aged 65 years or older who were scheduled for acute hip surgery were eligible for inclusion. Patients received melatonin 3 mg or placebo in the evening for 5 consecutive days, starting within 24 hours after admission. The primary outcome was incidence of delirium within 8 days of admission. We also monitored the duration of delirium. Results: A total of 452 patients were randomly assigned to the 2 study groups. We subsequently excluded 74 patients for whom the primary end point could not be measured or who had delirium before the second day of the study. After these postrandomization exclusions, data for 378 patients were included in the main analysis. The overall mean age was 84 years, 238 (63.0%) of the patients lived at home before admission, and 210 (55.6%) had cognitive impairment. We observed no effect of melatonin on the incidence of delirium: 55/186 (29.6%) in the melatonin group v. 49/192 (25.5%) in the placebo group; difference 4.1 (95% confidence interval −0.05 to 13.1) percentage points. There were no between-group differences in mortality or in cognitive or functional outcomes at 3-month follow-up. Interpretation: In this older population with hip fracture, treatment with melatonin did not reduce the incidence of delirium. Trial registration: Netherlands Trial Registry, NTR1576: MAPLE (Melatonin Against PLacebo in Elderly patients) study; www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=1576 PMID:25183726

  15. Survival of ceramic bearings in total hip replacement after high-energy trauma and periprosthetic acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Salih, S; Currall, V A; Ward, A J; Chesser, T J S

    2009-11-01

    Surgeons remain concerned that ceramic hip prostheses may fail catastrophically if either the head or the liner is fractured. We report two patients, each with a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement who sustained high-energy trauma sufficient to cause a displaced periprosthetic acetabular fracture in whom the ceramic bearings survived intact. Simultaneous fixation of the acetabular fracture, revision of the cementless acetabular prosthesis and exchange of the ceramic bearings were performed successfully in both patients. Improved methods of manufacture of new types of alumina ceramic with a smaller grain size, and lower porosity, have produced much stronger bearings. Whether patients should be advised to restrict high-impact activities in order to protect these modern ceramic bearings from fracture remains controversial. PMID:19880903

  16. Classifications of Acute Scaphoid Fractures: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ten Berg, Paul W; Drijkoningen, Tessa; Strackee, Simon D; Buijze, Geert A

    2016-05-01

    Background In the lack of consensus, surgeon-based preference determines how acute scaphoid fractures are classified. There is a great variety of classification systems with considerable controversies. Purposes The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the different classification systems, clarifying their subgroups and analyzing their popularity by comparing citation indexes. The intention was to improve data comparison between studies using heterogeneous fracture descriptions. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature based on a search of medical literature from 1950 to 2015, and a manual search using the reference lists in relevant book chapters. Only original descriptions of classifications of acute scaphoid fractures in adults were included. Popularity was based on citation index as reported in the databases of Web of Science (WoS) and Google Scholar. Articles that were cited <10 times in WoS were excluded. Results Our literature search resulted in 308 potentially eligible descriptive reports of which 12 reports met the inclusion criteria. We distinguished 13 different (sub) classification systems based on (1) fracture location, (2) fracture plane orientation, and (3) fracture stability/displacement. Based on citations numbers, the Herbert classification was most popular, followed by the Russe and Mayo classifications. All classification systems were based on plain radiography. Conclusions Most classification systems were based on fracture location, displacement, or stability. Based on the controversy and limited reliability of current classification systems, suggested research areas for an updated classification include three-dimensional fracture pattern etiology and fracture fragment mobility assessed by dynamic imaging. PMID:27104083

  17. Actis Total Hip System 2 Year Follow-up

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Osteoarthritis; Traumatic Arthritis; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head; Acute Traumatic Fracture of the Femoral Head or Neck; Certain Cases of Ankylosis; Non-union of Femoral Neck Fractures; Certain High Sub-Capital and Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

  18. Protective effects of dietary carotenoids on risk of hip fracture in men: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhaoli; Wang, Renwei; Ang, Li-Wei; Low, Yen-Ling; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-02-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that carotenoids in vegetables and fruits may benefit bone health due to their antioxidant properties. The relationship between dietary total and specific carotenoids, as well as vegetables and fruits, and risk of hip fracture was examined among Chinese in Singapore. We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 men and women who were of ages 45 to 74 years between 1993 and 1998. At recruitment, subjects were interviewed on lifestyle factors and medical history. Usual diet was measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 9.9 years, we identified 1630 hip fracture incident cases. Among men, consumption of vegetables was associated with lower hip fracture risk. Similarly, dietary total carotenoids and specific carotenoids, α-carotene, β-carotene, and lutein/zeaxanthin were inversely associated with hip fracture risk. Compared to men in the lowest quartile of nutrient density, men in the highest quartile had statistically significant 26% to 39% risk reduction (all p for trend <0.05). When stratified by body mass index (BMI), the greatest protective effects of total vegetables and carotenoids were found in men with BMI <20 kg/m(2) (p for trend ≤0.004). There was no association between dietary carotenoids or vegetables/fruits and hip fracture risk among women. This study suggests that adequate intake of vegetables may reduce risk of osteoporotic fractures among elderly men and that the antioxidant effects of carotenoids may counteract the mechanism of osteoporosis related to leanness. PMID:23857780

  19. The effect of a pre- and postoperative orthogeriatric service on cognitive function in patients with hip fracture: randomized controlled trial (Oslo Orthogeriatric Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delirium is a common complication in patients with hip fractures and is associated with an increased risk of subsequent dementia. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effect of a pre- and postoperative orthogeriatric service on the prevention of delirium and longer-term cognitive decline. Methods This was a single-center, prospective, randomized controlled trial in which patients with hip fracture were randomized to treatment in an acute geriatric ward or standard orthopedic ward. Inclusion and randomization took place in the Emergency Department at Oslo University hospital. The key intervention in the acute geriatric ward was Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment including daily interdisciplinary meetings. Primary outcome was cognitive function four months after surgery measured using a composite outcome incorporating the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) and the 10 words learning and recalls tasks from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease battery (CERAD). Secondary outcomes were pre- and postoperative delirium, delirium severity and duration, mortality and mobility (measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)). Patients were assessed four and twelve months after surgery by evaluators blind to allocation. Results A total of 329 patients were included. There was no significant difference in cognitive function four months after surgery between patients treated in the acute geriatric and the orthopedic wards (mean 54.7 versus 52.9, 95% confidence interval for the difference -5.9 to 9.5; P = 0.65). There was also no significant difference in delirium rates (49% versus 53%, P = 0.51) or four month mortality (17% versus 15%, P = 0.50) between the intervention and the control group. In a pre-planned sub-group analysis, participants living in their own home at baseline who were randomized to orthogeriatric care had better mobility four months after surgery compared with patients randomized to the

  20. Milk intake and risk of hip fracture in men and women: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk contains calcium, phosphorus, and protein, and is fortified with vitamin D in the US. All of these ingredients may improve bone health. However, the potential benefit of milk on hip fracture prevention is not well established. The objective of this cohort study is to assess the association of ...

  1. Hip fracture risk in older US adults by treatment eligibility status based on new National Osteoporosis Foundation Guidance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between treatment eligibility by the new National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) FRAX® -based Guide to the Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis and the risk of subsequent hip fracture is unknown. The study sample consisted of 3208 men and women ages 65 years and older who were ex...

  2. Factors influencing surgical delay after hip fracture in hospitals of Emilia Romagna Region, Italy: a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Belotti, Laura Maria Beatrice; Bartoli, Simona; Trombetti, Susanna; Montella, Maria Teresa; Toni, Aldo; De Palma, Rossana

    2013-01-01

    Hip fracture is becoming a major public health concern, with associated mortality and morbidity particularly in the elderly. This study aims to investigate factors (i.e. patient factors and hospital variables) associated with increased risk for delaying surgery after hip fractures, and to assess whether and to what extent timing was associated with mortality risk. All patients aged 65 and over, resident in Emilia Romagna Region (Italy) and admitted to hospital for hip fracture (2009 - 2010) were selected. Data on surgical delay were adjusted using multilevel logistic regression model. A Cox proportional hazard model was fitted to a propensity score matched sample to assess mortality between delayed and early treated patients. Of the 10, 995 patients included (mean age: 83.3 years), 44.9% underwent surgery within 2 days. Significant risk factors for delayed surgery were: gender (OR: 1.16), comorbidity (OR: 1.29), anticoagulant (OR: 7.64) ,antiplatelet medication (OR: 2.43) , type of procedure (OR: 1.37) and day of admission (OR: Thu-Fri: 6.05; Sat-Sun: 1.17). Type of hospital and annual volume of hip fracture surgeries were not sufficient to explain hospital variability. A significant difference in mortality rate between early and delayed surgery emerged six months post surgery. PMID:23397198

  3. Proximal Femoral Shortening after Operation with Compression Hip Screws for Intertrochanteric Fracture in Patients under the Age of 60 Years

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Kee; Kim, Dong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to quantify proximal femoral shortening after operation with compression hip screws for intertrochanteric fracture in patients under the age of 60 years. Materials and Methods We followed 37 consecutive patients with intertrochanteric fractures treated with compression hip screws from March 2005 to February 2014. We designated the aspect of the fracture, a defect of the postero-medial wall, a defect of the lateral wall, and the degree of reduction as four potentially important factors we assumed would strongly affect proximal femoral shortening. We quantified proximal femoral shortening and compared the effects of above factors. We divided femoral shortening into two plane vectors; femoral offset in the horizontal plane and leg length discrepancy in the vertical plane. We measured shortening separately during two periods: during operation and after weight bearing (called dynamic compression). Results After bone union, the average femoral offset shortening was 5.45 mm. Patient groups with anatomic reduction and intact postero-medial wall showed lower femoral offset shortening than the respective opposite groups. As to functional score using modified Harris hip score, low femoral offset shortening group showed more 2.35 scores than high groups. None of the factors significantly affected leg length shortening. Conclusion We found that a stable medial buttress is involved in lower femoral offset shortening. Thus, surgeons need to attempt to recover the defect of the medial wall and to reduce anatomically when operating intertrochanteric fractures with compression hip screws.

  4. Increased intake of vegetables, but not fruits, may be associated with reduced risk of hip fracture: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Si yang; Li, Yan; Luo, Hong; Yin, Xin hai; Lin, Du ren; Zhao, Ke; Huang, Guang lei; Song, Ju kun

    2016-01-01

    Association between dietary intake of vegetables and fruits and risk of hip fracture has been reported for many years. However, the findings remain inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between intake of vegetables and fruits, and risk of hip fracture. Literature search for relevant studies was performed on PubMed and Embase databases. Five observational studies were included in the meta-analysis. Summary hazard ratio (HR) with corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated from pooled data using the random-effects model irrespective of heterogeneity. Sensitivity and subgroup analysis were performed to explore possible reasons for heterogeneity. The summary HR for hip fracture in relation to high intake vs. low intake of only vegetables, only fruits, and combined intake of fruits and vegetables, was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.61–0.92), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.74–1.04), and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.61–1.03), respectively. Subgroup analyses based on study design, geographical location, number of cases, and gender showed similar results. Increased intake of vegetables, but not fruits, was found to be associated with a lower risk of hip fracture. Large prospective clinical trials with robust methodology are required to confirm our findings. PMID:26806285

  5. Correlation between Parameters of Calcaneal Quantitative Ultrasound and Hip Structural Analysis in Osteoporotic Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hailiang; Li, Ming; Yin, Pengbin; Peng, Ye; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS), which is used in the evaluation of osteoporosis, is believed to be intimately associated with the characteristics of the proximal femur. However, the specific associations of calcaneal QUS with characteristics of the hip sub-regions remain unclear. Design A cross-sectional assessment of 53 osteoporotic patients was performed for the skeletal status of the heel and hip. Methods We prospectively enrolled 53 female osteoporotic patients with femoral fractures. Calcaneal QUS, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and hip structural analysis (HSA) were performed for each patient. Femoral heads were obtained during the surgery, and principal compressive trabeculae (PCT) were extracted by a three-dimensional printing technique-assisted method. Pearson’s correlation between QUS measurement with DXA, HSA-derived parameters and Young’s modulus were calculated in order to evaluate the specific association of QUS with the parameters for the hip sub-regions, including the femoral neck, trochanteric and Ward’s areas, and the femoral shaft, respectively. Results Significant correlations were found between estimated BMD (Est.BMD) and BMD of different sub-regions of proximal femur. However, the correlation coefficient of trochanteric area (r = 0.356, p = 0.009) was higher than that of the neck area (r = 0.297, p = 0.031) and total proximal femur (r = 0.291, p = 0.034). Furthermore, the quantitative ultrasound index (QUI) was significantly correlated with the HSA-derived parameters of the trochanteric area (r value: 0.315–0.356, all p<0.05) as well as with the Young’s modulus of PCT from the femoral head (r = 0.589, p<0.001). Conclusion The calcaneal bone had an intimate association with the trochanteric cancellous bone. To a certain extent, the parameters of the calcaneal QUS can reflect the characteristics of the trochanteric area of the proximal hip, although not specifically reflective of those of the femoral neck

  6. The effect of intravenous iron on postoperative transfusion requirements in hip fracture patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anaemia following hip fracture is common. Approximately 30 to 45% of patients have haemoglobin concentrations below population norms on admission, and around 10% are severely anaemic. Anaemia on admission, and in the postoperative period, is associated with poor outcomes with regard to mobility, postoperative mortality and readmission. There is currently no clear consensus on the optimal method of managing perioperative anaemia in this group of frail patients with frequent comorbidity. Liberal red cell transfusion in the postoperative period does not appear to improve outcome, whereas tranexamic acid appears to reduce transfusion rate at the expense of increased cardiovascular morbidity. There are encouraging results from one centre with the use of agents to stimulate red cell production, including intravenous iron and erythropoietin. UK practice differs significantly from these patients and these studies, and it is not clear whether these promising results will translate to the UK population. Methods/Design This is a single-centre randomized controlled parallel group trial, in a British university hospital.Randomization is achieved using a website and computer-generated concealed tables. Participants are 80 patients 70 years or over with acute hip fracture undergoing operative repair. The intervention group receive three daily infusions of 200 mg iron sucrose, starting within 24 hours of admission. The control group receive standard hospital care at the discretion of the clinical team. Red cell transfusions for each group are given in accordance with standard clinical triggers. The primary outcome is an increase in mean reticulocyte count in the intervention group at day 7. Secondary outcome measures include haemoglobin concentrations, early and late transfusion rates, infectious and cardiovascular complications, mobility and 30-day mortality. Discussion This is a pilot study to demonstrate haematopoietic efficacy of intravenous iron in this setting

  7. The Impact of a National Clinician-led Audit Initiative on Care and Mortality after Hip Fracture in England

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Colin; Wakeman, Robert; Tsang, Carmen; Plant, Fay; De Stavola, Bianca; Cromwell, David A.; van der Meulen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hip fracture is the most common serious injury of older people. The UK National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD) was launched in 2007 as a national collaborative, clinician-led audit initiative to improve the quality of hip fracture care, but has not yet been externally evaluated. Methods: We used routinely collected data on 471,590 older people (aged 60 years and older) admitted with a hip fracture to National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England between 2003 and 2011. The main variables of interest were the use of early surgery (on day of admission, or day after) and mortality at 30 days from admission. We compared time trends in the periods 2003–2007 and 2007–2011 (before and after the launch of the NHFD), using Poisson regression models to adjust for demographic changes. Findings: The number of hospitals participating in the NHFD increased from 11 in 2007 to 175 in 2011. From 2007 to 2011, the rate of early surgery increased from 54.5% to 71.3%, whereas the rate had remained stable over the period 2003–2007. Thirty-day mortality fell from 10.9% to 8.5%, compared with a small reduction from 11.5% to 10.9% previously. The annual relative reduction in adjusted 30-day mortality was 1.8% per year in the period 2003–2007, compared with 7.6% per year over 2007–2011 (P<0.001 for the difference). Interpretation: The launch of a national clinician-led audit initiative was associated with substantial improvements in care and survival of older people with hip fracture in England. PMID:26172938

  8. Postoperative blood transfusion strategy in frail, anemic elderly patients with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Merete; Borris, Lars C; Damsgaard, Else Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Hip fracture (HF) in frail elderly patients is associated with poor physical recovery and death. There is often postoperative blood loss and the hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in these patients is unknown. We investigated whether RBC transfusion strategies were associated with the degree of physical recovery or with reduced mortality after HF surgery. Patients and methods We enrolled 284 consecutive post-surgical HF patients (aged ≥ 65 years) with Hb levels < 11.3 g/dL (7 mmol/L) who had been admitted from nursing homes or sheltered housing. Allocation was stratified by residence. The patients were randomly assigned to either restrictive (Hb < 9.7 g/dL; < 6 mmol/L) or liberal (Hb < 11.3 g/dL; < 7 mmol/L) RBC transfusions given within the first 30 days postoperatively. Follow-up was at 90 days. Results No statistically significant differences were found in repeated measures of daily living activities or in 90-day mortality rate between the restrictive group (where 27% died) and the liberal group (where 21% died). Per-protocol 30-day mortality was higher with the restrictive strategy (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1–5.2; p = 0.03). The 90-day mortality rate was higher for nursing home residents in the restrictive transfusion group (36%) than for those in the liberal group (20%) (HR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1–3.6; p = 0.01). Interpretation According to our Hb thresholds, recovery from physical disabilities in frail elderly hip fracture patients was similar after a restrictive RBC transfusion strategy and after a liberal strategy. Implementation of a liberal RBC transfusion strategy in nursing home residents has the potential to increase survival. PMID:25586270

  9. Association between Intraoperative Blood Pressure and Postoperative Delirium in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nae-Yuh; Hirao, Ai; Sieber, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Background One possible area of intervention to prevent postoperative delirium (PD) is intraoperative blood pressure management. However, the relationship between intraoperative blood pressure and PD is unclear. A secondary analysis of a RCT study examining the PD risk over the range of absolute intraoperative mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) readings and the corresponding relative changes from preoperative baseline level was performed to determine the role of MAP on PD. Methods Nonparametric locally weighted quadratic polynomial smoothing (LOESS) regression explored the pattern of PD risk at postoperative day 2 as a function of mean surgery MAP (msMAP) and percent change of msMAP from baseline in 103 elderly hip fracture patients. Segment-linear logistic regression models were then constructed to determine the odds ratios (OR) of PD over the observed range of these msMAP measures, adjusting for potential confounds. Results Twenty-three patients (22%) developed PD on day 2. LOESS regression revealed a j-shaped association between absolute levels of msMAP and PD risk. When msMAP was ≥80 mmHg, higher msMAP imparted greater PD risk (OR = 2.28 per 10 mmHg msMAP increase; 95% CI: 1.11–4.70), while higher msMAP was associated with lower PD risk (OR = 0.19 per 10 mmHg increase; CI: 0.05–0.76) if msMAP was <80 mmHg. There was no statistically significant relationship between PD risk and average percent change from baseline in these msMAP measures. Conclusion In elderly hip fracture patients, both very high and very low levels of msMAP were associated with significantly increased risk of PD. PMID:25860338

  10. Preoperative plasma leptin levels predict delirium in elderly patients after hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue-Wu; Shi, Jun-Wu; Yang, Ping-Shan; Wu, Zhu-Qi

    2014-07-01

    Leptin is considered to be a modulator of the immune response. Hypoleptinemia increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of plasma leptin level to predict delirium in elderly patients after hip fracture surgery. Postoperative delirium (pod) was evaluated using the Confusion Assessment Method. Prolonged postoperative delirium (ppod) was defined as delirium lasting more than 4 weeks. Plasma leptin levels of 186 elderly patients and 186 elderly controls were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma leptin level was substantially lower in patients than in controls (4.6±2.2ng/ml vs. 7.5±1.8ng/ml, P<0.001). It was identified as an independent predictor for pod [odds ratio, 0.385; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.286-0.517; P<0.001] and ppod (odds ratio, 0.283; 95% CI, 0.152-0.527; P<0.001) using a multivariate analysis, and had high area under receiver operating characteristic curve for pod [area under curve (AUC), 0.850; 95% CI, 0.790-0.898] and ppod (AUC, 0.890; 95% CI, 0.836-0.931). The predictive value of leptin was markedly bigger than that of age for pod (AUC, 0.705; 95% CI, 0.634-0.770; P=0.002) and ppod (AUC, 0.713; 95% CI, 0.642-0.777; P=0.019). In a combined logistic-regression model, leptin improved the AUC of age to 0.890 (95% CI, 0.836-0.931) (P<0.001) for pod and 0.910 (95% CI, 0.860-0.947) (P=0.005) for ppod. Thus, preoperative plasma leptin level may be a useful, complementary tool to predict delirium and also prolonged delirium in elderly patients after hip fracture surgery. PMID:24787655

  11. EVALUATION OF THE MORTALITY RATE ONE YEAR AFTER HIP FRACTURE AND FACTORS RELATING TO DIMINISHED SURVIVAL AMONG ELDERLY PEOPLE

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Guilherme; Longaray, Maurício Portal; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Neto, Ary da Silva Ungaretti; Manente, Marislei; Barbosa, Luíza Barbosa Horta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the mortality rate after one year and correlated preoperative factors, among patients with hip fractures. Methods: We prospectively studied 202 out of a total of 376 patients with a diagnosis of hip fracture who were admitted to the Hospital Cristo Redentor, between October 2007 and March 2009. The database with the epidemiological analysis was set up during their hospitalization, and follow–up data were obtained preferentially by phone. Results: The overall mortality rate after one year of follow-up was 28.7% or 58 deaths, among which 11 (5.45%) occurred during hospitalization. Fractures were more prevalent among women (71.3%) and rare among blacks (5%). Among the comorbidities, dementia and depression showed a statistically significant reduction in survival (p = 0.018 and 0.007, respectively). Conclusion: The mortality rate after one year of follow-up was 28.7%. Dementia and depression increased this rate. PMID:27042638

  12. [Experience with dynamic hip screw in retrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures of upper femur.].

    PubMed

    Weissinger, M; Helmreich, C; Bösel, A

    1995-01-01

    From 1st January 1988 to 31st December 1994, 105 patients were given 106 dynamic hip-screws in the Orthopaedic Department of the Public General Hospital, Zwettl. The average age at the time of operation was 77.6 years and the time lapse between the accident occuring and the operation performed was on average 31 hours. In 94.3% of the cases we could perform a closed reduction and in 88.7% we used a 135 degree-DHS. The four-hole plate dominated in 73.6% of the plates used. Internal complications totalled 23.6% out of which 9.5% of the patients died during their hospitalization. Here one must take note that the patients who died were of advanced age and multimorbid. We carried out clinical and radiological postoperative examinations on 54 patients (51.4%) with 55 operations (51.9%). The postoperative examinations took place on an average of 33 months (2 years and 9 months). The clinical postoperative examinations were carried out according to the Merle D'Aubigne system - 29 excellent, 58 good and 13 poor. The radiological postoperative examinations disclosed an ossian consolidation of 100% for 54 patients with 55 operations. Taking into account the classification of fractures according to the AO we find that the DHS is mainly used to treat fractures A 1/1-, A 1/2- and A 2/2-. With the exception of subtrochanteric fractures in which we have lately been using the Gamma-Nail, we have the DHS as a technically relatively simple and inexpensive implant in the treatment of pertrochanteric fractures of the neck of the femur. PMID:20470515

  13. Is chronic hyponatremia a novel risk factor for hip fracture in the elderly?

    PubMed Central

    Carlos Ayus, Juan; Negri, Armando Luis; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Moritz, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures represent a serious health risk in the elderly, with significant associated morbidity and mortality. There is now an emerging literature that suggests that chronic hyponatremia increases the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for both falls and fractures in the elderly. Hyponatremia appears to contribute to falls and fractures by two mechanisms: (i) it produces mild cognitive impairment resulting in unsteady gait and falls and (ii) it directly contributes to osteoporosis and increased bone fragility by inducing increased bone resorption to mobilize sodium. There is debate over the effect of hyponatremia on the production of osteoporosis, as one study found decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and another did not. Should we be screening for low serum sodium in patients with osteoporosis or assessing BMD in patients with hyponatremia? The final answer is yet to come from prospective studies that allocate elderly individuals with mild hyponatremia to receive active treatment or not for hyponatremia and see if this intervention prevents gait disturbances and changes in BMD reducing fracture risk. In the meantime, physicians caring for elderly patients must be aware of the association between hyponatremia and bone problems. As serum sodium is a readily available, simple and affordable biochemical measurement, clinicians should look for hyponatremia in elderly patients who take medications that can cause hyponatremia. Also, elderly patients with unsteady gait and/or confusion should be checked for the presence of mild hyponatremia and if present it should not be ignored. Finally, elderly patients presenting with an orthopedic injury should have serum sodium checked and corrected if hyponatremia is present. PMID:23114899

  14. Effectiveness of bisphosphonates on nonvertebral and hip fractures in the first year of therapy: The risedronate and alendronate (REAL) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Watts, N. B.; Delmas, P. D.; Lange, J. L.; Lindsay, R.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Randomized clinical trials have shown that risedronate and alendronate reduce fractures among women with osteoporosis. The aim of this observational study was to observe, in clinical practice, the incidence of hip and nonvertebral fractures among women in the year following initiation of once-a-week dosing of either risedronate or alendronate. Methods Using records of health service utilization from July 2002 through September 2004, we created two cohorts: women (ages 65 and over) receiving risedronate (n = 12,215) or alendronate (n = 21,615). Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to compare the annual incidence of nonvertebral fractures and of hip fractures between cohorts, adjusting for potential differences in risk factors for fractures. Results There were 507 nonvertebral fractures and 109 hip fractures. Through one year of therapy, the incidence of nonvertebral fractures in the risedronate cohort (2.0%) was 18% lower (95% CI 2% – 32%) than in the alendronate cohort (2.3%). The incidence of hip fractures in the risedronate cohort (0.4%) was 43% lower (95% CI 13% – 63%) than in the alendronate cohort (0.6%). These results were consistent across a number of sensitivity analyses. Conclusion Patients receiving risedronate have lower rates of hip and nonvertebral fractures during their first year of therapy than patients receiving alendronate. PMID:17106785

  15. Hip fracture surgery in Nova Scotia: a comparison of treatment provided by “generalist” general surgeons and orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Chiasson, Patrick M.; Roy, Peter D.; Mitchell, Michael J.; Chiasson, Ann M.; Alexander, David I.

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine quality of hip fracture services provided by “generalist” general surgeons (generalists) in Nova Scotia. Design Chart review and postoperative, blinded, random-ordered radiologic analysis. Setting Three community hospitals and 1 tertiary care hospital in Nova Scotia. Participants Seven generalists who performed 120 hip fracture repairs and 7 orthopedic surgeons (specialists) who performed 135 hip fracture repairs. Outcome measures Patient demographics, preoperative, perioperative, postoperative and discharge information, technical quality of reduction as determined through postoperative radiologic assessment. Results There were no differences between patients treated by generalists and those treated by specialists with respect to age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists’ class, level of function and fracture type. Intraoperatively, the patient groups were similar with respect to type of anesthesia, use of antibiotics, number of transfusions and surgical complications. Significant differences were noted in length of operation (54.4 v. 41.1 minutes), use of C-arm imaging (6.7% v. 85.9%) and management of Garden classes 1 and 2 subcapital fractures. Postoperatively, the 2 groups had similar numbers of medical complications, wound complications, reoperations, readmissions and deaths, and a similar level of function on discharge. Significant differences included the number of intensive care unit admissions (5.8% v. 15.6%) and length of stay there (5.7 v. 2.8 days) and of postoperative stay (14.5 v. 10.7 days). The assessment of radiographs did not demonstrate any significant difference in the quality of reduction. Conclusion In Nova Scotia the outcomes of hip fracture surgery performed by generalists are comparable to those performed by specialists. PMID:9336529

  16. A Simple Technique for the Positioning of a Patient with an above Knee Amputation for an Ipsilateral Extracapsular Hip Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Davarinos, N.; Ellanti, P.; McCoy, G.

    2013-01-01

    The positioning of the patient on the fracture table is critical to the successful reduction and operative fixation of hip fractures which are fixed using the dynamic hip screw system (DHS). There is a standard setup which is commonly used with relative ease. Yet the positioning of patients with amputations either above or below knee of the affected side can pose a significant challenge. We describe a novel positioning technique used on a 51-year old patient with a right above knee amputation who sustained an intertrochanteric extracapsular hip fracture. PMID:24416607

  17. Acute Lumbar Burst Fracture Treated by Minimally Invasive Lateral Corpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Rodrigo; Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Coutinho, Thiago

    2013-01-01

    Burst fractures in acute spinal traumas are a difficult problem to solve. Different approaches and techniques have been utilized, but with high incidence of morbidity and mortality, besides unsatisfactory clinical and radiological results. Mini-open approaches recently emerged and have been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of several spinal conditions. Here we report a case of acute lumbar burst fracture at L2 treated by minimally invasive true lateral approach posteriorly instrumented with percutaneous pedicle screws. The minimum disruptive access in addition to a rigid construction allowed a lumbar corpectomy without the morbidity of standard open approaches, lowering surgery costs and accelerating the patient recovery with successfully clinical and radiological results. PMID:23634314

  18. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of periprosthetic femoral fractures associated with hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhendong; Zhuo, Qi; Chai, Wei; Ni, Ming; Li, Heng; Chen, Jiying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) is a complicated complication of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty with an increasing incidence. The present study aimed to summarize the clinical characteristics and identify the risk factors for PFF which would be potentially helpful in the prevention and treatment of PFF. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 89 cases of PFF, and a case–control study was designed to identify the potential risk for intraoperative and postoperative PFF in both primary and revision hip arthroplasty. The overall incidence of PFF was 2.08% (intraoperative: 1.77%, postoperative: 0.30%, revision: 13.60%, and primary: 0.97%). The most commonly used treatment strategy was fixation with cerclage wire or band for intraoperative PFF, whereas long stem revision with plate or cortical allograft strut fixation was the main treatment strategy for postoperative PFF. The risk factors for intraoperative PFF in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) included the diagnosis of development dysplasia of the hip (DDH) (odds ratio [OR] = 5.01, 95%CI, 1.218–20.563, P=0.03) and CBR ≥ 0.49 (OR = 3.34, 95%CI, 1.138–9.784, P = 0.03). The increased age was associated with increased incidence of postoperative PFF in primary THA (OR = 1.09, 95%CI, 1.001–1.194, P = 0.04). As for the intraoperative PFF in revision THA, we found that receiving multiple operations before revision (OR = 2.45, 95%CI, 1.06–5.66, P = 0.04), revisions due to prosthetic joint infection (OR = 6.72, 95%CI, 1.007–44.832, P = 0.04), the presence of cementless implant before revision (OR = 13.54, 95%CI, 3.103–59.08, P = 0.001), and femoral deformity (OR = 8.03, 95%CI, 1.656–38.966, P = 0.01) were all risk factors. Screening for high-risk patients, preoperative templating, and detailed discharge instructions may be the potential strategies to reduce the incidence of PFF. The treatment of PFFs should take

  19. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of periprosthetic femoral fractures associated with hip arthroplasty: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhendong; Zhuo, Qi; Chai, Wei; Ni, Ming; Li, Heng; Chen, Jiying

    2016-08-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) is a complicated complication of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty with an increasing incidence. The present study aimed to summarize the clinical characteristics and identify the risk factors for PFF which would be potentially helpful in the prevention and treatment of PFF.We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 89 cases of PFF, and a case-control study was designed to identify the potential risk for intraoperative and postoperative PFF in both primary and revision hip arthroplasty.The overall incidence of PFF was 2.08% (intraoperative: 1.77%, postoperative: 0.30%, revision: 13.60%, and primary: 0.97%). The most commonly used treatment strategy was fixation with cerclage wire or band for intraoperative PFF, whereas long stem revision with plate or cortical allograft strut fixation was the main treatment strategy for postoperative PFF. The risk factors for intraoperative PFF in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) included the diagnosis of development dysplasia of the hip (DDH) (odds ratio [OR] = 5.01, 95%CI, 1.218-20.563, P=0.03) and CBR ≥ 0.49 (OR = 3.34, 95%CI, 1.138-9.784, P = 0.03). The increased age was associated with increased incidence of postoperative PFF in primary THA (OR = 1.09, 95%CI, 1.001-1.194, P = 0.04). As for the intraoperative PFF in revision THA, we found that receiving multiple operations before revision (OR = 2.45, 95%CI, 1.06-5.66, P = 0.04), revisions due to prosthetic joint infection (OR = 6.72, 95%CI, 1.007-44.832, P = 0.04), the presence of cementless implant before revision (OR = 13.54, 95%CI, 3.103-59.08, P = 0.001), and femoral deformity (OR = 8.03, 95%CI, 1.656-38.966, P = 0.01) were all risk factors.Screening for high-risk patients, preoperative templating, and detailed discharge instructions may be the potential strategies to reduce the incidence of PFF. The treatment of PFFs should take into account Vancouver

  20. Describing variation in the delivery of secondary fracture prevention after hip fracture: an overview of 11 hospitals within one regional area in England

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Sarah; Sheard, Sally; Chana, Jasroop; Cooper, Cyrus; Javaid, M Kassim; Judge, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hip fractures are usually the result of low impact falls and underlying osteoporosis. Since the risk of further fractures in osteoporotic patients can be reduced by between 20 - 70% with bone protection therapy, the NHS is under an obligation to provide effective fracture prevention services for hip fracture patients to reduce risk of further fractures. Evidence suggests there is variation in service organisation. The objective of the study was to explore this variation in more detail by looking at the services provided in one region in England. Methods A questionnaire was designed which included questions around staffing, models of care and how the four components of fracture prevention (case finding, osteoporosis assessment, treatment initiation and adherence (monitoring) were undertaken. We also examined falls prevention services. Clinicians involved in the delivery of osteoporosis services at 11 hospitals in one region in England completed the questionnaire. Results The service overview showed significant variation in service organisation across all aspects of care examined. All sites provided some form of case finding and assessment. However, interesting differences arose when we examined how these components were structured. Eight sites generally initiated treatment in an inpatient setting, two in outpatients and one in primary care. Monitoring was undertaken by secondary care at seven sites and the remainder conducted by GPs. Conclusions The variability in service provision was not explained by local variations in care need. Further work is now needed to establish how the variability in service provision affects key patient, clinical and health economic outcomes. PMID:24964893

  1. A modified technique to extract fractured femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Magra, Merzesh; Shetty, Ajit; Ng, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The removal of well-fixed broken femoral component and cement mantle can be extremely demanding, time consuming and potentially damaging to the host bone. Different methods have been described to extract broken femoral stem yet this remains one of the most challenging prospect to the revision hip surgeon. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors present two cases underwent a modified sliding cortical window technique utilising a tungsten carbide drill, Charnley pin retractor and an orthopaedic mallet to aid extraction of a fractured cemented femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty. DISCUSSION The modified technique offers a simple and controlled method in extracting a well fixed fractured cemented femoral stem. It has the advantage of retaining the cement mantle with subsequent good seal of the femoral cortical window secured with cable ready system. Furthermore, tungsten carbide drill bit and Charnley pin retractor are relatively readily available to aid the extraction of the broken stem. Finally, it yields the option of implanting a standard femoral stem and obviates the need for bypassing the cortical window with long revision femoral component. CONCLUSION Fractured femoral stem is a rare yet a complex and very demanding prospect to both patients and hip surgeons. The sliding cortical window technique utilising tungsten carbide drill and Charnley pin retractor is technically easy and most importantly; preserves host bone stock with cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty. We believe this technique can be added to the armamentarium of revision hip surgeon when faced with the challenge of extracting a fractured cemented femoral stem. PMID:24858980

  2. Poststroke Hip Fracture: Prevalence, Clinical Characteristics, Mineral-Bone Metabolism, Outcomes, and Gaps in Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Alexander; Srikusalanukul, Wichat; Davis, Michael; Smith, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence, clinical and laboratory characteristics, and short-term outcomes of poststroke hip fracture (HF). Methods. A cross-sectional study of 761 consecutive patients aged ≥60 years (82.3 ± 8.8 years; 75% females) with osteoporotic HF. Results. The prevalence of poststroke HF was 13.1% occurring on average 2.4 years after the stroke. The poststroke group compared to the rest of the cohort had a higher proportion of women, subjects with dementia, history of TIA, hypertension, coronary artery disease, secondary hyperparathyroidism, higher serum vitamin B12 levels (>350 pmol/L), walking aid users, and living in residential care facilities. The majority of poststroke HF patients had vitamin D insufficiency (68%) and excess bone resorption (90%). This group had a 3-fold higher incidence of postoperative myocardial injury and need for institutionalisation. In multivariate analysis, independent indicators of poststroke HF were female sex (OR 3.6), history of TIA (OR 5.2), dementia (OR 4.1), hypertension (OR 3.2), use of walking aid (OR 2.5), and higher vitamin B12 level (OR 2.3). Only 15% of poststroke patients received antiosteoporotic therapy prior to HF. Conclusions. Approximately one in seven HFs occurs in older stroke survivors and are associated with poorer outcomes. Early implementation of fracture prevention strategies is needed. PMID:24187647

  3. Decision making on timing of surgery for hip fracture patients on clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, B; Webb, M; Weusten, A; Bonczek, S; Ramaskandhan, J; Nanu, A

    2016-02-01

    Patients taking clopidogrel who sustain a fractured neck of femur pose a challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. The aim of this study was to determine whether delay to theatre for these patients affects drop in haemoglobin levels, need for blood transfusion, length of hospital stay and 30-day mortality. A retrospective review of all neck of femur patients admitted at two centres in the North East of England over 3 years revealed 85 patients. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they were taking clopidogrel alone (C) or with aspirin (CA). Haemoglobin drop was significantly different in the CA group that was operated on early (CA1) versus the group for which surgery was delayed by over 48 hours (CA2): 3.3g/dl and 1.9g/dl respectively (p=0.01). The mean inpatient stay in group C was 35.9 days while in group CA it was 19.9 days (p=0.002). The mean length of stay in group CA2 (26.7 days) was significantly longer than for CA1 patients (14.1 days) (p=0.01). There were no significant differences in mortality or wound complications. Hip fracture patients on clopidogrel can be safely operated on early provided they are medically stable. Bleeding risk should be borne in mind in those patients on dual therapy with aspirin. PMID:26829666

  4. [A case of acute renal failure following compartment syndrome after the surgery for femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Koda, Kenichiro; Uzawa, Masashi; Ide, Yasuo; Harada, Masaki; Sanbe, Norie; Sugano, Takayuki; Satoh, Yasuo; Tagami, Megumi

    2013-02-01

    Compartment syndrome is known to develop after a prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. We experienced acute renal failure following compartment syndrome after the surgery in hemilithotomy position. A 62-year-old man underwent a left hip fixation for femoral neck fracture. The surgical leg was placed into traction in a foot piece and the intact leg was placed in the hemilithotomy position. Because of the difficulty in repositioning and the trouble with fluoroscope, the surgery took over 5 hours. He suffered acute pain, swelling and spasm in his intact leg placed into hemilithotomy after the surgery. Creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine markedly increased and myoglobinuria was recognized. We diagnosed an acute renal failure following compartment syndrome and treated him in the ICU on close monitoring. In spite of the treatment with massive transfusion and diuretics, he needed hemodialysis twice and then his renal function improved. Prevention is most essential for compartment syndrome after a prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. Risk factors should be recognized before surgery and appropriate action should be taken such as using Allen stirrups and avoiding hypotension, hypovolemia and the prolonged lithotomy position with exaggerated elevation of legs. PMID:23479927

  5. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  6. Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes among Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty, Compression Hip Screw and Proximal Femur Nail Antirotation in Treating Comminuted Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Suh, You-Sung; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Seong-Min; Hong, Sijohn; Choi, Hyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In comminuted intertrochanteric fractures, various operative options have been introduced. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences in clinical and radiologic outcomes among bipolar hemiarthroplasty (BH), compression hip screw (CHS) and proximal femur nail antirotation (PFNA) in treating comminuted intertrochanteric fractures (AO/OTA classification, A2 [22, 23]) Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated total 150 patients (BH, 50; CHS, 50; PFNA, 50) who were operated due to intertrochanteric fractures from March 2010 to December 2012 and were older than 65 years at the time of surgery. We compared these three groups for radiologic and clinical outcomes at 12 months postoperatively, including Harris Hip Score, mobility (Koval stage), visual analogue scale and radiologic limb length discrepancy (shortening). Results There was no statistical significance among three groups in clinical outcomes including Harris Hip Score, mobility (Koval stage), visual analogue scale. However, there was significant differences in radiologic limb discrepancy in plain radiographs at 12 months postoperatively (radiologic shortening: BH, 2.3 mm; CHS, 5.1 mm; PFNA, 3.0 mm; P=0.000). Conclusion There were no clinical differences among BH, PFNA, and CHS in this study. However, notable limb length shortening could be originated during fracture healing in osteosynthesis, compared to arthroplasty (BH

  7. Late fatigue fracture of a modern cemented [corrected] cobalt chrome stem for total hip arthroplasty: a report of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Alejandro González; Becksaç, Burak; Anderson, John; Wright, Timothy; Nestor, Bryan; Pellicci, Paul M; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2005-12-01

    We report 10 fatigue fractures of a modern, cemented, cobalt chromium alloy stem (Osteonics Omnifit) for total hip arthroplasty occurring between 1995 and 2004. The primary total hip arthroplasties had been performed between 1989 and 1996. The average age at the time of surgery was 54 years (range, 34-70 years), and the average body mass index was 29 (range, 20-38). The time in situ of the prosthesis at the time of fracture averaged 8 years (range, 4-12 years). Intermediate follow-up radiographs before the fracture were available in 7 cases, all of which demonstrated loss of calcar support. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces in 3 of the components showed porosity near the initiation site. Metallography of polished and etched cross sections near the fracture surface revealed large grain size. In the presence of a spontaneous onset of thigh pain at intermediate follow-up in patients with this stem, particularly if associated with loss of calcar support, a fatigue fracture should be considered. PMID:16376269

  8. At the moment of occurrence of a fragility hip fracture, men have higher mechanical properties values in comparison with women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well established that males have lower fracture risk in comparison with females, which suggests a higher bone resistance in men. The aim of our study was to find out if in older patients with hip fragility fractures, gender has also an impact on trabecular bone material behaviour, specifically to determine whether trabecular mechanical properties under compressive loading differ between men and women who suffered a fragility hip fracture. Methods Femoral epiphyses were consecutively collected during hip replacement surgery due to proximal femur fragility fracture. Trabecular bone cylinders were drilled and submitted to uniaxial compression tests and mechanical properties were assessed. Results Seventy-three patients, 55 women (mean age 81 years and standard deviation of 7 years) and 18 men (mean age 81 years and standard deviation of 8 years) were evaluated. The ultimate stress of trabecular bone was significantly higher in men than in women: the median values and the interquartile range (IQR) were respectively 8.04(5.35-10.90) MPa vs. 4.46(3.02-7.73) MPa, (p-value = 0.005). The same difference between male and female was observed in the Young’s modulus: 293.68(166.67-538.18) MPa vs. 174.26(73.07-322.28) MPa, (p-value = 0.028), and also in the energy to failure: 0.25(0.07-0.42) MJ/m3 vs. 0.11(0.05-0.25) MJ/m3, (p-value = 0.058). These differences were also verified after adjusting the analysis for age in a multivariate model analysis. Conclusions Our observations demonstrated that, even in a population who suffered a fragility hip fracture, men still have higher trabecular bone mechanical properties in comparison with women. PMID:24131745

  9. A Case Report: An Acute Thrombus in the Femoral Artery following Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GBS, Varun; N, Muralidhar; Bharathidasan, Kavya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular complications post-operative to a total hip arthroplasty are a very rare phenomenon. Only a few isolated cases have been reported to date. Diagnosis of such a case in a timely manner so as to preserve the limb is also difficult due to the subtle signs with which the patient presents. We report a case of complete occlusion of the common femoral artery following total hip arthroplasty due to acute thrombus formation. Case Presentation: A 56 year old Indian male patient underwent a cemented total hip replacement. Three hours post-operatively, the patient’s left lower limb was found to be pale and pulseless. Angiography showed complete occlusion of the left common femoral artery. Thrombectomy was carried out immediately and the patient recovered well. Conclusion: Vascular injuries are highly unusual findings following a total hip arthroplasty. Careful pre-operative and immediate post-operative monitoring of the patient is essential. Signs such as limb ischemia, absence of pulses, etc. must be recognized as early as possible and the necessary investigations and procedures should be carried out without any delay. PMID:27299128

  10. Total Hip Arthroplasty Complicated by a Gluteal Hematoma Resulting in Acute Foot Drop.

    PubMed

    Khattar, Nicolas K; Parry, Phillip V; Agarwal, Nitin; George, Hope K; Kretz, Eric S; Larkin, Timothy M; Gruen, Gary S; Abla, Adnan A

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a prevalent orthopedic intervention in the United States. Massive postoperative hematomas are a rare albeit serious complication of the procedure. Sequelae of these hematomas can include lower extremity paralysis from compression of the sciatic nerve. A 66-year-old woman taking aspirin and clopidogrel for coronary stents presented with a complete foot drop, paresthesias, and lower extremity pain 10 days after a total hip arthroplasty. The patient was initially seen by a neurology service at another hospital and thought to have lateral recess stenosis. At the authors' center, magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine failed to show lateral recess stenosis. Urgent pelvic computed tomography showed a large hematoma and raised suspicion of sciatic nerve compression. Hip magnetic resonance imaging showed a right gluteal hematoma compressing the sciatic nerve. The patient was then taken to the operating room for the clot to be evacuated and was later referred for rehabilitation. Massive hematomas after total hip arthroplasty are an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of nontraumatic acute foot drop. Prompt diagnosis may correlate with improved neurological outcome and help reduce overall morbidity. PMID:26966944

  11. Substantially higher prevalence of postoperative peri­prosthetic fractures in octogenarians with hip fractures operated with a cemented, polished tapered stem rather than an anatomic stem

    PubMed Central

    Mukka, Sebastian; Mellner, Carl; Knutsson, Björn; Sayed-Noor, Arkan; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Recent studies have demonstrated a high incidence of postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPF) in elderly patients treated with 2 commonly used cemented, polished tapered stems. We compared the prevalence and incidence rate of PPF in a consecutive cohort of octagenerians with femoral neck fractures (FNFs) treated with either a collarless, polished tapered (CPT) stem or an anatomic matte stem (Lubinus SP2). Patients and methods In a multicenter, prospective cohort study, we included 979 hips in patients aged 80 years and above (72% females, median age 86 (80–102) years) with a femoral neck fracture as indication for surgery. 69% of the patients were classified as ASA class 3 or 4. Hip-related complications and repeat surgery were assessed at a median follow-up of 20 (0–24) months postoperatively. Results 22 hips (2.2%) sustained a PPF at a median of 7 (0–22) months postoperatively; 14 (64%) were Vancouver B2 fractures. 7 of the 22 surgically treated fractures required revision surgery, mainly due to deep infection. The cumulative incidence of PPFs was 3.8% in the CPT group, as compared with 0.2% in the SP2 group (p < 0.001). The risk ratio (RR) was 16 (95% CI: 2–120) using the SP2 group as denominator. Interpretation The CPT stem was associated with a higher risk of PPF than the SP2 stem. We suggest that the tapered CPT stem should not be used for the treatment of femoral neck fractures in patients over 80 years. PMID:27045318

  12. Substantially higher prevalence of postoperative peri-prosthetic fractures in octogenarians with hip fractures operated with a cemented, polished tapered stem rather than an anatomic stem.

    PubMed

    Mukka, Sebastian; Mellner, Carl; Knutsson, Björn; Sayed-Noor, Arkan; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Recent studies have demonstrated a high incidence of postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPF) in elderly patients treated with 2 commonly used cemented, polished tapered stems. We compared the prevalence and incidence rate of PPF in a consecutive cohort of octagenerians with femoral neck fractures (FNFs) treated with either a collarless, polished tapered (CPT) stem or an anatomic matte stem (Lubinus SP2). Patients and methods - In a multicenter, prospective cohort study, we included 979 hips in patients aged 80 years and above (72% females, median age 86 (80-102) years) with a femoral neck fracture as indication for surgery. 69% of the patients were classified as ASA class 3 or 4. Hip-related complications and repeat surgery were assessed at a median follow-up of 20 (0-24) months postoperatively. Results - 22 hips (2.2%) sustained a PPF at a median of 7 (0-22) months postoperatively; 14 (64%) were Vancouver B2 fractures. 7 of the 22 surgically treated fractures required revision surgery, mainly due to deep infection. The cumulative incidence of PPFs was 3.8% in the CPT group, as compared with 0.2% in the SP2 group (p < 0.001). The risk ratio (RR) was 16 (95% CI: 2-120) using the SP2 group as denominator. Interpretation - The CPT stem was associated with a higher risk of PPF than the SP2 stem. We suggest that the tapered CPT stem should not be used for the treatment of femoral neck fractures in patients over 80 years. PMID:27045318

  13. Use of rib belts in acute rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Lazcano, A; Dougherty, J M; Kruger, M

    1989-01-01

    The current treatment for uncomplicated rib fractures is the exclusion of associated injuries followed by symptomatic treatment with analgesics. Encouragement of deep breathing is also recommended to avoid secondary or delayed pulmonary complications. The use of circumferential rib belts in treating patients with acute rib fractures has been discouraged because of possible complications from restricted ventilation. A review of the literature revealed no previous clinical studies to support this view. We designed and conducted a controlled, prospective, randomized pilot study to determine if there was any increased morbidity associated with the use of rib belts in the treatment of patients with acute rib fractures. Twenty-five adult patients with radiographically proven acute rib fractures were randomized into two groups. The first group was treated with analgesics and a standard circumferential rib belt (Zimmer Universal Rib Belt). The second group was treated with oral analgesics alone. Patients were contacted by telephone three days after the initial injury and then reexamined 14 days postinjury. Rates of pain resolution, compliance, and delayed complications were determined. Rib belts were not found to significantly reduce the severity of pain. Four complications (one case of bloody pleural effusion requiring hospitalization, two cases of asymptomatic discoid atelectasis, and one case of allergic contact dermatitis) were identified, all occurring in the group of patients receiving rib belts. This pilot study indicates that while rib belts are widely accepted by patients for control of pain, they appear to be associated with an increased incidence of complications. Clinical studies with larger sample sizes will be needed to confirm these findings. PMID:2643965

  14. Plasma phosphatidylcholine concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids are differentially associated with hop bone mineral density and hip fracture in older adults: The Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may influence bone health. Our objective was to examine associations between plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) PUFA concentrations and hip measures: 1) femoral neck bone mineral density (FN-BMD) (n=765); 2) 4-y change in FN-BMD (n=556); and 3) hip fracture risk (n=76...

  15. The effect of music on pain and acute confusion in older adults undergoing hip and knee surgery.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Ruth; Locsin, Rozzano

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music listening in older adults following hip or knee surgery. Acute confusion and pain after surgery can increase length of stay and reduce function. Study results demonstrate a reduction in acute confusion and pain and improved ambulation and higher satisfaction scores in older adults who listened to music. PMID:16974175

  16. Lower prevalence of hip fractures in foreign-born individuals than in Swedish-born individuals during the period 1987-1999

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This is the first longitudinal study with a 22-year follow-up, based on a national and complete sample, to determine whether the prevalence of hip fracture and the age when it occurs are influenced by migration and by being foreign-born. Cultural background and environmental factors such as UV-radiation and lifestyle during childhood and adolescence may influence the risk of a hip fracture event later in life. Differences in prevalence might occur between the indigenous population and those who have migrated to a country. Methods The study was based on national population data. The study population consisted of 321,407 Swedish-born and 307,174 foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the period 1987-1999. Results Foreign-born individuals had a reduced risk of hip fracture, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.47-0.77 for men and 0.42-0.88 for women. Foreign-born women had the hip fracture event at a higher age on average, but a longer time spent in Sweden was associated with a small but significant increase in risk. Conclusions We found that there was a reduced risk of hip fracture in all foreign-born individuals, and that the hip fracture event generally happened at a higher age in foreign-born women. Migration must therefore be considered in relation to the prevalence and risk of hip fracture. Migration can therefore have a positive effect on one aspect of the health of a population, and can influence and lower the total cost of healthcare due to reduced risk and prevalence of hip fracture. PMID:20831791

  17. The Comparison of Compression Hip Screw and Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty for the Treatment of AO Type A2 Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yee-Suk; Hur, Jae-Seung; Hwang, Kyu-Tae; Choi, Il-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of osteosynthesis using compression hip screw fixation versus bipolar hemiarthroplasty in AO type A2 intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods From March 2003 to December 2009, 89 patients were included in this study. They were treated using compression hip screws (43 cases) or bipolar hemiarthroplasty (46 cases). The mean age of patients was 77.7 years (65-94 years) and the mean follow-up period was 5.9 years (1-8.3 years). For comparison of the outcomes in the two groups, statistical analyses were performed with parameters including anesthesia time, operation time, amount of transfusion, hospital stay, general complications, clinical outcome, time of partial weight-bearing using a walker, and radiological failure rate. Results Differences in the amount of transfusion, general complications, and clinical outcome (Merle d'Aubigné and Postel score) were not statistically significant between the two groups. The bipolar hemiarthroplasty group showed better results than the compression hip screw group for anesthesia time and the time of partial weight-bearing using a walker. Radiological failures were observed in hips in one case (2.2%) of bipolar hemiarthroplasty, and in four cases (9.3%) of compression hip screw fixation. Conclusion Among elderly individuals with AO type A2 intertrochanteric fractures, patients treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty were able to perform early ambulation. However, no significant difference in operation time, amount of postoperative transfusion, clinical results, hospital stay, and radiological failure rate was observed between the bipolar hemiarthroplasty and compression hip screw fixation groups.

  18. Male Astronauts Have Greater Bone Loss and Risk of Hip Fracture Following Long Duration Spaceflights than Females

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Rachel; Sibonga, Jean; Bouxsein, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews bone loss in males and compares it to female bone loss during long duration spaceflight. The study indicates that males suffer greater bone loss than females and have a greater risk of hip fracture. Two possible reason for the greater male bone loss are that the pre-menopausal females have the estrogen protection and the greater strength of men max out the exercise equipment that provide a limited resistance to 135 kg.

  19. In Hospital and 3-Month Mortality and Functional Recovery Rate in Patients Treated for Hip Fracture by a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Rostagno, Carlo; Buzzi, Roberto; Campanacci, Domenico; Boccacini, Alberto; Cartei, Alessandro; Virgili, Gianni; Belardinelli, Andrea; Matarrese, Daniela; Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Gusinu, Roberto; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medical comorbidities affect outcome in elderly patients with hip fracture. This study was designed to preliminarily evaluate the usefulness of a hip-fracture unit led by an internal medicine specialist. Methods In-hospital and 3-month outcomes in patients with hip fracture were prospectively evaluated in 121 consecutive patients assessed before and followed after surgery by a multidisciplinary team led by internal medicine specialist; 337 consecutive patients were recalled from ICD-9 discharge records and considered for comparison regarding in-hospital mortality. Results In the intervention period, patients treated within 48 hours were 54% vs. 26% in the historical cohort (P<0.0001). In-hospital mortality remained stable at about 2.3 per 1000 person-days. At 3 months, 10.3% of discharged patients had died, though less than 8% of patients developed postoperative complications (mainly pneumonia and respiratory failure). The presence of more than 2 major comorbidities and the loss of 3 or more BADL were independent predictors of death. 50/105 patients recovered previous functional capacity, but no independent predictor of functional recovery could be identified. Mean length of hospital stay significantly decreased in comparison to the historical cohort (13.6± 4.7 vs 17 ± 5 days, p = 0.0001). Combined end-point of mortality and length of hospitalization < 12 days was significantly lower in study period (27 vs 34%, p <0.0132). Conclusions Identification and stabilization of concomitant clinical problems by internal medicine specialists may safely decrease time to surgery in frail subjects with hip fracture. Moreover, integrated perioperative clinical management may shorten hospital stay with no apparent increase in in-hospital mortality and ultimately improve the outcome. These results are to be confirmed by a larger study presently ongoing at our institution. PMID:27389193

  20. Delirium Outcomes in a Randomized Trial of Blood Transfusion Thresholds Among Hospitalized Older Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Marcantonio, Edward; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay; Terrin, Michael; Barr, Erik; Brown, Jessica Pelletier; Paris, Barbara; Zagorin, Aleksandra; Roffey, Darren M.; Zakriya, Khwaja; Blute, Mary-Rita; Hebel, J. Richard; Carson, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine if a higher blood transfusion threshold would prevent new or worsening delirium symptoms in the hospital after hip fracture surgery. Design Ancillary study to a randomized clinical trial. Setting Thirteen hospitals in United States and Canada. Participants One-hundred-thirty-nine hospitalized hip fracture patients, age ≥50, with cardiovascular disease or risk factors, and hemoglobin<10 g/dL within 3 days of surgery, recruited in an ancillary study of “Transfusion Trigger Trial for Functional Outcomes in Cardiovascular Patients Undergoing Surgical Hip Fracture Repair (FOCUS) trial.” Intervention Treatment groups: 1) Liberal: received one unit of packed red blood cells and as much blood as needed to maintain hemoglobin >10 g/dL; 2) Restrictive: received transfusions if developed symptoms of anemia or hemoglobin fell below 8 g/dL. Measurements Delirium assessments performed pre-randomization and up to three times post-randomization. Primary outcome: Severity of delirium using Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) scale. Secondary outcome: presence or absence of delirium defined by Confusion Assessment Method Diagnostic Algorithm (CAM). Results Mean age was 81.5 (SD=9.1). Liberal group received a median 2 units and Restrictive group 0 units of blood. Hemoglobin concentration on day 1 post randomization was 1.4 g/dL higher in the Liberal group. Treatment groups did not significantly differ at any time point or over time on either MDAS delirium severity (p=0.28) or CAM delirium presence (p=0.83). Conclusion Blood transfusion to maintain hemoglobin >10 g/dL alone is unlikely to influence delirium severity or rate in postoperative hip fracture patients with hemoglobin concentration <10 g/dL. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00071032 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00071032 PMID:23898894

  1. Random field assessment of inhomogeneous bone mineral density from DXA scans can enhance the differentiation between postmenopausal women with and without hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xuanliang Neil; Pinninti, Rajeshwar; Lowe, Timothy; Cussen, Patricia; Ballard, Joyce E.; Paolo, David Di; Shirvaikar, Mukul

    2015-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements from Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) alone cannot account for all factors associated with the risk of hip fractures. For example, the inhomogeneity of bone mineral density in the hip region also contributes to bone strength. In the stochastic assessment of bone inhomogeneity, the BMD map in the hip region is considered as a random field and stochastic predictors can be calculated by fitting a theoretical model onto the experimental variogram of the BMD map. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of bone mineral density and stochastic assessment of inhomogeneous distribution of bone mineral density in predicting hip fractures for postmenopausal women. DXA scans in the hip region were obtained from postmenopausal women with hip fractures (N=47, Age: 71.3±11.4 years) and without hip fractures (N=45, Age: 66.7±11.4 years). Comparison of BMD measurements and stochastic predictors in assessing bone fragility was based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) from logistic regression analyses. Although stochastic predictors offered higher accuracy (AUC=0.675) in predicting the risk of hip fractures than BMD measurements (AUC=0.625), such difference was not statistically significant (p=0.548). Nevertheless, the combination of stochastic predictors and BMD measurements had significantly (p=0.039) higher prediction accuracy (AUC=0.748) than BMD measurements alone. This study demonstrates that stochastic assessment of bone mineral distribution from DXA scans can serve as a valuable tool in enhancing the prediction of hip fractures for postmenopausal women in addition to BMD measurements. PMID:25683520

  2. Random field assessment of inhomogeneous bone mineral density from DXA scans can enhance the differentiation between postmenopausal women with and without hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuanliang Neil; Pinninti, Rajeshwar; Lowe, Timothy; Cussen, Patricia; Ballard, Joyce E; Di Paolo, David; Shirvaikar, Mukul

    2015-04-13

    Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements from Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) alone cannot account for all factors associated with the risk of hip fractures. For example, the inhomogeneity of bone mineral density in the hip region also contributes to bone strength. In the stochastic assessment of bone inhomogeneity, the BMD map in the hip region is considered as a random field and stochastic predictors can be calculated by fitting a theoretical model onto the experimental variogram of the BMD map. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of bone mineral density and stochastic assessment of inhomogeneous distribution of bone mineral density in predicting hip fractures for postmenopausal women. DXA scans in the hip region were obtained from postmenopausal women with hip fractures (N=47, Age: 71.3±11.4 years) and without hip fractures (N=45, Age: 66.7±11.4 years). Comparison of BMD measurements and stochastic predictors in assessing bone fragility was based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) from logistic regression analyses. Although stochastic predictors offered higher accuracy (AUC=0.675) in predicting the risk of hip fractures than BMD measurements (AUC=0.625), this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.548). Nevertheless, the combination of stochastic predictors and BMD measurements had significantly (p=0.039) higher prediction accuracy (AUC=0.748) than BMD measurements alone. This study demonstrates that stochastic assessment of bone mineral distribution from DXA scans can serve as a valuable tool in enhancing the prediction of hip fractures for postmenopausal women in addition to BMD measurements. PMID:25683520

  3. "When Things Are Really Complicated, We Call the Social Worker": Post-Hip-Fracture Care Transitions for Older People.

    PubMed

    Sims-Gould, Joanie; Byrne, Kerry; Hicks, Elisabeth; Franke, Thea; Stolee, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Social workers play a key role in the delivery of interdisciplinary health care. However, in the past decade, concerns have been raised about social work's sustainability and contributions in a changing health care sector. These changes come at a time when older patients are more complex and vulnerable than ever before. In this article, using a strengths-based approach, the authors examine the key contributions made by social workers working with older patients with hip fracture as they strive to achieve successful care transitions. Twenty-five interviews with health care professionals (HCPs) were conducted and then analyzed using an analytical coding framework. Although social workers are vital, they are often underused and overlooked in the care of hip fracture patients. The authors sketch the important contributions that social workers make to care transitions after hip fracture, specifically informational continuity; patient-HCP relational continuity; conflict resolution; mediation among family, patient, and HCP (for example, doctors and nurses); collaboration with family caregivers and community supports; and relocation counseling. PMID:26638501

  4. Effects of a Rehabilitation Program on Perceived Environmental Barriers in Older Patients Recovering from Hip Fracture: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Salpakoski, Anu; Arkela, Marja; Kallinen, Mauri; Rantanen, Taina; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To study effects of a one-year multicomponent intervention on perceived environmental barriers in hip fracture patients. Design. Randomized controlled trial of a 12-month home-based rehabilitation aiming to improve mobility and function (ISRCTN53680197); secondary analyses. Subjects. Community-dwelling hip fracture patients on average 70 days after trauma (n = 81). Methods. Assessments at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months later included perceived entrance-related barriers (e.g., indoor/outdoor stairs, lighting, floor surfaces, and storage for mobility devices) and perceived barriers in the outdoor environment (poor street condition, hilly terrain, long-distances, and lack of resting places). Sum scores for entrance-related and outdoor barriers were analyzed using general estimating equation models. Results. At baseline, 48% and 37% of the patients perceived at least one entrance-related barrier, and 62% and 60% perceived at least one outdoor barrier in the intervention and control group, respectively. Over time, (P = 0.003) the number of entrance-related barriers decreased in both groups (group P = 0.395; interaction P = 0.571). For outdoor barriers, time (P = 0.199), group (P = 0.911), and interaction effect (P = 0.430) were not significant. Conclusion. Our intervention had no additional benefit over standard care in hip fracture patients. Further study is warranted to determine whether perceived environmental barriers can be reduced by interventions targeted at the older individual. This trial is registered with ISRCTN53680197. PMID:23986910

  5. The effectiveness and safety of two prophylactic antibiotic regimes in hip-fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khan, M A; Allgar, V; Mohsen, A

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis with cefuroxime can reduce the incidence of deep wound infection (DWI) in hip-fracture surgery, but may increase the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). An alternative is gentamicin with beta-lactam for which a question exists around clinical effectiveness and safety, given the gentamicin-associated nephrotoxicity particularly in the elderly and narrower sensitivity spectrum. We compared 744 consecutive patients (group I-cefuroxime) with 756 in group II (gentamicin + flucloxacillin) who were well matched. There were 4 cases of CDI in the cefuroxime prophylaxis, whereas none in flucloxacillin plus gentamicin (group II). There was a statistically significant (p = 0.036) increased DWI rate in group II (2.5 %) as compared to group I (1.1 %). However, after controlling for age, gender, ASA grade, surgeon grade, implant type and type of anaesthesia, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.146). 8.5 % of group I and 16.5 % of group II developed AKI post-operatively (p = 0.023); however, 79 % of group I and 80 % of in group II had complete resolution of AKI prior to their discharge. Further, a significant increase in inpatient deaths (p = 0.057) in group II was observed, but not at 30 days (p = 0.378). PMID:27193753

  6. Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk Assessment to Optimize Prosthesis Selection in Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pétursson, Þröstur; Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnús Kjartan; Magnússon, Benedikt; Magnúsdóttir, Gígja; Halldórsson, Grétar; Jónsson, Halldór; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The variability in patient outcome and propensity for surgical complications in total hip replacement (THR) necessitates the development of a comprehensive, quantitative methodology for prescribing the optimal type of prosthetic stem: cemented or cementless. The objective of the research presented herein was to describe a novel approach to this problem as a first step towards creating a patient-specific, presurgical application for determining the optimal prosthesis procedure. Finite element analysis (FEA) and bone mineral density (BMD) calculations were performed with ten voluntary primary THR patients to estimate the status of their operative femurs before surgery. A compilation model of the press-fitting procedure was generated to define a fracture risk index (FRI) from incurred forces on the periprosthetic femoral head. Comparing these values to patient age, sex, and gender elicited a high degree of variability between patients grouped by implant procedure, reinforcing the notion that age and gender alone are poor indicators for prescribing prosthesis type. Additionally, correlating FRI and BMD measurements indicated that at least two of the ten patients may have received nonideal implants. This investigation highlights the utility of our model as a foundation for presurgical software applications to assist orthopedic surgeons with selecting THR prostheses. PMID:26417376

  7. Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk Assessment to Optimize Prosthesis Selection in Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pétursson, Þröstur; Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnús Kjartan; Magnússon, Benedikt; Magnúsdóttir, Gígja; Halldórsson, Grétar; Jónsson, Halldór; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The variability in patient outcome and propensity for surgical complications in total hip replacement (THR) necessitates the development of a comprehensive, quantitative methodology for prescribing the optimal type of prosthetic stem: cemented or cementless. The objective of the research presented herein was to describe a novel approach to this problem as a first step towards creating a patient-specific, presurgical application for determining the optimal prosthesis procedure. Finite element analysis (FEA) and bone mineral density (BMD) calculations were performed with ten voluntary primary THR patients to estimate the status of their operative femurs before surgery. A compilation model of the press-fitting procedure was generated to define a fracture risk index (FRI) from incurred forces on the periprosthetic femoral head. Comparing these values to patient age, sex, and gender elicited a high degree of variability between patients grouped by implant procedure, reinforcing the notion that age and gender alone are poor indicators for prescribing prosthesis type. Additionally, correlating FRI and BMD measurements indicated that at least two of the ten patients may have received nonideal implants. This investigation highlights the utility of our model as a foundation for presurgical software applications to assist orthopedic surgeons with selecting THR prostheses. PMID:26417376

  8. Characterization of Fatty Acid Composition in Bone Marrow Fluid From Postmenopausal Women: Modification After Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Melissa; Pino, Ana María; Fuenzalida, Karen; Rosen, Clifford J; Seitz, Germán; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is associated with low bone mass, although the functional consequences for skeletal maintenance of increased BMAT are currently unclear. BMAT might have a role in systemic energy metabolism, and could be an energy source as well as an endocrine organ for neighboring bone cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids into the bone marrow microenvironment. The aim of the present report was to compare the fatty acid composition in the bone marrow supernatant fluid (BMSF) and blood plasma of postmenopausal women women (65-80 years old). BMSF was obtained after spinning the aspirated bone marrow samples; donors were classified as control, osteopenic or osteoporotic after dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Total lipids from human bone marrow fluid and plasma were extracted, converted to the corresponding methyl esters, and finally analyzed by a gas chromatographer coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results showed that fatty acid composition in BMSF was dynamic and distinct from blood plasma, implying significance in the locally produced lipids. The fatty acid composition in the BMSF was enriched in saturated fatty acid and decreased in unsaturated fatty acids as compared to blood plasma, but this relationship switched in women who suffered a hip fracture. On the other hand, there was no relationship between BMSF and bone mineral density. In conclusion, lipid composition of BMSF is distinct from the circulatory compartment, most likely reflecting the energy needs of the marrow compartment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2370-2376, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27416518

  9. Evaluation of the Fracture Toughness on the Surface Layer in HIP-Sintered Silicon Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Tohru; Miyoshi, Yoshio; Tanabe, Hirotaka; Segawa, Muneyoshi

    To clarify the validity of evaluation of the threshold value of fracture toughness Kth on the surface layer of ceramics by sphere indentation test, indenters of various diameters 2R were used for sphere indentation tests with using Si3N4 specimens made by HIP-sintering and numerical calculation of the stress intensity factor KI was performed for surface cracks under ball-plate contact loading. The crack length ci was estimated from experimental results using KI, where ci is the length of the crack leading to a ring crack and the conditions for ring crack initiation were assumed to be KI>Kth. The average values of ci increased with increasing 2R in the case of small 2R, but the averages of ci gradually approached a constant value in cases with large 2R. The constant value of ci was estimated as 7.9-8.6 μm using Kth=5.3 MPa·m½ and was almost equivalent to the grain size of the test material. The same results were obtained in the previous study with Si3N4 specimens made by gas-pressure-sintering. Therefore, sphere indentation tests can be used to evaluate Kth of ceramics using KI for surface cracks.

  10. The effect of care pathways for hip fractures: a systematic overview of secondary studies.

    PubMed

    Leigheb, Fabrizio; Vanhaecht, Kris; Sermeus, Walter; Lodewijckx, Cathy; Deneckere, Svin; Boonen, Steven; Boto, Paulo A; Mendes, Rita Veloso; Panella, Massimiliano

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to perform a systematic overview of secondary literature studies on care pathways (CPs) for hip fracture (HF). The online databases MEDLINE-PubMed, Ovid-EMBASE, CINAHL-EBSCO-host, and The Cochrane Library were searched. A total of six papers, corresponding to six secondary studies, were included but only four secondary studies were HF-specific and thus assessed. Secondary studies were evaluated for patients' clinical outcomes. There were wide differences among the studies that assessed the effects of CPs on HF patients, with some contrasting clinical outcomes reported. Secondary studies that were non-specific for CPs and included other multidisciplinary care approaches as well showed, in some cases, a shorter hospital length of stay (LOS) compared to usual care; studies that focused on promoting early mobilization showed better outcomes of mortality, morbidity, function, or service utilization; CPs mainly based on intensive occupational therapy and/or physical therapy exercises improved functional recovery and reduced LOS, with patients also discharged to a more favorable discharge destination; CPs principally focused on early mobilization improved functional recovery. A secondary study specifically designed for CPs showed lower odds of experiencing common complications of hospitalization after HF. In conclusion, although our overview suggests that CPs can reduce significantly LOS and can have a positive impact on different outcomes, data are insufficient for formal recommendations. To properly understand the effects of CPs for HF, a systematic review is needed of primary studies that specifically examined CPs for HF. PMID:23412217

  11. Sedation depth during spinal anesthesia and survival in elderly patients undergoing hip fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Brown, Charles H; Azman, Andrew S; Gottschalk, Allan; Mears, Simon C; Sieber, Frederick E

    2014-05-01

    Low intraoperative Bispectral Index (BIS) values may be associated with increased mortality. In a previously reported trial to prevent delirium, we randomized patients undergoing hip fracture repair under spinal anesthesia to light (BIS >80) or deep (BIS approximately 50) sedation. We analyzed survival of patients in the original trial. Among all patients, mortality was equivalent across sedation groups. However, among patients with serious comorbidities (Charlson score >4), 1-year mortality was reduced in the light (22.2%) vs deep (43.6%) sedation group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.97; P = 0.04) during spinal anesthesia. Similarly, among patients with Charlson score >6, 1-year mortality was reduced in the light (28.6%) vs deep (52.6%) sedation group (HR 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.94; P = 0.04) during spinal anesthesia. Further research on reduced mortality after light sedation during spinal anesthesia is needed. PMID:24781567

  12. Is There Relationship between Brain Atrophy and Higher Incidence of Hip Fracture in Old Age? -A Preliminary Study-

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Suh, Seung Woo; Yoon, Tae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The studies on the correlation between incidence of fall and brain atrophy have been going on to find out the cause of fall and its prevention. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between incidence of hip fracture and brain volume, measured by magnetic resonance image. Materials and Methods A total of 14 subjects with similar conditions (age, height, weight, and past history) were selected for this study. Fracture group (FG) was consisted of 5 subjects with intertrochanteric fracture. Control group (CG) had 9 subjects without intertrochanteric fracture. MRI-based brain volumetry was done in FG and CG with imaging software (V-works, CyberMed Co., Korea). Total brain (tBV), absolute cerebellar volumes (aCV) and relative cerebellar volumes (rCV) were compared between two groups. Student t-test was used to statistically analyze the results. Results In FG, average tBV, aCV and rCV were 1034.676±38.80, 108.648±76.80 and 10.50±0.72 cm3, respectively. In CG, average tBV, aCV and rCV were found to be 1106.459±89.15, 114.899±98.06 and 10.39±0.53 cm3, respectively, having no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). Conclusion There was no significant difference between the fracture and control groups. Patients with neurologic disease such as cerebellar ataxia definitely have high incidence of fall that causes fractures and have brain changes as well. However, FG without neurologic disease did not have brain volume change. We consider that high risk of fall with hip fracture might decrease brain function which is not obvious to pickup on MRI. PMID:24142659

  13. Bilateral femoral neck fractures secondary to chronic carbamazepine use treated by bilateral dynamic hip screw: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sariyilmaz, Kerim; Gulenc, Baris; Ozkunt, Okan; Dikici, Fatih; Yazicioglu, Onder

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bilateral femoral neck fractures without major trauma are rare and related to several conditions. Insufficiency fractures due to the use of anti-epileptic drug are one of the rare causes. This case study is about bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fractures resulting from chronic use of anti-epileptic drug. Presentation of case A 26-year-old woman was referred to our emergency department with a complaint of bilateral groin pain and a 12-year history of irregular carbamazepine use. The diagnosis was bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fractures due to irregular long-term carbamazepine use. One-stage bilateral dynamic hip screw osteosynthesis was performed. After 2 years of follow up, good result was obtained. Discussion There are several risk factors for insufficiency fracture, and antiepileptic drug related osteoporosis is one of the reason. These drugs have negative effect on bone methabolism and bone mineral density. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature of bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fracture due to chronic carbamazepine use. Joint and bone pain with a history of long-term use of anti-epileptic drug should be investigated carefully, and insufficiency fractures should be kept in mind. PMID:25528039

  14. Acute and sub-acute effects of repetitive kicking on hip adduction torque in injury-free elite youth soccer players.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper; Bandholm, Thomas; Hölmich, Per; Thorborg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Hip adduction strength is important for kicking and acceleration in soccer players. Changes in hip adduction strength may therefore have an effect on soccer players' athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute and sub-acute effects of a kicking drill session on hip strength, concerning isometric hip adduction, abduction and flexion torque of the kicking leg and the supporting leg. Ten injury-free male elite soccer players, mean ± s age of 15.8 ± 0.4 years participated. All players underwent a specific 20 min kicking drill session, comprising 45 kicks. The players were tested the day before, 15 min after and 24 h after the kicking drill session by a blinded tester using a reliable test procedure. The isometric hip-action and leg-order were randomized. For the kicking leg, hip adduction torque increased from 2.45 (2.19-2.65) Nm ∙ kg(-1), median (25th-75th percentiles), at pre-kicking to 2.65 (2.55-2.81) Nm ∙ kg(-1) (P = 0.024) 24 h post-kicking. This may have implications for the soccer player's ability to maximally activate the hip adductors during kicking and acceleration, and thereby improve performance the day after a kicking drill session. PMID:24669834

  15. Acute delayed infection: increased risk in failed metal on metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Hernan A; Berbari, Elie F; Sierra, Rafael J

    2014-09-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions occurring in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) could potentially lead to secondary failure modes such as dislocation or infection. The authors report a series of 124 patients treated with MoM hip arthroplasty between 2006 and 2010 with a minimum follow-up of 3 years. Eight hips presented with acute delayed or late periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) (defined as an infection occurring after 3 months in an otherwise well functioning implant). The rate of infection observed was higher than expected, almost 4 times higher (5.6%) compared to previous historical cohorts from our institution (1.3%). This high risk of infection in patients with DePuy ASR implants requires further study but we theorize that the increased prevalence of infection could be due to a combination of particulate debris, molecular (rather than particulate) effects of Co and Cr ions on soft tissues, and/or products of corrosion that may change the local environment predisposing to infection. PMID:24851788

  16. [Femoral nerve block as pain relief in hip fracture. A good alternative in perioperative treatment proved by a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Kullenberg, Björn; Ysberg, Benita; Heilman, Martin; Resch, Sylvia

    2004-06-10

    Almost 25% of all patients with hip fracture experience temporary confusion pre- and directly postoperatively due to trauma, advanced age, transport between units, and the use of analgesics, 35-50% of the patients suffer temporary or chronic decubitus. Analgesics often lead to nausea. A femoral nerve block can interrupt sensory impulses from the hip joint and provide complete pain relief without affecting the CNS, thus making preoperative care easier and postoperative rehabilitation can be started earlier. 80 consecutive patients with hip fracture were randomized to femoral nerve block or pharmacological treatment only. Paracetamol and tramadol were the standard analgesics used. All patients were followed up with regard to pain, duration of the block, number of analgesics doses, temporary confusion and time for postoperative mobilization. Pain was estimated by the patients using the visual analogue scale (VAS). A nerve block was performed to block the femoral nerve, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and the obturator nerve with 30 ml of ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml. Mental status was evaluated with Pfeiffer-test. All patients experienced relatively intense pain on admission with an average VAS of 6. After nerve block the VAS was 2. Pain relief was the same in the control group. Pain relief was sustained for 15 hours. The time for mobilization after surgery was significantly lower, 23 hours compared to 36 for the control group. There was a lower number of patients temporarily confused in the block group compared to the control group, however no significant differences were seen. Femoral nerve block provides adequate pain relief, equivalent to pharmacological treatment in most patients. The time for postoperative mobilization was shorter and less temporary confusion was seen. There were no complications in this group, making nerve block a good alternative to traditional pharmacological preoperative treatment for patients with hip fractures. PMID:15282985

  17. Protective effect of total and supplemental vitamin C intake on the risk of hip fracture - A 17-year follow-up from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary antioxidants such as vitamin C may play a role in bone health. We evaluated associations of vitamin C intake (total, dietary and supplemental) with incident hip fracture and non-vertebral osteoporotic fracture, over a 15 to 17-y follow-up, in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. 366 men and 59...

  18. Glycated Hemoglobin Level and Risk of Hip Fracture in Older People with Type 2 Diabetes: A Competing Risk Analysis of Taiwan Diabetes Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Meng, Nai-Hsin; Chen, Ching-Chu; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Hip fracture, which is associated with substantial morbidity and long-term mortality, imposes a major burden on the healthcare system. Diabetes is a risk factor for osteoporosis, which is a crucial risk factor of hip fracture. However, epidemiological studies investigating the risk of hip fracture among patients with type 2 diabetes are limited. This study explored the association between hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and the risk of hip fracture in people with type 2 diabetes aged 65 years and older. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 20,025 older patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in the National Diabetes Case Management Program in Taiwan. The HbA1c level at the baseline and hip fracture incidence over an average of 7.41 years of follow-up were analyzed (maximum and standard deviation were 10.9 and 2.42 years, respectively). A total of 1514 hip fracture cases were recorded. The incidence rates of hip fracture were 9.15, 8.02, 9.58, 10.61, 12.51, and 13.43 per 1000 person-years in patients with baseline HbA1c levels of < 6%, 6-7%, 7%-8%, 8%-9%, 9%-10%, and ≥ 10%, respectively. After multivariate adjustment, the risk of hip fracture increased among patients with HbA1c levels of 9%-10% and ≥ 10.0% compared with patients with HbA1c levels of 6-7% (hazard ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.49 and 1.32; 1.09-1.58, respectively). Significant linear trends among various HbA1c levels were observed (P  < 0.05). Patients with type 2 diabetes whose HbA1c levels exceeded 9.0% exhibited an increased risk of hip fracture, confirming a linear relationship. Our study's findings demonstrated the importance of glycemic control for fracture prevention in older adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25598134

  19. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA): can it detect acute scaphoid fractures?

    PubMed

    Stephen, A B; Pye, D; Lyons, A R; Oni, J A; Davis, T R C

    2005-02-01

    This prospective study investigated whether dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) could detect acute scaphoid fractures. We blindly compared 10 normal and 10 fractured scaphoid images produced with a new technique of DXA scan analysis. This measured and plotted the density of the scaphoid throughout its length, producing a linear graph of the scaphoids' density instead of a single area (g/cm2) measurement of bone density. These new plots only detected six of the 10 fractures and suggested that four of the normal controls were fractured. Thus, this technique of DXA scan analysis is neither sensitive nor specific for the detection of acute scaphoid fractures. PMID:15620498

  20. The effect of care pathways for hip fractures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Leigheb, Fabrizio; Vanhaecht, Kris; Sermeus, Walter; Lodewijckx, Cathy; Deneckere, Svin; Boonen, Steven; Boto, Paulo Alexandre Faria; Mendes, Rita Veloso; Panella, Massimiliano

    2012-07-01

    We performed a systematic review for primary studies on care pathways (CPs) for hip fracture (HF). The online databases MEDLINE-PubMed, Ovid-EMBASE, CINAHL-EBSCO host, and The Cochrane Library (Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials, Health Technology Assessment Database, NHS Economic Evaluation Database) were searched. Two researchers reviewed the literature independently. Primary studies that met predefined inclusion criteria were assessed for their methodological quality. A total of 15 publications were included: 15 primary studies corresponding with 12 main investigations. Primary studies were evaluated for clinical outcomes, process outcomes, and economic outcomes. The studies assessed a wide range of outcome measures. While a number of divergent clinical outcomes were reported, most studies showed positive results of process management and health-services utilization. In terms of mortality, the results provided evidence for a positive impact of CPs on in-hospital mortality. Most studies also showed a significantly reduced risk of complications, including medical complications, wound infections, and pressure sores. Moreover, time-span process measures showed that an improvement in the organization of care was achieved through the use of CPs. Conflicting results were observed with regard to functional recovery and mobility between patients treated with CPs compared to usual care. Although our review suggests that CPs can have positive effects in patients with HF, the available evidence is insufficient for formal recommendations. There is a need for more research on CPs with selected process and outcome indicators, for in-hospital and postdischarge management of HF, with an emphasis on well-designed randomized trials. PMID:22476267

  1. Hemodialysis Induced Amyloid Arthropathy of Hip Presenting as Pathological Fracture-A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid arthropathy is a recognized complication of chronic renal failure with long term dialysis. The amyloid, a beta 2microglobulin is not filtered by dialysis membrane and remains in the circulation, gets deposited over the synovium, articular bones and cartilage. As a result the large joints like shoulder, hips and knees show cystic bone lesions. The radiological features precede the clinical symptoms. The majority of the patients remain asymptomatic till the advanced stage or may present with pathological fracture. The patient in this case report had a long history of dialysis due to renal failure and presented with pain, limping and difficult to walk after the history of fall in bathroom. The radiological investigations, particularly MRI hip had typical signs of amyloid arthropathy; later on confirmed by biopsy. This case report is presented to call attention of clinicians and radiologists for the early and prompt diagnosis of amyloid arthropathy, avoiding false/delayed diagnosis which can increase morbidity and mortality. PMID:25478427

  2. The effect of delay to surgery on morbidity, mortality and length of stay following periprosthetic fracture around the hip.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Lynn, Sarah; Ngu, Albert; Holland, Jim; Carluke, Ian; Fearon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing prevalence of total hip arthroplasty and the increasing longevity of patients with implants in situ, periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur are seen with greater frequency. They represent a challenging surgical problem, requiring combined arthroplasty and trauma skills in a potentially compromised surgical bed. We present data from the 82 consecutive patients with periprosthetic fractures around the hip presenting to two NHS Foundation Trusts in the period January 2009 to February 2014. Inpatient mortality across all sites was 11.0%. This increased to 17.1% at 1 year. There was no association between delay to surgery and either inpatient or 1 year mortality. Mean delay to surgery was 4.1 days in those without inpatient mortality, 5.2 days in those with (p=0.3075). Mean delay to surgery was 4.5 days in those with 1 year mortality, 4.16 days in those without (p=0.6203). The number of post-operative complications was not significantly positively correlated with increasing delay to surgery (Pearson correlation coefficient -0.04437). It would appear that a delay to order necessary equipment and obtain relevant surgical expertise for the treatment of these complex fractures is safe and not associated with increased mortality or post-operative complications. PMID:26653266

  3. Use of the Patellar-Pubic Percussion Test in the Diagnosis and Management of a Patient with a Non-Displaced Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Borgerding, Leah J.; Kikillus, Pamela J.; Boissonnault, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and subsequent medical and physical therapy management of a 68-year-old patient with an undiagnosed non-displaced hip fracture. Initial plain film radiographs and a computed tomography (CT) scan of the involved hip were both interpreted as negative. One of the findings on the physical examination included a positive patellar-pubic percussion test (PPPT). This finding in a female patient of this age raised the suspicion of an occult hip fracture and she was referred back to her primary care physician. Repeat radiographs revealed a non-displaced hip fracture and the patient was treated surgically. The PPPT is an easy-to-implement clinical examination tool that may be extremely useful in physical therapy practice to guide the decision-making process for patients with suspected hip fractures. The utilization of the PPPT by the treating physical therapist for the patient in this case report contributed to a timely diagnosis, potentially preventing the disabling sequelae associated with a displaced femoral fracture. PMID:19066665

  4. Single Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block is Safe and Effective for Emergency Pain Relief in Hip-fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Groot, Leonieke; Dijksman, Lea M.; Simons, Maarten P.; Zwartsenburg, Mariska M.S.; Rebel, Jasper R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Currently, it is common practice in the emergency department (ED) for pain relief in hip-fracture patients to administer pain medication, commonly systemic opioids. However, with these pain medications come a high risk of side effects, especially in elderly patients. This study investigated the safety profile and success rate of fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) in a busy ED. This ED was staffed with emergency physicians (EPs) and residents of varying levels of experience. This study followed patients’ pain levels at various hourly intervals up to eight hours post procedure. Methods Between September 2012 and July 2013, we performed a prospective pilot study on hip-fracture patients who were admitted to the ED of a teaching hospital in the Netherlands. These patients were followed and evaluated post FICB for pain relief. Secondary outcome was the use of opioids as rescue medication. Results Of the 43 patients in this study, patients overall experienced less pain after the FICB (p=0.04). This reduction in pain was studied in conjunction with the use and non-use of opioids. A clinically meaningful decrease in pain was achieved after 30 minutes in 62% of patients (54% with the use of opioids, 8% without opioids); after 240 minutes in 82% of patients (18% with opioids, 64% without opioids); after 480 minutes in 88% of patients (16% with opioids, 72% without opioids). No adverse events were reported. Conclusion In a busy Dutch ED with rotating residents of varying levels of experience, FICB seems to be an efficient, safe and practical method for pain reduction in patients with a hip fracture. Even without the use of opioids, pain reduction was achieved in 64% of patients after four hours and in 72% of patients after eight hours. PMID:26759680

  5. The use of fibrinogen uptake test in screening for deep vein thrombosis in patients with hip fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Fauno, P.; Suomalainen, O.; Bergqvist, D.; Fredin, H.; Kettunen, K.; Soimakallio, S.; Cederholm, C.; Karjalainen, P.; Vissinger, H.; Justesen, T. )

    1990-11-01

    255 hip fracture patients were studied by {sup 125}I-fibrinogen uptake test and bilateral phlebography. We found the sensitivity of fibrinogen scanning to be 44% for the non-operated limb and 50% for the calves. The predictive value of a negative result was found to be 92% and 93% respectively. We conclude that the use of fibrinogen uptake test as single diagnosticum is not valid and can only be recommended in combination with phlebography when studying patient where the frequency of DVT is expected to be low.

  6. The Epidemiology of Hip and Major Osteoporotic Fractures in a Dutch Population of Community-Dwelling Elderly: Implications for the Dutch FRAX® Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Klop, Corinne; Welsing, Paco M. J.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Elders, Petra J. M.; Overbeek, Jetty A.; van den Bergh, Joop P.; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; de Vries, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Incidence rates of non-hip major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) remain poorly characterized in the Netherlands. The Dutch FRAX® algorithm, which predicts 10-year probabilities of hip fracture and MOF (first of hip, humerus, forearm, clinical vertebral), therefore incorporates imputed MOF rates. Swedish incidence rate ratios for hip fracture to MOF (Malmo 1987–1996) were used to perform this imputation. However, equality of these ratios between countries is uncertain and recent evidence is scarce. Aims were to estimate incidence rates of hip fracture and MOF and to compare observed MOF rates to those predicted by the imputation method for the Netherlands. Methods Using hospitalisation and general practitioner records from the Dutch PHARMO Database Network (2002–2011) we calculated age-and-sex-specific and age-standardized incidence rates (IRs) of hip and other MOFs (humerus, forearm, clinical vertebral) and as used in FRAX®. Observed MOF rates were compared to those predicted among community-dwelling individuals ≥50 years by the standardized incidence ratio (SIR; 95% CI). Results Age-standardized IRs (per 10,000 person-years) of MOF among men and women ≥50 years were 25.9 and 77.0, respectively. These numbers were 9.3 and 24.0 for hip fracture. Among women 55–84 years, observed MOF rates were significantly higher than predicted (SIR ranged between 1.12–1.50, depending on age). In men, the imputation method performed reasonable. Conclusion Observed MOF incidence was higher than predicted for community-dwelling women over a wide age-range, while it agreed reasonable for men. As miscalibration may influence treatment decisions, there is a need for confirmation of results in another data source. Until then, the Dutch FRAX® output should be interpreted with caution. PMID:26633011

  7. The effect of osteoporotic treatment on the functional outcome, re-fracture rate, quality of life and mortality in patients with hip fractures: a prospective functional and clinical outcome study on 520 patients.

    PubMed

    Makridis, Konstantinos G; Karachalios, Theofilos; Kontogeorgakos, Vasilios A; Badras, Leonidas S; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2015-02-01

    Numerous high quality studies have shown the positive effects of various osteoporotic medical treatment regimens on bone mass and on the reduction of risk for new spinal, hip and non-spinal fractures in osteoporotic patients. However, the effect of osteoporotic treatment on the functional and clinical outcome of patients who have sustained hip fractures and been treated surgically has not yet been addressed. Five hundred and twenty patients out of 611 who were admitted (2009-2011), operated on due to a hip fracture and completed their follow-up evaluations were included in this study. Data related to functional outcome scores, re-fracture rate, quality of life and mortality rate were prospectively recorded, analysed and correlated to osteoporotic medical treatment. There were 151 (25%) men and 369 (71%) women with a mean age of 80.7 years (range, 60 to 90 years). At a mean follow-up of 27.5 months (range, 24 to 36 months) a mortality rate of 23.6% at 2 years was recorded. Mean values of functional and quality of life scores were found to have progressively improved within two years after surgery. Seventy-eight (15%) patients were taking osteoporotic treatment before their hip fracture and 89 (17.1%) started afterwards. Osteoporotic treatment proved to be an important predictor of functional recovery (all p values<0.05), re-fracture rate (p=0.028) and quality of life (EQ-5D, all dimensions, p values<0.05). Osteoporotic treatment did not affect post-fracture mortality rates. Osteoporotic treatment taken before or initiated after fracture is a strong predictor of functional and clinical outcome in patients with hip fractures treated surgically. PMID:25541417

  8. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Modular Trabecular Metal Acetabular Components for Failed Treatment of Acetabular Fractures: A Mid-term Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, De-Yong; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Xu, Hui; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Porous-coated cups have been widely used in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures, and good results have been reported with the use of these cups; however, the durability and functionality of modular trabecular metal (TM) acetabular components in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures remain unclear. This study aimed to examine the radiographic and clinical outcomes associated with the use of modular TM acetabular components for failed treatment of acetabular fractures to assess the durability and functionality of these components in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures. Methods: A total of 41 patients (41 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) using modular TM acetabular components for failed treatment of acetabular fractures at our hospital between January 2007 and December 2012. Among these patients, two were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 39 patients (39 hips) were finally included in this study. The Harris hip score before and after the surgery, satisfaction level of the patients, and radiographic results were assessed. Results: The mean Harris hip score increased from 34 (range, 8–52) before surgery to 91 (range, 22–100) at the latest follow-up examination (P < 0.001). The results were excellent for 28 hips, good for six, fair for three, and poor for two. Among the 39 patients, 25 (64%) and 10 (26%) were very satisfied and somewhat satisfied, respectively. All cups were found to be fully incorporated, and no evidence of cup migration or periacetabular osteolysis was noted. Conclusions: Despite the technically demanding nature of the procedure, THA using modular TM acetabular components showed good durability and functionality and may be an effective reconstruction option for failed treatment of acetabular fractures. PMID:27064033

  9. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  10. A new technique for lag screw placement in the dynamic hip screw fixation of intertrochanteric fractures: decreasing radiation time dramatically

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wei-Chao; Li, Jia-Zhen; Chen, Sheng-Hua

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to confirm the decrease in radiation time required for a new technique to place dynamic hip screws (DHS) in intertrochanteric fractures. Seventy-six patients were treated with DHS by either the new technique (NT) or the conventional technique (CT). The width of femoral shaft, the length of the hip screw to be implanted into the injured side, and the distance between the tip of the greater trochanter and the entry point of the guide wire were measured at the uninjured side on the anteroposterior pelvic radiograph preoperatively, and the actual width of the injured femoral shaft was measured intra-operatively. Finally, the entry point and the length of hip screw were obtained through an equation. Mean radiation time of the NT patients (24.57 ± 7.80 s) was significantly shorter than the CT patients (54.2 ± 18.26 s) (P  < 0.001). The new technique decreased radiation time dramatically in DHS fixation. PMID:18265981

  11. Microarchitecture and Peripheral BMD are Impaired in Postmenopausal White Women With Fracture Independently of Total Hip T-Score: An International Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Boutroy, Stephanie; Khosla, Sundeep; Sornay-Rendu, Elisabeth; Zanchetta, Maria Belen; McMahon, Donald J; Zhang, Chiyuan A; Chapurlat, Roland D; Zanchetta, Jose; Stein, Emily M; Bogado, Cesar; Majumdar, Sharmila; Burghardt, Andrew J; Shane, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Because single-center studies have reported conflicting associations between microarchitecture and fracture prevalence, we included high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) data from five centers worldwide into a large multicenter analysis of postmenopausal women with and without fracture. Volumetric BMD (vBMD) and microarchitecture were assessed at the distal radius and tibia in 1379 white postmenopausal women (age 67 ± 8 years); 470 (34%) had at least one fracture including 349 with a major fragility fracture. Age, height, weight, and total hip T-score differed across centers and were employed as covariates in analyses. Women with fracture had higher BMI, were older, and had lower total hip T-score, but lumbar spine T-score was similar between groups. At the radius, total and trabecular vBMD and cortical thickness were significantly lower in fractured women in three out of five centers, and trabecular number in two centers. Similar results were found at the tibia. When data from five centers were combined, however, women with fracture had significantly lower total, trabecular, and cortical vBMD (2% to 7%), lower trabecular number (4% to 5%), and thinner cortices (5% to 6%) than women without fracture after adjustment for covariates. Results were similar at the radius and tibia. Similar results were observed with analysis restricted to major fragility fracture, vertebral and hip fractures, and peripheral fracture (at the radius). When focusing on osteopenic women, each SD decrease of total and trabecular vBMD was associated with a significantly increased risk of major fragility fracture (OR = 1.55 to 1.88, p < 0.01) after adjustment for covariates. Moreover, trabecular architecture modestly improved fracture discrimination beyond peripheral total vBMD. In conclusion, we observed differences by center in the magnitude of fracture/nonfracture differences at both the distal radius and tibia. However, when data were pooled across

  12. Integrated transitional care: patient, informal caregiver and health care provider perspectives on care transitions for older persons with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Toscan, Justine; Mairs, Katie; Hinton, Stephanie; Stolee, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Complex older adults, such as those with hip fracture, frequently require care from multiple professionals across a variety of settings. Integrated care both between providers and across settings is important to ensure care quality and patient safety. The purpose of this study was to determine the core factors related to poorly integrated care when hip fracture patients transition between care settings. Methods A qualitative, focused ethnographic approach was used to guide data collection and analysis. Patients, their informal caregivers and health care providers were interviewed and observed at each care transition. A total of 45 individual interviews were conducted. Interview transcripts and field notes were coded and analysed to uncover emerging themes in the data. Results Four factors related to poorly integrated transitional care were identified: confusion with communication about care, unclear roles and responsibilities, diluted personal ownership over care, and role strain due to system constraints. Conclusions Our research supports a broader notion of collaborative practice that extends beyond specific care settings and includes an appropriate, informed role for patients and informal caregivers. This research can help guide system-level and setting-specific interventions designed to promote high-quality, patient-centred care during care transitions. PMID:22977426

  13. Prevalence of delirium in geriatric rehabilitation in Israel and its influence on rehabilitation outcomes in patients with hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Neomi; Nili, Frances; Shahory, Ron; Seleznev, Irena; Ben Natan, Merav

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of delirium among geriatric patients with hip fractures and to examine the influence of delirium on rehabilitation outcomes. A prospective study was carried out among 95 hip fracture patients admitted to an orthopedic geriatric rehabilitation ward. At admission, the following data were gathered: sociodemographic data, prefracture Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Mini-Mental State Examination, comorbidities, and medication. Delirium was assessed using the Confusion Assessment Method. The severity of delirium among patients with a positive score on the Confusion Assessment Method was assessed using the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98). Rehabilitation outcomes were evaluated by comparing FIM and ADL at admission and at discharge. The research findings showed that the prevalence of delirium among patients was 30%. In addition, a significant difference was found between patients who developed delirium and those who did not. Patients who developed delirium were mostly Jewish, with lower ADL levels at admission, more significant renal failure, lower levels of FIM, and lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores. Furthermore, FIM at discharge and delta FIM were lower among patients who developed delirium than among those who did not. The research conclusions indicated that the functional recovery of patients with delirium is slower. Therefore, it is important to adjust the therapeutic approach to these patients. PMID:26154303

  14. The Efficacy of Low Molecular Weight Heparin for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism after Hip Fracture Surgery in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Kyoun; Won, Ye-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in Korean patients who underwent hip fracture surgery (HFS). Materials and Methods Prospectively, a total 181 cases were classified into the LMWH user group (116 cases) and LMWH non-user group (65 cases). Each group was sub-classified according to fracture types as follows: 81 cases of intertrochanteric fracture (group A: 49, group B: 32) and 100 cases of neck fracture (group C: 67, group D: 33). We compared the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) according to LMWH use. Results Of the 181 cases, four DVTs were found in the LMWH user groups (1 in group A, and 3 in group C). One case of PE was found in LMWH non-user group D. The incidences of DVT and PE showed no statistically significant differences between the LMWH user and non-user groups (p=0.298 and 0.359, respectively). In subgroup analysis, no statistically significant differences were found between groups A and B and between groups C and D. Conclusion The administration of LMWH was not effective in the prevention of venous thromboembolism and PE in the Korean patients who underwent HFS. PMID:27401653

  15. Comparison of complications and length of hospital stay between orthopedic and orthogeriatric treatment in elderly patients with a hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Pablo; Fuentes, Paola; Diaz, Andres; Martinez, Felipe; Amenabar, Pedro; Schweitzer, Daniel; Botello, Eduardo; Gac, Homero

    2012-06-01

    Hip fractures in the elderly individuals are a complex problem. Our objective was to determine whether orthogeriatric treatment is effective in terms of reducing length of hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality of elderly patients with a hip fracture compared with orthopedic (traditional) treatment. From July 2009 to May 2011, patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture were followed prospectively. They were co-treated by geriatric and orthopedic teams. This cohort was compared with a retrospective cohort followed from January 2007 to June 2009 that was managed by the orthopedic surgery team only. Epidemiology, pre- and postoperative hematocrit, and renal function were registered. Also, in-hospital and distant mortality data (determined by consulting the national registry), mortality-associated factors, postoperative complications, hospital stay length, and transfers to other services were registered. One hundred and eighty-three patients in the retrospective group and 92 in the prospective group were included in this study with a median follow-up of 26 months (interquartile range: 13-41). The average age was 84 years and 74% of patients were female. Intertrochanteric fracture accounted for 51% of the cases. There was no difference between groups with regard to hospital stay length, hematocrit at discharge, in-hospital mortality, long-term survival, or transfers to internal medicine or the intensive care unit. It did show differences in the transfer to the intermediate care unit, prolonged hospitalizations (>20 days), and diagnosis of delirium and anemia requiring transfusion. In the present study, orthogeriatric treatment is slightly more effective than traditional treatment in terms of morbidity, but there is no difference in hospital stay length or mortality. Further studies and longer follow-up are needed to draw more conclusions. PMID:23569697

  16. Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in the Setting of a Complex Acetabulum Fracture without Hip Dislocation Treated Surgically Using Ilio-inguinal Approach: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis in isolated fractures of the acetabulum without dislocation of hip seems to be a known complication, but to our knowledge it has not been reported adequately. The causative nature of post-traumatic femoral head osteonecrosis has not been studied critically. The pathophysiology of osteonecrosis in this case also eludes us. Striking evidence points towards the intra-operative blood loss and low mean arterial pressure possibly leading to hypo-perfusion of femoral head leading to osteonecrosis. Fractures of the acetabulum pose a difficult problem for the patient and the surgeon because of possible complications. Thus any surgeon involved in surgery for fractures of the acetabulum should be aware of the possibility of this potential complication. Here is a 61-year male, who sustained a complex fracture of the acetabulum without hip dislocation, subsequently was treated surgically with internal fixation using an anterior approach, 10 months after surgery patient developed osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

  17. The Effects of a Warm-up on Acute Hip Joint Flexibility Using a Modified PNF Stretching Technique

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, William L.; Hands, Mary R.

    1992-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the effects of various types of warm-up on performance of the slow-reversal-hold-relax modified Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) flexibility maneuver. The subjects for this study (N=54) were active, injuryfree females who were randomly assigned to stationary cycling, whirlpool, or control groups. Each group participated in its assigned treatment for 20 minutes and did not perform any stretching exercises before or during their warm-up. Acute flexibility data were collected for hip flexion with the use of a Leighton Flexometer following the treatment condition. Hip range of motion (ROM) did not differ between the groups performing a warm-up and the control group; therefore, a warm-up had no effect on hip ROM when using a modified PNF technique. ImagesFig 1. PMID:16558145

  18. Mild to moderate cognitive impairment is a major risk factor for mortality and nursing home admission in the first year after hip fracture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not well established if and to what extent mild to moderate cognitive impairment predicts mortality and risk of nursing home admission after hip fracture. To investigate prospectively whether and to what extent mild to moderate cognitive impairment, contributes to mortality and admission to nu...

  19. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiang; Lau, Tak-Wing; Leung, Frankie

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw (DHS) is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade) was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC), superior-centre (SC), inferior-center (IC), centre-anterior (CA), and centre-posterior (CP). All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups. PMID:23509433

  20. A biomechanical study comparing helical blade with screw design for sliding hip fixations of unstable intertrochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiang; Yuen, Grace; Lau, Tak-Wing; Yeung, Kelvin; Leung, Frankie

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw (DHS) is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade) was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC), superior-centre (SC), inferior-center (IC), centre-anterior (CA), and centre-posterior (CP). All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups. PMID:23509433

  1. High risk of adverse events in hospitalised hip fracture patients of 65 years and older: results of a retrospective record review study

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Hanneke; Johannesma, Paul C; Lubberding, Sanne; Zegers, Marieke; Langelaan, Maaike; Jukema, Gerrolt N; Heetveld, Martin J; Wagner, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Hip fracture patients of 65 years and older are a complex patient group who often suffer from complications and difficult rehabilitation with disappointing results. It is unknown to what extent suboptimal hospital care contributes to these poor outcomes. This study reports on the scale, preventability, causes and prevention strategies of adverse events in patients, aged 65 years and older, admitted to the hospital with a primary diagnosis of hip fracture. Design, setting and outcome measures A retrospective record review study was conducted of 616 hip fracture patients (≥65 years) admitted to surgical or orthopaedic departments in four Dutch hospitals in 2007. Experienced physician reviewers determined the presence and preventability of adverse events, causes and prevention strategies using a structured review form. The main outcome measures were frequency of adverse events and preventable adverse events in hospitalised hip fracture patients of 65 years and older, and strategies to prevent them in the future. Results 114 (19%) of the 616 patients in the study experienced one or more adverse events; 49 of these were preventable. The majority of the adverse events (70%) was related to the surgical procedure and many resulted in an intervention or additional treatment (67%). Human causes contributed to 53% of the adverse events, followed by patient-related factors (39%). Training and close monitoring of quality of care and the health professional's performance were the most often selected strategies to prevent these adverse events in the future. Conclusions The high percentage of preventable adverse events found in this study shows that care for older hospitalised hip fracture patients should be improved. More training and quality assurance is required to provide safer care and to reduce the number of preventable adverse events in this vulnerable patient group. PMID:26346870

  2. Fracture toughness of CIP-HIP (cold isostatic pressed - hot isostatic pressed) beryllium at elevated temperatures. Final report, 13 May 1980-13 February 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.M.; Jones, A.H.

    1986-04-01

    The fracture toughness of CIP-HIP (cold isostatic pressed-hot isostatic pressed) beryllium was determined using the short-bar fracture-toughness (K/sub IcSB/) method. The K/sub IcSB/ value measured was 10.96 MPa x the square root of m at room temperature. This falls well within the expected range of 9 to 12 MPa x the square root of m as observed from previous fracture toughness measurements of beryllium. Toughness increased rapidly between 400 F and 500 F reaching a value of 16.7 MPa x the square root of m at 500 F.

  3. Neck fracture of a cementless forged titanium alloy femoral stem following total hip arthroplasty: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, Theodoros B; Savvidou, Olga D; Psarakis, Spyridon A; Bernard, Pierre-Francois; Triantafyllopoulos, George; Kovanis, Ioannis; Alexandropoulos, Panagiotis

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Fractures of the neck of the femoral component have been reported in uncemented total hip replacements, however, to our knowledge, no fractures of the neck of a cementless forged titanium alloy femoral stem coated in the proximal third with hydroxy-apatite have been reported in the medical literature. Case presentation This case report describes a fracture of the neck of a cementless forged titanium alloy stem coated in the proximal third with hydroxy-apatite. Conclusion The neck of the femoral stem failed from fatigue probably because of a combination of factors described analytically below. PMID:18062807

  4. Preoperative protein profiles in cerebrospinal fluid in elderly hip fracture patients at risk for delirium: A proteomics and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Dunja; Witlox, Joost; van Aalst, Corneli; Scholtens, Rikie M.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Munster, Barbara C.; de Jonghe, Jos F.M.; Houdijk, Alexander P.J.; Eikelenboom, Piet; van Westerloo, David J.; van de Beek, Diederik; van Gool, Willem A.; Koenderman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Background A neuroinflammatory response is suggested to play an important role in delirium, a common complication in older hospitalized patients. We examined whether hip fracture patients who develop postoperative delirium have a different proteome in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior to surgery. Methods Patients (≥ 75 years) were admitted for hip fracture surgery. CSF was collected during spinal anaesthesia; proteins were separated using gel electrophoresis and identified with mass spectrometry. We compared the proteome of patients with and without postoperative delirium. Findings were validated in an independent, comparable cohort using immuno-assays. Results In the derivation cohort 53 patients were included, 35.8% developed postoperative delirium. We identified differences in levels of eight CSF proteins between patients with and without subsequent delirium: complement factor C3, contactin-1, fibulin-1 and I-beta-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase were significantly lower in patients with postoperative delirium, while neural cell adhesion molecule-2, fibrinogen, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein and haptoglobin levels were significantly higher. In the validation cohort 21.2% of 52 patients developed postoperative delirium. Immuno-assays confirmed contactin-1 results although not statistically significant. Complement factor C3 was significantly higher in patients with postoperative delirium. Conclusion Our results show the complexity of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in delirium and emphasizes the need of independent validation of findings. General significance This study highlights the challenges and inconsistent findings in studies of delirium, a serious complication in older patients. We analysed proteins in CSF, the most proximal fluid to the brain. All patients were free from delirium at the time of sampling. PMID:26675981

  5. [Hip Fracture--Epidemiology, Management and Liaison Service. Multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of proximal femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Sawaguchi, Takeshi; Shigemoto, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    Multidisciplinary approach for proximal femoral fracture was organized in the hospital. Inter and intra division obstacles were discussed. After general consensus of the team was obtained, manuals and guidelines of the each division were prepared. In addition to this, the electrical chart specific for the proximal femoral fracture was made which enables to eliminate in-hospital reference letters. As the results, all patients were examined by internal medicine doctors at the time of admission. Average interval from the time of admission to surgery became 1.3 days. Closer relationship with psychiatrist made early detection and treatment of delirium possible. After changing the system to check the antiosteoporosis medication at the time of discharge by the ward pharmacist dramatically increased the prescription rate form 39 percent to 95 percent. PMID:25814013

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Highly Concomitant but Not Strong Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients Aged 50 Year and Older with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyeong-Hak; Lim, Jung-Won; Park, Yong-Gum

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and risk factors associated with mortality in patients ≥50-year-of-age with hip fractures. Methods A total of 489 patients ≥50-year-of-age who sustained a hip fracture from January 2010 to October 2014 were followed-up for a minimum of 1 year. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated including prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Crude mortality rates were calculated, and the effects of different risk factors on mortality were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency was present in 76.5% of cases (n=237). The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency was 12.3%, and only 11.2% of patients had normal vitamin D levels. Accumulated mortality was 11% (54 patients) at 1 year. A univariate analysis showed that vitamin D deficiency (P=0.012), age (P<0.001), BMI (P<0.001), type of management (P<0.001), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P=0.009), pre-fracture ambulatory status (P<0.001), and osteoporosis (P<0.001) were associated with mortality. A multivariate analysis performed using a Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated that ASA score (P=0.001) and pre-fracture ambulatory status (P=0.011) were independently associated with mortality after hip fracture. Conclusions We did not find a relationship between serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels and mortality after hip fracture, although we observed a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and a significant association with mortality in the univariate analysis. PMID:26713312

  7. Do fall-risk-increasing drugs have an impact on mortality in older hip fracture patients? A population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kragh Ekstam, Annika; Elmståhl, Sölve

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the mortality in hip fracture patients with regard to use of fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs), by comparing survival in exposed and nonexposed individuals. Design This was a general population-based cohort study. Settings Data on hip fracture patients were retrieved from three national databases. Participants All hip fracture patients aged 60 years or older in a Swedish county in 2006 participated in this study. Measurements We studied the mortality in hip fracture patients by comparing those exposed to FRIDs, combinations of FRIDs, and polypharmacy to nonexposed patients, adjusting for age and sex. For survival estimates in patients using four or more FRIDs, a Cox regression analysis was used, adjusting for age, sex, and use of any four or more drugs. Results First-year all-cause mortality was 24.6% (N=503) in 2,043 hip fracture patients aged 60 years or older, including 170 males (33.8%) and 333 females (66.2%). Patients prescribed four or more FRIDs, five or more drugs (polypharmacy), psychotropic drugs, and cardiovascular drugs showed significantly increased first-year mortality. Exposure to four or more FRIDs (518 patients, 25.4%) was associated with an increased mortality at 30 days with odds ratios (ORs) 2.01 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44–2.79), 90 days with OR 1.56 (95% CI 1.19–2.04), 180 days with OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.20–1.97), and 365 days with OR 1.43 (95% CI 1.13–1.80). Cox regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, and use of any four or more drugs showed a significantly higher mortality in patients treated with four or more FRIDs at 90 days (P=0.015) and 180 days (P=0.012) compared to patients treated with three or less FRIDs. Conclusion First-year all-cause mortality was significantly higher in older hip fracture patients exposed before the fracture to FRIDs, in particular to four or more FRIDs, polypharmacy, psychotropic, and cardiovascular drugs. Interventions aiming to optimize both safety

  8. Promoting mobility after hip fracture (ProMo): study protocol and selected baseline results of a year-long randomized controlled trial among community-dwelling older people

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To cope at their homes, community-dwelling older people surviving a hip fracture need a sufficient amount of functional ability and mobility. There is a lack of evidence on the best practices supporting recovery after hip fracture. The purpose of this article is to describe the design, intervention and demographic baseline results of a study investigating the effects of a rehabilitation program aiming to restore mobility and functional capacity among community-dwelling participants after hip fracture. Methods/Design Population-based sample of over 60-year-old community-dwelling men and women operated for hip fracture (n = 81, mean age 79 years, 78% were women) participated in this study and were randomly allocated into control (Standard Care) and ProMo intervention groups on average 10 weeks post fracture and 6 weeks after discharged to home. Standard Care included written home exercise program with 5-7 exercises for lower limbs. Of all participants, 12 got a referral to physiotherapy. After discharged to home, only 50% adhered to Standard Care. None of the participants were followed-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery. ProMo-intervention included Standard Care and a year-long program including evaluation/modification of environmental hazards, guidance for safe walking, pain management, progressive home exercise program and physical activity counseling. Measurements included a comprehensive battery of laboratory tests and self-report on mobility limitation, disability, physical functional capacity and health as well as assessments for the key prerequisites for mobility, disability and functional capacity. All assessments were performed blinded at the research laboratory. No significant differences were observed between intervention and control groups in any of the demographic variables. Discussion Ten weeks post hip fracture only half of the participants were compliant to Standard Care. No follow-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery occurred

  9. Clinical and radiological factors affecting progressive collapse of acute osteoporotic compression spinal fractures.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sergei; Smorgick, Yossi; Mirovsky, Yigal; Anekstein, Yoram; Blecher, Ronen; Tal, Sigal

    2016-09-01

    Osteoporotic compression spine fractures have a different clinical course and outcomes when compared to spinal fractures occurring in the younger population. Only a few studies have investigated the risk factors for progressive osteoporotic compression spine fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological factors related to progressive collapse following acute osteoporotic compression spine fractures. We retrospectively identified all patients treated for thoracolumbar fractures in our institution between January 2008 and July 2013. Included cases were examined by plain radiographs and CT scans. For each patient we classified the fracture according to the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System. The difference between initial and final height loss and initial and final local kyphosis was documented as height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference. The presence of old fractures and intravertebral cleft were also documented. The study included 153 patients, comprising 102 women and 51 men. The mean patient age was 68.9years. The mean length of follow up was 15months. A statistically significant correlation was found between patient age, final height loss, height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference. Height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference were significantly correlated to type of fracture according to the AO classification system. The height loss difference was 18.1% in A1 type fractures, 27.1% in A2 type fractures, 24.2% in A3 type fractures and 25.7% in A4 type fractures. During a minimum 3-month follow up of conservative treatment for acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, age and the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System were predictive factors for progressive collapse. PMID:27387197

  10. Outcome of Hemiarthroplasty and Total Hip Replacement for Active Elderly Patients with Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures: A Meta-Analysis of 8 Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yiqiong; Fu, Dong; Chen, Kai; Li, Guodong; Cai, Zhengdong; Shi, Yan; Yin, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Background Displaced fracture of the femoral neck has been a common clinical problem, especially in aged patients. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of randomized clinical trials assessing the results of hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in patients undergoing either alternative using meta-analysis. Methods A literature search for randomized clinical trials was conducted through Medline, Embase and Cochrane library between 1969 and 2013 with no restrictions. Additional relevant articles were referred as source of information by way of manual searches on major orthopedic journals. Upon the search, two authors independently evaluated study quality and relevant data was extracted. Results A total of 8 studies with 983 patients were included in this meta-analysis. After pooling the available data, a significant dominance of Harris hip score was found for total hip replacement compared with hemiarthroplasty (SMD: −7.11, 95%:−10.70,−3.53) one year postoperatively and the advantage kept over (SMD: −6.91, 95%:−12.98, −0.85) two years after surgery. A trend toward a higher dislocation rate was found in total hip replacement group (RR: 0.46, 95%: 0.21, 1.02), of which the difference was considered insignificant. The risk of revision in group hemiarthroplasty appeared to be more than two folds higher than that after total hip replacement (RR: 4.14, 95%CI: 2.09, 8.19). Conclusion Even though there is a higher rate of dislocation after total hip replacement, this disadvantage could be accounted for, on the basis of a better functional score and the lower revision rate. However, from the results, it stands to reason that total hip replacement should be strongly suggested in elderly active patients with femoral neck fracture. PMID:24854195

  11. Sonography of Sports Injuries of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Aaron R. L.; Seidenberg, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports-related injuries of the hip are a common complaint of both competitive and recreational athletes of all ages. The anatomic and biomechanical complexity of the hip region often cause diagnostic uncertainty for the clinicians evaluating these injuries. Therefore, obtaining additional diagnostic information is often crucial for providing injured athletes with a prompt and accurate diagnosis so they can return to activity as soon as possible. Musculoskeletal ultrasound is becoming increasingly important in evaluating and treating sports-related injuries of the hip. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in May of 2013 for English-language articles pertaining to sonography of sports injuries of the hip using the following keywords in various combinations: musculoskeletal, ultrasound, hip, hip sonography, and sports. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Musculoskeletal ultrasound is currently being used for both diagnosis and treatment in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions affecting the hip, including tendinosis, tendon/muscle strains, ligamentous sprains, enthesopathies, growth plate injuries, fractures, bursitis, effusions, synovitis, labral tears, and snapping hip. Therapeutically, it is used to guide injections, aspirations, and biopsies. Conclusion: Musculoskeletal ultrasound use is expanding and will likely continue to do so as more clinicians realize its capabilities. Characteristics, including accessibility, portability, noninvasiveness, dynamic examination, power Doppler examination, and low cost highlight the potential of ultrasound. PMID:25364486

  12. The T.A.R.Ge.T. project: a regional program to reduce hip fracture in elderly patients. Main results of retrospective phase

    PubMed Central

    Parri, Simone; Cianferotti, Luisella; Marcucci, Gemma; Gronchi, Giorgio; Rizzuti, Carla; Colli, Emanuela; Manetti, Beatrice; Naldoni, Walter; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Tuscany Region was the first Italian Region to initiate a program for the prevention of hip fractures in over 65 year old. The T.A.R.Ge.T. project “Appropriate treatment of geriatric re-fractures in Tuscany” (Trattamento Appropriato delle Rifratture Geriatriche in Toscana), which is still on-going, includes a preliminary phase (2009–2010) for baseline analysis and education of the participating centers and a 4-year-prospective phase (2011–2014). The monitoring system is performed horizontally analyzing 5 different flows: SDO (Performance Hospitalization), SPF (Pharmaceutical Distribution Dataset), FED (Direct Distribution Dataset), SAA (Registry of Patients), SPA (Specialized Outpatient) flows. In this review will be shown some of the most important results of analyzes of the retrospective phase. Between 2006 and 2011 only 26% of hip fractured patients has being treated with anti-osteoporotic drugs. The percentage of treatment increases 10% after the second fracture. Until 2011 there wasn’t in Tuscany a prevention program of bone fragility; patients were treated with specific treatment only in severe cases: this phenomenon implies that mortality and re-fracture are higher on treated patients than in patients who did not have any kind of treatment. The treated patients are the most severe and therefore they have a higher risk of death and re-fracture. PMID:26136794

  13. Impact of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Safety-Related Announcements on the Use of Bisphosphonates After Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoyoung C; Kim, Dae Hyun; Mogun, Helen; Eddings, Wesley; Polinski, Jennifer M; Franklin, Jessica M; Solomon, Daniel H

    2016-08-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued several announcements related to potential risk of bisphosphonates including osteonecrosis of the jaw (2005), atrial fibrillation (2007), and atypical femur fracture (2010). We aimed to evaluate the impact of three FDA drug safety announcements on the use of bisphosphonates in patients with hip fracture using claims data from a U.S. commercial health plan (2004-2013). We calculated the proportion of patients in each quarter who received a bisphosphonate or other osteoporosis medication in the 6 months following hospitalization for hip fracture. Segmented logistic regression models examined the time trends. Among 22,598 patients with hip fracture, use of bisphosphonate decreased from 15% in 2004 to 3% in the last quarter of 2013. Prior to the 2007 announcement, there was a 4% increase in the odds of bisphosphonate use every quarter (OR 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.07). After the 2007 announcement, there was a 4% decrease in the odds of bisphosphonate use (OR 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93 to 0.99) every quarter. The announcement in 2007 was associated with a significant decline in the rate of change of bisphosphonate uses over time (p < 0.001), but no impact on other osteoporosis medication use (p = 0.2). After the 2010 announcement, the odds of bisphosphonate use continued to decrease by 4% (OR 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.98) each quarter and the odds of other osteoporosis medication use remained stable over time (OR 0.99; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.02). The FDA safety announcement related to atrial fibrillation in 2007 was significantly associated with a decrease in bisphosphonate use among patients with hip fracture. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26969902

  14. Sliding hip screw versus sliding helical blade for intertrochanteric fractures: a propensity score-matched case control study.

    PubMed

    Fang, C; Lau, T W; Wong, T M; Lee, H L; Leung, F

    2015-03-01

    The spiral blade modification of the Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) was designed for superior biomechanical fixation in the osteoporotic femoral head. Our objective was to compare clinical outcomes and in particular the incidence of loss of fixation. In a series of 197 consecutive patients over the age of 50 years treated with DHS-blades (blades) and 242 patients treated with conventional DHS (screw) for AO/OTA 31.A1 or A2 intertrochanteric fractures were identified from a prospectively compiled database in a level 1 trauma centre. Using propensity score matching, two groups comprising 177 matched patients were compiled and radiological and clinical outcomes compared. In each group there were 66 males and 111 females. Mean age was 83.6 (54 to 100) for the conventional DHS group and 83.8 (52 to 101) for the blade group. Loss of fixation occurred in two blades and 13 DHSs. None of the blades had observable migration while nine DHSs had gross migration within the femoral head before the fracture healed. There were two versus four implant cut-outs respectively and one side plate pull-out in the DHS group. There was no significant difference in mortality and eventual walking ability between the groups. Multiple logistic regression suggested that poor reduction (odds ratio (OR) 11.49, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.45 to 90.9, p = 0.021) and fixation by DHS (OR 15.85, 95%CI 2.50 to 100.3, p = 0.003) were independent predictors of loss of fixation. The spiral blade design may decrease the risk of implant migration in the femoral head but does not reduce the incidence of cut-out and reoperation. Reduction of the fracture is of paramount importance since poor reduction was an independent predictor for loss of fixation regardless of the implant being used. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:398-404. PMID:25737525

  15. The Association between Metabolic Syndrome, Bone Mineral Density, Hip Bone Geometry and Fracture Risk: The Rotterdam Study

    PubMed Central

    Muka, Taulant; Trajanoska, Katerina; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Oei, Ling; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Dehghan, Abbas; Zillikens, M. Carola; Franco, Oscar H.; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and bone health remains unclear. We aimed to study the association between MS and hip bone geometry (HBG), femoral neck bone mineral density (FN-BMD), and the risk of osteoporosis and incident fractures. Data of 2040 women and 1510 men participants in the third visit (1997–1999) of the Rotterdam Study (RSI-3), a prospective population based cohort, were available (mean follow-up 6.7 years). MS was defined according to the recent harmonized definition. HBG parameters were measured at the third round visit whereas FN-BMD was assessed at the third round and 5 years later. Incident fractures were identified from medical registry data. After correcting for age, body mass index (BMI), lifestyle factors and medication use, individuals with MS had lower bone width (β = -0.054, P = 0.003), lower cortical buckling ratio (β = -0.81, P = 0.003) and lower odds of having osteoporosis (odds ratio =0.56, P = 0.007) in women but not in men. Similarly, MS was associated with higher FN-BMD only in women (β = 0.028, P=0.001). In the analyses of MS components, the glucose component (unrelated to diabetes status) was positively associated with FN-BMD in both genders (β = 0.016, P = 0.01 for women and β = 0.022, P = 0.004 for men). In men, waist circumference was inversely associated with FN-BMD (β = -0.03, P = 0.004). No association was observed with fracture risk in either sex. In conclusion, women with MS had higher FN-BMD independent of BMI. The glucose component of MS was associated with high FN-BMD in both genders, highlighting the need to preserve glycemic control to prevent skeletal complications. PMID:26066649

  16. Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation in Treatment of Intertrochanteric Hip Fractures: a Retrospective Study in 113 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadic, Sahmir; Custovic, Svemir; Jasarevuc, Mahir; Fazlic, Mirsad; Krupic, Ferid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The best treatment for intertrochanteric fractures remains controversial. Many methods have been recommended. Aim: We aimed to assess the results of osteosynthesis using the Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation (PFNA) system. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 113 consecutive patients with intertrochanteric fractures treated with PFNA. Fractures were classified in accordance with the AO/OTA classification system into the groups A1, A2 and A3. The postoperative quality of fracture reduction was described as good, acceptable or poor. The location of the blade within the head was recorded as per the Cleveland method. Tip-apex distance (TAD) was used as a method for evaluating screw position. Pre-fracture and postoperative functional level were evaluated by the new mobility score (NMS). Results: The average age at the time of surgery was 75.9 years. The majority, 75 (66.3 %), were unstable fracture types. The reduction was good in 67 (61.4 %) cases. Of the 24 deaths, 19 patients had comorbidities (p < 0.001). The number of deaths in the first 6 months was significantly higher than in the next 6 months (p = 0.001). The mean TAD was 25.6 mm. The Cleveland zone centre-centre was the most common placement of the blade, accounting for 33 (29 %) of the cases. Reoperation was required in four patients. There were four patients with cut-out. The pre-facture mean value NMS was 8.6 (SD 1.1) and the postoperative mean value was 4.3 (SD 3.6). Conclusion: We concluded that PFNA offers biomechanical advantages, but the best position of the blade is still unknown. PMID:26843723

  17. Acute Osteochondral Fractures in the Lower Extremities - Approach to Identification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, M.E; DaCambra, M.P; Jibri, Z; Dhillon, S; Jen, H; Jomha, N.M

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral fractures of the lower extremities are important injuries because they can cause pain and dysfunction and often lead to osteoarthritis. These injuries can be misdiagnosed initially which may impact on the healing potential and result in poor long-term outcome. This comprehensive review focuses on current pitfalls in diagnosing acute osteochondral lesions, potential investigative techniques to minimize diagnostic errors as well as surgical treatment options. Acute osteochondral fractures are frequently missed and can be identified more accurately with specific imaging techniques. A number of different methods can be used to fix these fractures but attention to early diagnosis is required to limit progression to osteoarthritis. These fractures are common with joint injuries and early diagnosis and treatment should lead to improved long term outcomes. PMID:26587063

  18. Split Fracture: A Complication of Cerclage Wiring of Acute Patellar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Cho Yau; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Iatrogenic patellar fracture is reported as a complication of patella procedures, such as medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee using bone-patellar tendon-bone technique, and resurfacing the patella in total knee arthroplasty. Case Presentation: A 65-year-old lady with right patella fracture was treated with open reduction and cerclage wiring. An iatrogenic split fracture was noted during tension of the cerclage wire and was successfully managed by screw fixation of the split fracture. Conclusions: Split fracture is a rare complication of circumferential cerclage wiring of patellar fracture. The surgeon should be aware of the contributing factors in order to avoid this complication. PMID:25593896

  19. Acute coronary syndrome due to complete bare metal stent fracture in the right coronary artery.