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Sample records for acute hospital discharge

  1. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  2. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  3. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  4. [Rad-Esito: new informational debt as integration of hospital discharge cards for acute patients].

    PubMed

    Rini, F; Piscioneri, C; Consolante, C; Fara, G M; Marino, M G; Conte, A; Maurici, M

    2009-01-01

    Since the January 2008 the tracking of additional information about hospital discharge card's content has been activated in Latium. The new data, noticed by RAD-Esito card, regard the hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarction, femoral neck fracture and coronary artery bypass surgery. This study's objective has been to evaluate the quality of the data collected with the new card, at the end of the 1st semester of experimentation, concerning two institutes of care of Latium (Region of Central Italy), the Casilino Polyclinic (ASL Rome B) and the Anzio-Nettuno hospital (Assembled Hospitals, ASL Rome H). Furthermore, any significant correlation's existence between variables for acute myocardial infarction and femoral fracture with the mortality rate and an increased average hospitalization period has been statistically verified. In acute myocardial infarction mortality is significantly related to a low systolic blood pressure (<130 mmHg) at admission (p < 0.02) and to having no surgical intervention instead of transcutaneous transluminal coronary angioplastic surgery (p < 0.0001); in this case there is also an increased average hospitalization period (p < 0.03). In femoral neck fracture mortality is significantly related to having a conservative surgery instead of fracture reduction or prosthesis implantation (p < 0.0002).This study's preliminary results show how the integration of the hospital informative flow with the new clinical variables will be able to allow the promotion of the quality in the coding of the diagnosis and procedures, according to the current international innovations. This additional information will also be able to support the regional appropriateness and outcome of the treatments evaluation programs.

  5. Trends in hospital discharges, management and in-hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction in Switzerland between 1998 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the late nineties, no study has assessed the trends in management and in-hospital outcome of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Switzerland. Our objective was to fill this gap. Methods Swiss hospital discharge database for years 1998 to 2008. AMI was defined as a primary discharge diagnosis code I21 according to the ICD10 classification. Invasive treatments and overall in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Overall, 102,729 hospital discharges with a diagnosis of AMI were analyzed. The percentage of hospitalizations with a stay in an Intensive Care Unit decreased from 38.0% in 1998 to 36.2% in 2008 (p for trend < 0.001). Percutaneous revascularizations increased from 6.0% to 39.9% (p for trend < 0.001). Bare stents rose from 1.3% to 16.6% (p for trend < 0.001). Drug eluting stents appeared in 2004 and increased to 23.5% in 2008 (p for trend < 0.001). Coronary artery bypass graft increased from 1.0% to 3.0% (p for trend < 0.001). Circulatory assistance increased from 0.2% to 1.7% (p for trend < 0.001). Among patients managed in a single hospital (not transferred), seven-day and total in-hospital mortality decreased from 8.0% to 7.0% (p for trend < 0.01) and from 11.2% to 10.1%, respectively. These changes were no longer significant after multivariate adjustment for age, gender, region, revascularization procedures and transfer type. After multivariate adjustment, differing trends in revascularization procedures and in in-hospital mortality were found according to the geographical region considered. Conclusion In Switzerland, a steep rise in hospital discharges and in revascularization procedures for AMI occurred between 1998 and 2008. The increase in revascularization procedures could explain the decrease in in-hospital mortality rates. PMID:23530470

  6. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  7. Hyponatremia at discharge as a predictor of 12-month clinical outcomes in hospital survivors after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bae, Myung Hwan; Kim, Jae Hee; Jang, Se Yong; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Jang Hoon; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Chae, Shung Chull

    2017-02-01

    Hyponatremia in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a well-known predictor of poor prognosis. However, little is known about the clinical implication of sodium levels at discharge in hospital survivors after AMI. The study included 1290 consecutive patients (64 ± 12 years; 877 men) who survived the index hospitalization after AMI. We determined the 12-month mortality rates of these patients. Patients who died during the 12-month follow-up had lower sodium levels at discharge than those who had survived (137 ± 6 vs. 139 ± 4 mmol/L; P < 0.014). Hyponatremia at discharge, defined as a serum sodium level ≤135 mmol/L, was present in 210 patients (16.3 %). In the Cox-proportional hazard model, hyponatremia at discharge (hazard ratio, 2.264; 95 % confidence interval, 1.119-4.579; P = 0.023) was an independent predictor of 12-month mortality. Moreover, hyponatremia at discharge had an incremental prognostic value over conventional risk factors (χ (2) = 7, P = 0.007), and conventional risk factors and log N-terminal Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide combined (χ (2) = 5, P = 0.021). In the subgroup analysis, the 12-month mortality of patients with hyponatremia at discharge was significantly higher than in those without, irrespective of age, Killip class, left ventricular ejection fraction, percutaneous coronary intervention at index hospitalization, and prescription of diuretics at discharge. Hyponatremia at discharge is an independent predictor of 12-month mortality in hospital survivors after AMI.

  8. Outcomes of Patients Discharged to Skilled Nursing Facilities After Acute Care Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Hakkarainen, Timo W.; Arbabi, Saman; Willis, Margaret M.; Davidson, Giana H.; Flum, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate previously independent older patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and identify risk factors for failure to return home and death and development of a predictive tool to determine likelihood of adverse outcome. Background Little is known about the likelihood of return to home, and higher than expected mortality rates in SNFs have recently been described, which may represent an opportunity for quality improvement. Methods Retrospective cohort of older hospitalized patients discharged to SNFs during 2007 to 2009 in 5 states using Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services linked minimum data set data from SNFs. We assessed mortality, hospital readmission, discharge to home, and logistic regression models for predicting risk of each outcome. Results Of 416,997 patients, 3.8% died during the initial SNF stay, 28.6% required readmission, and 60.5% were ultimately discharged home. Readmission to a hospital was the strongest predictor of death in the years after SNF admission (unadjusted hazard ratio, 28.2; 95% confidence interval, 27.2–29.3; P < 0.001). Among all patients discharged to SNFs, 7.8% eventually died in an SNF and overall 1-year mortality was 26.1%. Risk factors associated with mortality and failure to return home were increasing age, male sex, increasing comorbidities, decreased cognitive function, decreased functional status, parenteral nutrition, and pressure ulcers. Conclusions A large proportion of older patients discharging to SNFs never return home. A better understanding of the natural history of patients sent to SNFs after hospitalization and risk factors for failure to return to home, readmission, and death should help identify opportunities for interventions to improved outcome. PMID:26445466

  9. Predictive value of D-dimer test for recurrent venous thromboembolism at hospital discharge in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Luo, Qin; Zhao, Zhi-Hui; Zhao, Qing

    2011-11-01

    D-dimer can be used to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE) for its high negative predictive value (NPV). Also, it is a predictor of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) after anticoagulation withdrawal. The aim of the present study was to assess the predictive value of D-dimer for recurrent VTE when tested at hospital discharge. Plasma D-dimer levels were repeatedly measured at hospital discharge in 204 consecutive patients with the first episode of acute pulmonary embolism. Patients were categorized to two groups by D-dimer levels at hospital discharge and followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. The primary end point was symptomatic, recurrent fatal or nonfatal VTE. D-dimer levels were persistently abnormal in 66 patients (32%). After 31±19 months follow-up, patients with persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels showed a higher rate of of recurrent VTE (14 patients, 21%) compared to those with D-dimer regression (8 patients, 6%) (P = 0.001). At the multivariate analysis, after adjustment for other relevant factors, persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels were an independent predictor of recurrent VTE in all subjects investigated, (hazard ratio, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.61-10.39; P = 0.003), especially in those with unprovoked PE (hazard ratio, 4.61; 95% CI, 1.85-11.49; P = 0.001). The negative predictive value of D-dimer was 94.2 and 92.9% in all subjects or those with unprovoked PE, respectively. Persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels at hospital discharge have a high negative predictive value for recurrence in patients with acute pulmonary embolism, especially in subjects with an unprovoked previous event.

  10. The experience of daily life of acutely admitted frail elderly patients one week after discharge from the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Jane; Lund, Hans; Aadahl, Mette; Sørensen, Erik E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Frail elderly are at higher risk of negative outcomes such as disability, low quality of life, and hospital admissions. Furthermore, a peak in readmission of acutely admitted elderly patients is seen shortly after discharge. An investigation into the daily life experiences of the frail elderly shortly after discharge seems important to address these issues. The aim of this study was to explore how frail elderly patients experience daily life 1 week after discharge from an acute admission. Methods The qualitative methodological approach was interpretive description. Data were gathered using individual interviews. The participants were frail elderly patients over 65 years of age, who were interviewed at their home 1 week after discharge from an acute admission to a medical ward. Results Four main categories were identified: “The system,” “Keeping a social life,” “Being in everyday life,” and “Handling everyday life.” These categories affected the way the frail elderly experienced daily life and these elements resulted in a general feeling of well-being or non-well-being. The transition to home was experienced as unsafe and troublesome especially for the more frail participants, whereas the less frail experienced this less. Conclusion and discussion Several elements and stressors were affecting the well-being of the participants in daily life 1 week after discharge. In particular, contact with the health care system created frustrations and worries, but also physical disability, loneliness, and inactivity were issues of concern. These elements should be addressed by health professionals in relation to the transition phase. Future interventions should incorporate a multidimensional and bio-psycho-social perspective when acutely admitted frail elderly are discharged. Stakeholders should evaluate present practice to seek to improve care across health care sectors. PMID:26037333

  11. Improving Hospital Discharge Time

    PubMed Central

    El-Eid, Ghada R.; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2 hours during the preintervention period to 1.7 hours post-intervention (P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients left their room before noon in the postintervention period (P < 0.001), though there was no statistical difference in before noon discharge. Hospital LOS dropped from 3.4 to 3.1 days postintervention (P < 0.001). ED mean LOS of patients admitted to the hospital was significantly lower in the postintervention period (6.9 ± 7.8 vs 5.9 ± 7.7 hours; P < 0.001). Six Sigma methodology can be an effective change management tool to improve discharge time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific. PMID:25816029

  12. [Rad-Esito: new informational additions in the integration of content of hospital discharge cards for acute patients].

    PubMed

    Rini, F; Piscioneri, C; Consolante, C; Fara, G M

    2009-01-01

    Since the January 2008 the tracking of additional information about hospital discharge card's content has been activated in Latium. The new data, noticed by RAD-Esito card, regard the hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarction, femoral neck fracture and coronary artery bypass surgery. This study's objective has been to evaluate the quality of the data collected with the new card, at the end of the 1st semester of experimentation, concerning two institutes of care of Latium, the Casilino Polyclinic (ASL Rome B) and the Anzio-Nettuno hospital (Assembled Hospitals, ASL Rome H). Furthermore, any significant correlation's existence between a few variables for acute myocardial infarction and femoral fracture with the mortality rate and the average hospitalization period has been statistically verified. This study's preliminary results show how the integration of the hospital informative flow with the new clinical variables will be able to allow the promotion of the quality in the coding of the diagnosis and procedures, according to the current international innovations. This additional information will also be able to support the regional appropriateness and outcome of the treatments evaluation programs.

  13. Reliability of Predicting Early Hospital Readmission After Discharge For An Acute Coronary Syndrome using Claims-Based Data

    PubMed Central

    McManus, David D.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Lessard, Darleen; Waring, Molly E.; Allison, Jeroan; Parish, David C.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Ash, Arlene; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2015-01-01

    Early rehospitalization after discharge for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), including acute myocardial infarction (AMI), is generally considered undesirable. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) base hospital financial incentives on risk-adjusted readmission rates following AMI, using claims data in its adjustment models. Little is known about the contribution to readmission risk of factors not captured by claims. For 804 consecutive patients over 65 years old discharged in 2011–13 from 6 hospitals in Massachusetts and Georgia after an ACS, we compared a CMS-like readmission prediction model with an enhanced model incorporating additional clinical, psychosocial, and sociodemographic characteristics, after principal components analysis. Mean age was 73 years, 38% were women, 25% college educated, 32% had a prior AMI; all-cause re-hospitalization occurred within 30 days for 13%. In the enhanced model, prior coronary intervention [Odds Ratio=2.05 95% Confidence Interval (1.34, 3.16)], chronic kidney disease [1.89 (1.15, 3.10)], low health literacy [1.75 (1.14, 2.69)], lower serum sodium levels, and current non-smoker status were positively associated with readmission. The discriminative ability of the enhanced vs. the claims-based model was higher without evidence of over-fitting. For example, for patients in the highest deciles of readmission likelihood, observed readmissions occurred in 24% for the claims-based model and 33% for the enhanced model. In conclusion, readmission may be influenced by measurable factors not in CMS’ claims-based models and not controllable by hospitals. Incorporating additional factors into risk-adjusted readmission models may improve their accuracy and validity for use as indicators of hospital quality. PMID:26718235

  14. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Fram, Ricki Y; Cree, Melanie G; Wolfe, Robert R; Barr, David; Herndon, David N

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months postburn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children before discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Twenty-four children, aged 4 to 17 years, with burns > or = 40% TBSA underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test before discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared with published oral glucose tolerance test data from healthy, nonburned children. There was a significant difference between severely burned children and nonburned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53 +/- 1.62 compared with the value in nonburned, healthy children of 1.28 +/- 0.16 (P < .05). Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury.

  15. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Barr, David; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months post burn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children prior to discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Methods Twenty-four children, aged 4–17 years, with burns ≥ 40% total body surface area (TBSA) underwent a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) prior to discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared to published OGTT data from healthy, non-burned children. Results There was a significant difference between severely burned children and non-burned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53±1.62 compared to the value in non-burned healthy children was 1.28±0.16 (p<0.05). Conclusion Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury. PMID:20634704

  16. C-Reactive Protein at Discharge, Diabetes Mellitus and ≥ 1 Hospitalization During Previous Year Predict Early Readmission in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Ernesto; Torres, Antoni; Huerta, Arturo; Méndez, Raúl; Guerrero, Mónica; Martinez, Raquel; Liapikou, Adamantia; Soler, Néstor; Sethi, Sanjay; Menéndez, Rosario

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent hospitalizations in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) patients have clinical and economic consequences; particularly those readmitted soon after discharge. The aim of our observational study was to determine predictors of early readmission to hospital (30 days from discharge). Prospective data on 125 hospitalized AECOPD patients were collected over a 30-month period at two Spanish university hospitals. Based on readmission after discharge, patients were divided into non-readmitted (n = 96) and readmitted (n = 29). Measures of serum inflammatory biomarkers were recorded on admission to hospital, at day 3 and at discharge; data on clinical, laboratory, microbiological and severity features were also recorded. In a multivariate model, C-reactive protein (CRP) at discharge ≥ 7.6 mg/L, presence of diabetes and ≥ 1 hospitalization for AECOPD during previous year were significant risk factors for predicting readmission. Presence of all 3 risk factors perfectly identified the readmitted patients (positive and negative predictive values of 1.000; 95% CI, 1.00-1.00). A combination of 3 readily available clinical and biochemical parameters is accurate in identifying hospitalized AECOPD patients at risk for early readmission.

  17. Tailored support for type 2 diabetes patients with an acute coronary event after discharge from hospital – design and development of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with an acute coronary event (ACE) experience decreased quality of life and increased distress. According to the American Diabetes Association, discharge from the hospital is a time of increased distress for all patients. Tailored support specific to diabetes is scarce in that period. We developed an intervention based on Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory, Leventhal’s Common Sense Model, and results of focus groups. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention to reduce distress in type 2 diabetes patients who experienced a first ACE. Methods Randomised controlled trial. Two hundred patients are recruited in thirteen hospitals. A diabetes nurse visits the patients in the intervention group (n = 100) at home within three weeks after discharge from hospital, and again after two weeks and two months. The control group (n = 100) receives a consultation by telephone. The primary outcome is diabetes-related distress, measured with the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are well-being, health status, anxiety, depression, HbA1c, blood pressure and lipids. Mediating variables are self-management, self-efficacy and illness representations. Outcomes are measured with questionnaires directly after discharge from hospital and five months later. Biomedical variables are obtained from the records from the primary care physician and the hospital. Differences between groups in change over time are analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The Holm-Bonferroni correction is used to adjust for multiplicity. Discussion Type 2 diabetes patients who experience a first ACE need tailored support after discharge from the hospital. This trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness of a supportive intervention in reducing distress in these patients. Trial registration NCT01801631 PMID:24438342

  18. Metadata - National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) is an annual probability survey that collects information on the characteristics of inpatients discharged from non-federal short-stay hospitals in the United States.

  19. Predictors of one-year mortality at hospital discharge after acute coronary syndromes: A new risk score from the EPICOR (long-tErm follow uP of antithrombotic management patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients) study

    PubMed Central

    Pocock, Stuart; Bueno, Héctor; Licour, Muriel; Medina, Jesús; Zhang, Lin; Annemans, Lieven; Danchin, Nicholas; Huo, Yong; Van de Werf, Frans

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A reliable prediction tool is needed to identify acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients with high mortality risk after their initial hospitalization. Methods: EPICOR (long-tErm follow uP of antithrombotic management patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients: NCT01171404) is a prospective cohort study of 10,568 consecutive hospital survivors after an ACS event (4943 ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 5625 non-ST-elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS)). Of these cases, 65.1% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and 2.5% coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Post-discharge mortality was recorded for up to two years. From over 50 potential predictor variables a new risk score for one-year mortality was developed using forward stepwise Cox regression, and examined for goodness-of-fit, discriminatory power, and external validation. Results: A total of 407 patients (3.9%) died within one year of discharge. We identified 12 highly significant independent predictors of mortality (in order of predictive strength): age, lower ejection fraction, poorer EQ-5D quality of life, elevated serum creatinine, in-hospital cardiac complications, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, elevated blood glucose, male gender, no PCI/CABG after NSTE-ACS, low hemoglobin, peripheral artery disease, on diuretics at discharge. When combined into a new risk score excellent discrimination was achieved (c-statistic=0.81) and this was also validated on a large similar cohort (9907 patients) in Asia (c=0.78). For both STEMI and NSTE-ACS there was a steep gradient in one-year mortality ranging from 0.5% in the lowest quintile to 18.2% in the highest decile. NSTE-ACS contributes over twice as many high-risk patients as STEMI. Conclusions: Post-discharge mortality for ACS patients remains of concern. Our new user-friendly risk score available on www.acsrisk.org can readily identify who is at high risk. PMID:25301783

  20. The risks of getting hospital discharge wrong.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Hospital discharge remains a hot topic for all of us who work with older people. As the recent National Audit Office (NAO) 2016 report on discharging older patients from hospital rather bluntly put it: 'There are currently far too many older people in hospitals who do not need to be there.'

  1. The impact of hospital discharge on inappropriate hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Panis, Lambert J G G; Verheggen, Frank W S M; Pop, Peter; Prins, Martin H

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate hospital stay should be effective, efficient and tailored to patient needs. Previous studies have found that on average 20 per cent of hospital stay is inappropriate. Within obstetrics, inappropriate hospital stay consists mostly of delays in hospital discharge. The specific goals of this study were to reduce inappropriate hospital stay by fine-tuning patient logistics, increasing efficiency and providing more comfortable surroundings. New policies using strict discharge criteria were implemented. Total inappropriate hospital stay decreased from 13.3 to 7.2 per cent. The delay in discharge procedures halved. P-charts showed a decrease in inappropriate hospital stay, indicating the current process to be stable. Concludes that a significant reduction in inappropriate hospital stay was found following the implementation of innovative hospital discharge policies, indicating greater efficiency and accessibility of hospital services.

  2. Hospital discharge documentation and risk of rehospitalisation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Luke O; Strater, Amy; Smith, Lisa; Lee, Jungwha; Press, Robert; Ward, Norman; Weigelt, John A; Boling, Peter; Williams, Mark V

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND Avoidable hospital readmission is a focus of quality improvement efforts. The effectiveness of individual elements of the standard discharge process in reducing rehospitalisation is unknown. METHODS The authors conducted a case-control study of 1039 patients experiencing rehospitalisation within 30 days of discharge and 981 non-rehospitalised patients matched on admission diagnosis, discharge disposition, and severity of illness. In separate models for each discharge process component, the authors measured the relationship between readmission and discharge summary completion, contents of discharge summary, completion of discharge instructions, contents of discharge instructions, presence of caregiver for discharge instruction, completion of medication reconciliation, and arrangement of ambulatory follow-up prior to discharge. RESULTS Adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, including severity of illness and discharge disposition, the study failed to find an association between readmission and most components of the discharge process. There was no association between readmission and medication reconciliation, transmission of discharge summary to an outpatient physician, or documentation of any specific aspect of discharge instruction. Associations were found between readmission and discharge with followup arranged (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.21; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.37) and increasing number of medicines (adjusted OR 1.02; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.04). CONCLUSIONS Documentation of discharge process components in the medical record may not reflect actual discharge process activities. Alternatively, mandated discharge processes are ineffective in preventing readmission. The observed absence of an association between discharge documentation and readmission indicates that discharge quality improvement initiatives should target metrics of discharge process quality beyond improving rates of documentation.

  3. Usefulness of combining admission brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) plus hospital discharge bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) in predicting 90 days cardiovascular mortality in patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Simona; Russo, Veronica; Lalle, Irene; De Berardinis, Benedetta; Navarin, Silvia; Magrini, Laura; Piccoli, Antonio; Codognotto, Marta; Castello, Luigi Maria; Avanzi, Gian Carlo; Villacorta, Humberto; Precht, Bernardo Luiz Campanário; de Araújo Porto, Pilar Barreto; Villacorta, Aline Sterque; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2016-12-16

    Heart failure is a disease characterized by high prevalence and mortality, and frequent rehospitalizations. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic power of combining brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and congestion status detected by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) in acute heart failure patients. This is an observational, prospective, and a multicentre study. BNP assessment was measured upon hospital arrival, while BIVA analysis was obtained at the time of discharge. Cardiovascular deaths were evaluated at 90 days by a follow up phone call. 292 patients were enrolled. Compared to survivors, BNP was higher in the non-survivors group (mean value 838 vs 515 pg/ml, p < 0.001). At discharge, BIVA shows a statistically significant difference in hydration status between survivors and non-survivors [respectively, hydration index (HI) 85 vs 74, p < 0.001; reactance (Xc) 26.7 vs 37, p < 0.001; resistance (R) 445 vs 503, p < 0.01)]. Discharge BIVA shows a prognostic value in predicting cardiovascular death [HI: area under the curve (AUC) 0.715, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.65-0.76; p < 0.004; Xc: AUC 0.712, 95% CI 0.655-0.76, p < 0.007; R: AUC 0.65, 95% CI 0.29-0.706, p < 0.0247]. The combination of BIVA with BNP gives a greater prognostic power for cardiovascular mortality [combined receiving operating characteristic (ROC): AUC 0.74; 95% CI 0.68-0.79; p < 0.001]. In acute heart failure patients, higher BNP levels upon hospital admission, and congestion detected by BIVA at discharge have a significant predictive value for 90 days cardiovascular mortality. The combined use of admission BNP and BIVA discharge seems to be a useful tool for increasing prognostic power in these patients.

  4. [Hospital discharge criteria for very low birth weight newborns].

    PubMed

    Benavente Fernández, Isabel; Sánchez Redondo, María Dolores; Leante Castellanos, Jose Luis; Pérez Muñuzuri, Alejandro; Rite Gracia, Segundo; Ruiz Campillo, Cèsar W; Sanz López, Ester; Sánchez Luna, Manuel

    2017-01-04

    Hospital discharge criteria for the pre-term newborn are mainly based on physiological competences (thermoregulation, respiratory stability, and feeding skills), although family support and ability to care for the baby, as well as a well-planned discharge are also cornerstones to ensure a successful discharge. In this article, the Committee of Standards of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviews the current hospital discharge criteria in order for it to be useful as a clinical guide in Spanish neonatal units.

  5. Whiteboards and discharge traffic lights: visual management in acute care.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lauri; Bassham, Jane; Lewis, Melissa

    2015-04-01

    Flinders Medical Centre was experiencing issues with timely discharge and knowing the potential discharges and in-patient bed capacity for the next day. This case study describes the application of 'visual management' theory to discharge processes. The solutions developed were 'patient journey boards' and 'discharge traffic lights'. The implementation of these visual management systems has enabled the hospital to improve its discharge processes.

  6. Medication problems occurring at hospital discharge among older adults with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Foust, Janice B; Naylor, Mary D; Bixby, M Brian; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2012-01-01

    Medication reconciliation problems are common among older adults at hospital discharge and lead to adverse events. The purpose of this study was to examine the rates and types of medication reconciliation problems among older adults hospitalized for acute episodes of heart failure who were discharged home. This secondary analysis of data generated from a transitional care intervention included 198 hospital discharge medical records, representing 162 patients. A retrospective chart review comparing medication lists between hospital discharge summaries and patient discharge instructions was completed to identify medication reconciliation problems. Most hospital discharges (71.2%) had at least one type of reconciliation problem and frequently involved a high-risk medication (76.6%). Discrepancies were the most common problem (58.9%), followed by incomplete discharge summaries (52.5%) and partial patient discharge instructions (48.9%). More attention needs to be given to the quality of discharge instructions, and the problem of vague phrases (e.g., "take as directed") can be addressed by adding it to "do not use" lists to promote safer transitions in care.

  7. Handgrip strength predicts functional decline at discharge in hospitalized male elderly: a hospital cohort study.

    PubMed

    García-Peña, Carmen; García-Fabela, Luis C; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis M; García-González, Jose J; Arango-Lopera, Victoria E; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario U

    2013-01-01

    Functional decline after hospitalization is a common adverse outcome in elderly. An easy to use, reproducible and accurate tool to identify those at risk would aid focusing interventions in those at higher risk. Handgrip strength has been shown to predict adverse outcomes in other settings. The aim of this study was to determine if handgrip strength measured upon admission to an acute care facility would predict functional decline (either incident or worsening of preexisting) at discharge among older Mexican, stratified by gender. In addition, cutoff points as a function of specificity would be determined. A cohort study was conducted in two hospitals in Mexico City. The primary endpoint was functional decline on discharge, defined as a 30-point reduction in the Barthel Index score from that of the baseline score. Handgrip strength along with other variables was measured at initial assessment, including: instrumental activities of daily living, cognition, depressive symptoms, delirium, hospitalization length and quality of life. All analyses were stratified by gender. Logistic regression to test independent association between handgrip strength and functional decline was performed, along with estimation of handgrip strength test values (specificity, sensitivity, area under the curve, etc.). A total of 223 patients admitted to an acute care facility between 2007 and 2009 were recruited. A total of 55 patients (24.7%) had functional decline, 23.46% in male and 25.6% in women. Multivariate analysis showed that only males with low handgrip strength had an increased risk of functional decline at discharge (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.98, p = 0.01), with a specificity of 91.3% and a cutoff point of 20.65 kg for handgrip strength. Females had not a significant association between handgrip strength and functional decline. Measurement of handgrip strength on admission to acute care facilities may identify male elderly patients at risk of having functional decline, and intervene

  8. Handgrip Strength Predicts Functional Decline at Discharge in Hospitalized Male Elderly: A Hospital Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    García-Peña, Carmen; García-Fabela, Luis C.; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis M.; García-González, Jose J.; Arango-Lopera, Victoria E.; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario U.

    2013-01-01

    Functional decline after hospitalization is a common adverse outcome in elderly. An easy to use, reproducible and accurate tool to identify those at risk would aid focusing interventions in those at higher risk. Handgrip strength has been shown to predict adverse outcomes in other settings. The aim of this study was to determine if handgrip strength measured upon admission to an acute care facility would predict functional decline (either incident or worsening of preexisting) at discharge among older Mexican, stratified by gender. In addition, cutoff points as a function of specificity would be determined. A cohort study was conducted in two hospitals in Mexico City. The primary endpoint was functional decline on discharge, defined as a 30-point reduction in the Barthel Index score from that of the baseline score. Handgrip strength along with other variables was measured at initial assessment, including: instrumental activities of daily living, cognition, depressive symptoms, delirium, hospitalization length and quality of life. All analyses were stratified by gender. Logistic regression to test independent association between handgrip strength and functional decline was performed, along with estimation of handgrip strength test values (specificity, sensitivity, area under the curve, etc.). A total of 223 patients admitted to an acute care facility between 2007 and 2009 were recruited. A total of 55 patients (24.7%) had functional decline, 23.46% in male and 25.6% in women. Multivariate analysis showed that only males with low handgrip strength had an increased risk of functional decline at discharge (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79–0.98, p = 0.01), with a specificity of 91.3% and a cutoff point of 20.65 kg for handgrip strength. Females had not a significant association between handgrip strength and functional decline. Measurement of handgrip strength on admission to acute care facilities may identify male elderly patients at risk of having functional decline, and

  9. [Ethnography of health care after hospital discharge].

    PubMed

    de Castro, Edna Aparecida Barbosa; de Camargo Junior, Kenneth Rochel

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how Clifford Geertz' anthropological approach contributes to studies and investigations on health care. Geertz' approach relies basically on a semiotic conception of culture adopting thick description as the axis for interpretive elaborations and defending cultural interpretation as a science allowing to understand processes and to construct knowledge. We will present an overview of some constitutive elements of that author's thoughts we consider relevant for understanding the human experience of dealing with the disease/health process. The challenging question is how families deal with the need to provide care to a diseased relative after hospital discharge. We use this issue as an excuse for expounding this theoretical approach, interweaving the two areas. The micro-focus is the kind of healthcare that takes place outside the cultural environment where the technical forms of care based on scientific knowledge occur. We will briefly discuss how this question becomes evident in an object of study, and how it can be investigated according to the ethnography proposed by Geertz (op. cit.), allowing, in the end, for some considerations that further contribute to the construction of knowledge in public health.

  10. A Reengineered Hospital Discharge Program to Decrease Rehospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Brian W.; Chetty, Veerappa K.; Anthony, David; Greenwald, Jeffrey L.; Sanchez, Gail M.; Johnson, Anna E.; Forsythe, Shaula R.; O'Donnell, Julie K.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Manasseh, Christopher; Martin, Stephen; Culpepper, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background: Emergency department visits and rehospitalization are common after hospital discharge. Objective: To test the effects of an intervention designed to minimize hospital utilization after discharge. Design: Randomized trial using block randomization of 6 and 8. Randomly arranged index cards were placed in opaque envelopes labeled consecutively with study numbers, and participants were assigned a study group by revealing the index card. Setting: General medical service at an urban, academic, safety-net hospital. Patients: 749 English-speaking hospitalized adults (mean age, 49.9 years). Intervention: A nurse discharge advocate worked with patients during their hospital stay to arrange follow-up appointments, confirm medication reconciliation, and conduct patient education with an individualized instruction booklet that was sent to their primary care provider. A clinical pharmacist called patients 2 to 4 days after discharge to reinforce the discharge plan and review medications. Participants and providers were not blinded to treatment assignment. Measurements: Primary outcomes were emergency department visits and hospitalizations within 30 days of discharge. Secondary outcomes were self-reported preparedness for discharge and frequency of primary care providers′ follow-up within 30 days of discharge. Research staff doing follow-up were blinded to study group assignment. Results: Participants in the intervention group (n = 370) had a lower rate of hospital utilization than those receiving usual care (n = 368) (0.314 vs. 0.451 visit per person per month; incidence rate ratio, 0.695 [95% CI, 0.515 to 0.937]; P = 0.009). The intervention was most effective among participants with hospital utilization in the 6 months before index admission (P = 0.014). Adverse events were not assessed; these data were collected but are still being analyzed. Limitation: This was a single-center study in which not all potentially eligible patients could be enrolled, and outcome

  11. Program for validation of aggregated hospital discharge data.

    PubMed

    Rakovac, Ivo; Maharjan, Bikram; Stein, Claudia; Loyola, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals are major providers of health services and analysis of hospital activity data is of great interest for both policy makers and public health researchers. The WHO Regional Office for Europe disseminates the hospital discharge data from European countries through the European Hospital Morbidity Database, available on http://data.euro.who.int/hmdb. In order to ensure that reliable high quality data on hospital activities can be published in a timely manner, a program for validation of hospital discharge data has been developed using the R language for statistical computing. This program has been in use since the October 2012 version of the European Hospital Morbidity Database and its use has contributed to improved quality and comparability of data on hospital activities across Europe.

  12. High output stomas: ensuring safe discharge from hospital to home.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa

    High-output stomas are a challenge for the patient and all health professionals involved. This article discusses safe discharge home for this patient group, encouraging collaborative working practices between acute care trust and the community services. The authors also discuss the management of a high-output stoma and preparation and education of the patient before discharge home.

  13. Post-Acute Care Facility as a Discharge Destination for Patients in Need of Palliative Care in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme L; Japiassu, André M; Gomes, Lucia C; Pereira, Rogéria

    2017-01-01

    Patients with complex palliative care needs can experience delayed discharge, which causes an inappropriate occupancy of hospital beds. Post-acute care facilities (PACFs) have emerged as an alternative discharge destination for some of these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of admissions and characteristics of palliative care patients discharged from hospitals to a PACF. We conducted a retrospective analysis of PACF admissions between 2014 and 2016 that were linked to hospital discharge reports and electronic health records, to gather information about hospital-to-PACF transitions. In total, 205 consecutive patients were discharged from 6 different hospitals to our PACF. Palliative care patients were involved in 32% (n = 67) of these discharges. The most common conditions were terminal cancer (n = 42, 63%), advanced dementia (n = 17, 25%), and stroke (n = 5, 8%). During acute hospital stays, patients with cancer had significant shorter lengths of stay (13 vs 99 days, P = .004), a lower use of intensive care services (2% vs 64%, P < .001) and mechanical ventilation (2% vs 40%, P < .001), when compared to noncancer patients. Approximately one-third of discharges from hospitals to a PACF involved a heterogeneous group of patients in need of palliative care. Further studies are necessary to understand the trajectory of posthospitalized patients with life-limiting illnesses and what factors influence their decision to choose a PACF as a discharge destination and place of death. We advocate that palliative care should be integrated into the portfolio of post-acute services.

  14. Rubicon crossed in acute hospital design?

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2008-06-01

    With construction work now underway on the new pound sterling 227 million PFI-funded Pembury Hospital near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, Jonathan Baillie talks to John Cooper of architects Anshen + Allen, who is convinced that this exciting new acute facility will become the first of a new generation of 100% single-bedroom hospitals in the UK.

  15. Hospital discharge plan for patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Andrietta, Maria Paula; Lopes Moreira, Rita Simone; Bottura Leite de Barros, Alba Lucia

    2011-01-01

    This integrative review investigates how nurses plan the hospital discharge of patients with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) since an inadequate discharge plan and patients' subsequent non-adherence to instruction provided upon discharge are indicated as potential factors for re-hospitalization. A total of 24 papers were found in a search carried out in the LILACS and MEDLINE databases between 2004 and 2008, which given the inclusion criteria, were reduced to 14 papers. The papers were analyzed and categorized into "Health Education", and "Nursing Care". The synthesis of results indicates that the discharge plan devised by nurses is based on two categories. The actions of nurses to promote health education can enable patients with CHF to improve self-care.

  16. Waiting for placement: an exploratory analysis of determinants of delayed discharges of elderly hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, D; Bolda, E; Leak, S C

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the causes of delayed hospital discharge for 3,111 patients waiting for alternative placement in 80 North Carolina acute care general hospitals during May 1989. Almost all of the patients were elderly: their average age was 77. Delay is defined as the period between the day a patient was judged medically ready for discharge by a discharge planner and the day the patient was discharged (or May 31 if unplaced). The average delay was 16.7 days. The policy-relevant patient characteristics associated with delay are requirement for heavy care, race, source of reimbursement, and whether or not there was a financial problem in arranging discharge. The patient's age and whether or not a problem with behavior or family cooperativeness was noted also were predictors. Along with patient characteristics, hospital features such as bed size, occupancy rate, and total revenues were correlated with delay. Local nursing and rest home (domiciliary) bed supply were insignificant predictors, possibly because of their limited variance: the number of nursing home beds in all North Carolina counties is below the national mean; the number of rest home beds exceeds it. The conclusion reached is that the delay problem warrants more intensive analysis, particularly regarding financial problems encountered at discharge, and race. Guidelines for such an endeavor are provided. Further, there is a need to recognize the increasing preponderance of a new type of heavy care patient via more appropriate reimbursement levels and "transitional care" services. PMID:1869444

  17. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field.

  18. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  19. From discharge planner to "concierge": recommendations for hospital social work by clients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kristen F; Ing, Marissa M; Vento, Megan A; Nakagawa, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act and budget cuts have changed the role of hospital social workers by placing pressure on them to conduct speedy discharges and decrease readmission rates. This qualitative study aimed to assess if hospital social work is meeting the needs of clients in the hospital and postdischarge. Semistructured interviews with 10 clients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 11 caregivers were conducted. Participants reported that social work services were not meeting their needs. Clients with ICH and their caregivers expressed needs from social workers that surpassed their roles as discharge planners, including counseling, help with finances and insurance, and advocacy. Participants wanted social work services to begin early in acute treatment with continuity postdischarge. Social workers should conduct ethical social work by meeting clients where they are, addressing needs as prioritized by the client, and advocating individually and organizationally for clients.

  20. Discharges of nuclear medicine radioisotopes in Spanish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, E; Piñero-García, F; Ferro-García, M A

    2013-02-01

    Given the increasing use of radiopharmaceuticals in medicine, the aim of this paper is to determine radioactivity levels in the effluents of hospitals with Nuclear Medicine Departments. The radiological study of hospital discharges was carried out by gamma spectrometry, and liquid scintillation spectrometry to determine (14)C and (3)H contents. On March 9th and April 19th, 2010, daily radioactivity levels were monitored from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Each sample was collected at a specific control point of two major public hospitals in Granada (Spain). The analytical results show the presence of radionuclides such as (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, and (111)In.They are frequently used in nuclear medicine for diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes. This study shows the differences between direct and after-storage discharges and also justifies the need of storage tanks in hospitals with nuclear medicine departments. Moreover, monitoring of (99m)Tc released at hospital control points can be a useful tool for optimizing the safety conditions of storage tanks and discharge of radionuclides.

  1. Discharge after discharge: predicting surgical site infections after patients leave hospital.

    PubMed

    Daneman, N; Lu, H; Redelmeier, D A

    2010-07-01

    In this population-based retrospective cohort study, we examined the frequency, severity, and prediction of post-discharge surgical site infections (SSIs). We evaluated all patients admitted for their first elective surgical procedure in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2002 and 31 March 2008. Procedure and patient characteristics were derived from linked hospital, emergency room and physician claims databases within Canada's universal healthcare system. The 30 day risk of SSI was derived from the initial hospital admission, outpatient consultations, return emergency room visits and readmissions. The cohort included 622 683 patients, of whom 84 081 (13.5%) were diagnosed with SSI, and more than half (48 725) were diagnosed post-discharge. Post-discharge infections were associated with an increased risk of reoperation (odds ratio: 2.28; 95% confidence interval: 2.11-2.48), return emergency room visit (9.08; 8.89-9.27), and readmission (6.16; 5.98-6.35). The most common risk index predicted incremental increases in the risk of in-hospital SSI, but did not predict increases in the risk of post-discharge infection. Patients with post-discharge infections had baseline characteristics more akin to uninfected patients than patients with in-hospital infections. Predictors of post-discharge infection included shorter procedure duration, shorter length of stay, rural residence, alcoholism, diabetes and obesity. Post-discharge SSIs are frequent, severe, scattered over time and location, and hard to predict using common risk indices. They represent an important hidden burden in our healthcare system.

  2. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... 0938-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident... Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term...

  3. Supported discharge shortens hospital stay in patients hospitalized because of an exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Sala, E; Alegre, L; Carrera, M; Ibars, M; Orriols, F J; Blanco, M L; Cárceles, F; Bertran, S; Mata, F; Font, I; Agustí, A G

    2001-06-01

    This prospective, controlled, but not formally randomized study investigates the feasibility and efficiency of an alternative to standard hospitalization for patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), based upon supported discharge with nurse supervision at home. Over a 12-month period, emergency physicians, not directly involved in the study, admitted 205 patients with exacerbated COPD to the authors' respiratory unit. Patients were included in the supported discharge group (n=105) if they voluntarily chose to participate in the programme and lived in the city of Palma de Mallorca (where adequate home support could be provided). Patients not fulfilling these criteria (mainly residents outside the city) served as controls (n=100). Inpatient treatment was standardized in all patients and included oxygen therapy, bronchodilators, antibiotics and steroids. Both groups were comparable in terms of age (mean +/- SD: 70 +/- 10 versus 65 +/- 11 yr for supported discharge and control group, respectively), severity of airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in one second 45 +/- 18% reference versus 46 +/- 19% ref.), comorbidity and socioeconomic status. Length of hospital stay (LOS) in the supported discharge group was shorter (5.9 +/- 2.8 versus 8.0 +/- 5.1 days, p < 0.001). After discharge, a respiratory nurse visited supported discharge patients at home during 7.3 +/- 3.8 days. Only one patient (1%) required hospital readmission during this period of time. The reduced LOS resulted in a lower utilization of hospital beds at any given point in time throughout the study period. Within the framework and potential limitations of this study, the results indicate that the supported discharge programme in Spain: 1) allows a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay of patients hospitalized because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; 2) does not result in an inappropriately increased rate of hospital

  4. Language Barriers and Understanding of Hospital Discharge Instructions

    PubMed Central

    Karliner, Leah S.; Auerbach, Andrew; Nápoles, Anna; Schillinger, Dean; Nickleach, Dana; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Effective communication at hospital discharge is necessary for an optimal transition and to avoid adverse events. We investigated the association of a language barrier with patient understanding of discharge instructions. Methods Spanish, Chinese and English speaking patients admitted to two urban hospitals between 2005-2008, comparing patient understanding of follow-up appointment type, and medication category and purpose between limited English proficient (LEP) and English proficient (EP) patients. Results Of the 308 patients, 203 were LEP. Rates of understanding were low overall for follow-up appointment type (56%) and the 3 medication outcomes (category 48%, purpose 55%, both 41%). In unadjusted analysis, LEP were less likely than EP patients to know appointment type (50% vs. 66%; p = .01), medication category (45% vs. 54%; p = .05), and medication category and purpose combined (38% vs. 47%; p = .04), but equally likely to know medication purpose alone. These results persisted in the adjusted models for medication outcomes: LEP patients had lower odds of understanding medication category (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.95); and category/purpose (OR 0.59; 95%CI 0.39-0.89). Conclusions Understanding of appointment type and medications post-discharge was low, with LEP patients demonstrating worse understanding of medications. System interventions to improve communication at hospital discharge for all patients, and especially those with LEP, are needed. PMID:22411441

  5. Community services' involvement in the discharge of older adults from hospital into the community

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Michelle; Grimmer, Karen; Kumar, Saravana

    2013-01-01

    Background Community services are playing an increasing role in supporting older adults who are discharged from hospital with ongoing non-acute care needs. However, there is a paucity of information regarding how community services are involved in the discharge process of older individuals from hospital into the community. Methods Twenty-nine databases were searched from 1980 to 2012 (inclusive) for relevant primary published research, of any study design, as well as relevant unpublished work (e.g. clinical guidelines) which investigated community services' involvement in the discharge of older individuals from hospital into the community. Data analysis and quality appraisal (using McMaster critical appraisal tools) were undertaken predominately by the lead author. Data was synthesised qualitatively. Results Twelve papers were eligible for inclusion (five randomised controlled trials, four before and after studies and three controlled trials), involving a total of 8440 older adults (>65 years). These papers reported on a range of interventions. During data synthesis, descriptors were assigned to four emergent discharge methods: Virtual Interface Model, In-reach Interface Model, Out-reach Interface Model and Independent Interface Model. In each model, the findings were mixed in terms of health care and patient and carer outcomes. Conclusions It is plausible that each model identified in this systematic review has a role to play in successfully discharging different cohorts of older adults from hospital. Further research is required to identify appropriate population groups for various discharge models and to select suitable outcome measures to determine the effectiveness of these models, considering all stakeholders' involved. PMID:24179455

  6. Cutting Medicare Hospital Prices Leads to a Spillover Reduction in Hospital Discharges for the Nonelderly

    PubMed Central

    White, Chapin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure spillover effects of Medicare inpatient hospital prices on the nonelderly (under age 65). Primary Data Sources Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (10 states, 1995–2009) and Medicare Hospital Cost Reports. Study Design Outcomes include nonelderly discharges, length of stay and case mix, staffed hospital bed-days, and the share of discharges and days provided to the elderly. We use metropolitan statistical areas as our markets. We use descriptive analyses comparing 1995 and 2009 and panel data fixed-effects regressions. We instrument for Medicare prices using accumulated changes in the Medicare payment formula. Principal Findings Medicare price reductions are strongly associated with reductions in nonelderly discharges and hospital capacity. A 10-percent reduction in the Medicare price is estimated to reduce discharges among the nonelderly by about 5 percent. Changes in the Medicare price are not associated with changes in the share of inpatient hospital care provided to the elderly versus nonelderly. Conclusions Medicare price reductions appear to broadly constrain hospital operations, with significant reductions in utilization among the nonelderly. The slow Medicare price growth under the Affordable Care Act may result in a spillover slowdown in hospital utilization and spending among the nonelderly. PMID:24850524

  7. [Coordination to assist with hospital-to-home discharge after cerebral hemorrhage--perspectives of a patient's family and nurse].

    PubMed

    Waguchi, Hideko; Hidaka, Kumi; Shinoki, Keiji; Matsuoka, Mio; Mito, Saori; Doi, Seiko; Hata, Akiko; Ibata, Takeshi; Komuro, Ryutaro; Iijima, Shohei

    2013-12-01

    Discharge support, although provided for a limited time, is of vital importance in the acute phase care period. Such support is necessary to ensure continuity of care and treatment even after being discharged from the hospital. I acquired both the viewpoints of the family and the nurse of a patient who was about to be discharged from the hospital after cerebral hemorrhage. However, the patient's family and I were not able to decide on a home care plan or hospital-to-home transfer ahead of time because of the unstable condition of the patient, limited care power of the family, and varying discharge plans among the family members. I intended to help in the decision-making process, taking into consideration the patient's best interest. I evaluated the viewpoint of the family and was able to understand situations in which a family member, who assumes the role of a primary care giver, would need guidance in providing home care to the patient.

  8. Interventions aimed at reducing problems in adult patients discharged from hospital to home: a systematic meta-review

    PubMed Central

    Mistiaen, Patriek; Francke, Anneke L; Poot, Else

    2007-01-01

    Background Many patients encounter a variety of problems after discharge from hospital and many discharge (planning and support) interventions have been developed and studied. These primary studies have already been synthesized in several literature reviews with conflicting conclusions. We therefore set out a systematic review of the reviews examining discharge interventions. The objective was to synthesize the evidence presented in literature on the effectiveness of interventions aimed to reduce post-discharge problems in adults discharged home from an acute general care hospital. Methods A comprehensive search of seventeen literature databases and twenty-five websites was performed for the period 1994–2004 to find relevant reviews. A three-stage inclusion process consisting of initial sifting, checking full-text papers on inclusion criteria, and methodological assessment, was performed independently by two reviewers. Data on effects were synthesized by use of narrative and tabular methods. Results Fifteen systematic reviews met our inclusion criteria. All reviews had to deal with considerable heterogeneity in interventions, populations and outcomes, making synthesizing and pooling difficult. Although a statistical significant effect was occasionally found, most review authors reached no firm conclusions that the discharge interventions they studied were effective. We found limited evidence that some interventions may improve knowledge of patients, may help in keeping patients at home or may reduce readmissions to hospital. Interventions that combine discharge planning and discharge support tend to lead to the greatest effects. There is little evidence that discharge interventions have an impact on length of stay, discharge destination or dependency at discharge. We found no evidence that discharge interventions have a positive impact on the physical status of patients after discharge, on health care use after discharge, or on costs. Conclusion Based on fifteen

  9. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after hospital discharge: transition to preventive care.

    PubMed

    Kaatz, Scott; Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2011-08-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, the common clinical manifestations of venous thromboembolism (VTE), are among the most preventable complications of hospitalized patients. However, survey data repeatedly show poor rates of compliance with guideline-based preventive strategies. This has led the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to deny reimbursement for hospital readmission for thromboembolic complications in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty. Multiple strategies and national initiatives have been developed to improve rates of VTE prophylaxis during hospitalization; however, most VTE occurs in the outpatient setting. Epidemiologic data suggest that recent surgery or hospitalization is a strong risk factor for the development of VTE and that this risk may persist for up to 6 months. These observations call into question whether VTE prophylaxis should be administered only during hospitalization or if this preventive strategy should be continued after hospital discharge. Many of the randomized trials showing efficacy of VTE prophylaxis have used longer durations of prophylaxis than are typical for current length of hospital stay, highlighting the issue of how long the duration of prophylaxis should be. Several patient groups have undergone formal testing to evaluate the risks and benefits of extended-duration VTE prophylaxis, but this issue is less clear for other categories of patients. Although there is clear consensus that most hospitalized patients should receive VTE prophylaxis, there is uncertainty about whether to continue VTE prophylaxis in the immediate post-hospital period or for an extended duration. The transition from inpatient to outpatient care is a key event in the coordination of continuity of care, but VTE-specific care transition guidance is limited. In this article, we review the evidence for both standard- and extended-duration VTE prophylaxis and discuss the difficulties in effectively maintaining VTE

  10. Hospital Readmission Following Discharge From Inpatient Rehabilitation for Older Adults With Debility

    PubMed Central

    Karmarkar, Amol M.; Graham, James E.; Tan, Alai; Raji, Mukaila; Granger, Carl V.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Debility accounts for 10% of inpatient rehabilitation cases among Medicare beneficiaries. Debility has the highest 30-day readmission rate among 6 impairment groups most commonly admitted to inpatient rehabilitation. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine rates, temporal distribution, and factors associated with hospital readmission for patients with debility up to 90 days following discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Design A retrospective cohort study was conducted using records for 45,424 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with debility discharged to community from 1,199 facilities during 2006–2009. Methods Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for readmission. Schoenfeld residuals were examined to identify covariate-time interactions. Factor-time interactions were included in the full model for Functional Independence Measure (FIM) discharge motor functional status, comorbidity tier, and chronic pulmonary disease. Most prevalent reasons for readmission were summarized by Medicare severity diagnosis related groups. Results Hospital readmission rates for patients with debility were 19% for 30 days and 34% for 90 days. The highest readmission count occurred on day 3 after discharge, and 56% of readmissions occurred within 30 days. A higher FIM discharge motor rating was associated with lower hazard for readmissions prior to 60 days (30-day hazard ratio=0.987; 95% confidence interval=0.986, 0.989). Comorbidities with hazard ratios >1.0 included comorbidity tier and 11 Elixhauser conditions, 3 of which (heart failure, renal failure, and chronic pulmonary disease) were among the most prevalent reasons for readmission. Limitations Analysis of Medicare data permitted only use of variables reported for administrative purposes. Comorbidity data were analyzed only for inpatient diagnoses. Conclusions One-third of patients were readmitted to acute hospitals within 90 days following rehabilitation for

  11. Medication knowledge of patients hospitalized for heart failure at admission and after discharge

    PubMed Central

    Custodis, Florian; Rohlehr, Franziska; Wachter, Angelika; Böhm, Michael; Schulz, Martin; Laufs, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Background A substantial aspect of health literacy is the knowledge of prescribed medication. In chronic heart failure, incomplete intake of prescribed drugs (medication non-adherence) is inversely associated with clinical prognosis. Therefore, we assessed medication knowledge in a cohort of patients with decompensated heart failure at hospital admission and after discharge in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Methods One hundred and eleven patients presenting at the emergency department with acute decompensated heart failure were included (mean age 78.4±9.2, 59% men) in the study. Patients’ medication knowledge was assessed during individual interviews at baseline, course of hospitalization, and 3 months after discharge. Individual responses were compared with the medical records of the referring general practitioner. Results Median N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide plasma concentration in the overall population at baseline was 4,208 pg/mL (2,023–7,101 pg/mL [interquartile range]), 20 patients died between the second and third interview. The number of prescribed drugs increased from 8±3 at baseline to 9±3 after 3 months. The majority of patients did not know the correct number of their drugs. Medication knowledge decreased continuously from baseline to the third interview. At baseline, 37% (n=41) of patients stated the correct number of drugs to be taken, whereas only 18% (n=16) knew the correct number 3 months after discharge (P=0.008). Knowledge was inversely related to N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide levels. Conclusion Medication knowledge of patients with acute decompensated heart failure is poor. Despite care in a university hospital, patients’ individual medication knowledge decreased after discharge. The study reveals an urgent need for better strategies to improve and promote the knowledge of prescribed medication in these very high-risk patients. PMID:27877025

  12. Herpes Zoster Associated Hospital Admissions in Italy: Review of the Hospital Discharge Forms

    PubMed Central

    Gabutti, Giovanni; Serenelli, Carlotta; Cavallaro, Alessandra; Ragni, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    In Italy a specific surveillance system for zoster does not exist, and thus updated and complete epidemiological data are lacking. The objective of this study was to retrospectively review the national hospital discharge forms database for the period 1999–2005 using the code ICD9-CM053. In the period 1999–2005, 35,328 hospital admissions have been registered with annual means of 4,503 hospitalizations and 543 day-hospital admissions. The great part of hospitalizations (61.9%) involved subjects older than 65 years; the mean duration of stay was 8 days. These data, even if restricted to hospitalizations registered at national level, confirm the epidemiological impact of shingles and of its complications. PMID:19826547

  13. A framework of pediatric hospital discharge care informed by legislation, research, and practice.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jay G; Blaine, Kevin; Rogers, Jayne; McBride, Sarah; Schor, Edward; Birmingham, Jackie; Schuster, Mark A; Feudtner, Chris

    2014-10-01

    To our knowledge, no widely used pediatric standards for hospital discharge care exist, despite nearly 10 000 pediatric discharges per day in the United States. This lack of standards undermines the quality of pediatric hospital discharge, hinders quality-improvement efforts, and adversely affects the health and well-being of children and their families after they leave the hospital. In this article, we first review guidance regarding the discharge process for adult patients, including federal law within the Social Security Act that outlines standards for hospital discharge; a variety of toolkits that aim to improve discharge care; and the research evidence that supports the discharge process. We then outline a framework within which to organize the diverse activities that constitute discharge care to be executed throughout the hospitalization of a child from admission to the actual discharge. In the framework, we describe processes to (1) initiate pediatric discharge care, (2) develop discharge care plans, (3) monitor discharge progress, and (4) finalize discharge. We contextualize these processes with a clinical case of a child undergoing hospital discharge. Use of this narrative review will help pediatric health care professionals (eg, nurses, social workers, and physicians) move forward to better understand what works and what does not during hospital discharge for children, while steadily improving their quality of care and health outcomes.

  14. Post-acute home care and hospital readmission of elderly patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K

    2004-11-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce hospital readmission during the post-acute period. Using proportional Cox regression analysis, the authors examined the independent and joint effects of post-acute informal and formal services on hospital readmission. No evidence of service impact was found. Rather, hospital readmission was associated with a longer length of CHF history and noncompliance with medication regimes. Research, policy, and practice implications are discussed.

  15. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY... Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of Inpatient... ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

  16. Hospital Management of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Ashraf S

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalizations for elderly adults in the United States. One in 5 Americans will be >65 years of age by 2050. Because of the high prevalence of HF in this group, the number of Americans requiring hospitalization for this disorder is expected to rise significantly. We reviewed the most recent and ongoing studies and recommendations for the management of patients hospitalized due to decompensated HF. The Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry, together with the 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association heart failure guidelines, earlier retrospective and prospective studies including the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation (DOSE), the Trial of Intensified vs Standard Medical Therapy in the Elderly Patients With Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF), the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure (OPTIMIZE-HF), the Rapid Emergency Department Heart Failure Outpatient Trial (REDHOT) and the Comparison of Medical, Pacing and Defibrillation Therapies in Heart Failure (COMPANION) trial were reviewed for current practices pertaining to these patients. Gaps in our knowledge of optimal use of patient-specific information (biomarkers and comorbid conditions) still exist.

  17. Statewide Hospital Discharge Data: Collection, Use, Limitations, and Improvements

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Roxanne M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To provide an overview of statewide hospital discharge databases (HDD), including their uses in health services research and limitations, and to describe Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Enhanced State Data grants to address clinical and race–ethnicity data limitations. Principal Findings Almost all states have statewide HDD collected by public or private data organizations. Statewide HDD, based on the hospital claim with state variations, contain useful core variables and require minimal collection burden. AHRQ’s Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project builds uniform state and national research files using statewide HDD. States, hospitals, and researchers use statewide HDD for many purposes. Illustrating researchers’ use, during 2012–2014, HSR published 26 HDD-based articles on health policy, access, quality, clinical aspects of care, race–ethnicity and insurance impacts, economics, financing, and research methods. HDD have limitations affecting their use. Five AHRQ grants focused on enhancing clinical data and three grants aimed at improving race–ethnicity data. Conclusion ICD-10 implementation will significantly affect the HDD. The AHRQ grants, information technology advances, payment policy changes, and the need for outpatient information may stimulate other statewide HDD changes. To remain a mainstay of health services research, statewide HDD need to keep pace with changing user needs while minimizing collection burdens. PMID:26150118

  18. In Nonagenarians, Acute Kidney Injury Predicts In-Hospital Mortality, while Heart Failure Predicts Hospital Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lin, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Ko, Wen-Je

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of admitted patients worldwide. We investigate the determinants of hospital length of stay and outcomes in patients aged 90 years and older. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all admitted patients aged >90 years from the general medical wards in a tertiary referral medical center between August 31, 2009 and August 31, 2012. Patients’ clinical characteristics, admission diagnosis, concomitant illnesses at admission, and discharge diagnosis were collected. Each patient was followed until discharge or death. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to study factors associated with longer hospital length of stay (>7 days) and in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 283 nonagenarian in-patients were recruited, with 118 (41.7%) hospitalized longer than one week. Nonagenarians admitted with pneumonia (p = 0.04) and those with lower Barthel Index (p = 0.012) were more likely to be hospitalized longer than one week. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with lower Barthel Index (odds ratio [OR] 0.98; p = 0.021) and those with heart failure (OR 3.05; p = 0.046) had hospital stays >7 days, while patients with lower Barthel Index (OR 0.93; p = 0.005), main admission nephrologic diagnosis (OR 4.83; p = 0.016) or acute kidney injury (OR 30.7; p = 0.007) had higher in-hospital mortality. Conclusion In nonagenarians, presence of heart failure at admission was associated with longer hospital length of stay, while acute kidney injury at admission predicted higher hospitalization mortality. Poorer functional status was associated with both prolonged admission and higher in-hospital mortality. PMID:24223127

  19. Acute Surgical Unit at Auckland City Hospital: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsee, Li; Devaud, Marcelo; Middelberg, Lisa; Jones, Wayne; Civil, Ian

    2012-09-01

    Lack of timely assessment and access to acute operating rooms is a worldwide problem and also exists in New Zealand hospitals. To address these issues, an Acute Surgical Unit (ASU) was set up at Auckland City Hospital (ACH) in January 2009. This service has evolved and been modified to address the specific needs of acute surgical patients of ACH. Despite initial challenges inherent to setting up a new service, the Unit has been in steady operation and enhanced its performance over time. This paper is a descriptive analysis of the design of the ACH ASU and discusses some of the indications for streamlining acute surgical services at a large tertiary metropolitan hospital in New Zealand. Performance of the ASU has shown benefits for acute patients and the Hospital. The acute surgical rotation has also been beneficial for surgical training.

  20. The 1966 enactment of Medicare: its effect on discharges from Los Angeles County-operated hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Glassman, P A; Bell, R M; Tranquada, R E

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Medicare on two public hospitals in Los Angeles County was analyzed by examining the percentage of patients 65 years of age and older among all discharges from 1958 through 1971. At Harbor General Hospital, discharges of elderly patients had dropped from 21.7% to 7.9% by late 1966; at Los Angeles County General Hospital, discharges decreased from 15.3% to 10.7% between 1966 and 1967. Monitoring public hospitals' demographic changes after enacting a national health plan may provide information on patients' and providers' acceptance of insurance and on resources needed by public hospitals to care for those left without coverage. PMID:8059897

  1. The 1966 enactment of Medicare: its effect on discharges from Los Angeles County-operated hospitals.

    PubMed

    Glassman, P A; Bell, R M; Tranquada, R E

    1994-08-01

    The effect of Medicare on two public hospitals in Los Angeles County was analyzed by examining the percentage of patients 65 years of age and older among all discharges from 1958 through 1971. At Harbor General Hospital, discharges of elderly patients had dropped from 21.7% to 7.9% by late 1966; at Los Angeles County General Hospital, discharges decreased from 15.3% to 10.7% between 1966 and 1967. Monitoring public hospitals' demographic changes after enacting a national health plan may provide information on patients' and providers' acceptance of insurance and on resources needed by public hospitals to care for those left without coverage.

  2. [Discharges for external injuries from a hospital in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Apodaca, Beatriz A; De Cosio, Federico G; Moye-Elizalde, Gustavo; Fornelli-Laffon, Felipe F

    2012-05-01

    In Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, morbidity and mortality from injuries have increased alarmingly since 2008. This paper aims to examine the changes in the number of hospital discharges for external injuries recorded during the 2008-2010 period in a hospital in Ciudad Juarez. A descriptive retrospective study conducted at the Ciudad Juarez General Hospital looked at the incidence of external injuries as the reason for hospital discharges during the period under analysis. The average proportion of hospital discharges attributed to external injuries was 27%, with the 25-44-year-old age group being the most affected. More than half of the discharges were for fractures. The incidence rate of hospital discharges attributed to injuries in Ciudad Juarez was almost four times greater than that reported at the national level.

  3. Impact on mortality following first acute myocardial infarction of distance between home and hospital: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L; Lang, C C; Sullivan, F M; Boyle, P; Wang, J; Pringle, S D; MacDonald, T M

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of distance between home and acute hospital on mortality outcome of patients experiencing an incident myocardial infarction (MI). Design: Cohort study using a record linkage database. Setting: Tayside, Scotland, UK. Patients: 10 541 patients with incident acute MI between 1994 and 2003 were identified from Tayside hospital discharge data and from death certification data. Main outcome measures: MI mortality in the community, all-cause mortality in hospital and all-cause mortality during follow-up. Results: 4133 subjects died following incident MI in the community (that is, were not hospitalised), 6408 patients survived to be hospitalised and 1010 of these (15.8%) died in hospital. Of 5398 discharged from hospital, 1907 (35.3%) died during a median of 3.2 years of follow-up. After adjustment for rurality and other known risk factors, distance between home and admitting hospital was significantly associated with increased mortality both before hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 4.21 for >9 miles and 1.46, 1.09 to 1.95 for 3–9 miles when compared to <3 miles) and after hospitalisation (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.90, 1.19 to 3.02 and 1.27, 0.96 to 1.68). However, there was no effect of distance on in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR 0.95, 0.45 to 2.03 and 1.02, 0.66 to 1.58). Conclusion: The distance between home and hospital of admission may predict mortality in subjects experiencing a first acute MI. This association was found both before and after hospitalisation. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this association. However these data provide support for policies that locate services for acute MI closer to where patients live. PMID:17984217

  4. Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay in People with Down Syndrome: Evidence from a National Hospital Discharge Claims Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the…

  5. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  6. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  7. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers and for Ambulatory...

  8. Switching of adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor after hospital discharge among myocardial infarction patients: Insights from the Treatment with Adenosine Diphosphate Receptor Inhibitors: Longitudinal Assessment of Treatment Patterns and Events after Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRANSLATE-ACS) observational study.

    PubMed

    Zettler, Marjorie E; Peterson, Eric D; McCoy, Lisa A; Effron, Mark B; Anstrom, Kevin J; Henry, Timothy D; Baker, Brian A; Messenger, John C; Cohen, David J; Wang, Tracy Y

    2017-01-01

    The reasons for postdischarge adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor (ADPri) switching among patients with myocardial infarction (MI) are unclear. We sought to describe the incidence and patterns of postdischarge ADPri switching among patients with acute MI treated with percutaneous coronary intervention.

  9. A systematic review on the effect of the organisation of hospital discharge on patient health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carrat, Fabrice; Hejblum, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Objective The transition from hospital to home represents a key step in the management of patients and several problems related to this transition may arise, with potential adverse effects on patient health after discharge. The purpose of our study was to explore the association between components of the hospital discharge process including subsequent continuity of care and patient outcomes in the post-discharge period. Design Systematic review of observational and interventional studies. Setting We conducted a combined search in the Medline and Web of Science databases. Additional studies were identified by screening the bibliographies of the included studies. The data collection process was conducted using a standardised predefined grid that included quality criteria. Participants A standard patient population returning home after hospitalisation. Primary and secondary outcomes Adverse health outcomes occurring after hospital discharge. Results In the 20 studies fulfilling our eligibility criteria, the main discharge-process components explored were: discharge summary (n=2), discharge instructions (n=2), drug-related problems at discharge (n=4), transition from hospital to home (n=5) and continuity of care after hospital discharge (n=7). The major subsequent patient health outcomes measured were: rehospitalisations (n=18), emergency department visits (n=8) and mortality (n=5). Eight of the 18 studies exploring rehospitalisations and two of the eight studies examining emergency department visits reported at least one significant association between the discharge process and these outcomes. None of the studies investigating patient mortality reported any significant such associations between the discharge process and these outcomes. Conclusions Irrespective of the component of the discharge process explored, the outcome considered (composite or not), the sample size and the study design, no consistent statistical association between hospital discharge and patient

  10. Are Older Adults Receiving Evidence-Based Advice to Prevent Falls Post-Discharge from Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Brown, Ted; Stolwyk, Rene; O'Connor, Daniel W.; Haines, Terry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older adults experience a high rate of falls when they transition to community-living following discharge from hospital. Objectives: To describe the proportion of older adults who could recall having discussed falls and falls prevention strategies with a health professional within 6 months following discharge from hospital. To describe…

  11. Use of Mobile Applications for Hospital Discharge Letters: Improving Handover at Point of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Bridget; Drachsler, Hendrik; Kalz, Marco; Hoare, Cathal; Sorensen, Humphrey; Lezcano, Leonardo; Henn, Pat; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Handover of patient care is a time of particular risk and it is important that accurate and relevant information is clearly communicated. The hospital discharge letter is an important part of handover. However, the quality of hospital discharge letters is variable and letters frequently omit important information. The Cork Letter-Writing…

  12. The Change in Body Weight During Hospitalization Predicts Mortality in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Komaki, Tomo; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Arimura, Tadaaki; Shiga, Yuhei; Morii, Joji; Kuwano, Takashi; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Kitajima, Ken; Iwata, Atsushi; Morito, Natsumi; Yahiro, Eiji; Fujimi, Kanta; Matsunaga, Akira; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    Background In our experience, the change in body weight (BW) during hospitalization varies greatly in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF). Since the clinical significance of a change in BW is not clear, we investigated whether a change in BW could predict mortality. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 130 patients (72 males; aged 68 ± 10 years) who were hospitalized due to acute decompensated HF and followed for 2 years after discharge. The change in the BW index during hospitalization (ΔBWI) was calculated as (BW at hospital admission minus BW at hospital discharge)/body surface area at hospital discharge. Results The patients were divided into quartiles according to ΔBWI, and the 2-year mortality rates in the quartiles with the lowest, second, third and highest ΔBWI were 18.8%, 12.1%, 3.1% and 9.1%, respectively. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis after adjusting for variables with a P value less than 0.05, ΔBWI was independently associated with 2-year mortality (P = 0.0002), and the quartile with the lowest ΔBWI had a higher relative risk (RR) for 2-year mortality than the quartile with the highest ΔBWI (RR: 7.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.03 - 53.99, P = 0.04). Conclusion In conclusion, ΔBWI was significantly associated with 2-year mortality after discharge, which indicates that ΔBWI might be a simple predictor of prognosis in acute decompensated HF. PMID:28179967

  13. Testing the bed-blocking hypothesis: does nursing and care home supply reduce delayed hospital discharges?

    PubMed

    Gaughan, James; Gravelle, Hugh; Siciliani, Luigi

    2015-03-01

    Hospital bed-blocking occurs when hospital patients are ready to be discharged to a nursing home, but no place is available, so that hospital care acts as a more costly substitute for long-term care. We investigate the extent to which greater supply of nursing home beds or lower prices can reduce hospital bed-blocking using a new Local Authority (LA) level administrative data from England on hospital delayed discharges in 2009-2013. The results suggest that delayed discharges respond to the availability of care home beds, but the effect is modest: an increase in care home beds by 10% (250 additional beds per LA) would reduce social care delayed discharges by about 6-9%. We also find strong evidence of spillover effects across LAs: more care home beds or fewer patients aged over 65 years in nearby LAs are associated with fewer delayed discharges.

  14. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ..., 2010 unless otherwise footnoted).'' c. Third column, the title, ``Table 4J.--Out-Migration Adjustment...) Out-Migration Adjustment for Acute Care Hospitals--FY 2010 (April 1, 2010 through September 30, 2010...: Table 4J--(Abbreviated) Out-Migration Adjustment for Acute Care Hospitals--FY 2010 (April 1,...

  15. Physiotherapists' Perceptions of and Experiences with the Discharge Planning Process in Acute-Care General Internal Medicine Units in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Uyeno, Jennifer; Heck, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To examine discharge planning of patients in general internal medicine units in Ontario acute-care hospitals from the perspective of physiotherapists. Methods: A cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire was sent to participants in November 2011. Respondents' demographic characteristics and ranking of factors were analyzed using descriptive statistics; t-tests were performed to determine between-group differences (based on demographic characteristics). Responses to open-ended questions were coded to identify themes. Results: Mobility status was identified as the key factor in determining discharge readiness; other factors included the availability of social support and community resources. While inter-professional communication was identified as important, processes were often informal. Discharge policies, timely availability of other discharge options, and pressure for early discharge were identified as affecting discharge planning. Respondents also noted a lack of training in discharge planning; accounts of ethical dilemmas experienced by respondents supported these themes. Conclusions: Physiotherapists consider many factors beyond the patient's physical function during the discharge planning process. The improvement of team communication and resource allocation should be considered to deal with the realities of discharge planning. PMID:25125778

  16. Effects of reduction of acute hospital services on district nursing services: implications for quality assurance.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, L D; Addington-Hall, J M; Hennessy, D A; Gould, T R

    1991-01-01

    Two questions of importance to those concerned with maintaining standards and increasing the efficiency of Community Nursing are: (1) does reducing hospital provision alter the number of patients referred for Community Nursing or the type of care provided; (2) are Community Nursing Services directed towards those who most require them? A base-line study was carried out in the first quarter of 1988, before the closure of one of two general hospitals in an inner London Health Authority and was replicated in the same quarter of 1989, after all acute inpatient services had been transferred to the other hospital. Comparison of patients discharged before and after closure showed no significant differences in patients' age, sex, proportion living alone, length of stay in hospital, readmissions or deaths within one month of discharge. There was some decline in general nursing care. Total discharges declined by 20% while the number of referrals remained the same, indicating that proportionately more patients were discharged with a referral. Comparing referred and unreferred patients showed that Community Nursing Services were already being directed towards those most in need both before and after hospital closure. Results suggest that Community Nursing helps to maintain patients in the community.

  17. Wet BNP, fluid and hemodynamic status at discharge in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Parrinello, Gaspare; Torres, Daniele; Paterna, Salvatore; Di Pasquale, Pietro; Licata, Giuseppe

    2010-11-19

    We comment the noteworthy results of Pimenta et al. concerning the significance of discharge BNP levels in acute HF patients. The innovation of Pimento's study is the systematic research of the potential relationship between BNP and clinical and hemodynamic parameters. We focused the attention on the importance of wet "BNP" in managing HF and its ability to reflect congestion and multiple underlying patho-physiological disturbances. The first observation, regarding the statistical order, underlines the importance of renal insufficiency at discharge in genesis of higher BNP levels. Secondly, we note that the relationship between natriuretic peptides and the non-invasive measurement of the fluid status assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis was already demonstrated. Thirdly, we comment on the potential therapeutical implication of the verified relationship between BNP and albumin levels and we argue on the clinical utility of the albumin supplementation or hypertonic solutions in unstable HF management due to their oncotic power. Fourthly, we wish to further examine the role of central volemia. We underline that some studies had demonstrated that systemic congestion may be a mirror of central congestion and may also influence these levels alone in acute and also chronic HF patients. We believe that a concealed or poorly-assessed accumulation of systemic fluid is of crucial importance in managing HF, which frequently remains undiagnosed or inappropriately treated, thus requiring recurrent hospital readmission and disease progression. Furthermore not only BNP at discharge but also bioimpedance detection may be helpful to discover misdiagnosed congestion. We are of the opinion that, in cases of hospitalized HF and thereafter in ambulatory setting, the achievement and, then, maintenance of dry-wet tailoring diuretics, fluid and sodium intake is the key approach leading to a euvolemic status, a lowering of the NYHA class and an improvement in cardiac hemodynamics

  18. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  19. Software design to facilitate information transfer at hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Nace, G Stephen; Graumlich, James F; Aldag, Jean C

    2006-01-01

    Discharge communication between inpatient and outpatient physicians is often an inefficient and error-prone process. Adverse events result from poor communication at the time of discharge. The objective of this study was to describe development of discharge software to overcome communication barriers. The secondary objective was to assess factors that influence the time to complete tasks with the software. Methods were a performance improvement model and database analysis of 336 discharges. Software design specifications included computerised physician order entry, immediate utility, minimal development and deployment costs, acceptability to physician-users, and satisfaction of primary care physicians, patients and pharmacists. Design features included simple 'just-in-time' prompts and point-of-care prescribing resources. The dependent variable for analysis was physician time to complete discharge prescriptions and instructions while using the software. General linear and mixed-effects regression models adjusted for physician effects and other predictors. Results revealed that physician factors significantly affected the time to complete a discharge while using the software. As the number of accesses (log-ins) and free text typing increased, then time to complete the computerised discharge increased. Patient-related factors that increased physician time were discharge diagnoses, prescriptions and length of stay. In conclusion, discharge software can help inpatient physicians transfer timely, complete and legible information to outpatient physicians, pharmacists and patients. Physician and patient factors influence the time to complete discharges using the software.

  20. Characteristics of acute care hospitals with diversity plans and translation services.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Charles B; Shen, Jay J; Ginn, Gregory O

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals provide diversity activities for a number of reasons. The authors examined community demand, resource availability, managed care, institutional pressure, and external orientation related variables that were associated with acute care hospital diversity plans and translation services. The authors used multiple logistic regression to analyze the data for 478 hospitals in the 2006 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) dataset that had available data on the racial and ethnic status of their discharges. We also used 2004 and 2006 American Hospital Association (AHA) data to measure the two dependent diversity variables and the other independent variables. We found that resource, managed care, and external orientation variables were associated with having a diversity plan and that resource, managed care, institutional, and external orientation variables were associated with providing translation services. The authors concluded that more evidence for diversity's impact, additional resources, and more institutional pressure may be needed to motivate more hospitals to provide diversity planning and translation services.

  1. Hospitalization for acute pyelonephritis in Manitoba, Canada, during the period from 1989 to 1992; impact of diabetes, pregnancy, and aboriginal origin.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, L E; Friesen, D; Harding, G K; Roos, L L

    1996-06-01

    Population-based rates of hospitalization for acute pyelonephritis were estimated over 3 years with use of provincial administrative data on health care. Retrospective review of records of ICD9-CM discharge codes of pyelonephritis and urinary infection was performed in two acute care institutions to validate the discharge diagnosis; 80% of patients with a discharge diagnosis of pyelonephritis and 7% to 20% of patients with a discharge diagnosis of urinary infection met clinical criteria for admission for acute pyelonephritis. Mean rates of hospitalization +/- SD for acute pyelonephritis were 10.86 +/- 0.51 per 10,000 population among women and 3.32 +/- 0.27 per 10,000 population among men. From 18% to 31% of hospitalized women aged 20-39 years pregnant; 36% of 797 hospitalized women and 21% of 402 hospitalized men 40 years of age or older were diabetic. The hospitalization rates among Native American women with treaty status were five to 20 times greater than those among other women, which was partially attributable to a significantly greater frequency of pregnancy and diabetes in the former women. Hospitalization for acute pyelonephritis is common, and pregnancy and diabetes contribute substantially to hospitalization rates. The increased hospitalization rate among Native American women with treaty status is not fully explained by pregnancy or diabetes.

  2. Septic shock: a major cause of hospital death after intensive care unit discharge

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Matheus Gomes; Lopes, Márcia Valéria Caldeira Angelucci; Gandolfi, Joelma Villafanha; Lobo, Suzana Margareth Ajeje

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the causes and factors associated with the death of patients between intensive care unit discharge and hospital discharge. Methods The present is a pilot, retrospective, observational cohort study. The records of all patients admitted to two units of a public/private university hospital from February 1, 2013 to April 30, 2013 were assessed. Demographic and clinical data, risk scores and outcomes were obtained from the Epimed monitoring system and confirmed in the electronic record system of the hospital. The relative risk and respective confidence intervals were calculated. Results A total of 581 patients were evaluated. The mortality rate in the intensive care unit was 20.8% and in the hospital was 24.9%. Septic shock was the cause of death in 58.3% of patients who died after being discharged from the intensive care unit. Of the patients from the public health system, 73 (77.6%) died in the intensive care unit and 21 (22.4%) died in the hospital after being discharged from the unit. Of the patients from the Supplementary Health System, 48 (94.1%) died in the intensive care unit and 3 (5.9%) died in the hospital after being discharged from the unit (relative risk, 3.87%; 95% confidence interval, 1.21 - 12.36; p < 0.05). The post-discharge mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with intensive care unit hospitalization time longer than 6 days. Conclusion The main cause of death of patients who were discharged from the intensive care unit and died in the ward before hospital discharge was septic shock. Coverage by the public healthcare system and longer hospitalization time in the intensive care unit were factors associated with death after discharge from the intensive care unit. PMID:25909313

  3. Trends in Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospitalizations: Are We Seeing the Whole Picture?

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Naomi C.; Ash, Arlene S.; Ghosh, Kaushik; Rosen, Amy K.; Wong, John B.; Rosen, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Payers and policy makers rely on studies of trends in Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) hospitalizations and spending that count only hospitalizations where the AMI is the principal discharge diagnosis. Hospitalizations with AMI coded as a secondary diagnosis are ignored. The effects of excluding these hospitalizations on estimates of trends are unknown. Methods Observational study of all AMI hospitalizations in Fee-for-Service Medicare beneficiaries ages 65 and over, from 2002 through 2011. Results We studied 3,663,137 hospitalizations with any AMI discharge diagnosis over 288,873,509 beneficiary-years. Of these, 66% had AMI coded as principal (versus secondary). From 2002 to 2011, AMI hospitalization rates declined 24.5% (from 1,485 per 100,000 beneficiary-years in 2002 to 1,122 in 2011). Meanwhile, the proportion of these hospitalizations with a secondary AMI diagnosis increased from 28% to 40%; by 2011 these secondary AMI hospitalizations accounted for 43% of all expenditures for hospitalizations with AMI, or $2.8 billion. Major changes in comorbidities, principal diagnoses and mean costs for hospitalizations with a non-principal AMI diagnosis occurred in the 2006-2008 timeframe. Conclusions Current estimates of the burden of AMI ignore an increasingly large proportion of overall AMI hospitalizations and spending. Changes in the characteristics of hospitalizations that coincided with major payment and policy changes suggest that non-clinical factors affect AMI coding. Failing to consider all AMIs could inflate estimates of population health improvements, underestimate current and future AMI burden and expenditures, and overestimate the value of AMI prevention and treatment. PMID:26678643

  4. The Relationship between C-Reactive Protein Level and Discharge Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Geng, He-Hong; Wang, Xin-Wang; Fu, Rong-Li; Jing, Meng-Juan; Huang, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, was associated with stroke severity and long-term outcome. However, the relationship between the acute-phase CRP level and discharge outcome has received little attention. We prospectively studied 301 patients with acute ischemic stroke (over a period of two weeks) from two hospital stroke wards and one rehabilitation department in Henan, China. Patients’ demographic and clinical data were collected and evaluated at admission. Poor discharge outcome was assessed in patients at discharge using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS > 2). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the risk factors of poor discharge outcome after adjusting for potential confounders. Poor discharge outcome was observed in 78 patients (25.9%). Univariate analyses showed that factors significantly influencing poor discharge outcome were age, residence, recurrent acute ischemic stroke, coronary heart disease, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission, non-lacunar stroke, time from onset of stroke to admission, CRP, TBIL (total bilirubin), direct bilirubin (DBIL), ALB (albumin), FIB (fibrinogen) and D-dimer (p < 0.05). After adjusting for age, residence, recurrent ischemic stroke, coronary heart disease, NIHSS score at admission, lacunar stroke, time from onset of stroke to admission, CRP, TBIL, DBIL, ALB, FIB and D-dimer, multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that poor outcome at discharge was associated with recurrent acute ischemic stroke (OR, 2.115; 95% CI, 1.094–4.087), non-lacunar stroke (OR, 2.943; 95% CI, 1.436–6.032), DBIL (OR, 1.795; 95% CI, 1.311–2.458), and CRP (OR, 4.890; 95% CI, 3.063–7.808). In conclusion, the CRP level measured at admission was found to be an independent predictor of poor outcome at discharge. Recurrent acute ischemic stroke, non-lacunar stroke and DBIL were also significantly associated with discharge

  5. [Medico-legal features of early discharge in acute myocardial infarction and chest pain].

    PubMed

    Montisci, M; Ruscazio, M; Snenghi, R; Nalin, S; Montisci, R; Iliceto, S; Ferrara, S D

    2001-06-01

    The authors' aim is to outline some of the main medico-legal problems in cardiology, especially those regarding the premature hospital discharge of patients with undefined chest pain and/or with acute myocardial infarction. After a brief overview on the etiology and clinical definition of chest pain and myocardial infarction, premature hospital discharge is defined and the incidental medico-legal risks that physicians operating in such situations are exposed to are pointed out. Next, the profiles regarding both the positive and negative views of professional medical responsibility are described. In the negative frame, the authors outline the most frequent civil and penal aspects of the unpremeditated responsibility. Then the physician's error, in both qualitative (generic or specific guilt) and quantitative (degree) terms, is considered; particularly, negligence, imprudence and inexperience, as qualitatively accepted meanings of generic guilt, are dealt with by adopting illustrative cases settled in the light of the right legal interpretation. The phases of the diagnostic or prognostic error are evaluated, and clinical protocols, as a reference parameter for the identification of error, are considered. Lastly, the problem of causality, essential condition for the judgment about the professional responsibility, and the problem of the patient's consent, including an evaluation of the legal capability or incapability about the declaration of consent, are examined closely.

  6. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure: a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-06-01

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to practicing physicians and nurses to manage acute heart failure in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. Criteria of hospitalization and of discharge are described. Gaps in knowledge and perspectives in the management of acute heart failure are also detailed. This consensus paper on acute heart failure might help enable contiguous practice.

  7. Prognostic indicators of adverse renal outcome and death in acute kidney injury hospital survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamzić-Mehmedbašić, Aida; Rašić, Senija; Balavac, Merima; Rebić, Damir; Delić-Šarac, Marina; Durak-Nalbantić, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding prognostic factors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in acute kidney injury (AKI) hospital survivors are scarce and controversial. Objectives: We aimed to identify predictors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in AKI hospital survivors. Patients and Methods: The study group consisted of 84 AKI hospital survivors admitted to the tertiary medical center during 2-year period. Baseline clinical parameters, with renal outcome 3 months after discharge and 6-month mortality were evaluated. According survival and renal function outcome, patients were divided into two groups. Results: Patients who did not recover renal function were statistically significantly older (P < 0.007) with higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (P < 0.000) and more likely to have anuria and oliguria (P = 0.008) compared to those with recovery. Deceased AKI patients were statistically significantly older (P < 0.000), with higher CCI score (P < 0.000), greater prevalence of sepsis (P =0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.017) and ferritin (P < 0.051) and lower concentrations of albumin (P<0.01) compared to survivors. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of adverse renal outcome were female gender (P =0.033), increasing CCI (P =0.000), presence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease (P =0.000) and diabetes mellitus (P =0.019) as well as acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (P =0.032), while protective factor for renal function outcome was higher urine output (P =0.009). Independent predictors of post-discharge mortality were female gender (P =0.04), higher CCI score (P =0.001) and sepsis (P =0.034). Conclusion: Female AKI hospital survivors with increasing burden of comorbidities, diagnosis of sepsis and ADHF seem to be at high-risk for poor post-discharge outcome. PMID:27471736

  8. Hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in the thrombolytic era

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, N; O'Rorke, C; Codd, M; McCann, H; McGarry, K; Sugrue, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the management and outcome of an unselected consecutive series of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to a tertiary referral centre.
DESIGN—A historical cohort study over a three year period (1992-94) of consecutive unselected admissions with acute myocardial infarction identified using the HIPE (hospital inpatient enquiry) database and validated according to MONICA criteria for definite or probable acute myocardial infarction.
SETTING—University teaching hospital and cardiac tertiary referral centre.
RESULTS—1059 patients were included. Mean age was 67 years; 60% were male and 40% female. Rates of coronary care unit (CCU) admission, thrombolysis, and predischarge angiography were 70%, 28%, and 32%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 18%. Independent predictors of hospital mortality by multivariate analysis were age, left ventricular failure, ventricular arrhythmias, cardiogenic shock, management outside CCU, and reinfarction. Hospital mortality in a small cohort from a non-tertiary referral centre was 14%, a difference largely explained by the lower mean age of these patients (64 years). Five year survival in the cohort was 50%. Only age and left ventricular failure were independent predictors of mortality at follow up.
CONCLUSIONS—In unselected consecutive patients the hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction remains high (18%). Age and the occurrence of left ventricular failure are major determinants of short and long term mortality after acute myocardial infarction.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; mortality; thrombolysis PMID:10212164

  9. [Criteria for hospital discharge of the healthy term newborn after delivery].

    PubMed

    Rite Gracia, Segundo; Pérez Muñuzuri, Alejandro; Sanz López, Ester; Leante Castellanos, José Luis; Benavente Fernández, Isabel; Ruiz Campillo, César W; Sánchez Redondo, M Dolores; Sánchez Luna, Manuel

    2016-10-13

    Criteria for newborn hospital discharge have to include physiological stability and family competence to provide newborn care at home. In this document, the Committee of Standards of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviews the minimum criteria to be met before hospital discharge of a term newborn infant. We include a review of hospital discharge criteria for the late preterm infants, as these infants are often not hospitalised and remain with their mother after birth. A shortened hospital stay (less than 48h after delivery) for healthy term newborns can be considered, but it is not appropriate for every mother and newborn. Newborn infants discharged before 48h of age, should be examined within 3-4 days of life.

  10. A prospective controlled trial of a geriatric consultation team in an acute-care hospital.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D B; Fox, R A

    1990-03-01

    Attempts to prove the usefulness of geriatric consultation teams (GCT) in acute-care settings have been inconclusive. We have completed a prospective, controlled trial of a GCT in an acute-care setting, aiming our interventions at a specific subgroup of elderly patients. One hundred and thirty-two out of 352 (37.5%) patients met the inclusion criteria with 66 each being assigned to the intervention and the control groups. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. Patients in the intervention group received follow-up after discharge from hospital by the geriatric service. We found that the intervention was associated with improved 6-month survival (p less than 0.01), improved Barthel Index at 1 year (p less than 0.01), and a trend towards decreased reliance on institutional care (hospital or nursing home) during the year of follow-up. The benefits occurred principally in patients who were discharged to a nursing home. Our findings support the utility of GCT and highlight the importance of focusing the intervention and providing follow-up after discharge from hospital.

  11. Effects of an Enhanced Discharge Planning Intervention for Hospitalized Older Adults: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altfeld, Susan J.; Shier, Gayle E.; Rooney, Madeleine; Johnson, Tricia J.; Golden, Robyn L.; Karavolos, Kelly; Avery, Elizabeth; Nandi, Vijay; Perry, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To identify needs encountered by older adult patients after hospital discharge and assess the impact of a telephone transitional care intervention on stress, health care utilization, readmissions, and mortality. Design and Methods: Older adult inpatients who met criteria for risk of post-discharge complications were…

  12. 42 CFR 405.1205 - Notifying beneficiaries of hospital discharge appeal rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... beneficiary refuses to sign the notice. The hospital may annotate its notice to indicate the refusal, and the date of refusal is considered the date of receipt of the notice. (c) Follow up notification. (1) The... of discharge as possible, but not more than 2 calendar days before discharge. (2) Follow...

  13. Antibiotic prescribing at the transition from hospitalization to discharge: a target for antibiotic stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Yogo, Norihiro; Haas, Michelle K; Knepper, Bryan C; Burman, William J; Mehler, Philip S; Jenkins, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Of 300 patients prescribed oral antibiotics at the time of hospital discharge, urinary tract infection, community-acquired pneumonia , and skin infections accounted for 181 (60%) of the treatment indications. Half of the prescriptions were antibiotics with broad gram-negative activity. Discharge prescriptions were inappropriate in 79 (53%) of 150 cases reviewed. PMID:25782905

  14. Hospital readmission from post-acute care facilities: risk factors, timing, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Robert E.; Whitfield, Emily A.; Hittle, David; Min, Sung-joon; Levy, Cari; Prochazka, Allan V.; Coleman, Eric A.; Schwartz, Robert; Ginde, Adit A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hospital discharges to post-acute care (PAC) facilities have increased rapidly. This increase may lead to more hospital readmissions from PAC facilities, which are common and poorly understood. We sought to determine the risk factors and timing for hospital readmission from PAC facilities and evaluate the impact of readmission on patient outcomes. Design Retrospective analysis of Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) from 2003–2009. Setting The MCBS is a nationally-representative survey of beneficiaries matched with claims data. Participants Community-dwelling beneficiaries who were hospitalized and discharged to a PAC facility for rehabilitation. Intervention/Exposure Potential readmission risk factors included patient demographics, health utilization, active medical conditions at time of PAC admission, and PAC characteristics. Measurements Hospital readmission during the PAC stay, return to community residence, and all-cause mortality. Results Of 3246 acute hospitalizations followed by PAC facility stays, 739 (22.8%) included at least 1 hospital readmission. The strongest risk factors for readmission included impaired functional status (HR 4.78, 95% CI 3.21–7.10), markers of increased acuity such as need for intravenous medications in PAC (1.63, 1.39–1.92), and for-profit PAC ownership (1.43, 1.21–1.69). Readmitted patients had a higher mortality rate at both 30 days (18.9 vs. 8.6%, p<0.001) and 100 days (39.9 vs. 14.5%, p<0.001) even after adjusting for age, comorbidities, and prior health care utilization (30 days: OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.60–2.54; 100 days: OR 3.79, 95% CI 3.13–4.59). Conclusions Hospital readmission from PAC facilities is common and associated with a high mortality rate. Readmission risk factors may signify inadequate transitional care processes or a mismatch between patient needs and PAC resources. PMID:26715357

  15. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  16. Improving hospital discharge time: a successful implementation of Six Sigma methodology.

    PubMed

    El-Eid, Ghada R; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A

    2015-03-01

    Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2 hours during the preintervention period to 1.7 hours post-intervention (P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients left their room before noon in the postintervention period (P < 0.001), though there was no statistical difference in before noon discharge. Hospital LOS dropped from 3.4 to 3.1 days postintervention (P < 0.001). ED mean LOS of patients admitted to the hospital was significantly lower in the postintervention period (6.9 ± 7.8 vs 5.9 ± 7.7 hours; P < 0.001). Six Sigma methodology can be an effective change management tool to improve discharge time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific.

  17. 76 FR 51475 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010......

  18. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  19. [Hospital readmission after postpartum discharge of term newborns in two maternity wards in Stockholm and Marseille].

    PubMed

    Boubred, F; Herlenius, E; Andres, V; des Robert, C; Marchini, G

    2016-03-01

    The consequences of early postpartum discharge (EPPD, within 2 days after birth) on newborn health remain debated. Early discharge has been associated with increased neonatal morbidity. However, neonatal re-hospitalization can be prevented by careful follow-up during the 1st week after birth. We compared the early neonatal hospitalization of term newborns over 2 years in two hospitals: Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm (n=7300 births), which allowed early discharge from 6h after birth with specific neonatal follow-up, and Marseille University Hospital (AP-HM) (n=4385) where postpartum discharge was more conventional after 72 h. During the study period, the EPPD rate was 41% vs. 2% in Stockholm and Marseille, respectively (P<0.001). Hospital readmission was comparable (5.6‰ vs. 7‰, P=0.2). The leading cause associated with hospitalization was icterus in Stockholm (76% vs. 26%, P<0.001) and feeding difficulties in Marseille (17% vs. 48%, P<0.001). In conclusion, close neonatal follow-up during the 1st week of life associated with restricted maternal and neonatal eligibility criteria for EPPD are required to prevent early neonatal re-hospitalization.

  20. Reducing Length of Hospital Stay Does Not Increase Readmission Rates in Early-Stage Gastric, Colon, and Lung Cancer Surgical Cases in Japanese Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kunisawa, Susumu; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The Japanese government has worked to reduce the length of hospital stay by introducing a per-diem hospital payment system that financially incentivizes the timely discharge of patients. However, there are concerns that excessively reducing length of stay may reduce healthcare quality, such as increasing readmission rates. The objective of this study was to investigate the temporal changes in length of stay and readmission rates as quality indicators in Japanese acute care hospitals. Methods We used an administrative claims database under the Diagnosis Procedure Combination Per-Diem Payment System for Japanese hospitals. Using this database, we selected hospitals that provided data continuously from July 2010 to March 2014 to enable analyses of temporal changes in length of stay and readmission rates. We selected stage I (T1N0M0) gastric, colon, and lung cancer surgical patients who had been discharged alive from the index hospitalization. The outcome measures were length of stay during the index hospitalization and unplanned emergency readmissions within 30 days after discharge. Results From among 804 hospitals, we analyzed 42,585, 15,467, and 40,156 surgical patients for gastric, colon, and lung cancer, respectively. Length of stay was reduced by approximately 0.5 days per year. In contrast, readmission rates were generally stable at approximately 2% or had decreased slightly over the 4-year period. Conclusions In early-stage gastric, colon, and lung cancer surgical patients in Japan, reductions in length of stay did not result in increased readmission rates. PMID:27832182

  1. Rates and predictors of depression status among caregivers of patients with COPD hospitalized for acute exacerbations: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; García-Guillamón, Gloria; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; García-Vidal, José Antonio; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization is common for acute exacerbation of COPD, but little is known about its impact on the mental health of caregivers. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the rates and predictors of depressive symptoms in caregivers at the time of hospitalization for acute exacerbation of COPD and to identify the probability and predictors of subsequent changes in depressive status 3 months after discharge. Materials and methods This was a prospective study. Depression symptoms were measured in 87 caregivers of patients hospitalized for exacerbation at hospitalization and 3 months after discharge. We measured factors from four domains: context of care, caregiving demands, caregiver resources, and patient characteristics. Univariate and multivariate multiple logistic regressions were used to determine the predictors of depression at hospitalization and subsequent changes at 3 months. Results A total of 45 caregivers reported depression at the time of hospitalization. After multiple adjustments, spousal relationship, dyspnea, and severe airflow limitation were the strongest independent predictors of depression at hospitalization. Of these 45 caregivers, 40% had a remission of their depression 3 months after discharge. In contrast, 16.7% of caregivers who were not depressive at hospitalization became depressive at 3 months. Caregivers caring >20 hours per week for patients with dependencies had decreased odds of remission, and patients having dependencies after discharge increased the odds of caregivers becoming depressed. Conclusion Depressive symptoms are common among caregivers when patients are hospitalized for exacerbation of COPD. Although illness factors are determinants of depression at hospitalization, patient dependence determines fluctuations in the depressive status of caregivers. PMID:28008245

  2. A randomised clinical trial on a comprehensive geriatric assessment and intensive home follow-up after hospital discharge: the Transitional Care Bridge

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Older patients are at high risk for poor outcomes after acute hospital admission. The mortality rate in these patients is approximately 20%, whereas 30% of the survivors decline in their level of activities of daily living (ADL) functioning three months after hospital discharge. Most diseases and geriatric conditions that contribute to poor outcomes could be subject to pro-active intervention; not only during hospitalization, but also after discharge. This paper presents the design of a randomised controlled clinical trial concerning the effect of a pro-active, multi-component, nurse-led transitional care program following patients for six months after hospital admission. Methods/Design Three hospitals in the Netherlands will participate in the multi-centre, double-blind, randomised clinical trial comparing a pro-active multi-component nurse-led transitional care program to usual care after discharge. All patients acutely admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine who are 65 years and older, hospitalised for at least 48 hours and are at risk for functional decline are invited to participate in the study. All patients will receive integrated geriatric care by a geriatric consultation team during hospital admission. Randomization, which will be stratified by study site and cognitive impairment, will be conducted during admission. The intervention group will receive the transitional care bridge program, consisting of a handover moment with a community care Care Nurse (CN) during hospital admission and five home visits after discharge. The control group will receive 'care as usual' after discharge. The main outcome is the level of ADL functioning six months after discharge compared to premorbid functioning measured with the Katz ADL index. Secondary outcomes include; survival, cognitive functioning, quality of life, and health care utilization, satisfaction of the patient and primary care giver with the transitional care bridge program. All outcomes

  3. Therapy of acute hypertension in hospitalized children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Webb, Tennille N; Shatat, Ibrahim F; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypertension (HTN) in hospitalized children and adolescents occurs relatively frequently, and in some cases, if not recognized and treated promptly, it can lead to hypertensive crisis with potentially significant morbidity and mortality. In contrast to adults, where acute HTN is most likely due to uncontrolled primary HTN, children and adolescents with acute HTN are more likely to have secondary HTN. This review will briefly cover evaluation of acute HTN and various age-specific etiologies of secondary HTN and provide more in-depth discussion on treatment targets, potential risks of acute HTN therapy, and available pediatric data on intravenous and oral antihypertensive agents, and it proposes treatment schema including unique therapy of specific secondary HTN scenarios.

  4. Testing the Bed-Blocking Hypothesis: Does Nursing and Care Home Supply Reduce Delayed Hospital Discharges?

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, James; Gravelle, Hugh; Siciliani, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Hospital bed-blocking occurs when hospital patients are ready to be discharged to a nursing home, but no place is available, so that hospital care acts as a more costly substitute for long-term care. We investigate the extent to which greater supply of nursing home beds or lower prices can reduce hospital bed-blocking using a new Local Authority (LA) level administrative data from England on hospital delayed discharges in 2009–2013. The results suggest that delayed discharges respond to the availability of care home beds, but the effect is modest: an increase in care home beds by 10% (250 additional beds per LA) would reduce social care delayed discharges by about 6–9%. We also find strong evidence of spillover effects across LAs: more care home beds or fewer patients aged over 65 years in nearby LAs are associated with fewer delayed discharges. © 2015 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25760581

  5. Care Transitions: Using Narratives to Assess Continuity of Care Provided to Older Patients after Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carolyn; Hogan, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Background A common scenario that may pose challenges to primary care providers is when an older patient has been discharged from hospital. The aim of this pilot project is to examine the experiences of patients’ admission to hospital through to discharge back home, using analysis of patient narratives to inform the strengths and weaknesses of the process. Methods For this qualitative study, we interviewed eight subjects from the Sheldon M. Chumir Central Teaching Clinic (CTC). Interviews were analyzed for recurring themes and phenomena. Two physicians and two resident learners employed at the CTC were recruited as a focus group to review the narrative transcripts. Results Narratives generally demonstrated moderate satisfaction among interviewees with respect to their hospitalization and follow-up care in the community. However, the residual effects of their hospitalization surprised five patients, and five were uncertain about their post-discharge management plan. Conclusion Both secondary and primary care providers can improve on communicating the likely course of recovery and follow-up plans to patients at the time of hospital discharge. Our findings add to the growing body of research advocating for the implementation of quality improvement measures to standardize the discharge process. PMID:27729948

  6. European Society of Cardiology - Acute Cardiovascular Care Association position paper on safe discharge of acute heart failure patients from the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Miró, Òscar; Peacock, Frank W; McMurray, John J; Bueno, Héctor; Christ, Michael; Maisel, Alan S; Cullen, Louise; Cowie, Martin R; Di Somma, Salvatore; Martín Sánchez, Francisco J; Platz, Elke; Masip, Josep; Zeymer, Uwe; Vrints, Christiaan; Price, Susanna; Mebazaa, Alexander; Mueller, Christian

    2016-02-21

    Heart failure is a global public health challenge frequently presenting to the emergency department. After initial stabilization and management, one of the most important decisions is to determine which patients can be safely discharged and which require hospitalization. This is a complex decision that depends on numerous subjective factors, including both the severity of the patient's underlying condition and an estimate of the acuity of the presentation. An emergency department observation period may help select the correct option. Ideally, during an observation period, risk stratification should be carried out using parameters specifically designed for use in the emergency department. Unfortunately, there is little objective literature to guide this disposition decision. An objective and reliable definition of low-risk characteristics to identify early discharge candidates is needed. Benchmarking outcomes in patients discharged from the emergency department without hospitalization could aid this process. Biomarker determinations, although undoubtedly useful in establishing diagnosis and predicting longer-term prognosis, require prospective validation for emergency department disposition guidance. The challenge of identifying emergency department acute heart failure discharge candidates will only be overcome by future multidisciplinary research defining the current knowledge gaps and identifying potential solutions.

  7. Effectiveness of acute geriatric units on functional decline, living at home, and case fatality among older patients admitted to hospital for acute medical disorders: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-García, Francisco M; López-Arrieta, Jesús; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of acute geriatric units compared with conventional care units in adults aged 65 or more admitted to hospital for acute medical disorders. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library up to 31 August 2008, and references from published literature. Review methods Randomised trials, non-randomised trials, and case-control studies were included. Exclusions were studies based on administrative databases, those that assessed care for a single disorder, those that evaluated acute and subacute care units, and those in which patients were admitted to the acute geriatric unit after three or more days of being admitted to hospital. Two investigators independently selected the studies and extracted the data. Results 11 studies were included of which five were randomised trials, four non-randomised trials, and two case-control studies. The randomised trials showed that compared with older people admitted to conventional care units those admitted to acute geriatric units had a lower risk of functional decline at discharge (combined odds ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.99) and were more likely to live at home after discharge (1.30, 1.11 to 1.52), with no differences in case fatality (0.83, 0.60 to 1.14). The global analysis of all studies, including non-randomised trials, showed similar results. Conclusions Care of people aged 65 or more with acute medical disorders in acute geriatric units produces a functional benefit compared with conventional hospital care, and increases the likelihood of living at home after discharge. PMID:19164393

  8. Implementing Patient-Oriented Discharge Summaries (PODS): A Multisite Pilot Across Early Adopter Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Okrainec, Karen; Damba, Cynthia; Huynh, Tai; Lau, Davina; Maxwell, Joanne; McGuire, Ryan; Yang, Lily; Abrams, Howard B

    2016-01-01

    Communication gaps when patients transition from hospital to either home or community can be problematic. Partnership between Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (TC LHIN) and OpenLab addressed this through the Patient-Oriented Discharge Summaries (PODS) project. From January through March 2015, eight hospital departments across Toronto came together to implement the PODS, a tool previously developed through a co-design process involving patients, caregivers and providers. This paper presents data on how the hospitals came together and the impact of PODS on the patient and provider experience across these hospitals and discusses it implications.

  9. Troponin T: role in altering patient management and enabling earlier discharge from a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Owen, A; Khan, W; Griffiths, K D

    2001-03-01

    The use of troponin T to facilitate early patient discharge was investigated in a prospective study in a district general hospital. Troponin T was measured in 91 patients admitted over a period of 6 months with chest pain but without evidence of myocardial infarction. The main outcome measure was length of hospital stay. A negative troponin T was found in 70 patients. Fifty of these were discharged within 24 h of the troponin result being available and they had a significantly shorter hospital stay than a case control group and a historical control group from the previous 6 months. Troponin T measurement has a role in altering patient management by enabling early discharge, resulting in significant cost savings and increasing bed availability.

  10. Patient and carer experience of hospital-based rehabilitation from intensive care to hospital discharge: mixed methods process evaluation of the RECOVER randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Merriweather, Judith; Salisbury, Lisa; Rattray, Janice; Griffith, David; Walsh, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore and compare patient/carer experiences of rehabilitation in the intervention and usual care arms of the RECOVER trial (ISRCTN09412438); a randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention of post-intensive care unit (ICU) acute hospital-based rehabilitation following critical illness. Design Mixed methods process evaluation including comparison of patients' and carers' experience of usual care versus the complex intervention. We integrated and compared quantitative data from a patient experience questionnaire (PEQ) with qualitative data from focus groups with patients and carers. Setting Two university-affiliated hospitals in Scotland. Participants 240 patients discharged from ICU who required ≥48 hours of mechanical ventilation were randomised into the trial (120 per trial arm). Exclusion criteria comprised: primary neurologic diagnosis, palliative care, current/planned home ventilation and age <18 years. 182 patients completed the PEQ at 3 months postrandomisation. 22 participants (14 patients and 8 carers) took part in focus groups (2 per trial group) at >3 months postrandomisation. Interventions A complex intervention of post-ICU acute hospital rehabilitation, comprising enhanced physiotherapy, nutritional care and information provision, case-managed by dedicated rehabilitation assistants (RAs) working within existing ward-based clinical teams, delivered between ICU discharge and hospital discharge. Comparator was usual care. Outcome measures A novel PEQ capturing patient-reported aspects of quality care. Results The PEQ revealed statistically significant between-group differences across 4 key intervention components: physiotherapy (p=0.039), nutritional care (p=0.038), case management (p=0.045) and information provision (p<0.001), suggesting greater patient satisfaction in the intervention group. Focus group data strongly supported and helped explain these findings. Specifically, case management by dedicated RAs facilitated

  11. Auto-selection of DRG codes from discharge summaries by text mining in several hospitals: analysis of difference of discharge summaries.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Doi, Shunsuke; Shimada, Gen; Takasaki, Mitsuhiro; Tamura, Toshiyo; Fujita, Shinsuke; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Recently, electronic medical record (EMR) systems have become popular in Japan, and number of discharge summaries is stored electronically, though they have not been reutilized yet. We performed text mining with Tf-idf method and morphological analysis in the discharge summaries from three Hospitals (Chiba University Hospital, St. Luke's International Hospital and Saga University Hospital). We showed differences in the styles of summaries, between hospitals, while the rate of properly classified DPC (Diagnosis Procedure Combination) codes were almost the same. Beyond different styles of the discharge summaries, text mining method could obtain proper extracts of proper DPC codes. Improvement was observed by using integrated model data between the hospitals. It seemed that huge database which contains the data of many hospitals can improve the precision of text mining.

  12. Nursing assistance at the hospital discharge after cardiac surgery: integrative review

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Daniela Fraga; Marques, Patrícia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to analyze the available evidence in the literature on nursing care in the hospital post-cardiac surgery. Data were collected from electronic databases LILACS, SciELO, MEDLINE, via DeCS thoracic surgery, hospital, nursing care, in the period 2001 to 2011. Ten articles were selected that showed the need to develop a plan of nursing discharge focusing on prevention of complications and coping with physical limitations resulting from heart surgery. Thus, the discharge should be considered from the time of admission, with carefully planned actions involving patient and family. PMID:24598961

  13. Clinical and Prognostic Significance of Positive Hepatojugular Reflux on Discharge in Acute Heart Failure: Insights from the ESCAPE Trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. There has been a decline in emphasis of the value of physical examination in heart failure (HF) with increased reliance on cardiac imaging. We aim to study the clinical and prognostic significance of positive hepatojugular reflux (HJR) on discharge in patients hospitalized with HF. Methods. Using the ESCAPE trial data, patients were compared according to the presence or absence of a positive HJR on discharge. The primary study endpoints were all-cause mortality and a composite endpoint of death, rehospitalization, and cardiac transplant during the first 6 months after discharge. Results. Among 392 patients (age: 56 years, 74% men), the HJR correlated well with clinical and objective hemodynamic markers of volume overload including right atrial pressure (RAP, P = 0.002), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP, P = 0.006), and inferior vena cava size during inspiration (P = 0.005) and expiration (P = 0.003). The RAP had the highest AUC for predicting a positive HJR on admission (AUC: 0.655, P = 0.004) and discharge (AUC: 0.672, P = 0.001). Cox's proportional hazards analysis revealed that a positive HJR on discharge is an independent predictor of 6-month mortality (estimated hazard ratio: 1.689; 95% CI: 1.032–2.764; P = 0.037) after adjusting for age, baseline creatinine, baseline hematocrit, baseline NYHA class, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the presence of tricuspid regurgitation. Conclusion. The HJR should be routinely checked in patients admitted with acute HF throughout hospitalization and especially on discharge as it serves as an important prognostic marker for postdischarge outcomes. PMID:28316980

  14. Perceived Pain and Satisfaction with Medical Rehabilitation after Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Bergés, Ivonne-Marie; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Smith, Pamela M.; Smith, David; Ostir, Glenn V.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between pain and satisfaction with medical rehabilitation in patients with hip or knee replacement approximately 90 days after discharge from in-patient medical rehabilitation. Design A cross-sectional design. Participants The sample included 2,507 patients with hip or knee replacement using information from the IT HealthTrack medical outcome database. Main outcome measure Satisfaction with medical rehabilitation. Results The average age was 70.2 years, 66.5% were female, and 88.5% were non-Hispanic white. Pain scores were significantly and inversely associated with satisfaction with medical rehabilitation after adjustment for possible confounding factors. In patients with hip replacement each one-point increase in pain score was associated with a 10% decreased odds ratio of being satisfied with medical rehabilitation (OR 0.90, 95 % CI: 0.84, 0.96). In patients with knee replacement, each one-point increase in pain score was associated with a 9% decreased odds ratio (OR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.87, 0.96) of being satisfied with medical rehabilitation. Conclusion Our data indicate that postoperative pain from hip or knee replacement is associated with reduced satisfaction with medical rehabilitation. Better post-operative pain control may improve a patient’s level of satisfaction. PMID:16944829

  15. The relationship between organizational culture and performance in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rowena; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw T O; Harrison, Stephen; Konteh, Fred; Walshe, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between senior management team culture and organizational performance in English acute hospitals (NHS Trusts) over three time periods between 2001/2002 and 2007/2008. We use a validated culture rating instrument, the Competing Values Framework, to measure senior management team culture. Organizational performance is assessed using a wide range of routinely collected indicators. We examine the associations between organizational culture and performance using ordered probit and multinomial logit models. We find that organizational culture varies across hospitals and over time, and this variation is at least in part associated in consistent and predictable ways with a variety of organizational characteristics and routine measures of performance. Moreover, hospitals are moving towards more competitive culture archetypes which mirror the current policy context, though with a stronger blend of cultures. The study provides evidence for a relationship between culture and performance in hospital settings.

  16. The Economic Crisis and Acute Myocardial Infarction: New Evidence Using Hospital-Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Maggioni, Aldo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Objective This research sought to assess whether and to what extent the ongoing economic crisis in Italy impacted hospitalizations, in-hospital mortality and expenditures associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods The data were obtained from the hospital discharge database of the Italian Health Ministry and aggregated at the hospital level. Each hospital (n = 549) was observed for 4 years and was geographically located within a “Sistema Locale del Lavoro” (SLL, i.e., clusters of neighboring towns with a common economic structure). For each SLL, the intensity of the crisis was determined, defined as the 2012–2008 increase in the area-specific unemployment rate. A difference-in-differences (DiD) approach was employed to compare the increases in AMI-related outcomes across different quintiles of crisis intensity. Results Hospitals located in areas with the highest intensity of crisis (in the fifth quintile) had an increase of approximately 30 AMI cases annually (approximately 13%) compared with hospitals in area with lower crisis intensities (p<0.001). A significant increase in total hospital days was observed (13%, p<0.001) in addition to in-hospital mortality (17%, p<0.001). As a consequence, an increase of around €350.000 was incurred in annual hospital expenditures for AMI (approximately 36%, p<0.001). Conclusions More attention should be given to the increase in health needs associated with the financial crisis. Policies aimed to contrast unemployment in the community by keeping and reintegrating workers in jobs could also have positive impacts on adverse health outcomes, especially in areas of high crisis intensity. PMID:26574745

  17. Secular trends in acute coronary syndrome hospitalization from 1994 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Dennis T; Newman, Alice M; Alter, David A; Austin, Peter C; Chiu, Maria; Cox, Jafna L; Goodman, Shaun G; Tu, Jack V

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is one of the most frequent reasons for hospitalization worldwide. Although substantial advances have been made in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease, their impact on the rates of ACS hospitalization is unclear. METHODS: Data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database were used to estimate secular trends in ACS hospitalization. A total of 1.3 million ACS hospitalizations in Canada from April 1, 1994, to March 31, 2006, were examined. Overall hospitalization rates were standardized for age and sex using 1991 Canadian census data, and hospitalization rates were also stratified by age group, sex and Canadian province to assess trends in each subgroup. RESULTS: The Canadian age- and sex-standardized ACS hospitalization rate was 508 per 100,000 persons in 1994, and 317 per 100,000 persons in 2005 – a relative reduction of 37.8% and an average annual relative reduction of 3.9% per year. Declines in ACS hospitalization rates were observed among men (annual relative reduction 3.9%, relative reduction 39.0%) and women (annual relative reduction 3.8%, relative reduction 35.8%). Declining trends were also observed among patients of different age groups and among patients hospitalized across all Canadian provinces. INTERPRETATION: Over the past decade, a substantial decline in ACS hospitalization rates occurred, which has not been previously observed. This finding is likely due to improvements in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. The present study’s data should provide important insights and guidance for future health care planning in Canada. PMID:20352132

  18. Examining Outcomes of Acute Psychiatric Hospitalization among Children

    PubMed Central

    Tharayil, Priya R.; Sigrid, James; Morgan, Ronald; Freeman, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Within the past two decades, few studies have examined outcomes of acute psychiatric hospitalization among children, demonstrating change in emotional and behavioral functioning. A secondary analysis of pre-test/post-test data collected on 36 children was conducted, using the Target Symptom Rating (TSR). The TSR is a 13-item measure with two subscales – Emotional Problems and Behavioral Problems and was designed for evaluation of outcome among children and adolescents in acute inpatient psychiatric settings. Results of this study, its limitations, and the barriers encountered in the implementation of the TSR scale as part of routine clinical practice are discussed. PMID:23946699

  19. Prevention of deterioration in acutely ill patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Steen, Colin

    The shift towards providing critical care in general wards has changed the way acutely ill patients are identified, treated and managed in hospital. This requires the expertise of knowledgeable, informed and capable staff. Effective education and appropriate knowledge and skills are required to aid identification of the deteriorating patient and provide prompt, timely and appropriate intervention to prevent further deterioration and possibly death. This article provides information about a systematic approach that will enable healthcare professionals to intervene to prevent deterioration in acutely ill patients.

  20. Acute care alternate-level-of-care days due to delayed discharge for traumatic and non-traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Amy, Chen; Zagorski, Brandon; Chan, Vincy; Parsons, Daria; Vander Laan, Rika; Colantonio, Angela

    2012-05-01

    Alternate-level-of-care (ALC) days represent hospital beds that are taken up by patients who would more appropriately be cared for in other settings. ALC days have been found to be costly and may result in worse functional outcomes, reduced motor skills and longer lengths of stay in rehabilitation. This study examines the factors that are associated with acute care ALC days among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). We used the Discharge Abstract Database to identify patients with ABI using International Classification of Disease-10 codes. From fiscal years 2007/08 to 2009/10, 17.5% of patients with traumatic and 14% of patients with non-traumatic brain injury had at least one ALC day. Significant predictors include having a psychiatric co-morbidity, increasing age and length of stay in acute care. These findings can inform planning for care of people with ABI in a publicly funded healthcare system.

  1. Readmission of older patients after hospital discharge for hip fracture: a multilevel approach

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Fátima de Lima; da Cunha, Geraldo Marcelo; Leite, Iúri da Costa; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Valente, Joaquim Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify individual and hospital characteristics associated with the risk of readmission in older inpatients for proximal femoral fracture in the period of 90 days after discharge. METHODS Deaths and readmissions were obtained by a linkage of databases of the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System and the System of Information on Mortality of the city of Rio de Janeiro from 2008 to 2011. The population of 3,405 individuals aged 60 or older, with non-elective hospitalization for proximal femoral fracture was followed for 90 days after discharge. Cox multilevel model was used for discharge time until readmission, and the characteristics of the patients were used on the first level and the characteristics of the hospitals on the second level. RESULTS The risk of readmission was higher for men (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37; 95%CI 1.08–1.73), individuals more than 79 years old (HR = 1.45; 95%CI 1.06–1.98), patients who were hospitalized for more than two weeks (HR = 1.33; 95%CI 1.06-1.67), and for those who underwent arthroplasty when compared with the ones who underwent osteosynthesis (HR = 0.57; 95%CI 0.41–0.79). Besides, patients admitted to state hospitals had lower risk for readmission when compared with inpatients in municipal (HR = 1.71; 95%CI 1.09–2.68) and federal hospitals (HR = 1.81; 95%CI 1.00–3.27). The random effect of the hospitals in the adjusted model remained statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Hospitals have complex structures that reflect in the quality of care. Thus, we propose that future studies may include these complexities and the severity of the patients in the analysis of the data, also considering the correlation between readmission and mortality to reduce biases. PMID:27143616

  2. 76 FR 19365 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2011 Final Wage Indices...), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice contains the final fiscal year (FY) 2011 wage indices and... the expiration date for certain geographic reclassifications and special exception wage...

  3. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  4. In-hospital versus post discharge adverse events following carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fokkema, M; Bensley, RP; Lo, RC; Hamdan, AD; Wyers, MC; Moll, FL; de Borst, GJ; Schermerhorn, ML

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and objectives Most studies based on state and nation-wide registries evaluating perioperative outcome after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) rely on hospital discharge data only. Therefore, the true 30-day complication risk after carotid revascularization may be underestimated. Methods We used the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database 2005–2010 to assess the in-hospital and post discharge rate of any stroke, death, cardiac event (new Q-wave MI or cardiac arrest), combined stroke/death and combined adverse outcome (S/D/CE) at 30 days following CEA. Multivariable analyses were used to identify predictors for in-hospital and post discharge events separately, and in particular, those that predict post discharge events distinctly. Results A total of 35,916 patients who underwent CEA during 2005–2010 were identified in the NSQIP database. 59% were male (median age 72 years) and 44% had a previous neurologic event. Thirty-day stroke rate was 1.6% (n=591), death rate was 0.8% (n=272), cardiac event rate was 1.0% (n=350), stroke or death rate was 2.2% (n=794) and combined S/D/CE rate was 2.9% (n=1043). 33% of strokes, 53% of deaths, 32% of cardiac events, 40% of combined stroke/death and 38% of combined S/D/CE took place after hospital discharge. Patients with a prior stroke or TIA had similar proportions of post discharge events as compared to patients without prior symptoms. Independent predictors for post discharge events, but not for in-hospital events were female gender (stroke [OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.1] and stroke/death [OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.7]), renal failure (stroke [OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4–6.2]) and COPD (stroke/death [OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4–2.4] and S/D/CE [OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4–2.3]). Conclusions With 38% of perioperative adverse events after CEA happening post hospitalization, regardless of symptoms status, we need to be alert to the ongoing risks after discharge particularly in women, patients with renal failure, or a history

  5. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation.

  6. Relationship Between Quality of Care for Hospitalized Vulnerable Elders and Post-Discharge Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vineet M.; Fish, Melissa; Basu, Anirban; Olson, Jared; Plein, Colleen; Suresh, Kalpana; Sachs, Greg; Meltzer, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relationship between quality of hospital care, as measured by ACOVE quality indicators, and post-discharge mortality for hospitalized seniors. Design Observational cohort study Setting Single academic medical center Participants Patients age 65 and over who were identified as “vulnerable” using the Vulnerable Elder Survey (VES-13) Measurements Adherence to 16 ACOVE measures through chart audit; Post-discharge mortality obtained through Social Security Death Index Results 856 inpatient vulnerable elders were enrolled. Mean quality of care score was 59.5% (SD 19.2) and 495 (26.7%) died within one year of discharge. In multivariate logistic regression, controlling for sociodemographic and disease severity variables (Charlson comorbidity score, VES-13 score, number of quality indicators triggered, length of stay, baseline ADL limitations, code status), higher quality of care appeared to be associated with a lower risk of death at one year. For each 10% increase in quality score, patients were 7% less likely to die [OR 0.93 (0.87-1.00), p=0.045]. In Cox proportional hazard models, those hospitalized patients receiving quality of care better than the median quality score were less likely to die 1 year period post-discharge [HR 0.82, 95% CI (0.68-1.00), p=0.05]. Those patients that received a nutritional status assessment were less likely to die one year after discharge [HR 0.61, 95% CI (0.40-0.93), p=0.022]. Conclusion Higher quality of care for hospitalized seniors, as measured by ACOVE measures, may be associated with a lower likelihood of death 1 year after discharge. Given these findings, future work testing interventions to improve adherence to these quality indicators is warranted. PMID:20863323

  7. The role of rhinovirus in children hospitalized for acute respiratory disease, Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Juan Manuel; Molina, Fabiana; Díaz, Rocío; Bonet, Virginia; Ortellao, Lucila; Cantarutti, Diego; Gómez, Alejandra; Pierini, Judith; Cociglio, Raquel; Kusznierz, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were historically considered upper airway pathogens. However, they have recently been proven to cause infections in the lower respiratory tract, resulting in hospitalization of children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and chronic pulmonary obstruction. In this report, HRV frequency and seasonality are described together with patient clinical-epidemiological aspects. From a total of 452 surveyed samples, the HRV nucleic acids was detected in 172 (38.1%) and found in every month of the study year. 60% of inpatients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) associated with HRV were under 6 months of age and 31% had a clinical history, being preterm birth and recurrent wheezing the prevailing conditions. The most frequent discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (35.2%), bronchiolitis (32.4%), and bronchitis (12.4%). Fifteen point nine percent of patients required admission into intensive care units. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the association between HRV and children hospitalizations caused by ARI.

  8. Pharmaceutical orientation at hospital discharge of transplant patients: strategy for patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Lívia Falcão; Martins, Bruna Cristina Cardoso; de Oliveira, Francisco Roberto Pereira; Cavalcante, Rafaela Michele de Andrade; Magalhães, Vanessa Pinto; Firmino, Paulo Yuri Milen; Adriano, Liana Silveira; da Silva, Adriano Monteiro; Flor, Maria Jose Nascimento; Néri, Eugenie Desirée Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe and analyze the pharmaceutical orientation given at hospital discharge of transplant patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive and retrospective study that used records of orientation given by the clinical pharmacist in the inpatients unit of the Kidney and Liver Transplant Department, at Hospital Universitário Walter Cantídio, in the city of Fortaleza (CE), Brazil, from January to July, 2014. The following variables recorded at the Clinical Pharmacy Database were analyzed according to their significance and clinical outcomes: pharmaceutical orientation at hospital discharge, drug-related problems and negative outcomes associated with medication, and pharmaceutical interventions performed. Results: The first post-transplant hospital discharge involved the entire multidisciplinary team and the pharmacist was responsible for orienting about drug therapy. The mean hospital discharges/month with pharmaceutical orientation during the study period was 10.6±1.3, totaling 74 orientations. The prescribed drug therapy had a mean of 9.1±2.7 medications per patient. Fifty-nine drug-related problems were identified, in which 67.8% were related to non-prescription of medication needed, resulting in 89.8% of risk of negative outcomes associated with medications due to untreated health problems. The request for inclusion of drugs (66.1%) was the main intervention, and 49.2% of the medications had some action in the digestive tract or metabolism. All interventions were classified as appropriate, and 86.4% of them we able to prevent negative outcomes. Conclusion: Upon discharge of a transplanted patient, the orientation given by the clinical pharmacist together with the multidisciplinary team is important to avoid negative outcomes associated with drug therapy, assuring medication reconciliation and patient safety. PMID:27759824

  9. Prediction of destination at discharge from a comprehensive rehabilitation hospital using the home care score

    PubMed Central

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Tani, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Nami; Yamashita, Akira; Mori, Nobuhiko; Oku, Kosuke; Murakami, Yoshikazu; Nomura, Shohei; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether it is possible to predict return to home at discharge from a rehabilitation hospital in Japan using the home care score of patients with cerebrovascular or osteoarticular disease and low activities of daily living at admission. [Subjects and Methods] The home care score and functional independent measurement were determined for 226 patients at admission and at discharge from five hospitals, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were conducted. [Results] The home care score cutoff point for the prediction of return to home at admission and at discharge was 11, and the area under the curve was more than 0.8. The area under the curve of the home care score was 0.77 for patients with low activities of daily living and within this group, the probability of return to home was approximately 50%, as predicted by the functional independent measurement. The home care score increased after receiving intervention at a rehabilitation hospital. [Conclusion] The home care score is useful for the prediction of return to home from a rehabilitation hospital, although prediction using the functional independent measurement is difficult for patients with low activities of daily living. Moreover, comprehensive interventions provided by the rehabilitation hospitals improve the ability to provide home care of the patient’s family, which is assessed by the home care score. PMID:27821925

  10. Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infection in MRSA-colonized patients discharged from a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    PubMed

    Cadena, J; Richardson, A M; Frei, C R

    2016-02-01

    Currently, limited studies have quantified the risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) for MRSA-colonized patients on discharge from hospital. Our retrospective, case-control study identified independent risk factors for the development of MRSA SSTIs among such patients detected by active MRSA nasal screening in an acute care hospital by PCR on admission, and bacteriological cultures on discharge. Cases were MRSA-colonized patients aged ⩾18 years who developed a MRSA SSTI post-discharge and controls were those who did not develop a MRSA SSTI post-discharge. Controls were matched to cases by length of follow-up (±10 days) for up to 18 months. Potential demographic and clinical risk factors for MRSA infection were identified using electronic queries and manual chart abstraction; data were compared by standard statistical tests and variables with P values ⩽0·05 in bivariable analysis were entered into a logistic regression model. Multivariable analysis demonstrated prior hospital admission within 12 months (P = 0·02), prior MRSA infection (P = 0·05), and previous myocardial infarction (P = 0·01) were independently predictive of a MRSA SSTI post-discharge. Identification of MRSA colonization upon admission and recognition of risk factors could help identify a high-risk population that could benefit from MRSA SSTI prevention strategies.

  11. Reducing Length of Acute Inpatient Hospitalization Using a Residential Step Down Model for Patients with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Zarzar, Theodore; Sheitman, Brian; Cook, Alan; Robbins, Brian

    2017-02-23

    Psychiatric inpatient bed numbers have been markedly reduced in recent decades often resulting in long emergency department wait times for acutely ill psychiatric patients. The authors describe a model utilizing short-term residential treatment to substitute for acute inpatient care when the barrier to discharge for patients with serious mental illness (SMI) is finding appropriate community placement. Thirty-eight patients (community hospital (n = 30) and a state hospital (n = 8)) were included. Clinical variables, pre-/post-step down length of stay, and adverse outcomes are reported. Thirty of the 38 patients completed treatment on the residential unit and were discharged to the community. Five of the patients required readmission to an inpatient unit and the other three had pre-planned state hospital discharges. The majority of patients with SMI awaiting placement can be stepped down to residential treatment, potentially freeing up an inpatient bed for an acutely ill patient. Reforms in healthcare funding are necessary to incentivize such an approach on a larger scale, despite likely cost savings.

  12. Recording of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of COPD in UK electronic health care records

    PubMed Central

    Rothnie, Kieran J; Müllerová, Hana; Thomas, Sara L; Chandan, Joht S; Smeeth, Liam; Hurst, John R; Davis, Kourtney; Quint, Jennifer K

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate identification of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) within electronic health care records is important for research, public health, and to inform health care utilization and service provision. We aimed to develop a strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in secondary care data and to investigate the validity of strategies to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in primary care data. Methods We identified patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) with linked Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data. We used discharge summaries for recent hospitalizations for AECOPD to develop a strategy to identify the recording of hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES. We then used the HES strategy as a reference standard to investigate the positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of strategies for identifying AECOPD using general practice CPRD data. We tested two strategies: 1) codes for hospitalization for AECOPD and 2) a code for AECOPD other than hospitalization on the same day as a code for hospitalization due to unspecified reason. Results In total, 27,182 patients with COPD were included. Our strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES had a sensitivity of 87.5%. When compared with HES, using a code suggesting hospitalization for AECOPD in CPRD resulted in a PPV of 50.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 48.5%–51.8%) and a sensitivity of 4.1% (95% CI 3.9%–4.3%). Using a code for AECOPD and a code for hospitalization due to unspecified reason resulted in a PPV of 43.3% (95% CI 42.3%–44.2%) and a sensitivity of 5.4% (95% CI 5.1%–5.7%). Conclusion Hospitalization for AECOPD can be identified with high sensitivity in the HES database. The PPV and sensitivity of strategies to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in primary care data alone are very poor. Primary care data alone should not be used to identify

  13. [The Health Department of Sicily "Regional recommendations for hospital discharge and communication with patients after admission due to a cardiologic event" decree].

    PubMed

    Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe; De Luca, Giovanni; Gabriele, Michele; Tourkmani, Nidal

    2014-06-01

    Mortality and rehospitalizations still remain high after discharge for an acute cardiologic event. In this context, hospital discharge represents a potential pitfall for heart disease patients. In the setting of care transitions, the discharge letter is the main instrument of communication between hospital and primary care. Communication, besides, is an integral part of high-quality, patient-centered interventions aimed at improving the discharge process. Inadequate information at discharge significantly affects the quality of treatment compliance and the adoption of lifestyle modifications for an effective secondary prevention. The Health Department of Sicily, in 2013, established a task force with the aim to elaborate "Regional recommendations for hospital discharge and communication with patients after admission due to a cardiologic event", inviting to participate GICR-IACPR and many other scientific societies of cardiology and primary care, as discharge letter and communication are fundamental junctions of care transitions in cardiology. These recommendations have been published as a specific decree and contain: a structured model of discharge letter, which includes all of the parameters characterizing patients at high clinical risk, high thrombotic risk and low risk according to the Consensus document ANMCO/GICR-IACPR/GISE; is thus possible to identify these patients, choosing consequently the most appropriate follow-up pathways. A particular attention has been given to the "Medication Reconciliation" and to the identification of therapeutic targets; an educational Kit, with different forms on cardiac diseases, risk factors, drugs and lifestyle; a check-list about information given to the patient and caregivers. The "Recommendations" represent, in conclusion, the practical realization of the fruitful cooperation between scientific societies and political-administrative institutions that has been realized in Sicily in the last years.

  14. Going home? An ethnographic study of assessment of capacity and best interests in people with dementia being discharged from hospital

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant proportion of patients in an acute hospital is made up of older people, many of whom have cognitive impairment or dementia. Rightly or wrongly, if a degree of confusion is apparent, it is often questioned whether the person is able to return to the previous place of residence. We wished to understand how, on medical wards, judgements about capacity and best interests with respect to going home are made for people with dementia and how decision-making around hospital discharge for people with dementia and their families might be improved. Our research reflects the jurisdiction in which we work, but the importance of residence capacity rests on its implications for basic human rights. Methods The research employed a ward-based ethnography. Observational data were captured through detailed fieldnotes, in-depth interviews, medical-record review and focus groups. Themes and key issues were identified using constant comparative analysis of 29 cases. Theoretical sampling of key stakeholders was undertaken, including patients with dementia (with and without residence capacity), their relatives and a range of practitioners. The research was carried out in three hospital wards (acute and rehabilitation) in two hospitals within two National Health Service (NHS) healthcare trusts in the North of England over a period of nine months between 2008 and 2009. Results Our analysis highlights the complexity of judgements about capacity and best interests in relation to decisions about place of residence for people with dementia facing discharge from hospital. Five key themes emerged from data: the complexity of borderline decisions; the requirement for better understanding of assessment approaches in relation to residence capacity; the need for better documentation; the importance of narrative; and the crucial relevance of time and timing in making these decisions. Conclusions We need: more support and training for practitioners, as well as support for

  15. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Wolf, Achim; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Larsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services. Method We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder) on outcomes. Results Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949) after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%), and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613) with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied—substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:27196309

  16. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  17. Predictors for nephrology outpatient care and recurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) after an in-hospital AKI episode.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingyang; Iqbal, Sameena

    2014-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased long-term risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and mortality. Nephrology care following discharge from hospital may improve survival through prevention of recurrent AKI events. In this study, we examined the factors that were associated with outpatient nephrology follow-up after the development of AKI on patients who had a nephrology in-hospital consultation and were discharged from McGill University Health Centre between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2010. The associated factors for AKI-free survival postdischarge were assessed applying multivariate Cox hazard proportional models. Of 170 patients, only 22% of the AKI admissions studied were booked with nephrology follow-up after discharge. The unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) of outpatient nephrology care postdischarge was 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-3.56) for AKI-free survival postdischarge. The adjusted HR was 2.04 (95% CI 1.01-4.12) when we adjusted for follow-up with other medical clinics, significant stage 4 and stage 5 chronic kidney disease and diabetes status. Patients with less comorbidities and higher serum creatinine on discharge received outpatient nephrology care. Nephrology outpatient care is associated with decreased risk of recurrence of AKI after discharge from hospital.

  18. Predicting Discharge Mortality after Acute Ischemic Stroke Using Balanced Data

    PubMed Central

    Ho, King Chung; Speier, William; El-Saden, Suzie; Liebeskind, David S.; Saver, Jeffery L.; Bui, Alex A. T.; Arnold, Corey W.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been developed to predict stroke outcomes (e.g., stroke mortality, patient dependence, etc.) in recent decades. However, there is little discussion regarding the problem of between-class imbalance in stroke datasets, which leads to prediction bias and decreased performance. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique to overcome such problems. We also compare state of the art machine learning methods and construct a six-variable support vector machine (SVM) model to predict stroke mortality at discharge. Finally, we discuss how the identification of a reduced feature set allowed us to identify additional cases in our research database for validation testing. Our classifier achieved a c-statistic of 0.865 on the cross-validated dataset, demonstrating good classification performance using a reduced set of variables. PMID:25954451

  19. POST DISCHARGE DROPOUT OF ALCOHOLICS - A NATURALISTIC STUDY IN A GENERAL HOSPITAL SETTING

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Somnath; Kar, N.; Sharma, P.S.V.N.; Rao, Gaunasagari

    2001-01-01

    In a naturalistic longitudinal design 133 consecutive inpatients with alcohol dependence syndrome were followed up for one year following discharge from the hospital. 59 patients (group 1) paid follow up visit at regular intervals whereas 28 subjects (group 2)never returned despite three consecutive postal intimations. Rest of the patient were irregular in follow up. The individuals in group 1 were compared with those in group 2 on various sociodemographic and clinical variables with the aim of delineating the characteristics that could define the alcoholics who dropped out following discharge. It was found that such patient were relatively younger with lower level of education, less frequently married, had earlier onset of problem drinking with poor social support and higher rates of mental problems. It was concluded that post discharge attrition of alcoholics could be a social as well as a clinical problem in any setting rendering long treatment for alcoholism. PMID:21407859

  20. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  1. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  2. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  3. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  4. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  5. Patient outcomes following discharge from secure psychiatric hospitals: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Cocks, Christopher; Coid, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background Secure hospitals are a high-cost, low-volume service consuming around a fifth of the overall mental health budget in England and Wales. Aims A systematic review and meta-analysis of adverse outcomes after discharge along with a comparison with rates in other clinical and forensic groups in order to inform public health and policy. Method We searched for primary studies that followed patients discharged from a secure hospital, and reported mortality, readmissions or reconvictions. We determined crude rates for all adverse outcomes. Results In total, 35 studies from 10 countries were included, involving 12 056 patients out of which 53% were violent offenders. The crude death rate for all-cause mortality was 1538 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 1175–1901). For suicide, the crude death rate was 325 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 235–415). The readmission rate was 7208 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 5916–8500). Crude reoffending rates were 4484 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 3679–5287), with lower rates in more recent studies. Conclusions There is some evidence that patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services have lower offending outcomes than many comparative groups. Services could consider improving interventions aimed at reducing premature mortality, particularly suicide, in discharged patients. PMID:26729842

  6. Hospital discharge records under-report the prevalence of diabetes in inpatients.

    PubMed

    Carral, Florentino; Olveira, Gabriel; Aguilar, Manuel; Ortego, José; Gavilán, Inmaculada; Doménech, Inmaculada; Escobar, Luis

    2003-02-01

    The objective of our study was to estimate the hospital inpatient prevalence of diabetes mellitus in a Spanish tertiary care teaching hospital. We analyzed a cohort of 1036 patients consecutively admitted over a 7-day period to our hospital. We classified this total of hospitalized patients based on information obtained from individual analysis of medical history and values of plasma glucose after fasting, into groups with the following conditions: recognized diabetes, unrecognized diabetes, other hyperglycaemic situations, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or non diabetes. One hundred and seventy-eight patients were estimated to have diabetes (total prevalence: 17.2%), including 158 patients with recognized diabetes and 20 patients with diabetes unrecognized before admission. Additionally, 25 patients were considered to have other hyperglycaemic situations and 20 patients were estimated to have IFG. The mean age of the diabetic patients was 65+/-13.7 years (50.5% men), and 94.4% had type 2 diabetes. Diabetes disproportionately affects the elderly inpatient, with a prevalence of 30.9% in people older than 64 years. Of the total number of patients with diabetes, only 144 (diabetes prevalence: 13.8%) were registered in hospital discharge records as having diabetes. We conclude that the extent of hospital diabetes prevalence considerably exceeds levels reported in the literature, suggesting that true diabetes prevalence in hospitals could be significantly under-reported, resulting in a serious underestimate of required expenditures.

  7. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  8. [Effect of a Discharge Planning Educational Program in a University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shima; Ohori, Yoko; Tanaka, Yuko; Sato, Yukiko; Watanabe, Ami; Fujii, Junko

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a discharge planning educational program on multidisciplinary team staff in a community. We provided training to nurses of a university hospital. The training covered an introduction to discharge planning, decision-making support, home care medicine and home nursing care, the medical social welfare system, and case review meetings. It was conducted every year from September through February between 2012 and 2015. Before and after the training, the awareness of nurses was evaluated by using self-administered questionnaires and the Discharge Planning scale for Ward Nurses(DPWN), and discharge planning satisfaction was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The study process was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of Tokyo Women's Medical University. The questionnaires were distributed to 96 nurses; of these, responses of 72 nurses(pre- and post-training)were analyzed(response rate: 75.0%). The average number of years of nursing experience was 8.5± 7.7. The total score of the DPWN and its subscales, as well as the VAS, with regard to satisfaction level significantly increased after the training(p<0.01), indicating that training improved nurses' awareness of discharge planning practices.

  9. Hospitals as a `risk environment: An ethno-epidemiological study of voluntary and involuntary discharge from hospital against medical advice among people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Ryan; Small, Will; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) experience high levels of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C (HCV) infection that, together with injection-related complications such as non-fatal overdose and injection-related infections, lead to frequent hospitalizations. However, injection drug-using populations are among those most likely to be discharged from hospital against medical advice, which significantly increases their likelihood of hospital readmission, longer overall hospital stays, and death. In spite of this, little research has been undertaken examining how social-structural forces operating within hospital settings shape the experiences of PWID in receiving care in hospitals and contribute to discharges against medical advice. This ethno-epidemiological study was undertaken in Vancouver, Canada to explore how the social-structural dynamics within hospitals function to produce discharges against medical advice among PWID. In-depth interviews were conducted with thirty PWID recruited from among participants in ongoing observational cohort studies of people who inject drugs who reported that they had been discharged from hospital against medical advice within the previous two years. Data were analyzed thematically, and by drawing on the `Risk Environment' framework and concepts of social violence. Our findings illustrate how intersecting social and structural factors led to inadequate pain and withdrawal management, which led to continued drug use in hospital settings. In turn, diverse forms of social control operating to regulate and prevent drug use in hospital settings amplified drug-related risks and increased the likelihood of discharge against medical advice. Given the significant morbidity and health care costs associated with discharge against medical advice among drug-using populations, there is an urgent need to reshape the social-structural contexts of hospital care for PWID by shifting emphasis toward evidence-based pain and drug treatment augmented by harm

  10. The need for industry and occupation standards in hospital discharge data.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer A; Frey, Leslie T

    2013-05-01

    Occupational injuries and illnesses affect the productivity of the U.S. workforce, yet public health surveillance in the United States does not adequately track and report these incidents. Adding industry and occupation standards to US hospital data collection would enable physicians, researchers, and payors to accurately account for occupational injuries and illnesses as well as support prevention initiatives. The authors petitioned for the inclusion of standards for industry and occupation within hospital data; however, additional support from the occupational and environmental health community is needed to move the petition to adoption. This article discusses the policy implications and benefits to occupational medicine and public health provided by collecting industry and occupation in hospital discharge data, as well as the process of initiating a data change request with the National Uniform Billing Committee.

  11. High Prevalence of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Hospitalized Acute Heart Failure Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Pedro; Timenetsky, Karina T.; Casalaspo, Thaisa Juliana André; Gonçalves, Louise Helena Rodrigues; Yang, Angela Shu Yun; Eid, Raquel Caserta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Muscle Weakness (RMW) has been defined when the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is lower than 70% of the predictive value. The prevalence of RMW in chronic heart failure patients is 30 to 50%. So far there are no studies on the prevalence of RMW in acute heart failure (AHF) patients. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence of RMW in patients admitted because of AHF and the condition of respiratory muscle strength on discharge from the hospital. Methods Sixty-three patients had their MIP measured on two occasions: at the beginning of the hospital stay, after they had reached respiratory, hemodynamic and clinical stability and before discharge from the hospital. The apparatus and technique to measure MIP were adapted because of age-related limitations of the patients. Data on cardiac ejection fraction, ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and on the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) were collected. Results The mean age of the 63 patients under study was 75 years. On admission the mean ejection fraction was 33% (95% CI: 31–35) and the BNP hormone median value was 726.5 pg/ml (range: 217 to 2283 pg/ml); 65% of the patients used NIV. The median value of MIP measured after clinical stabilization was -52.7 cmH2O (range: -20 to -120 cmH2O); 76% of the patients had MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. On discharge, after a median hospital stay of 11 days, the median MIP was -53.5 cmH2O (range:-20 to -150 cmH2O); 71% of the patients maintained their MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. The differences found were not statistically significant. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted with AHF may present a high prevalence of RMW on admission; this condition may be maintained at similar levels on discharge in a large percentage of these patients, even after clinical stabilization of the heart condition. PMID:25671566

  12. Don't let go of the rope: reducing readmissions by recognizing hospitals' fiduciary duties to their discharged patients.

    PubMed

    Hafemeister, Thomas L; Hinckley Porter, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    In the early years of the twenty-first century, it was widely speculated that massive, multi-purpose hospitals were becoming the "dinosaurs" of health care, to be largely replaced by community-based clinics providing specialty services on an outpatient basis. Hospitals, however, have roared back to life, in part by reworking their business model. There has been a wave of consolidations and acquisitions (including acquisitions of community-based clinics), with deals valued at $7.9 billion in 2011, the most in a decade, and the number of deals increasing another 18% in 2012. The costs of hospital care are enormous, with 31.5% ($851 billion) of the total health expenditures in the United States in 2011 devoted to these services. Hospitals are (1) placing growing emphasis on increasing revenue and decreasing costs; (2) engaging in pervasive marketing campaigns encouraging patients to view hospitals as an all-purpose care provider; (3) geographically targeting the expansion of their services to "capture" well-insured patients, while placing greater pressure on patients to pay for the services delivered; (4) increasing their size, wealth, and clout, with two-thirds of hospitals undertaking renovations or additional construction and smaller hospitals being squeezed out, and (5) expanding their use of hospital-employed physicians, rather than relying on community-based physicians with hospital privileges, and exercising greater control over medical staff. Hospitals have become so pivotal in the U.S. healthcare system that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) frequently targeted them as a vehicle to enhance patient safety and control escalating health care costs. One such provision--the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, which goes into effect in fiscal year 2013--will reduce payments ordinarily made to hospitals if they have an "excess readmission" rate. It is estimated that adverse events following a hospital discharge impact as many as 19

  13. The Identification of Seniors at Risk (ISAR) score to predict clinical outcomes and health service costs in older people discharged from UK acute medical units

    PubMed Central

    Edmans, Judi; Bradshaw, Lucy; Gladman, John R. F.; Franklin, Matthew; Berdunov, Vladislav; Elliott, Rachel; Conroy, Simon P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: tools are required to identify high-risk older people in acute emergency settings so that appropriate services can be directed towards them. Objective: to evaluate whether the Identification of Seniors At Risk (ISAR) predicts the clinical outcomes and health and social services costs of older people discharged from acute medical units. Design: an observational cohort study using receiver–operator curve analysis to compare baseline ISAR to an adverse clinical outcome at 90 days (where an adverse outcome was any of death, institutionalisation, hospital readmission, increased dependency in activities of daily living (decrease of 2 or more points on the Barthel ADL Index), reduced mental well-being (increase of 2 or more points on the 12-point General Health Questionnaire) or reduced quality of life (reduction in the EuroQol-5D) and high health and social services costs over 90 days estimated from routine electronic service records. Setting: two acute medical units in the East Midlands, UK. Participants: a total of 667 patients aged ≥70 discharged from acute medical units. Results: an adverse outcome at 90 days was observed in 76% of participants. The ISAR was poor at predicting adverse outcomes (AUC: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.54–0.65) and fair for health and social care costs (AUC: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.59–0.81). Conclusions: adverse outcomes are common in older people discharged from acute medical units in the UK; the poor predictive ability of the ISAR in older people discharged from acute medical units makes it unsuitable as a sole tool in clinical decision-making. PMID:23666405

  14. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  15. Assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke in China: Findings from the China National Stroke Registry II.

    PubMed

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Li, Zixiao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Xingquan; Li, Hao; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Chunjuan; Meng, Xia; Wang, Anxin; Pan, Yuesong; Peterson, Eric D; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Background Stroke rehabilitation improves functional recovery among stroke patients. However, little is known about clinical practice in China regarding the assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients with acute ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the frequency and determinants of an assessment for rehabilitation among acute ischemic stroke patients from the China National Stroke Registry II. Methods Data for 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to 219 hospitals from June 2012 to January 2013 were analyzed. The multivariable logistic regression model with the generalized estimating equation method accounting for in-hospital clustering was used to identify patient and hospital factors associated with having a rehabilitation assessment during the acute hospitalization. Results Among 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients, 11,451 (59.4%) were assessed for rehabilitation. Rates of rehabilitation assessment varied among 219 hospitals (IQR 41.4% vs 81.5%). In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with increased likelihood of a rehabilitation assessment ( p < 0.05) included disability prior to stroke, higher NIHSS on admission, receipt of a dysphagia screen, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, carotid vessel imaging, longer length of stay, and treatment at a hospital with a higher number of hospital beds (per 100 units). In contrast, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and hospitals with higher number of annual stroke discharges (per 100 patients) were less likely to receive rehabilitation assessment during the acute stroke hospitalization. Conclusions Rehabilitation assessment among acute ischemic stroke patients was suboptimal in China. Rates varied considerably among hospitals and support the need to improve adherence to recommended care for stroke survivors.

  16. Outcomes associated with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder requiring hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S; Rajesh, BP; Chaudhury, Alisha; Hattiholi, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (AECOPD) are known to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality and have a significant socioeconomic impact. The factors that determine frequent hospital readmissions for AECOPD are poorly understood. The present study was done to ascertain failures rates following AECOPD and to evaluate factors associated with frequent readmissions. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 186 patients with COPD with one or more admissions for acute exacerbations in a tertiary care hospital. Frequency of previous re-admissions for AECOPD in the past year, and clinical characteristics, including spirometry were ascertained in the stable state both before discharge and at 6-month post-discharge. Failure rates following treatment were ascertained during the follow-up period. All the patients were followed up for a period of 2 years after discharge to evaluate re-admissions for the AECOPD. Results: Of 186 COPD patients admitted for AECOPD, 54% had one or more readmission, and another 45% had two or more readmissions over a period of 2 years. There was a high prevalence of current or ex-heavy smokers, associated co-morbidity, underweight patients, low vaccination prevalence and use of domiciliary oxygen therapy among COPD patients. A total of 12% mortality was observed in the present study. Immediate failure rates after first exacerbation was observed to be 34.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that duration >20 years (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.10-0.86), use of Tiotropium (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12-4.69) and use of co-amoxiclav during first admission (OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.21-4.79) were significantly associated with higher immediate failure rates. The multivariate analysis for repeated admissions revealed that disease duration >10 years (OR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.27-0.93), low usage of inhaled ICS + LABA (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.08-4.54), and MRC dyspnea grade >3 (OR = 2.51; 95% CI: 1.08-5.82) were

  17. Successful provision of inter-hospital extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for acute post-partum pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; Laurie, J; Janssens, S; Zazulak, C; Kotze, P; Shekar, K

    2017-01-09

    Mortality during pregnancy in a well-resourced setting is rare, but acute pulmonary embolism is one of the leading causes. We present the successful use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) in a 22-year old woman who experienced cardiopulmonary collapse following urgent caesarean section in the setting of a sub-massive pulmonary embolus. Resources and personnel to perform eCPR were not available at the maternity hospital and were recruited from an adjacent pediatric hospital. Initial care used low blood flow extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with pediatric ECMO circuitry, which was optimized when the team from a nearby adult cardiac hospital arrived. Following ECMO support, the patient experienced massive hemorrhage which was managed with uterotonic agents, targeted transfusion, bilateral uterine artery embolisation and abdominal re-exploration. The patient was transferred to an adult unit where she remained on ECMO for five days. She was discharged home with normal cognitive function. This case highlights the role ECMO plays in providing extracorporeal respiratory or mechanical circulatory support in a high risk obstetric patient.

  18. Acute myocardial infarction hospitalization statistics: apparent decline accompanying an increase in smoke-free areas.

    PubMed

    Villalbí, Joan R; Castillo, Antonia; Cleries, Montse; Saltó, Esteve; Sánchez, Emília; Martínez, Rosa; Tresserras, Ricard; Vela, Emili

    2009-07-01

    Recent research suggests that the introduction of antismoking regulations reduces the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to analyze changes in AMIs in the Barcelona metropolitan area in Spain following implementation of the 2006 antismoking law. Data was collected on all discharges from hospitals funded by the Catalan Health Service in 2004-2006. All patients aged over 24 years who lived in the area and who received a primary diagnosis of AMI were included. Annual AMI hospitalization rates, with 95% confidence intervals, were estimated for each year and stratified according to age and sex. The 2004 rate was higher than the 2005 rate for most age and sex groups, though confidence intervals overlapped. The 2006 rates were lower than the 2005 rates for all age groups, and there was no overlap in confidence intervals in men. In conclusion, the introduction of regulations on smoke-free areas was accompanied by a reduction in the AMI hospitalization rate.

  19. National audit of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital. Standards of Care Committee, British Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain the standard of care for hospital management of acute severe asthma in adults. DESIGN--Questionnaire based retrospective multicentre survey of case records. SETTING--36 hospitals (12 teaching and 24 district general hospitals) across England, Wales, and Scotland. PATIENTS--All patients admitted with acute severe asthma between 1 August and 30 September 1990 immediately before publication of national guidelines for asthma management. MAIN MEASURES--Main recommendations of guidelines for hospital management of acute severe asthma as performed by respiratory and non-respiratory physicians. RESULTS--766 patients (median age 41 (range 16-94) years) were studied; 465 (63%) were female and 448 (61%) had had previous admissions for asthma. Deficiencies were evident for each aspect of care studied, and respiratory physicians performed better than non-respiratory physicians. 429 (56%) patients had had their treatment increased in the two weeks preceding the admission but only 237 (31%) were prescribed oral steroids. Initially 661/766 (86%) patients had peak expiratory flow measured and recorded but only 534 (70%) ever had arterial blood gas tensions assessed. 65 (8%) patients received no steroid treatment in the first 24 hours after admission. Variability of peak expiratory flow was measured before discharge in 597/759 (78%) patients, of whom 334 (56%) achieved good control (variability < 25%). 47 (6%) patients were discharged without oral or inhaled steroids; 182/743 (24%) had no planned outpatient follow up and 114 failed to attend, leaving 447 (60%) seen in clinic within two months. Only 57/629 (8%) patients were recorded as having a written management plan. CONCLUSIONS--The hospital management of a significant minority of patients deviates from recommended national standards and some deviations are potentially serious. Overall, respiratory physicians provide significantly better care than non-respiratory physicians. PMID:10142032

  20. Kidney removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... nephrectomy - discharge; Open nephrectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic nephrectomy - discharge; Partial nephrectomy - discharge ... Plan to have someone drive you home from the hospital. DO NOT drive yourself home. You may ...

  1. Atrial fibrillation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Auricular fibrillation - discharge; A-fib - discharge; AF - discharge; Afib - discharge ... been in the hospital because you have atrial fibrillation . This condition occurs when your heart beats faster ...

  2. Historical Data Analysis of Hospital Discharges Related to the Amerithrax Attack in Florida.

    PubMed

    Burke, Lauralyn K; Brown, C Perry; Johnson, Tammie M

    2016-01-01

    Interrupted time-series analysis (ITSA) can be used to identify, quantify, and evaluate the magnitude and direction of an event on the basis of time-series data. This study evaluates the impact of the bioterrorist anthrax attacks ("Amerithrax") on hospital inpatient discharges in the metropolitan statistical area of Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade counties in the fourth quarter of 2001. Three statistical methods-standardized incidence ratio (SIR), segmented regression, and an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA)-were used to determine whether Amerithrax influenced inpatient utilization. The SIR found a non-statistically significant 2 percent decrease in hospital discharges. Although the segmented regression test found a slight increase in the discharge rate during the fourth quarter, it was also not statistically significant; therefore, it could not be attributed to Amerithrax. Segmented regression diagnostics preparing for ARIMA indicated that the quarterly data time frame was not serially correlated and violated one of the assumptions for the use of the ARIMA method and therefore could not properly evaluate the impact on the time-series data. Lack of data granularity of the time frames hindered the successful evaluation of the impact by the three analytic methods. This study demonstrates that the granularity of the data points is as important as the number of data points in a time series. ITSA is important for the ability to evaluate the impact that any hazard may have on inpatient utilization. Knowledge of hospital utilization patterns during disasters offer healthcare and civic professionals valuable information to plan, respond, mitigate, and evaluate any outcomes stemming from biothreats.

  3. Historical Data Analysis of Hospital Discharges Related to the Amerithrax Attack in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Lauralyn K.; Brown, C. Perry; Johnson, Tammie M.

    2016-01-01

    Interrupted time-series analysis (ITSA) can be used to identify, quantify, and evaluate the magnitude and direction of an event on the basis of time-series data. This study evaluates the impact of the bioterrorist anthrax attacks (“Amerithrax”) on hospital inpatient discharges in the metropolitan statistical area of Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade counties in the fourth quarter of 2001. Three statistical methods—standardized incidence ratio (SIR), segmented regression, and an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA)—were used to determine whether Amerithrax influenced inpatient utilization. The SIR found a non–statistically significant 2 percent decrease in hospital discharges. Although the segmented regression test found a slight increase in the discharge rate during the fourth quarter, it was also not statistically significant; therefore, it could not be attributed to Amerithrax. Segmented regression diagnostics preparing for ARIMA indicated that the quarterly data time frame was not serially correlated and violated one of the assumptions for the use of the ARIMA method and therefore could not properly evaluate the impact on the time-series data. Lack of data granularity of the time frames hindered the successful evaluation of the impact by the three analytic methods. This study demonstrates that the granularity of the data points is as important as the number of data points in a time series. ITSA is important for the ability to evaluate the impact that any hazard may have on inpatient utilization. Knowledge of hospital utilization patterns during disasters offer healthcare and civic professionals valuable information to plan, respond, mitigate, and evaluate any outcomes stemming from biothreats. PMID:27843420

  4. Outcomes of patients hospitalized for acute decompensated heart failure: does nesiritide make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Richard J; Mulla, Zuber D; Hauck, Loran D; Westbrook, Audrey

    2007-01-01

    Background Nesiritide is indicated in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure. However, a recent meta-analysis reported that nesiritide may be associated with an increased risk of death. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of nesiritide treatment on four outcomes among adults hospitalized for congestive heart failure (CHF) during a three-year period. Methods CHF patients discharged between 1/1/2002 and 12/31/2004 from the Adventist Health System, a national, not-for-profit hospital system, were identified. 25,330 records were included in this retrospective study. Nesiritide odds ratios (OR) were adjusted for various factors including nine medications and/or an APR-DRG severity score. Results Initially, treatment with nesiritide was found to be associated with a 59% higher odds of hospital mortality (Unadjusted OR = 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.31–1.93). Adjusting for race, low economic status, APR-DRG severity of illness score, and the receipt of nine medications yielded a nonsignificant nesiritide OR of 1.07 for hospital death (95% CI: 0.85–1.35). Nesiritide was positively associated with the odds of prolonged length of stay (all adjusted ORs = 1.66) and elevated pharmacy cost (all adjusted ORs > 5). Conclusion In this observational study, nesiritide therapy was associated with increased length of stay and pharmacy cost, but not hospital mortality. Randomized trials are urgently needed to better define the efficacy, if any, of nesiritide in the treatment of decompensated heart failure. PMID:18039381

  5. Citicoline for acute ischemic stroke in Mexican hospitals: a retrospective postmarketing analysis.

    PubMed

    Leon-Jimenez, C; Chiquete, E; Cantu, C; Miramontes-Saldana, M J; Andrade-Ramos, M A; Ruiz-Sandoval, J L

    2010-06-01

    Some neuroprotective agents have shown benefits in animal models, but disappointing results in humans. Citicoline is used in several countries as coadjuvant treatment in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients; however, there are no retrospective postmarketing surveillances on the experience of citicoline in Mexico. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between citicoline exposure and functional outcome at discharge and at 30 and 90 days post-stroke, in a retrospective case-control design on systematic descriptive databases from three referral hospitals. Clinical records of 173 consecutively registered patients were analyzed, 86 of whom were treated with citicoline within the first 48 h after AIS and the remaining 87 were untreated, randomly selected controls matched for age (+/- 5 years), gender and NIHSS (+/- 1 point) at hospital admission. Pretreatment conditions were similar between groups. Compared with controls, exposure to citicoline was associated with a significantly lower 30-day mean and median modified Rankin score (in both, P < 0.05). After paired multivariate analyses (controlled for NIHSS, age, gender, hospital arrival in < 24 h, thrombolysis and comorbidities) citicoline was independently associated with a lower 90-day mortality risk (P = 0.047) and with fewer in-hospital complications (mainly infections and sepsis, P = 0.001). In this observational study, citicoline use was associated with a better functional status and lower rates of short-term mortality, possibly due to fewer in-hospital systemic complications. The putative benefits should be interpreted as clinical associations, since this is not a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  6. Hospital to home: a geriatric educational program on effective discharge planning.

    PubMed

    DeCaporale-Ryan, Lauren N; Cornell, Ann; McCann, Robert M; McCormick, Kevin; Speice, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    There has been increased attention on the needs of the burgeoning older adult population, with focus on the limited education and training experiences available in geriatric care. Older adults transitioning between levels of care often require increased attention, and the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Task Force on the Future of Geriatric Medicine has encouraged greater training opportunities be provided to better understand the needs of this population. The Hospital to Home Program is one model of geriatric training emphasizing many of the AGS recommendations. Through qualitative analyses of 51 internal medicine residents' reflections, the authors report how this educational program is meeting the above need and share how Hospital to Home is enhancing residents' skills in creating a safe discharge for geriatric patients and their families.

  7. “It's like two worlds apart”: an analysis of vulnerable patient handover practices at discharge from hospital

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Raluca Oana; Orrego, Carola; Suñol, Rosa; Barach, Paul; Groene, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Background Handover practices at hospital discharge are relatively under-researched, particularly as regards the specific risks and additional requirements for handovers involving vulnerable patients with limited language, cognitive and social resources. Objective To explore handover practices at discharge and to focus on the patients’ role in handovers and on the potential additional risks for vulnerable patients. Methods We conducted qualitative interviews with patients, hospital professionals and primary care professionals in two hospitals and their associated primary care centres in Catalonia, Spain. Results We identified handover practices at discharge that potentially put patients at risk. Patients did not feel empowered in the handover but were expected to transfer information between care providers. Professionals identified lack of medication reconciliation at discharge, loss of discharge information, and absence of plans for follow-up care in the community as quality and safety problems for discharge handovers. These occurred for all patients, but appeared to be more frequent and have a greater negative effect in patients with limited language comprehension and/or lack of family and social support systems. Conclusions Discharge handovers are often haphazard. Healthcare professionals do not consider current handover practices safe, with patients expected to transfer information without being empowered to understand and act on it. This can lead to misinformation, omission or duplication of tests or interventions and, potentially, patient harm. Vulnerable patients may be at greater risk given their limited language, cognitive and social resources. Patient safety at discharge could benefit from strategies to enhance patient education and promote empowerment. PMID:23112285

  8. Learning to speak up about hospital failures.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Dawne

    2016-08-17

    The recent Public Accounts Committee (PAC) report on discharging older people from acute hospitals in England revealed that rising numbers of patients are remaining in hospital when they are clinically ready to go home.

  9. Long-term care provision, hospital bed blocking, and discharge destination for hip fracture and stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, James; Gravelle, Hugh; Santos, Rita; Siciliani, Luigi

    2017-02-28

    We examine the relationship between long-term care supply (care home beds and prices) and (i) the probability of being discharged to a care home and (ii) length of stay in hospital for patients admitted to hospital for hip fracture or stroke. Using patient level data from all English hospitals and allowing for a rich set of demographic and clinical factors, we find no association between discharge destination and long-term care beds supply or prices. We do, however, find evidence of bed blocking: hospital length of stay for hip fracture patients discharged to a care home is shorter in areas with more long-term care beds and lower prices. Length of stay is over 30% shorter in areas in the highest quintile of care home beds supply compared to those in the lowest quintile.

  10. Activity-Based Funding of Hospitals and Its Impact on Mortality, Readmission, Discharge Destination, Severity of Illness, and Volume of Care: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Karen S.; Agoritsas, Thomas; Martin, Danielle; Scott, Taryn; Mulla, Sohail M.; Miller, Ashley P.; Agarwal, Arnav; Bresnahan, Andrew; Hazzan, Afeez Abiola; Jeffery, Rebecca A.; Merglen, Arnaud; Negm, Ahmed; Siemieniuk, Reed A.; Bhatnagar, Neera; Dhalla, Irfan A.; Lavis, John N.; You, John J.; Duckett, Stephen J.; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Activity-based funding (ABF) of hospitals is a policy intervention intended to re-shape incentives across health systems through the use of diagnosis-related groups. Many countries are adopting or actively promoting ABF. We assessed the effect of ABF on key measures potentially affecting patients and health care systems: mortality (acute and post-acute care); readmission rates; discharge rate to post-acute care following hospitalization; severity of illness; volume of care. Methods We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of the worldwide evidence produced since 1980. We included all studies reporting original quantitative data comparing the impact of ABF versus alternative funding systems in acute care settings, regardless of language. We searched 9 electronic databases (OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, OVID Healthstar, CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL, Health Technology Assessment, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Business Source), hand-searched reference lists, and consulted with experts. Paired reviewers independently screened for eligibility, abstracted data, and assessed study credibility according to a pre-defined scoring system, resolving conflicts by discussion or adjudication. Results Of 16,565 unique citations, 50 US studies and 15 studies from 9 other countries proved eligible (i.e. Australia, Austria, England, Germany, Israel, Italy, Scotland, Sweden, Switzerland). We found consistent and robust differences between ABF and no-ABF in discharge to post-acute care, showing a 24% increase with ABF (pooled relative risk  = 1.24, 95% CI 1.18–1.31). Results also suggested a possible increase in readmission with ABF, and an apparent increase in severity of illness, perhaps reflecting differences in diagnostic coding. Although we found no consistent, systematic differences in mortality rates and volume of care, results varied widely across studies, some suggesting appreciable benefits from ABF, and others

  11. Validity of AHRQ patient safety indicators derived from ICD-10 hospital discharge abstract data (chart review study)

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Hude; Eastwood, Cathy; Cunningham, Ceara Tess; Liu, Mingfu; Flemons, Ward; De Coster, Carolyn; Ghali, William A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess if the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality  patient safety indictors (PSIs) could be used for case findings in the International Classification of Disease 10th revision (ICD-10) hospital discharge abstract data. Design We identified and randomly selected 490 patients with a foreign body left during a procedure (PSI 5—foreign body), selected infections (IV site) due to medical care (PSI 7—infection), postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) or deep vein thrombosis (DVT; PSI 12—PE/DVT), postoperative sepsis (PSI 13—sepsis)and accidental puncture or laceration (PSI 15—laceration) among patients discharged from three adult acute care hospitals in Calgary, Canada in 2007 and 2008. Their charts were reviewed for determining the presence of PSIs and used as the reference standard, positive predictive value (PPV) statistics were calculated to determine the proportion of positives in the administrative data representing ‘true positives’. Results The PPV for PSI 5—foreign body was 62.5% (95% CI 35.4% to 84.8%), PSI 7—infection was 79.1% (67.4% to 88.1%), PSI 12—PE/DVT was 89.5% (66.9% to 98.7%), PSI 13—sepsis was 12.5% (1.6% to 38.4%) and PSI 15—laceration was 86.4% (75.0% to 94.0%) after excluding those who presented to the hospital with the condition. Conclusions Several PSIs had high PPV in the ICD administrative data and are thus powerful tools for true positive case finding. The tools could be used to identify potential cases from the large volume of admissions for verification through chart reviews. In contrast, their sensitivity has not been well characterised and users of PSIs should be cautious if using them for ‘quality of care reporting’ presenting the rate of PSIs because under-coded data would generate falsely low PSI rates. PMID:24114372

  12. Functional Changes during Hospital Stay in Older Patients Admitted to an Acute Care Ward: A Multicenter Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    De Buyser, Stefanie L.; Petrovic, Mirko; Taes, Youri E.; Vetrano, Davide L.; Corsonello, Andrea; Volpato, Stefano; Onder, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Changes in physical performance during hospital stay have rarely been evaluated. In this study, we examined functional changes during hospital stay by assessing both physical performance and activities of daily living. Additionally, we investigated characteristics of older patients associated with meaningful in-hospital improvement in physical performance. Methods The CRiteria to assess appropriate Medication use among Elderly complex patients project recruited 1123 patients aged ≥65 years, consecutively admitted to geriatric or internal medicine acute care wards of seven Italian hospitals. We analyzed data from 639 participating participants with a Mini Mental State Examination score ≥18/30. Physical performance was assessed by walking speed and grip strength, and functional status by activities of daily living at hospital admission and at discharge. Meaningful improvement was defined as a measured change of at least 1 standard deviation. Multivariable logistic regression models predicting meaningful improvement, included age, gender, type of admission (through emergency room or elective), and physical performance at admission. Results Mean age of the study participants was 79 years (range 65–98), 52% were female. Overall, mean walking speed and grip strength performance improved during hospital stay (walking speed improvement: 0.04±0.20 m/s, p<0.001; grip strength improvement: 0.43±5.66 kg, p = 0.001), no significant change was observed in activities of daily living. Patients with poor physical performance at admission had higher odds for in-hospital improvement. Conclusion Overall, physical performance measurements show an improvement during hospital stay. The margin for meaningful functional improvement is larger in patients with poor physical function at admission. Nevertheless, most of these patients continue to have poor performance at discharge. PMID:24820733

  13. Using decision trees to manage hospital readmission risk for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, John P; Zasadil, Scott; Keyser, Donna J; Peele, Pamela B

    2014-12-01

    To improve healthcare quality and reduce costs, the Affordable Care Act places hospitals at financial risk for excessive readmissions associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Although predictive analytics is increasingly looked to as a means for measuring, comparing, and managing this risk, many modeling tools require data inputs that are not readily available and/or additional resources to yield actionable information. This article demonstrates how hospitals and clinicians can use their own structured discharge data to create decision trees that produce highly transparent, clinically relevant decision rules for better managing readmission risk associated with AMI, HF, and PN. For illustrative purposes, basic decision trees are trained and tested using publically available data from the California State Inpatient Databases and an open-source statistical package. As expected, these simple models perform less well than other more sophisticated tools, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (or AUC) of 0.612, 0.583, and 0.650, respectively, but achieve a lift of at least 1.5 or greater for higher-risk patients with any of the three conditions. More importantly, they are shown to offer substantial advantages in terms of transparency and interpretability, comprehensiveness, and adaptability. By enabling hospitals and clinicians to identify important factors associated with readmissions, target subgroups of patients at both high and low risk, and design and implement interventions that are appropriate to the risk levels observed, decision trees serve as an ideal application for addressing the challenge of reducing hospital readmissions.

  14. Predictors of quality of life among hospitalized geriatric patients with diabetes mellitus upon discharge

    PubMed Central

    Johari, Nuruljannah; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Ibrahim, Norhayati; Shahar, Suzana; Mustafa, Norlaila

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus is prevalent among older adults, and affects their quality of life. Furthermore, the number is growing as the elderly population increases. Thus, this study aims to explore the predictors of quality of life among hospitalized geriatric patients with diabetes mellitus upon discharge in Malaysia. Methods A total of 110 hospitalized geriatric patients aged 60 years and older were selected using convenience sampling method in a cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data and medical history were obtained from the medical records. Questionnaires were used during the in-person semistructured interviews, which were conducted in the wards. Linear regression analyses were used to determine the predictors of each domain of quality of life. Results Multiple regression analysis showed that activities of daily living, depression, and appetite were the determinants of physical health domain of quality of life (R2=0.633, F(3, 67)=38.462; P<0.001), whereas depression and instrumental activities of daily living contributed to 55.8% of the variability in psychological domain (R2=0.558, F(2, 68)=42.953; P<0.001). Social support and cognitive status were the determinants of social relationship (R2=0.539, F(2, 68)=39.763; P<0.001) and also for the environmental domain of the quality of life (R2=0.496, F(2, 68)=33.403; P<0.001). Conclusion The findings indicated different predictors for each domain in the quality of life among hospitalized geriatric patients with diabetes mellitus. Nutritional, functional, and psychological aspects should be incorporated into rehabilitation support programs prior to discharge in order to improve patients’ quality of life. PMID:27799751

  15. Randomised pragmatic comparison of UK and US treatment of acute asthma presenting to hospital

    PubMed Central

    Innes, N; Stocking, J; Daynes, T; Harrison, B

    2002-01-01

    Background: Systemic corticosteroids and inhaled ß2 agonists are accepted first line treatments for acute severe asthma, but there is no consensus on their optimum dosage and frequency of administration. American regimens include higher initial dosages of ß2 agonists and corticosteroids than UK regimens. Methods: In a prospective, pragmatic, randomised, parallel group study, 170 patients of mean (SD) age 37 (12) years with acute asthma (peak expiratory flow (PEF) 212 (80) l/min) presenting to hospital received treatment with either high dose prednisolone and continuous nebulised salbutamol as recommended in the US or lower dose prednisolone and bolus nebulised salbutamol as recommended in the UK by the BTS. Results: Outcome measures were: ΔPEF at 1 hour (BTS 89 l/min, US 106 l/min, p=0.2, CI –8 to 41) and at 2 hours (BTS 49 l/min, US 101 l/min, p<0.0001, CI 28 to 77); time to discharge if admitted (BTS 4 days, US 4 days); rates of achieving discharge PEF (>60%) at 2 hours (BTS 64%, US 78%, p=0.04); time to regain control of asthma as measured by PEF ≥80% best with ≤20% variability (BTS 3 days, US 4 days, p=0.6); PEF at 24 hours in patients admitted (BTS 293 l/min, US 288 l/min, p=0.8); and control of asthma in the subsequent month (no significant differences). Conclusions: Treatment with higher doses of continuous nebulised salbutamol leads to a greater immediate improvement in PEF but the degree of recovery at 24 hours and speed of recovery thereafter is achieved as effectively with lower corticosteroid doses as recommended in the British guidelines. PMID:12454298

  16. Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

    2004-01-01

    One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

  17. Benefits of Early Roflumilast Treatment After Hospital or Emergency Department Discharge for a COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Qing; Mocarski, Michelle; Sun, Shawn X.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic lower respiratory disease, which includes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Roflumilast is an oral, once-daily, selective phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor approved for reducing the risk for COPD exacerbations in patients with severe COPD associated with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations. Objectives To evaluate the effects of roflumilast treatment timing on COPD exacerbation rates (primary objective) and on resource utilization and healthcare costs (secondary objective) after hospital or emergency department discharge associated with a COPD exacerbation. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, claims data from March 2011 to March 2013 were extracted from Truven Health MarketScan combined commercial healthcare claims and Medicare supplemental claims databases and were analyzed to compare the exacerbation rates and the healthcare resource utilization and costs between the early roflumilast treatment (treatment initiation ≤30 days after hospital or emergency department discharge) and the delayed roflumilast treatment (treatment initiation 31–180 days after discharge) cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression and generalized linear models with log-link function and gamma distribution were adjusted for age, sex, insurance plan type, COPD disease complexity, and comorbidities. Results A total of 995 patients (N = 280 early roflumilast treatment, N = 715 delayed roflumilast treatment) were included. Compared with the delayed roflumilast treatment group, patients in the early roflumilast treatment group were 39% less likely to have an exacerbation after hospital discharge (P = .004). The patients receiving early roflumilast treatment also had 42% (P = .003) and 37% (P = .005) lower risks for COPD-related and all-cause rehospitalizations, respectively, than patients in the delayed roflumilast treatment group. Significantly fewer patients receiving early roflumilast

  18. Influence of homelessness on acute admissions to hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Lissauer, T; Richman, S; Tempia, M; Jenkins, S; Taylor, B

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look at the influence of homelessness on acute medical admissions. A prospective case-controlled study was therefore performed on all homeless children admitted through the accident and emergency department over one year, comparing them with the next age matched admission from permanent housing. Assessments made were: whether homelessness or other social factors influenced the doctors' decision to admit; differences in severity of illness; length of stay; and use of primary care. The admitting doctors completed a semi-structured questionnaire during admission about social factors that influenced their decision to admit and graded the severity of the child's illness. The length of hospital stay was recorded. The family's social risk factors and accommodation were assessed at a home visit using a standardised questionnaire and by observation. Seventy homeless children were admitted. Social factors influenced the decision to admit in 77% of homeless children and 43% of controls. More of the homeless children were only mildly ill (33/70) than those from permanent housing (21/70), although three of the homeless children died of overwhelming infections compared with none of the controls. Among homeless families many were recent immigrants (44%). There was a marked increase in socioeconomic deprivation, in major life events in the previous year (median score 3 v 1), and in maternal depression (27% v 8%). Referral to the hospital was made by a general practitioner in only 5/50 (10%) of homeless compared with 18/50 (36%) of controls. Social factors were an important influence on the decision to admit in over three quarters of the homeless children and resulted in admission when less severely ill even when compared with admissions from an inner city population. Even though there was marked social deprivation among the homeless families, the decision to admit was based on vague criteria that need to be further refined. PMID:8259871

  19. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Population and methods Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. Results There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR = 1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p = 0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR= 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p = 0.63). Conclusion In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. PMID:26388119

  20. The Florida Investigation of Primary Late Preterm and Cesarean Delivery: the accuracy of the birth certificate and hospital discharge records.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Heather B; Sappenfield, William M; Gulitz, Elizabeth; Mahan, Charles S; Petersen, Donna J; Stanley, Kara M; Salihu, Hamisu M

    2013-07-01

    (1) Assess the accuracy of public health data sources used to investigate primary late preterm cesarean delivery (PLPCD) and (2) compare differences in data accuracy by hospital PLPCD rate classification. This analysis uses data from the Florida Investigation of Late Preterm and Cesarean Delivery (FILPCD), an investigation of singleton, PLPCD's that occurred from 2006 to 2007 in hospitals classified with either a low or high PLPCD rate (high rate 39.4-58.3 %, low rate 11.9-25.1 %). Three data sources were validated with maternal medical records: birth certificates, hospital discharge data, and combined birth certificate and hospital discharge data. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and kappa values were calculated. A summary measure of kappa values was compared by hospital PLPCD rate classification using the paired sample Wilcoxon signed rank test. Large variations in accuracy of data elements were found by hospital PLPCD rate classification, with low PLPCD rate hospitals demonstrating higher overall data accuracy. The summary measure of agreement was significantly higher for low PLPCD rate hospitals compared to high PLPCD rate hospitals (0.60 vs. 0.50, p < 0.01). Accurate estimates of CD and late preterm birth are vital for public health practitioners and policy makers who seek to address the growing concern over recent increases in CD and late preterm birth. Understanding the potential for systematic differences in reporting accuracy by hospital PLPCD rate is important to data quality improvement efforts.

  1. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units.

  2. [Definition of hospital discharge, serious injury and death from traffic injuries].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Katherine; Seguí-Gómez, María; Arrufat, Vita; Barberia, Eneko; Cabeza, Elena; Cirera, Eva; Gil, Mercedes; Martín, Carlos; Novoa, Ana M; Olabarría, Marta; Lardelli, Pablo; Suelves, Josep Maria; Santamariña-Rubio, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Road traffic injury surveillance involves methodological difficulties due, among other reasons, to the lack of consensus criteria for case definition. Police records have usually been the main source of information for monitoring traffic injuries, while health system data has hardly been used. Police records usually include comprehensive information on the characteristics of the crash, but often underreport injury cases and do not collect reliable information on the severity of injuries. However, statistics on severe traffic injuries have been based almost exclusively on police data. The aim of this paper is to propose criteria based on medical records to define: a) "Hospital discharge for traffic injuries", b) "Person with severe traffic injury", and c) "Death from traffic injuries" in order to homogenize the use of these sources.

  3. Factors related to breastfeeding discontinuation between hospital discharge and 2 weeks postpartum.

    PubMed

    Brand, Elizabeth; Kothari, Catherine; Stark, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Although breastfeeding is known to be beneficial to both mother and infant, many women encounter barriers to breastfeeding, even after successful breastfeeding initiation, which may put them at greater risk for early cessation of breastfeeding. The objectives of this study were to conduct a secondary analysis of data from a longitudinal study of postpartum depression to (a) examine factors related to very early discontinuation of breastfeeding (at 2 weeks postpartum) following hospital discharge and (b) identify women's reasons for very early cessation of breastfeeding. The results of this study support findings from previous research. Having a perceived support system, whether it is personal or professional, may have an effect on both the initiation and duration of breastfeeding. Educating expectant and new mothers, especially women who encounter multiple barriers and are at risk for very early cessation of breastfeeding, of the benefits of breastfeeding and supporting them in developing efficient techniques and problem-solving skills can help increase the duration of breastfeeding.

  4. Innovative use of tele-ICU in long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mullen-Fortino, Margaret; Sites, Frank D; Soisson, Michael; Galen, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Tele-intensive care units (ICUs) typically provide remote monitoring for ICUs of acute care, short-stay hospitals. As part of a joint venture project to establish a long-term acute level of care, Good Shepherd Penn Partners became the first facility to use tele-ICU technology in a nontraditional setting. Long-term acute care hospitals care for patients with complex medical problems. We describe describes the benefits and challenges of integrating a tele-ICU program into a long-term acute care setting and the impact this model of care has on patient care outcomes.

  5. Exploring Reasons for Bed Pressures in Winnipeg Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menec, Verena H.; Bruce, Sharon; MacWilliam, Leonard R.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital overcrowding has plagued Winnipeg and other Canadian cities for years. This study explored factors related to overcrowding. Hospital files were used to examine patterns of hospital use from fiscal years 1996/1997 to 1999/2000. Chart reviews were conducted to examine appropriateness of admissions and hospital stays during one pressure…

  6. Effect of Cause-of-Death Training on Agreement Between Hospital Discharge Diagnoses and Cause of Death Reported, Inpatient Hospital Deaths, New York City, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Accurate cause-of-death reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City death certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of death following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-death reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which death certificates citing heart disease as cause of death agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. Methods We analyzed 74,373 death certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were linked with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient deaths and calculated the proportion of discordant deaths, that is, death certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient deaths reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Results Citywide discordance between death certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P < .001), driven by a decrease in discordance at intervention hospitals (20.2% in 2008 to 8.9% in 2010; P < .001). At intervention hospitals, reporting of sepsis increased from 3.7% of inpatient deaths in 2008 to 20.6% in 2010 (P < .001). Conclusion Overreporting of heart disease as cause of death declined at intervention hospitals, driving a citywide decline, and sepsis reporting practices changed in accordance with health department training. Researchers should consider the effect of overreporting and data-quality changes when analyzing New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions

  7. Who Dies after ICU Discharge? Retrospective Analysis of Prognostic Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of ICU Survivors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the causes of inpatient death after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge and determined predictors of in-hospital mortality in Korea. Using medical ICU registry data of Seoul National University Hospital, we performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who were discharged alive from their first ICU admission with at least 24 hours of ICU length of stay (LOS). From January 2011 to August 2013, 723 patients were admitted to ICU and 383 patients were included. The estimated in-hospital mortality rate was 11.7% (45/383). The most common cause of death was respiratory failure (n = 25, 56%) followed by sepsis and cancer progression; the causes of hospital death and ICU admission were the same in 64% of all deaths; sudden unexpected deaths comprised about one-fifth of all deaths. In order to predict in-hospital mortality among ICU survivors, multivariate analysis identified presence of solid tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.01–8.2; P < 0.001), hematologic disease (OR, 4.75; 95% CI, 1.51–14.96; P = 0.013), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score upon ICU admission (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.99–1.17; P = 0.075), and hemoglobin (Hb) level (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52–0.86; P = 0.001) and platelet count (Plt) (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.99–1.00; P = 0.033) upon ICU discharge as significant factors. In conclusion, a significant proportion of in-hospital mortality is predictable and those who die in hospital after ICU discharge tend to be severely-ill, with comorbidities of hematologic disease and solid tumor, and anemic and thrombocytopenic upon ICU discharge. PMID:28145659

  8. Characteristics of Older Adults Admitted to Hospital versus Those Discharged Home, in Emergency Department Patients Referred to Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hominick, Kathryn; McLeod, Victoria; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background Frail older adults present to the Emergency Department (ED) with complex medical, functional, and social needs. When these needs can be addressed promptly, discharge is possible, and when they cannot, hospital admission is required. We evaluated the care needs of frail older adults in the ED who were consulted to internal medicine and seen by a geriatrician to determine, under current practices, which factors were associated with hospitalization and which allowed discharge. Methods We preformed a chart-based, exploratory study. Data were abstracted from consultation records and ED charts. All cases had a standard Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA which records a Clinical Frailty Scale (CFA) and allows calculation of a Frailty Index (FI). Results Of 100 consecutive patients, 2 died in the ED, 75 were admitted, and 23 were discharged, including one urgent placement. Compared with discharged patients (0.39 ± SD 0.16), those admitted had a higher mean FI-CGA (0.48 ± 0.13; p < .01). Greater mobility dependence (2% in discharged vs. 32% in admitted; p < .05) was notable. Conclusions Discharge decisions require assessment of medical, functional, and social problems. Ill, frail patients often can be discharged home when social and nursing support can be provided. The degree of frailty, impaired mobility, and likely delirium must be taken into account when planning for their care. PMID:27076860

  9. Acute Psychiatric Hospital Admissions of Adults and Elderly Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Examination of the records of 240 inpatients with mental retardation and 7 with autism discharged from a university hospital indicated that elderly adults had more medical problems than did adults, more elderly adults were transferred to a state hospital, and the most common diagnosis in both adults and elderly adults was chronic schizophrenia,…

  10. Clinical and functional outcomes of acute lower extremity compartment syndrome at a Major Trauma Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lollo, Loreto; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute lower extremity compartment syndrome (CS) is a condition that untreated causes irreversible nerve and muscle ischemia. Treatment by decompression fasciotomy without delay prevents permanent disability. The use of intracompartmental pressure (iCP) measurement in uncertain situations aids in diagnosis of severe leg pain. As an infrequent complication of lower extremity trauma, consequences of CS include chronic pain, nerve injury, and contractures. The purpose of this study was to observe the clinical and functional outcomes for patients with lower extremity CS after fasciotomy. Methods: Retrospective chart analysis for patients with a discharge diagnosis of CS was performed. Physical demographics, employment status, activity at time of injury, injury severity score, fracture types, pain scores, hours to fasciotomy, iCP, serum creatine kinase levels, wound treatment regimen, length of hospital stay, and discharge facility were collected. Lower extremity neurologic examination, pain scores, orthopedic complications, and employment status at 30 days and 12 months after discharge were noted. Results: One hundred twenty-four patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred and eight patients were assessed at 12 months. Eighty-one percent were male. Motorized vehicles caused 51% of injuries in males. Forty-one percent of injuries were tibia fractures. Acute kidney injury occurred in 2.4%. Mean peak serum creatine kinase levels were 58,600 units/ml. Gauze dressing was used in 78.9% of nonfracture patients and negative pressure wound vacuum therapy in 78.2% of fracture patients. About 21.6% of patients with CS had prior surgery. Nearly 12.9% of patients required leg amputation. Around 81.8% of amputees were male. Sixty-seven percent of amputees had associated vascular injuries. Foot numbness occurred in 20.5% of patients and drop foot palsy in 18.2%. Osteomyelitis developed in 10.2% of patients and fracture nonunion in 6.8%. About 14.7% of patients

  11. Implementation of an Acute Care Surgery Service in a Community Hospital: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A service led by acute care surgeons managing trauma, critically ill surgical, and emergency general surgery patients via an acute care surgery model of patient care improves hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at university-affiliated hospitals and American College of Surgeons-verified trauma centers. Our goal was to determine whether an acute care surgeon led service, entitled the Surgical Trauma and Acute Resuscitative Service (STARS) that implemented an acute care surgery model of patient care, could improve hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at a community hospital. A total of 492 patient charts were reviewed, which included 230 before the implementation of the STARS [pre-STARS (control)] and 262 after the implementation of the STARS [post-STARS (study)]. Demographics included age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score, and medical comorbidities. Efficiency data included length of stay in emergency department (ED-LOS), length of stay in surgical intensive care unit (SICU-LOS), and length of stay in hospital (H-LOS), and total in hospital charges. Average age was 64.1 + 16.4 years, 255 males (51.83%) and 237 females (48.17%). Average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score was 11.9 + 5.8. No significant differences in demographics were observed. Average decreases in ED-LOS (9.7 + 9.6 hours, pre-STARS versus 6.6 + 4.5 hours, post-STARS), SICU-LOS (5.3 + 9.6 days, pre-STARS versus 3.5 + 4.8 days, post-STARS), H-LOS (12.4 + 12.7 days, pre-STARS versus 11.4 + 11.3 days, post-STARS), and total in hospital charges ($419,602.6 + $519,523.0 pre-STARS to $374,816.7 + $411,935.8 post-STARS) post-STARS. Regression analysis revealed decreased ED-LOS-2.9 hours [P = 0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): -7.0, 1.2], SICU-LOS-6.3 days (P < 0.001; 95% CI: -9.3, -3.2), H-LOS-7.6 days (P = 0.001; 95% CI: -12.1, -3.1), and 3.4 times greater odds of survival (P = 0.04; 95% CI: 1.1, 10.7) post-STARS. In conclusion, implementation of

  12. Hospital discharge abstracts have limited accuracy in identifying occurrence of Clostridium difficile infections among hospitalized individuals with inflammatory bowel disease: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harminder; Nugent, Zoann; Yu, B. Nancy; Lix, Lisa M.; Targownik, Laura; Bernstein, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospital discharge databases are used to study the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) among hospitalized patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CDI in IBD is increasingly important and accurately estimating its occurrence is critical in understanding its comorbidity. There are limited data on the reliability of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD-10) (now widely used in North America) CDI code in determining occurrence of CDI among hospitalized patients. We compared the performance of ICD-10 CDI coding to laboratory confirmed CDI diagnoses. Methods The University of Manitoba IBD Epidemiology Database was used to identify individuals with and without IBD discharged with CDI diagnoses between 07/01/2005 and 3/31/2014. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of ICD-10 CDI code was compared to laboratory CDI diagnoses recorded in a province wide CDI dataset. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed to test the predictors of diagnostic inaccuracy of ICD-10 CDI code. Results There were 273 episodes of laboratory confirmed CDI (hospitalized and non-hospitalized) among 7396 individuals with IBD and 536 among 66,297 matched controls. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ICD-10 CDI code in discharge abstracts was 72.8%, 99.6%, 64.1% and 99.7% among those with IBD and 70.8%, 99.9%, 79.0% and 99.9% among those without IBD. Predictors of diagnostic inaccuracy included IBD, older age, increased co-morbidity and earlier years of hospitalization. Conclusions Identification of CDI using ICD-10 CDI code in hospital discharge abstracts may not identify up to 30% of CDI cases, with worse performance among those with IBD. PMID:28199401

  13. Impact of a pharmacist-delivered discharge and follow-up intervention for patients with acute coronary syndromes in Qatar: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zidan, Amani; Awaisu, Ahmed; Kheir, Nadir; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Kaddoura, Rasha; AlYafei, Sumaya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Secondary cardiovascular risk reduction therapy (consisting of an aspirin, a β-blocker, an ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker and a statin) is needed for all patients with ACS. Less than 80% of patients with ACS in Qatar use this combination after discharge. This study is aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical pharmacist-delivered intervention at discharge and tailored follow-up postdischarge on decreasing hospital readmissions, emergency department (ED) visits and mortality among patients with ACS. Methods and analysis A prospective, randomised controlled trial will be conducted at the Heart Hospital in Qatar. Patients are eligible for enrolment if they are at least 18 years of age and are discharged from any non-surgical cardiology service with ACS. Participants will be randomised into 1 of 3 arms: (1) ‘control’ arm which includes patients discharged during weekends or after hours; (2) ‘clinical pharmacist delivered usual care at discharge’ arm which includes patients receiving the usual care at discharge by clinical pharmacists; and (3) ‘clinical pharmacist-delivered structured intervention at discharge and tailored follow-up postdischarge’ arm which includes patients receiving intensive structured discharge interventions in addition to 2 follow-up sessions by intervention clinical pharmacists. Outcomes will be measured by blinded research assistants at 3, 6 and 12 months after discharge and will include: all-cause hospitalisations and cardiac-related hospital readmissions (primary outcome), all-cause mortality including cardiac-related mortality, ED visits including cardiac-related ED visits, adherence to medications and treatment burden. Percentage of readmissions between the 3 arms will be compared on intent-to-treat basis using χ2 test with Bonferroni's adjusted pairwise comparisons if needed. Ethics and

  14. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers

  15. Perceived quality of an alternative to acute hospitalization: an analytical study at a community hospital in Hallingdal, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lappegard, Øystein; Hjortdahl, Per

    2014-10-01

    There is growing international interest in the geography of health care provision, with health care providers searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Norway, the government has recently legislated for municipal authorities to develop local health services for a selected group of patients, with a quality equal to or better than that provided by hospitals for emergency admissions. General practitioners in Hallingdal, a rural district in southern Norway, have for several years referred acutely somatically ill patients to a community hospital, Hallingdal sjukestugu (HSS). This article analyzes patients' perceived quality of HSS to demonstrate factors applicable nationally and internationally to aid in the development of local alternatives to general hospitals. We used a mixed-methods approach with questionnaires, individual interviews and a focus group interview. Sixty patients who were taking part in a randomized, controlled study of acute admissions at HSS answered the questionnaire. Selected patients were interviewed about their experiences and a focus group interview was conducted with representatives of local authorities, administrative personnel and health professionals. Patients admitted to HSS reported statistically significant greater satisfaction with several care aspects than those admitted to the general hospital. Factors highlighted by the patients were the quiet and homelike atmosphere; a small facility which allowed them a good overall view of the unit; close ties to the local community and continuity in the patient-staff relationship. The focus group members identified some overarching factors: an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, local ownership, proximity to local general practices and close cooperation with the specialist health services at the hospital. Most of these factors can be viewed as general elements relevant to the development of local alternatives to acute hospitalization both nationally and internationally. This

  16. The prevalence of maternal medical conditions during pregnancy and a validation of their reporting in hospital discharge data.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Ruth M; Lain, Samantha J; Cameron, Carolyn A; Bell, Jane C; Morris, Jonathan M; Roberts, Christine L

    2008-02-01

    Population health datasets are a valuable resource for studying maternal and obstetric health outcomes. However, their validity has not been thoroughly examined. We compared medical records from a random selection of New South Wales (NSW) women who gave birth in a NSW hospital in 2002 with coded hospital discharge records. We estimated the population prevalence of maternal medical conditions during pregnancy and found a tendency towards underreporting although specificities were high, indicating that false positives were uncommon.

  17. mHealth for Schizophrenia: Patient Engagement With a Mobile Phone Intervention Following Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Emily A; Gottlieb, Jennifer D; Rotondi, Armando J; Brunette, Mary F; Achtyes, Eric D; Mueser, Kim T; Gingerich, Susan; Brenner, Christopher J; Begale, Mark; Mohr, David C; Schooler, Nina; Marcy, Patricia; Robinson, Delbert G; Kane, John M

    2016-01-01

    Background mHealth interventions that use mobile phones as instruments for illness management are gaining popularity. Research examining mobile phone‒based mHealth programs for people with psychosis has shown that these approaches are feasible, acceptable, and clinically promising. However, most mHealth initiatives involving people with schizophrenia have spanned periods ranging from a few days to several weeks and have typically involved participants who were clinically stable. Objective Our aim was to evaluate the viability of extended mHealth interventions for people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders following hospital discharge. Specifically, we set out to examine the following: (1) Can individuals be engaged with a mobile phone intervention program during this high-risk period?, (2) Are age, gender, racial background, or hospitalization history associated with their engagement or persistence in using a mobile phone intervention over time?, and (3) Does engagement differ by characteristics of the mHealth intervention itself (ie, pre-programmed vs on-demand functions)? Methods We examined mHealth intervention use and demographic and clinical predictors of engagement in 342 individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders who were given the FOCUS mobile phone intervention as part of a technology-assisted relapse prevention program during the 6-month high-risk period following hospitalization. Results On average, participants engaged with FOCUS for 82% of the weeks they had the mobile phone. People who used FOCUS more often continued using it over longer periods: 44% used the intervention over 5-6 months, on average 4.3 days a week. Gender, race, age, and number of past psychiatric hospitalizations were associated with engagement. Females used FOCUS on average 0.4 more days a week than males. White participants engaged on average 0.7 days more a week than African-Americans and responded to prompts on 0.7 days more a week than Hispanic participants. Younger

  18. In-hospital percentage BNP reduction is highly predictive for adverse events in patients admitted for acute heart failure: the Italian RED Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to evaluate the role of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) percentage variations at 24 hours and at discharge compared to its value at admission in order to demonstrate its predictive value for outcomes in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Methods This was a multicenter Italian (8 centers) observational study (Italian Research Emergency Department: RED). 287 patients with ADHF were studied through physical exams, lab tests, chest X Ray, electrocardiograms (ECGs) and BNP measurements, performed at admission, at 24 hours, and at discharge. Follow up was performed 180 days after hospital discharge. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for the various subgroups created. For all comparisons, a P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results BNP median (interquartile range (IQR)) value at admission was 822 (412 - 1390) pg\\mL; at 24 hours was 593 (270 - 1953) and at discharge was 325 (160 - 725). A BNP reduction of >46% at discharge had an area under curve (AUC) of 0.70 (P < 0.001) for predicting future adverse events. There were 78 events through follow up and in 58 of these patients the BNP level at discharge was >300 pg/mL. A BNP reduction of 25.9% after 24 hours had an AUC at ROC curve of 0.64 for predicting adverse events (P < 0.001). The odds ratio of the patients whose BNP level at discharge was <300 pg/mL and whose percentage decrease at discharge was <46% compared to the group whose BNP level at discharge was <300 pg/mL and whose percentage decrease at discharge was >46% was 4.775 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.76 - 12.83, P < 0.002). The odds ratio of the patients whose BNP level at discharge was >300 pg/mL and whose percentage decrease at discharge was <46% compared to the group whose BNP level at discharge was <300 pg/mL and whose percentage decrease at discharge was >46% was 9.614 (CI 4.51 - 20.47, P < 0.001). Conclusions A reduction of BNP >46% at hospital discharge

  19. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  20. Curriculum Guide for the Chronic Mentally Ill in the Pre-Discharge Program at East Mississippi State Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle, Allyson; Shannon, Cheryl

    The paper describes the pre-discharge program for chronically mentally ill patients at East Mississippi State Hospital and outlines program curriculum units. The program's requirements for admission, enrollment capacity, length of stay, program standards (on such matters as referral, assessment, and case records) and the typical activity schedule…

  1. Recovery and outcome of patients with stroke treated in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, R W; Kloter, K; Cooper, J

    1991-01-01

    This retrospective study of patients with stroke was performed to describe the patients' functional independence on admission to and discharge from physical therapy treatment, determine whether significant functional recovery occurred during the treatment period, and identify independent variables correlating with recovery and outcome at discharge. The Functional Independence Measurement (FIM) system was used to score performance in bed mobility, transfers, locomotion, and stairs. Outcome was indicated by the discharge FIM scores and discharge habitat. The 105 patients whose acute care records were reviewed demonstrated significant improvements between admission and discharge in all functions. Among the variables that correlated significantly with recovery were number of treatments and admission FIM scores. Age and number of treatments correlated significantly with discharge habitat. All FIM scores (admission and discharge) correlated significantly with discharge habitat. Results suggest that FIM scores can be used to document the functional status of patients with stroke in an acute care setting and that the scores have value as predictors of recovery and outcome.

  2. Impact of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on in-hospital outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Masashi; Ishihara, Masaharu; Honda, Satoshi; Kawakami, Shoji; Yamane, Takafumi; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Kumasaka, Leon; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Tahara, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Michio; Noguchi, Teruo; Kusano, Kengo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Goto, Yoichi; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-15

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute hyperglycemia (acute-HG) and chronic hyperglycemia (chronic-HG) on short-term outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study consisted of 696 patients with AMI. Acute-HG was defined as admission plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl and chronic-HG as hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%. Acute-HG was associated with higher peak serum creatine kinase (4,094 ± 4,594 vs 2,526 ± 2,227 IU/L, p <0.001) and in-hospital mortality (9.8% vs 1.6%, p <0.001). On the contrary, there was no significant difference in peak creatine kinase (2,803 ± 2,661 vs 2,940 ± 3,181 IU/L, p = 0.59) and mortality (3.3 vs 3.7%, p = 0.79) between patients with chronic-HG and those without. Multivariate analysis showed that admission plasma glucose was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.27, p <0.001), but hemoglobin A1c was not. When only patients with acute-HG were analyzed, chronic-HG was associated with a significantly smaller infarct size (3,221 ± 3,001 vs 5,904 ± 6,473 IU/L, p <0.001) and lower in-hospital mortality (5.5 vs 18.9%, p = 0.01). In conclusion, these results suggested that acute-HG, but not chronic-HG, was associated with adverse short-term outcomes after AMI. Paradoxically, in patients with acute-HG, chronic-HG might abate the adverse effects of acute-HG.

  3. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  4. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism.

  5. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  6. On-site availability of Legionella testing in acute care hospitals, United States.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Laurel E; Shaw, Kristin M S; McCollum, Jeffrey T; Dexter, Carol; Vagnone, Paula M Snippes; Thompson, Jamie H; Giambrone, Gregory; White, Benjamin; Thomas, Stepy; Carpenter, L Rand; Nichols, Megin; Parker, Erin; Petit, Susan; Hicks, Lauri A; Langley, Gayle E

    2014-07-01

    We surveyed 399 US acute care hospitals regarding availability of on-site Legionella testing; 300 (75.2%) did not offer Legionella testing on site. Availability varied according to hospital size and geographic location. On-site access to testing may improve detection of Legionnaires disease and inform patient management and prevention efforts.

  7. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  8. Body Mass Index and Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Receiving Care in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Camprubi, Mercedes; Cabrera, Sandra; Sans, Jordi; Vidal, Georgina; Salvadó, Teresa; Bardají, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor, some controversy has arisen with regard to its effect on hospital mortality in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Methods. Clinical and anthropometric variables were analyzed in patients consecutively admitted for acute coronary syndrome to a university hospital between 2009 and 2010, and the correlation of those variables with hospital mortality was examined. Results. A total of 824 patients with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction or unstable angina were analyzed. Body mass index was an independent factor in hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.739 (IC 95%: 0.597 − 0.916), P = 0.006). Mortality in normal weight (n = 218), overweight (n = 399), and obese (n = 172) subjects was 6.1%, 3.1%, and 4.1%, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions. There is something of a paradox in the relationship between body mass index and hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in that the mortality rate decreases as body mass index increases. However, no statistically significant differences have been found in normal weight, overweight, or obese subjects. PMID:22900151

  9. Recently hospital-discharged older adults are vulnerable and may be underserved by the Older Americans Act Nutrition Program.

    PubMed

    Sahyoun, Nadine R; Anyanwu, Ucheoma O; Sharkey, Joseph R; Netterville, Linda

    2010-04-01

    The home-delivered meal (HDM) program of the Older Americans Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) has traditionally served frail homebound older adults; however, due to gaps in the continuum of care, enrollment in this program following hospital discharge remains a challenge. Trained interviewers at 6 HDM sites in 6 U.S. states assigned 566 hospital-discharged individuals, ages 60-96 years, into either early (48 hour) or delayed (2 weeks) enrollment groups and assessed their health and nutrition status. Regardless of elapsed time at enrollment, more than 80% reported at least one limitation in activities and instrumental activities of daily living. About 20% had impaired cognition and more than 40% had depressive symptoms. Also, 40% reported fair or poor appetite. Despite intense recruitment from hospitals, only 30% of participants were referred from hospitals. The recently hospital-discharged older adult population may include a higher prevalence of individuals with poor functional status and at nutritional risk than participants in the OAANP HDM program and yet may be underserved by this program.

  10. Falls after Discharge from Hospital: Is There a Gap between Older Peoples' Knowledge about Falls Prevention Strategies and the Research Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Hoffmann, Tammy; Beer, Christopher; McPhail, Steven; Hill, Keith D.; Oliver, David; Brauer, Sandra G.; Haines, Terry P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine whether older people are prepared to engage in appropriate falls prevention strategies after discharge from hospital. Design and Methods: We used a semi-structured interview to survey older patients about to be discharged from hospital and examined their knowledge regarding falls prevention strategies…

  11. Relief and Recurrence of Congestion During and After Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure: Insights from DOSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF

    PubMed Central

    Lala, Anuradha; McNulty, Steven E.; Mentz, Robert J.; Dunlay, Shannon; Vader, Justin M.; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F.; DeVore, Adam D.; Khazanie, Prateeti; Redfield, Margaret M.; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Bart, Bradley A.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Felker, Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Stevenson, Lynne W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Congestion is the most frequent cause for hospitalization in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Although decongestion is a major goal of acute therapy, it is unclear how the clinical components of congestion (e.g., peripheral edema, orthopnea) contribute to outcomes after discharge or how well decongestion is maintained. Methods and Results A post-hoc analysis was performed of 496 patients enrolled in the DOSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF trials during hospitalization with ADHF and clinical congestion. A simple “orthodema” congestion score was generated based on symptoms of orthopnea (≥2 pillows=2 points, <2 pillows=0 points) and peripheral edema (trace=0 points, moderate=1 point, severe=2 points) at baseline, discharge, and 60-day follow-up. Orthodema scores were classified as absent (score of 0), low-grade (score of 1–2), and high-grade (score of 3–4), and the association with death, rehospitalization or unscheduled medical visits through 60 days was assessed. At baseline, 65% of patients had high-grade orthodema and 35% had low-grade orthodema. At discharge, 52% patients were free from orthodema at discharge (score = 0) and these patients had lower 60-day rates of death, rehospitalization, or unscheduled visits (50%) compared to those with low-grade or high-grade orthodema (52% and 68%, respectively, p=0.038). Of the patients without orthodema at discharge, 27% relapsed to low-grade orthodema and 38% to high-grade orthodema at 60-day follow-up. Conclusions Increased severity of congestion by a simple orthodema assessment is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite intent to relieve congestion, current therapy often fails to relieve orthodema during hospitalization or to prevent recurrence after discharge. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00608491, NCT00577135. PMID:26041600

  12. 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' predicts mortality and length of hospital stay in acutely ill elderly.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Rebecca J; King, Claire L; Stroud, Mike A; Jackson, Alan A; Elia, Marinos

    2006-02-01

    Malnutrition and its impact on clinical outcome may be underestimated in hospitalised elderly as many screening procedures require measurements of weight and height that cannot often be undertaken in sick elderly patients. The 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' ('MUST') has been developed to screen all adults, even if weight and/or height cannot be measured, enabling more complete information on malnutrition prevalence and its impact on clinical outcome to be obtained. In the present study, 150 consecutively admitted elderly patients (age 85 (sd 5.5) years) were recruited prospectively, screened with 'MUST' and clinical outcome recorded. Although only 56 % of patients could be weighed, all (n 150) could be screened with 'MUST'; 58 % were at malnutrition risk and these individuals had greater mortality (in-hospital and post-discharge, P<0.01) and longer hospital stays (P=0.02) than those at low risk. Both 'MUST' categorisation and component scores (BMI, weight loss, acute disease) were significantly related to mortality (P<0.03). Those patients with no measured or recalled weight ('MUST' subjective criteria used) had a greater risk of malnutrition (P=0.01) and a poorer clinical outcome (P<0.002) than those who could be weighed and, within both groups, clinical outcome was worse in those at risk of malnutrition. The present study suggests that 'MUST' predicts clinical outcome in hospitalised elderly, in whom malnutrition is common (58 %). In those who cannot be weighed, a higher prevalence of malnutrition and associated poorer clinical outcome supports the importance of routine screening with a tool, like 'MUST', that can be used to screen all patients.

  13. BMI upon discharge from hospital and its relationship with survival: an observational study utilising linked patient records

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Daniel; Falcaro, Milena; McNulty, David; Shallcross, Laura; Wood, John; Pagano, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Objective Current advice for patients being discharged from hospital suggests a body mass index of 18.5 to 24 kgm−2, although this aspirational target may often not be achieved. We examined the relationship between body mass index on discharge from hospital and subsequent mortality over a maximum follow-up of 3.8 years. Design We conducted a survival analysis using linked hospital records data with national hospital episode statistics and national death certification data. Participants & Setting The analysis included adult patients who were admitted to University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust for a period of over 24 h during 2011, excluding day cases and regular day case attenders. Main outcome measures The relationship between body mass index and mortality at medium term was estimated separately in both men and women, after accounting for case-mix. Results For both males and females, the relationship between body mass index at discharge and the loge hazard of death was strongly non-linear (p = 0.0002 for females and p < 0.0001 for males) and predictive (both p < 0.0001). In all models, the optimal body mass index range associated with best survival was 25 to 35 kgm−2, with a sharp increase in risk for lower body mass index. Conclusions There was little evidence to support current aspirational body mass index targets in the discharge population. Hospitals should ensure adequate nutrition especially among those with a reduced body mass index. PMID:27053359

  14. Team-based innovations in primary care delivery in Quebec and timely physician follow-up after hospital discharge: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Riverin, Bruno D.; Li, Patricia; Naimi, Ashley I.; Diop, Mamadou; Provost, Sylvie; Strumpf, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Outpatient follow-up has been a key intervention point in addressing gaps in care after hospital discharge. We sought to estimate the association between enrolment in new team-based primary care practices and 30-day postdischarge physician follow-up among older patients and patients with chronic illnesses who were admitted to hospital in Quebec, Canada. Methods: Patients were selected into this cohort if a primary care physician enrolled them as a "vulnerable patient" between November 2002 and January 2005. Data for this analysis included province-wide health insurance claims for inpatient and outpatient services delivered between November 2002 and January 2009 in Quebec. The primary analysis examined time to the first outpatient postdischarge follow-up service provided by either a primary care physician or a medical specialist. We used marginal structural models to estimate adjusted rates of follow-up with a primary care physician or with a medical specialist by primary care delivery models. Results: We extracted billing data for 312 377 patients that represented 620 656 index admissions for any cause from 2002 to 2009. Rates of 30-day follow-up were 374 visits to primary care physicians and 422 visits to medical specialists per 1000 discharges. Rates of primary care physician follow-up were similar across primary care delivery models, except for patients with very high morbidity; these patients had significantly higher rates of follow-up with a primary care physician if they were enrolled in team-based primary care practices (30-d rate difference [RD] 13.3 more follow-up visits per 1000 discharges, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.8 to 19.8). Rates of follow-up with a medical specialist were lower among patients enrolled in team-based practices, particularly within 15 days of hospital discharge (15-d RD 25.1 fewer follow-up visits per 1000 discharges, 95% CI 21.1 to 29.1). Interpretation: Our study found lower rates of postdischarge follow-up with a

  15. Hospital Palliative Care Teams and Post-Acute Care in Nursing Facilities: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Joan G

    2017-01-01

    Although palliative care consultation teams are common in U.S. hospitals, follow up and outcomes of consultations for frail older adults discharged to nursing facilities are unclear. To summarize and critique research on the care of patients discharged to nursing facilities following a hospital-based palliative care consult, a systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, Ageline, and PsycINFO was conducted in February 2016. Data from the articles (N = 12) were abstracted and analyzed. The results of 12 articles reflecting research conducted in five countries are presented in narrative form. Two studies focused on nurse perceptions only, three described patient/family/caregiver experiences and needs, and seven described patient-focused outcomes. Collectively, these articles demonstrate that disruption in palliative care service on hospital discharge and nursing facility admission may result in high symptom burden, poor communication, and inadequate coordination of care. High mortality was also noted. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(1):25-34.].

  16. The role of patient-provider interactions: Using an accounts framework to explain hospital discharges against medical advice.

    PubMed

    Lekas, Helen-Maria; Alfandre, David; Gordon, Peter; Harwood, Katherine; Yin, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    The phenomenon of leaving the hospital against medical advice (AMA) despite being quite common and associated with significant deleterious health outcomes remains inadequately understood and addressed. Researchers have identified certain patient characteristics as predictors of AMA discharges, but the patients' reasons for these events have not been comprehensively explored. Moreover, because the medical authority model dominates this research area, providers' experiences of AMA discharges remain unstudied. We examined the AMA discharge from a patient-centered perspective by analyzing the content of notes providers generate to record such events. We analyzed providers' notes for all inpatients with a primary HIV diagnosis (N = 33) that, in 2012, left an urban hospital AMA. Applying the Scott and Lyman accounts framework, we identified that the notes constituted records of providers' and patients' excuses and justifications for failing to meet the expectations of a provider offering patient-centered care and a compliant patient receiving care. Alongside the patients' reasons for leaving AMA, the notes also revealed the providers' reasons for honoring or discrediting the patients' accounts. The style of the accounts and the professional status of the notes' authors enabled us to contextualize the production and sharing of AMA notes in the hospital hierarchy. Conceptualizing AMA notes as dyadic accounts elicited specific factors that challenge the patient-provider relationship, and generated insights on how to strengthen it, and thus decrease the rates of AMA discharges and their associated health effects.

  17. A feasibility pilot using a mobile personal health assistant (PHA) app to assist stroke patient and caregiver communication after hospital discharge

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Emily; Mooney, Lesia; Smith, Christina; Peel, J. Brent; Dole, Adam; Maler, Paul; Freeman, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent advancements have lowered national acute stroke mortality, yet posthospital care and readmission rates remain challenges. A personal health assistant (PHA) may help manage the spectrum of posthospital care. We hypothesized that a PHA application (app) would be associated with high poststroke patient care satisfaction and might prevent hospital readmission. Methods This is a case series of acute stroke patients admitted to a single, tertiary care, comprehensive stroke center (Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida) who were offered a personal health assistance through a smart phone app. Patients were screened based on having a cerebrovascular event and the ability to use a necessary device. All patients received the standard poststroke discharge protocol, the PHA app, and the 30-day Likert scale survey. Results We screened 21 patients and enrolled 3 (14%) before premature financial closure. Two of the 3 patients rated the app highly, and the third patient had not started using it. Of the ineligible patients, 4 had no device, 3 declined enrollment, and 2 were not able to use the device. One of the 2 patients who used the PHA app was readmitted for new stroke symptoms. Conclusions Both patients who used the app were very satisfied with the PHA and their posthospital care coordination. This study had an enrollment rate of about 14% due to various factors, including limited access or utilization of necessary technology. Though limited by final patient sample size and early termination from funding, this study provides useful information about developing future mobile health apps for acute stroke patients. PMID:28293604

  18. An Elder Abuse Assessment Team in an Acute Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Beth Israel Hospital Elder Assessment Team

    1986-01-01

    Describes a hospital-based multidisciplinary team designed to assess and respond to cases of suspected abuse or neglect of elders from both institutional and community settings. Presence of the team has increased the hospital staff's awareness of elder abuse and neglect, as well as their willingness to refer suspected cases for further assessment.…

  19. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  20. Discharge Against Medical Advice in the Pediatric Wards in Boo-ali Sina Hospital, Sari, Iran 2010

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni Saravi, Benyamin; Reza Zadeh, Esmaeil; Siamian, Hasan; Yahghoobian, Mahboobeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Since children neither comprehended nor contribute to the decision, discharge against medical advice is a challenge of health care systems in the world. Therefore, the current study was designed to determine the rate and causes of discharge against medical advice. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was done by reviewing the medical records by census method. Data was analyzed using SPSS software and x2 statistics was used to determine the relationship between variables. The value of P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Rate of discharged against medical advice was 108 (2.2%). Mean of age and length of stay were 2.8±4 (SD).3 years old and 3.7±5.4 (SD) days, respectively. Totally, 95 patients (88.7%) had health insurance and 65 (60.2%) patients lived in urban areas. History of psychiatric disease and addiction in 22 (20.6%) of the parents were negative. In addition, 100 (92.3%) patients admitted for medical treatment and the others for surgery. The relationship of the signatory with patients (72.3%) was father. Of 108 patients discharged against medical advice, 20 (12%) were readmitted. The relationship between the day of discharge and discharge against medical advice was significant (ρ =0/03). Conclusion: Rate of discharge against medical advice in Boo-ali hospital is the same as the other studies in the same range. The form which is used for this purpose did not have suitable data elements about description of consequence of such discharge, and it has not shown the real causes of discharge against medical advice. PMID:24554800

  1. Potentially inappropriate prescribing and associated factors in elderly patients at hospital discharge in Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ana Luiza Pereira Moreira; Carvalho, Renata Cunha; Aguiar, Patricia Melo; de Lima, Maria Goretti Farias; Rossi, Magali da Silva Pacheco Nobre; Carrillo, José Fernando Salvador; Dórea, Egídio Lima; Storpirtis, Sílvia

    2017-04-01

    Background The Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (STOPP/START) criteria is used to identify instances of potentially inappropriate prescribing in a patient's medication regimen. Objective To determine the prevalence and predictors of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs) among elderly patients at hospital discharge. Setting A university hospital medical clinic in Brazil. Method Discharge prescriptions were examined using the STOPP/START criteria. Subjects were inpatients aged ≥60 years receiving at least one medication prior to hospitalization and with a history of cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of PIMs and PPOs was determined and a multivariable binary regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors associated with PIMs or PPOs. Main outcome measure Prevalence of PIMs and PPOs. Results Of the 230 subjects, 13.9% were prescribed at least one PIM. The most frequently prescribed PIMs were glibenclamide or chlorpropamide prescribed for type 2 diabetes mellitus (31.0%), and aspirin at doses >150 mg/day (14.3%). Ninety patients had at least one PPO (39.1%). The most prevalent PPOs were statins (29.8%) and antiplatelet therapy (13.7%) for diabetes mellitus when coexisting major cardiovascular risk factors were present. No predictors for PIMs were found. In contrast, diabetes was a risk factor while dyslipidaemia was a protective factor for PPOs. Conclusion PIMs and PPOs commonly occur with elderly people at hospital discharge. Diabetes and dyslipidaemia were significantly associated with PPOs. Our findings show the need for interventions to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing, such as a pharmacist medication review process at hospital discharge.

  2. Trends in the Prevalence of Depression in Hospitalized Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Spain: Analysis of Hospital Discharge Data from 2001 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-de-Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-Trujillo, Mª Isabel; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Miguel-Yanes, José Mª; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; Perez-Farinos, Napoleón; de Burgos Lunar, Carmen; Cárdenas-Valladolid, Juan; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aims to describe trends in the prevalence of depression among hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes in Spain, 2001–2011. Methods We selected patients with a discharge diagnosis of type 2 diabetes using national hospital discharge data. Discharges were grouped by depression status. Prevalence of depression globally and according to primary diagnoses based on the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) were analyzed. We calculated length of stay (LOHS) and in-hospital mortality (IHM). Multivariate analysis was adjusted by age, year and comorbidity. Results From 2001 to 2011, 4,723,338 discharges with type 2 diabetes were identified (4.93% with depression). Prevalence of depression in diabetic patients increased from 3.54% in 2001 to 5.80% in 2011 (p<0.05). The prevalence of depression was significantly higher in women than in men in each year studied and increased from 5.22% in 2001 to 9.24% in 2011 (p<0.01). The highest prevalence was observed in the youngest age group (35–59 years). The median LOHS decreased significantly over this period. Men with diabetes and depression had higher IHM than women in all the years studied (p<0.05). Older age and greater comorbidity were significantly associated with a higher risk of dying, among diabetic patients with concomitant depression. Conclusions Prevalence of depression increased significantly among hospitalized diabetic patients from 2001 to 2011 even if the health profile and LOHS have improved over this period. Programs targeted at preventing depression among persons with diabetes should be reinforced in Spain. PMID:25706646

  3. National Trends over One Decade in Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction among Spanish Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Cumulative Incidence, Outcomes and Use of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-de-Andres, Ana; Jimenez-Garcia, Rodrigo; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentin; Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; de Miguel, Angel Gil; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to describe trends in the rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and use of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain, 2001–2010. Methods We selected all patients with a discharge of AMI using national hospital discharge data. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status: type 2 diabetes and no diabetes. In both groups PCIs were identified. The cumulative incidence of discharges attributed to AMI were calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status and year. We calculated length of stay and in-hospital mortality (IHM). Use of PCI was calculated stratified by diabetes status. Multivariate analysis was adjusted by age, sex, year and comorbidity. Results: From 2001 to 2010, 513,517 discharges with AMI were identified (30.3% with type 2 diabetes). The cumulative incidence of discharges due to AMI in diabetics patients increased (56.3 in 2001 to 71 cases per 100,000 in 2004), then decreased to 61.9 in 2010. Diabetic patients had significantly higher IHM (OR, 1.14; 95%CI, 1.05–1.17). The proportion of diabetic patients that underwent PCI increased from 11.9% in 2001 to 41.6% in 2010. Adjusted incidence of discharge in patients with diabetes who underwent PCI increased significantly (IRR, 3.49; 95%CI, 3.30–3.69). The IHM among diabetics patients who underwent a PCI did not change significantly over time. Conclusions AMI hospitalization rates increased initially but declining slowly. From 2001 to 2010 the proportion of diabetic patients who undergo a PCI increased almost four-fold. Older age and more comorbidity may explain why IHM did not improve after a PCI. PMID:24454920

  4. 75 FR 31118 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...This notice contains the final wage indices, hospital reclassifications, payment rates, impacts, and other related tables effective for the fiscal year (FY) 2010 hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) and rate year 2010 long-term care hospital (LTCH) prospective payment system (PPS). The rates, tables, and impacts included in this notice reflect changes required by or resulting......

  5. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... 106-554 BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics CAH Critical access hospital CARE Continuity Assessment Record... Disproportionate share hospital ECI Employment cost index EDB Enrollment Database EHR Electronic health record EMR Electronic medical record FAH Federation of American Hospitals FDA Food and Drug Administration FFY...

  6. Tolvaptan in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Heart Failure: Rationale and Design of the TACTICS and the SECRET of CHF Trials.

    PubMed

    Felker, G Michael; Mentz, Robert J; Adams, Kirkwood F; Cole, Robert T; Egnaczyk, Gregory F; Patel, Chetan B; Fiuzat, Mona; Gregory, Douglas; Wedge, Patricia; O'Connor, Christopher M; Udelson, James E; Konstam, Marvin A

    2015-09-01

    Congestion is a primary reason for hospitalization in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Despite inpatient diuretics and vasodilators targeting decongestion, persistent congestion is present in many AHF patients at discharge and more severe congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Moreover, hospitalized AHF patients may have renal insufficiency, hyponatremia, or an inadequate response to traditional diuretic therapy despite dose escalation. Current alternative treatment strategies to relieve congestion, such as ultrafiltration, may also result in renal dysfunction to a greater extent than medical therapy in certain AHF populations. Truly novel approaches to volume management would be advantageous to improve dyspnea and clinical outcomes while minimizing the risks of worsening renal function and electrolyte abnormalities. One effective new strategy may be utilization of aquaretic vasopressin antagonists. A member of this class, the oral vasopressin-2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan, provides benefits related to decongestion and symptom relief in AHF patients. Tolvaptan may allow for less intensification of loop diuretic therapy and a lower incidence of worsening renal function during decongestion. In this article, we summarize evidence for decongestion benefits with tolvaptan in AHF and describe the design of the Targeting Acute Congestion With Tolvaptan in Congestive Heart Failure Study (TACTICS) and Study to Evaluate Challenging Responses to Therapy in Congestive Heart Failure (SECRET of CHF) trials.

  7. Hospital Strategies for Reducing Risk-Standardized Mortality Rates in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.; Spatz, Erica S.; Herrin, Jeph; Cherlin, Emily J.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Thompson, Jennifer W.; Ting, Henry H.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite recent improvements in survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), U.S. hospitals vary 2-fold in their 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs). Nevertheless, information is limited on hospital-level factors that may be associated with RSMRs. Objective To identify hospital strategies that were associated with lower RSMRs. Design Cross-sectional survey of 537 hospitals (91% response rate) and weighted multivariate regression by using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to determine the associations between hospital strategies and hospital RSMRs. Setting Acute care hospitals with an annualized AMI volume of at least 25 patients. Participants Patients hospitalized with AMI between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Measurements Hospital performance improvement strategies, characteristics, and 30-day RSMRs. Results In multivariate analysis, several hospital strategies were significantly associated with lower RSMRs and in aggregate were associated with clinically important differences in RSMRs. These strategies included holding monthly meetings to review AMI cases between hospital clinicians and staff who transported patients to the hospital (RSMR lower by 0.70 percentage points), having cardiologists always on site (lower by 0.54 percentage points), fostering an organizational environment in which clinicians are encouraged to solve problems creatively (lower by 0.84 percentage points), not cross-training nurses from intensive care units for the cardiac catheterization laboratory (lower by 0.44 percentage points), and having physician and nurse champions rather than nurse champions alone (lower by 0.88 percentage points). Fewer than 10% of hospitals reported using at least 4 of these 5 strategies. Limitation The cross-sectional design demonstrates statistical associations but cannot establish causal relationships. Conclusion Several strategies, which are currently implemented by relatively few hospitals, are

  8. Physical Fitness in Older People Recently Diagnosed with Cognitive Impairment Compared to Older People Recently Discharged from Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hesseberg, Karin; Bergland, Astrid; Rydwik, Elisabeth; Brovold, Therese

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims There is evidence of an association between cognitive function and physical fitness. The aim of this study was to compare physical fitness in patients with cognitive impairment with a group of older people recently discharged from hospital. Methods A cross-sectional study with 98 patients recently diagnosed with cognitive impairment and 115 patients recently discharged from hospital. Associations between the study group variable and different components in the Senior fitness test were examined, controlling for demographic factors and comorbidity. Results The group recently diagnosed with cognitive impairment indicated poorer results on three of six physical fitness components (p < 0.05). Conclusion Older adults with cognitive impairment are in need of individually tailored physical activity programs to increase the level of physical fitness. PMID:27703472

  9. The Development of an On-Line, Partially Automated Discharge Summary and Core Clinical Data-Base in an Existing Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mark S.; Zibrak, Joseph D.; Siders, Alice; Zullo, Nan; Peterson, Mark

    1989-01-01

    We describe the development of a hospital-wide computer system that produces on-line, partially automated discharge summaries, assists nursing staff with discharge functions, and stores a core clinical database on all patients. The system was created using only tools and functions contained within the existing order-entry/results reporting hospital information system. Data enters the discharge database in three ways: direct transfer from the information system, on line selection by physicians and nurses of specific data already contained in the system (eg. lab and radiology results), and by typed input of varying amounts of text (eg. chief complaint, hospital course). If completed the night prior to discharge, the system produces several products for residents and nurses, included typed prescriptions, the printed discharge summary, nursing referral or patient care forms, and simple discharge planning information for the patient. During the course of a 9 week pilot program, 428 summaries were completed on the system, 420 of which met JCHAO criteria.

  10. Design and Rationale of a Randomized Trial of a Care Transition Strategy in Patients With Acute Heart Failure Discharged From the Emergency Department: GUIDED-HF (Get With the Guidelines in Emergency Department Patients With Heart Failure).

    PubMed

    Fermann, Gregory J; Levy, Phillip D; Pang, Peter; Butler, Javed; Ayaz, S Imran; Char, Douglas; Dunn, Patrick; Jenkins, Cathy A; Kampe, Christy; Khan, Yosef; Kumar, Vijaya A; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Liu, Dandan; Miller, Karen; Peacock, W Frank; Rizk, Samaa; Robichaux, Chad; Rothman, Russell L; Schrock, Jon; Singer, Adam; Sterling, Sarah A; Storrow, Alan B; Walsh, Cheryl; Wilburn, John; Collins, Sean P

    2017-02-01

    GUIDED-HF (Get With the Guidelines in Emergency Department Patients With Heart Failure) is a multicenter randomized trial of a patient-centered transitional care intervention in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) who are discharged either directly from the emergency department (ED) or after a brief period of ED-based observation. To optimize care and reduce ED and hospital revisits, there has been significant emphasis on improving transitions at the time of hospital discharge for patients with HF. Such efforts have been almost exclusively directed at hospitalized patients; individuals with AHF who are discharged from the ED or ED-based observation are not included in these transitional care initiatives. Patients with AHF discharged directly from the ED or after a brief period of ED-based observation are randomly assigned to our transition GUIDED-HF strategy or standard ED discharge. Patients in the GUIDED arm receive a tailored discharge plan via the study team, based on their identified barriers to outpatient management and associated guideline-based interventions. This plan includes conducting a home visit soon after ED discharge combined with close outpatient follow-up and subsequent coaching calls to improve postdischarge care and avoid subsequent ED revisits and inpatient admissions. Up to 700 patients at 11 sites will be enrolled over 3 years of the study. GUIDED-HF will test a novel approach to AHF management strategy that includes tailored transitional care for patients discharged from the ED or ED-based observation. If successful, this program may significantly alter the current paradigm of AHF patient care.

  11. Organisation and features of hospital, intermediate care and social services in English sites with low rates of delayed discharge.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Matt; Evans, Sherrill; Perkins, Margaret; Curtis, Lesley; Netten, Ann; Fernandez, Jose-Luis; Huxley, Peter

    2007-07-01

    In recent years, there has been significant concern, and policy activity, in relation to the problem of delayed discharges from hospital. Key elements of policy to tackle delays include new investment, the establishment of the Health and Social Care Change Agent Team, and the implementation of the Community Care (Delayed Discharge) Act 2003. Whilst the problem of delays has been widespread, some authorities have managed to tackle delays successfully. The aim of the qualitative study reported here was to investigate discharge practice and the organisation of services at sites with consistently low rates of delay, in order to identify factors supporting such good performance. Six 'high performing' English sites (each including a hospital trust, a local authority, and a primary care trust) were identified using a statistical model, and 42 interviews were undertaken with health and social services staff involved in discharge arrangements. Additionally, the authors set out to investigate the experiences of patients in the sites to examine whether there was a cost to patient care and outcomes of discharge arrangements in these sites, but unfortunately, it was not possible to secure sufficient patient participation. Whilst acknowledging the lack of patient experience and outcome data, a range of service elements was identified at the sites that contribute to the avoidance of delays, either through supporting efficiency within individual agencies or enabling more efficient joint working. Sites still struggling with delays should benefit from knowledge of this range. The government's reimbursement scheme appears to have been largely helpful in the study sites, prompting efficiency-driven changes to the organisation of services and discharge systems, but further focused research is required to provide clear evidence of its impact nationally, and in particular, how it impacts on staff, and patients and their families.

  12. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.7±3.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Children’s Hospital. PMID:24358438

  13. The Relationship between Local Economic Conditions and Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Utilization by Adults and Seniors in the United States, 1995–2011

    PubMed Central

    Carls, Ginger Smith; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Karaca, Zeynal; Marder, William D; Wong, Herbert S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between aggregate unemployment and hospital discharges for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among adults and seniors, 1995–2011. Data Sources/Study Setting Community hospital discharge data from states collected for the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SID) and economic data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1995–2011. Study Design Quarterly time series study of unemployment and aggregate hospital discharges in local areas using fixed effects to control for differences between local areas. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Secondary data on inpatient stays and unemployment rates aggregated to micropolitan and metropolitan areas. Principal Findings For both adults and seniors, a 1 percentage point increase in the contemporaneous unemployment rate was associated with a statistically significant 0.80 percent (adults) to 0.96 percent (seniors) decline in AMI hospitalization during the first half of the study but was unrelated to the economic cycle in the second half of the study period. Conclusions The study found evidence that the aggregate relationship between health and the economy may be shifting for cardiovascular events, paralleling recent research that has shown a similar shift for some types of mortality (Ruhm 2013), self-reported health, and inpatient use among seniors (McInerney and Mellor 2012). PMID:25772510

  14. Predictors and Prevalence of Recovery and Remission for Consumers Discharged from Mental Hospitals in a Chinese Society.

    PubMed

    Young, Daniel K W; Ng, Petrus Y N; Pan, Jiayan

    2017-02-23

    This research study examines the 1 year rate of recovery and remissions for consumers recently discharging from mental hospitals and identifies factors predicting recovery and remissions in the Hong Kong context. By adopting a prospective longitudinal follow-up research design, a cohort of Chinese people discharged from the mental hospitals and participating in a community-based psychosocial program was followed for 1 year. These individuals were assessed by using standardized assessment scales at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months of follow-up. At 1 year follow up, the rates of recovery, functional and symptomatic remission were 8.0%, 23.0% and 79.3% respectively. Logistic regression analyses indicted that: current recovery was significantly predicted by baseline functioning level and achieving open employment, symptomatic remission was significantly predicted by previous symptom severity and having open employment at baseline, while functional remission was significantly predicted by previous functioning level and having open employment. Result indicates that it is more difficult to achieve functional remission and recovery than symptomatic remission for consumers recently discharging from mental hospitals. Also, symptomatic remission is found not a sufficient condition for recovery, while functional remission plays a vital role in recovery. Helping consumers to achieve open employment and improve social functioning are identified as the predicting factors for recovery and functional remission in the local context.

  15. Hypotension During Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure Is Independently Associated With 30-Day Mortality: Findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyesh A.; Heizer, Gretchen; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Hasselblad, Vic; Mills, Roger M.; McMurray, John J.; Starling, Randall C.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes associated with episodes of hypotension while hospitalized are not well understood. Methods and Results Using data from ASCEND-HF, we assessed factors associated with inhospital hypotension and subsequent 30-day outcomes. Patients were classified as having symptomatic or asymptomatic hypotension. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with in-hospital hypotension, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between hypotension and 30-day outcomes. We also tested for treatment interaction with nesiritide on 30-day outcomes and the association between inhospital hypotension and renal function at hospital discharge. Overall, 1555/7141 (21.8%) patients had an episode of hypotension, of which 73.1% were asymptomatic and 26.9% were symptomatic. Factors strongly associated with in-hospital hypotension included randomization to nesiritide (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.76–2.23; p<0.001), chronic metolazone therapy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.60; p<0.001), and baseline orthopnea (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.13–1.52; p=0.001) or S3 gallop (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06–1.40; p=0.006). In-hospital hypotension was associated with increased hazards of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.57–2.61; p<0.001), 30-day heart failure (HF) hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34–1.86; p<0.001), and 30-day all-cause hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.22–1.61; p<0.001). Nesiritide had no interaction on the relationship between hypotension and 30-day outcomes (interaction p=0.874 for death, p=0.908 for death/HF hospitalization, p=0.238 death/all-cause hospitalization). Conclusions Hypotension while hospitalized for acute decompensated HF is an independent risk factor for adverse 30-day outcomes, and its occurrence highlights the need for modified treatment strategies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT

  16. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mirghani, Hyder O.; Elnour, Mohammed A.; Taha, Akasha M.; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P < 0.05). No differences were found with regard to age, hypertension, diabetes, family history of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and in-hospital acute coronary complications (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications. PMID:27186156

  17. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  18. Impact of California mandated acute care hospital nurse staffing ratios: a literature synthesis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Nancy; Shapiro, Susan

    2010-08-01

    California is the first state to enact legislation mandating minimum nurse-to-patient ratios at all times in acute care hospitals. This synthesis examines 12 studies of the impact of California's ratios on patient care cost, quality, and outcomes in acute care hospitals. A key finding from this synthesis is that the implementation of minimum nurse-to-patient ratios reduced the number of patients per licensed nurse and increased the number of worked nursing hours per patient day in hospitals. Another finding is that there were no significant impacts of these improved staffing measures on measures of nursing quality and patient safety indicators across hospitals. A critical observation may be that adverse outcomes did not increase despite the increasing patient severity reflected in case mix index. We cautiously posit that this finding may actually suggest an impact of ratios in preventing adverse events in the presence of increased patient risk.

  19. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    PubMed

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  20. The creation of a Dementia Nurse Specialist role in an acute general hospital.

    PubMed

    Elliot, R; Adams, J

    2011-09-01

    Older people form the largest group occupying acute hospital beds and many of them will have undiagnosed mental health problems. The creation of a Dementia Nurse Specialist role in a district general hospital provided the opportunity to assess the extent of the previously unmet need among patients, carers and nursing staff. Over 30 patients were seen each month, while around 6 to 12 were diagnosed as having dementia. Other activities undertaken as part of the role included providing information and support for carers, and advice on management of behaviours and support for ward staff. The role also involved policy writing, pathway and local strategy planning, care plan development, and formal and informal teaching on dementia. It is argued that this fixed-term post demonstrated that a Dementia Nurse Specialist could provide significant input in an acute hospital setting, by improving the experience of hospitalization for vulnerable older people and their carers.

  1. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... established that ESRD beneficiary discharges, excluding discharges classified into MS-DRG 652 (Renal Failure), MS-DRG 682 (Renal Failure with MCC), MS-DRG 683 (Renal Failure with CC), MS-DRG 684 (Renal Failure without CC/MCC) and MS-DRG 685 (Admit for Renal Dialysis), where the beneficiary received...

  2. [The Torino Network Project. Global management of acute myocardial infarction from the field to the hospital].

    PubMed

    Casaccia, Michele; Sicuro, Marco; Scacciatella, Paolo

    2002-02-01

    A unidirectional clinical pathway for acute myocardial infarction from out-of-hospital setting to the coronary care unit and catheterization laboratory could lead to mortality reduction. The ongoing "Progetto Torino Network. Gestione globale dell'infarto miocardico acuto prime ore dal territorio all'ospedale" is based on this statement and described in the three-structural, diagnostic-therapeutical, multimedial issues. This project represents the historical evolution of our involvement in out-of-hospital cardiac emergency management.

  3. Bereavement Support in an Acute Hospital: An Irish Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Trish; Foreman, Maeve; Curry, Philip; O'Driscoll, Siobhan; McCormack, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the first Irish study to examine a hospital-based bereavement care program, 1 year's cohort of bereaved people was surveyed. A response rate of over 40% provided 339 completed questionnaires from bereaved next-of-kin. The findings suggest that a tiered pyramid model of bereavement care (the Beaumont model) may be functional in a number of ways.…

  4. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  5. Intracardiac impedance response during acute AF internal cardioversion using novel rectilinear and capacitor-discharge waveforms.

    PubMed

    Rababah, A S; Walsh, S J; Manoharan, G; Walsh, P R; Escalona, O J

    2016-07-01

    Intracardiac impedance (ICI) is a major determinant of success during internal cardioversion of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, there have been few studies that have examined the dynamic behaviour of atrial impedance during internal cardioversion in relation to clinical outcome. In this study, voltage and current waveforms captured during internal cardioversion of acute AF in ovine models using novel radiofrequency (RF) generated low-tilt rectilinear and conventional capacitor-discharge based shock waveforms were retrospectively analysed using a digital signal processing algorithm to investigate the dynamic behaviour of atrial impedance during cardioversion. The algorithm was specifically designed to facilitate the simultaneous analysis of multiple impedance parameters, including: mean intracardiac impedance (Z M), intracardiac impedance variance (ICIV) and impedance amplitude spectrum area (IAMSA) for each cardioversion event. A significant reduction in ICI was observed when comparing two successive shocks of increasing energy where cardioversion outcome was successful. In addition, ICIV and IAMSA variables were found to inversely correlate to the magnitude of energy delivered; with a stronger correlation found to the former parameter. In conclusion, ICIV and IAMSA have been evidenced as two key dynamic intracardiac impedance variables that may prove useful in better understanding of the cardioversion process and that could potentially act as prognostic markers with respect to clinical outcome.

  6. Selected enteropathogens and clinical course in children hospitalized with severe acute gastroenteritis in Barbados

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Browne, Chantelle; Scotland, Shauna; Krishnamurthy, Kandamaran; Nielsen, Anders L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of selected bacterial and viral enteropathogens in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis and the secondary aim was to characterize the clinical course and the outcome. Methodology A retrospective audit of children (<15 years) admitted with acute gastroenteritis during January 2008 to October 2010. Stool samples were analyzed for bacterial pathogens and for the Rotavirus. Demographics, clinical presentations, hospital course and outcome were extracted from the admission records. Results There were 571 children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis, which accounted for 11% of all medical hospitalization in children. Overall, 42.9% of these children were ≤12 months in age. Stool test result was documented in 46.6% of children hospitalized with gastroenteritis and an enteropathogen was isolated in 36.8% of cases with documented stool test result. Non-typhoidal Salmonella species was the most commonly isolated enteropathogen accounting for 21.1% of all the documented cases. Rotavirus was identified as an etiological agent in 9.0%. Of the 56 children who had non-typhoidal salmonella gastroenteritis, 54(96.4%) were younger than 5 years. The median duration of hospitalization was 2 days (Range 1 day to 9 days). There were no deaths. Conclusion Non-typhoidal salmonella was the most common enteropathogen isolated and this was followed by the Rotavirus. PMID:25780359

  7. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... CMS Abstraction & Reporting Tool CAUTI Catheter-associated urinary tract infection CBSAs Core-based... Regulations CLABSI Central line-associated bloodstream infection CIPI Capital input price index CMI Case-mix... Healthcare-associated infection HBIPS Hospital-based inpatient psychiatric services HCAHPS Hospital...

  8. Dynamic changes of serum SARS-Coronavirus IgG, pulmonary function and radiography in patients recovering from SARS after hospital discharge

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lixin; Liu, Youning; Fan, Baoxing; Xiao, Yueyong; Tian, Qing; Chen, Liangan; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Weijun

    2005-01-01

    Objective The intent of this study was to examine the recovery of individuals who had been hospitalized for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in the year following their discharge from the hospital. Parameters studied included serum levels of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) IgG antibody, tests of lung function, and imaging data to evaluate changes in lung fibrosis. In addition, we explored the incidence of femoral head necrosis in some of the individuals recovering from SARS. Methods The subjects of this study were 383 clinically diagnosed SARS patients in Beijing, China. They were tested regularly for serum levels of SARS-CoV IgG antibody and lung function and were given chest X-rays and/or high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) examinations at the Chinese PLA General Hospital during the 12 months that followed their release from the hospital. Those individuals who were found to have lung diffusion abnormities (transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide [DLCO] < 80% of predicted value [pred]) received regular lung function tests and HRCT examinations in the follow-up phase in order to document the changes in their lung condition. Some patients who complained of joint pain were given magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of their femoral heads. Findings Of all the subjects, 81.2% (311 of 383 patients) tested positive for serum SARS-CoV IgG. Of those testing positive, 27.3% (85 of 311 patients) were suffering from lung diffusion abnormities (DLCO < 80% pred) and 21.5% (67 of 311 patients) exhibited lung fibrotic changes. In the 12 month duration of this study, all of the 40 patients with lung diffusion abnormities who were examined exhibited some improvement of lung function and fibrosis detected by radiography. Of the individuals receiving MRI examinations, 23.1% (18 of 78 patients) showed signs of femoral head necrosis. Interpretation The lack of sero-positive SARS-CoV in some individuals suggests that there may have been some misdiagnosed cases

  9. Discharge behaviors of trapezius motor units during exposure to low and high levels of acute psychosocial stress

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Jennifer L; Maluf, Katrina S

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute psychosocial stress on trapezius single motor unit discharge behaviors. Twenty-one healthy women performed feedback-controlled isometric contractions under conditions of low and high psychosocial stress in the same experimental session. Psychosocial stress was manipulated using a verbal math task combined with social evaluative threat which significantly increased perceived anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure (P<0.001). Motor unit discharge behaviors including the threshold and discharge rate at recruitment (7.7 (5.7) %MVC and 7.3 (6.8) pps, P>0.121, N=103) and derecruitment (6.0(4.4) %MVC and 6.5(4.1) pps, P>0.223, N=99), the mean (11.3 (2.3) pps, P=0.309, N=106) and variability (2.5 (0.91) pps, P=0.958, N=106) of discharge rate, and the proportion of motor units exhibiting double discharges (21%, P=0.446) did not change across stress conditions. Discharge rate modulation with changes in contraction intensity was highly variable and similar across stress conditions (P>0.308, N=89). Rate-rate modulation of concurrently active motor units was also highly variable (r=−0.84–1.00, N=75). Estimates of ΔF for motor unit pairs with rate-rate modulation ≥0.7 were positive and similar across stress conditions (4.7(2.0) pps, P=0.405, N=16). Results indicate that acute psychosocial stress does not alter trapezius motor unit discharge behaviors during a precisely controlled motor task in healthy women. PMID:20087201

  10. Recognizing clinical entities in hospital discharge summaries using Structural Support Vector Machines with word representation features

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Named entity recognition (NER) is an important task in clinical natural language processing (NLP) research. Machine learning (ML) based NER methods have shown good performance in recognizing entities in clinical text. Algorithms and features are two important factors that largely affect the performance of ML-based NER systems. Conditional Random Fields (CRFs), a sequential labelling algorithm, and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), which is based on large margin theory, are two typical machine learning algorithms that have been widely applied to clinical NER tasks. For features, syntactic and semantic information of context words has often been used in clinical NER systems. However, Structural Support Vector Machines (SSVMs), an algorithm that combines the advantages of both CRFs and SVMs, and word representation features, which contain word-level back-off information over large unlabelled corpus by unsupervised algorithms, have not been extensively investigated for clinical text processing. Therefore, the primary goal of this study is to evaluate the use of SSVMs and word representation features in clinical NER tasks. Methods In this study, we developed SSVMs-based NER systems to recognize clinical entities in hospital discharge summaries, using the data set from the concept extration task in the 2010 i2b2 NLP challenge. We compared the performance of CRFs and SSVMs-based NER classifiers with the same feature sets. Furthermore, we extracted two different types of word representation features (clustering-based representation features and distributional representation features) and integrated them with the SSVMs-based clinical NER system. We then reported the performance of SSVM-based NER systems with different types of word representation features. Results and discussion Using the same training (N = 27,837) and test (N = 45,009) sets in the challenge, our evaluation showed that the SSVMs-based NER systems achieved better performance than the CRFs

  11. Readmission for Acute Exacerbation within 30 Days of Discharge Is Associated with a Subsequent Progressive Increase in Mortality Risk in COPD Patients: A Long-Term Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Mónica; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Liapikou, Adamantia; Huerta, Arturo; Gabarrús, Albert; Chetta, Alfredo; Soler, Nestor; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Twenty per cent of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are readmitted for acute exacerbation (AECOPD) within 30 days of discharge. The prognostic significance of early readmission is not fully understood. The objective of our study was to estimate the mortality risk associated with readmission for acute exacerbation within 30 days of discharge in COPD patients. Methods The cohort (n = 378) was divided into patients readmitted (n = 68) and not readmitted (n = 310) within 30 days of discharge. Clinical, laboratory, microbiological, and severity data were evaluated at admission and during hospital stay, and mortality data were recorded at four time points during follow-up: 30 days, 6 months, 1 year and 3 years. Results Patients readmitted within 30 days had poorer lung function, worse dyspnea perception and higher clinical severity. Two or more prior AECOPD (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.51–4.05) was the only variable independently associated with 30-day readmission. The mortality risk during the follow-up period showed a progressive increase in patients readmitted within 30 days in comparison to patients not readmitted; moreover, 30-day readmission was an independent risk factor for mortality at 1 year (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.10–5.59). In patients readmitted within 30 days, the estimated absolute increase in the mortality risk was 4% at 30 days (number needed to harm NNH, 25), 17% at 6-months (NNH, 6), 19% at 1-year (NNH, 6) and 24% at 3 years (NNH, 5). Conclusion In conclusion a readmission for AECOPD within 30 days is associated with a progressive increased long-term risk of death. PMID:26943928

  12. A multilevel intervention to increase community hospital use of alteplase for acute stroke (INSTINCT): a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Phillip A; Meurer, William J; Frederiksen, Shirley M; Kalbfleisch, John D; Xu, Zhenzhen; Haan, Mary N; Silbergleit, Robert; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Use of alteplase improves outcome in some patients with stroke. Several types of barrier frequently prevent its use. We assessed whether a standardised, barrier-assessment, multicomponent intervention could increase alteplase use in community hospitals in Michigan, USA. Methods In a cluster-randomised controlled trial, we selected adult, non-specialty, acute-care community hospitals in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, USA. Eligible hospitals discharged at least 100 patients who had had a stroke per year, had less than 100 000 visits to the emergency department per year, and were not academic comprehensive stroke centres. Using a computer-generated randomisation sequence, we selected 12 matched pairs of eligible hospitals. Within pairs, the hospitals were allocated to intervention or control groups with restricted randomisation in January, 2007. Between January, 2007, and December, 2007, intervention hospitals implemented a multicomponent intervention that included qualitative and quantitative assessment of barriers to alteplase use and ways to address the findings, and provided additional support. The primary outcome was change in alteplase use in patients with stroke in emergency departments between the pre-intervention period (January, 2005, to December, 2006) and the post-intervention period (January, 2008, to January, 2010). Physicians in participating hospitals and the coordinating centre could not be masked to group assignment, but were masked to progress made in paired control hospitals. External medical reviewers who were masked to group assignment assessed outcomes. We did intention-to-treat (ITT) and target-population (without one pair that was excluded after randomisation) analyses. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00349479. Findings All 24 hospitals completed the study. Overall, 745 of 40 823 patients with stroke received intravenous alteplase treatment. In the ITT analysis, the proportion of patients with

  13. A randomised trial deploying a simulation to investigate the impact of hospital discharge letters on patient care in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Jiwa, Moyez; Meng, Xingqiong; O'Shea, Carolyn; Magin, Parker; Dadich, Ann; Pillai, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine how the timing and length of hospital discharge letters impact on the number of ongoing patient problems identified by general practitioners (GPs). Trial design GPs were randomised into four groups. Each viewed a video monologue of an actor-patient as he might present to his GP following a hospital admission with 10 problems. GPs were provided with a medical record as well as a long or short discharge letter, which was available when the video was viewed or 1 week later. GPs indicated if they would prescribe, refer or order tests for the patient's problems. Methods Setting Primary care. Participants Practising Australian GPs. Intervention A short or long hospital discharge letter enumerating patient problems. Outcome measure Number of ongoing patient problems out of 10 identified for management by the GPs. Randomisation 1:1 randomisation. Blinding (masking) Single-blind. Results Numbers randomised 59 GPs. Recruitment GPs were recruited from a network of 102 GPs across Australia. Numbers analysed 59 GPs. Outcome GPs who received the long letter immediately were more satisfied with this information (p<0.001). Those who received the letter immediately identified significantly more health problems (p=0.001). GPs who received a short, delayed discharge letter were less satisfied than those who received a longer delayed letter (p=0.03); however, both groups who received the delayed letter identified a similar number of health problems. GPs who were older, who practised in an inner regional area or who offered more patient sessions per week identified fewer health problems (p values <0.01, <0.05 and <0.05, respectively). Harms Nil. Conclusions Receiving information during patient consultation, as well as GP characteristics, influences the number of patient problems addressed. Trial registration number ACTRN12614000403639. PMID:25005597

  14. Comorbidity in Adult Patients Hospitalized with Type 2 Diabetes in Northeast China: An Analysis of Hospital Discharge Data from 2002 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Di; Gong, Chunxiu; Pan, Qing; Dong, Xiao; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Kuan; Wang, Shiping; Lei, Jianbo; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the comorbidity burden and patterns among adult patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Northeast China using hospital discharge data derived from the electronic medical record database between 2002 and 2013. 12.8% of 4,400,892 inpatients aged ≥18 had a diagnosis of T2DM. Sex differences in prevalence varied among those aged <50, 50-59, and ≥60. Twenty-seven diseases were determined as major comorbidities of T2DM. Essential hypertension was the most common comorbidity of T2DM (absolute cooccurrence risk, 58.4%), while T2DM was also the most popular comorbidity of essential hypertension. Peripheral and visceral atherosclerosis showed the strongest association (relative cooccurrence risk, RCoR 4.206). For five leading comorbidities among patients aged ≥40, male patients had a stronger association with disorders of lipid metabolism than female patients (RCoR 2.779 versus 2.099), and female patients had a stronger association with chronic renal failure than male patients (RCoR 2.461 versus 2.155). Leading comorbidities, except chronic renal failure, had declining associations with T2DM with increased age. Collectively, hospital discharge data can be used to estimate disease prevalence and identify comorbidities. The findings provided comprehensive information on comorbidity patterns, helping policy makers and programs in public health domains to estimate and evaluate the epidemic of chronic diseases.

  15. Comorbidity in Adult Patients Hospitalized with Type 2 Diabetes in Northeast China: An Analysis of Hospital Discharge Data from 2002 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Di; Gong, Chunxiu; Pan, Qing; Dong, Xiao; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the comorbidity burden and patterns among adult patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Northeast China using hospital discharge data derived from the electronic medical record database between 2002 and 2013. 12.8% of 4,400,892 inpatients aged ≥18 had a diagnosis of T2DM. Sex differences in prevalence varied among those aged <50, 50–59, and ≥60. Twenty-seven diseases were determined as major comorbidities of T2DM. Essential hypertension was the most common comorbidity of T2DM (absolute cooccurrence risk, 58.4%), while T2DM was also the most popular comorbidity of essential hypertension. Peripheral and visceral atherosclerosis showed the strongest association (relative cooccurrence risk, RCoR 4.206). For five leading comorbidities among patients aged ≥40, male patients had a stronger association with disorders of lipid metabolism than female patients (RCoR 2.779 versus 2.099), and female patients had a stronger association with chronic renal failure than male patients (RCoR 2.461 versus 2.155). Leading comorbidities, except chronic renal failure, had declining associations with T2DM with increased age. Collectively, hospital discharge data can be used to estimate disease prevalence and identify comorbidities. The findings provided comprehensive information on comorbidity patterns, helping policy makers and programs in public health domains to estimate and evaluate the epidemic of chronic diseases. PMID:27847807

  16. Current use of beta blockers in patients with reactive airway disease who are hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Olenchock, Benjamin A; Fonarow, Gregg G; Pan, Wenqin; Hernandez, Adrian; Cannon, Christopher P

    2009-02-01

    Beta blockers have a proven benefit in the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and for secondary prevention of coronary events. Current guidelines list such reactive airway diseases (RADs) such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as relative contraindications to beta-blocker use. However, the co-morbid burden of RAD and coronary heart disease is substantial, and data suggest that the treatment benefit of beta blockers is shared by patients with RAD. The Get with the Guidelines (GWTG) database was used to evaluate use of beta blockers within 24 hours of admission and at discharge in patients with ACS with (n = 12,967) and without (n = 81,140) a history of RAD. Data were collected in 435 hospitals between January 2000 and September 2006. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine predictors of beta-blocker treatment. In patients with no RAD history, beta-blocker prescription rates were 78.3% at admission and 88.7% at discharge; in patients with a RAD history, rates were 65.6% at admission and 77.2% at discharge. Compared with patients with no history of RAD, patients with a history of RAD were 42% less likely (odds ratio 0.58, confidence interval 0.54 to 0.62, p <0.0001) to receive a beta blocker upon admission and 55% less likely (odds ratio 0.45, confidence interval 0.41 to 0.48, p <0.0001) to receive a beta blocker at discharge in multivariable analysis. Among all other clinical factors, RAD history was the most significant predictor of likelihood of not receiving a beta blocker at admission or discharge. Receipt of beta blockers within 24 hours after admission was associated with a lower in-hospital mortality rate for patients with RAD (odds ratio = 0.52, p <0.001) and for patients without RAD (odds ratio = 0.38, p <0.001). Careful assessment of beta-blocker safety and RAD severity by physicians is needed to improve beta-blocker prescription rates in this large group of patients with ACS.

  17. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  18. Predicting discharge in forensic psychiatry: the legal and psychosocial factors associated with long and short stays in forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ross, Thomas; Querengässer, Jan; Fontao, María Isabel; Hoffmann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In Germany, both the number of patients treated in forensic psychiatric hospitals and the average inpatient treatment period have been increasing for over thirty years. Biographical and clinical factors, e.g., the number of prior offences, type of offence, and psychiatric diagnosis, count among the factors that influence the treatment duration and the likelihood of discharge. The aims of the current study were threefold: (1) to provide an estimate of the German forensic psychiatric patient population with a low likelihood of discharge, (2) to replicate a set of personal variables that predict a relatively high, as opposed to a low, likelihood of discharge from forensic psychiatric hospitals, and (3) to describe a group of other factors that are likely to add to the existing body of knowledge. Based on a sample of 899 patients, we applied a battery of primarily biographical and other personal variables to two subgroups of patients. The first subgroup of patients had been treated in a forensic psychiatric hospital according to section 63 of the German legal code for at least ten years (long-stay patients, n=137), whereas the second subgroup had been released after a maximum treatment period of four years (short-stay patients, n=67). The resulting logistic regression model had a high goodness of fit, with more than 85% of the patients correctly classified into the groups. In accordance with earlier studies, we found a series of personal variables, including age at first admission and type of offence, to be predictive of a short or long-stay. Other findings, such as the high number of immigrants among the short-stay patients and the significance of a patient's work time before admission to a forensic psychiatric hospital, are more clearly represented than has been observed in previous research.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of a Specialist Geriatric Medical Intervention for Frail Older People Discharged from Acute Medical Units: Economic Evaluation in a Two-Centre Randomised Controlled Trial (AMIGOS)

    PubMed Central

    Tanajewski, Lukasz; Franklin, Matthew; Gkountouras, Georgios; Berdunov, Vladislav; Edmans, Judi; Conroy, Simon; Bradshaw, Lucy E.; Gladman, John R. F.; Elliott, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor outcomes and high resource-use are observed for frail older people discharged from acute medical units. A specialist geriatric medical intervention, to facilitate Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, was developed to reduce the incidence of adverse outcomes and associated high resource-use in this group in the post-discharge period. Objective To examine the costs and cost-effectiveness of a specialist geriatric medical intervention for frail older people in the 90 days following discharge from an acute medical unit, compared with standard care. Methods Economic evaluation was conducted alongside a two-centre randomised controlled trial (AMIGOS). 433 patients (aged 70 or over) at risk of future health problems, discharged from acute medical units within 72 hours of attending hospital, were recruited in two general hospitals in Nottingham and Leicester, UK. Participants were randomised to the intervention, comprising geriatrician assessment in acute units and further specialist management, or to control where patients received no additional intervention over and above standard care. Primary outcome was incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results We undertook cost-effectiveness analysis for 417 patients (intervention: 205). The difference in mean adjusted QALYs gained between groups at 3 months was -0.001 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.009, 0.007). Total adjusted secondary and social care costs, including direct costs of the intervention, at 3 months were £4412 (€5624, $6878) and £4110 (€5239, $6408) for the intervention and standard care groups, the incremental cost was £302 (95% CI: 193, 410) [€385, $471]. The intervention was dominated by standard care with probability of 62%, and with 0% probability of cost-effectiveness (at £20,000/QALY threshold). Conclusions The specialist geriatric medical intervention for frail older people discharged from acute medical unit was not cost-effective. Further research on

  20. Impaired Arousal in Older Adults is Associated with Prolonged Hospital Stay and Discharge to Skilled Nursing Facility

    PubMed Central

    Yevchak, Andrea M.; Han, Jin Ho; Doherty, Kelly; Archambault, Elizabeth G.; Kelly, Brittany; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Ely, E. Wesley; Rudolph, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor cognitive function is associated with negative consequences across settings of care, but research instruments are arduous for routine clinical implementation. This study examined the association between impaired arousal, as measured using an ultra-brief screen, and risk of two adverse clinical outcomes: hospital length of stay and discharge to a skilled nursing facility (SNF). Design, Setting, & Participants A secondary data analysis was conducted using two separate groups of medical ward patients: a VA medical center in the northeast (N=1,487, between 2010 and 2012) 60 years and older and a large tertiary care, university-based medical center (N=669, between 2007 and 2013) 65 years and older in the southeastern United States. Measurements The impact of impaired arousal, defined by the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) as anything other than “awake and alert,” was determined using Cox Proportional Hazard Regression for time to hospital discharge and logistic regression for discharge to a SNF. Hazard ratios (HR) and odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported, respectively. Both models were adjusted age, sex, and dementia. Results The 2,156 total patients included in these groups had a mean age of 76 years, of whom 16.4% in group one and 28.5% in group two had impaired arousal. In the first group, patients with normal arousal spent an average of 5.9 days (SD 6.2) in the hospital, while those with impaired arousal spent 8.5 days (9.2). On any given day, patients with impaired arousal had 27% lower chance of being discharged (adjusted hazard ratio 0.73 (95%CI: 0.63 – 0.84). In the second group, individuals with normal arousal spent 3.8 (4.1) days in the hospital compared to 4.7 (4.6) for those with impaired arousal; indicating a 21% lower chance of being discharged [adjusted HR 0.79 (95%CI: 0.66 – 0.95). With regard to risk of discharge to SNF, those with impaired arousal in group 1 had a 65% higher risk than

  1. The effect of post-discharge educational intervention on patients in achieving objectives in modifiable risk factors six months after discharge following an episode of acute coronary syndrome, (CAM-2 Project): a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether an intervention mainly consisting of a signed agreement between patient and physician on the objectives to be reached, improves reaching these secondary prevention objectives in modifiable cardiovascular risk factors six-months after discharge following an acute coronary syndrome. Background There is room to improve mid-term adherence to clinical guidelines' recommendations in coronary heart disease secondary prevention, specially non-pharmacological ones, often neglected. Methods In CAM-2, patients discharged after an acute coronary syndrome were randomly assigned to the intervention or the usual care group. The primary outcome was reaching therapeutic objectives in various secondary prevention variables: smoking, obesity, blood lipids, blood pressure control, exercise and taking of medication. Results 1757 patients were recruited in 64 hospitals and 1510 (762 in the intervention and 748 in the control group) attended the six-months follow-up visit. After adjustment for potentially important variables, there were, between the intervention and control group, differences in the mean reduction of body mass index (0.5 vs. 0.2; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (1.6 cm vs. 0.6 cm; p = 0.05), proportion of patients who exercise regularly and those with total cholesterol below 175 mg/dl (64.7% vs. 56.5%; p = 0.001). The reported intake of medications was high in both groups for all the drugs considered with no differences except for statins (98.1% vs. 95.9%; p = 0.029). Conclusions At least in the short term, lifestyle changes among coronary heart disease patients are achievable by intensifying the responsibility of the patient himself by means of a simple and feasible intervention. PMID:21092191

  2. Effectiveness of Hospital Functions for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment on In-Hospital Mortality: Results From a Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Background Though evidence is limited in Japan, clinical controlled studies overseas have revealed that specialized care units are associated with better outcomes for acute stoke patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of hospital functions for acute care of ischemic stroke on in-hospital mortality, with statistical accounting for referral bias. Methods We derived data from a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database linked to the Survey of Medical Care Institutions and Hospital Report data. We compared the mortality of acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 41 476) in hospitals certified for acute stroke treatment with that in non-certified institutions. To adjust for potential referral bias, we used differential distance to hospitals from the patient’s residence as an instrumental variable and constructed bivariate probit models. Results With the ordinary probit regression model, in-hospital mortality in certified hospitals was not significantly different from that in non-certified institutions. Conversely, the model with the instrumental variable method showed that admission to certified hospitals reduced in-hospital mortality by 30.7% (P < 0.001). This difference remained after adjusting for hospital size, volume, staffing, and intravenous use of tissue plasminogen activator. Conclusions Comparison accounting for referral selection found that certified hospital function for acute ischemic stroke care was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality. Our results indicate that organized stroke care—with certified subspecialty physicians and around-the-clock availability of personnel, imaging equipment, and emergency neurosurgical procedures in an intensive stroke care unit—is effective in improving outcomes in acute ischemic stroke care. PMID:26165489

  3. Occurrence of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria at an Acute Care Hospital Using Secondary Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of infection control strategies at acute-care hospitals has contributed to an overall decline in the number of healthcare-associated infections (HAI’s) in the United States, especially those caused by contaminated equipment used in surgical procedures and co...

  4. Changing Patterns of Mental Hospital Discharges and Readmissions in the Past Two Decades

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. Edgar; Wanklin, James; Ladd, K. B.

    1965-01-01

    The discharge and readmission pattern for the non-organic psychoses (chiefly schizophrenia and manic-depressive psychoses) was studied for three-year periods: immediately before extensive use of modern therapies (1940-42), when electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) alone was extensively used (1950-52), and finally when tranquillizers had been added (1956-58). Patients were followed up for four years after either admission or discharge. The cohort method was used. With the use of ECT alone discharge took place at an earlier period after admission but was associated with a higher rate of readmission. With the addition of tranquillizers the improvement in rate of discharge continued for the whole four years after admission and the readmission rate was reduced to that seen in the first period. The rate of changing factors other than specific therapies is discussed. PMID:14308904

  5. Time Trends in Hospital Admissions for Bronchiectasis: Analysis of the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Data (2004 to 2013)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Gema; López de Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Pedraza-Serrano, Fernando; Puente-Maestu, Luis; de Miguel-Díez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze changes in the incidence, diagnostic procedures, comorbidity, length of hospital stay (LOHS), costs and in-hospital mortality (IHM) for patients with bronchiectasis who were hospitalized in Spain over a 10-year period. Methods We included all admissions for patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis as primary or secondary diagnosis during 2004–2013. Results 282,207 patients were admitted to the study. After controlling for possible confounders, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of hospitalizations over the study period when bronchiectasis was a secondary diagnosis. When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis we observed a significant decline in the incidence. In all cases, this pathology was more frequent in males, and the average age and comorbidity increased significantly during the study period (p<0.001). When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis, the most frequent secondary diagnosis was Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. When bronchiectasis was the secondary diagnosis, the most frequent primary diagnosis was COPD. IHM was low, tending to decrease from 2004 to 2013 (p<0.05). The average LOHS decreased significantly during the study period in both cases (p<0.001). The mean cost per patient decreased in patients with bronchiectasis as primary diagnosis, but it increased for cases of bronchiectasis as secondary diagnosis (p<0.001). Conclusions Our results reveal an increase in the incidence of hospital admissions for patients with bronchiectasis as a secondary diagnosis from 2004 to 2013, as opposed to cases of bronchiectasis as the primary diagnosis. Although the average age and comorbidity significantly increased over time, both IHM and average LOHS significantly decreased. PMID:27622273

  6. The effect of funding policy on day of week admissions and discharges in hospitals: the cases of Austria and Canada.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kevin J; Rauner, Marion S; Schaffhauser-Linzatti, Michaela Maria; Yap, Richard

    2003-03-01

    This paper compares two different funding policies for inpatients, the case-based approach in Austria versus the global budgeting approach in Canada. It examines the impact of these funding policies on length of stay of inpatients as one key measure of health outcome. In our study, six major clinical categories for inpatients are selected in which the day of the week for admission is matched to the particular day of the week of discharge for each individual case. The strategic statistical analysis proves that funding policies have a significant impact on the expected length of stay of inpatients. For all six clinical categories, Austrian inpatients stayed longer in hospitals compared to Canadian inpatients. Moreover, inpatients were not admitted and discharged equally throughout the week. We also statistically prove for certain clinical categories that more inpatients are discharged on certain days such as Mondays or Fridays depending on the funding policy. Our study is unique in the literature and our conclusions indicate that, with the right incentives in place, the length of stay can be decreased and discharge anomalies can be eliminated, which ultimately leads to a decrease in healthcare expenditures and an increase in healthcare effectiveness.

  7. Factors associated with relapse in adult patients discharged from the emergency department following acute asthma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jesse; Arrotta, Nicholas; Villa-Roel, Cristina; Dennett, Liz; Rowe, Brian H

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients discharged from the emergency department (ED) with asthma exacerbations will relapse within 4 weeks. This systematic review summarises the evidence regarding relapses and factors associated with relapse in adult patients discharged from EDs after being treated for acute asthma. Following a registered protocol, comprehensive literature searches were conducted. Studies tracking outcomes for adults after ED management and discharge were included if they involved adjusted analyses. Methodological quality was assessed using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS) and the Risk of Bias (RoB) Tool. Results were summarised using medians and IQRs or mean and SD, as appropriate. 178 articles underwent full-text review and 10 studies, of various methodologies, involving 32 923 patients were included. The majority of the studies were of high quality according to NOS and RoB Tool. Relapse proportions were 8±3%, 12±4% and 14±6% at 1, 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Female sex was the most commonly reported and statistically significant factor associated with an increased risk of relapse within 4 weeks of ED discharge for acute asthma. Other factors significantly associated with relapse were past healthcare usage and previous inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) usage. A median of 17% of patients who are discharged from the ED will relapse within the first 4 weeks. Factors such as female sex, past healthcare usage and ICS use at presentation were commonly and significantly associated with relapse occurrence. Identifying patients with these features could provide clinicians with guidance during their ED discharge decision-making. PMID:28176972

  8. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  9. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  10. [Task analysis of clinical laboratory physician in acute hospital].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junko

    2013-06-01

    Appropriate communications between clinical divisions and clinical laboratories are required to improve the quality of health care in hospitals. In this paper, the routine work of a clinical laboratory physician is presented. 1. In order to support attentive medical practice, we have established a consultation service system for handling questions from medical staff. The main clients are doctors and clinical laboratory technologists. 2. In order to improve the quality of infectious disease analysis, we have recommended obtaining two or more blood culture sets to achieve good sensitivity. The order rate of multiple blood culture sets increased 90% or more in 2011. 3. In order to provide appropriate blood transfusion, we intervene in inappropriate transfusion plans. 4. In order to support prompt decision making, we send E-mails to physicians regarding critical values. 5. We send reports on the morphology of cells(peripheral blood and bone marrow), IEP, flow cytometry, irregular antibodies, and so on. It has been realized that doctors want to know better solutions immediately rather than the best solution tomorrow morning. We would like to contribute to improving the quality of health care in Saitama Cooperative Hospital as clinical laboratory physicians.

  11. Prevalence and hospital discharge status of human immunodeficiency virus–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Annangi, Srinadh; Farber, Harrison W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a noninfectious complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that has gained in importance since the advent of antiretroviral therapy. HIV-associated PAH (HIV-PAH) has a higher prevalence than idiopathic PAH (IPAH), although the vascular pathology seen in HIV-PAH is virtually identical to that seen in IPAH. Initiating therapy for PAH at an early stage is associated with a better prognosis; however, because of the nonspecific symptoms associated with PAH, the diagnosis is often delayed. In addition, because of the low prevalence of HIV-PAH, routine screening for this condition has never been recommended. We hypothesize that the failure to create screening guidelines for HIV-PAH has resulted in underdiagnosis of the condition. This, in turn, results in individuals with HIV-PAH remaining undetected, allowing the disease to progress to more advanced stages or even remain unrecognized until death. If this hypothesis is correct, it may provide a strong argument for HIV-PAH screening guidelines, because HIV-PAH portends a poor prognosis and creates a significant economic burden if left untreated. To address this issue, we conducted a retrospective review of the National Hospital Discharge Survey data and the multiple-cause mortality data to determine the prevalence of HIV-PAH at hospital discharge and death. Using these large data sets, we observed that the prevalence of HIV-PAH among HIV-infected individuals at hospital discharge and death was significantly lower than the reported prevalence in the literature. In addition, we found that PAH was designated as the most common cause of mortality in patients with HIV-PAH. PMID:26401251

  12. Hospital Nursing and 30-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Provisions of the Affordable Care Act that increase hospitals’ financial accountability for preventable readmissions have heightened interest in identifying system-level interventions to reduce readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationship between hospital nursing; i.e. nurse work environment, nurse staffing levels, and nurse education, and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Method and Design Analysis of linked data from California, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that included information on the organization of hospital nursing (i.e., work environment, patient-to-nurse ratios, and proportion of nurses holding a BSN degree) from a survey of nurses, as well as patient discharge data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Robust logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between nursing factors and 30-day readmission. Results Nearly one-quarter of heart failure index admissions (23.3% [n=39,954]); 19.1% (n=12,131) of myocardial infarction admissions; and 17.8% (n=25,169) of pneumonia admissions were readmitted within 30-days. Each additional patient per nurse in the average nurse’s workload was associated with a 7% higher odds of readmission for heart failure (OR=1.07, [1.05–1.09]), 6% for pneumonia patients (OR=1.06, [1.03–1.09]), and 9% for myocardial infarction patients (OR=1.09, [1.05–1.13]). Care in a hospital with a good versus poor work environment was associated with odds of readmission that were 7% lower for heart failure (OR = 0.93, [0.89–0.97]); 6% lower for myocardial infarction (OR = 0.94, [0.88–0.98]); and 10% lower for pneumonia (OR = 0.90, [0.85–0.96]) patients. Conclusions Improving nurses’ work environments and staffing may be effective interventions for preventing readmissions. PMID:23151591

  13. Dispensing medications at the hospital upon discharge from an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Loren G; Manzi, Shannon; Shaw, Kathy N; Ackerman, Alice D; Chun, Thomas H; Conners, Gregory P; Dudley, Nanette C; Fein, Joel A; Fuchs, Susan M; Moore, Brian R; Selbst, Steven M; Wright, Joseph L

    2012-02-01

    Although most health care services can and should be provided by their medical home, children will be referred or require visits to the emergency department (ED) for emergent clinical conditions or injuries. Continuation of medical care after discharge from an ED is dependent on parents or caregivers' understanding of and compliance with follow-up instructions and on adherence to medication recommendations. ED visits often occur at times when the majority of pharmacies are not open and caregivers are concerned with getting their ill or injured child directly home. Approximately one-third of patients fail to obtain priority medications from a pharmacy after discharge from an ED. The option of judiciously dispensing ED discharge medications from the ED's outpatient pharmacy within the facility is a major convenience that overcomes this obstacle, improving the likelihood of medication adherence. Emergency care encounters should be routinely followed up with primary care provider medical homes to ensure complete and comprehensive care.

  14. Palliative care need and management in the acute hospital setting: a census of one New Zealand Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving palliative care management in acute hospital settings has been identified as a priority internationally. The aim of this study was to establish the proportion of inpatients within one acute hospital in New Zealand who meet prognostic criteria for palliative care need and explore key aspects of their management. Methods A prospective survey of adult hospital inpatients (n = 501) was undertaken. Case notes were examined for evidence that the patient might be in their last year of life according to Gold Standards Framework (GSF) prognostic indicator criteria. For patients who met GSF criteria, clinical and socio-demographic information were recorded. Results Ninety-nine inpatients met GSF criteria, representing 19.8% of the total census population. The patients’ average age was 70 years; 47% had a primary diagnosis of cancer. Two thirds had died within 6 months of their admission. Seventy-eight of the 99 cases demonstrated evidence that a palliative approach to care had been adopted; however documentation of discussion about goals of care was very limited and only one patient had evidence of an advance care plan. Conclusion One fifth of hospital inpatients met criteria for palliative care need, the majority of whom were aged >70 years. Whilst over three quarters were concluded to be receiving care in line with a palliative care approach, very little documented evidence of discussion with patients and families regarding end of life issues was evident. Future research needs to explore how best to support ‘generalist’ palliative care providers in initiating, and appropriately recording, such discussions. PMID:23537092

  15. Multi-unit Providers Survey. For-profits report decline in acute-care hospitals ... newcomers to top 10.

    PubMed

    Bellandi, D; Kirchheimer, B

    1999-05-24

    For-profit hospital systems cleaned house last year. After years of adding hospitals, investor-owned operators shed facilities in 1998, recording the first decline in the number of acute-care hospitals they've owned or managed since 1991, according to our 23rd annual Multi-unit Providers Survey.

  16. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  17. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Adjustment Authorized by Section 7(b)(1)(B) of Public Law 110-90 7. Background on the Application of the... Hospital-Specific Rates for FY 2011 and Subsequent Fiscal Years 9. Application of the Documentation and... (AutoLITT\\TM\\) 4. FY 2013 Applications for New Technology Add-On Payments a. Glucarpidase (Trade...

  18. The use of Functional Consequences Theory in acutely confused hospitalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Kozak-Campbell, C; Hughes, A M

    1996-01-01

    Acute confusion is a common complication of hospitalization in the elderly that impacts on both the use of health care resources and the functional status of individuals. Providing optimum nursing care for these patients depends on three factors: 1) the nurse's ability to differentiate acute confusion from other common conditions in the hospitalized elderly, chiefly dementia or depression, 2) the nurse's ability to identify factors contributing to this condition, and 3) the implementation of interventions to minimize the effects of these factors on the patient. This article differentiates the clinical features of acute confusion from those of depression and dementia, and discusses the use of the Functional Consequences Theory, developed by Miller (1990), as a framework for nursing assessment and management of care for elderly patients with this condition. The functional consequences theory framework assists the nurse to identify risk factors associated with the development of acute confusion in the hospitalized elderly. Further it guides the development of interventions to minimize the effects of this condition in this population. The use of this framework in the clinical setting is illustrated through a case study.

  19. Adverse drug reactions to anticoagulants in Spain: analysis of the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Data (2010–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Garrido, P; Hernández-Barrera, V; Esteban-Hernández, J; Jiménez-Trujillo, I; Álvaro-Meca, A; López de Andrés, A; de Miguel Diez, J; Rodríguez Barrios, J M; Muñoz Robles, J A; Jiménez-García, R

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe and analyse hospitalisations for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) involving anticoagulants. We also analysed the progress of the reactions over time, the factors related with ADRs. Design A retrospective, descriptive, epidemiological study. Setting This study used the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Database (Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos, CMBD), over a 4-year period. Participants We selected CMBD data corresponding to hospital discharges with a diagnosis of ADRs to anticoagulants (International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code E934.2) in any diagnostic field during the study period. Main outcome measures We calculated the annual incidence of ADRs to anticoagulants according to sex and age groups. The median lengths of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality (IHM) were also estimated for each year studied. Bivariate analyses of the changes in variables according to year were based on Poisson regression. IHM was analysed using logistic regression models. The estimates were expressed as ORs and their 95% CI. Results During the study period, 50 042 patients were hospitalised because of ADRs to anticoagulants (6.38% of all ADR-related admissions). The number of cases increased from 10 415 in 2010 to 13 891 in 2013. Cumulative incidence of ADRs to anticoagulants was significantly higher for men than women and in all age groups. An adjusted multivariate analysis revealed that IHM did not change significantly over time. We observed a statistically significant association between IHM and age, with the highest risk for the ≥85 age group (OR 2.67; 95% CI 2.44 to 2.93). Conclusions The incidence of ADRs to anticoagulants in Spain increased from 2010 to 2013, and was significantly higher for men than women and in all age groups. Older patients were particularly susceptible to being hospitalised with an adverse reaction to an anticoagulant. PMID:28073793

  20. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  1. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  2. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  3. 42 CFR 412.104 - Special treatment: Hospitals with high percentage of ESRD discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The payment is based on the estimated weekly cost of dialysis and the average length of stay of ESRD.... (5) The payment to a hospital equals the average length of stay of ESRD beneficiaries in the...

  4. [Acute hospital admissions among nursing home residents--benefits and potential harms].

    PubMed

    Bally, Klaus W; Nickel, Christian

    2013-08-07

    Nursing home residents are often referred by their general practitioners to the emergency department or to a geriatric hospital. Hospitalization is mainly perceived as a burden by elderly people; it may also contribute to a reduction of their mental abilities and functional decline. Reasons for admitting patients from nursing homes include infections, exacerbation of pre-existing cardiovascular disease and falls. GP presence in the nursing home, qualified nursing staff, early diagnosis of infections or acute on chronic episodes of e. g. heart failure and appropriate management of chronic diseases are essential to avoid unnecessary hospitalizations. Furthermore, physicians should identify palliative situations in a timely manner and should be familiar with the patients' preferences regarding hospitalization and place of death.

  5. Rearranging the deckchairs on the Titanic: failure of an augmented home help scheme after discharge to reduce the length of stay in hospital.

    PubMed

    Victor, C R; Vetter, N J

    1988-03-01

    An augmented home help service was set up in the Rhondda Valley in South Wales in order to facilitate discharge from hospital of elderly subjects who were kept in hospital because of mainly social problems. Patients were allocated to the new service or the pre-existing services according to their date of birth. The extra social support did not result in a faster discharge from hospital, nor in any improvement in well-being of the intervention group, largely because the small extra amount of service input was inadequate to ameliorate the extreme physical, mental and social problems experienced by the study group.

  6. Rationale, Design, Methodology and Hospital Characteristics of the First Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE)

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Kadhim J.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Husam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of data on heart failure (HF) in the Gulf Middle East. The present paper describes the rationale, design, methodology and hospital characteristics of the first Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Materials and Methods: Gulf CARE is a prospective, multicenter, multinational registry of patients >18 year of age admitted with diagnosis of acute HF (AHF). The data collected included demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, precipitating factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with AHF. In addition, data about hospital readmission rates, procedures and mortality at 3 months and 1-year follow-up were recorded. Hospital characteristics and care provider details were collected. Data were entered in a dedicated website using an electronic case record form. Results: A total of 5005 consecutive patients were enrolled from February 14, 2012 to November 13, 2012. Forty-seven hospitals in 7 Gulf States (Oman, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, United Gulf Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain) participated in the project. The majority of hospitals were community hospitals (46%; 22/47) followed by non-University teaching (32%; 15/47 and University hospitals (17%). Most of the hospitals had intensive or coronary care unit facilities (93%; 44/47) with 59% (28/47) having catheterization laboratory facilities. However, only 29% (14/47) had a dedicated HF clinic facility. Most patients (71%) were cared for by a cardiologist. Conclusions: Gulf CARE is the first prospective registry of AHF in the Middle East, intending to provide a unique insight into the demographics, etiology, management and outcomes of AHF in the Middle East. HF management in the Middle East is predominantly provided by cardiologists. The data obtained from this registry will help the local clinicians to identify the deficiencies in HF management as well as provide a platform to implement evidence based preventive and treatment strategies to reduce the burden of HF in

  7. Bed leasing program helps hospitals discharge hard-to-place patients.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    UCLA Health's program that pays a negotiated daily rate to skilled nursing facilities to hold beds for patients who otherwise would stay in an acute care bed saved a total of 2,516 acute care days from June 2014 to July 2015. UCLA Health pays a negotiated daily rate if the beds are occupied or not. The rate covers boarding, nursing care, medications, and physical therapy and occupational therapy Nurse practitioners are embedded in the participating nursing homes and provide care for UCLA Health's patients every day, often treating problems that might cause a readmission. The program helps with emergency department throughput and frees up acute care beds for patients who need them.

  8. Determinants of alternate-level-of-care delayed discharge among acute care survivors of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stock, David; Cowie, Cassandra; Chan, Vincy; Colantonio, Angela; Wodchis, Walter P.; Alter, David; Cullen, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delayed discharge, captured as alternate-level-of-care days, represents inefficient use of high-demand acute care resources and results in potentially poorer patient outcomes. We performed a study to determine the extent of alternate-level-of-care days among patients who survived hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in inpatient hospital care in Ontario and to identify predictors of alternate-level-of-care use in this population. Methods: A population-based cohort of acute care survivors of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury aged 20 years or more from 2002/03 through 2011/12 was identified. We used 2 case definitions, the more specific identifying patients with a most responsible diagnosis of "anoxic brain damage," and the more sensitive capturing additional likely causative conditions as the most responsible diagnosis. Multivariable zero-inflated negative binomial regression was used to estimate independent effects on the relative incidence of alternate-level-of-care days. Results: We identified 491 patients using the specific case definition and 669 patients using the extended case definition. After deaths were excluded, 232 patients (47.2%) and 278 patients (41.6%), respectively, had at least 1 alternate-level-of-care day (median 20 and 19 d, respectively). In both cohorts, decreasing age, no special care unit hours and acute care episode earlier in the study period were predictive of increased alternate-level-of-care days relative to length of stay. Discharge disposition and psychiatric/behavioural comorbidity were most predictive of having any alternate-level-of-care days. Interpretation: Patients with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury had a greater proportion of alternate-level-of-care days than has been reported for patients with other types of acquired brain injury. This finding suggests that substantial barriers to appropriate discharge exist for this population. Predictors of increased alternate-level-of-care days were also shown to be unique. Further study

  9. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  10. Usefulness of Serum Triiodothyronine (T3) to Predict Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Rothberger, Gary D; Gadhvi, Sonya; Michelakis, Nickolaos; Kumar, Amit; Calixte, Rose; Shapiro, Lawrence E

    2017-02-15

    Thyroid hormone plays an important role in cardiac function. Low levels of serum triiodothyronine (T3) due to nonthyroidal illness syndrome may have adverse effects in heart failure (HF). This study was designed to assess the ability of T3 to predict in-hospital outcomes in patients with acute HF. In total, 137 patients without thyroid disease or treatment with drugs which affect TH levels, who were hospitalized with acute HF were prospectively enrolled and studied. TH levels were tested upon hospital admission, and outcomes were compared between patients with low (<2.3 pg/ml) and normal (≥2.3 pg/ml) free T3 levels as well as between those with low (<0.6 ng/ml) and normal (≥0.6 ng/ml) total T3 levels. Low free T3 correlated with an increased length of stay in the hospital (median 11 vs 7 days, p <0.001) and higher rates of intensive care unit admission (31.8% vs 16.9%, p = 0.047), with a trend toward increased need for invasive mechanical ventilation (9.0% vs 1.4%, p = 0.056). Low total T3 correlated with an increased length of stay in the hospital (median 11 vs 7 days, p <0.001) and increased need for invasive mechanical ventilation (9.8% vs 1.3%, p = 0.045). In conclusion, low T3 predicts worse hospital outcomes in patients with acute HF and can be useful in the risk stratification of these patients.

  11. Change of glycaemic control and predictors in diabetes patients: longitudinal observational study during the one year after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Tai, Li-Ai; Tsai, Li-Yu; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2013-09-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) might reflect glycaemic control in persons with diabetes. Study aims were to identify changes in glycated haemoglobin values and predictors (baseline coping behaviour, fasting plasma glucose, disease-related and demographic factors) in patients during 1 year after hospital discharge. A longitudinal prospective design with convenience sampling was used. Subjects were recruited from a community hospital in Taiwan. Measures included Jalowiec Coping Scale, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c values, and demographics. Generalized estimating equation was used to determine factors of change in glycated haemoglobin. A total of 57 patients completed 1 year of follow-up. Half did not receive diabetes mellitus education and regular exercise. Patients' glycated haemoglobin levels follow controls at 6 months after discharge. Patients with higher levels of blood glucose, less problem-focused coping and greater emotion-focused coping were associated with poor glycaemic control. Education programmes should involve individual-centred care and health behaviours for prevention of diabetes complications.

  12. [Structural and ultrastructural changes in thrombocytes of patients with measles before admittance to the hospital and after discharge].

    PubMed

    Bakuzanashvili, Kh N; Dzhavakhadze, M V

    2005-06-01

    Thrombocytes have been studied at the admittance to the hospital of patients with measles and after their discharge using light and electron microscopy. Response of thrombocytes to antigen penetrated into the organism has been shown, however, it appears to be absolutely different before and after the treatment. Structural indices of thrombocytes were studied in their functional aspect. Obtained parameters of thrombocytes at the admittance of patients to the hospital indicate that giant forms of thrombocytes are prevailed and "biological net" is absent, while before discharge of patients the number of mature thrombocytes increases, and amount of giant forms decrease to the minimum. There appears a "biological net", playing an important role in the adsorption of the antigen. Proceeding from this, functional possibilities of thrombocytes, first of all, are directed to defense of the macroorganism from viral antigen. In its turn, measles virus having an influence on the thrombocytes can induce relieve of granules from their body, which also can seem to be the defensive reaction against the antigen.

  13. Physiotherapy after stroke: to what extent is task-oriented practice a part of conventional treatment after hospital discharge?

    PubMed

    Askim, Torunn; Indredavik, Bent; Engen, Astrid; Roos, Kerstin; Aas, Tone; Mørkved, Siv

    2013-07-01

    Research has shown that motor training after stroke should be task-oriented. It is still unknown whether the task-oriented approach is implemented into clinical practice. The purpose of the present study was to survey to which extent task-specific training was a part of conventional physiotherapy practice given to stroke patients after discharge from hospital. This cross-sectional survey was a sub-study of a randomized controlled trial. Physiotherapists treating patients included in the trial were asked to register their choice of treatment according to 11 predefined activity categories during the second week after discharge from hospital. Nineteen physiotherapists treating 46 patients suffering from mild-to-moderate stroke were included. The activities chosen in most patients were sit-to-stand (60.9%), balance in standing position (65.2%), walking on even ground (78.3%), and stair climbing (56.5%). Only two patients (4.3%) practiced transfers or balance related to activities of daily living (ADL), such as washing, dressing, and toileting. This study shows that conventional physiotherapy practice for a selected group of Norwegian stroke patients was mainly based on a task-oriented approach, although with very little emphasis on training in relation to ADL. Future research is needed to ensure that evidence-based treatment is given to all stroke patients.

  14. Adherence to Long-Acting Bronchodilators After Discharge for COPD: How Much of the Geographic Variation is Attributable to the Hospital of Discharge and How Much to the Primary Care Providers?

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Mirko; Ventura, Martina; Cappai, Giovanna; Lallo, Adele; Davoli, Marina; Agabiti, Nera; Fusco, Danilo

    2017-02-01

    In moderate-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), long-acting bronchodilators (LBs) are recommended to improve the quality of life. The aims of this study were to measure adherence to LBs after discharge for COPD, identify determinants of adherence, and compare amounts of variation attributable to hospitals of discharge and primary care providers, i.e. local health districts (LHDs) and general practitioners (GPs). This cohort study was based on the Lazio region population, Italy. Patients discharged in 2007-2011 for COPD were followed up for 2 years. Adherence was defined as a medication possession ratio >80%. Cross-classified models were performed to analyse variation. Variances were expressed as median odds ratios (MORs). An MOR of 1.00 stands for no variation, a large MOR indicates considerable variation. We enrolled 13,178 patients. About 29% of patients were adherent to LBs. Adherence was higher for patients discharged from pneumology wards and for patients with GPs working in group practice. A relevant variation between LHDs (MOR = 1.21, p = 0.001) and GPs (MOR = 1.28, p = 0.035) was detected. When introducing the hospital of discharge in the model, the MOR related to LHDs decreased to 1.05 (p = 0.345), MOR related to GPs dropped to 1.22 (p = 0.086), whereas MOR associated with hospitals of discharge was 1.38 (p < 0.001). Treatments with proven benefit for COPD were underused. Moreover, a relevant geographic variation was observed. This heterogeneity raises equity concerns in access to optimal care. The reduction of variability among LHDs and GPs after entering the hospital level proved that differences we observe in primary care partially 'reflect' the clinical approach of hospitals of discharge.

  15. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  16. Medical student-led patient education prior to hospital discharge improves 1-month adherence rates.

    PubMed

    Leung, Chun H S; Chong, Carol; Lim, Wen K

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 40% of patients are non-adherent to their medications. A prospective study of 80 patients evaluated the effectiveness of medical student-led pre-discharge medication education sessions. A significantly greater proportion of patients in the intervention group were adherent to their regular medications at 1 month compared with the control group (76.3% compared to 60.3%, P = 0.037). Medical student-led patient education significantly improved medication adherence rates.

  17. Prevalence of nosocomial infections in acute care hospitals in Catalonia (VINCat Program).

    PubMed

    Olona, Montserrat; Limón, Enric; Barcenilla, Fernando; Grau, Santiago; Gudiol, Francesc

    2012-06-01

    The first objective of the Catalonian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (VINCat) is to monitor the prevalence (%) of patients with nosocomial infections (NI), patients undergoing urinary catheterization with closed circuit drainage (%) and patients undergoing antibiotic treatment (%). We present the results for the period 2008-2010. Comprehensive and point annual prevalence surveys were conducted that included conventionally hospitalized patients in acute care hospitals belonging to the VINCat Program. The number of participating hospitals was 46 (2008), 48 (2009) and 61 (2010), most belonging to the Network of Public Use Hospitals of Servei Català de la Salut. The results are presented globally and by hospital size (<200 beds, 200-500 beds, >500 beds). The prevalence of patients with active NI acquired during the current or the previous hospitalization (global NI/P%) was 7.6 (2008), 6.2 (2009) and 6.3 (2010). The prevalence of patients with active NI acquired during the current (actual NI/P%) was 6.2 (2008), 4.7 (2009) and 4.6 (2010).The results by hospital size shows that the variation occurred mainly in <200 beds hospitals. The proportion of closed circuit urinary catheterization use was 90.2%. The use of antibiotics varied between 34.6% and 37.6%, with no differences due to hospital size. The global prevalence of NI provides information on the burden of NI at the institutional and regional level. Between 17.3% and 26.9% of patients with NI at the time of the study had acquired it in a previous hospitalization at the same institution.

  18. QTc Prolongation in Patients Acutely Admitted to Hospital for Psychosis and Treated with Second Generation Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Kroken, Rune A.; Løberg, Else-Marie; Jørgensen, Hugo A.

    2013-01-01

    QTc interval prolongation is a side effect of several antipsychotic drugs, with associated risks of torsade de pointes arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. There is an ongoing debate of whether or not electrocardiogram (ECG) assessments should be mandatory in patients starting antipsychotic drugs. To investigate QTc prolongation in a clinically relevant patient group 171 adult patients acutely admitted to an emergency ward for psychosis were consecutively recruited. ECGs were recorded at baseline and then at discharge or after 6 weeks at the latest (discharge/6 weeks), thus reflecting the acute phase treatment period. The mean QTc interval was 421.1 (30.4) ms at baseline and there was a positive association between the QTc interval and the agitation score whereas the QTc interval was inversely associated with the serum calcium level. A total of 11.6% had abnormally prolonged QTc intervals and another 14.3% had borderline prolongation. At discharge/6 weeks, the corresponding proportions were reduced to 4.2% and 5.3%, respectively. The reduction of the proportion with prolonged QTc intervals reached statistical significance (chi-square exact test: P = 0.046). The finding of about one-quarter of the patients with borderline or prolonged QTc intervals could indicate mandatory ECG recordings in this population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00932529. PMID:24490070

  19. Lactobacillus acidophilus Mixture in Treatment of Children Hospitalized With Acute Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jamie M; Petrova, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Despite unproven effectiveness, Lactobacillus acidophilus is a widely used probiotic in the treatment of pediatric diarrhea. In this report, we evaluated the association between length of stay (LOS) for 290 young children hospitalized with acute diarrhea and adjuvant therapy with a probiotic mixture containing 80% L acidophilus that was included in treatment for 22.4% of them. Overall, no association between LOS and use of L acidophilus was recorded after controlling for age, length of diarrhea symptoms, duration of intravenous fluids, and prior exposure to antibiotic. However, LOS was directly associated with use of L acidophilus in children with negative stool studies, and no such association was recorded in children with positive stool for rotavirus or other infections. We concluded that adjuvant therapy with L acidophilus mixture is not beneficial for young children hospitalized with acute diarrhea.

  20. Rehab rounds: overcoming barriers to individualized psychosocial rehabilitation in an acute treatment unit of a state hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, A S; Dollieslager, L P

    2000-03-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation begins during the acute stages of a psychiatric disorder and continues throughout the person's lifetime, with the types of services flexibly keyed to the person's phase of illness, needs, and personal goals. During periods of relapse and exacerbation of symptoms, when hospitalization is often required, psychiatric rehabilitation should include the following five objectives: * Clarify how the person's own goals in life, such as a desire for more self-control, freedom of choice, privacy, and time with friends and family, can be served by inpatient treatment and symptom stabilization. * Educate the patient about the nature of his or her illness and how medications work to restore self-control. * Teach the patient about side effects and self-monitoring and negotiating about medication and its effects in a collaborative way with the psychiatrist and other members of the treatment team. * Connect with the family or other natural supports that the person has in the community. * Enable the patient to make appropriate aftercare plans for residential and continuing treatment needs after discharge. When rehabilitation is viewed from the vantage point of these objectives, the inextricable interweaving of "treatment" with "rehabilitation" becomes clear. Treatment and rehabilitation are two sides of the same. It is much easier to integrate psychiatric rehabilitation into more traditional methods of treatment than it is to reorganize a treatment program or facility so that it blends rehabilitation with prevailing treatment imperatives of pharmacotherapy, supervision, and security and safety. In previous Rehab Rounds columns, we have described examples of creative methods for bringing the principles and practices of psychiatric rehabilitation into the treatment milieu (1,2,3). Faced with regulatory criticism from governmental agencies, Dr. Dhillon and his colleagues at Eastern State Hospital in Williamsburg, Virginia, launched a vigorous initiative to

  1. Quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in South Western Nigeria: A report of clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Adeoti, Adekunle Olatayo; Ogunmola, Olarinde Jeffrey; Fadare, Joseph Olusesan; Kolawole, Tolutope Fasanmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: To audit the quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in the southwestern region of Nigeria and to compare the clinical practice against the recommendations of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of 101 patients who presented with acute exacerbation of asthma to the hospital between November 2010 and October 2015. Results: Majority of the cases were females (66.3%), <45 years of age (60.4%), and admitted in the wet season (64.4%). The median duration of hospital stay was 2 days (interquartile range; 1–3 days) and the mortality was 1.0%. At admission, 73 (72.3%) patients had their triggering factors documented and 33 (32.7%) had their severity assessed. Smoking status, medication adherence, serial oxygen saturation, and peak expiratory flow rate measurement were documented in less than half of the cases, respectively. Seventy-six (75.2%) patients had nebulized salbutamol, 89 (88.1%) had systemic corticosteroid, and 78 (77.2%) had within 1 h. On discharge, 68 (67.3%) patients were given follow-up appointment and 32 (31.7%) were reviewed within 30 days after discharge. Less than half were prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), a self-management plan, or had their inhaler technique reviewed or controller medications adjusted. Overall, adherence to the GINA guideline was not satisfactory and was very poor among the medical officers. Conclusion: The quality of acute asthma care in our setting is not satisfactory, and there is a low level of compliance with most recommendations of asthma guidelines. This audit has implicated the need to address the non-performing areas and organizational issues to improve the quality of care. PMID:27942102

  2. Level of Physical Activity and In-Hospital Course of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Juliana de Goes; Santos, Marcos Antonio Almeida; Barreto Filho, José Augusto Soares; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes; de Melo, Enaldo Vieira; de Oliveira, Norma Alves; Faro, Gustavo Baptista de Almeida; Sousa, Antônio Carlos Sobral

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. A sedentary lifestyle, present in 85% of the Brazilian population, is considered a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease. However, the correlation of a sedentary lifestyle with cardiovascular events (CVE) during hospitalization for ACS is not well established. Objective To evaluate the association between physical activity level, assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), with in-hospital prognosis in patients with ACS. Methods Observational, cross-sectional, and analytical study with 215 subjects with a diagnosis of ACS consecutively admitted to a referral hospital for cardiac patients between July 2009 and February 2011. All volunteers answered the short version of the IPAQ and were observed for the occurrence of CVE during hospitalization with a standardized assessment conducted by the researcher and corroborated by data from medical records. Results The patients were admitted with diagnoses of unstable angina (34.4%), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without ST elevation (41.4%), and AMI with ST elevation (24.2%). According to the level of physical activity, the patients were classified as non-active (56.3%) and active (43.7%). A CVE occurred in 35.3% of the cohort. The occurrence of in-hospital complications was associated with the length of hospital stay (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15) and physical inactivity (OR = 2.54), and was independent of age, systolic blood pressure, and prior congestive heart failure. Conclusion A physically active lifestyle reduces the risk of CVE during hospitalization in patients with ACS. PMID:26690692

  3. The choice of alternatives to acute hospitalization: a descriptive study from Hallingdal, Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hallingdal is a rural region in southern Norway. General practitioners (GPs) refer acutely somatically ill patients to any of three levels of care: municipal nursing homes, the regional community hospital or the local general hospital. The objective of this paper is to describe the patterns of referrals to the three different somatic emergency service levels in Hallingdal and to elucidate possible explanations for the differences in referrals. Methods Quantitative methods were used to analyse local patient statistics and qualitative methods including focus group interviews were used to explore differences in referral rates between GPs. The acute somatic admissions from the six municipalities of Hallingdal were analysed for the two-year period 2010–11 (n = 1777). A focus group interview was held with the chief municipal medical officers of the six municipalities. The main outcome measure was the numbers of admissions to the three different levels of acute care in 2010–11. Reflections of the focus group members about the differences in admission patterns were also analysed. Results Acute admissions at a level lower than the local general hospital ranged from 9% to 29% between the municipalities. Foremost among the local factors affecting the individual doctor’s admission practice were the geographical distance to the different places of care and the GP’s working experience in the local community. Conclusion The experience from Hallingdal demonstrates that GPs use available alternatives to hospitalization but to varying degrees. This can be explained by socio-demographic factors and factors related to the medical reasons for admission. However, there are also important local factors related to the individual GP and the structural preparedness for alternatives in the community. PMID:23800090

  4. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  5. Trends in the incidence and treatment of necrotizing soft tissue infections: an analysis of the National Hospital Discharge Survey.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ali M; Best, Matthew J; Francis, Cameron S; Allan, Bassan J; Askari, Morad; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a rare but potentially fatal condition of the soft tissues caused by virulent, toxin-producing bacteria. In the United States, there is an estimated annual incidence of 0.04 cases per 1000 annually, but previous estimates of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had the incidence at 500 to 1500 cases yearly. Early reports of mortality were variable with rates ranging from 46 to 76% but outcomes have been improving over time. The National Hospital Discharge Survey was analyzed to study current trends in the demographics, incidence, use, and mortality of patients diagnosed with necrotizing soft tissue infections. The authors analyzed the 1999, 2002, and 2007 National Hospital Discharge Survey by using a sampling weighting method. A total of 13,648 cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections were identified in 2007. This represents an increase from 12,153 cases in 2002 and 6612 cases in 1999. In the 9 years from 1999 to 2007 the gross incidence of necrotizing soft tissue infections more than doubled. Hospital stay was essentially unchanged within study years, at 16 days. Mean age increased from approximately 50 years in 1999 to 54 years in 2007. Further, mortality went from 10.45% in 1999 to 9.75% in the 2007 survey. The population-adjusted incidence rate increased 91% in the studied years. Rising use of immunosupression, exponential growth in the incidence of obesity, and type 2 diabetes could be a major contributing factor. The mortality rate is far below the rate in reports published from as early as 20 years ago, and at 9.75% compares with modern case series, but is a more accurate measure of mortality in this condition.

  6. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after…

  7. Predicted implications of using percentage weight gain as single discharge criterion in management of acute malnutrition in rural southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Forsén, Emmanuel; Tadesse, Elazar; Berhane, Yemane; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte

    2015-10-01

    Mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) is increasingly used in identifying and admitting children with acute malnutrition for treatment. It is easy to use because it does not involve height assessment, but its use calls for alternative discharge criteria. This study examined how use of percentage weight gain as discharge criterion would affect the nutritional status of children admitted into a community-based management programme for acute malnutrition in rural southern Ethiopia. Non-oedematous children (n = 631) aged 6-59 months and having a MUAC of <125 mm were studied. By simulation, 10%, 15% and 20% weight was added to admission weight and their nutritional status by weight-for-height z-score (WHZ) was determined at each target. Moderate and severe wasting according to World Health Organization WHZ definitions was used as outcome. Applying the most commonly recommended target of 15% weight gain resulted in 9% of children with admission MUAC <115 mm still being moderately or severely wasted at theoretical discharge. In children with admission MUAC 115-124 mm, 10% of weight gain was sufficient to generate a similar result. Children failing to recover were the ones with the poorest nutritional status at admission. Increasing the percentage weight gain targets in the two groups to 20% and 15%, respectively, would largely resolve wasting but likely lead to increased programme costs by keeping already recovered children in the programme. Further research is needed on appropriate discharge procedures in programmes using MUAC for screening and admission.

  8. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  9. Plasma glucose, lactate, sodium, and potassium levels in children hospitalized with acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Tõnisson, Mailis; Tillmann, Vallo; Kuudeberg, Anne; Väli, Marika

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our research was to study prevalence of changes in plasma levels of lactate, potassium, glucose, and sodium in relation to alcohol concentration in children hospitalized with acute alcohol intoxication (AAI). Data from 194 under 18-year-old children hospitalized to the two only children's hospital in Estonia over a 2-year period were analyzed. The pediatrician on call filled in a special form on the clinical symptoms of AAI; a blood sample was drawn for biochemical tests, and a urine sample taken to exclude narcotic intoxication. The most common finding was hyperlactinemia occurring in 66% of the patients (n=128) followed by hypokalemia (<3.5 mmol/L) in 50% (n=97), and glucose above of reference value (>6.1 mmol/L) in 40.2% of the children (n=78). Hypernatremia was present in five children. In conclusion, hyperlactinemia, hypokalemia, and glucose levels above of reference value are common biochemical findings in children hospitalized with acute AAI.

  10. Acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after percutaneous coronary interventions Eptifibatide versus Abciximab

    SciTech Connect

    Ajani, Andrew E.; Waksman, Ron; Gruberg, Luis; Sharma, Arvind K.; Lew, Robert; Pinnow, Ellen; Canos, Daniel A.; Cheneau, Edouard; Castagna, Marco; Satler, Lowell; Pichard, Augusto; Kent, Kenneth M

    2003-03-01

    Background: Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists reduce peri-angioplasty ischemic complications and improve in-hospital outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Prior studies have demonstrated favorable results with both eptifibatide and abciximab. The purpose of this study was to assess whether there are any differences in rates of acute procedural complications and in-hospital events with the use of these two agents. Methods: A retrospective review of 359 elective PCIs from June 1998 to August 2000 identified 152 PCIs treated with eptifibatide (bolus 180 {mu}g/kg, infusion 2 {mu}g/kg/min for 12-48 h) and 205 PCIs treated with abciximab (bolus 0.25 mg/kg, infusion 10 {mu}g/min for 12 h). All patients received IIb/IIIa antagonists at the initiation of the intervention. Results: The clinical demographics, the angiographic morphology, the indications, and the procedural details were similar in both groups. In the eptifibatide group, the maximum ACT was lower (235{+-}45 vs. 253{+-}40, P<.0001). The incidence of major procedural and in-hospital events was compared. Eptifibatide and abciximab had similar rates of major complications (death or myocardial infarction) (1.4% vs. 2.9%), repeat PTCA (3.4% vs. 1.9%), and major bleeding (3.3% vs. 4.3%). Conclusions: Eptifibatide is comparable to abciximab in regards to acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after PCI.

  11. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  12. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  13. Delivering palliative care in an acute hospital setting: views of referrers and specialist providers.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Gail; Farquhar, Morag; Booth, Sara

    2009-09-01

    There has been a steady expansion of hospital-based palliative care in the United Kingdom but limited published research on health professionals' views of hospital multidisciplinary specialist palliative care services (SPCS). The aim of the study was to describe referrer (SPCS user) and provider (SPCS staff) perspectives on delivery of specialist palliative care in hospital. Interviews were conducted with referrers, including five junior doctors, 13 consultants, and six clinical nurse specialists, to investigate the reasons for referral, beneficial aspects, and barriers to use. Focus groups were conducted with providers, six medical and five nursing, to identify their perspective on delivering the specialist service in hospital. Discussions were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed thematically using a framework analysis approach. The study found large areas of agreement between referrers and providers on what hospital palliative care teams should be providing for patients, that is, expertise in managing difficult symptoms and complex psychosocial problems, and this was being achieved locally. Access to the specialist team was also important: visibility on the wards, informal routes of access to advice and a timely response by specialists. However, discordance in views of providing palliative care was also identified; in particular, whether specialists should be providing generalist palliative care (such as basic psychological support) neglected by ward teams and implementation of specialist advice by referrers. Such perspectives on the interface of generalist and specialist provision provide insights into improving care for palliative patients in the acute hospital setting.

  14. The Conscientious Practice Policy: a futility policy for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2005-08-01

    Much attention has been paid in recent years to the conflict that may occur when patients or their families insist on a therapy that the physician feels would be futile. In 1999 the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association recommended that all health-care institutions adopt a policy on medical futility that follows a fair process. Development of such a policy has proved problematic for many hospitals. The Conscientious Practice Policy at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital was developed as a response to the AMA recommendation. It outlines a specific process to be followed in the event that a physician wishes to refuse to provide a requested therapy, whether that refusal is based on perceived futility or other concerns. The policy was subsequently modified slightly and adopted by two other Connecticut acute care hospitals.

  15. Predictors of medication compliance after hospital discharge in adolescent psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A; Horan, W; Borgaro, S R; Stokes, J M; Pogge, D L; Harvey, P D

    1998-01-01

    Failure in medication compliance in adult psychiatric patients is often found to be due to side effects or associated with unawareness of illness. Little research has been conducted on medication compliance in adolescent psychiatric patients. In this study, 97 adolescent psychiatric patients, including 46 with substance abuse, were followed up an average of 14 months after their discharge from inpatient psychiatric care. Compliance with prescribed medications was examined and the association between several potential predictors and compliance was examined. The overall rate of medication compliance was only 38% at 14-month follow-up, whereas the rate of patients stopping their medications because of side effects was only 23%. Significant predictors of compliance failures were general noncompliance with the discharge plan, followed by postdischarge substance abuse. Side effects did not contribute any additional variance when these factors were considered. These data suggest that medication compliance may be adversely impacted by general tendencies toward noncompliance with treatment, which may be mediated by several possible factors. Interventions to increase awareness of the need for psychotropic medications as well as careful monitoring for substance abuse relapse in this population are suggested.

  16. Characteristics and outcomes of America’s lowest performing hospitals: an analysis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) hospital care in the US

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Ioana; Werner, Rachel M.; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary S.; Cram, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that most hospitals now have relatively high adherence with recommended AMI process measures. Little is known about hospitals with consistently poor adherence with AMI process measures, and whether these hospitals also have increased patient mortality. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective study of 2761 US hospitals reporting AMI process measures to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare database during 2004–2006 that could be linked to 2005 Medicare Part A data. The main outcome measures were hospitals’ combined compliance with five AMI measures (aspirin and beta blocker on admission and discharge and ACE inhibitor/ARB use at discharge for patients with left ventricular dysfunction) and risk-adjusted 30-day mortality for 2005. We stratified hospitals into those with low AMI adherence (ranked in the lowest decile for AMI adherence for three consecutive years [2004–2006], [N=105]), high adherence (ranked in the top decile for three consecutive years [N=63]), and intermediate adherence (all others [N=2,593]). Mean AMI performance varied significantly across low, intermediate and high performing hospitals (mean score 68% vs. 92% vs. 99%, P<.001). Low-performing hospitals were more likely than intermediate- and high-performing hospitals to be safety net providers (19.2% vs. 11.0% vs. 6.4%, p=.005). Low-performing hospitals had higher unadjusted 30-day mortality rates (23.6% vs. 17.8% vs. 14.9%; p<.001). These differences persisted after adjustment for patient characteristics (16.3% vs. 16.0% vs. 15.7%, p=.02). Conclusion Consistently low-performing hospitals differ substantially from other US hospitals. Targeting quality improvement efforts towards these hospitals may offer an attractive opportunity for improving AMI outcomes. PMID:20031841

  17. Delay to reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction presenting to acute care hospitals: an international perspective

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Frederick A.; Montalescot, Gilles; Fox, Keith A.A.; Goodman, Shaun G.; Granger, Christopher B.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Oliveira, Gustavo B.F.; Anderson, Frederick A.; Eagle, Kim A.; Fitzgerald, Gordon; Gore, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To examine the extent of delay from initial hospital presentation to fibrinolytic therapy or primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), characteristics associated with prolonged delay, and changes in delay patterns over time in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and results We analysed data from 5170 patients with STEMI enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events from 2003 to 2007. The median elapsed time from first hospital presentation to initiation of fibrinolysis was 30 min (interquartile range 18–60) and to primary PCI was 86 min (interquartile range 53–135). Over the years under study, there were no significant changes in delay times to treatment with either strategy. Geographic region was the strongest predictor of delay to initiation of fibrinolysis >30 min. Patient's transfer status and geographic location were strongly associated with delay to primary PCI. Patients treated in Europe were least likely to experience delay to fibrinolysis or primary PCI. Conclusion These data suggest no improvements in delay times from hospital presentation to initiation of fibrinolysis or primary PCI during our study period. Geographic location and patient transfer were the strongest predictors of prolonged delay time, suggesting that improvements in modifiable healthcare system factors can shorten delay to reperfusion therapy even further. PMID:20231154

  18. Aetiological characteristics of adult acute diarrhoea in a general hospital of Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Ni, B; Wang, Y; Shen, X; Zhang, C; Liu, J; Li, S

    2017-02-01

    Epidemic surveillance is an effective means to determine the characteristics of acute diarrhoea and the benefits of disease control and prevention. The epidemiological, clinical, and aetiological data of adult (aged ⩾15 years) acute diarrhoea in a general hospital in Shanghai were collected and analysed. Out of 2430 acute diarrhoea patients, 162 subjects were sampled (sample ratio 15:1). The sampled subjects had an average age (±s.d.) of 44 ± 18 years; 142 (87·7%) had a history that indicated ingestion of contaminated food; and 40 (24·7%), 54 (33·3%), and 73 (45·1%) patients had diarrhoea that was attributed to viral, bacterial, and unknown aetiological origins respectively. Viral diarrhoea is mainly prevalent during the winter and spring months, while bacterial and diarrhoea of unknown aetiology occur mainly in the summer months. The average age of the unknown aetiology group (48 ± 19 years) was significantly older than that of the viral diarrhoea group (39 ± 16 years). The number of patients with vomiting in the viral group (30·6%) was significantly higher than that in the bacterial (17·1%) and unknown aetiology (8·2%) groups. Viral and bacterial infections are the main cause of acute diarrhoea in Shanghai. However, further effective technological means are needed to improve the surveillance, control, and prevention of acute diarrhoea.

  19. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  20. [Characteristics of acute renal failure in elderly patients admitted to a small town hospital].

    PubMed

    Lou, L M; Boned, B; Gimeno, J A; Beguer, P; Cruz, A; Telmo, S; Lou, M T; Gómez Sánchez, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the features of acute renal failure (ARF) in elderly patients treated in a hospital, without an intensive care unit, to identify etiological factors and establish adequate preventive measures and treatment. During twelve consecutive months we studied prospectively 99 patients with ARF diagnosed by conventional criteria, an incidence of 1,238 cases per million per year. ARF affected 1.78% of patients admitted to hospital. We analyzed age, sex, serum creatinine, diuresis, etiology, type of ARF, preexisting chronic diseases, treatment, complications and outcome. Preexisting chronic diseases were common, the most frequent being hypertension (54%) and diabetes (39%). Previous treatments for cardiovascular diseases were frequent (angiotensin-renin system blockade 35.4%, diuretics 50.5%). 79% of ARF arose in hospital, 21% outside hospital. ARF was pre-renal in 60%, renal in 31% and post-renal in 9%. 34.7% were caused by volume depletion, 23.4% by low cardiac output and 23.4% by infection. 44.4% of ARF patients had oliguria or anuria latrogenic factors contributed to the ethiology of ARF in 35.3% of patients. Hospital stay was doubled by ARF the presence of ARF and the mortality was 36.4%. The rate was higher in ARF arising in hospital than in ARF acquired before admission. Factors that had a significant influence on the mortality rate were comorbid conditions, oliguroanuria, ARF of renal origin and serum albumin. We conclude that ARF has a high incidence, morbidity and mortality in this elderly population. Volume depletion, associated cardiovascular pathology and pharmacological treatment are important etiological factors in those with ARF outside hospital. Adequate treatment of ARF and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications are necessary in hospital.

  1. Prediction of Outcome in Diabetic Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Hospital-Based Pilot Study Report

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Amit R.; Badar, Shweta R.; Lande, Neha; Kawle, Anuja P.; Kabra, Dinesh P.; Chandak, Nitin H.; Raje, Dhananjay V.; Singh, Lokendra R.; Daginawala, Hatim F.; Kashyap, Rajpal S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Demographic and clinical characteristics are known to influence the outcome in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. Purpose This study is aimed at evaluating short- and long-term outcomes in diabetic AIS patients. In addition, the study also evaluates the impact of diabetes on the performance of indigenously reported biomarker, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and known biomarkers, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and glial-derived S-100 beta beta protein (S-100ββ). Methods This study was performed on 29 diabetes and 75 non-diabetes AIS patients. Outcome of AIS patients was analyzed by using modified Rankin scale at discharge, then at 12 and 18 months after discharge. Based on the obtained scores, patients were classified as improved group (scales 1-3) and dependent/expired group (scales 3-6). Blood samples were collected during admission and at discharge/expired time. Levels of NSE, S100ββ, and ITIH4 were analyzed in all samples. Results On discharge, frequencies of dependent/expired outcome were 4/29 (14%) and 19/75 (17%) in diabetic and non-diabetic AIS patients. However, follow-up outcome at 12 and 18 months showed higher dependent/expired cases of 43 and 41% among diabetic AIS patients compared to 27 and 21% in non-diabetic patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes is an independent risk factor for dependent/expired outcome in AIS patients (OR 0.484 (at discharge); 1.307 (at 12 months) and 1.675 (at 18 months)). NSE, S100ββ, and ITIH4 showed a differential expression in both the outcome groups of AIS patients, irrespective of diabetes. Conclusion Diabetes increases the risk of dependent/expired outcome in AIS patients. Also, serum NSE, S100ββ, and ITIH4 are independent biomarkers for prognosis of outcome in AIS patients, irrespective of diabetes. PMID:27780987

  2. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  3. Prevalence of Inadequate Blood Pressure Control Among Veterans After Acute Ischemic Stroke Hospitalization: A Retrospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Roumie, Christianne L.; Ofner, Susan; Ross, Joseph S.; Arling, Greg; Williams, Linda S.; Ordin, Diana L.; Bravata, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Reducing blood pressure (BP) after stroke reduces risk for recurrent events. Our aim was to describe hypertension care among veterans with ischemic stroke including BP control by discharge and over the 6 months post stroke event. Methods and Results The Office of Quality and Performance Stroke Special Study included a systematic sample of veterans hospitalized for ischemic stroke in 2007. We examined BP control (<140/90 mmHg) at discharge excluding those who died, enrolled in hospice, or had unknown discharge disposition (N=3640, 3382 adjusted analysis). The second outcome was BP control (<140/90 mmHg) within 6-months post-stroke, excluding patients who died /readmitted within 30 days, lost to follow-up or did not have a BP recorded (N=2054, 1915 adjusted analysis). The population was white (62.7 %) and male (97.7%); 46.9% were <65 years of age; 29% and 37% had a history of cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease, respectively. Among the 3640 stroke patients 1573(43%) had their last documented BP prior to discharge >140/90 mmHg. Black race (adjusted OR 0.77 [95% CI 0.65, 0.91]), diabetes (OR 0.73 [95% CI 0.62, 0.86]) and hypertension history (OR 0.51 [95% CI 0.42, 0.63]) were associated with lower odds for controlled BP at discharge. Of the 2054 stroke patients seen within 6 months from their index event, 673 (32.8%) remained uncontrolled. By 6 months post event, neither race nor diabetes was associated with BP control; whereas history of hypertension continued to have lower odds of BP control. For each 10 point increase in systolic BP > 140 mmHg at discharge, odds of BP control within 6 months post discharge decreased by 12% (95% CI (8%, 18%)). Conclusions BP values in excess of national guidelines are common after stroke. Forty three percent of patients were discharged with an elevated BP and 33% remained uncontrolled by 6 months. PMID:21693725

  4. Determinants of distance walked during the six-minute walk test in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at hospital discharge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of distance walked in six-minute walk test (6MWD) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at hospital discharge. Methods The assessment was performed preoperatively and at discharge. Data from patient records were collected and measurement of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) were performed. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) was performed at discharge. Patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery, coronary artery bypass grafting or valve replacement were eligible. Patients older than 75 years who presented arrhythmia during the protocol, with psychiatric disorders, muscular or neurological disorders were excluded from the study. Results Sixty patients (44.26% male, mean age 51.53 ± 13 years) were assessed. In multivariate analysis the following variables were selected: type of surgery (P = 0.001), duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (P = 0.001), Functional Independence Measure - FIM (0.004) and body mass index - BMI (0.007) with r = 0.91 and r2 = 0.83 with P < 0.001. The equation derived from multivariate analysis: 6MWD = Surgery (89.42) + CPB (1.60) + MIF (2.79 ) - BMI (7.53) - 127.90. Conclusion In this study, the determinants of 6MWD in patients undergoing cardiac surgery were: the type of surgery, CPB time, functional capacity and body mass index. PMID:24885130

  5. Injuries among powered two-wheeler users in eight European countries: a descriptive analysis of hospital discharge data.

    PubMed

    Forman, Jason L; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J; Pollack, Keshia; Heredero-Ordoyo, Rafael; Molinero, Aquilino; Mansilla, Alberto; Fildes, Brian; Segui-Gomez, Maria

    2012-11-01

    Powered two-wheelers (PTWs--mopeds, motorcycles, and scooters) remain the most dangerous form of travel on today's roads. This study used hospital discharge data from eight European countries to examine the frequencies and patterns of injury among PTW users (age≥14 years), the predicted incidence of the loss of functional ability, and the mechanisms of the head injuries observed (all in light of increased helmet use). Of 977,557 injured patients discharged in 2004, 12,994 were identified as having been injured in PTW collisions. Lower extremity injuries accounted for 26% (25.6-26.7, 95% C.I.) of the total injuries, followed by upper extremity injuries (20.7%: 20.3-21.2), traumatic brain injuries (TBI) (18.5%: 18-19), and thoracic injuries (8.2%: 7.8-8.5). Approximately 80% of the lower extremity injury cases were expected to exhibit some functional disability one year following discharge (predicted Functional Capacity Index, pFCI-AIS98<100), compared to 47% of the upper extremity injury cases and 24% of the TBI cases. Although it occurred less frequently, patients that were expected to experience some functional limitation from TBI were predicted to fair worse on average (lose more functional ability) than patients expected to have functional limitations from extremity injuries. Cerebral concussion was the most common head injury observed (occurring in 56% of head injury cases), with most concussion cases (78%) exhibiting no other head injury. Among the AIS3+ head injuries that could be mapped to an injury mechanism, 48% of these were associated with a translational-impact mechanism, and 37% were associated with a rotational mechanism. The observation of high rates of expected long-term disability suggests that future efforts aim to mitigate lower and upper extremity injuries among PTW users. Likewise, the high rates of concussion and head injuries associated with a rotational mechanism provide goals for the next phase of PTW user head protection.

  6. On Arrival High Blood Glucose Level is Associated With Detrimental and Fatal Hospitalization Outcomes for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartopo, Anggoro B.; Setianto, Budi Y.; Gharini, Putrika P.R.; Dinarti, Lucia K.

    2011-01-01

    Background High blood glucose level is frequently encountered in acute coronary syndrome. We investigated the effects of high blood glucose measured on arrival on hospitalization adverse events in acute coronary syndrome. Our study patients were Javanese in ethnicity, which constitute half of population in Indonesia. We hypothesized that elevated blood glucose has detrimental effects on hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome. Methods We designed an observasional cohort study and recruited 148 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome. Venous blood was collected on hospital arrival. High blood glucose level was determined as plasma glucose > 140 mg/dL. Adverse hospitalization events were recorded, i.e. mortality, acute heart failure, cardiogenic shock and heart rhythm disorders. Echocardiography examination was performed to determine left ventricular function. Results The prevalence of on arrival high blood glucose among Javanese patients with acute coronary syndrome was considerably high (36%). On arrival high blood glucose was associated with acute heart failure (P < 0.001) and shock cardiogenic (P = 0.02). Heart rhythm disorders were higher in high blood glucose patients (P = 0.004). Left ventricular dysfunction was more prevalent in high blood glucose patients (P = 0.001) and ejection fraction was lower (P = 0.001). On arrival high blood glucose was independently associated with hospitalization adverse events (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.9, P = 0.03) and hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 6.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-38.6, P = 0.03). Conclusions Our study suggests that on arrival high blood glucose among Javanese patients with acute coronary syndrome is considerably high and is associated with detrimental and fatal hospitalization outcomes.

  7. Clostridium Difficile Infection in Acute Care Hospitals: Systematic Review and Best Practices for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Louh, Irene K; Greendyke, William G; Hermann, Emilia A; Davidson, Karina W; Falzon, Louise; Vawdrey, David K; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Calfee, David P; Furuya, E Yoko; Ting, Henry H

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in acute-care hospitals is a priority for hospitals and clinicians. We performed a qualitative systematic review to update the evidence on interventions to prevent CDI published since 2009. DESIGN We searched Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, the ISI Web of Knowledge, and grey literature databases from January 1, 2009 to August 1, 2015. SETTING We included studies performed in acute-care hospitals. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS We included studies conducted on hospitalized patients that investigated the impact of specific interventions on CDI rates. INTERVENTIONS We used the QI-Minimum Quality Criteria Set (QI-MQCS) to assess the quality of included studies. Interventions were grouped thematically: environmental disinfection, antimicrobial stewardship, hand hygiene, chlorhexidine bathing, probiotics, bundled approaches, and others. A meta-analysis was performed when possible. RESULTS Of 3,236 articles screened, 261 met the criteria for full-text review and 46 studies were ultimately included. The average quality rating was 82% according to the QI-MQCS. The most effective interventions, resulting in a 45% to 85% reduction in CDI, included daily to twice daily disinfection of high-touch surfaces (including bed rails) and terminal cleaning of patient rooms with chlorine-based products. Bundled interventions and antimicrobial stewardship showed promise for reducing CDI rates. Chlorhexidine bathing and intensified hand-hygiene practices were not effective for reducing CDI rates. CONCLUSIONS Daily and terminal cleaning of patient rooms using chlorine-based products were most effective in reducing CDI rates in hospitals. Further studies are needed to identify the components of bundled interventions that reduce CDI rates. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:476-482.

  8. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  9. Acute pain management services: a comparison between Air Force and U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rayos, C L; McDonough, J P

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess the prevalence of acute pain management services (APMS) in Air Force medical facilities. There are no published reports on the current status of Air Force pain programs. This study used a telephone survey to all facilities worldwide that house an anesthesia department. Anesthesia providers in charge of pain services or department chiefs were interviewed from December 1996 to May 1997. Respondents were asked questions related to the initiation of a formal APMS, components, and familiarity with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines on pain management. Data analysis described current practices and used chi 2 analysis to compare results with a national study of U.S. hospitals. Air Force anesthesia departments (45%) had established as many acute pain services as U.S. hospitals (42%). Formal pain programs are becoming more prevalent in Air Force hospitals. These findings suggest an increased awareness of the need for pain management and future establishment of pain programs.

  10. Intranet usage and potential in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring Intranet and its potential in health care. The survey measured the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. Business-to-business electronic commerce and electronic commerce for customers were measured. Since the Intranet was not studied in survey-1997, no comparisons could be made. Therefore the results were presented and discussed. The Intranet data were compared with the Internet data and statistically significant differences were presented and analyzed. This information will assist hospitals to plan Internet and Intranet technology. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the Survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.(1) The first article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2) The second article based upon the survey results discusses distribution of Internet usage and rating of Internet usage applied to specific applications. Homepages, advertising, and electronic commerce are discussed from an Internet perspective.

  11. Patients with acute chest pain - experiences of emergency calls and pre-hospital care.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Kihlgren, Mona; Ostman, Ingela; Sørlie, Venke

    2005-01-01

    Acute chest pain is a common reason why people call an emergency medical dispatch (EMD) centre. We examined how patients with acute chest pain experience the emergency call and their pre-hospital care. A qualitative design was used with a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Thirteen patients were interviewed, three women and 10 men. The patients were grateful that their lives had been saved and in general were satisfied with their pre-hospital contact. Sometimes they felt that it took too long for the emergency operators to answer and to understand the urgency. They were in a life-threatening situation and their feeling of vulnerability and dependency was great. Time seemed to stand still while they were waiting for help during their traumatic experience. The situation was fraught with pain, fear and an experience of loneliness. A sense of individualized care is important to strengthen trust and confidence between the patient and the pre-hospital personnel. Patients were aware of what number to call to reach the EMD centre, but were uncertain about when to call. More lives can be saved if people do not hesitate to call for help.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  13. The Frequency and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury in a Tertiary Hospital: Which Factors Affect Mortality?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Arı, Derya; Ozkan, Gulsum; Cansız, Muammer; Kaynar, Kubra

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. Incidence and mortality rates vary from country to country, and according to different in-hospital monitoring units and definitions of AKI. The aim of this study was to determine factors affecting frequency of AKI and mortality in our hospital. We retrospectively evaluated data for 1550 patients diagnosed with AKI and 788 patients meeting the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline AKI criteria out of a total of 174 852 patients hospitalized in our institution between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Staging was performed based on KDIGO Clinical Practice for Acute Kidney Injury and RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function and End-stage renal failure). Demographic and biochemical data were recorded and correlations with mortality were assessed. The frequency of AKI in our hospital was 0.9%, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 34.6%. At multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.87-0.92; P < 0.001), monitoring in the intensive care unit (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09-0.38; P < 0.001), urine output (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.03-7.89; P < 0.001), duration of oliguria (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.69; P < 0.001), length of hospitalization (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79-0.88; P < 0.001), dialysis requirement (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.12-4.71; P < 0.05), APACHE II score (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.24; P < 0.001), and albumin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.50; P < 0.001) were identified as independent determinants affecting mortality. Frequency of AKI and associated mortality rates in our regional reference hospital were compatible with those in the literature. This study shows that KDIGO criteria are more sensitive in determining AKI. Mortality was not correlated with staging based on RIFLE or KDIGO. Nonetheless, our identification of urine output as one of the independent determinants of mortality suggests that this

  14. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Saikat; Das, Anjan; Kundu, Ratul; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Hazra, Bimal; Mitra, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv) paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F) and (P) Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h). Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1st, 2nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital. PMID:25276627

  15. Ten tools of continuous quality improvement: a review and case example of hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Ziegenfuss, J T; McKenna, C K

    1995-01-01

    Concepts and methods of continuous quality improvement have been endorsed by quality specialists in American Health care, and their use has convinced CEOs that industrial methods can make a contribution to health and medical care. For all the quality improvement publications, there are still few that offer a clear, concise definition and an explanation of the primary tools for teaching purposes. This report reviews ten continuous quality improvement methods including: problem solving cycle, affinity diagrams, cause and effect diagrams, Pareto diagrams, histograms, bar charts, control charts, scatter diagrams, checklists, and a process decision program chart. These do not represent an exhaustive list, but a set of commonly used tools. They are applied to a case study of bed utilization in a university hospital.

  16. Improving the quality of discharge summaries: implementing updated Academy of Medical Royal Colleges standards at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    May-Miller, Hannah; Hayter, Joanne; Loewenthal, Lola; Hall, Louis; Hilbert, Rebecca; Quinn, Michael; Pearson, Nicola; Patel, Alisha; Law, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Quality of documentation is harder to quantify and incentivise, but it has a significant impact on patient care. Good discharge summaries facilitate continuity between secondary and primary care. The junior doctors' forum led this project to improve the quality of electronic discharge summaries (eDS). Baseline measurement revealed significant room for improvement. We measured the quality of 10 summaries per month (across all inpatient specialties), against 23 indicators from the revised Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) standards (2013) that were prioritised by GPs as a "minimum dataset". Junior doctors felt that the Trust's dual eDS systems were responsible for great variation in quality. This was confirmed by the results of a comparison audit of the systems in April 2014: one system greatly outperformed the other (57% mean compliance with iSoft clinical management (iCM) based system vs. 77% with InfoPath-based system). We recommended that the Trust move to a single eDS system, decommissioning the iCM-based system, and this proposal was approved by several Trust committees. We worked with information services, junior doctors, general practitioners and hospital physicians to develop and implement a generic template to further improve compliance with AoMRC standards. In August 2014, the iCM-based system was withdrawn, the new template went live, and training was delivered, coinciding with the changeover of junior doctors to minimise disruption. Median compliance increased from 66.7% to 77.8%. Quality of discharge summaries had improved across the specialties. There was a reduction in the number of complaints and positive qualitative feedback from general practitioners and junior doctors. Completion of discharge summaries within 24 hours was not affected by this change. There is still more to be done to improve quality; average compliance with the full AoMRC standards (39 indicators) is 59.5%. With the approval of the Trust executive committee further plan

  17. Improving the quality of discharge summaries: implementing updated Academy of Medical Royal Colleges standards at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    May-Miller, Hannah; Hayter, Joanne; Loewenthal, Lola; Hall, Louis; Hilbert, Rebecca; Quinn, Michael; Pearson, Nicola; Patel, Alisha; Law, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Quality of documentation is harder to quantify and incentivise, but it has a significant impact on patient care. Good discharge summaries facilitate continuity between secondary and primary care. The junior doctors’ forum led this project to improve the quality of electronic discharge summaries (eDS). Baseline measurement revealed significant room for improvement. We measured the quality of 10 summaries per month (across all inpatient specialties), against 23 indicators from the revised Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) standards (2013) that were prioritised by GPs as a “minimum dataset”. Junior doctors felt that the Trust's dual eDS systems were responsible for great variation in quality. This was confirmed by the results of a comparison audit of the systems in April 2014: one system greatly outperformed the other (57% mean compliance with iSoft clinical management (iCM) based system vs. 77% with InfoPath-based system). We recommended that the Trust move to a single eDS system, decommissioning the iCM-based system, and this proposal was approved by several Trust committees. We worked with information services, junior doctors, general practitioners and hospital physicians to develop and implement a generic template to further improve compliance with AoMRC standards. In August 2014, the iCM-based system was withdrawn, the new template went live, and training was delivered, coinciding with the changeover of junior doctors to minimise disruption. Median compliance increased from 66.7% to 77.8%. Quality of discharge summaries had improved across the specialties. There was a reduction in the number of complaints and positive qualitative feedback from general practitioners and junior doctors. Completion of discharge summaries within 24 hours was not affected by this change. There is still more to be done to improve quality; average compliance with the full AoMRC standards (39 indicators) is 59.5%. With the approval of the Trust executive committee further

  18. China PEACE risk estimation tool for in-hospital death from acute myocardial infarction: an early risk classification tree for decisions about fibrinolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Li, Jing; Masoudi, Frederick A; Spertus, John A; Lin, Zhenqiu; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives As the predominant approach to acute reperfusion for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in many countries, fibrinolytic therapy provides a relative risk reduction for death of ∼16% across the range of baseline risk. For patients with low baseline mortality risk, fibrinolytic therapy may therefore provide little benefit, which may be offset by the risk of major bleeding. We aimed to construct a tool to determine if it is possible to identify a low-risk group among fibrinolytic therapy-eligible patients. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE) study includes a nationally representative retrospective sample of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in 162 hospitals. Participants 3741 patients with STEMI who were fibrinolytic-eligible but did not receive reperfusion therapy. Main outcome measures In-hospital mortality, which was defined as a composite of death occurring within hospitalisation or withdrawal from treatment due to a terminal status at discharge. Results In the study cohort, the in-hospital mortality was 14.7%. In the derivation cohort and the validation cohort, the combination of systolic blood pressure (≥100 mm Hg), age (<60 years old) and gender (male) identified one-fifth of the cohort with an average mortality rate of <3.0%. Half of this low risk group—those with non-anterior AMI—had an average in-hospital death risk of 1.5%. Conclusions Nearly, one in five patients with STEMI who are eligible for fibrinolytic therapy are at a low risk for in-hospital death. Three simple factors available at the time of presentation can identify these individuals and support decision-making about the use of fibrinolytic therapy. Trial registration number NCT01624883. PMID:27798032

  19. The clinical spectrum of severe acute malnutrition in children in Cameroon: a hospital-based study in Yaounde, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Malangue, Berthe; Nguefack, Seraphin; Dongmo, Félicitée Nguefack; Fru, Florence; Takou, Virginie; Angwafo, Fru

    2017-01-01

    Background Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major health problem, and the cause of more than half of childhood deaths in children less than 5 years in developing countries. Globally, 20 million children under 5 years of age are severely malnourished according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In Cameroon, the prevalence of SAM remains high and estimated at 1.9% in 2011 and 1.3% in 2014. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology, clinical aspects and outcome of SAM at the Yaounde Gynaeco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital (YGOPH). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children hospitalized in the YGOPH for SAM over a period of 8 1/2 years (from September 2006 to March 2015). We included the medical records of children under 15 years of age who were hospitalized in the pediatric unit of the YGOPH for the management of SAM. Data was collected using a data entry form and was analyzed with Epi info version 3.5.4 software. Data was considered statistically significant for P less than 0.05. Results The prevalence of SAM was 2.72%. The median age was 9 months (range, 23 days–112 months). The most represented age group was 6 to 12 months with 34.6% of the children. The most frequent symptoms on admission were: wasting (58.1%) and fever (53.6%). The mean interval between the onset of symptoms and admission was 30.36 days. Marasmus was the most frequent clinical form of SAM observed in 88.8% of the children. Respiratory tract infections were the most common comorbidities and were present in 45 patients (25.1%), followed by malaria in 15.1% of cases. The sero-prevalence of human immuno deficiency virus (HIV) was 43.75% amongst the 32 children whose HIV status was known. Dehydration was the most frequent complication, with an occurrence of 29.6%. A total of 58.7% of patients were discharged following clinical improvement and the mortality rate was 15%. The average duration of hospitalization was 8.25 days. Conclusions SAM is a

  20. Predicting frequent hospital admission risk in Singapore: a retrospective cohort study to investigate the impact of comorbidities, acute illness burden and social determinants of health

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Wang, Sijia; Thumboo, Julian; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of comorbidities, acute illness burden and social determinants of health on predicting the risk of frequent hospital admissions. Design Multivariable logistic regression was used to associate the predictive variables extracted from electronic health records and frequent hospital admission risk. The model's performance of our predictive model was evaluated using a 10-fold cross-validation. Setting A single tertiary hospital in Singapore. Participants All adult patients admitted to the hospital between 1 January 2013 and 31 May 2014 (n=25 244). Main outcome measure Frequent hospital admissions, defined as 3 or more inpatient admissions within 12 months of discharge. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the predictive model, and the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values for various cut-offs. Results 4322 patients (17.1%) met the primary outcome. 11 variables were observed as significant predictors and included in the final regression model. The strongest independent predictor was treatment with antidepressants in the past 1 year (adjusted OR 2.51, 95% CI 2.26 to 2.78). Other notable predictors include requiring dialysis and treatment with intravenous furosemide during the index admission. The predictive model achieved an AUC of 0.84 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.85) for predicting frequent hospital admission risk, with a sensitivity of 73.9% (95% CI 72.6% to 75.2%), specificity of 79.1% (78.5% to 79.6%) and positive predictive value of 42.2% (95% CI 41.1% to 43.3%) at the cut-off of 0.235. Conclusions We have identified several predictors for assessing the risk of frequent hospital admissions that achieved high discriminative model performance. Further research is necessary using an external validation cohort. PMID:27742630

  1. A qualitative study of nursing care for hospitalized patients with acute mania.

    PubMed

    Daggenvoorde, Thea; Geerling, Bart; Goossens, Peter J J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with a bipolar disorder and currently experiencing acute mania often require hospitalization. We explored patient problems, desired patient outcomes, and nursing interventions by individually interviewing 22 nurses. Qualitative content analysis gave a top five of patients problems, desired patient outcomes and nursing interventions, identified as most important in the interviews. We then conducted three focus group meetings to gain greater insight into these results. Intensive nursing care is needed, fine-tuning on the patient as a unique person is essential, taking into account the nature and severity of the manic symptoms of the patient.

  2. Management of medical technology: case study of a major acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian; Smale, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results of a Capital Equipment Management Plan undertaken at a major acute hospital in Australia. By classifying existing equipment using a threshold replacement value into Major and Minor items, detailed planning information was collected for 527 items of Major equipment representing 80% of the hospital's total equipment stock. A number of meaningful views of this significant asset base are presented, and a prioritisation method used to provide recommendations for future equipment replacement and acquisition for a 5 year planning period. The survey work to identify and document actual equipment items provides a convincing argument for the funding levels required for capital equipment replacement and acquisition, and evidence for the extent of technology reliance in modern health care facilities.

  3. Uninsured patients require creative discharge plans.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Case managers are being challenged to find a discharge destination for patients who are uninsured or underinsured and who need services after hospitalization.These patients often stay in the hospital longer than necessary, at the hospital's expense. Case managers should develop a network of community resources that can assist with care for unfunded patients after discharge. In some cases, it makes sense for the hospital to pay for a lower level of care rather than keeping patients in acute care beds that could be occupied by paying patients. Case managers often are under pressure to move patients through the continuum of care, making it a challenge to create an effective discharge plan for patients with limited financial resources. Many unfunded patients are eligible for financial assistance with their healthcare needs, but they aren't aware of it and don't know how to apply.

  4. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  5. Acute Kidney Injury, Risk Factors, and Prognosis in Hospitalized HIV-Infected Adults in South Africa, Compared by Tenofovir Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Neil; Motlhaoleng, Katlego; Abraham, Pattamukkil; Mancama, Dalu; Naicker, Saraladevi; Variava, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are limited data describing acute kidney injury (AKI) in HIV-infected adult patients in resource-limited settings where tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), which is potentially nephrotoxic, is increasingly prescribed. We describe risk factors for and prognosis of AKI in HIV-infected individuals, stratified by those receiving and those naive to TDF. A prospective case cohort study of hospitalized HIV-infected adults with AKI stratified by TDF exposure. Adults (≥18 years) were recruited: clinical and biochemical data were collected at admission; their renal recovery, discharge, or mortality was ascertained as an in-patient and, subsequently, to a scheduled 3-month follow-up. Among this predominantly female (61%), almost exclusively black African cohort of 175 patients with AKI, 93 (53%) were TDF exposed; median age was 41 years (interquartile range 35–50). Median CD4 count and viral load and creatinine at baseline were 116 cells/mm3 and 110,159 copies/ml, respectively. A greater proportion of the TDF group had severe AKI on admission (61% vs. 43%, p = .014); however, both groups had similar rates of newly diagnosed tuberculosis (TB; 52%) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID; 32%) use. Intravenous fluid was the therapeutic mainstay; only seven were dialyzed. Discharge median serum creatinine (SCr) was higher in the TDF group (p = .032) and fewer in the TDF group recovered renal function after 3 months (p = .043). Three-month mortality was 27% in both groups, but 55% of deaths occurred in hospital. Those that died had a higher SCr and more severe AKI than survivors; TB was diagnosed in 33 (70%) of those who died. AKI was more severe and renal recovery slower in the TDF group; comorbidities, risk factors, and prognosis were similar regardless of TDF exposure. Because TB is linked to higher mortality, TB coinfection in HIV-infected patients with AKI warrants more intensive monitoring. In all those with poor renal recovery, our

  6. Thinking Outside the Box: Treating Acute Heart Failure Outside the Hospital to Improve Care and Reduce Admissions.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Adam D; Allen, Larry A; Eapen, Zubin J

    2015-08-01

    The management of acute heart failure is shifting toward treatment approaches outside of a traditional hospital setting. Many heart failure providers are now treating patients in less familiar health care settings, such as acute care clinics, emergency departments, and skilled nursing facilities. In this review we describe the current pressures driving change in the delivery of acute heart failure and summarize the evidence regarding treatments for acute heart failure outside of the inpatient setting. We also provide considerations for the design of future treatment strategies to be implemented in alternative care settings.

  7. Summertime extreme heat events and increased risk of acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jared A; Jiang, Chengsheng; Soneja, Sutyajeet I; Mitchell, Clifford; Puett, Robin C; Sapkota, Amir

    2017-02-08

    Few studies have examined the association between exposure to extreme heat events and risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or demonstrated which populations are most vulnerable to the effects of extreme heat. We defined extreme heat events as days when the daily maximum temperature (TMAX) exceeded the location- and calendar day-specific 95th percentile of the distribution of daily TMAX during the 30-year baseline period (1960-1989). We used a time-stratified case-crossover design to analyze the association between exposure to extreme heat events and risk of hospitalization for AMI in the summer months (June-August) with 0, 1, or 2 lag days. There were a total of 32,670 AMI hospitalizations during the summer months in Maryland between 2000 and 2012. Overall, extreme heat events on the day of hospitalization were associated with an increased risk of AMI (lag 0 OR=1.11; 95% CI: 1.05-1.17). Results considering lag periods immediately before hospitalization were comparable, but effect estimates varied among several population subgroups. As extreme weather events are expected to become more frequent and intense in response to our changing climate, community-specific adaptation strategies are needed to account for the differential susceptibility across ethnic subgroups and geographic areas.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 8 February 2017; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.83.

  8. Lessons learned in using hospital discharge data for state and national public health surveillance: implications for Centers for Disease Control and prevention tracking program.

    PubMed

    Love, Denise; Rudolph, Barbara; Shah, Gulzar H

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Program is to build a nationwide network of integrated health and environmental data to measure impact of environmental factors on public health. This article describes how hospital discharge data can provide essential information for public health programs, including EPHT. The state inpatient hospital discharge data systems have properties that are highly desirable for surveillance and multistate initiatives, like EPHT, yet accessing and using the data can create challenges for the end user. This article highlights the strengths and limitations of hospital discharge data and references crash outcome data and evaluation system and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project as models for accessing, linking, and aggregating hospital discharge data. These federal-state data partnerships have overcome many of these challenges and have the potential to serve as models for the EPHT Program. The lessons learned from these "early adopters" can shortcut the implementation period for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention EPHT Program.

  9. Record linkage between hospital discharges and mortality registries for motor neuron disease case ascertainment for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Elena; Ramalle-Gómara, Enrique; Quiñones, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to analyse the coverage of hospital discharge data and the mortality registry (MR) of La Rioja to ascertain motor neuron disease (MND) cases to be included in the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry. MND cases that occurred in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011 were selected from hospital discharge data and the MR by means of the International Classification of Diseases. Review of the medical histories was carried out to confirm the causes of death reported. Characteristics of the population with MND were analysed. A total of 133 patients with MND were detected in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011; 30.1% were only recorded in the hospital discharges data, 12.0% only in the MR, and 57.9% were recorded by both databases. Medical records revealed a miscoding of patients who had been diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy but were recorded in the MR with an MND code. In conclusion, the hospital discharges data and the MR appear to be complementary and are valuable databases for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry when MNDs are properly codified. Nevertheless, it would be advisable to corroborate the validity of the MR as data source since the miscoding of progressive supranuclear palsy has been corrected.

  10. Patterns, Trajectories, and Predictors of Functional Decline after Hospitalization for Acute Exacerbations in Men with Moderate to Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; García-Guillamón, Gloria; Valera Novella, Elisa; Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; García-Vidal, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization for acute exacerbations (AE) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common, but little is known about the impact of hospitalization on the development of disability. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate and time course of functional changes 3 months after hospital discharge for AE-COPD compared with baseline levels 2 weeks before admission, and to identify predictors of functional decline. Methods This was a prospective study including 103 patients (age mean, 71 years; standard deviation, 9.1 years) who were hospitalized with AE-COPD. Number of dependencies in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) was measured at the preadmission baseline and at weeks 6 and 12 after discharge. Patterns of improvement, no change, and decline were defined over 3 consecutive intervals (baseline and weeks 6 and 12). Trajectories grouped patients with similar time courses of disability. Recovery was defined as returning to baseline function after functional decline. Univariate and multivariate multiple logistic regression was used to determine predictors of functional decline after week 12. Results Six trajectories of functional changes were found. From baseline to 12 weeks, 50% of patients continued to have the same function whereas 31% experienced functional decline after 6 weeks; 16.7% recovered over subsequent weeks. At week 12, as a consequence of all trajectories, 38% of patients showed functional declines compared with baseline function, 57% had not declined, and 6 improved. Length of stay (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12;95% [confidence interval] CI 1.03–1.22), dyspnea (OR = 1.85; 95% CI 1.05–3.26), and frailty (OR = 3.97; 95% CI 1.13–13.92) were independent predictors of functional decline after 12 weeks. Conclusions Hospitalization for AE-COPD is a risk factor for the progression of disability. More than one third of patients hospitalized for AE-COPD declined during the 12 weeks following discharge, with most of this decline

  11. Acute Q fever in Portugal. Epidemiological and clinical features of 32 hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Carolina; Badura, Robert; Valadas, Emília

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. The main characteristic of acute Q fever is its clinical polymorphism, usually presenting as a febrile illness with varying degrees of hepatitis and/or pneumonia. Q fever is endemic in Portugal, and it is an obligatory notifiable disease since 1999. However, its epidemiological and clinical characteristics are still incompletely described. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 32 cases admitted in the Infectious Diseases Department, Santa Maria’s University Hospital, from January 2001 to December 2010, in whom acute Q fever was diagnosed by the presence of antibodies to phase II Coxiella burnetii antigens associated with a compatible clinical syndrome. Results Out of the 32 cases recorded, 29 (91%) were male, with a male:female ratio of 9.7:1. Individuals at productive age were mainly affected (88%, n=28, with ages between 25 and 64 years). Clinically, the most common manifestation of acute Q fever was hepatic involvement (84%, n=27), which occurred isolated in 53% (n=17) of the cases. Hepatitis was more severe, presenting with higher values of liver function tests, in patients presenting both pulmonary and hepatic involvement. Additionally, we report one case of myocarditis and another one with neurological involvement. Empiric but appropriate antibiotic therapy was given in 66% (n=21) of the cases. There was a complete recovery in 94% (n=30) of the patients, and one death. We confirmed the sub-notification of this disease in Portugal, with only 47% (n=15) of the cases notified. Conclusion In Portugal further studies are needed to confirm our results. From the 32 cases studied, acute Q fever presented more frequently as a febrile disease with hepatic involvement affecting mainly young male individuals. Furthermore, acute Q fever is clearly underdiagnosed and underreported in Portugal, which suggests that an increased awareness of the disease is needed, together with a broader use

  12. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  13. Patterns and loss of sexual activity in the year following hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (a United States National Multisite Observational Study).

    PubMed

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Abramsohn, Emily; Gosch, Kensey; Wroblewski, Kristen; Spatz, Erica S; Chan, Paul S; Spertus, John; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2012-05-15

    A multisite observational study of sexual activity-related outcomes in patients enrolled in the TRIUMPH registry during hospitalization for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was conducted to identify patterns and loss of sexual activity 1 year after hospitalization for AMI. Gender-specific multivariable hierarchical models were used to identify correlates of loss of sexual activity including physician counseling. Main outcome measurements included "loss of sexual activity" (less frequent or no sexual activity 1 year after an AMI in those who were sexually active in the year before the AMI) and 1-year mortality. Mean ages were 61.1 years for women (n = 605) and 58.6 years for men (n = 1,274). Many were sexually active in the year before and 1 year after hospitalization (44% and 40% of women, 74% and 68% of men, respectively). One third of women and 47% of men reported receiving hospital discharge instructions about resuming sex. Those who did not receive instructions were more likely to report loss of sexual activity (women, adjusted relative risk 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.79; men, adjusted relative risk 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 1.46). One year mortality after AMI was similar in those who reported sexual activity in the first month after AMI (2.1%) and those who were sexually inactive (4.1%, p = 0.08). In conclusion, although many patients were sexually active before AMI, only a minority received discharge counseling about resuming sexual activity. Lack of counseling was associated with loss of sexual activity 1 year later. Mortality was not significantly increased in patients who were sexually active soon after their AMI.

  14. The indispensable intermediaries: a qualitative study of informal caregivers’ struggle to achieve influence at and after hospital discharge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The care policy and organization of the care sector is shifting to accommodate projected demographic changes and to ensure a sustainable model of health care provision in the future. Adult children and spouses are often the first to assume care giving responsibilities for older adults when declining function results in increased care needs. By introducing policies tailored to enabling family members to combine gainful employment with providing care for older relatives, the sustainability of the future care for older individuals in Norway is more explicitly placed on the family and informal caregivers than previously. Care recipients and informal caregivers are expected to take an active consumer role and participate in the care decision-making process. This paper aims to describe the informal caregivers’ experiences of influencing decision-making at and after hospital discharge for home-bound older relatives. Methods This paper reports findings from a follow-up study with an exploratory qualitative design. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 19 informal caregivers of older individuals discharged from hospital in Norway. An inductive thematic content analysis was undertaken. Results Informal caregivers take on comprehensive all-consuming roles as intermediaries between the care recipient and the health care services. In essence, the informal caregivers take the role of the active participant on behalf of their older relative. They describe extensive efforts struggling to establish dialogues with the “gatekeepers” of the health care services. Achieving the goal of the best possible care for the care recipient seem to depend on the informal caregivers having the resources to choose appropriate strategies for gaining influence over decisions. Conclusions The care recipients’ extensive frailty and increasing dependence on their families coupled with the complexity of health care services contribute to the perception of the informal

  15. Rate of spontaneous voiding recovery after acute urinary retention due to bed rest in the hospital setting in a non-urological population clinical study of the relationship between lower limbs and bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Hering, Flávio; Cieli, Eli; Campagnari, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To understand the clinical relationship between lower limbs functions and the recovery of spontaneous voiding after an acute urinary retention (AUR) in older patients admitted to hospitals for non-urological causes using clinical parameters. Materials and Methods 56 adult patients (32 men; mean age: 77.9 ± 8.3 and 24 women; mean age 82.1 ± 4.6) with AUR were prospectively followed with validated Physical Performance Mobility Exam (PPME) instrument to evaluate the relationship between the recovery of mobility capacity and spontaneous voiding. After a short period of permanent bladder drainage patients started CIC along evaluation by PPME during hospitalization and at 7, 15, 30 60, 90, and 180 days of discharge. Mann-Whitney U, chi-square test and ANOVA tests were used. Results All patients were hospitalized for at least 15 days (Median 26.3 ± 4.1 days). Progressive improvement on mobility scale measured by PPME was observed after leaving ICU and along the initial 7 days of hospitalization but with a deterioration if hospitalization extends beyond 15 days (p<0.03). Prolonged hospital stay impairs mobility in all domains (p<0.05) except step-up and transfer skills (p<0.02) although a recovery rate on spontaneous voiding persistented. Restoration of spontaneous voiding was accompanied by improvement on mobility scale (p<0.02). Recovery of spontaneous voiding was markedly observed after discharging the hospital. All patients recovered spontaneous voiding until 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions Recovery to spontaneous voiding after acute urinary retention in the hospital setting may be anticipated by evaluation of lower limbs function measured by validated instruments. PMID:27532117

  16. Unit-Specific Rates of Hand Hygiene Opportunities in an Acute-Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Han, Angela; Conway, Laurie J; Moore, Christine; McCreight, Liz; Ragan, Kelsey; So, Jannice; Borgundvaag, Emily; Larocque, Mike; Coleman, Brenda L; McGeer, Allison

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the frequency of hand hygiene opportunities (HHOs) in multiple units of an acute-care hospital. DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING The adult intensive care unit (ICU), medical and surgical step-down units, medical and surgical units, and the postpartum mother-baby unit (MBU) of an academic acute-care hospital during May-August 2013, May-July 2014, and June-August 2015. PARTICIPANTS Healthcare workers (HCWs). METHODS HHOs were recorded using direct observation in 1-hour intervals following Public Health Ontario guidelines. The frequency and distribution of HHOs per patient hour were determined for each unit according to time of day, indication, and profession. RESULTS In total, 3,422 HHOs were identified during 586 hours of observation. The mean numbers of HHOs per patient hour in the ICU were similar to those in the medical and surgical step-down units during the day and night, which were higher than the rates observed in medical and surgical units and the MBU. The rate of HHOs during the night significantly decreased compared with day (P92% of HHOs on medical and surgical units, compared to 67% of HHOs on the MBU. CONCLUSIONS Assessment of hand hygiene compliance using product utilization data requires knowledge of the appropriate opportunities for hand hygiene. We have provided a detailed characterization of these estimates across a wide range of inpatient settings as well as an examination of temporal variations in HHOs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:411-416.

  17. Experiences of parenting a child with medical complexity in need of acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Monica; Ehnfors, Margareta; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with medical complexity have described being responsible for providing advanced care for the child. When the child is acutely ill, they must rely on the health-care services during short or long periods of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to describe parental experiences of caring for their child with medical complexity during hospitalization for acute deterioration, specifically focussing on parental needs and their experiences of the attitudes of staff. Data were gathered through individual interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The care period can be interpreted as a balancing act between acting as a caregiver and being in need of care. The parents needed skilled staff who could relieve them of medical responsibility, but they wanted to be involved in the care and in the decisions taken. They needed support, including relief, in order to meet their own needs and to be able to take care of their children. It was important that the child was treated with respect in order for the parent to trust the staff. An approach where staff view parents and children as a single unit, as recipients of care, would probably make the situation easier for these parents and children.

  18. A Study of Acute Poisoning Cases Admitted to the University Hospital Emergency Department in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Oraie, Mehdi; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Islambulchilar, Mina; Hosseini, Seyed-Hasan; Ahadi-Barzoki, Mehdi; Sadr, Habib; Yaghoubi, Hashem

    2017-03-01

    Chemical substances have an important threat due to extensive use in medicine, agriculture, industry and environment. In this retrospective study, etiological and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning cases admitted to a hospital in Iran were investigated. We compared these data with those reported from other parts of the country and the international experiences to evaluate any difference if exists. 7 052 poisoned cases admitted to the hospital from April 2006 to March 2013, by data collected from the medical record in poison center section. According to our results there is a predominance of male patients and the majority of the poisoned patients were between 20-30 years old. Drug poisoning was the most common cause of poisonings. The most frequently involved drugs were benzodiazepines and antidepressants. The seasonal distribution of our study showed a peak in summer. To prevent acute poisonings, the social education about the risk assessment of central nervous system-acting drugs and reduction of the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. This study suggested a proper educational program for the public and primary care units. Our results provide useful information for preventive strategies.

  19. Acute effects of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zhao, Ang; Zhao, Jinzhuo; Chen, Renjie; Wang, Weibing; Ha, Sandie; Xu, Xiaohui; Kan, Haidong

    2014-08-01

    Air pollution has been accepted as an important contributor to asthma development and exacerbation. However, the evidence is limited in China. In this study, we investigated the acute effect of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China. We applied over-dispersed generalized additive model adjusted for weather conditions, day of the week, long-term and seasonal trends. An interquartile range increase in the moving average concentrations of PM10, SO2, NO2 and BC on the concurrent day and previous day corresponded to 1.82%, 6.41%, 8.26% and 6.62% increase of asthmatic hospitalization, respectively. The effects of SO2 and NO2 were robust after adjustment for PM10. The associations appeared to be more evident in the cool season than in the warm season. Our results contribute to the limited data in the scientific literature on acute effects of air pollution on asthma in high exposure settings, which are typical in developing countries.

  20. Simple In-Hospital Interventions to Reduce Door-to-CT Time in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheraghdam, Aliakbar; Rikhtegar, Reza; Mehrvar, Kaveh; Mehrara, Mehrdad; Hassasi, Rogayyeh; Aliyar, Hannane; Farzi, Mohammadamin; Hasaneh Tamar, Somayyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, a time dependent therapy, can reduce the morbidity and mortality of acute ischemic stroke. This study was designed to assess the effect of simple in-hospital interventions on reducing door-to-CT (DTC) time and reaching door-to-needle (DTN) time of less than 60 minutes. Methods. Before any intervention, DTC time was recorded for 213 patients over a one-year period at our center. Five simple quality-improvement interventions were implemented, namely, call notification, prioritizing patients for CT scan, prioritizing patients for lab analysis, specifying a bed for acute stroke patients, and staff education. After intervention, over a course of 44 months, DTC time was recorded for 276 patients with the stroke code. Furthermore DTN time was recorded for 106 patients who were treated with IV thrombolytic therapy. Results. The median DTC time significantly decreased in the postintervention period comparing to the preintervention period [median (IQR); 20 (12–30) versus 75 (52.5–105), P < 0.001]. At the postintervention period, the median (IQR) DTN time was 55 (40–73) minutes and proportion of patients with DTN time less than 60 minutes was 62.4% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Our interventions significantly reduced DTC time and resulted in an acceptable DTN time. These interventions are feasible in most hospitals and should be considered. PMID:27478641

  1. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain

    PubMed Central

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas. PMID:26810147

  2. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-04-02

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas.

  3. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features.

  4. Epidemiology of Acute Pancreatitis in Hospitalized Children in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Chaitanya; Deshpande, Abhishek; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Anderson, Michael P.; Bitar, Anas; Steele, Marilyn I.; Bass, Pat F.; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Single-center studies suggest an increasing incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) in children. Our specific aims were to (i) estimate the recent secular trends, (ii) assess the disease burden, and (iii) define the demographics and comorbid conditions of AP in hospitalized children within the United States. Methods We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for the years 2000 to 2009. Extracted data were weighted to generate national-level estimates. We used the Cochrane-Armitage test to analyze trends; cohort-matching to evaluate the association of AP and in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and charges; and multivariable logistic regression to test the association of AP and demographics and comorbid conditions. Results We identified 55,012 cases of AP in hospitalized children (1–20 years of age). The incidence of AP increased from 23.1 to 34.9 (cases per 10,000 hospitalizations per year; P<0.001) and for all-diagnoses 38.7 to 61.1 (P<0.001). There was an increasing trend in the incidence of both primary and all-diagnoses of AP (P<0.001). In-hospital mortality decreased (13.1 to 7.6 per 1,000 cases, P<0.001), median length of stay decreased (5 to 4 days, P<0.001), and median charges increased ($14,956 to $22,663, P<0.001). Children with AP compared to those without the disease had lower in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, aOR 0.86, 95% CI, 0.78–0.95), longer lengths of stay (aOR 2.42, 95% CI, 2.40–2.46), and higher charges (aOR 1.62, 95% CI, 1.59–1.65). AP was more likely to occur in children older than 5 years of age (aORs 2.81 to 5.25 for each 5-year age interval). Hepatobiliary disease was the comorbid condition with the greatest association with AP. Conclusions These results demonstrate a rising incidence of AP in hospitalized children. Despite improvements in mortality and length of stay, hospitalized children with AP have significant morbidity. PMID

  5. Concurrent Oral Antipsychotic Drug Use Among Schizophrenia Patients Initiated on Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics Post-Hospital Discharge.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jalpa A; Pettit, Amy R; Stoddard, Jeffrey J; Zummo, Jacqueline; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-08-01

    Pharmacological treatment is central to effective management of schizophrenia. Prescribing clinicians have an increasing array of options from which to choose, and oral antipsychotic polypharmacy is common in routine clinical practice. Practice guidelines recommend long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations, typically viewed as monotherapeutic alternatives, for patients with established nonadherence. Yet there are limited data on the prevalence and nature of concurrent oral antipsychotic prescriptions in patients receiving LAIs. Our observational, claims-based study examined the frequency and duration of concurrent oral prescriptions in 340 Medicaid patients receiving LAI therapy. Specifically, we examined patients with a recent history of nonadherence and hospitalization for schizophrenia and included both first-generation antipsychotic depot medications (fluphenazine decanoate, haloperidol decanoate) and more recently available second-generation injectables (LAI risperidone, paliperidone palmitate). Of all patients initiated on LAIs, 75.9% had a concurrent oral antipsychotic prescription in the 6 months post-hospital discharge. Patients receiving concurrent prescriptions were frequently prescribed an oral formulation of their LAI agent, but many first-generation LAI users received a concurrent second-generation oral medication. The lowest rate of concurrent prescribing (58.8%) was found with paliperidone palmitate, whereas the highest rate was with LAI risperidone (88.9%). Overlap in oral and LAI prescriptions typically occurred for a substantial period of time (ie, >30 days) and for a notable percentage of the days covered by LAIs (often 50% or more). Our findings highlight the need to further examine such prescribing patterns, to probe the reasons for them, and to clarify the optimal roles of different antipsychotic treatments in clinical practice.

  6. Medication adherence and utilization in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder receiving aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are chronic debilitating disorders that are often treated with second-generation antipsychotic agents, such as aripiprazole, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. While patients who are hospitalized for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder often receive these agents at discharge, comparatively little information exists on subsequent patterns of pharmacotherapy. Methods Using a database linking hospital admission records to health insurance claims, we identified all patients hospitalized for schizophrenia (ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 295.XX) or bipolar disorder (296.0, 296.1, 296.4-296.89) between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2008 who received aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at discharge. Patients not continuously enrolled for 6 months before and after hospitalization (“pre-admission” and “follow-up”, respectively) were excluded. We examined patterns of use of these agents during follow-up, including adherence with treatment (using medication possession ratios [MPRs] and cumulative medication gaps [CMGs]) and therapy switching. Analyses were undertaken separately for patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively. Results We identified a total of 43 patients with schizophrenia, and 84 patients with bipolar disorder. During the 6-month period following hospitalization, patients with schizophrenia received an average of 101 therapy-days with the second-generation antipsychotic agent prescribed at discharge; for patients with bipolar disorder, the corresponding value was 68 therapy-days. Mean MPR at 6 months was 55.1% for schizophrenia patients, and 37.3% for those with bipolar disorder; approximately one-quarter of patients switched to another agent over this period. Conclusions Medication compliance is poor in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who initiate treatment with aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge. PMID:22856540

  7. Risk Factors of Acute Behavioral Regression in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Périsse, Didier; Amiet, Claire; Consoli, Angèle; Thorel, Marie-Vincente; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Guinchat, Vincent; Barthélémy, Catherine; Cohen, David

    2010-01-01

    Aim: During adolescence, some individuals with autism engage in severe disruptive behaviors, such as violence, agitation, tantrums, or self-injurious behaviors. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute states and regression in adolescents with autism in an inpatient population. Method: Between 2001 and 2005, we reviewed the charts of all adolescents with autism (N=29, mean age=14.8 years, 79% male) hospitalized for severe disruptive behaviors in a psychiatric intensive care unit. We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), associated organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. Results: All patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability, and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. Fifteen subjects exhibited epilepsy, including three cases in which epilepsy was unknown before the acute episode. For six (21%) of the subjects, uncontrolled seizures were considered the main cause of the disruptive behaviors. Other suspected risk factors associated with disruptive behavior disorders included adjustment disorder (N=7), lack of adequate therapeutic or educational management (N=6), depression (N=2), catatonia (N=2), and painful comorbid organic conditions (N=3). Conclusion: Disruptive behaviors among adolescents with autism may stem from diverse risk factors, including environmental problems, comorbid acute psychiatric conditions, or somatic diseases such as epilepsy. The management of these behavioral changes requires a multidisciplinary functional approach. PMID:20467546

  8. Factors Affecting Recovery Time of Pulmonary Function in Hospitalized Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Jaemoon; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Park, So-Young; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation is a significant burden on asthmatics, and management of these patients needs to be improved. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with a longer recovery time of pulmonary function among asthmatic patients hospitalized due to a severe asthma exacerbation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 89 patients who were admitted for the management of acute asthma exacerbations. The recovery time of pulmonary function was defined as the time from the date each patient initially received treatment for asthma exacerbations to the date the patient reached his or her previous best FEV1% value. We investigated the influence of various clinical and laboratory factors on the recovery time. Results The median recovery time of the patients was 1.7 weeks. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that using regular inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) before an acute exacerbation of asthma and concurrent with viral infection at admission were associated with the prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function. Conclusions The prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after a severe asthma exacerbation was not shown to be directly associated with poor adherence to ICS. Therefore the results indicate that an unknown subtype of asthma may be associated with the prolonged recovery of pulmonary function time after an acute exacerbation of asthma despite regular ICS use. Further prospective studies to investigate factors affecting the recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation are warranted. PMID:27582400

  9. Effect of aliskiren on post-discharge outcomes among diabetic and non-diabetic patients hospitalized for heart failure: insights from the ASTRONAUT trial

    PubMed Central

    Maggioni, Aldo P.; Greene, Stephen J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Böhm, Michael; Zannad, Faiez; Solomon, Scott D.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Baschiera, Fabio; Hua, Tsushung A.; Gimpelewicz, Claudio R.; Lesogor, Anastasia; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ramos, Silvina; Luna, Alejandra; Miriuka, Santiago; Diez, Mirta; Perna, Eduardo; Luquez, Hugo; Pinna, Jorge Garcia; Castagnino, Jorge; Alvarenga, Pablo; Ibañez, Julio; Blumberg, Eduardo Salmon; Dizeo, Claudio; Guerrero, Rodolfo Ahuad; Schygiel, Pablo; Milesi, Rodolfo; Sosa, Carlos; Hominal, Miguel; Marquez, Lilia Lobo; Poy, Carlos; Hasbani, Eduardo; Vico, Marisa; Fernandez, Alberto; Vita, Nestor; Vanhaecke, Johan; De Keulenaer, Gilles; Striekwold, Harry; Vervoort, Geert; Vrolix, Mathias; Henry, Philippe; Dendale, Paul; Smolders, Walter; Marechal, Patrick; Vandekerckhove, Hans; Oliveira, Mucio; Neuenschwande, Fernando; Reis, Gilmar; Saraiva, Jose; Bodanese, Luiz; Canesin, Manoel; Greco, Oswaldo; Bassan, Roberto; Marino, Roberto Luis; Giannetti, Nadia; Moe, Gordon; Sussex, Bruce; Sheppard, Richard; Huynh, Thao; Stewart, Robert; Haddad, Haissam; Echeverria, Luis; Quintero, Adalberto; Torres, Adriana; Jaramillo, Mónica; Lopez, Mónica; Mendoza, Fernan; Florez, Noel; Cotes, Carlos; Garcia, Magali; Belohlavek, Jan; Hradec, Jaromir; Peterka, Martin; Gregor, Pavel; Monhart, Zdenek; Jansky, Petr; Kettner, Jiri; Reichert, Petr; Spinar, Jindrich; Brabec, Tomas; Hutyra, Martin; Solar, Miroslav; Pietilä, Mikko; Nyman, Kai; Pajari, Risto; Cohen, Ariel; Galinier, Michel; Gosse, Philippe; Livarek, Bernard; Neuder, Yannick; Jourdain, Patrick; Picard, François; Isnard, Richard; Hoppe, Uta; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Rosocha, Stefan; Prondzinsky, Roland; Felix, Stephan; Duengen, Hans-Dirk; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Fischer, Sven; Behrens, Steffen; Stawowy, Philipp; Kruells-Muench, Juergen; Knebel, Fabian; Nienaber, Christoph; Werner, Dierk; Aron, Wilma; Remppis, Bjoern; Hambrecht, Rainer; Kisters, Klaus; Werner, Nikos; Hoffmann, Stefan; Rossol, Siegbert; Geiss, Ernst; Graf, Kristof; Hamann, Frank; von Scheidt, Wolfgang; Schwinger, Robert; Tebbe, Ulrich; Costard-Jaeckle, Angelika; Lueders, Stephan; Heitzer, Thomas; Leutermann-Oei, Marie-Louise; Braun-Dullaeus, Ruediger; Roehnisch, Jens-Uwe; Muth, Gerhard; Goette, Andreas; Rotter, Achim; Ebelt, Henning; Olbrich, Hans-Georg; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian; Schellong, Sebastian; Zamolyi, Karoly; Vertes, Andras; Matoltsy, Andras; Palinkas, Attila; Herczeg, Bela; Apro, Dezso; Lupkovics, Geza; Tomcsanyi, Janos; Toth, Kalman; Mathur, Atul; Banker, Darshan; Bharani, Anil; Arneja, Jaspal; Khan, Aziz; Gadkari, Milind; Hiremath, Jagdish; Patki, Nitin; Kumbla, Makund; Santosh, M.J.; Ravikishore, A.G.; Abhaichand, Rajpal; Maniyal, Vijayakukmar; Nanjappa, Manjunath; Reddy, P. Naveen; Chockalingam, Kulasekaran; Premchand, Rajendra; Mahajan, Vijay; Lewis, Basil; Wexler, Dov; Shochat, Michael; Keren, Andre; Omary, Muhamad; Katz, Amos; Marmor, Alon; Lembo, Giuseppe; Di Somma, Salvatore; Boccanelli, Alessandro; Barbiero, Mario; Pajes, Giuseppe; De Servi, Stefano; Greco, Dott Cosimo; De Santis, Fernando; Floresta, Agata; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona; Piovaccari, Giancarlo; Cavallini, Claudio; Di Biase, Matteo; Masini, Dott Franco; Vassanelli, Corrado; Viecca, Maurizio; Cangemi, Dott Francesco; Pirelli, Salvatore; Borghi, Claudio; Volpe, Massimo; Branzi, Angelo; Percoco, Dott Giovanni; Severi, Silvia; Santini, Alberto; De Lorenzi, Ettore; Metra, Marco; Zacà, Valerio; Mortara, Andrea; Tranquilino, Francisco P.; Babilonia, Noe A.; Ferrolino, Arthur M.; Manlutac, Benjamin; Dluzniewski, Miroslaw; Dzielinska, Zofia; Nowalany-Kozie, Ewa; Mazurek, Walentyna; Wierzchowiecki, Jerzy; Wysokinski, Andrzej; Szachniewicz, Joanna; Romanowski, Witold; Krauze-Wielicka, Magdalena; Jankowski, Piotr; Berkowski, Piotr; Szelemej, Roman; Kleinrok, Andrzej; Kornacewicz-Jac, Zdzislawa; Vintila, Marius; Vladoianu, Mircea; Militaru, Constantin; Dan, Gheorghe; Dorobantu, Maria; Dragulescu, Stefan; Kostenko, Victor; Vishnevsky, Alexandr; Goloschekin, Boris; Tyrenko, Vadim; Gordienko, Alexander; Kislyak, Oxana; Martsevich, Sergey; Kuchmin, Alexey; Karpov, Yurii; Fomin, Igor; Shvarts, Yury; Orlikova, Olga; Ershova, Olga; Berkovich, Olga; Sitnikova, Maria; Pakhomova, Inna; Boldueva, Svetlana; Tyurina, Tatiana; Simanenkov, Vladimir; Boyarkin, Mikhail; Novikova, Nina; Tereschenko, Sergey; Zadionchenko, Vladimir; Shogenov, Zaur; Gordeev, Ivan; Moiseev, Valentin; Wong, Raymond; Ong, Hean Yee; Le Tan, Ju; Goncalvesova, Eva; Kovar, Frantisek; Skalina, Ivan; Kasperova, Viera; Hojerova, Silvia; Szentivanyi, Miroslav; Stancak, Branislav; Babcak, Marian; Kycina, Peter; Poliacik, Pavol; Toth, Peter; Sirotiakova, Jana; de Sa, Esteban Lopez; Bueno, Manuel Gomez; Selles, Manuel Martinez; Cabrera, Jose Angel; Freire, Ramon Bover; Gonzalez Juanatey, Jose Ramon; Comin, Josep; Soriano, FranciscoRidocci; Lopez, Alejandro; Vicho, Raul; Lama, Manuel Geraldia; Schaufelberger, Maria; Brunotte, Richard; Ullman, Bengt; Hagerman, Inger; Cizinsky, Stella; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yu, Wen-Chung; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Ter; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Ural, Dilek; Badak, Ozer; Akin, Mustafa; Yigit, Zerrin; Yokusoglu, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Abaci, Adnan; Ebinc, Haksun; Perlman, Richard; Parish, David; Bergin, James; Burnham, Kenneth; Brown, Christopher; Lundbye, Justin; Williams, Celeste; Eisen, Howard; Juneman, Elizabeth; Joseph, Susan; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Peura, Jennifer; Gupta, Vishal; Habet, Kalim; French, William; Mody, Freny; Graham, Susan; Hazelrigg, Monica; Chung, Eugene; Dunlap, Stephanie; Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Najjar, Samer; Katz, Richard; Murali, Srinivas; Izzo, Joseph L.; Callister, Tracy; Phillips, Roland; Lippolis, Nicholas; Winterton, John; Meymandi, Sheba; Heilman, Karl; Oren, Ron; Zolty, Ronald; Brottman, Michael; Gunawardena, D.R.; Adams, Kirkwood; Barnard, Denise; Klapholz, Marc; Fulmer, James

    2013-01-01

    Aims The objective of the Aliskiren Trial on Acute Heart Failure Outcomes (ASTRONAUT) was to determine whether aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor, would improve post-discharge outcomes in patients with hospitalization for heart failure (HHF) with reduced ejection fraction. Pre-specified subgroup analyses suggested potential heterogeneity in post-discharge outcomes with aliskiren in patients with and without baseline diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods and results ASTRONAUT included 953 patients without DM (aliskiren 489; placebo 464) and 662 patients with DM (aliskiren 319; placebo 343) (as reported by study investigators). Study endpoints included the first occurrence of cardiovascular death or HHF within 6 and 12 months, all-cause death within 6 and 12 months, and change from baseline in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) at 1, 6, and 12 months. Data regarding risk of hyperkalaemia, renal impairment, and hypotension, and changes in additional serum biomarkers were collected. The effect of aliskiren on cardiovascular death or HHF within 6 months (primary endpoint) did not significantly differ by baseline DM status (P = 0.08 for interaction), but reached statistical significance at 12 months (non-DM: HR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64–0.99; DM: HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.91–1.47; P = 0.03 for interaction). Risk of 12-month all-cause death with aliskiren significantly differed by the presence of baseline DM (non-DM: HR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50–0.94; DM: HR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.15–2.33; P < 0.01 for interaction). Among non-diabetics, aliskiren significantly reduced NT-proBNP through 6 months and plasma troponin I and aldosterone through 12 months, as compared to placebo. Among diabetic patients, aliskiren reduced plasma troponin I and aldosterone relative to placebo through 1 month only. There was a trend towards differing risk of post-baseline potassium ≥6 mmol/L with aliskiren by underlying DM status (non-DM: HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.71–1.93; DM: HR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.30

  10. Impact of emergency medical helicopter transport directly to a university hospital trauma center on mortality of severe blunt trauma patients until discharge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of transporting severely injured patients by helicopter remain controversial. This study aimed to analyze the impact on mortality of helicopter compared to ground transport directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. Methods The French Intensive Care Research for Severe Trauma cohort study enrolled 2,703 patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to University hospital intensive care units within 72 hours. Pre-hospital and hospital clinical data, including the mode of transport, (helicopter (HMICU) versus ground (GMICU), both with medical teams), were recorded. The analysis was restricted to patients admitted directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. The main endpoint was mortality until ICU discharge. Results Of the 1,958 patients analyzed, 74% were transported by GMICU, 26% by HMICU. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 26 (interquartile range (IQR) 19 to 34) for HMICU patients and 25 (IQR 18 to 34) for GMICU patients. Compared to GMICU, HMICU patients had a higher median time frame before hospital admission and were more intensively treated in the pre-hospital phase. Crude mortality until hospital discharge was the same regardless of pre-hospital mode of transport. After adjustment for initial status, the risk of death was significantly lower (odds ratio (OR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 0.98, P = 0.035) for HMICU compared with GMICU. This result did not change after further adjustment for ISS and overall surgical procedures. Conclusions This study suggests a beneficial impact of helicopter transport on mortality in severe blunt trauma. Whether this association could be due to better management in the pre-hospital phase needs to be more thoroughly assessed. PMID:23131068

  11. Predictors of hypoxaemia in hospital admissions with acute lower respiratory tract infection in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M.; Usen, S.; Palmer, A.; Jaffar, S.; Mulholland, E

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 5 November 1996
 Since oxygen has to be given to most children in developing countries on the basis of clinical signs without performing blood gas analyses, possible clinical predictors of hypoxaemia were studied. Sixty nine children between the ages of 2 months and 5 years admitted to hospital with acute lower respiratory tract infection and an oxygen saturation (SaO2) < 90% were compared with 67 children matched for age and diagnosis from the same referral hospital with an SaO2 of 90% or above (control group 1), and 44unreferred children admitted to a secondary care hospital with acute lower respiratory infection (control group 2). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, sleepiness, arousal, quality of cry, cyanosis, head nodding, decreased air entry, nasal flaring, and upper arm circumference were found to be independent predictors of hypoxaemia on comparison of the cases with control group 1.Using a simple model of cyanosis or head nodding or not crying, the sensitivity to predict hypoxaemia was 59%, and the specificity 94% and 93% compared to control groups 1 and 2, respectively; 80% of the children with an SaO2 < 80% were identified by the combination of these signs. Over half of the children with hypoxaemia could be identified with a combination of three signs: extreme respiratory distress, cyanosis, and severely compromised general status. Further prospective validation of this model with other datasets is warranted. No other signs improved the sensitivity without compromising specificity. If a higher sensitivity is required, pulse oximetry has to be used.

 PMID:9166021

  12. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  13. Descriptions of Acute Transfusion Reactions in the Teaching Hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. Material and Methods The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. Results In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). Conclusion It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable. PMID:24505522

  14. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  15. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cabri, Giulio; Carretti, Eleonora; Galli, Giacomo; Giambalvo, Nina; Rioli, Giulia; Saraceni, Serena; Spiga, Giulia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Ferri, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI), which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town), who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for <72 hours. We collected the demographic and clinical variables of our sample (n=135). We statistically analyzed PDI scores, performing Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation. We concomitantly administered to our sample other scales (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD) with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient =0.93). The factorial analysis showed the following three factors with eigenvalue >1 (Kaiser’s criterion), which explained >80% of total variance with good internal consistency: 1) “Loss of self-identity and social role”, 2) “Anxiety and uncertainty for future” and 3) “Loss of personal autonomy”. The PDI and the three-factor scores were statistically significantly positively correlated with the Hamilton Scales for Depression and Anxiety but not with other scale scores. Conclusion Our preliminary research suggests that PDI can be a reliable tool to assess patients’ dignity perception in a psychiatric setting, until now

  16. Prevalence and predictors of hospital prealerting in acute stroke: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, J P; Lindenmeyer, A; Mellor, R M; Greenfield, S; Mant, J; Quinn, T; Rosser, A; Sandler, D; Sims, D; Ward, M; McManus, R J

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis can significantly reduce the burden of stroke but the time window for safe and effective treatment is short. In patients travelling to hospital via ambulance, the sending of a ‘prealert’ message can significantly improve the timeliness of treatment. Objective Examine the prevalence of hospital prealerting, the extent to which prealert protocols are followed and what factors influence emergency medical services (EMS) staff's decision to send a prealert. Methods Cohort study of patients admitted to two acute stroke units in West Midlands (UK) hospitals using linked data from hospital and EMS records. A logistic regression model examined the association between prealert eligibility and whether a prealert message was sent. In semistructured interviews, EMS staff were asked about their experiences of patients with suspected stroke. Results Of the 539 patients eligible for this study, 271 (51%) were recruited. Of these, only 79 (29%) were eligible for prealerting according to criteria set out in local protocols but 143 (53%) were prealerted. Increasing number of Face, Arm, Speech Test symptoms (1 symptom, OR 6.14, 95% CI 2.06 to 18.30, p=0.001; 2 symptoms, OR 31.36, 95% CI 9.91 to 99.24, p<0.001; 3 symptoms, OR 75.84, 95% CI 24.68 to 233.03, p<0.001) and EMS contact within 5 h of symptom onset (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.37 to 6.50 p=0.006) were key predictors of prealerting but eligibility for prealert as a whole was not (OR 1.92, 95% CI 0.85 to 4.34 p=0.12). In qualitative interviews, EMS staff displayed varying understanding of prealert protocols and described frustration when their interpretation of the prealert criteria was not shared by ED staff. Conclusions Up to half of the patients presenting with suspected stroke in this study were prealerted by EMS staff, regardless of eligibility, resulting in disagreements with ED staff during handover. Aligning the expectations of EMS and ED staff, perhaps through simplified prealert protocols, could be

  17. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Man Sik

    2015-11-13

    Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004-2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07-1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04-1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas.

  18. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose) fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Marcello; Porreca, Ettore

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH), or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily) of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients hospitalized in intensive care units with no contraindications, LMWH or UFH are recommended, with frequent and careful assessment of the risk of bleeding. In this review, we discuss the evidence for use of thromboprophylaxis for VTE in acutely ill hospitalized medical patients, with a focus on (low-dose) fondaparinux.

  19. From acute care to home care: the evolution of hospital responsibility and rationale for increased vertical integration.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    The responsibility of hospitals is changing. Those activities that were once confined within the walls of the medical facility have largely shifted outside them, yet the requirements for hospitals have only grown in scope. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the development of accountable care organizations, financial incentives are focused on care coordination, and a hospital's responsibility now includes postdischarge outcomes. As a result, hospitals need to adjust their business model to accommodate their increased need to impact post-acute care settings. A home care service line can fulfill this role for hospitals, serving as an effective conduit to the postdischarge realm-serving as both a potential profit center and a risk mitigation offering. An alliance between home care agencies and hospitals can help improve clinical outcomes, provide the necessary care for communities, and establish a potentially profitable product line.

  20. A Comprehensive Review of Prehospital and In-hospital Delay Times in Acute Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Foraker, Randi; Morris, Dexter L.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize prehospital and in-hospital stroke evaluation and treatment delay times. We identified 123 unique peer-reviewed studies published from 1981 to 2007 of prehospital and in-hospital delay time for evaluation and treatment of patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms. Based on studies of 65 different population groups, the weighted Poisson regression indicated a 6.0% annual decline (p<0.001) in hours/year for prehospital delay, defined from symptom onset to emergency department (ED) arrival. For in-hospital delay, the weighted Poisson regression models indicated no meaningful changes in delay time from ED arrival to ED evaluation (3.1%, p=0.49 based on 12 population groups). There was a 10.2% annual decline in hours/year from ED arrival to neurology evaluation or notification (p=0.23 based on 16 population groups) and a 10.7% annual decline in hours/year for delay time from ED arrival to initiation of computed tomography (p=0.11 based on 23 population groups). Only one study reported on times from arrival to computed tomography scan interpretation, two studies on arrival to drug administration, and no studies on arrival to transfer to an in-patient setting, precluding generalizations. Prehospital delay continues to contribute the largest proportion of delay time. The next decade provides opportunities to establish more effective community based interventions worldwide. It will be crucial to have effective stroke surveillance systems in place to better understand and improve both prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke care. PMID:19659821

  1. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization.

  2. Optimizing laboratory test utilization in long-term acute care hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Brian S.; Grigonis, Antony M.; Dawson, Amanda; Jing, Yuqing; Hammerman, Samuel I.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory tests can be considered inappropriate if overused or when repeated, unnecessary “routine” testing occurs. For chronically critically ill patients treated in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs), inappropriate testing may result in unnecessary blood draws that could potentially harm patients or increase infections. A quality improvement initiative was designed to increase physician awareness of their patterns of lab utilization in the LTACH environment. Within a large network of LTACHs, 9 hospitals were identified as having higher patterns of lab utilization than other LTACHs. Meetings were held with administrative staff and physicians, who designed and implemented hospital-specific strategies to address lab utilization. Lab utilization was measured in units of lab tests ordered per inpatient day (lab UPPD) for 8 months prior to the initial meeting and 7 months after the meeting. A repeated measures mixed model determined that postintervention lab utilization improved, on average and adjusted by case mix index, by 0.37 lab UPPD (t = −3.61, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.58) compared to the preintervention period. Overall, the case mix index 8 months prior to the intervention was no different than it was 7 months after the initial meeting (t[8] = −0.96, P = 0.37). Patient safety and outcome measures, including percentage of patients weaned from a ventilator, readmission rates, central catheter utilization rates, and the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other multidrug resistant organisms, showed no significant change. Hospital staff meetings focused on lab utilization and the development and deployment of tailored lab utilization strategies were associated with LTACHs achieving significantly lower lab utilization without negatively impacting quality outcomes. PMID:28127124

  3. Acute and Chronic Effects of Particles on Hospital Admissions in New-England

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Coull, Brent A.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have reported significant associations between exposure to PM2.5 and hospital admissions, but all have focused on the effects of short-term exposure. In addition all these studies have relied on a limited number of PM2.5 monitors in their study regions, which introduces exposure error, and excludes rural and suburban populations from locations in which monitors are not available, reducing generalizability and potentially creating selection bias. Methods Using our novel prediction models for exposure combining land use regression with physical measurements (satellite aerosol optical depth) we investigated both the long and short term effects of PM2.5 exposures on hospital admissions across New-England for all residents aged 65 and older. We performed separate Poisson regression analysis for each admission type: all respiratory, cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke and diabetes. Daily admission counts in each zip code were regressed against long and short-term PM2.5 exposure, temperature, socio-economic data and a spline of time to control for seasonal trends in baseline risk. Results We observed associations between both short-term and long-term exposure to PM2.5 and hospitalization for all of the outcomes examined. In example, for respiratory diseases, for every10-µg/m3 increase in short-term PM2.5 exposure there is a 0.70 percent increase in admissions (CI = 0.35 to 0.52) while concurrently for every10-µg/m3 increase in long-term PM2.5 exposure there is a 4.22 percent increase in admissions (CI = 1.06 to 4.75). Conclusions As with mortality studies, chronic exposure to particles is associated with substantially larger increases in hospital admissions than acute exposure and both can be detected simultaneously using our exposure models. PMID:22529923

  4. Predictors and in-hospital prognosis of recurrent acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Cheng-Fu; Li, Su-Fang; Chen, Hong; Song, Jun-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the contributing factors and in-hospital prognosis of patients with or without recurrent acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods A total of 1686 consecutive AMI patients admitted to Peking University People's Hospital from January 2010 to December 2015 were recruited. Their clinical characteristics were retrospectively compared between patients with or without a recurrent AMI. Then multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the predictors of recurrent myocardial infarction. Results Recurrent AMI patients were older (69.3 ± 11.5 vs. 64.7 ± 12.8 years, P < 0.001) and had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) (52.2% vs. 35.0%, P < 0.001) compared with incident AMI patients, they also had worse heart function at admission, more severe coronary disease and lower reperfusion therapy. Age (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.02–1.05; P < 0.001), DM (OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.37–2.52; P < 0.001) and reperfusion therapy (OR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.52–0.89; P < 0.001) were independent risk factors for recurrent AMI. Recurrent AMI patients had a higher in-hospital death rate (12.1% vs. 7.8%, P = 0.039) than incident AMI patients. Conclusions Recurrent AMI patients presented with more severe coronary artery conditions. Age, DM and reperfusion therapy were independent risk factors for recurrent AMI, and recurrent AMI was related with a high risk of in-hospital death. PMID:27928225

  5. Assessment of the management of acute myocardial infarction patients and their outcomes at the Nairobi Hospital from January 2007 to June 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kimeu, Redemptar; Kariuki, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction The demographics, clinical characteristics and management of patients presenting at the Nairobi Hospital with acute myocardial infarction have not been documented in the past. There is a paucity of studies on this subject in this region. Methods A retrospective, hospital-based study was carried out, examining data of patients presenting at Nairobi Hospital with acute myocardial infarction between January 2007 and June 2009. The data collected were patient demographics, coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors, clinical presentation, GRACE score risk stratification, coronary anatomical findings on angiography, interventions and outcomes during hospitalisation. Results Sixty-four patients were recruited (mean age 56.7 years). The CAD risk-factor profile included systemic hypertension in 71.9% of patients, age over 55 or 65 years in men and women, respectively in 42.2%, 35.9% of subjects were smokers, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in 25%, diabetes mellitus in 25%, family history of premature coronary artery disease in 8%, prior acute coronary syndrome in 18.8%, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in 60.9% and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) in 39.1% of patients. In the STEMI arm, 79.5% of patients underwent thrombolysis, 17.9% had rescue percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and 2.6% had no reperfusion therapy. Medical management was carried out in 29% of the patients, 19.1% had a coronary artery bypass graft and 40.4% had PCI. The mean duration of hospitalisation was 6.69 days. The in-hospital mortality rate was 9.4% and mean in-hospital probability of death according to the GRACE risk score was 16.05%. Discharge medication was a β-blocker in 84.5% of patients, an ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in 48.3%, low-dose aspirin in 96.6%, clopidogrel in 96.6% and statins in 93.1%. Conclusion: The risk-factor assessment in our population, albeit small, was in keeping with the

  6. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Successful Escape of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients from Hospital to Home: Clinical Note

    PubMed Central

    Tei, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    I describe four patients who successfully escaped from the hospital to their own home during the acute phase of ischemic stroke. This is a very rare phenomenon (seen in 0.35% of 1150 consecutive patients with first ischemic stroke within 24 h after onset), but the patients had rather uniform clinical characteristics. All were male, around 60 years old, had moderate to severe aphasia (Wernicke’s in 2 patients, Broca's in 1, and transcortical motor in 1), and cerebral infarction of the left middle cerebral artery territory. None had significant motor weakness, hemispatial neglect, or hemianopia at the time of escape. Overall functional outcome was good for all but one patient, but aphasia persisted in three. Although none of the four patients sustained serious injury during the escape, patients with such clinical characteristics must be managed cautiously to prevent serious consequences. PMID:22425726

  8. Viruses associated with acute respiratory infections in children admitted to hospital in Naples, 1979-82*

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, D.; Ribera, G.; Attena, F.; Schioppa, F.; Romano, F.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of the virological and epidemiological features of acute respiratory diseases in children admitted to hospital in Naples has been carried out; the results of three years of research are reported. Between April 1979 and March 1982, 787 nasopharyngeal swabs were examined. There were 287 (36.5%) positive samples, with the highest isolation rate being found in children with bronchiolitis (39.5%). Among the different viruses isolated, adenovirus was the most common (161 positive samples, 56%); this agent appeared regularly in the different age and disease groups, with a marked increase in prevalence during the winter of 1980. Isolations of herpesvirus, respiratory syncytial virus and enterovirus were less frequent; however, echovirus 3 caused an epidemic in the summer of 1980. Influenza and parainfluenza viruses were seen fairly infrequently; two cases of Reye's syndrome yielded strains of influenza B. PMID:6325032

  9. A population-based longitudinal study of suicide risk in male schizophrenia patients: Proximity to hospital discharge and the moderating effect of premorbid IQ.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Mark; Kapara, Ori; Werbeloff, Nomi; Goldberg, Shira; Fenchel, Daphna; Reichenberg, Abraham; Yoffe, Rinat; Ginat, Keren; Fruchter, Eyal; Davidson, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Suicide is a major cause of death in schizophrenia. Identifying factors which increase the risk of suicide among schizophrenia patients might help focus prevention efforts. This study examined risk of suicide in male schizophrenia patients using population-based data, examining the timing of suicide in relation to the last hospital discharge, and the effect of premorbid IQ on risk of suicide. Data on 930,000 male adolescents from the Israeli military draft board were linked with data from the Israeli Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry and vital statistics from the Israeli Ministry of Health. The relationship between premorbid IQ and risk for suicide was examined among 2881 males hospitalized with schizophrenia and compared to a control group of 566,726 males from the same cohort, who were not hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder, using survival analysis methods. Over a mean follow-up period of 9.9 years (SD=5.8, range: 0-22 years), 77/3806 males with schizophrenia died by suicide (a suicide rate of 204.4 per 100,000 person-years). Approximately 48% of the suicides occurred within a year of discharge from the last hospital admission for schizophrenia. Risk of suicide was higher in male schizophrenia patients with high premorbid IQ (HR=4.45, 95% CI=1.37-14.43) compared to those with normal premorbid IQ. These data indicate that male schizophrenia patients with high premorbid IQ are at particularly high risk of suicide, and the time of peak risk is during the first year after the last hospitalization discharge.

  10. Impact of late hospital admission on the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Novak, Katarina; Ribicić, Kristijana Novak; Perić, Irena; Batinić, Tonci; Ribicić, Ivan; Stula, Ivana

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the time elapsed from the onset of pain in patients with AMI to their hospital admission (pain to door time) and fibrinolytic administration (door to needle time). The objective is also to determine whether there is a difference between the frequency of fibrinolytic administration to patients and the survival rate of patients with AMI with respect to the location they are transported from. This prospective clinical study included patients manifesting clear clinical, electrocardiographic and biochemical evidence of AMI, according to criteria of ECS (European Society of Cardiology), and who were admitted to the Coronary Care Unit of Split Clinical Hospital in the period from 1 January to 31 December 1999. On the basis of their residence, the patients were divided into three groups: 1. patients from Split and the surrounding area distant up to 15 km from the city; 2. patients from the surrounding area within 15 km from Split, 3. patients living on the islands of Central Dalmatia. 409 patients with AMI were admitted to hospital in the period in question. The first group consisted of 207, the second of 163, and the third of 39 subjects (254:39; p < 0.001). The median time from the onset of pain to hospital admission for all patients with AMI was 7.3 hours, for patients from the islands 13 hours, whereas for those coming from locations distant more than 15 km from Split it amounted to 7.6 hours (p < 0.001). The number of patients that were administered fibrinolysis is extremely low (17.1%) and there is no significant difference in the frequency of fibrinolytic administration between certain patient groups (p > 0.05). Similarly, the mortality rate prior to hospital discharge is high (18.8%) and does not vary among the three studied groups (p > 0.05). The results of this study are in opposition to the assumption that the mortality rate will be lower in patients living in Split and the immediate surroundings when compared to the

  11. Retrospective study of human cystic echinococcosis in Italy based on the analysis of hospital discharge records between 2001 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Brundu, Diego; Piseddu, Toni; Stegel, Giovanni; Masu, Gabriella; Ledda, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna

    2014-12-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important zoonotic parasitic infection. The European Centre for Disease Control highlights that Italy lacks a surveillance system for CE. Due to the lack of official data, we analysed the Hospital Discharge Records (HDRs) drawn from the National Ministry of Health. The aim of this study was to analyse data from the HDRs with CE-related diagnoses in Italy from 2001 to 2012 to assess the current status and trend of disease epidemiology. A total of 16,550 HDRs related to the admission of 10,682 Italian patients were examined. The HDRs were analysed according to the patient's region and province code to evaluate the demographic and clinical characteristics of each case, together with the annual incidence rates of hospital cases (AIh) in administrative divisions in rural and urban areas. Lesions occurred frequently in the liver (83.6%) and lungs (8.4%). Patients ranged in age from 1 to 100 years (mean 59.8), and 57% were over 60 years old. The highest average AIh was registered in the Islands with 4.6/10(5) inhabitants (6.9/10(5) in Sardinia and 4.3/10(5) in Sicily), followed by the South with an average AIh of 1.9/10(5) inhabitants (5.4/10(5) inhabitants) and the Centre with an average AIh of 1.07/10(5) inhabitants (there was an AIh of 1.65/10(5) in Latium). The analysis for trend showed a statistically significant decrease in the AIh throughout the study period (e.g., in the Islands r(2)=0.98, p<0.001). An AIh over 2/10(5) inhabitants was observed in 31/110 provinces. Rural areas with comprehensive development problems had a relative risk of CE of 5.7 (95% CI, 5.3 to 6.9) compared to urban areas. The relative risk increased between areas where sheep breeding is widespread compared to those where it is less prevalent. This study shows a detailed picture of the geographic distribution and the epidemiological situation of CE in Italy, indicating that CE continues to be a significant public health problem in Italy. The retrospective study

  12. Symptom, Family, and Service Predictors of Children's Psychiatric Rehospitalization within One Year of Discharge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blader, Joseph C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate predictors of readmission to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children aged 5 to 12 discharged from acute-care hospitalization. Method: One hundred nine children were followed for 1 year after discharge from inpatient care. Time to rehospitalization was the outcome of interest. Predictors of readmission, examined via…

  13. Graduated compression stockings to prevent venous thromboembolism in hospital: evidence from patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Kearon, Clive; O'Donnell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of death in hospital patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is cost-saving in high-risk patients. Low-dose anticoagulation is very effective at preventing VTE but increases bleeding. Graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices are also used to prevent VTE and do not increase bleeding, which makes their use appealing in patients who cannot tolerate bleeding, such as patients with acute stroke. Studies that evaluated mechanical methods of preventing VTE were small and mainly used asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), detected using screening tests, as the study outcome. The recently published CLOTS Trial 1 (Clots in Legs Or sTockings after Stroke) compared thigh-level compression stockings with no stockings in about 2500 patients with stroke and immobility, and found that thigh-level stockings were not effective. Indirectly, the findings of this study question the ability of stockings to prevent VTE in other patient groups, including those after surgery. CLOTS 1 compared thigh-level and below-knee stockings in about 3000 patients with acute stroke. Given that thigh-level stockings were ineffective in CLOTS 1, it is surprising that they were more effective than below-knee stockings in CLOTS Trial 2. A possible explanation is that below-knee stockings increase DVT, although this seems unlikely. CLOTS 1 and CLOTS 2 question whether graduated compression stockings prevent VTE and suggest the need for further trials evaluating their efficacy in medical and surgical patients.

  14. Nurses' knowledge of and compliance with universal precautions in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chan, Regina; Molassiotis, Alexander; Chan, Eunice; Chan, Virene; Ho, Becky; Lai, Chit-ying; Lam, Pauline; Shit, Frances; Yiu, Ivy

    2002-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the nurses' knowledge of and compliance with Universal Precautions (UP) in an acute hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 450 nurses were randomly selected from a population of acute care nurses and 306 were successfully recruited in the study. The study revealed that the nurses' knowledge of UP was inadequate. In addition, UP was not only insufficiently and inappropriately applied, but also selectively practiced. Nearly all respondents knew that used needles should be disposed of in a sharps' box after injections. However, nurses had difficulty in distinguishing between deep body fluids and other general body secretions that are not considered infectious in UP. A high compliance was reported regarding hand-washing, disposal of needles and glove usage. However, the use of other protective wear such as masks and goggles was uncommon. The results also showed no significant relationships between the nurses' knowledge and compliance with UP. It is recommended that UP educational programmes need to consider attitudes in conjunction with empirical knowledge. Nurse managers and occupational health nurses should take a leadership role to ensure safe practices are used in the care of patients.

  15. Comparative analysis of acute toxic poisoning in 2003 and 2011: analysis of 3 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jung-Youn; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Hong, Yun-Sik; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Social factors may affect the available sources of toxic substances and causes of poisoning; and these factors may change over time. Additionally, understanding the characteristics of patients with acute toxic poisoning is important for treating such patients. Therefore, this study investigated the characteristics of patients with toxic poisoning. Patients visiting one of 3 hospitals in 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Data on all patients who were admitted to the emergency departments with acute toxic poisoning were retrospectively obtained from medical records. Total 939 patients were analyzed. The average age of patients was 40.0 ± 20 yr, and 335 (36.9%) patients were men. Among the elements that did not change over time were the facts that suicide was the most common cause, that alcohol consumption was involved in roughly 1 of 4 cases, and that there were more women than men. Furthermore, acetaminophen and doxylamine remained the most common poisoning agents. In conclusion, the average patient age and psychotic drug poisoning has increased over time, and the use of lavage treatment has decreased.

  16. Acute Splenic Infarction at an Academic General Hospital Over 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ami, Schattner; Meital, Adi; Ella, Kitroser; Abraham, Klepfish

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few case series provide a current, comprehensive, and detailed description of splenic infarction (SI), an uncommon condition. Retrospective chart review complemented by imaging evaluation and patient follow-up. All adult patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute SI discharged over 10 years from a single academic center were studied. A systematic literature review was done to compile a complete list of SI etiologies. SI was found in 32 patients, 0.016% of admissions. Ages ranged from 18 to 86 (median 64) years. Cardiogenic emboli were the predominant etiology (20/32, 62.5%) and atrial fibrillation was frequent. Other patients had autoimmune disease (12.5%), associated infection (12.5%), or hematological malignancy (6%). Nine of the patients (28%) had been previously healthy or with no recognized morbidity predisposing to SI. In 5 of 9 hitherto silent antiphospholipid syndrome or mitral valve disease had been identified. Two remained cryptogenic. Most patients presented with abdominal pain (84%), often felt in the left upper quadrant or epigastrium. Associated symptoms, leukocytosis or increased serum lactate dehydrogenase occurred inconsistently (∼25% each). Chest X-ray showed suggestive Lt. supra-diaphragmatic findings in 22%. Thus, the typical predisposing factors and/or clinical presentation should suggest SI to the clinician and be followed by early imaging by computed tomography (CT), highly useful also in atypical presentations. Complications were rare and patients were discharged after 6.5 days (median) on anticoagulant treatment. The systematic literature review revealed an extensive list of conditions underlying SI. In some, SI may be the first and presenting manifestation. SI is a rare event but should be considered in predisposed patients or those with any combination of suggestive clinical features, especially abdominal pain CT evaluation is diagnostic and the outcome is good. PMID:26356690

  17. The relationship between business process re-engineering and Internet usage: survey of acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    1999-12-01

    The data from a national survey of acute care hospitals was used for analysis. Hatcher discusses the complete questionnaire, data collection procedure, and sample selection. The relationship between business process re-engineering, total quality management, innovation system approaches, and Internet usage and potential usage will be reported and discussed.

  18. Molecular detection of human calicivirus in young children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Melbourne, Australia, during 1999.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, C D; Bishop, R F

    2001-07-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR and sequence analysis identified calciviruses in 32 of 60 stool specimens (negative for other enteric pathogens) obtained from children admitted to our hospital with acute gastroenteritis. The overall annual incidence rate for calcivirus was 9% (32 of 354 children). Molecular analysis identified 30 "Norwalk-like virus" genogroup II (predominantly Lordsdale cluster) and 2 "Sapporo-like virus" strains.

  19. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  20. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Nurse Planning Information Series 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John P.; And Others

    A critical review of literature on factors affecting nurse staffing in acute care hospitals, with particular regard for the consequences of a movement from team nursing to primary nursing care, was conducted. The literature search revealed a need for more research on the philosophy of nursing and nursing goals and policy as they relate to nurse…

  1. 6-PACK programme to decrease fall injuries in acute hospitals: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Renata T; Wolfe, Rory; Brand, Caroline A; Haines, Terry P; Hill, Keith D; Brauer, Sandra G; Botti, Mari; Cumming, Robert G; Livingston, Patricia M; Sherrington, Catherine; Zavarsek, Silva; Lindley, Richard I; Kamar, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the 6-PACK programme on falls and fall injuries in acute wards. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Six Australian hospitals. Participants All patients admitted to 24 acute wards during the trial period. Interventions Participating wards were randomly assigned to receive either the nurse led 6-PACK programme or usual care over 12 months. The 6-PACK programme included a fall risk tool and individualised use of one or more of six interventions: “falls alert” sign, supervision of patients in the bathroom, ensuring patients’ walking aids are within reach, a toileting regimen, use of a low-low bed, and use of a bed/chair alarm. Main outcome measures The co-primary outcomes were falls and fall injuries per 1000 occupied bed days. Results During the trial, 46 245 admissions to 16 medical and eight surgical wards occurred. As many people were admitted more than once, this represented 31 411 individual patients. Patients’ characteristics and length of stay were similar for intervention and control wards. Use of 6-PACK programme components was higher on intervention wards than on control wards (incidence rate ratio 3.05, 95% confidence interval 2.14 to 4.34; P<0.001). In all, 1831 falls and 613 fall injuries occurred, and the rates of falls (incidence rate ratio 1.04, 0.78 to 1.37; P=0.796) and fall injuries (0.96, 0.72 to 1.27; P=0.766) were similar in intervention and control wards. Conclusions Positive changes in falls prevention practice occurred following the introduction of the 6-PACK programme. However, no difference was seen in falls or fall injuries between groups. High quality evidence showing the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in acute wards remains absent. Novel solutions to the problem of in-hospital falls are urgently needed. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000332921. PMID:26813674

  2. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  3. Antimicrobial Stewardship in a Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Using Offsite Electronic Medical Record Audit.

    PubMed

    Beaulac, Kirthana; Corcione, Silvia; Epstein, Lauren; Davidson, Lisa E; Doron, Shira

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To offer antimicrobial stewardship to a long-term acute care hospital using telemedicine. METHODS We conducted an uninterrupted time-series analysis to measure the impact of antimicrobial stewardship on hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates and antimicrobial use. Simple linear regression was used to analyze changes in antimicrobial use; Poisson regression was used to estimate the incidence rate ratio in CDI rates. The preimplementation period was April 1, 2010-March 31, 2011; the postimplementation period was April 1, 2011-March 31, 2014. RESULTS During the preimplementation period, total antimicrobial usage was 266 defined daily doses (DDD)/1,000 patient-days (PD); it rose 4.54 (95% CI, -0.19 to 9.28) per month then significantly decreased from preimplementation to postimplementation (-6.58 DDD/1,000 PD [95% CI, -11.48 to -1.67]; P=.01). The same trend was observed for antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (-2.97 DDD/1,000 PD per month [95% CI, -5.65 to -0.30]; P=.03). There was a decrease in usage of anti-CDI antibiotics by 50.4 DDD/1,000 PD per month (95% CI, -71.4 to -29.2; P<.001) at program implementation that was maintained afterwards. Anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics increased after implementation (30.6 DDD/1,000 PD per month [95% CI, 4.9-56.3]; P=.02) but with ongoing education this trend reversed. Intervention was associated with a decrease in hospital-acquired CDI (incidence rate ratio, 0.57 [95% CI, 0.35-0.92]; P=.02). CONCLUSION Antimicrobial stewardship using an electronic medical record via remote access led to a significant decrease in antibacterial usage and a decrease in CDI rates.

  4. Bordetella pertussis in infants hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms remains a concern

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preliminary results suggest that pertussis infection might be considered in infants during a seasonal respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak. Methods In order to analyze clinical features and laboratory findings in infants with pertussis hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms during a seasonal RSV outbreak, we conducted a retrospective single-center study on 19 infants with pertussis (6 boys; median age 72 days) and 19 matched controls (RSV-bronchiolitis), hospitalized from October 2008 to April 2010. B. pertussis and RSV were detected from nasopharyngeal washes with Real Time-PCR. Results Infants with pertussis were less often breastfeed than infants with RSV bronchiolitis (63.2% vs 89.5%; p <0.06). Clinically, significantly fewer infants with pertussis than controls had more episodes of whooping cough (63.2% vs 0.0%; p < 0.001) and also less frequently fever at admission (15.8% vs 68.4%; p <0.01), apnea (52.6% vs 10.5%; p <0.006), and cyanosis (52.6% vs 10.5%; p < 0.006). Infants with pertussis had more often no abnormal chest sounds on auscultation than infants with RSV bronchiolitis (0% vs 42,1%; p < 0.005). The absolute blood lymphocyte and eosinophil counts were higher in infants with B. pertussis than in controls with bronchiolitis (23886 ± 16945 vs 10725 ± 4126 cells/mm3, p < 0.0001 and 13.653 ± 10.430 vs 4.730 ± 2.400 cells/mm3, p < 0.001). The molecular analysis of 2 B. pertussis isolates for ptxA1, ptxP3, and prn2 genes showed the presence of gene variants. Conclusions When infants are hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms, physicians should suspect a pertussis infection, seek for specific clinical symptoms, investigate lymphocyte and eosinophil counts and thus diagnose infection early enough to allow treatment. PMID:24209790

  5. The Impact of Hospital/Surgeon Volume on Acute Renal Failure and Mortality in Liver Transplantation: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lin, Jr-Rung; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the case volume of surgeons and hospitals affects the rates of postoperative complications and survival after liver transplantation. This population-based retrospective cohort study included 2938 recipients of liver transplantation performed between 1998 and 2012, enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. They were divided into two groups, according to the cumulative case volume of their operating surgeons and the case volume of their hospitals. The duration of intensive care unit stay and post-transplantation hospitalization, postoperative complications, and mortality were analyzed. The results showed that, in the low and high case volume surgeons groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred at the rate of 14.11% and 5.86% (p<0.0001), and the overall mortality rates were 19.61% and 12.44% (p<0.0001). In the low and high case volume hospital groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred in 11% and 7.11% of the recipients (p = 0.0004), and the overall mortality was 18.44% and 12.86% (p<0.0001). These findings suggest that liver transplantation recipients operated on higher case volume surgeons or in higher case volume hospitals have a lower rate of acute renal failure and mortality. PMID:27706183

  6. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  7. In-Hospital Outcome of Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results from Royal Hospital Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Mukhaini, Mohammed; Al-Riyami, Abdullah; El-Deeb, Mohammad; Rahman, Said Abdul; Al-Riyami, Mohammed B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiogenic shock (CS) is still the leading cause of in-hospital mortality in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to determine the in-hospital mortality and clinical outcome in AMI patients presenting with CS in a tertiary hospital in Oman. Methods This retrospective observational study included patients admitted to the cardiology department between January 2013 and December 2014. A purposive sampling technique was used, and 63 AMI patients with CS admitted to (36.5%) or transferred from a regional hospital (63.5%) were selected for the study. Results Of 63 patients, 73% (n = 46) were Omani and 27% (n = 17) were expatriates: 79% were male and 21% were female. The mean age of patients was 60±12 years. The highest incidence of CS (30%) was observed in the 51–60 year age group. Diabetes mellitus (43%) and hypertension (40%) were the predominant risk factors. Ninety-two percent of patients had ST-elevation MI, 58.7% patients were thrombolysed, and 8% had non-ST-elevation MI. Three-quarters (75%) of CS patients had severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (defined as ejection fraction <30%). Coronary angiogram showed single vessel disease in 17%, double vessel disease in 40%, and triple vessel disease in 32% and left main disease in 11%. The majority of the patients (93.6%) underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), among them 23 (36.5%) underwent primary PCI. In-hospital mortality was 52.4% in this study. Conclusions CS in AMI patients presenting to a tertiary hospital in Oman have high in-hospital mortality despite the majority undergoing PCI. Even though the in-hospital mortality is comparable to other studies and registries, there is an urgent need to determine the causes and find any remedies to provide better care for such patients, specifically concentrating on the early transfer of patients from regional hospitals for early PCI. PMID:26814946

  8. A Study to Develop a Method of Assessing the Effectiveness of Discharge Planning in a Military Hospital.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    means of documenting discharge planning effectiveness. Fourthly, the Chief of Professional Services, as Chairman of the Medical Care Evaluation Committee... Medical Care Evaluation Committee for direct screening (see Appendix G). The Committee Chairperson prepares and distributes the agenda for each...monthly reports to the Medical Care Evaluation (MCE) Committee and represents the Discharge Planning Coordination Committee at the MCE Committee

  9. Process evaluation of an integrated model of discharge planning.

    PubMed

    LeClerc, M; Wells, D L

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a new, empirically-derived model of discharge planning for acutely-ill elderly was evaluated to determine (a) whether it could be implemented in a hospital setting, and (b) what facilitated or challenged the implementation. The process evaluation involved four case studies conducted on three in-patient units of two acute-care hospitals. Data were analyzed using explanation-building and case comparison methods. Three main study results emerged: (a) The integrated model had the potential to be implemented in a hospital setting when certain conditions were in place, (b) use of the integrated approach to discharge planning contributed to patient satisfaction, and (c) the materials developed as part of the discharge planning protocol required only minor formatting modifications in order to be rendered user-friendly. In this article, recommendations are made that will facilitate the model's implementation and utilization in other clinical settings and ongoing and future process evaluations.

  10. Utility of the combination of serum highly-sensitive C-reactive protein level at discharge and a risk index in predicting readmission for acute exacerbation of COPD*,**

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun; Zhu, Hong; Shen, Ning; Han, Xiang; Chen, Yahong; He, Bei

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Frequent readmissions for acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are an independent risk factor for increased mortality and use of health-care resources. Disease severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level are validated predictors of long-term prognosis in such patients. This study investigated the utility of combining serum CRP level with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) exacerbation risk classification for predicting readmission for AECOPD. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study of consecutive patients hospitalized for AECOPD at Peking University Third Hospital, in Beijing, China. We assessed patient age; gender; smoking status and history (pack-years); lung function; AECOPD frequency during the last year; quality of life; GOLD risk category (A-D; D indicating the greatest risk); and serum level of high-sensitivity CRP at discharge (hsCRP-D). RESULTS: The final sample comprised 135 patients. Of those, 71 (52.6%) were readmitted at least once during the 12-month follow-up period. The median (interquartile) time to readmission was 78 days (42-178 days). Multivariate analysis revealed that serum hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD category D were independent predictors of readmission (hazard ratio = 3.486; 95% CI: 1.968-6.175; p < 0.001 and hazard ratio = 2.201; 95% CI: 1.342-3.610; p = 0.002, respectively). The ordering of the factor combinations by cumulative readmission risk, from highest to lowest, was as follows: hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD category D; hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD categories A-C; hsCRP-D < 3 mg/L and GOLD category D; hsCRP-D < 3 mg/L and GOLD categories A-C. CONCLUSIONS: Serum hsCRP-D and GOLD classification are independent predictors of readmission for AECOPD, and their predictive value increases when they are used in combination. PMID:25410837

  11. Examination of hospital length of stay in Canada among patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Potashman, Michele H; Stokes, Michael; Liu, Jieruo; Lawrence, Robin; Harris, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Skin infections, particularly those caused by resistant pathogens, represent a clinical burden. Hospitalization associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to the economic burden of the disease. This study was conducted to provide current, real-world data on hospitalization patterns for patients with ABSSSI caused by MRSA across multiple geographic regions in Canada. Patients and methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated length of stay (LOS) for hospitalized patients with ABSSSI due to MRSA diagnosis across four Canadian geographic regions using the Discharge Abstract Database. Patients with ICD-10-CA diagnosis consistent with ABSSSI caused by MRSA between January 2008 and December 2014 were selected and assigned a primary or secondary diagnosis based on a prespecified ICD-10-CA code algorithm. Results Among 6,719 patients, 3,273 (48.7%) and 3,446 (51.3%) had a primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively. Among patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis, the cellulitis/erysipelas subtype was most common. The majority of patients presented with 0 or 1 comorbid condition; the most common comorbidity was diabetes. The mean LOS over the study period varied by geographic region and year; in 2014 (the most recent year analyzed), LOS ranged from 7.7 days in Ontario to 13.4 days in the Canadian Prairie for a primary diagnosis and from 18.2 days in Ontario to 25.2 days in Atlantic Canada for a secondary diagnosis. A secondary diagnosis was associated with higher rates of continuing care compared with a primary diagnosis (10.6%–24.2% vs 4.6%–12.1%). Conclusion This study demonstrated that the mean LOS associated with ABSSSI due to MRSA in Canada was minimally 7 days. Clinical management strategies, including medication management, which might facilitate hospital discharge, have the potential to reduce hospital LOS and related economic

  12. Recent Trends in Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Beijing: Increasing Overall Burden and a Transition From ST-Segment Elevation to Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction in a Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Dong; Xie, Wuxiang; Xie, Xueqin; Guo, Moning; Wang, Miao; Wang, Wei; Liu, Wanru; Liu, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Comparable data on trends of hospitalization rates for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-STEMI (NSTEMI) remain unavailable in representative Asian populations.To examine the temporal trends of hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its subtypes in Beijing.Patients hospitalized for AMI in Beijing from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2012 were identified from the validated Hospital Discharge Information System. Trends in hospitalization rates, in-hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and hospitalization costs were analyzed by regression models for total AMI and for STEMI and NSTEMI separately. In total, 77,943 patients were admitted for AMI in Beijing during the 6 years, among whom 67.5% were males and 62.4% had STEMI. During the period, the rate of AMI hospitalization per 100,000 population increased by 31.2% (from 55.8 to 73.3 per 100,000 population) after age standardization, with a slight decrease in STEMI but a 3-fold increase in NSTEMI. The ratio of STEMI to NSTEMI decreased dramatically from 6.5:1.0 to 1.3:1.0. The age-standardized in-hospital mortality decreased from 11.2% to 8.6%, with a significant decreasing trend evident for STEMI in males and females (P < 0.001) and for NSTEMI in males (P = 0.02). The rate of percutaneous coronary intervention increased from 28.7% to 55.6% among STEMI patients. The total cost for AMI hospitalization increased by 56.8% after adjusting for inflation, although the LOS decreased by 1 day.The hospitalization burden for AMI has been increasing in Beijing with a transition from STEMI to NSTEMI. Diverse temporal trends in AMI subtypes from the unselected "real-world" data in Beijing may help to guide the management of AMI in China and other developing countries.

  13. Pre-Stage Acute Kidney Injury Can Predict Mortality and Medical Costs in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin Young; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    The significance of minimal increases in serum creatinine below the levels indicative of the acute kidney injury (AKI) stage is not well established. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-stage AKI (pre-AKI) on clinical outcomes. We enrolled a total of 21,261 patients who were admitted to the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. Pre-AKI was defined as a 25–50% increase in peak serum creatinine levels from baseline levels during the hospital stay. In total, 5.4% of the patients had pre-AKI during admission. The patients with pre-AKI were predominantly female (55.0%) and had a lower body weight and lower baseline levels of serum creatinine (0.63 ± 0.18 mg/dl) than the patients with AKI and the patients without AKI (P < 0.001). The patients with pre-AKI had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (25.1%) and malignancy (32.6%). The adjusted hazard ratio of in-hospital mortality for pre-AKI was 2.112 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.143 to 3.903]. In addition, patients with pre-AKI had an increased length of stay (7.7 ± 9.7 days in patients without AKI, 11.4 ± 11.4 days in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) and increased medical costs (4,061 ± 4,318 USD in patients without AKI, 4,966 ± 5,099 USD in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) during admission. The adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality for pre-AKI during the follow-up period of 2.0 ± 0.6 years was 1.473 (95% CI, 1.228 to 1.684). Although the adjusted hazard ratio of pre-AKI for overall mortality was not significant among the patients admitted to the surgery department or who underwent surgery, pre-AKI was significantly associated with mortality among the non-surgical patients (adjusted HR 1.542 [95% CI, 1.330 to 1.787]) and the patients admitted to the medical department (adjusted HR 1.384 [95% CI, 1.153 to 1.662]). Pre-AKI is associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and increased medical costs during admission. More attention

  14. From admission to discharge: patterns of interpreter use among resident physicians caring for hospitalized patients with limited english proficiency.

    PubMed

    Tang, Amy S; Kruger, Jenna F; Quan, Judy; Fernandez, Alicia

    2014-11-01

    Resident physicians' use of professional interpreters drives communication with hospitalized patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). We surveyed residents from three specialties across two hospitals affiliated with one academic medical institution about their communication with their last hospitalized LEP patient. Among 149 respondents (73% response rate), 71% reported using professional interpreters for fewer than 60% of hospital encounters. Most (91%) perceived their quality of communication with hospitalized LEP patients as worse than with English-speaking patients. Professional interpreter use varied substantially by resident and by hospital encounter, with more reporting use of ad hoc interpreters, their own language skills, or not talking to the patient due to time constraints during pre-rounds (39%), team rounds (49%), or check-ins (40%) than during procedural consents (9%) or family meetings (17%). The reported variation suggests targets for quality improvement efforts and the need for clear enforceable guidelines on resident communication with hospitalized LEP patients.

  15. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  16. Demographic, seasonal, and spatial differences in acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital in Melbourne Australia

    PubMed Central

    Loughnan, Margaret E; Nicholls, Neville; Tapper, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    Background Seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the northern hemisphere are well described in the literature. More recently age and gender differences in cardiac mortality and to a lesser extent morbidity have been presented. To date spatial differences between the seasonal patterns of cardiac disease has not been presented. Literature relating to seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the southern hemisphere and in Australia in particular is scarce. The aim of this paper is to describe the seasonal, age, gender, and spatial patterns of cardiac disease in Melbourne Australia by using acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital as a marker of cardiac disease. Results There were 33,165 Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) admissions over 2186 consecutive days. There is a seasonal pattern in AMI admissions with increased rates during the colder months. The peak month is July. The admissions rate is greater for males than for females, although this difference decreases with advancing age. The maximal AMI season for males extends from April to November. The difference between months of peak and minimum admissions was 33.7%. Increased female AMI admissions occur from May to November, with a variation between peak and minimum of 23.1%. Maps of seasonal AMI admissions demonstrate spatial differences. Analysis using Global and Local Moran's I showed increased spatial clustering during the warmer months. The Bivariate Moran's I statistic indicated a weaker relationship between AMI and age during the warmer months. Conclusion There are two distinct seasons with increased admissions during the colder part of the year. Males present a stronger seasonal pattern than females. There are spatial differences in AMI admissions throughout the year that cannot be explained by the age structure of the population. The seasonal difference in AMI admissions warrants further investigation. This includes detailing the prevalence of cardiac disease in the community and examining

  17. Characteristics, Outcomes and Predictors of Long-Term Mortality for Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure: A Report From the Korean Heart Failure Registry

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Ju; Han, Seongwoo; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Kim, Jae-Joong; Yoo, Byung-Su; Shin, Mi-Seung; Seong, In-Whan; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Yung-Jo; Kim, Hyung Seop; Chae, Shung Chull; Oh, Byung-Hee; Lee, Myung-Mook

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acute heart failure (AHF) is associated with a poor prognosis and it requires repeated hospitalizations. However, there are few studies on the characteristics, treatment and prognostic factors of AHF. The aims of this study were to describe the clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of the patients hospitalized for AHF in Korea. Subjects and Methods We analyzed the clinical data of 3,200 hospitalization episodes that were recorded between June 2004 and April 2009 from the Korean Heart Failure (KorHF) Registry database. The mean age was 67.6±14.3 years and 50% of the patients were female. Results Twenty-nine point six percent (29.6%) of the patients had a history of previous HF and 52.3% of the patients had ischemic heart disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was reported for 89% of the patients. The mean LVEF was 38.5±15.7% and 26.1% of the patients had preserved systolic function (LVEF ≥50%), which was more prevalent in the females (34.0% vs. 18.4%, respectively, p<0.001). At discharge, 58.6% of the patients received beta-blockers (BB), 53.7% received either angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEi/ARB), and 58.4% received both BB and ACEi/ARB. The 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-year mortality rates were 15%, 21%, 26% and 30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that advanced age {hazard ratio: 1.023 (95% confidence interval: 1.004-1.042); p=0.020}, a previous history of heart failure {1.735 (1.150-2.618); p=0.009}, anemia {1.973 (1.271-3.063); p=0.002}, hyponatremia {1.861 (1.184-2.926); p=0.007}, a high level of serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) {3.152 (1.450-6.849); p=0.004} and the use of BB at discharge {0.599 (0.360-0.997); p=0.490} were significantly associated with total death. Conclusion We present here the characteristics and prognosis of an unselected population of AHF patients in Korea. The long-term mortality rate was comparable to that

  18. "It's the people that make the environment good or bad": the patient's experience of the acute care hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Hogan, Beverly; Thomas, Sandra P

    2005-01-01

    A review of contemporary nursing research reveals a tendency to focus on select aspects of the hospital environment such as noise, light, and music. Although studies such as these shed light on discrete aspects of the hospital environment, this body of literature contributes little to an understanding of the entirety of that world as the patient in the sickbed experiences it. The purpose of the study detailed in this article was to describe the patient's experience of the acute care hospital environment. Nondirective, in-depth phenomenological interviews were conducted, then transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for themes. Against the backdrop of "I lived and that's all that matters," there were 3 predominant themes in patients' experience of the acute care environment: (1) disconnection/connection, (2) fear/less fear, and (3) confinement/freedom. In this environment, human-to-human contact increased security and power in an environment that was described as sterile, disorienting, and untrustworthy. Acute and critical care nurses and other caregivers can use the findings to create less noxious hospital environments.

  19. Time Trends in Ischemic Stroke among Type 2 Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients: Analysis of the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Data (2003-2012)

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel-Yanes, José Ma; Esteban-Hernández, Jesús; Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; de Miguel-Díez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) is the most rapidly increasing risk factor for ischemic stroke. We aimed to compare trends in outcomes for ischemic stroke in people with or without diabetes in Spain between 2003 and 2012. Methods We selected all patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke using national hospital discharge data. We evaluated annual incident rates stratified by T2DM status. We analyzed trends in the use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, patient comorbidities, and in-hospital outcomes. We calculated in-hospital mortality (IHM), length of hospital stay (LOHS) and readmission rate in one month after discharge. Time trend on the incidence of hospitalization was estimated fitting Poisson regression models by sex and diabetes variables. In-hospital mortality was analyzed using logistic regression models separate for men and women. LOHS were compared with ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis when necessary. Results We identified a total of 423,475 discharges of patients (221,418 men and 202,057 women) admitted with ischemic stroke as primary diagnosis. Patients with T2DM accounted for 30.9% of total. The estimated incidence rates of discharges increased significantly in all groups. The incidence of hospitalization due to stroke (with ICD9 codes for stroke as main diagnosis at discharge) was higher among those with than those without diabetes in all the years studied. T2DM was positively associated with ischemic stroke with an adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 2.27 (95% CI 2.24–2.29) for men and 2.15 (95%CI 2.13–2.17) for women. Over the 10 year period LOHS decreased significantly in men and women with and without diabetes. Readmission rate remained stable in diabetic and non diabetic men (around 5%) while slightly increased in women with and without diabetes. We observed a significant increase in the use of fibrinolysis from 2002–2013. IHM was positively associated with older age in all groups, with Charlson Comorbidity Index > 3 and atrial

  20. Are inspectors’ assessments reliable? Ratings of NHS acute hospital trust services in England

    PubMed Central

    Addicott, Rachael; Robertson, Ruth; Ross, Shilpa; Walshe, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    The credibility of a regulator could be threatened if stakeholders perceive that assessments of performance made by its inspectors are unreliable. Yet there is little published research on the reliability of inspectors’ assessments of health care organizations’ services. Objectives We investigated the inter-rater reliability of assessments made by inspectors inspecting acute hospitals in England during the piloting of a new regulatory model implemented by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) during 2013 and 2014. Multi-professional teams of inspectors rated service provision on a four-point scale for each of five domains: safety; effectiveness; caring; responsiveness; and leadership. Methods In an online survey, we asked individual inspectors to assign a domain and a rating to each of 10 vignettes of service information extracted from CQC inspection reports. We used these data to simulate the ratings that might be produced by teams of inspectors. We also observed inspection teams in action, and interviewed inspectors and staff from hospitals that had been inspected. Results Levels of agreement varied substantially from vignette to vignette. Characteristics such as professional background explained only a very small part of the variation. Overall, agreement was higher on ratings than on domains, and for groups of inspectors compared with individual inspectors. A number of potential causes of disagreement were identified, such as differences regarding the weight that should be given to contextual factors and general uncertainty about interpreting the rating and domain categories. Conclusion Groups of inspectors produced more reliable assessments than individual inspectors, and there is evidence to support the utility of appropriate discussions between inspectors in improving reliability. The reliability of domain allocations was lower than for ratings. It is important to define categories and rating levels clearly, and to train inspectors in their use. Further

  1. Predictors of acute diarrhoea among hospitalized children in Gaza Governorates: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Alnawajha, Samer Khader; Bakry, Ghadeer Abdo; Aljeesh, Yousef Ibrahim

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to determine the predictors of acute diarrhoea among hospitalized children in the Gaza Governorates. The case-control design included 140 children (70 cases and 70 controls) in a stratified cluster sample from Naser Medical Complex and Alnasser Pediatric Hospital. An interview questionnaire was used, and face and content validations were performed. Multiple logistic regression was used for the multivariate analysis of risk factors of diarrhoea in children aged less than five years. Results showed a significant association between diarrhoea and family income, residence, complementary feeding, and age of weaning (p<0.05). Children living in villages had lower odds of having diarrhoea by 53.2% than children living in cities. Children of families with incomes between US$ 485 and 620 had lower odds of having diarrhoea by 80.8% than children of families with incomes less than US$ 485. Moreover, children who did not receive complementary feeding had lower odds of having diarrhoea by 59.0%. We found that, for one month increase in weaning age, the odds of diarrhoea decreased by 1.06 times (adjusted OR=1.05, 95% CI 1.0180-1.100). The study concludes that urban residence, lower family income, complementary feeding, and lower age of weaning are risk factors of diarrhoea among children aged less than five years in the Gaza Strip. The results of the study suggest that children of low-income families and those who were not naturally breastfed may warrant more attention for prevention and/or treatment of diarrhoea.

  2. Reducing falls after hospital discharge: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating an individualised multimodal falls education programme for older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; McPhail, Steven M; Morris, Meg E; Flicker, Leon; Bulsara, Max; Lee, Den-Ching; Francis-Coad, Jacqueline; Waldron, Nicholas; Boudville, Amanda; Haines, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Older adults frequently fall after discharge from hospital. Older people may have low self-perceived risk of falls and poor knowledge about falls prevention. The primary aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of providing tailored falls prevention education in addition to usual care on falls rates in older people after discharge from hospital compared to providing a social intervention in addition to usual care. Methods and analyses The ‘Back to My Best’ study is a multisite, single blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial with blinded outcome assessment and intention-to-treat analysis, adhering to CONSORT guidelines. Patients (n=390) (aged 60 years or older; score more than 7/10 on the Abbreviated Mental Test Score; discharged to community settings) from aged care rehabilitation wards in three hospitals will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of two groups. Participants allocated to the control group shall receive usual care plus a social visit. Participants allocated to the experimental group shall receive usual care and a falls prevention programme incorporating a video, workbook and individualised follow-up from an expert health professional to foster capability and motivation to engage in falls prevention strategies. The primary outcome is falls rates in the first 6 months after discharge, analysed using negative binomial regression with adjustment for participant's length of observation in the study. Secondary outcomes are injurious falls rates, the proportion of people who become fallers, functional status and health-related quality of life. Healthcare resource use will be captured from four sources for 6 months after discharge. The study is powered to detect a 30% relative reduction in the rate of falls (negative binomial incidence ratio 0.70) for a control rate of 0.80 falls per person over 6 months. Ethics and dissemination Results will be presented in peer-reviewed journals and at conferences worldwide. This

  3. Changes in Payment Regulation and Acute Care Use for Total Hip Replacement: Trends in Length of Stay, Costs, and Discharge, 1997–2012

    PubMed Central

    Baernholdt, Marianne; Merwin, Elizabeth I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe trends in the length of stay (LOS), costs, mortality, and discharge destination among a national sample of total hip replacement (THR) patients between 1997 and 2012. Design Longitudinal retrospective design. Methods Descriptive analysis of the Healthcare Utilization Project (HCUP) National Inpatient Sample data. Findings A total of 3,516,636 procedures were performed over the study period. Most THR patients were women, and the proportion aged 44–65 years increased. LOS decreased from 5 to 3 days. Charges more than doubled, from $22,184 to $53,901. Deaths decreased from 43 to 12 deaths per 10,000 patients. THR patients discharged to an institutional setting declined, while those discharged to the community increased. Conclusion We found an increase in THR patients, who were younger, women, had private insurance, and among those discharged to community-based settings. Clinical Relevance Findings have implications for patient profiles, workplace environments, quality improvement, and educational preparation of nurses in acute and post-acute settings. PMID:25820992

  4. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  5. A retrospective analysis of hospital discharge records for S. pneumoniae diseases in the elderly population of Florence, Italy, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Bechini, Angela; Taddei, Cristina; Barchielli, Alessandro; Levi, Miriam; Tiscione, Emilia; Santini, Maria Grazia; Niccolini, Fabrizio; Mechi, Maria Teresa; Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Azzari, Chiara; Bonanni, Paolo; Boccalini, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) and community acquired pneumonia (CAP) represent two of the major causes of out-patient visits, hospital admissions and deaths in the elderly. In Tuscany (Italy), in the Local Health Unit of Florence, a project aimed at implementing an active surveillance of pneumococcal diseases in the hospitalized elderly population started in 2013. The aim of this study is to show the results of the retrospective analysis (2010-2012) on hospital discharge records (HDRs) related to diseases potentially due to S. pneumoniae, using a selection of ICD9-CM codes. All ordinary hospitalizations (primary and secondary diagnoses) of the elderly population were included (11 245 HDRs). Among a population of about 200 000 inhabitants ≥65 y, the hospitalization rate (HR) increased with increasing age and was higher in males in all age groups. Almost all hospitalizations (95%) were due to CAP, only 5% were invasive diseases. Only few cases of CAP were specified as related to S. pneumoniae, the percentage was higher in case of meningitis (100%) or septicemia (22%). In-hospital deaths over the three-year period were 1703 (case fatality rate: 15%). The risk of dying, being hospitalized for a disease potentially attributable to pneumococcus (as primary diagnosis) increased significantly with age (P < 0.001), the odds ratio (OR) per increasing age year was 1.06 (95% CI 1.05-1.07) and was higher in patients with co-existing medical conditions with respect to patients without comorbidities. Currently, an active surveillance system on S. pneumoniae diseases with the inclusion of bio-molecular tests (RT-PCR), is a key step to assess the effectiveness of the PCV13 vaccine (13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) in the elderly population after implementation of vaccination policies. The results of this study will provide the comparator baseline data for the evaluation of a possible immunization programme involving one or more cohorts of the elderly in

  6. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment of Aggressive Patients Admitted to the Acute Behavioral Unit of a Community General Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Reade, Cynthia; Stoltzfus, Jill; Mittal, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aggressive patients are not uncommon in acute inpatient behavioral health units of general hospitals. Prior research identifies various predictors associated with aggressive inpatient behavior. This prospective observational study examines the demographic and clinical characteristics of aggressive inpatients and the routine medications these patients were receiving at discharge. Method: Thirty-six adults diagnosed with a DSM-IV mental disorder who met 2 of 6 established inclusion criteria for high violence risk and a Clinical Global Impressions–Severity of Illness (CGI-S) scale score ≥ 4 were observed for a maximum of 28 days on the 23-bed case mix acute behavioral health unit of St Luke’s University Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, from January 2012 to May 2013. Primary outcome measures were the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) and CGI-S; secondary measures were symptom outcome measures and demographic and clinical characteristics data. Analysis was conducted using repeated measures methodology. Results: Younger males with a history of previous violence, psychiatric admissions, and symptoms of severe agitation were more at risk for aggressive behavior. Positive psychotic symptoms, a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, substance use, and comorbid personality disorders also increased risk. Significant improvements from baseline to last visit were observed for the CGI-S and MOAS (P < .001 for both), with a significant correlation between the MOAS and CGI-S at last visit (P < .001). Only the symptom of agitation was significantly correlated to MOAS scores at both baseline and last visit (P < .001). Conclusion: Patients significantly improved over time in both severity of illness and level of aggression. PMID:25317364

  7. The Belgian trial with azithromycin for acute COPD exacerbations requiring hospitalization: an investigator-initiated study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vermeersch, Kristina; Gabrovska, Maria; Deslypere, Griet; Demedts, Ingel K; Slabbynck, Hans; Aumann, Joseph; Ninane, Vincent; Verleden, Geert M; Troosters, Thierry; Bogaerts, Kris; Brusselle, Guy G; Janssens, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term use of macrolide antibiotics is effective to prevent exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As risks and side effects of long-term intervention outweigh the benefits in the general COPD population, the optimal dose, duration of treatment, and target population are yet to be defined. Hospitalization for an acute exacerbation (AE) of COPD may offer a targeted risk group and an obvious risk period for studying macrolide interventions. Methods/design Patients with COPD, hospitalized for an AE, who have a smoking history of ≥10 pack-years and had ≥1 exacerbation in the previous year will be enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (NCT02135354). On top of a standardized treatment of systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics, subjects will be randomized to receive either azithromycin or placebo during 3 months, at an uploading dose of 500 mg once a day for 3 days, followed by a maintenance dose of 250 mg once every 2 days. The primary endpoint is the time-to-treatment failure during the treatment phase (ie, from the moment of randomization until the end of intervention). Treatment failure is a novel composite endpoint defined as either death, the admission to intensive care or the requirement of additional systemic steroids or new antibiotics for respiratory reasons, or the diagnosis of a new AE after discharge. Discussion We investigate whether azithromycin initiated at the onset of a severe exacerbation, with a limited duration and at a low dose, might be effective and safe in the highest risk period during and immediately after the acute event. If proven effective and safe, this targeted approach may improve the treatment of severe AEs and redirect the preventive use of azithromycin in COPD to a temporary intervention in the subgroup with the highest unmet needs. PMID:27099485

  8. Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae across a hospital system: impact of post-acute care facilities on dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Endimiani, Andrea; Ray, Amy J.; Decker, Brooke K.; Wallace, Christopher J.; Hujer, Kristine M.; Ecker, David J.; Adams, Mark D.; Toltzis, Philip; Dul, Michael J.; Windau, Anne; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Jacobs, Michael R.; Salata, Robert A.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Resistance to carbapenems among Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae presents a serious therapeutic and infection control challenge. We describe the epidemiology and genetic basis of carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae in a six-hospital healthcare system in Northeast Ohio. Methods Clinical isolates of A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae distributed across the healthcare system were collected from April 2007 to April 2008. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed followed by molecular analysis of carbapenemase genes. Genetic relatedness of isolates was established with repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), multilocus PCR followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) and PFGE. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients were reviewed. Results Among 39 isolates of A. baumannii, two predominant genotypes related to European clone II were found. Eighteen isolates contained blaOXA-23, and four isolates possessed blaOXA-24/40. Among 29 K. pneumoniae isolates with decreased susceptibility to carbapenems, two distinct genotypes containing blaKPC-2 or blaKPC-3 were found. Patients with carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae were elderly, possessed multiple co-morbidities, were frequently admitted from and discharged to post-acute care facilities, and experienced prolonged hospital stays (up to 25 days) with a high mortality rate (up to 35%). Conclusion In this outbreak of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae across a healthcare system, we illustrate the important role post-acute care facilities play in the dissemination of multidrug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:20513702

  9. A hospital-level analysis of the work environment and workforce health indicators for registered nurses in Ontario's acute-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shamian, J; Kerr, M S; Laschinger, H K; Thomson, D

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between hospital-level indicators of the work environment and aggregated indicators of health and well-being amongst registered nurses working in acute-care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. This ecological analysis used data from a self-reported survey instrument randomly allocated to nurses using a stratified sampling approach. Multivariable linear regression models were used to examine hospital-level associations for burnout, musculoskeletal pain, self-rated general health, and absence due to illness. The unit of analysis was the hospital (n = 160), with individual nurse responses (n = 6,609) aggregated within hospitals. After controlling for basic differences in nurse workforces, including mean age and education, higher (better) work-environment scores were found to be generally associated with higher health-indicator scores, while a larger proportion of full-time than part-time nurses was found to be associated with lower (poorer) health scores. This study may provide direction for policy-makers in coping with the recruitment and retention of nursing staff in light of the current nursing shortage.

  10. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards). Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization), received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males) participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward. PMID:28164113

  11. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Stanislaw; Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards). Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization), received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males) participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward.

  12. Invasive Candidiasis in Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Experience from a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Baronia, Arvind Kumar; Azim, Afzal; Ahmed, Armin; Gurjar, Mohan; Marak, Rungmei S. K.; Yadav, Reema; Sharma, Preeti

    2017-01-01

    Background: Invasive candidiasis (IC) is associated with increased morbidity in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). There is limited information regarding the predisposing factors, Candida species distribution and in vitro susceptibility. Methodology: Current data have been derived from a larger prospective nonintervention study conducted on 200 critically ill patients which was done to study the antifungal prescription practices, collect epidemiological data, and perform an external validation of risk prediction models for IC under senior research associateship program of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research New Delhi. Of these critically ill patients, thirty had SAP and were included for analysis. Results: There were 23 males and 7 females. Out of eight patients (27%) who developed IC, three had isolated candidemia, two had isolated deep-seated candidiasis while three had both candidemia and deep-seated candidiasis. SAP patients with IC had a longer duration of Intensive Care Unit stay, hospital stay, days on mechanical ventilation and duration of shock. Mortality was not different between SAP patients with or without IC. Conclusion: There is a high rate of Candida infection in SAP. More studies are needed to generate epidemiological data and develop antifungal stewardship in this subset of high-risk population. PMID:28197050

  13. Characterisation of metabolic acidosis in Kenyan children admitted to hospital for acute non-surgical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sasi, P; English, M; Berkley, J; Lowe, B; Shebe, M; Mwakesi, R; Kokwaro, G

    2006-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with most severe malaria deaths in African children, and most deaths occur before maximum antimalarial action is achieved. Thus, specific acidosis treatment may reduce mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood and no specific interventions have been developed. A detailed characterisation of this acidosis is critical in treatment development. We used the traditional and Stewart's approach to characterise acidosis in consecutive paediatric admissions for malaria and other acute non-surgical conditions to Kilifi District Hospital in Kenya. The overall acidosis prevalence was 21%. Gastroenteritis had the highest prevalence (61%). Both the mean albumin-corrected anion gap and the strong ion gap were high (>13 mmol/l and >0 mmol/l, respectively) in malaria, gastroenteritis, lower respiratory tract infection and malnutrition. Presence of salicylate in plasma was not associated with acidosis but was associated with signs of severe illness (odds ratio 2.11, 95% CI 1.1-4.2). In malaria, mean (95% CI) strong ion gap was 15 (14-7) mmol/l, and lactate, creatinine and inorganic phosphorous explained only approximately 40% of the variability in base excess (adjusted R2 = 0.397). Acidosis may be more common than previously recognised amongst paediatric admissions in Africa and is characterised by the presence of currently unidentified strong anions. In malaria, lactate and ketones, but not salicylate, are associated with acidosis. However, unidentified anions may be more important.

  14. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fawkner-Corbett, David W; Khoo, Siew Kim; Duarte, Carminha M; Bezerra, Patricia G M; Bochkov, Yury A; Gern, James E; Le Souef, Peter N; McNamara, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterize the clinical and demographic features associated