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Sample records for acute hospital settings

  1. An Elder Abuse Assessment Team in an Acute Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Beth Israel Hospital Elder Assessment Team

    1986-01-01

    Describes a hospital-based multidisciplinary team designed to assess and respond to cases of suspected abuse or neglect of elders from both institutional and community settings. Presence of the team has increased the hospital staff's awareness of elder abuse and neglect, as well as their willingness to refer suspected cases for further assessment.…

  2. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  3. Delivering palliative care in an acute hospital setting: views of referrers and specialist providers.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Gail; Farquhar, Morag; Booth, Sara

    2009-09-01

    There has been a steady expansion of hospital-based palliative care in the United Kingdom but limited published research on health professionals' views of hospital multidisciplinary specialist palliative care services (SPCS). The aim of the study was to describe referrer (SPCS user) and provider (SPCS staff) perspectives on delivery of specialist palliative care in hospital. Interviews were conducted with referrers, including five junior doctors, 13 consultants, and six clinical nurse specialists, to investigate the reasons for referral, beneficial aspects, and barriers to use. Focus groups were conducted with providers, six medical and five nursing, to identify their perspective on delivering the specialist service in hospital. Discussions were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed thematically using a framework analysis approach. The study found large areas of agreement between referrers and providers on what hospital palliative care teams should be providing for patients, that is, expertise in managing difficult symptoms and complex psychosocial problems, and this was being achieved locally. Access to the specialist team was also important: visibility on the wards, informal routes of access to advice and a timely response by specialists. However, discordance in views of providing palliative care was also identified; in particular, whether specialists should be providing generalist palliative care (such as basic psychological support) neglected by ward teams and implementation of specialist advice by referrers. Such perspectives on the interface of generalist and specialist provision provide insights into improving care for palliative patients in the acute hospital setting.

  4. Palliative care need and management in the acute hospital setting: a census of one New Zealand Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving palliative care management in acute hospital settings has been identified as a priority internationally. The aim of this study was to establish the proportion of inpatients within one acute hospital in New Zealand who meet prognostic criteria for palliative care need and explore key aspects of their management. Methods A prospective survey of adult hospital inpatients (n = 501) was undertaken. Case notes were examined for evidence that the patient might be in their last year of life according to Gold Standards Framework (GSF) prognostic indicator criteria. For patients who met GSF criteria, clinical and socio-demographic information were recorded. Results Ninety-nine inpatients met GSF criteria, representing 19.8% of the total census population. The patients’ average age was 70 years; 47% had a primary diagnosis of cancer. Two thirds had died within 6 months of their admission. Seventy-eight of the 99 cases demonstrated evidence that a palliative approach to care had been adopted; however documentation of discussion about goals of care was very limited and only one patient had evidence of an advance care plan. Conclusion One fifth of hospital inpatients met criteria for palliative care need, the majority of whom were aged >70 years. Whilst over three quarters were concluded to be receiving care in line with a palliative care approach, very little documented evidence of discussion with patients and families regarding end of life issues was evident. Future research needs to explore how best to support ‘generalist’ palliative care providers in initiating, and appropriately recording, such discussions. PMID:23537092

  5. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  6. Nursing Education Interventions for Managing Acute Pain in Hospital Settings: A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes and Teaching Methods.

    PubMed

    Drake, Gareth; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the effects of nursing education interventions on clinical outcomes for acute pain management in hospital settings, relating interventions to health care behavior change theory. Three databases were searched for nursing education interventions from 2002 to 2015 in acute hospital settings with clinical outcomes reported. Methodological quality was rated as strong, moderate, or weak using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. The 12 eligible studies used varied didactic and interactive teaching methods. Several studies had weaknesses attributable to selection biases, uncontrolled confounders, and lack of blinding of outcome assessors. No studies made reference to behavior change theory in their design. Eight of the 12 studies investigated nursing documentation of pain assessment as the main outcome, with the majority reporting positive effects of education interventions on nursing pain assessment. Of the remaining studies, two reported mixed findings on patient self-report of pain scores as the key measure, one reported improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management after a nursing intervention, and one study found an increase in nurses' delivery of a relaxation treatment following an intervention. Improvements in design and evaluation of nursing education interventions are suggested, drawing on behavior change theory and emphasizing the relational, contextual, and emotionally demanding nature of nursing pain management in hospital settings.

  7. Systematic review of safety checklists for use by medical care teams in acute hospital settings - limited evidence of effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a fundamental component of good quality health care. Checklists have been proposed as a method of improving patient safety. This systematic review, asked "In acute hospital settings, would the use of safety checklists applied by medical care teams, compared to not using checklists, improve patient safety?" Methods We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE for randomised controlled trials published in English before September 2009. Studies were selected and appraised by two reviewers independently in consultation with colleagues, using inclusion, exclusion and appraisal criteria established a priori. Results Nine cohort studies with historical controls studies from four hospital care settings were included-intensive care unit, emergency department, surgery, and acute care. The studies used a variety of designs of safety checklists, and implemented them in different ways, however most incorporated an educational component to teach the staff how to use the checklist. The studies assessed outcomes occurring a few weeks to a maximum of 12 months post-implementation, and these outcomes were diverse. The studies were generally of low to moderate quality and of low levels of evidence, with all but one of the studies containing a high risk of bias. The results of these studies suggest some improvements in patient safety arising from use of safety checklists, but these were not consistent across all studies or for all outcomes. Some studies showed no difference in outcomes between checklist use and standard care without a checklist. Due to the variations in setting, checklist design, educational training given, and outcomes measured, it was unfeasible to accurately summarise any trends across all studies. Conclusions The included studies suggest some benefits of using safety checklists to improve protocol adherence and patient safety, but due to the risk of bias in these studies, their results should be interpreted with

  8. Delirium Detection and Impact of Comorbid Health Conditions in a Post-Acute Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Stelmokas, Julija; Gabel, Nicolette; Flaherty, Jennifer M.; Rayson, Katherine; Tran, Kathileen; Anderson, Jason R.; Bieliauskas, Linas A.

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis and under-detection of delirium may occur in many medical settings. This is important to address as delirium clearly increases risk of morbidity and mortality in such settings. This study assessed whether Veterans who screened positive on a delirium severity measure (Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale; MDAS) differed from those with and without corresponding medical documentation of delirium in terms of cognitive functioning, psychiatric/medical history, and medication use. A medical record review of 266 inpatients at a VA post-acute rehabilitation unit found that 10.9% were identified as delirious according to the MDAS and/or medical records. Of the Veterans who screened positive on the MDAS (N = 19), 68.4% went undetected by medical screening. Undetected cases had a higher number of comorbid medical conditions as measured by the Age-Adjusted Charlson Index (AACI) scores (median = 9, SD = 3.15; U = 5.5, p = .003) than medically documented cases. For Veterans with a score of 7 or greater on the AACI, the general relative risk for delirium was 4.46. Delirium is frequently under-detected in a post-acute rehabilitation unit, particularly for Veterans with high comorbid illness. The relative risk of delirium is up to 4.46 for those with high medical burden, suggesting the need for more comprehensive delirium screening in these patients. PMID:27902744

  9. The acute hospital setting as a place of death and final care: a qualitative study on perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers.

    PubMed

    Reyniers, Thijs; Houttekier, Dirk; Cohen, Joachim; Pasman, H Roeline; Deliens, Luc

    2014-05-01

    While the focus of end-of-life care research and policy has predominantly been on 'death in a homelike environment', little is known about perceptions of the acute hospital setting as a place of final care or death. Using a qualitative design and constant comparative analysis, the perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers were explored. Participants generally perceived the acute hospital setting to be inadequate for terminally ill patients, although they indicated that in some circumstances it might be a 'safe haven'. This implies that a higher quality of end-of-life care provision in the acute hospital setting needs to be ensured, preferably by improving communication skills. At the same time alternatives to the acute hospital setting need to be developed or expanded.

  10. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Marika; McKinley, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed in a rehabilitation hospital, over 4 weeks. The dance intervention followed the structure of an usual dance class, but the exercises were modified and progressed to meet each individual’s needs. The dance intervention, delivered in a group format, was feasible in a rehabilitation setting. A 45-min dance class of moderate intensity was of appropriate duration and intensity for individuals with subacute stroke to avoid excessive fatigue and to deliver the appropriate level of challenge. The overall satisfaction of the participants towards the dance class, the availability of space and equipment, and the low level of risks contributed to the feasibility of a dance intervention designed for individuals in the subacute stage of post-stroke recovery. PMID:25785497

  11. Structured sedation programs in the emergency department, hospital and other acute settings: protocol for systematic review of effects and events

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of procedural sedation outside the operating theatre has increased in hospital settings and has gained popularity among non-anesthesiologists. Sedative agents used for procedural pain, although effective, also pose significant risks to the patient if used incorrectly. There is currently no universally accepted program of education for practitioners using or introducing procedural sedation into their practice. There is emerging literature identifying structured procedural sedation programs (PSPs) as a method of ensuring a standardized level of competency among staff and reducing risks to the patient. We hypothesize that programs of education for healthcare professionals using procedural sedation outside the operating theatre are beneficial in improving patient care, safety, practitioner competence and reducing adverse event rates. Methods/Design Electronic databases will be systematically searched for studies (randomized and non-randomized) examining the effectiveness of structured PSPs from 1966 to present. Database searches will be supplemented by contact with experts, reference and citation checking, and a grey literature search. No language restriction will be imposed. Screening of titles and abstracts, and data extraction will be performed by two independent reviewers. All disagreements will be resolved by discussion with an independent third party. Data analysis will be completed adhering to procedures outlined in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions. If the data allows, a meta-analysis will be performed. Discussion This review will cohere evidence on the effectiveness of structured PSPs on sedation events and patient outcomes within the hospital and other acute care settings. In addition, it will examine key components identified within a PSP associated with patient safety and improved patient outcomes. Trial registration PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013003851 PMID:24083519

  12. Human resource management strategies for the retention of nurses in acute care settings in hospitals in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Pamela; Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy

    2007-04-01

    It is paramount that there is an adequate nursing workforce supply for now and in the future, to achieve equitable and quality health outcomes and consumer access to healthcare, regardless of geographic location. Nursing forms the largest body of employees in the health care system, spanning all segments of care. A shortage of nurses, particularly in the acute care settings in hospitals, jeopardizes the provision of quality health care to consumers. This article provides a literature review of Australian State and Federal Government reports into nurse retention. All reports discuss staff turnover rates; the average age of nurses; enrolment numbers in nursing courses; workloads; nursing workforce shortfalls and the effect on the work environment; leadership and management styles; organizational culture; change management; the mobility of nursing qualifications both locally and internationally and the critical need to value nurses. Then why has the situation of nurse retention not improved? Possible reasons for the continued nurse shortage and the promise of strategic HRM in addressing nurse retention are discussed.

  13. Bacterial and viral pathogen spectra of acute respiratory infections in under-5 children in hospital settings in Dhaka city

    PubMed Central

    Bhuyan, Golam Sarower; Hossain, Mohammad Amir; Sarker, Suprovath Kumar; Rahat, Asifuzzaman; Islam, Md Tarikul; Haque, Tanjina Noor; Begum, Noorjahan; Qadri, Syeda Kashfi; Muraduzzaman, A. K. M.; Islam, Nafisa Nawal; Islam, Mohammad Sazzadul; Sultana, Nusrat; Jony, Manjur Hossain Khan; Khanam, Farhana; Mowla, Golam; Matin, Abdul; Begum, Firoza; Shirin, Tahmina; Ahmed, Dilruba; Saha, Narayan; Qadri, Firdausi

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine for the first time the spectra of viral and bacterial pathogens along with the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated bacteria in under-5 children with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in hospital settings of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Nasal swabs were collected from 200 under-five children hospitalized with clinical signs of ARIs. Nasal swabs from 30 asymptomatic children were also collected. Screening of viral pathogens targeted ten respiratory viruses using RT-qPCR. Bacterial pathogens were identified by bacteriological culture methods and antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was determined following CLSI guidelines. About 82.5% (n = 165) of specimens were positive for pathogens. Of 165 infected cases, 3% (n = 6) had only single bacterial pathogens, whereas 43.5% (n = 87) cases had only single viral pathogens. The remaining 36% (n = 72) cases had coinfections. In symptomatic cases, human rhinovirus was detected as the predominant virus (31.5%), followed by RSV (31%), HMPV (13%), HBoV (11%), HPIV-3 (10.5%), and adenovirus (7%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequently isolated bacterial pathogen (9%), whereas Klebsiella pneumaniae, Streptococcus spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, and Haemophilus influenzae were 5.5%, 5%, 2%, and 1.5%, respectively. Of 15 multidrug-resistant bacteria, a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate and an Enterobacter agglomerans isolate exhibited resistance against more than 10 different antibiotics. Both ARI incidence and predominant pathogen detection rates were higher during post-monsoon and winter, peaking in September. Pathogen detection rates and coinfection incidence in less than 1-year group were significantly higher (P = 0.0034 and 0.049, respectively) than in 1–5 years age group. Pathogen detection rate (43%) in asymptomatic cases was significantly lower compared to symptomatic group (P<0.0001). Human rhinovirus, HPIV-3, adenovirus, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Klebsiella pneumaniae had

  14. Experiences of the Implementation of a Learning Disability Nursing Liaison Service within an Acute Hospital Setting: A Service Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castles, Amy; Bailey, Carol; Gates, Bob; Sooben, Roja

    2014-01-01

    It has been well documented that people with learning disabilities receive poor care in acute settings. Over the last few years, a number of learning disability liaison nurse services have developed in the United Kingdom as a response to this, but there has been a failure to systematically gather evidence as to their effectiveness. This article…

  15. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM.

  16. Exercise therapy for low back pain: a small-scale exploratory survey of current physiotherapy practice in the Republic of Ireland acute hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Karol; Doody, Catherine; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2006-11-01

    A small-scale exploratory cross-sectional survey investigated the current use of a range of exercise therapy approaches for low back pain (LBP) by outpatient physiotherapists in the acute hospital setting in the Republic of Ireland, where the majority of publicly funded treatment is delivered. Of the 120 postal questionnaires distributed to 24 physiotherapy departments, 87 were returned (72.5% response rate). The results showed specific spinal stabilization exercises were the most popular exercise therapy for acute (39%; n = 35) and chronic (51%; n = 48) LBP, followed by the McKenzie approach (acute LBP (ALBP) 35.6%; n = 32: chronic LBP (CLBP) 17%; n = 16), and abdominal exercise (ALBP 11.1%; n = 10: CLBP 9.6%; n = 9). The most popular forms of exercise therapy used by outpatient physiotherapists in acute hospital settings in Ireland lack support from evidence-based clinical guidelines, and further large-scale high quality randomized controlled trials of these approaches are warranted. Further research should also establish the use of exercise therapy and attitudes to clinical guidelines of physiotherapists in other countries and healthcare settings.

  17. Geriatric nursing in acute settings.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, T; Ashley, J; Reilly, C

    1986-01-01

    In conclusion, it is important to reiterate the interdependent nature of the functional health patterns as they relate to the geriatric patient in the acute care setting. Further, the combination of the primary nursing model with the functional health pattern approach that leads to subsequent nursing diagnoses provides a comprehensive care approach, which is so important for the elderly patient. As elders live longer, become frailer, and are subject to increasingly frequent hospitalizations, it will become more and more important to provide care in a manner that decreases fragmentation, increases individualization, and makes provisions for comprehensive and wholistic continuing care.

  18. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: a cross-sectional prevalence study in the Australian acute care hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jill L; Coyer, Fiona M; Osborne, Sonya R

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify the prevalence of incontinence and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) in Australian acute care patients and to describe the products worn to manage incontinence, and those provided at the bedside for perineal skin care. Data on 376 inpatients were collected over 2 days at a major Australian teaching hospital. The mean age of the sample group was 62 years and 52% of the patients were male. The prevalence rate of incontinence was 24% (91/376). Urinary incontinence was significantly more prevalent in females (10%) than males (6%) (χ(2)  = 4·458, df = 1, P = 0·035). IAD occurred in 10% (38/376) of the sample group, with 42% (38/91) of incontinent patients having IAD. Semi-formed and liquid stool were associated with IAD (χ(2)  = 5·520, df = 1, P = 0·027). Clinical indication of fungal infection was present in 32% (12/38) of patients with IAD. Absorbent disposable briefs were the most common incontinence aids used (80%, 70/91), with soap/water and disposable washcloths being the clean-up products most commonly available (60%, 55/91) at the bedside. Further data are needed to validate this high prevalence. Studies that address prevention of IAD and the effectiveness of management strategies are also needed.

  19. Use of Risk Assessment Tool for Inpatient Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage after Falls in Acute Care Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Toyabe, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Severe injuries such as intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) are the most serious problem after falls in hospital, but they have not been considered in risk assessment scores for falls. We tried to determine the risk factors for ICH after falls in 20,320 inpatients (696,364 patient-days) aged from 40 to 90 years who were admitted to a tertiary-care university hospital. Possible risk factors including STRATIFY risk score for falls and FRAX™ risk score for fractures were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Fallers accounted for 3.2% of the patients, and 5.0% of the fallers suffered major injuries, including peripheral bone fracture (59.6%) and ICH (23.4%). In addition to STRATIFY, FRAX™ was significantly associated not only with bone fractures but also ICH. Concomitant use of risk score for falls and risk score for fractures might be useful for the prediction of major injuries such as ICH after falls. PMID:22980233

  20. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  1. Acute Surgical Unit at Auckland City Hospital: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsee, Li; Devaud, Marcelo; Middelberg, Lisa; Jones, Wayne; Civil, Ian

    2012-09-01

    Lack of timely assessment and access to acute operating rooms is a worldwide problem and also exists in New Zealand hospitals. To address these issues, an Acute Surgical Unit (ASU) was set up at Auckland City Hospital (ACH) in January 2009. This service has evolved and been modified to address the specific needs of acute surgical patients of ACH. Despite initial challenges inherent to setting up a new service, the Unit has been in steady operation and enhanced its performance over time. This paper is a descriptive analysis of the design of the ACH ASU and discusses some of the indications for streamlining acute surgical services at a large tertiary metropolitan hospital in New Zealand. Performance of the ASU has shown benefits for acute patients and the Hospital. The acute surgical rotation has also been beneficial for surgical training.

  2. Rate of spontaneous voiding recovery after acute urinary retention due to bed rest in the hospital setting in a non-urological population clinical study of the relationship between lower limbs and bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Hering, Flávio; Cieli, Eli; Campagnari, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To understand the clinical relationship between lower limbs functions and the recovery of spontaneous voiding after an acute urinary retention (AUR) in older patients admitted to hospitals for non-urological causes using clinical parameters. Materials and Methods 56 adult patients (32 men; mean age: 77.9 ± 8.3 and 24 women; mean age 82.1 ± 4.6) with AUR were prospectively followed with validated Physical Performance Mobility Exam (PPME) instrument to evaluate the relationship between the recovery of mobility capacity and spontaneous voiding. After a short period of permanent bladder drainage patients started CIC along evaluation by PPME during hospitalization and at 7, 15, 30 60, 90, and 180 days of discharge. Mann-Whitney U, chi-square test and ANOVA tests were used. Results All patients were hospitalized for at least 15 days (Median 26.3 ± 4.1 days). Progressive improvement on mobility scale measured by PPME was observed after leaving ICU and along the initial 7 days of hospitalization but with a deterioration if hospitalization extends beyond 15 days (p<0.03). Prolonged hospital stay impairs mobility in all domains (p<0.05) except step-up and transfer skills (p<0.02) although a recovery rate on spontaneous voiding persistented. Restoration of spontaneous voiding was accompanied by improvement on mobility scale (p<0.02). Recovery of spontaneous voiding was markedly observed after discharging the hospital. All patients recovered spontaneous voiding until 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions Recovery to spontaneous voiding after acute urinary retention in the hospital setting may be anticipated by evaluation of lower limbs function measured by validated instruments. PMID:27532117

  3. Rubicon crossed in acute hospital design?

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2008-06-01

    With construction work now underway on the new pound sterling 227 million PFI-funded Pembury Hospital near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, Jonathan Baillie talks to John Cooper of architects Anshen + Allen, who is convinced that this exciting new acute facility will become the first of a new generation of 100% single-bedroom hospitals in the UK.

  4. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... 0938-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident... Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term...

  5. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  6. Examining Outcomes of Acute Psychiatric Hospitalization among Children

    PubMed Central

    Tharayil, Priya R.; Sigrid, James; Morgan, Ronald; Freeman, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Within the past two decades, few studies have examined outcomes of acute psychiatric hospitalization among children, demonstrating change in emotional and behavioral functioning. A secondary analysis of pre-test/post-test data collected on 36 children was conducted, using the Target Symptom Rating (TSR). The TSR is a 13-item measure with two subscales – Emotional Problems and Behavioral Problems and was designed for evaluation of outcome among children and adolescents in acute inpatient psychiatric settings. Results of this study, its limitations, and the barriers encountered in the implementation of the TSR scale as part of routine clinical practice are discussed. PMID:23946699

  7. The relationship between organizational culture and performance in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rowena; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw T O; Harrison, Stephen; Konteh, Fred; Walshe, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between senior management team culture and organizational performance in English acute hospitals (NHS Trusts) over three time periods between 2001/2002 and 2007/2008. We use a validated culture rating instrument, the Competing Values Framework, to measure senior management team culture. Organizational performance is assessed using a wide range of routinely collected indicators. We examine the associations between organizational culture and performance using ordered probit and multinomial logit models. We find that organizational culture varies across hospitals and over time, and this variation is at least in part associated in consistent and predictable ways with a variety of organizational characteristics and routine measures of performance. Moreover, hospitals are moving towards more competitive culture archetypes which mirror the current policy context, though with a stronger blend of cultures. The study provides evidence for a relationship between culture and performance in hospital settings.

  8. Medicinal Cannabis: History, Pharmacology, And Implications for the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Mary Barna; Abazia, Daniel T

    2017-03-01

    The authors review the historical use of medicinal cannabis and discuss the agent's pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, select evidence on medicinal uses, and the implications of evolving regulations on the acute care hospital setting.

  9. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY... Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of Inpatient... ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

  10. Innovative use of tele-ICU in long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mullen-Fortino, Margaret; Sites, Frank D; Soisson, Michael; Galen, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Tele-intensive care units (ICUs) typically provide remote monitoring for ICUs of acute care, short-stay hospitals. As part of a joint venture project to establish a long-term acute level of care, Good Shepherd Penn Partners became the first facility to use tele-ICU technology in a nontraditional setting. Long-term acute care hospitals care for patients with complex medical problems. We describe describes the benefits and challenges of integrating a tele-ICU program into a long-term acute care setting and the impact this model of care has on patient care outcomes.

  11. Renal scintigraphy in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Sfakianaki, Efrosyni; Sfakianakis, George N; Georgiou, Mike; Hsiao, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Renal scintigraphy is a powerful imaging method that provides both functional and anatomic information, which is particularly useful in the acute care setting. In our institution, for the past 2 decades, we have used a 25-minute renal diuretic protocol, technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) mercaptoacetyltriglycine with simultaneous intravenous injection of furosemide, for all ages and indications, including both native and transplant kidneys. As such, this protocol has been widely used in the workup of acutely ill patients. In this setting, there are common clinical entities which affect patients with native and transplant kidneys. In adult patients with native kidneys one of the most frequent reasons for emergency room visits is renal colic due to urolithiasis. Although unenhanced computed tomography is useful to assess the anatomy in cases of renal colic, it does not provide functional information. Time zero furosemide renal scintigraphy can do both and we have shown that it can effectively stratify patients with renal colic. To this end, 4 characteristic patterns of scintirenography have been identified, standardized, and consistently applied: no obstruction, partial obstruction (mild vs high grade), complete obstruction, and stunned (postdecompressed) kidney. With the extensive use of this protocol over the past 2 decades, a pattern of "regional parenchymal dysfunction" indicative of acute pyelonephritis has also been delineated. This information has proved to be useful for patients presenting with urinary tract infection and suspected pyelonephritis, as well as for patients who were referred for workup of renal colic but were found to have acute pyelonephritis instead. In instances of abdominal trauma, renal scintigraphy is uniquely suited to identify urine leaks. This is also true in cases of suspected leak following renal transplant or from other iatrogenic/postsurgical causes. Patients presenting with acute renal failure can be evaluated with renal scintigraphy. A

  12. Hospital Management of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Ashraf S

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalizations for elderly adults in the United States. One in 5 Americans will be >65 years of age by 2050. Because of the high prevalence of HF in this group, the number of Americans requiring hospitalization for this disorder is expected to rise significantly. We reviewed the most recent and ongoing studies and recommendations for the management of patients hospitalized due to decompensated HF. The Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry, together with the 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association heart failure guidelines, earlier retrospective and prospective studies including the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation (DOSE), the Trial of Intensified vs Standard Medical Therapy in the Elderly Patients With Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF), the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure (OPTIMIZE-HF), the Rapid Emergency Department Heart Failure Outpatient Trial (REDHOT) and the Comparison of Medical, Pacing and Defibrillation Therapies in Heart Failure (COMPANION) trial were reviewed for current practices pertaining to these patients. Gaps in our knowledge of optimal use of patient-specific information (biomarkers and comorbid conditions) still exist.

  13. Respirator Use in a Hospital Setting: Establishing Surveillance Metrics.

    PubMed

    Yarbrough, Mary I; Ficken, Meredith E; Lehmann, Christoph U; Talbot, Thomas R; Swift, Melanie D; McGown, Paula W; Wheaton, Robert F; Bruer, Michele; Little, Steven W; Oke, Charles A

    Information that details use and supply of respirators in acute care hospitals is vital to prevent disease transmission, assure the safety of health care personnel, and inform national guidelines and regulations.

  14. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  15. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  16. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  17. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers and for Ambulatory...

  18. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ..., 2010 unless otherwise footnoted).'' c. Third column, the title, ``Table 4J.--Out-Migration Adjustment...) Out-Migration Adjustment for Acute Care Hospitals--FY 2010 (April 1, 2010 through September 30, 2010...: Table 4J--(Abbreviated) Out-Migration Adjustment for Acute Care Hospitals--FY 2010 (April 1,...

  19. Setting up an acute pain management service.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Baratta, Jaime L; Gandhi, Kishor; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2014-12-01

    Successful implementation of an acute pain management service involves a team approach in which team members have clearly defined roles. Clinical protocols are designed to help address common problems and prevent errors. As the complexity of surgery and patients' diseases continues to increase, current knowledge of new analgesic medications, acute pain literature, and skills in regional anesthesia techniques is imperative. Emphasizing a multimodal approach can improve analgesia and decrease opioid-related side effects.

  20. Hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in the thrombolytic era

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, N; O'Rorke, C; Codd, M; McCann, H; McGarry, K; Sugrue, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the management and outcome of an unselected consecutive series of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to a tertiary referral centre.
DESIGN—A historical cohort study over a three year period (1992-94) of consecutive unselected admissions with acute myocardial infarction identified using the HIPE (hospital inpatient enquiry) database and validated according to MONICA criteria for definite or probable acute myocardial infarction.
SETTING—University teaching hospital and cardiac tertiary referral centre.
RESULTS—1059 patients were included. Mean age was 67 years; 60% were male and 40% female. Rates of coronary care unit (CCU) admission, thrombolysis, and predischarge angiography were 70%, 28%, and 32%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 18%. Independent predictors of hospital mortality by multivariate analysis were age, left ventricular failure, ventricular arrhythmias, cardiogenic shock, management outside CCU, and reinfarction. Hospital mortality in a small cohort from a non-tertiary referral centre was 14%, a difference largely explained by the lower mean age of these patients (64 years). Five year survival in the cohort was 50%. Only age and left ventricular failure were independent predictors of mortality at follow up.
CONCLUSIONS—In unselected consecutive patients the hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction remains high (18%). Age and the occurrence of left ventricular failure are major determinants of short and long term mortality after acute myocardial infarction.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; mortality; thrombolysis PMID:10212164

  1. Thinking Outside the Box: Treating Acute Heart Failure Outside the Hospital to Improve Care and Reduce Admissions.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Adam D; Allen, Larry A; Eapen, Zubin J

    2015-08-01

    The management of acute heart failure is shifting toward treatment approaches outside of a traditional hospital setting. Many heart failure providers are now treating patients in less familiar health care settings, such as acute care clinics, emergency departments, and skilled nursing facilities. In this review we describe the current pressures driving change in the delivery of acute heart failure and summarize the evidence regarding treatments for acute heart failure outside of the inpatient setting. We also provide considerations for the design of future treatment strategies to be implemented in alternative care settings.

  2. [The Torino Network Project. Global management of acute myocardial infarction from the field to the hospital].

    PubMed

    Casaccia, Michele; Sicuro, Marco; Scacciatella, Paolo

    2002-02-01

    A unidirectional clinical pathway for acute myocardial infarction from out-of-hospital setting to the coronary care unit and catheterization laboratory could lead to mortality reduction. The ongoing "Progetto Torino Network. Gestione globale dell'infarto miocardico acuto prime ore dal territorio all'ospedale" is based on this statement and described in the three-structural, diagnostic-therapeutical, multimedial issues. This project represents the historical evolution of our involvement in out-of-hospital cardiac emergency management.

  3. 76 FR 51475 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010......

  4. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  5. Enteral Nutrition for Adults in the Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Kozeniecki, Michelle; Fritzshall, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    In patients unable to tolerate oral intake, multiple options of nutrient delivery are available to the clinician. Administration of enteral nutrition (EN) has long been considered the standard of care for nutrition support among patients unable to meet energy and protein requirements orally. Healthcare practitioners must make careful decisions related to ordering, administering, and monitoring EN therapy. In the hospital setting, the registered dietitian is a key resource in enteral formula selection and method of administration, monitoring for and troubleshooting EN-related complications, and transitioning to oral feeding. The hospital setting also presents many unique challenges in providing optimal nutrition to the enterally fed patient.

  6. The creation of a Dementia Nurse Specialist role in an acute general hospital.

    PubMed

    Elliot, R; Adams, J

    2011-09-01

    Older people form the largest group occupying acute hospital beds and many of them will have undiagnosed mental health problems. The creation of a Dementia Nurse Specialist role in a district general hospital provided the opportunity to assess the extent of the previously unmet need among patients, carers and nursing staff. Over 30 patients were seen each month, while around 6 to 12 were diagnosed as having dementia. Other activities undertaken as part of the role included providing information and support for carers, and advice on management of behaviours and support for ward staff. The role also involved policy writing, pathway and local strategy planning, care plan development, and formal and informal teaching on dementia. It is argued that this fixed-term post demonstrated that a Dementia Nurse Specialist could provide significant input in an acute hospital setting, by improving the experience of hospitalization for vulnerable older people and their carers.

  7. Hospital Strategies for Reducing Risk-Standardized Mortality Rates in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.; Spatz, Erica S.; Herrin, Jeph; Cherlin, Emily J.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Thompson, Jennifer W.; Ting, Henry H.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite recent improvements in survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), U.S. hospitals vary 2-fold in their 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs). Nevertheless, information is limited on hospital-level factors that may be associated with RSMRs. Objective To identify hospital strategies that were associated with lower RSMRs. Design Cross-sectional survey of 537 hospitals (91% response rate) and weighted multivariate regression by using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to determine the associations between hospital strategies and hospital RSMRs. Setting Acute care hospitals with an annualized AMI volume of at least 25 patients. Participants Patients hospitalized with AMI between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Measurements Hospital performance improvement strategies, characteristics, and 30-day RSMRs. Results In multivariate analysis, several hospital strategies were significantly associated with lower RSMRs and in aggregate were associated with clinically important differences in RSMRs. These strategies included holding monthly meetings to review AMI cases between hospital clinicians and staff who transported patients to the hospital (RSMR lower by 0.70 percentage points), having cardiologists always on site (lower by 0.54 percentage points), fostering an organizational environment in which clinicians are encouraged to solve problems creatively (lower by 0.84 percentage points), not cross-training nurses from intensive care units for the cardiac catheterization laboratory (lower by 0.44 percentage points), and having physician and nurse champions rather than nurse champions alone (lower by 0.88 percentage points). Fewer than 10% of hospitals reported using at least 4 of these 5 strategies. Limitation The cross-sectional design demonstrates statistical associations but cannot establish causal relationships. Conclusion Several strategies, which are currently implemented by relatively few hospitals, are

  8. Therapy of acute hypertension in hospitalized children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Webb, Tennille N; Shatat, Ibrahim F; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypertension (HTN) in hospitalized children and adolescents occurs relatively frequently, and in some cases, if not recognized and treated promptly, it can lead to hypertensive crisis with potentially significant morbidity and mortality. In contrast to adults, where acute HTN is most likely due to uncontrolled primary HTN, children and adolescents with acute HTN are more likely to have secondary HTN. This review will briefly cover evaluation of acute HTN and various age-specific etiologies of secondary HTN and provide more in-depth discussion on treatment targets, potential risks of acute HTN therapy, and available pediatric data on intravenous and oral antihypertensive agents, and it proposes treatment schema including unique therapy of specific secondary HTN scenarios.

  9. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings.

  10. Impact on mortality following first acute myocardial infarction of distance between home and hospital: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L; Lang, C C; Sullivan, F M; Boyle, P; Wang, J; Pringle, S D; MacDonald, T M

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of distance between home and acute hospital on mortality outcome of patients experiencing an incident myocardial infarction (MI). Design: Cohort study using a record linkage database. Setting: Tayside, Scotland, UK. Patients: 10 541 patients with incident acute MI between 1994 and 2003 were identified from Tayside hospital discharge data and from death certification data. Main outcome measures: MI mortality in the community, all-cause mortality in hospital and all-cause mortality during follow-up. Results: 4133 subjects died following incident MI in the community (that is, were not hospitalised), 6408 patients survived to be hospitalised and 1010 of these (15.8%) died in hospital. Of 5398 discharged from hospital, 1907 (35.3%) died during a median of 3.2 years of follow-up. After adjustment for rurality and other known risk factors, distance between home and admitting hospital was significantly associated with increased mortality both before hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 4.21 for >9 miles and 1.46, 1.09 to 1.95 for 3–9 miles when compared to <3 miles) and after hospitalisation (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.90, 1.19 to 3.02 and 1.27, 0.96 to 1.68). However, there was no effect of distance on in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR 0.95, 0.45 to 2.03 and 1.02, 0.66 to 1.58). Conclusion: The distance between home and hospital of admission may predict mortality in subjects experiencing a first acute MI. This association was found both before and after hospitalisation. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this association. However these data provide support for policies that locate services for acute MI closer to where patients live. PMID:17984217

  11. Music in a Hospital Setting: A Multifaceted Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preti, Costanza; Welch, Graham F.

    2004-01-01

    The article offers an explanation of the effects of music on children within a hospital setting and points up the multifaceted nature of this experience. The nature of the client group allows the musical experience to work on many different levels, such as modifying the child's perception of pain and reducing stress, whilst at the same time having…

  12. PCL-R field validity in prison and hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Jeandarme, Inge; Edens, John F; Habets, Petra; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Oei, Karel; Bogaerts, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Recent field studies have questioned the interrater reliability (IRR) and predictive validity regarding (violent) recidivism of the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). Using a forensic psychiatric sample, the current study investigated discrepancies in scoring between hospital and prison settings, as well as differences in predictive validity across these two settings. PCL-R information was collected from prison and hospital files, resulting in 224 PCL-R total scores and 74 double scores. When examining repeated measurements, large individual differences were found together with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICCA,1) of .42 for the total score. Discrepant results were found for Factor 2, with repeated scores within the same setting having an ICCA,1 of .28 versus an ICCA,1 of .57 for repeated scores between settings. However, areas under the curve (AUCs) from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses for total, factor and facet scores did not differ between settings. For the whole sample, Factor 2 scores marginally predicted violent and general recidivism after 2 years (AUC = .62 and .63), whereas Factor 1 did not predict (violent) recidivism. Consistent with recent studies from other countries, these results suggest inadequate field reliability and validity in prison and hospital settings in Flanders (Belgium). (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. The Effects of Massage Therapy on Pain Management in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rose; White, Barb; Beckett, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain management remains a critical issue for hospitals and is receiving the attention of hospital accreditation organizations. The acute care setting of the hospital provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of massage therapy for pain management into the team-centered approach of patient care. Purpose and Setting This preliminary study evaluated the effect of the use of massage therapy on inpatient pain levels in the acute care setting. The study was conducted at Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff, Arizona—a nonprofit community hospital serving a large rural area of northern Arizona. Method A convenience sample was used to identify research participants. Pain levels before and after massage therapy were recorded using a 0 – 10 visual analog scale. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for analysis of this descriptive study. Participants Hospital inpatients (n = 53) from medical, surgical, and obstetrics units participated in the current research by each receiving one or more massage therapy sessions averaging 30 minutes each. The number of sessions received depended on the length of the hospital stay. Result Before massage, the mean pain level recorded by the patients was 5.18 [standard deviation (SD): 2.01]. After massage, the mean pain level was 2.33 (SD: 2.10). The observed reduction in pain was statistically significant: paired samples t52 = 12.43, r = .67, d = 1.38, p < .001. Qualitative data illustrated improvement in all areas, with the most significant areas of impact reported being overall pain level, emotional well-being, relaxation, and ability to sleep. Conclusions This study shows that integration of massage therapy into the acute care setting creates overall positive results in the patient’s ability to deal with the challenging physical and psychological aspects of their health condition. The study demonstrated not only significant reduction in pain levels, but also the interrelatedness of pain, relaxation

  14. Acute stress impairs set-shifting but not reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Butts, K A; Floresco, S B; Phillips, A G

    2013-09-01

    The ability to update and modify previously learned behavioral responses in a changing environment is essential for successful utilization of promising opportunities and for coping with adverse events. Valid models of cognitive flexibility that contribute to behavioral flexibility include set-shifting and reversal learning. One immediate effect of acute stress is the selective impairment of performance on higher-order cognitive control tasks mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but not the hippocampus. Previous studies show that the mPFC is required for set-shifting but not for reversal learning, therefore the aim of the present experiment is to assess whether exposure to acute stress (15 min of mild tail-pinch stress) given immediately before testing on either a set-shifting or reversal learning tasks would impair performance selectively on the set-shifting task. An automated operant chamber-based task, confirmed that exposure to acute stress significantly disrupts set-shifting but has no effect on reversal learning. Rats exposed to an acute stressor require significantly more trials to reach criterion and make significantly more perseverative errors. Thus, these data reveal that an immediate effect of acute stress is to impair mPFC-dependent cognition selectively by disrupting the ability to inhibit the use of a previously relevant cognitive strategy.

  15. Cost accounting methodologies in price setting of acute inpatient services in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Gaal, Peter; Stefka, Nóra; Nagy, Júlia

    2006-08-01

    On the basis of documentary analysis and interviews with decision makers, this paper discusses the cost accounting methodologies used for price setting of inpatient services in the Hungarian health care system focusing on sector of acute inpatient care, which is financed through the Hungarian adaptation of Diagnosis Related Groups since 1993. Hungary has a quite sophisticated DRG system, which had a deep impact on the efficiency of the acute inpatient care sector. Nevertheless, the system requires continuous maintenance, where the cooperation of hospitals, as well as the minimisation of political influence are critical success factors.

  16. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  17. Prevention of deterioration in acutely ill patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Steen, Colin

    The shift towards providing critical care in general wards has changed the way acutely ill patients are identified, treated and managed in hospital. This requires the expertise of knowledgeable, informed and capable staff. Effective education and appropriate knowledge and skills are required to aid identification of the deteriorating patient and provide prompt, timely and appropriate intervention to prevent further deterioration and possibly death. This article provides information about a systematic approach that will enable healthcare professionals to intervene to prevent deterioration in acutely ill patients.

  18. 76 FR 19365 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2011 Final Wage Indices...), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice contains the final fiscal year (FY) 2011 wage indices and... the expiration date for certain geographic reclassifications and special exception wage...

  19. Dilemma in the emergency setting: hypomagnesemia mimicking acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Martinez-Rodriguez, Laura; Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke mimics may account for up to 30% of all acute stroke consultations. However, in the emergency setting, accurate diagnosis is not always possible. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with acute aphasia and right hemiparesis. The National Institute of Health Stroke Score was 21, compatible with severe stroke, so she received thrombolysis. Laboratory testing demonstrated severe hypomagnesemia. She had been taking proton pump inhibitors for years and neuroimaging did not demonstrate signs of acute ischemic disease. After correcting the metabolic alterations with intravenous and oral supplemental magnesium, the patient was discharged asymptomatic. No further episodes have been registered to date. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia might cause acute neurological symptoms that could be confused with stroke. A careful history is essential for diagnosis but suspicion of stroke mimic should not prevent tPA administration. PMID:27354832

  20. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure: a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-06-01

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to practicing physicians and nurses to manage acute heart failure in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. Criteria of hospitalization and of discharge are described. Gaps in knowledge and perspectives in the management of acute heart failure are also detailed. This consensus paper on acute heart failure might help enable contiguous practice.

  1. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  2. A toolkit for single-session groups in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Keast, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Single-session groups are an effective method for providing mutual aid to patients and families experiencing crisis in acute care/emergency settings. This toolkit provides health care professionals with practical guidance in establishing, recruiting for, and facilitating single-session groups in hospital settings. A two-step literature search was conducted to identify all relevant articles. The literature was retrieved and reviewed for inclusion. The results of this review form the basis of the toolkit. A framework for establishing this type of group is explored. Challenges and strategies concerning recruitment are discussed. The practice skills relevant to facilitating time-limited groups are outlined.

  3. The use of Functional Consequences Theory in acutely confused hospitalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Kozak-Campbell, C; Hughes, A M

    1996-01-01

    Acute confusion is a common complication of hospitalization in the elderly that impacts on both the use of health care resources and the functional status of individuals. Providing optimum nursing care for these patients depends on three factors: 1) the nurse's ability to differentiate acute confusion from other common conditions in the hospitalized elderly, chiefly dementia or depression, 2) the nurse's ability to identify factors contributing to this condition, and 3) the implementation of interventions to minimize the effects of these factors on the patient. This article differentiates the clinical features of acute confusion from those of depression and dementia, and discusses the use of the Functional Consequences Theory, developed by Miller (1990), as a framework for nursing assessment and management of care for elderly patients with this condition. The functional consequences theory framework assists the nurse to identify risk factors associated with the development of acute confusion in the hospitalized elderly. Further it guides the development of interventions to minimize the effects of this condition in this population. The use of this framework in the clinical setting is illustrated through a case study.

  4. Hospital readmission from post-acute care facilities: risk factors, timing, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Robert E.; Whitfield, Emily A.; Hittle, David; Min, Sung-joon; Levy, Cari; Prochazka, Allan V.; Coleman, Eric A.; Schwartz, Robert; Ginde, Adit A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hospital discharges to post-acute care (PAC) facilities have increased rapidly. This increase may lead to more hospital readmissions from PAC facilities, which are common and poorly understood. We sought to determine the risk factors and timing for hospital readmission from PAC facilities and evaluate the impact of readmission on patient outcomes. Design Retrospective analysis of Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) from 2003–2009. Setting The MCBS is a nationally-representative survey of beneficiaries matched with claims data. Participants Community-dwelling beneficiaries who were hospitalized and discharged to a PAC facility for rehabilitation. Intervention/Exposure Potential readmission risk factors included patient demographics, health utilization, active medical conditions at time of PAC admission, and PAC characteristics. Measurements Hospital readmission during the PAC stay, return to community residence, and all-cause mortality. Results Of 3246 acute hospitalizations followed by PAC facility stays, 739 (22.8%) included at least 1 hospital readmission. The strongest risk factors for readmission included impaired functional status (HR 4.78, 95% CI 3.21–7.10), markers of increased acuity such as need for intravenous medications in PAC (1.63, 1.39–1.92), and for-profit PAC ownership (1.43, 1.21–1.69). Readmitted patients had a higher mortality rate at both 30 days (18.9 vs. 8.6%, p<0.001) and 100 days (39.9 vs. 14.5%, p<0.001) even after adjusting for age, comorbidities, and prior health care utilization (30 days: OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.60–2.54; 100 days: OR 3.79, 95% CI 3.13–4.59). Conclusions Hospital readmission from PAC facilities is common and associated with a high mortality rate. Readmission risk factors may signify inadequate transitional care processes or a mismatch between patient needs and PAC resources. PMID:26715357

  5. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  6. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  7. Telemedicine for the care of children in the hospital setting.

    PubMed

    McSwain, S David; Marcin, James P

    2014-02-01

    Telemedicine is by no means a new technology, given that audio-video telecommunication links have been utilized for the provision of medical services since the 1950s. Nonetheless, telemedicine is currently in a phase of rapid growth and evolution. The combination of increasingly affordable and powerful networking, computing, and communication technology, along with the continued nationwide crisis in health care access and costs, has created a "tipping point," whereby telemedicine has progressed from a novel means of practicing medicine to practical tool to help address our nation's health care needs. Telemedicine has also evolved beyond a means of providing care to remote communities to becoming a versatile tool in the delivery of health care in a variety of non-rural settings. Although no one can be everywhere at once, telemedicine allows us to be in more places at once than we've ever been before. The problems of disparities and access to care are even more evident in pediatrics, where subspecialists are fewer in number and more regionalized than adult providers. Numerous successful telemedicine programs across the country have demonstrated the impact that these technologies can have in pediatrics, with many more programs in development. As a versatile means of delivering care, telemedicine can be used at any point during the course of a health care encounter as not only a means of expanding our reach, but also as a means of increasing efficiency. Using telemedicine to provide consultations to community hospitals has been shown to improve quality of care, strengthen the referral base for the consulting facilities, facilitate cost savings, and improve the financial bottom line for both referring and consulting facilities. This review highlights some of the ways in which telemedicine is being used to facilitate timely and effective pediatric care in a variety of hospital settings.

  8. Methods for Extracellular Vesicles Isolation in a Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz-Cuesta, Matías; Arbelaiz, Ander; Oregi, Amaia; Irizar, Haritz; Osorio-Querejeta, Iñaki; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Banales, Jesus M.; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Olascoaga, Javier; Otaegui, David

    2015-01-01

    The research in extracellular vesicles (EVs) has been rising during the last decade. However, there is no clear consensus on the most accurate protocol to isolate and analyze them. Besides, most of the current protocols are difficult to implement in a hospital setting due to being very time-consuming or to requirements of specific infrastructure. Thus, our aim is to compare five different protocols (comprising two different medium-speed differential centrifugation protocols; commercially polymeric precipitation – exoquick – acid precipitation; and ultracentrifugation) for blood and urine samples to determine the most suitable one for the isolation of EVs. Nanoparticle tracking analysis, flow cytometry, western blot (WB), electronic microscopy, and spectrophotometry were used to characterize basic aspects of EVs such as concentration, size distribution, cell-origin and transmembrane markers, and RNA concentration. The highest EV concentrations were obtained using the exoquick protocol, followed by both differential centrifugation protocols, while the ultracentrifugation and acid-precipitation protocols yielded considerably lower EV concentrations. The five protocols isolated EVs of similar characteristics regarding markers and RNA concentration; however, standard protocol recovered only small EVs. EV isolated with exoquick presented difficult to be analyzed with WB. The RNA concentrations obtained from urine-derived EVs were similar to those obtained from blood-derived ones, despite the urine EV concentration being 10–20 times lower. We consider that a medium-speed differential centrifugation could be suitable to be applied in a hospital setting as it requires the simplest infrastructure and recovers higher concentration of EV than standard protocol. A workflow from sampling to characterization of EVs is proposed. PMID:25762995

  9. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  10. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  11. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  12. A prospective controlled trial of a geriatric consultation team in an acute-care hospital.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D B; Fox, R A

    1990-03-01

    Attempts to prove the usefulness of geriatric consultation teams (GCT) in acute-care settings have been inconclusive. We have completed a prospective, controlled trial of a GCT in an acute-care setting, aiming our interventions at a specific subgroup of elderly patients. One hundred and thirty-two out of 352 (37.5%) patients met the inclusion criteria with 66 each being assigned to the intervention and the control groups. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. Patients in the intervention group received follow-up after discharge from hospital by the geriatric service. We found that the intervention was associated with improved 6-month survival (p less than 0.01), improved Barthel Index at 1 year (p less than 0.01), and a trend towards decreased reliance on institutional care (hospital or nursing home) during the year of follow-up. The benefits occurred principally in patients who were discharged to a nursing home. Our findings support the utility of GCT and highlight the importance of focusing the intervention and providing follow-up after discharge from hospital.

  13. Nurses’ workarounds in acute healthcare settings: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Workarounds circumvent or temporarily ‘fix’ perceived workflow hindrances to meet a goal or to achieve it more readily. Behaviours fitting the definition of workarounds often include violations, deviations, problem solving, improvisations, procedural failures and shortcuts. Clinicians implement workarounds in response to the complexity of delivering patient care. One imperative to understand workarounds lies in their influence on patient safety. This paper assesses the peer reviewed empirical evidence available on the use, proliferation, conceptualisation, rationalisation and perceived impact of nurses’ use of workarounds in acute care settings. Methods A literature assessment was undertaken in 2011–2012. Snowballing technique, reference tracking, and a systematic search of twelve academic databases were conducted to identify peer reviewed published studies in acute care settings examining nurses’ workarounds. Selection criteria were applied across three phases. 58 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Using an analytic frame, these studies were interrogated for: workarounds implemented in acute care settings by nurses; factors contributing to the development and proliferation of workarounds; the perceived impact of workarounds; and empirical evidence of nurses’ conceptualisation and rationalisation of workarounds. Results The majority of studies examining nurses’ workarounds have been published since 2008, predominantly in the United States. Studies conducted across a variety of acute care settings use diverse data collection methods. Nurses’ workarounds, primarily perceived negatively, are both individually and collectively enacted. Organisational, work process, patient-related, individual, social and professional factors contribute to the proliferation of workarounds. Group norms, local and organisational culture, ‘being competent’, and collegiality influence the implementation of workarounds. Conclusion

  14. Hospitals as complex adaptive systems: A case study of factors influencing priority setting practices at the hospital level in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Edwine W; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike; Cleary, Susan

    2017-02-01

    There is a dearth of literature on priority setting and resource allocation (PSRA) practices in hospitals, particularly in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Using a case study approach, we examined PSRA practices in 2 public hospitals in coastal Kenya. We collected data through a combination of in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), review of documents such as hospital plans and budgets, minutes of meetings and accounting records, and non-participant observations of PSRA practices in case study hospitals over a period of 7 months. In this paper, we apply complex adaptive system (CAS) theory to examine the factors that influence PSRA practices. We found that PSRA practices in the case hospitals were influenced by, 1) inadequate financing level and poorly designed financing arrangements, 2) limited hospital autonomy and decision space, and 3) inadequate management and leadership capacity in the hospital. The case study hospitals exhibited properties of complex adaptive systems (CASs) that exist in a dynamic state with multiple interacting agents. Weaknesses in system 'hardware' (resource scarcity) and 'software' (including PSRA guidelines that reduced hospitals decision space, and poor leadership skills) led to the emergence of undesired properties. The capacity of hospitals to set priorities should be improved across these interacting aspects of the hospital organizational system. Interventions should however recognize that hospitals are CAS. Rather than rectifying isolated aspects of the system, they should endeavor to create conditions for productive emergence.

  15. Fatigue in the acute care and ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Margaret; Patricia, Branowicki

    2014-01-01

    Nurses commonly assess their patients for symptoms and intervene to ease any patient distress, yet children are seldom asked about feeling fatigued. The existing pediatric literature suggests that fatigue goes unrecognized and therefore untreated in children, particularly children experiencing stressful events, such as illness and/or hospitalization. In an effort to better understand the presence of the symptom in our environment we conducted a program specific point prevalence survey. Data were collected on nine inpatient and 11 outpatient units of a university affiliated tertiary care children's hospital. Overall, this sample reported higher levels of fatigue than published data from their healthy and chronically ill peers by total fatigue score and sub scores. This brief description of the symptom in our inpatient and ambulatory settings has provided information that will inform our nursing practice and drive future research.

  16. Clinical usefulness and feasibility of using Reality Orientation with patients who have dementia in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Bev; Gardner, Anne; Takase, Miyuki; Hawkins, Mary T; Ostaszkiewicz, Joan; Ski, Chantal; Josipovic, Patricia

    2007-06-01

    Reality Orientation (RO) was developed as a strategy to assist people with dementia to improve their orientation and everyday function. Although its efficacy has been extensively studied in long-term care facilities, its effectiveness has rarely been examined in acute care settings. The aim of this review was to examine the studies cited in systematic reviews of RO to determine the potential clinical usefulness and the feasibility of using RO in acute care settings. Based on this information, the authors make recommendations for future research in this area. The feasibility of implementing RO in acute care poses challenges because of the short time a patient is in hospital and their ability to participate given their acute medical condition. Although the efficacy and feasibility of using RO in acute care settings have not been sufficiently examined, its potential to improve care should not be ignored. A comprehensive and rigorous study is necessary to investigate the usefulness of RO in the acute care setting and to help establish clinical guidelines for dementia care in the context of acute care nursing.

  17. Clostridium Difficile Infection in Acute Care Hospitals: Systematic Review and Best Practices for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Louh, Irene K; Greendyke, William G; Hermann, Emilia A; Davidson, Karina W; Falzon, Louise; Vawdrey, David K; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Calfee, David P; Furuya, E Yoko; Ting, Henry H

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in acute-care hospitals is a priority for hospitals and clinicians. We performed a qualitative systematic review to update the evidence on interventions to prevent CDI published since 2009. DESIGN We searched Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, the ISI Web of Knowledge, and grey literature databases from January 1, 2009 to August 1, 2015. SETTING We included studies performed in acute-care hospitals. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS We included studies conducted on hospitalized patients that investigated the impact of specific interventions on CDI rates. INTERVENTIONS We used the QI-Minimum Quality Criteria Set (QI-MQCS) to assess the quality of included studies. Interventions were grouped thematically: environmental disinfection, antimicrobial stewardship, hand hygiene, chlorhexidine bathing, probiotics, bundled approaches, and others. A meta-analysis was performed when possible. RESULTS Of 3,236 articles screened, 261 met the criteria for full-text review and 46 studies were ultimately included. The average quality rating was 82% according to the QI-MQCS. The most effective interventions, resulting in a 45% to 85% reduction in CDI, included daily to twice daily disinfection of high-touch surfaces (including bed rails) and terminal cleaning of patient rooms with chlorine-based products. Bundled interventions and antimicrobial stewardship showed promise for reducing CDI rates. Chlorhexidine bathing and intensified hand-hygiene practices were not effective for reducing CDI rates. CONCLUSIONS Daily and terminal cleaning of patient rooms using chlorine-based products were most effective in reducing CDI rates in hospitals. Further studies are needed to identify the components of bundled interventions that reduce CDI rates. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:476-482.

  18. From acute care to home care: the evolution of hospital responsibility and rationale for increased vertical integration.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    The responsibility of hospitals is changing. Those activities that were once confined within the walls of the medical facility have largely shifted outside them, yet the requirements for hospitals have only grown in scope. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the development of accountable care organizations, financial incentives are focused on care coordination, and a hospital's responsibility now includes postdischarge outcomes. As a result, hospitals need to adjust their business model to accommodate their increased need to impact post-acute care settings. A home care service line can fulfill this role for hospitals, serving as an effective conduit to the postdischarge realm-serving as both a potential profit center and a risk mitigation offering. An alliance between home care agencies and hospitals can help improve clinical outcomes, provide the necessary care for communities, and establish a potentially profitable product line.

  19. Management of acute infectious diarrhea for children living in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan G, Miguel; Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Liat; O'Ryan-Soriano, Miguel A; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-05-01

    Acute infectious gastroenteritis continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children below 5 years of age, with the majority of deaths concentrated in 35 'low income' countries. In these countries the under five years of age mortality rates reach 100 per 1000 live births, of which a significant proportion are associated with acute diarrhea. Rotavirus, cryptosporidium, Shigella spp and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are the main pathogens causing disease in these settings, although other bacteria and parasites can cause moderate to severe disease in different regions and situations. Treatment of children in these setting should be focused on appropriate rehydration, early hospitalization of severely malnourished children, zinc supplementation, and in specific situations, antimicrobials should be considered. The rationale for antimicrobial use should be based on the potential benefits based on published literature and the opportunity for use. This review provides a pathogen-specific update on the potential benefits of antimicrobials and suggests an empirical management approach for children suffering an acute watery or bloody diarrhea in a resource-limited region.

  20. The Feasibility of Digital Pen and Paper Technology for Vital Sign Data Capture in Acute Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Patricia C.; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Gallagher, Joan; Li, Qi; Spurr, Cindy; McGrath, E. Jan; Kilroy, Susan M.; Prater, Marita

    2006-01-01

    The transition from paper to electronic documentation systems in acute care settings is often gradual and characterized by a period in which paper and electronic processes coexist. Intermediate technologies are needed to “bridge” the gap between paper and electronic systems as a means to improve work flow efficiency through data acquisition at the point of care in structured formats to inform decision support and facilitate reuse. The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a study conducted on three acute care units at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA to evaluate the feasibility of digital pen and paper technology as a means to capture vital sign data in the context of acute care workflows and to make data available in a flow sheet in the electronic medical record. PMID:17238337

  1. Mental health nurses' views of recovery within an acute setting.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Hunt, Glenn E

    2013-06-01

    How the principles of a recovery-oriented mental health service are incorporated in the day-to-day nursing practice of mental health nurses in inpatient settings is unclear. In this study, we interviewed 21 mental health nurses working in acute inpatient mental health units about a range of recovery-focused topics. Three overlapping themes were identified: (i) the perception of recovery; (ii) congruent humanistic approaches; and (iii) practical realities. Only four interviewees had some formal training about recovery. Most respondents recognize that positive attitudes, person-centred care, hope, education about mental illness, medication and side-effects, and the acknowledgement of individual recovery pathways are necessary to prevent readmission, and are central to a better life for people who live with a mental illness. This research supports the view that ideas and practices associated with the recovery movement have been adopted to some degree by nurses working at the acute end of the services continuum. However, most saw the recovery orientation as rhetoric rather than as an appropriately resourced, coordinated, and integrated program. These nurses, however, speak of much more detailed aspects of working with patients and being required to prepare them for the exigencies of living in the community post-discharge.

  2. Unit-Specific Rates of Hand Hygiene Opportunities in an Acute-Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Han, Angela; Conway, Laurie J; Moore, Christine; McCreight, Liz; Ragan, Kelsey; So, Jannice; Borgundvaag, Emily; Larocque, Mike; Coleman, Brenda L; McGeer, Allison

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the frequency of hand hygiene opportunities (HHOs) in multiple units of an acute-care hospital. DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING The adult intensive care unit (ICU), medical and surgical step-down units, medical and surgical units, and the postpartum mother-baby unit (MBU) of an academic acute-care hospital during May-August 2013, May-July 2014, and June-August 2015. PARTICIPANTS Healthcare workers (HCWs). METHODS HHOs were recorded using direct observation in 1-hour intervals following Public Health Ontario guidelines. The frequency and distribution of HHOs per patient hour were determined for each unit according to time of day, indication, and profession. RESULTS In total, 3,422 HHOs were identified during 586 hours of observation. The mean numbers of HHOs per patient hour in the ICU were similar to those in the medical and surgical step-down units during the day and night, which were higher than the rates observed in medical and surgical units and the MBU. The rate of HHOs during the night significantly decreased compared with day (P92% of HHOs on medical and surgical units, compared to 67% of HHOs on the MBU. CONCLUSIONS Assessment of hand hygiene compliance using product utilization data requires knowledge of the appropriate opportunities for hand hygiene. We have provided a detailed characterization of these estimates across a wide range of inpatient settings as well as an examination of temporal variations in HHOs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:411-416.

  3. The social practice of rescue: the safety implications of acute illness trajectories and patient categorisation in medical and maternity settings.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Sandall, Jane

    2016-02-01

    The normative position in acute hospital care when a patient is seriously ill is to resuscitate and rescue. However, a number of UK and international reports have highlighted problems with the lack of timely recognition, treatment and referral of patients whose condition is deteriorating while being cared for on hospital wards. This article explores the social practice of rescue, and the structural and cultural influences that guide the categorisation and ordering of acutely ill patients in different hospital settings. We draw on Strauss et al.'s notion of the patient trajectory and link this with the impact of categorisation practices, thus extending insights beyond those gained from emergency department triage to care management processes further downstream on the hospital ward. Using ethnographic data collected from medical wards and maternity care settings in two UK inner city hospitals, we explore how differences in population, cultural norms, categorisation work and trajectories of clinical deterioration interlink and influence patient safety. An analysis of the variation in findings between care settings and patient groups enables us to consider socio-political influences and the specifics of how staff manage trade-offs linked to the enactment of core values such as safety and equity in practice.

  4. Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

    2004-01-01

    One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

  5. Creative Music Therapy in an Acute Care Setting for Older Patients with Delirium and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Chin Yee; Tan, Jane An Qi; Foong, Yi-Lin; Koh, Hui Mien; Chen, Denise Zhen Yue; Tan, Jessie Joon Chen; Ng, Chong Jin; Yap, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The acute hospital ward can be unfamiliar and stressful for older patients with impaired cognition, rendering them prone to agitation and resistive to care. Extant literature shows that music therapy can enhance engagement and mood, thereby ameliorating agitated behaviours. This pilot study evaluates the impact of a creative music therapy (CMT) programme on mood and engagement in older patients with delirium and/or dementia (PtDD) in an acute care setting. We hypothesize that CMT improves engagement and pleasure in these patients. Methods Twenty-five PtDD (age 86.5 ± 5.7 years, MMSE 6/30 ± 5.4) were observed for 90 min (30 min before, 30 min during, and 30 min after music therapy) on 3 consecutive days: day 1 (control condition without music) and days 2 and 3 (with CMT). Music interventions included music improvisation such as spontaneous music making and playing familiar songs of patient's choice. The main outcome measures were mood and engagement assessed with the Menorah Park Engagement Scale (MPES) and Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS). Results Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant positive change in constructive and passive engagement (Z = 3.383, p = 0.01) in MPES and pleasure and general alertness (Z = 3.188,p = 0.01) in OERS during CMT. The average pleasure ratings of days 2 and 3 were higher than those of day 1 (Z = 2.466, p = 0.014). Negative engagement (Z = 2.582, p = 0.01) and affect (Z = 2.004, p = 0.045) were both lower during CMT compared to no music. Conclusion These results suggest that CMT holds much promise to improve mood and engagement of PtDD in an acute hospital setting. CMT can also be scheduled into the patients' daily routines or incorporated into other areas of care to increase patient compliance and cooperation. PMID:27489560

  6. [Task analysis of clinical laboratory physician in acute hospital].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junko

    2013-06-01

    Appropriate communications between clinical divisions and clinical laboratories are required to improve the quality of health care in hospitals. In this paper, the routine work of a clinical laboratory physician is presented. 1. In order to support attentive medical practice, we have established a consultation service system for handling questions from medical staff. The main clients are doctors and clinical laboratory technologists. 2. In order to improve the quality of infectious disease analysis, we have recommended obtaining two or more blood culture sets to achieve good sensitivity. The order rate of multiple blood culture sets increased 90% or more in 2011. 3. In order to provide appropriate blood transfusion, we intervene in inappropriate transfusion plans. 4. In order to support prompt decision making, we send E-mails to physicians regarding critical values. 5. We send reports on the morphology of cells(peripheral blood and bone marrow), IEP, flow cytometry, irregular antibodies, and so on. It has been realized that doctors want to know better solutions immediately rather than the best solution tomorrow morning. We would like to contribute to improving the quality of health care in Saitama Cooperative Hospital as clinical laboratory physicians.

  7. The Impact of Setting the Standards of Health Promoting Hospitals on Hospital Indicators in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohammad; Khosravi, Ahmad; Riyahi, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals play a critical role in the health promotion of the society. This study aimed to determine the impact of establishing standards of health promoting hospitals on hospital indicators in Shahroud. This applied study was a quasi-experimental one which was conducted in 2013. Standards of health promoting hospitals were established as an intervention procedure in the Fatemiyeh hospital. Parameters of health promoting hospitals were compared in intervention and control hospitals before and after of intervention (6 months). The data were analyzed using chi-square and t-test. With the establishment of standards for health promotion hospitals, standard scores in intervention and control hospitals were found to be 72.26 ± 4.1 and 16.26 ± 7.5, respectively. T-test showed a significant difference between the mean scores of the hospitals under study (P = 0.001).The chi-square test also showed a significant relationship between patient satisfaction before and after the intervention so that patients’ satisfaction was higher after the intervention (P = 0.001). Commenting on the short-term or long-term positive impacts of establishing standards of health promoting hospitals on all hospital indicators is a bit difficult but preliminary results show the positive impact of the implementation of standards in case hospitals which has led to the improvement of many indicators in the hospital. PMID:27959930

  8. Influence of homelessness on acute admissions to hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Lissauer, T; Richman, S; Tempia, M; Jenkins, S; Taylor, B

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look at the influence of homelessness on acute medical admissions. A prospective case-controlled study was therefore performed on all homeless children admitted through the accident and emergency department over one year, comparing them with the next age matched admission from permanent housing. Assessments made were: whether homelessness or other social factors influenced the doctors' decision to admit; differences in severity of illness; length of stay; and use of primary care. The admitting doctors completed a semi-structured questionnaire during admission about social factors that influenced their decision to admit and graded the severity of the child's illness. The length of hospital stay was recorded. The family's social risk factors and accommodation were assessed at a home visit using a standardised questionnaire and by observation. Seventy homeless children were admitted. Social factors influenced the decision to admit in 77% of homeless children and 43% of controls. More of the homeless children were only mildly ill (33/70) than those from permanent housing (21/70), although three of the homeless children died of overwhelming infections compared with none of the controls. Among homeless families many were recent immigrants (44%). There was a marked increase in socioeconomic deprivation, in major life events in the previous year (median score 3 v 1), and in maternal depression (27% v 8%). Referral to the hospital was made by a general practitioner in only 5/50 (10%) of homeless compared with 18/50 (36%) of controls. Social factors were an important influence on the decision to admit in over three quarters of the homeless children and resulted in admission when less severely ill even when compared with admissions from an inner city population. Even though there was marked social deprivation among the homeless families, the decision to admit was based on vague criteria that need to be further refined. PMID:8259871

  9. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Population and methods Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. Results There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR = 1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p = 0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR= 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p = 0.63). Conclusion In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. PMID:26388119

  10. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  11. Nurses' attitudes towards the use of PRN psychotropic medications in acute and forensic mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Barr, Lesley; Wynaden, Dianne; Heslop, Karen

    2017-03-24

    Many countries now have national mental health policies and guidelines to decrease or eliminate the use of seclusion and restraint yet the use of Pro Re Nata (PRN) medications has received less practice evaluation. This research aimed to identify mental health nurses' attitudes towards the use of PRN medications with mental health consumers. Participants were working in forensic mental health and non-forensic acute mental health settings. The "Attitudes towards PRN medication use survey" was used and data were collected online. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package Social Sciences, Version 22.0. Practice differences between forensic and other acute mental health settings were identified related to the use of PRN medications to manage symptoms from nicotine, alcohol and other drug withdrawal. Differences related to the useage of comfort rooms and conducting comprehensive assessments of consumers' psychiatric symptoms were also detected. Qualitative findings highlighted the need for increased accountability for the prescribing and administration of PRN medications along with more nursing education/training to use alternative first line interventions. Nurses administering PRN medications should be vigilant regarding the indications for this practice to ensure they are facilitating the consumer's recovery by reducing the use of all forms of potentially restrictive practices in the hospital setting. The reasons for using PRN medications and PRN administration rates must be continually monitored to avoid practices such as high dose antipsychotics use and antipsychotic polypharmacy to ensure the efficacy of the consumers' management plans on their health care outcomes.

  12. Successful provision of inter-hospital extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for acute post-partum pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; Laurie, J; Janssens, S; Zazulak, C; Kotze, P; Shekar, K

    2017-01-09

    Mortality during pregnancy in a well-resourced setting is rare, but acute pulmonary embolism is one of the leading causes. We present the successful use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) in a 22-year old woman who experienced cardiopulmonary collapse following urgent caesarean section in the setting of a sub-massive pulmonary embolus. Resources and personnel to perform eCPR were not available at the maternity hospital and were recruited from an adjacent pediatric hospital. Initial care used low blood flow extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with pediatric ECMO circuitry, which was optimized when the team from a nearby adult cardiac hospital arrived. Following ECMO support, the patient experienced massive hemorrhage which was managed with uterotonic agents, targeted transfusion, bilateral uterine artery embolisation and abdominal re-exploration. The patient was transferred to an adult unit where she remained on ECMO for five days. She was discharged home with normal cognitive function. This case highlights the role ECMO plays in providing extracorporeal respiratory or mechanical circulatory support in a high risk obstetric patient.

  13. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units.

  14. Use of sterile pre-fabricated antibiotic beads in the combat hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wade T; Petrides, Michael G; Gunn, Philip A; Howard, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Time and manpower constraints associated with acute combat casualty care can make antibiotic bead production at the point of care prohibitively difficult, if not impossible. The purpose of this study is to evaluate our technique for the sterile prefabrication of antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads in the combat hospital environment by assessing their sterility at the time of use. This investigation is a prospective study of a consecutive series of specimens. Imipenem-impregnated antibiotic beads were sterilely prepared, threaded on a suture strand, and packaged. Over a 6-week period, 50 consecutive packages were evaluated for sterility with aerobic and anaerobic culture swabs performed at the time of opening. Culture results, as well as number of shelf days for each specimen, were then reviewed. Of the 50 packages of antibiotic-impregnated PMMA beads, the average number of days on the shelf before use was 9.3 (range: 2-17). None of the packages showed growth of organisms from the cultures, indicating that antibiotic-impregnated PMMA beads can be sterilely produced and maintained in their sterile state for future use in the combat hospital environment. This practice should be considered a safe adjunct in the management of contaminated, open traumatic injuries in this setting.

  15. Environmental contaminants in hospital settings and progress in disinfecting techniques.

    PubMed

    Messina, Gabriele; Ceriale, Emma; Lenzi, Daniele; Burgassi, Sandra; Azzolini, Elena; Manzi, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Medical devices, such as stethoscopes, and other objects found in hospital, such as computer keyboards and telephone handsets, may be reservoirs of bacteria for healthcare-associated infections. In this cross-over study involving an Italian teaching hospital we evaluated microbial contamination (total bacterial count (TBC) at 36°C/22°C, Staphylococcus spp., moulds, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., E. coli, total coliform bacteria, Acinetobacter spp., and Clostridium difficile) of these devices before and after cleaning and differences in contamination between hospital units and between stethoscopes and keyboards plus handsets. We analysed 37 telephone handsets, 27 computer keyboards, and 35 stethoscopes, comparing their contamination in four hospital units. Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney tests were used. Before cleaning, many samples were positive for Staphylococcus spp. and coliforms. After cleaning, CFUs decreased to zero in most comparisons. The first aid unit had the highest and intensive care the lowest contamination (P < 0.01). Keyboards and handsets had higher TBC at 22°C (P = 0.046) and mould contamination (P = 0.002) than stethoscopes. Healthcare professionals should disinfect stethoscopes and other possible sources of bacterial healthcare-associated infections. The cleaning technique used was effective in reducing bacterial contamination. Units with high patient turnover, such as first aid, should practise stricter hygiene.

  16. Exploring Reasons for Bed Pressures in Winnipeg Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menec, Verena H.; Bruce, Sharon; MacWilliam, Leonard R.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital overcrowding has plagued Winnipeg and other Canadian cities for years. This study explored factors related to overcrowding. Hospital files were used to examine patterns of hospital use from fiscal years 1996/1997 to 1999/2000. Chart reviews were conducted to examine appropriateness of admissions and hospital stays during one pressure…

  17. A cost effectiveness analysis within a randomised controlled trial of post-acute care of older people in a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Jacqueline; Lowson, Karin; Young, John; Forster, Anne; Green, John; Small, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost effectiveness of post-acute care for older people in a locality based community hospital compared with a department for care of elderly people in a district general hospital, which admits patients aged over 76 years with acute medical conditions. Design Cost effectiveness analysis within a randomised controlled trial. Setting Community hospital and district general hospital in Yorkshire, England. Participants 220 patients needing rehabilitation after an acute illness for which they required admission to hospital. Interventions Multidisciplinary care in the district general hospital or prompt transfer to the community hospital. Main outcome measures EuroQol EQ-5D scores transformed into quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and health and social service costs over six months from randomisation. Results The mean QALY score for the community hospital group was marginally non-significantly higher than that for the district general hospital group (0.38 v 0.35) at six months after recruitment. The mean (standard deviation) costs per patient of the health and social services resources used were similar for both groups: community hospital group £7233 (euros 10 567; $13 341) (£5031), district general hospital group £7351 (£6229), and these findings were robust to several sensitivity analyses. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for community hospital care dominated. A cost effectiveness acceptability curve, based on bootstrapped simulations, suggests that at a willingness to pay threshold of £10 000 per QALY, 51% of community hospital cases will be cost effective, which rises to 53% of cases when the threshold is £30 000 per QALY. Conclusion Post-acute care for older people in a locality based community hospital is of similar cost effectiveness to that of an elderly care department in a district general hospital. PMID:16861254

  18. Acute effects of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zhao, Ang; Zhao, Jinzhuo; Chen, Renjie; Wang, Weibing; Ha, Sandie; Xu, Xiaohui; Kan, Haidong

    2014-08-01

    Air pollution has been accepted as an important contributor to asthma development and exacerbation. However, the evidence is limited in China. In this study, we investigated the acute effect of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China. We applied over-dispersed generalized additive model adjusted for weather conditions, day of the week, long-term and seasonal trends. An interquartile range increase in the moving average concentrations of PM10, SO2, NO2 and BC on the concurrent day and previous day corresponded to 1.82%, 6.41%, 8.26% and 6.62% increase of asthmatic hospitalization, respectively. The effects of SO2 and NO2 were robust after adjustment for PM10. The associations appeared to be more evident in the cool season than in the warm season. Our results contribute to the limited data in the scientific literature on acute effects of air pollution on asthma in high exposure settings, which are typical in developing countries.

  19. Creating self-care units in the acute care setting: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shendell-Falik, N

    1990-02-01

    Creating an environment in which patient's responsibility for self is fostered and nurses can practice professional and autonomous nursing practice is a challenge in today's hospitals. Innovative systems and structures need to be developed to assure quality of patient care and a high quality work environment. Newark Beth Israel Medical Center responded to the many demands of the mid-1980s, including increasing acuity of patients hospitalized, personnel shortages in nursing, physical therapy and other disciplines, and diminishing dollars available to the health care institution, through the creation of Self-Care Units. This article reviews how they came about, the way in which Self-Care Units function within the acute care setting and the management philosophy and structure which make them work. The experience at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center demonstrates that the potential exists to put control back at the bedside with the patient and the health care team working with the patient to achieve mutual goals. The focus of care has shifted from a "doing for" to a "working with" patients to identify interventions which promote active participation in hospitalization and a sense of self responsibility.

  20. Traumatic Tricuspid Insufficiency Requiring Valve Repair in an Acute Setting.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Yoshinori; Sudo, Yoshio; Sueta, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Tricuspid insufficiency due to penetrating cardiac trauma is rare. Patients with tricuspid insufficiency due to trauma can tolerate this abnormality for months or even years. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with penetrating cardiac trauma on the right side of her heart that required tricuspid valve repair in an acute setting. She sustained cut and stab wounds on her bilateral forearms and in the neck and epigastric region. She had cardiac tamponade and developed pulseless electrical activity, which required emergency surgery. The right ventricle and superior vena cava were dissected approximately 5 cm and 2 cm, respectively. After these wounds had been repaired, the patient's inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass suggested rightsided heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed tricuspid insufficiency. Right atriotomy was performed, and a detailed examination revealed that the tricuspid valve septal leaflet was split in two. There was also an atrial septal injury that created a connection with the left atrium; these injuries were not detected from the right ventricular wound. After repair, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass with mild tricuspid insufficiency was achieved, and she recovered uneventfully. This case emphasized the importance of thoroughly investigating intracardiac injury and transesophageal echocardiography.

  1. Microbiological safety of food in hospitals and other healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Lund, Barbara M; O'Brien, Sarah J

    2009-10-01

    Cases and outbreaks of foodborne infection in healthcare settings can result in serious illness, wastage of expensive medical treatments, spread of infection to other patients and staff and disruption of services. Providing nutritious meals for vulnerable people in healthcare settings involves a systematic approach to microbiological safety, as provided by hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) principles. The types of food served in healthcare settings should be selected to minimise the risk of foodborne infection.

  2. Implementation of an Acute Care Surgery Service in a Community Hospital: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A service led by acute care surgeons managing trauma, critically ill surgical, and emergency general surgery patients via an acute care surgery model of patient care improves hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at university-affiliated hospitals and American College of Surgeons-verified trauma centers. Our goal was to determine whether an acute care surgeon led service, entitled the Surgical Trauma and Acute Resuscitative Service (STARS) that implemented an acute care surgery model of patient care, could improve hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at a community hospital. A total of 492 patient charts were reviewed, which included 230 before the implementation of the STARS [pre-STARS (control)] and 262 after the implementation of the STARS [post-STARS (study)]. Demographics included age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score, and medical comorbidities. Efficiency data included length of stay in emergency department (ED-LOS), length of stay in surgical intensive care unit (SICU-LOS), and length of stay in hospital (H-LOS), and total in hospital charges. Average age was 64.1 + 16.4 years, 255 males (51.83%) and 237 females (48.17%). Average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score was 11.9 + 5.8. No significant differences in demographics were observed. Average decreases in ED-LOS (9.7 + 9.6 hours, pre-STARS versus 6.6 + 4.5 hours, post-STARS), SICU-LOS (5.3 + 9.6 days, pre-STARS versus 3.5 + 4.8 days, post-STARS), H-LOS (12.4 + 12.7 days, pre-STARS versus 11.4 + 11.3 days, post-STARS), and total in hospital charges ($419,602.6 + $519,523.0 pre-STARS to $374,816.7 + $411,935.8 post-STARS) post-STARS. Regression analysis revealed decreased ED-LOS-2.9 hours [P = 0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): -7.0, 1.2], SICU-LOS-6.3 days (P < 0.001; 95% CI: -9.3, -3.2), H-LOS-7.6 days (P = 0.001; 95% CI: -12.1, -3.1), and 3.4 times greater odds of survival (P = 0.04; 95% CI: 1.1, 10.7) post-STARS. In conclusion, implementation of

  3. Management of Levofloxacin Induced Anaphylaxis and Acute Delirium in a Palliative Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Damani, Anuja; Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Levofloxacin is a commonly prescribed antibiotic for managing chest and urinary tract infections in a palliative care setting. Incidence of Levofloxacin-associated anaphylaxis is rare and delirium secondary to Levofloxacin is a seldom occurrence with only few published case reports. It is an extremely rare occurrence to see this phenomenon in combination. Early identification and prompt intervention reduces both mortality and morbidity. A 17-year-old male with synovial sarcoma of right thigh with chest wall and lung metastasis and with no prior psychiatric morbidity presented to palliative medicine outpatient department with community-acquired pneumonia. He was initiated on intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Levofloxacin. Post IV Levofloxacin patient developed anaphylaxis and acute delirium necessitating IV Hydrocortisone, IV Chlorpheneramine, Oxygen and IV Haloperidol. Early detection and prompt intervention helped in complete recovery. Patient was discharged to hospice for respite after 2 days of hospitalization and then discharged home. Acute palliative care approach facilitated management of two life-threatening medical complications in a palliative care setting improving both quality and length of life. PMID:25709191

  4. Randomised controlled trial of a transprofessional healthcare role intervention in an acute medical setting.

    PubMed

    Kaltner, Melissa; Murtagh, Doug; Bennetts, Marguerite; Pighills, Alison; James, Julie; Scott, Annette

    2017-03-01

    As demand for health services increases, attention has turned to the development of alternate models of service delivery that maximise efficiency. These include skill sharing models, in which cross-professional skills are delivered by appropriately trained professionals. The usage of skill sharing models is increasing in some professions, but little evidence on efficacy currently exists. This article reports on an intervention of the use of a transprofessional role, which involved delivery of services from a range of health providers, including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, dietetics, speech pathology, podiatry, social work, and psychology, by a trained professional, developed and trialled in the acute medical setting in Toowoomba Hospital, Queensland, Australia. A single-blind randomised controlled trial examined the clinical efficacy of this skill shared service. Participants were allocated at random to either standard care (n = 29) or the new model of care (n = 29) groups and compared on a range of patient and service provision outcome measures. Descriptive outcomes indicated that patients receiving the new model of care underwent more comprehensive and prompt assessments in the health domains included than those in standard care, and demonstrated more positive health and functional outcomes at 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-up. Given the paucity of research on skill sharing, this study provides preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of skill shared roles in acute settings.

  5. Perceived quality of an alternative to acute hospitalization: an analytical study at a community hospital in Hallingdal, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lappegard, Øystein; Hjortdahl, Per

    2014-10-01

    There is growing international interest in the geography of health care provision, with health care providers searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Norway, the government has recently legislated for municipal authorities to develop local health services for a selected group of patients, with a quality equal to or better than that provided by hospitals for emergency admissions. General practitioners in Hallingdal, a rural district in southern Norway, have for several years referred acutely somatically ill patients to a community hospital, Hallingdal sjukestugu (HSS). This article analyzes patients' perceived quality of HSS to demonstrate factors applicable nationally and internationally to aid in the development of local alternatives to general hospitals. We used a mixed-methods approach with questionnaires, individual interviews and a focus group interview. Sixty patients who were taking part in a randomized, controlled study of acute admissions at HSS answered the questionnaire. Selected patients were interviewed about their experiences and a focus group interview was conducted with representatives of local authorities, administrative personnel and health professionals. Patients admitted to HSS reported statistically significant greater satisfaction with several care aspects than those admitted to the general hospital. Factors highlighted by the patients were the quiet and homelike atmosphere; a small facility which allowed them a good overall view of the unit; close ties to the local community and continuity in the patient-staff relationship. The focus group members identified some overarching factors: an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, local ownership, proximity to local general practices and close cooperation with the specialist health services at the hospital. Most of these factors can be viewed as general elements relevant to the development of local alternatives to acute hospitalization both nationally and internationally. This

  6. Sleep and the sleep environment of older adults in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Missildine, Kathy

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to describe sleep characteristics of hospitalized older adults and the nighttime environmental noise and light they encountered. Study participants included patients in an acute care setting; actigraphy and light and sound meters were used to measure the variables. Mean sleep time was 215 minutes, and the average sleep efficiency was 44.72%. Nighttime sleep was fragmented into 5 to 38 intervals of 15 to 24 minutes, with frequent awakenings. Mean light levels were 6.14 lux, with peak intensities of 59.68 lux lasting 95 minutes each night. Mean sound levels were 52.87 dB(A). Sleep was markedly impaired in an environment of elevated light and sound levels. Understanding the role of noise and light in the sleep efficiency of ill older adults can help nurses identify sources of noise and light and initiate sleep improvement protocols.

  7. Misdiagnosing Absent Pedicle of Cervical Spine in the Acute Trauma Setting

    PubMed Central

    Rossel, Felipe; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT)-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26605026

  8. Post-acute home care and hospital readmission of elderly patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K

    2004-11-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce hospital readmission during the post-acute period. Using proportional Cox regression analysis, the authors examined the independent and joint effects of post-acute informal and formal services on hospital readmission. No evidence of service impact was found. Rather, hospital readmission was associated with a longer length of CHF history and noncompliance with medication regimes. Research, policy, and practice implications are discussed.

  9. [Occupational exposure to glutaraldehyde in the hospital setting].

    PubMed

    d'Angelo, R; Russo, E; Lama, A

    2006-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde (GTA) solutions can be used for low-temperature endoscopes disinfection. The research aim was to evaluate the aldehyde air-contamination in Campania hospitals operating theatres produced by the use of two-percent glutaraldehyde alkaline solution. Air samples were analysed by HPLC-UV (Hight Performance Liquid Chromatography with UV detection). The final results show that some operating theatres have a significant GTA air-contamination with a substance concentration upper limit value (0,05 ppm), due to not-well ventilated workplaces and the presence of not-automatic washing units.

  10. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  11. Impact of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on in-hospital outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Masashi; Ishihara, Masaharu; Honda, Satoshi; Kawakami, Shoji; Yamane, Takafumi; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Kumasaka, Leon; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Tahara, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Michio; Noguchi, Teruo; Kusano, Kengo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Goto, Yoichi; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-15

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute hyperglycemia (acute-HG) and chronic hyperglycemia (chronic-HG) on short-term outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study consisted of 696 patients with AMI. Acute-HG was defined as admission plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl and chronic-HG as hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%. Acute-HG was associated with higher peak serum creatine kinase (4,094 ± 4,594 vs 2,526 ± 2,227 IU/L, p <0.001) and in-hospital mortality (9.8% vs 1.6%, p <0.001). On the contrary, there was no significant difference in peak creatine kinase (2,803 ± 2,661 vs 2,940 ± 3,181 IU/L, p = 0.59) and mortality (3.3 vs 3.7%, p = 0.79) between patients with chronic-HG and those without. Multivariate analysis showed that admission plasma glucose was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.27, p <0.001), but hemoglobin A1c was not. When only patients with acute-HG were analyzed, chronic-HG was associated with a significantly smaller infarct size (3,221 ± 3,001 vs 5,904 ± 6,473 IU/L, p <0.001) and lower in-hospital mortality (5.5 vs 18.9%, p = 0.01). In conclusion, these results suggested that acute-HG, but not chronic-HG, was associated with adverse short-term outcomes after AMI. Paradoxically, in patients with acute-HG, chronic-HG might abate the adverse effects of acute-HG.

  12. [Selection criteria of mobile lifters in the hospital setting].

    PubMed

    Ferriero, G; Ottonello, M; Franchignoni, F

    2002-01-01

    The manual handling of patients with limited mobility represents the major cause of musculoskeletal injury to the spine in paramedical health care workers. Within the hospital, the more complex procedures of patient transfer often require the use of mobile hoists. The aim of this paper is to describe the basic criteria for the selection of such hoists. The main characteristics of a hoist are its stability, the sling attachment, the speed of operation, range of movement of the spreader bar, safety of the operation being performed, patient comfort, the physical effort required on the part of the health care worker, manoeuvrability and simplicity of use. Important organizational-structural features to evaluate include: the type of patient normally present in the unit concerned, the specific movement to be performed, the structural characteristics of the environment, and the work organization of the personnel.

  13. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism.

  14. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  15. On-site availability of Legionella testing in acute care hospitals, United States.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Laurel E; Shaw, Kristin M S; McCollum, Jeffrey T; Dexter, Carol; Vagnone, Paula M Snippes; Thompson, Jamie H; Giambrone, Gregory; White, Benjamin; Thomas, Stepy; Carpenter, L Rand; Nichols, Megin; Parker, Erin; Petit, Susan; Hicks, Lauri A; Langley, Gayle E

    2014-07-01

    We surveyed 399 US acute care hospitals regarding availability of on-site Legionella testing; 300 (75.2%) did not offer Legionella testing on site. Availability varied according to hospital size and geographic location. On-site access to testing may improve detection of Legionnaires disease and inform patient management and prevention efforts.

  16. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  17. Body Mass Index and Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Receiving Care in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Camprubi, Mercedes; Cabrera, Sandra; Sans, Jordi; Vidal, Georgina; Salvadó, Teresa; Bardají, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor, some controversy has arisen with regard to its effect on hospital mortality in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Methods. Clinical and anthropometric variables were analyzed in patients consecutively admitted for acute coronary syndrome to a university hospital between 2009 and 2010, and the correlation of those variables with hospital mortality was examined. Results. A total of 824 patients with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction or unstable angina were analyzed. Body mass index was an independent factor in hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.739 (IC 95%: 0.597 − 0.916), P = 0.006). Mortality in normal weight (n = 218), overweight (n = 399), and obese (n = 172) subjects was 6.1%, 3.1%, and 4.1%, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions. There is something of a paradox in the relationship between body mass index and hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in that the mortality rate decreases as body mass index increases. However, no statistically significant differences have been found in normal weight, overweight, or obese subjects. PMID:22900151

  18. In Nonagenarians, Acute Kidney Injury Predicts In-Hospital Mortality, while Heart Failure Predicts Hospital Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lin, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Ko, Wen-Je

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of admitted patients worldwide. We investigate the determinants of hospital length of stay and outcomes in patients aged 90 years and older. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all admitted patients aged >90 years from the general medical wards in a tertiary referral medical center between August 31, 2009 and August 31, 2012. Patients’ clinical characteristics, admission diagnosis, concomitant illnesses at admission, and discharge diagnosis were collected. Each patient was followed until discharge or death. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to study factors associated with longer hospital length of stay (>7 days) and in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 283 nonagenarian in-patients were recruited, with 118 (41.7%) hospitalized longer than one week. Nonagenarians admitted with pneumonia (p = 0.04) and those with lower Barthel Index (p = 0.012) were more likely to be hospitalized longer than one week. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with lower Barthel Index (odds ratio [OR] 0.98; p = 0.021) and those with heart failure (OR 3.05; p = 0.046) had hospital stays >7 days, while patients with lower Barthel Index (OR 0.93; p = 0.005), main admission nephrologic diagnosis (OR 4.83; p = 0.016) or acute kidney injury (OR 30.7; p = 0.007) had higher in-hospital mortality. Conclusion In nonagenarians, presence of heart failure at admission was associated with longer hospital length of stay, while acute kidney injury at admission predicted higher hospitalization mortality. Poorer functional status was associated with both prolonged admission and higher in-hospital mortality. PMID:24223127

  19. Prevalence and predictors of hospital prealerting in acute stroke: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, J P; Lindenmeyer, A; Mellor, R M; Greenfield, S; Mant, J; Quinn, T; Rosser, A; Sandler, D; Sims, D; Ward, M; McManus, R J

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis can significantly reduce the burden of stroke but the time window for safe and effective treatment is short. In patients travelling to hospital via ambulance, the sending of a ‘prealert’ message can significantly improve the timeliness of treatment. Objective Examine the prevalence of hospital prealerting, the extent to which prealert protocols are followed and what factors influence emergency medical services (EMS) staff's decision to send a prealert. Methods Cohort study of patients admitted to two acute stroke units in West Midlands (UK) hospitals using linked data from hospital and EMS records. A logistic regression model examined the association between prealert eligibility and whether a prealert message was sent. In semistructured interviews, EMS staff were asked about their experiences of patients with suspected stroke. Results Of the 539 patients eligible for this study, 271 (51%) were recruited. Of these, only 79 (29%) were eligible for prealerting according to criteria set out in local protocols but 143 (53%) were prealerted. Increasing number of Face, Arm, Speech Test symptoms (1 symptom, OR 6.14, 95% CI 2.06 to 18.30, p=0.001; 2 symptoms, OR 31.36, 95% CI 9.91 to 99.24, p<0.001; 3 symptoms, OR 75.84, 95% CI 24.68 to 233.03, p<0.001) and EMS contact within 5 h of symptom onset (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.37 to 6.50 p=0.006) were key predictors of prealerting but eligibility for prealert as a whole was not (OR 1.92, 95% CI 0.85 to 4.34 p=0.12). In qualitative interviews, EMS staff displayed varying understanding of prealert protocols and described frustration when their interpretation of the prealert criteria was not shared by ED staff. Conclusions Up to half of the patients presenting with suspected stroke in this study were prealerted by EMS staff, regardless of eligibility, resulting in disagreements with ED staff during handover. Aligning the expectations of EMS and ED staff, perhaps through simplified prealert protocols, could be

  20. Microbial contamination of nonsterile pharmaceuticals in public hospital settings

    PubMed Central

    Mugoyela, Veronica; Mwambete, Kennedy D

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Contamination of pharmaceuticals with microorganisms irrespective whether they are harmful or nonpathogenic can bring about changes in physicochemical characteristics of the medicines. Although sterility is not a requirement in official compendia for nonsterile pharmaceuticals, bioburdens need to be within acceptable limits. Therefore, this study investigated microbial contamination of 10 nonsterile pharmaceuticals frequently delivered to outpatients by identifying and quantifying microbial contaminants and susceptibility pattern testing on the microbes isolated. Methods The study was carried out at Amana Municipal Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The protocol for the study involved structured selection of representative tablets, syrups, and capsules from the hospital’s outpatient pharmacy. Constitutive microorganisms were elaborated and enumerated using standard microbiologic procedures. Results Results showed that 50% of all tested products were heavily contaminated, and the predominant contaminants comprised Klebsiella, Bacillus, and Candida species. Furthermore, the results showed that the isolated Bacillus and Klebsiella species were resistant to Augmentin ® and cloxacillin. The differences in means for cfu/mL and zones of inhibition among the microorganisms isolated were considered significant at P < 0.05. Conclusion The nonsterile pharmaceuticals were presumably microbiologically contaminated due to poor handling during dispensing, repackaging, and/or nonadherence to good manufacturing practice. Therefore, training and educating the dispensers, as well as patients, on the proper handling and use of medicines cannot be overemphasized, because these are key aspects in controlling cross-contamination of medicines. PMID:20957135

  1. Collaboration: a Simple Recipe for Improving Research Productivity in the Community Teaching Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Yelena; Sills, Meagan

    The Medical Library and the Department of Research of the Staten Island University Hospital developed a collaborative project aimed at improving research and scholarly productivity in the community teaching hospital setting to meet teaching program accreditation requirements. The project opens a new venue for hospital librarians seeking new and innovative roles within their institutions while helping to strengthen the library's position and demonstrate the value of library services to health professionals.

  2. Collaboration: a Simple Recipe for Improving Research Productivity in the Community Teaching Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Yelena; Sills, Meagan

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Library and the Department of Research of the Staten Island University Hospital developed a collaborative project aimed at improving research and scholarly productivity in the community teaching hospital setting to meet teaching program accreditation requirements. The project opens a new venue for hospital librarians seeking new and innovative roles within their institutions while helping to strengthen the library’s position and demonstrate the value of library services to health professionals. PMID:26848287

  3. Characteristics of methylphenidate dependence syndrome in psychiatric hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Wada, Kiyoshi

    2006-04-01

    The characteristics of methylphenidate (MPD) cases reported in a nationwide mental hospital survey on substance-related psychiatric disorders are studied compared to methamphetamine cases. Although the two groups did not differ in terms of age and sex, the MPD group revealed longer educational histories and lower antisocial traits. About half of the MPD group had a history of methamphetamine use and 30% had used the substance as the initial substance of abuse. They exhibited a general tendency toward multiple substance use. These results indicate that a significant number of MPD cases exist who used MPD as a substance alternative to methamphetamine and also suggest that they may potentially have a tendency to develop abuse or dependence. The MPD cases most likely had a psychiatric diagnosis of "Dependence syndrome (F15.2)," according to the ICD-10 guidelines. The SDS scores also indicated a more severe dependence syndrome, particularly psychological dependence, which they may possibly develop more quickly. An abundance of information for MPD abusers to utilize is available through the internet, including the pharmacological properties, such as increased sensation or elation through MPD intake and how and where to easily acquire the substance. They may even forge a prescription to obtain MPD. This behavior can be recognized as "substance-seeking behavior" in behavioral pharmacology terms, accompanied by craving based on psychological dependence on the substance, and can be very difficult to control. Little evidence exists regarding the effectiveness and necessity of MPD as a treatment for depression, and thus MPD prescriptions must be carefully considered by psychiatrists or physicians. The application of MPD as an antidepressant in the health insurance system must be re-examined as well.

  4. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers.

  5. A Comprehensive Review of Prehospital and In-hospital Delay Times in Acute Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Foraker, Randi; Morris, Dexter L.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize prehospital and in-hospital stroke evaluation and treatment delay times. We identified 123 unique peer-reviewed studies published from 1981 to 2007 of prehospital and in-hospital delay time for evaluation and treatment of patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms. Based on studies of 65 different population groups, the weighted Poisson regression indicated a 6.0% annual decline (p<0.001) in hours/year for prehospital delay, defined from symptom onset to emergency department (ED) arrival. For in-hospital delay, the weighted Poisson regression models indicated no meaningful changes in delay time from ED arrival to ED evaluation (3.1%, p=0.49 based on 12 population groups). There was a 10.2% annual decline in hours/year from ED arrival to neurology evaluation or notification (p=0.23 based on 16 population groups) and a 10.7% annual decline in hours/year for delay time from ED arrival to initiation of computed tomography (p=0.11 based on 23 population groups). Only one study reported on times from arrival to computed tomography scan interpretation, two studies on arrival to drug administration, and no studies on arrival to transfer to an in-patient setting, precluding generalizations. Prehospital delay continues to contribute the largest proportion of delay time. The next decade provides opportunities to establish more effective community based interventions worldwide. It will be crucial to have effective stroke surveillance systems in place to better understand and improve both prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke care. PMID:19659821

  6. Roadmap to an effective quality improvement and patient safety program implementation in a rural hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ingabire, Willy; Reine, Petera M; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Kirk, Catherine M; Nahimana, Evrard; Nepomscene Uwiringiyemungu, Jean; Ndayisaba, Aphrodis; Manzi, Anatole

    2015-12-01

    Implementation lessons: (1) implementation of an effective quality improvement and patient safety program in a rural hospital setting requires collaboration between hospital leadership, Ministry of Health and other stakeholders. (2) Building Quality Improvement (QI) capacity to develop engaged QI teams supported by mentoring can improve quality and patient safety.

  7. Toward Audience Involvement: Extending Audiences of Written Physician Notes in a Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breuch, Lee-Ann Kastman; Bakke, Abigail; Thomas-Pollei, Kimberly; Mackey, L. Elizabeth; Weinert, Craig

    2016-01-01

    This article explores rhetorical implications of extending the audience of written physician notes in hospital settings to include patients and/or family members (the OpenNotes program). Interviews of participating hospital patients and family members (n = 16) underscored the need for more complex understandings of audience beyond…

  8. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  9. Single site multiport umbilical laparoscopic appendicectomy versus conventional multiport laparoscopic appendicectomy in acute settings

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, SP

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although conventional multiport laparoscopic appendicectomy (CMLA) is preferred for managing acute appendicitis, the recently developed transumbilical laparoscopic approach is rapidly gaining popularity. However, its wide dissemination seems restricted by technical/technological issues. In this regard, a newly developed method of single site multiport umbilical laparoscopic appendicectomy (SMULA) was compared prospectively with CMLA to assess the former’s efficacy and the technical advantages in acute scenarios. Methods Overall, 430 patients were studied: 212 in the SMULA group and 218 in the CMLA group. The same surgeon performed all the procedures using routine laparoscopic instruments. The SMULA technique entailed three ports inserted directly at the umbilical mound through three distinct strategically placed mini-incisions without raising the umbilical flap. The CMLA involved the traditional three-port technique. Results Both groups were comparable in terms of demographic criteria, indications for surgery, intraoperative blood loss, time to ambulation, length of hospital stay and umbilical morbidity. Although the mean operative time was marginally longer in the SMULA group (43.35 minutes, standard deviation [SD]: 21.16 minutes) than in the CMLA group (42.28 minutes, SD: 21.41 minutes), this did not reach statistical significance. Conversely, the mean pain scores on day 0 and the cosmetic outcomes differed significantly and favoured the SMULA technique. None of the patients developed port site hernias over the follow-up period (mean 2.9 years). Conclusions The favourable outcomes for the SMULA technique are likely to be due to the three small segregated incisions at one place and better trocar ergonomics. The SMULA technique is safe in an acute setting and may be considered of value among the options for transumbilical appendicectomy. PMID:25198978

  10. WSES Guidelines for the management of acute left sided colonic diverticulitis in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca; Coccolini, Federico; Griffiths, Ewen A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Di Saverio, Salomone; Ulrych, Jan; Kluger, Yoram; Ben-Ishay, Ofir; Moore, Frederick A; Ivatury, Rao R; Coimbra, Raul; Peitzman, Andrew B; Leppaniemi, Ari; Fraga, Gustavo P; Maier, Ronald V; Chiara, Osvaldo; Kashuk, Jeffry; Sakakushev, Boris; Weber, Dieter G; Latifi, Rifat; Biffl, Walter; Bala, Miklosh; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Inaba, Kenji; Ordonez, Carlos A; Hecker, Andreas; Augustin, Goran; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Melo, Renato Bessa; Marwah, Sanjay; Zachariah, Sanoop K; Shelat, Vishal G; McFarlane, Michael; Rems, Miran; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Faro, Mario Paulo; Júnior, Gerson Alves Pereira; Negoi, Ionut; Cui, Yunfeng; Sato, Norio; Vereczkei, Andras; Bellanova, Giovanni; Birindelli, Arianna; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Kok, Kenneth Y; Gachabayov, Mahir; Gkiokas, Georgios; Bouliaris, Konstantinos; Çolak, Elif; Isik, Arda; Rios-Cruz, Daniel; Soto, Rodolfo; Moore, Ernest E

    2016-01-01

    Acute left sided colonic diverticulitis is one of the most common clinical conditions encountered by surgeons in acute setting. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference on acute diverticulitis was held during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES in Jerusalem, Israel, on July 7th, 2015. During this consensus conference the guidelines for the management of acute left sided colonic diverticulitis in the emergency setting were presented and discussed. This document represents the executive summary of the final guidelines approved by the consensus conference.

  11. Communication Disorders and Treatment in the Acute Trauma Center Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz-Cowley, Roberta; Stepanik, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shock Trauma Center of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems instituted a comprehensive speech-language pathology program to provide acute intervention for communicative disorders in a critical/intensive care environment. This article provides a profile of the Center, a review of communicative impairments, and examples…

  12. New program set to intervene to prevent readmissions, repeat ED visits due to acute exacerbations of asthma.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Faculty at Indiana University School of Medicine are set to launch a community paramedicine program aimed at preventing repeat hospital and ED visits for acute exacerbations of asthma in children. Under the program, all children who are treated in the hospital or ED for asthma will receive home visits by specially trained paramedics within a few days of discharge. Paramedics will conduct a comprehensive assessment and make referrals as necessary for followup care. Nearly 30% of children who have been hospitalized for asthma require readmission to the hospital not long after discharge, and as many as 25% of children who have been treated in the ED for asthma will return to the ED within 30 days for another asthma-related visit. The one-time home visits will be comprehensive, enabling EMS providers to initiate stop-gap measures so that if a child is starting to get sick, paramedics can make sure the appropriate medicines are started and that acute care needs are met. Developers will monitor 30-day, 90-day, and one-year readmission metrics among patients who have received home visits.They hope that resulting cost-savings will sustain the program beyond the initial period, which is being funded through a grant from the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats.

    PubMed

    Thai, Chester A; Zhang, Ying; Howland, John G

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone.

  14. Trends of hospitalizations, fatality rate and costs for acute myocardial infarction among Spanish diabetic adults, 2001-2006

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the more frequent reasons diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, and there are reports that the long-term prognosis after an AMI is much worse in these patients than in non-diabetic patients. This study aims to compare hospital admissions and costs in Spanish diabetic and non-diabetic subjects due to AMI during the period 2001-2006. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 6 years of national hospitalization data associated with diabetes using the Minimum Basic Data Set. National hospitalization rates were calculated for AMI among diabetic and non-diabetic adults. Fatality rates, mean hospital stay and direct medical costs related to hospitalization were analyzed. Costs were calculated using Diagnosis-Related Groups for AMI in diabetics and non-diabetics patients. Results During the study period, a total of 307,099 patients with AMI were admitted to Spanish hospitals. Diabetic patients made up 29.6% of the total. The estimated incidence due to AMI in diabetics increased from 54.7 cases per 100,000 in 2001 to 64.1 in 2006. Diabetic patients had significantly higher mortality than nondiabetic patients after adjusting for age, gender, and year (OR 1.11 [95% CI, 1.08-1.14]). The cost among diabetic patients increased by 21.3% from 2001 to 2006. Conclusions Diabetic patients have higher rates of hospital admission and fatality rates during the hospitalization after an AMI than nondiabetic patients. Diabetic adults who have suffered an AMI have a greater than expected increase in direct hospital costs over the period 2001-2006. PMID:20205960

  15. 75 FR 31118 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...This notice contains the final wage indices, hospital reclassifications, payment rates, impacts, and other related tables effective for the fiscal year (FY) 2010 hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) and rate year 2010 long-term care hospital (LTCH) prospective payment system (PPS). The rates, tables, and impacts included in this notice reflect changes required by or resulting......

  16. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... 106-554 BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics CAH Critical access hospital CARE Continuity Assessment Record... Disproportionate share hospital ECI Employment cost index EDB Enrollment Database EHR Electronic health record EMR Electronic medical record FAH Federation of American Hospitals FDA Food and Drug Administration FFY...

  17. Evolving Guidance on Ureteric Calculi Management in the Acute Setting.

    PubMed

    Makanjuola, Jonathan K; Rintoul-Hoad, Sophie; Bultitude, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Ureteric colic is a common presentation to acute emergency services. The gold standard test for the diagnosis of acute ureteric colic is a non-contrast computer tomography of the kidneys ureters and bladder (CT KUB). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be used as first-line analgesia, with studies showing that there is no role for steroid or phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. There is emerging evidence that a high body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor. The drugs used to facilitate stone passage are known as medical expulsive therapy (MET). The most evaluated being alpha-blockers. The Spontaneous Urinary Stone Passage Enabled by Drugs (SUSPEND) trial was designed to evaluate the use of MET (tamsulosin and nifedipine). This trial showed that there was no difference with MET and placebo for the spontaneous passage of ureteric stones. There is an emerging role for the use of primary ureteroscopy in the management of non-infective ureteric stones.

  18. National audit of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital. Standards of Care Committee, British Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain the standard of care for hospital management of acute severe asthma in adults. DESIGN--Questionnaire based retrospective multicentre survey of case records. SETTING--36 hospitals (12 teaching and 24 district general hospitals) across England, Wales, and Scotland. PATIENTS--All patients admitted with acute severe asthma between 1 August and 30 September 1990 immediately before publication of national guidelines for asthma management. MAIN MEASURES--Main recommendations of guidelines for hospital management of acute severe asthma as performed by respiratory and non-respiratory physicians. RESULTS--766 patients (median age 41 (range 16-94) years) were studied; 465 (63%) were female and 448 (61%) had had previous admissions for asthma. Deficiencies were evident for each aspect of care studied, and respiratory physicians performed better than non-respiratory physicians. 429 (56%) patients had had their treatment increased in the two weeks preceding the admission but only 237 (31%) were prescribed oral steroids. Initially 661/766 (86%) patients had peak expiratory flow measured and recorded but only 534 (70%) ever had arterial blood gas tensions assessed. 65 (8%) patients received no steroid treatment in the first 24 hours after admission. Variability of peak expiratory flow was measured before discharge in 597/759 (78%) patients, of whom 334 (56%) achieved good control (variability < 25%). 47 (6%) patients were discharged without oral or inhaled steroids; 182/743 (24%) had no planned outpatient follow up and 114 failed to attend, leaving 447 (60%) seen in clinic within two months. Only 57/629 (8%) patients were recorded as having a written management plan. CONCLUSIONS--The hospital management of a significant minority of patients deviates from recommended national standards and some deviations are potentially serious. Overall, respiratory physicians provide significantly better care than non-respiratory physicians. PMID:10142032

  19. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.7±3.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Children’s Hospital. PMID:24358438

  20. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mirghani, Hyder O.; Elnour, Mohammed A.; Taha, Akasha M.; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P < 0.05). No differences were found with regard to age, hypertension, diabetes, family history of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and in-hospital acute coronary complications (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications. PMID:27186156

  1. Two Cases of Acute Renal Infarction in the Setting of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Ziffra, Jeffrey; Iqbal, Hina; Said, Albara; Oyama, Joseph H.; Lerma, Edgar V.; Chadaga, Amar R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute renal infarction (ARI) is an uncommon and often overlooked diagnosis in patients presenting with acute kidney injury and abdominal pain. Case Reports: We present 2 cases of ARI in the setting of atrial fibrillation along with a review of medical literature pertaining to ARI. Conclusion: This article should aid clinicians in the diagnosis of ARI. PMID:27660583

  2. Use of a national collaborative to improve hospital quality in a low-income setting

    PubMed Central

    Linnander, Erika; McNatt, Zahirah; Sipsma, Heather; Tatek, Dawit; Abebe, Yigeremu; Endeshaw, Abraham; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality improvement collaboratives are a widely used mechanism to improve hospital performance in high-income settings, but we lack evidence about their effectiveness in low-income settings. Methods We conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of data from the Ethiopian Hospital Alliance for Quality, a national collaborative sponsored by Ethiopia's Federal Ministry of Health. We identified hospital strategies associated with more positive patient satisfaction using linear regression and assessed changes in patient experience over a 3-year period (2012–2014) using matched t-tests. Results A total of 68 hospitals (response rate 68/120, 56.7%) were included in cross-sectional analysis. Four practices were significantly associated with more positive patient satisfaction (p<0.05): posting a record of cleaning activity in toilets and in patient wards, distributing leaflets in the local language with each prescription, and sharing ideas about patient experience across the hospital. Among hospitals that had complete data for longitudinal analysis (44/68, 65%), we found a 10% improvement in a 10-point measure of patient satisfaction (7.7 vs 8.4, p<0.01) from the start to the end of the study period. Conclusions Quality improvement collaboratives can be useful at scale in low-income settings in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly for hospitals that adopt strategies associated with patient satisfaction. PMID:26796023

  3. Investigation of the degree of organisational influence on patient experience scores in acute medical admission units in all acute hospitals in England using multilevel hierarchical regression modelling

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies found that hospital and specialty have limited influence on patient experience scores, and patient level factors are more important. This could be due to heterogeneity of experience delivery across subunits within organisations. We aimed to determine whether organisation level factors have greater impact if scores for the same subspecialty microsystem are analysed in each hospital. Setting Acute medical admission units in all NHS Acute Trusts in England. Participants We analysed patient experience data from the English Adult Inpatient Survey which is administered to 850 patients annually in each acute NHS Trusts in England. We selected all 8753 patients who returned the survey and who were emergency medical admissions and stayed in their admission unit for 1–2 nights, so as to isolate the experience delivered during the acute admission process. Primary and secondary outcome measures We used multilevel logistic regression to determine the apportioned influence of host organisation and of organisation level factors (size and teaching status), and patient level factors (demographics, presence of long-term conditions and disabilities). We selected ‘being treated with respect and dignity’ and ‘pain control’ as primary outcome parameters. Other Picker Domain question scores were analysed as secondary parameters. Results The proportion of overall variance attributable at organisational level was small; 0.5% (NS) for respect and dignity, 0.4% (NS) for pain control. Long-standing conditions and consequent disabilities were associated with low scores. Other item scores also showed that most influence was from patient level factors. Conclusions When a single microsystem, the acute medical admission process, is isolated, variance in experience scores is mainly explainable by patient level factors with limited organisational level influence. This has implications for the use of generic patient experience surveys for comparison between

  4. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gabriella; Jallow, Bintou; Le Doare, Kirsty; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Anderson, Suzanne T

    2015-04-01

    Poststreptococcal complications, such as acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD), are common in resource-limited settings, with RHD recognised as the most common cause of paediatric heart disease worldwide. Managing these conditions in resource-limited settings can be challenging. We review the investigation and treatment options for ARF and RHD and, most importantly, prevention methods in an African setting.

  5. Impact of California mandated acute care hospital nurse staffing ratios: a literature synthesis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Nancy; Shapiro, Susan

    2010-08-01

    California is the first state to enact legislation mandating minimum nurse-to-patient ratios at all times in acute care hospitals. This synthesis examines 12 studies of the impact of California's ratios on patient care cost, quality, and outcomes in acute care hospitals. A key finding from this synthesis is that the implementation of minimum nurse-to-patient ratios reduced the number of patients per licensed nurse and increased the number of worked nursing hours per patient day in hospitals. Another finding is that there were no significant impacts of these improved staffing measures on measures of nursing quality and patient safety indicators across hospitals. A critical observation may be that adverse outcomes did not increase despite the increasing patient severity reflected in case mix index. We cautiously posit that this finding may actually suggest an impact of ratios in preventing adverse events in the presence of increased patient risk.

  6. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    PubMed

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  7. Misuse of antibiotics reserved for hospital settings in outpatients: a prospective clinical audit in a university hospital in Southern France.

    PubMed

    Roche, Manon; Bornet, Charléric; Monges, Philippe; Stein, Andreas; Gensollen, Sophie; Seng, Piseth

    2016-07-01

    Some antibiotics are reserved essentially for hospital settings owing to cost effectiveness and in order to fight the emerging antibiotic resistance crisis. In some cases, antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals may be prescribed in outpatients for serious infections or in the absence of a therapeutic alternative. A 30-day prospective audit of outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals was performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relevance of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions by measuring appropriateness according to guidelines. During the study period, 53 prescriptions were included, only 40% of which were appropriate. Among the 32 inappropriate prescriptions, 4 cases lacked microbial arguments, 1 case was not adequate for the infection type, 1 case involved an incorrect antibiotic dosage, 1 case involved an incorrect interval of dose administration, 3 cases had a therapeutic alternative and 22 cases were not recommended. Of the 53 prescriptions, 66% were started in hospital and 34% in outpatients. Only 25% of cases were prescribed with infectious diseases specialist (IDS) advice, 64% were based on microbiological documentation and 13% had a negative bacterial culture. Inappropriate prescriptions were usually observed in antibiotic lock therapy, skin infections, Clostridium difficile colitis, intra-abdominal infections and intravascular catheter-related infections. Outpatient prescriptions of antimicrobial drugs reserved exclusively for use in hospitals are frequently inappropriate. We recommend a real-time analysis algorithm with the involvement of an IDS for monitoring prescriptions to improve the quality of these prescriptions and possibly to prevent antibiotic resistance.

  8. 6-PACK programme to decrease fall injuries in acute hospitals: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Renata T; Wolfe, Rory; Brand, Caroline A; Haines, Terry P; Hill, Keith D; Brauer, Sandra G; Botti, Mari; Cumming, Robert G; Livingston, Patricia M; Sherrington, Catherine; Zavarsek, Silva; Lindley, Richard I; Kamar, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the 6-PACK programme on falls and fall injuries in acute wards. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Six Australian hospitals. Participants All patients admitted to 24 acute wards during the trial period. Interventions Participating wards were randomly assigned to receive either the nurse led 6-PACK programme or usual care over 12 months. The 6-PACK programme included a fall risk tool and individualised use of one or more of six interventions: “falls alert” sign, supervision of patients in the bathroom, ensuring patients’ walking aids are within reach, a toileting regimen, use of a low-low bed, and use of a bed/chair alarm. Main outcome measures The co-primary outcomes were falls and fall injuries per 1000 occupied bed days. Results During the trial, 46 245 admissions to 16 medical and eight surgical wards occurred. As many people were admitted more than once, this represented 31 411 individual patients. Patients’ characteristics and length of stay were similar for intervention and control wards. Use of 6-PACK programme components was higher on intervention wards than on control wards (incidence rate ratio 3.05, 95% confidence interval 2.14 to 4.34; P<0.001). In all, 1831 falls and 613 fall injuries occurred, and the rates of falls (incidence rate ratio 1.04, 0.78 to 1.37; P=0.796) and fall injuries (0.96, 0.72 to 1.27; P=0.766) were similar in intervention and control wards. Conclusions Positive changes in falls prevention practice occurred following the introduction of the 6-PACK programme. However, no difference was seen in falls or fall injuries between groups. High quality evidence showing the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in acute wards remains absent. Novel solutions to the problem of in-hospital falls are urgently needed. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000332921. PMID:26813674

  9. Bereavement Support in an Acute Hospital: An Irish Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Trish; Foreman, Maeve; Curry, Philip; O'Driscoll, Siobhan; McCormack, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the first Irish study to examine a hospital-based bereavement care program, 1 year's cohort of bereaved people was surveyed. A response rate of over 40% provided 339 completed questionnaires from bereaved next-of-kin. The findings suggest that a tiered pyramid model of bereavement care (the Beaumont model) may be functional in a number of ways.…

  10. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  11. Selected enteropathogens and clinical course in children hospitalized with severe acute gastroenteritis in Barbados

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Browne, Chantelle; Scotland, Shauna; Krishnamurthy, Kandamaran; Nielsen, Anders L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of selected bacterial and viral enteropathogens in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis and the secondary aim was to characterize the clinical course and the outcome. Methodology A retrospective audit of children (<15 years) admitted with acute gastroenteritis during January 2008 to October 2010. Stool samples were analyzed for bacterial pathogens and for the Rotavirus. Demographics, clinical presentations, hospital course and outcome were extracted from the admission records. Results There were 571 children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis, which accounted for 11% of all medical hospitalization in children. Overall, 42.9% of these children were ≤12 months in age. Stool test result was documented in 46.6% of children hospitalized with gastroenteritis and an enteropathogen was isolated in 36.8% of cases with documented stool test result. Non-typhoidal Salmonella species was the most commonly isolated enteropathogen accounting for 21.1% of all the documented cases. Rotavirus was identified as an etiological agent in 9.0%. Of the 56 children who had non-typhoidal salmonella gastroenteritis, 54(96.4%) were younger than 5 years. The median duration of hospitalization was 2 days (Range 1 day to 9 days). There were no deaths. Conclusion Non-typhoidal salmonella was the most common enteropathogen isolated and this was followed by the Rotavirus. PMID:25780359

  12. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... CMS Abstraction & Reporting Tool CAUTI Catheter-associated urinary tract infection CBSAs Core-based... Regulations CLABSI Central line-associated bloodstream infection CIPI Capital input price index CMI Case-mix... Healthcare-associated infection HBIPS Hospital-based inpatient psychiatric services HCAHPS Hospital...

  13. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  14. [Nursing care management in hospital settings: the building of a construct].

    PubMed

    Christovam, Barbara Pompeu; Porto, Isaura Setenta; de Oliveira, Denise Cristina

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to build and present a theoretical definition of the concept of nursing care management in hospital settings, based on specific literature. We chose to use Concept Analysis strategies for building concepts, the rules of Archeological Analysis for forming concepts, and Lexical Analysis as the theoretical-methodological framework. The operationalization of the strategies and rules for forming the concept permitted the construction of the concept of nursing care in hospital settings. The constructed concept presented, by its nature, the capacity to form a dialectic integration of the aspects relative to the knowing-doing of care and management. The theoretical definition of the concept of Nursing Care Management in Hospital Settings assigned meaning to the term, in the initial context of the construction of a theory of Nursing Care Management in Health Services.

  15. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  16. Effectiveness of Hospital Functions for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment on In-Hospital Mortality: Results From a Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Background Though evidence is limited in Japan, clinical controlled studies overseas have revealed that specialized care units are associated with better outcomes for acute stoke patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of hospital functions for acute care of ischemic stroke on in-hospital mortality, with statistical accounting for referral bias. Methods We derived data from a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database linked to the Survey of Medical Care Institutions and Hospital Report data. We compared the mortality of acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 41 476) in hospitals certified for acute stroke treatment with that in non-certified institutions. To adjust for potential referral bias, we used differential distance to hospitals from the patient’s residence as an instrumental variable and constructed bivariate probit models. Results With the ordinary probit regression model, in-hospital mortality in certified hospitals was not significantly different from that in non-certified institutions. Conversely, the model with the instrumental variable method showed that admission to certified hospitals reduced in-hospital mortality by 30.7% (P < 0.001). This difference remained after adjusting for hospital size, volume, staffing, and intravenous use of tissue plasminogen activator. Conclusions Comparison accounting for referral selection found that certified hospital function for acute ischemic stroke care was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality. Our results indicate that organized stroke care—with certified subspecialty physicians and around-the-clock availability of personnel, imaging equipment, and emergency neurosurgical procedures in an intensive stroke care unit—is effective in improving outcomes in acute ischemic stroke care. PMID:26165489

  17. Occurrence of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria at an Acute Care Hospital Using Secondary Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of infection control strategies at acute-care hospitals has contributed to an overall decline in the number of healthcare-associated infections (HAI’s) in the United States, especially those caused by contaminated equipment used in surgical procedures and co...

  18. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed.

  19. Characteristics of acute care hospitals with diversity plans and translation services.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Charles B; Shen, Jay J; Ginn, Gregory O

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals provide diversity activities for a number of reasons. The authors examined community demand, resource availability, managed care, institutional pressure, and external orientation related variables that were associated with acute care hospital diversity plans and translation services. The authors used multiple logistic regression to analyze the data for 478 hospitals in the 2006 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) dataset that had available data on the racial and ethnic status of their discharges. We also used 2004 and 2006 American Hospital Association (AHA) data to measure the two dependent diversity variables and the other independent variables. We found that resource, managed care, and external orientation variables were associated with having a diversity plan and that resource, managed care, institutional, and external orientation variables were associated with providing translation services. The authors concluded that more evidence for diversity's impact, additional resources, and more institutional pressure may be needed to motivate more hospitals to provide diversity planning and translation services.

  20. Quality Indicators Sensitive to Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Settings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Provisional NQF (n=13) ANA (n=10) Death in low mortality DRG X Decubitus /pressure ulcer X X X Failure to rescue X X X Infection due to medical care X...overlap in these measure sets, with the exception of decubitus /pressure ulcer and failure to rescue. Caution should be taken since the measure intent...patient falls, pressure ulcers , and mortality, with increasing detail in measure specification.11 For example, nosocomial infections are broken down into

  1. Treatment of acute burn blisters in unscheduled care settings.

    PubMed

    Payne, Sarah; Cole, Elaine

    2012-09-01

    Many patients with minor burns present at emergency departments and urgent care centres, where their management is often undertaken by experienced nurses rather than experts in treating burns. This article describes a small study of the clinical decision making that underpins nurses' management of minor burns in these non-specialist settings. The results suggest that, due to a lack of relevant research, nurses base their decisions on previous experience or expert colleagues' opinions and advice rather than on the evidence.

  2. An identification and brief advice programme for low-risk alcohol consumption in an acute medical setting: an implementation study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stuart A; Phekoo, Karen J; Grover, Vijay PB; Lovendoski, James; Anderson, Mike; Bowden-Jones, Owen; Foxton, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To implement an identification and brief advice (IBA) intervention to detect low-risk/hazardous alcohol consumption. Design Implementation was guided through the use of quality improvement tools and training. Setting This study was conducted over an 18-month period from April 2010 to September 2011 on a 42-bed acute medical unit at a central London acute hospital. Participants All medical patients over the age of 18 admitted to the acute assessment unit were eligible; any patient unable to provide a medical history either through language barriers or due to illness was excluded. Main outcome measures Percentage of medical patients admitted each week to the acute assessment unit who were screened for low-risk/hazardous alcohol consumption. Results Weekly data were analysed in time series run charts and cross-referenced to the date of educational sessions and their effect on the uptake of screening monitored. A demonstrable change in the mean percentage number of patients screened was observed in different time periods, 67.3–80.1%, following targeted teaching on the AAU. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the successful use of quality improvement methodology to guide the implementation of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C), an IBA intervention, in the acute medical setting. The incorporation of the AUDIT-C into an admission document has been well accepted by the junior doctors, attaining an average (mean) of 80% of patients being screened using the tool. Targeted teaching of clinical staff involved in admitting patients appears to be the most effective method in improving uptake of IBA by junior doctors. PMID:23772314

  3. Preventing and Treating Acute Kidney Injury Among Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis and Ascites: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Bonder, Alan; Cardenas, Andres

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury in the setting of ascites and cirrhosis is a medical emergency characterized by significant morbidity and mortality. Clinicians other than gastroenterologists are often the front line against acute kidney injury for patients with ascites. Owing to the specifics of cirrhotic physiology, the treatment and prevention of acute kidney injury in the setting of ascites has unique features, widespread knowledge of which will benefit our patients with cirrhosis. Early detection and treatment of infection, maximization of cardiac output, and avoidance of medications that limit cardiorenal adaptations to arterial underfilling are part of a multipronged strategy to protect the renal function of our patients with cirrhosis and ascites.

  4. Trends in Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospitalizations: Are We Seeing the Whole Picture?

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Naomi C.; Ash, Arlene S.; Ghosh, Kaushik; Rosen, Amy K.; Wong, John B.; Rosen, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Payers and policy makers rely on studies of trends in Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) hospitalizations and spending that count only hospitalizations where the AMI is the principal discharge diagnosis. Hospitalizations with AMI coded as a secondary diagnosis are ignored. The effects of excluding these hospitalizations on estimates of trends are unknown. Methods Observational study of all AMI hospitalizations in Fee-for-Service Medicare beneficiaries ages 65 and over, from 2002 through 2011. Results We studied 3,663,137 hospitalizations with any AMI discharge diagnosis over 288,873,509 beneficiary-years. Of these, 66% had AMI coded as principal (versus secondary). From 2002 to 2011, AMI hospitalization rates declined 24.5% (from 1,485 per 100,000 beneficiary-years in 2002 to 1,122 in 2011). Meanwhile, the proportion of these hospitalizations with a secondary AMI diagnosis increased from 28% to 40%; by 2011 these secondary AMI hospitalizations accounted for 43% of all expenditures for hospitalizations with AMI, or $2.8 billion. Major changes in comorbidities, principal diagnoses and mean costs for hospitalizations with a non-principal AMI diagnosis occurred in the 2006-2008 timeframe. Conclusions Current estimates of the burden of AMI ignore an increasingly large proportion of overall AMI hospitalizations and spending. Changes in the characteristics of hospitalizations that coincided with major payment and policy changes suggest that non-clinical factors affect AMI coding. Failing to consider all AMIs could inflate estimates of population health improvements, underestimate current and future AMI burden and expenditures, and overestimate the value of AMI prevention and treatment. PMID:26678643

  5. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  6. Hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with heart failure: a condition often overlooked in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khalid; Workicho, Abdulhalik; Gudina, Esayas Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte abnormality in patients with heart failure (HF). It is independently associated with increased short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. The main objective of this study was to assess patterns of hyponatremia and its association with discharge outcomes in patients with HF admitted to a teaching hospital in Ethiopia. Patients and methods This is a descriptive, prospective, hospital-based cohort study of patients with HF admitted to Jimma University Hospital, Ethiopia, between November 1, 2013 and July 31, 2014. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on sociodemographic characteristics, clinical profile at admission, and outcomes at discharge. Plasma sodium concentration was analyzed at admission for all patients. The relationship between hyponatremia at admission and in-hospital mortality, as well as length of hospital stay, was assessed using both bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regressions. The level of statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results Of 152 participants admitted with HF, 44 (28.9%) had hyponatremia, which is defined as serum sodium level <135 mmol/L. Patients on salt restriction, on chronic diuretic treatment (furosemide and spironolactone), and with impaired renal function at admission were found to be highly affected. Hyponatremia was found to be associated with increased in-hospital mortality (P=0.008) and longer hospital stay (16.6 vs 12 days, P<0.001). Patients with hyponatremia also had lower blood pressure and poor functional status at discharge. Conclusion This study demonstrates that hyponatremia is highly prevalent in patients hospitalized with HF and is associated with increased in-hospital mortality and longer hospital stay. Thus, great emphasis should be given to identify high-risk patients, and prevention and early detection of hyponatremia to prevent its deleterious effects. Large-scale national studies are also needed to complement our

  7. Trends in hospital discharges, management and in-hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction in Switzerland between 1998 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the late nineties, no study has assessed the trends in management and in-hospital outcome of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Switzerland. Our objective was to fill this gap. Methods Swiss hospital discharge database for years 1998 to 2008. AMI was defined as a primary discharge diagnosis code I21 according to the ICD10 classification. Invasive treatments and overall in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Overall, 102,729 hospital discharges with a diagnosis of AMI were analyzed. The percentage of hospitalizations with a stay in an Intensive Care Unit decreased from 38.0% in 1998 to 36.2% in 2008 (p for trend < 0.001). Percutaneous revascularizations increased from 6.0% to 39.9% (p for trend < 0.001). Bare stents rose from 1.3% to 16.6% (p for trend < 0.001). Drug eluting stents appeared in 2004 and increased to 23.5% in 2008 (p for trend < 0.001). Coronary artery bypass graft increased from 1.0% to 3.0% (p for trend < 0.001). Circulatory assistance increased from 0.2% to 1.7% (p for trend < 0.001). Among patients managed in a single hospital (not transferred), seven-day and total in-hospital mortality decreased from 8.0% to 7.0% (p for trend < 0.01) and from 11.2% to 10.1%, respectively. These changes were no longer significant after multivariate adjustment for age, gender, region, revascularization procedures and transfer type. After multivariate adjustment, differing trends in revascularization procedures and in in-hospital mortality were found according to the geographical region considered. Conclusion In Switzerland, a steep rise in hospital discharges and in revascularization procedures for AMI occurred between 1998 and 2008. The increase in revascularization procedures could explain the decrease in in-hospital mortality rates. PMID:23530470

  8. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fawkner-Corbett, David W; Khoo, Siew Kim; Duarte, Carminha M; Bezerra, Patricia G M; Bochkov, Yury A; Gern, James E; Le Souef, Peter N; McNamara, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterize the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5 years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analyzed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs. 5%; P = 0.04). Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV-A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A.

  9. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fawkner-Corbett, DW; Khoo, SK; Duarte, MC; Bezerra, PGM; Bochkov, YA; Gern, JE; Le Souef, PN; McNamara, PS

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterise the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Methods Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analysed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. Results RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs 5%; p=0.04). Conclusions Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A. PMID:26100591

  10. Framework for preventing falls in acute hospitals using passive sensor enabled radio frequency identification technology.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, Renuka; Ranasinghe, Damith C; Shinmoto Torres, Roberto L; Hill, Keith

    2012-01-01

    We describe a distributed architecture for a real-time falls prevention framework capable of providing a technological intervention to mitigate the risk of falls in acute hospitals through the development of an AmbIGeM (Ambient Intelligence Geritatric Management system). Our approach is based on using a battery free, wearable sensor enabled Radio Frequency Identification device. Unsupervised classification of high risk falls activities are used to facilitate an immediate response from caregivers by alerting them of the high risk activity, the particular patient, and their location. Early identification of high risk falls activities through a longitudinal and unsupervised setting in real-time allows the preventative intervention to be administered in a timely manner. Furthermore, real-time detection allows emergency protocols to be deployed immediately in the event of a fall. Finally, incidents of high risk activities are automatically documented to allow clinicians to customize and optimize the delivery of care to suit the needs of patients identified as being at most risk.

  11. Use of portable electronic devices in a hospital setting and their potential for bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Rao, Amitha; Reyes-Sacin, Carlos; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Szpunar, Susan; Riederer, Kathleen; Kaye, Keith; Fishbain, Joel T; Levine, Diane

    2015-03-01

    Portable electronic devices are increasingly being used in the hospital setting. As with other fomites, these devices represent a potential reservoir for the transmission of pathogens. We conducted a convenience sampling of devices in 2 large medical centers to identify bacterial colonization rates and potential risk factors.

  12. MICRO-CARES: An Information Management System for Psychosocial Services in Hospital Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Jeffrey S.; Lyons, John S.; Strain, James J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a flexible software system that is adaptable to a variety of information management uses across different psychosocial service departments in hospital settings. Initially developed for Consultation Liaison Psychiatry, the present system has now been adapted for a Social Work department and is being adapted to Hospice, Home Care, Patient Representative, and Pastoral Care departmental uses.

  13. Efficacy Beliefs and the Learning Experiences of Children with Cancer in the Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    A study examined how self-efficacy beliefs influenced motivation, affect, and adjustment in five students aged 9-13 with cancer, receiving educational services in a hospital setting. Education was an effective vehicle through which children with cancer could experience control and autonomy and also achieve many necessary developmental outcomes for…

  14. [Rad-Esito: new informational debt as integration of hospital discharge cards for acute patients].

    PubMed

    Rini, F; Piscioneri, C; Consolante, C; Fara, G M; Marino, M G; Conte, A; Maurici, M

    2009-01-01

    Since the January 2008 the tracking of additional information about hospital discharge card's content has been activated in Latium. The new data, noticed by RAD-Esito card, regard the hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarction, femoral neck fracture and coronary artery bypass surgery. This study's objective has been to evaluate the quality of the data collected with the new card, at the end of the 1st semester of experimentation, concerning two institutes of care of Latium (Region of Central Italy), the Casilino Polyclinic (ASL Rome B) and the Anzio-Nettuno hospital (Assembled Hospitals, ASL Rome H). Furthermore, any significant correlation's existence between variables for acute myocardial infarction and femoral fracture with the mortality rate and an increased average hospitalization period has been statistically verified. In acute myocardial infarction mortality is significantly related to a low systolic blood pressure (<130 mmHg) at admission (p < 0.02) and to having no surgical intervention instead of transcutaneous transluminal coronary angioplastic surgery (p < 0.0001); in this case there is also an increased average hospitalization period (p < 0.03). In femoral neck fracture mortality is significantly related to having a conservative surgery instead of fracture reduction or prosthesis implantation (p < 0.0002).This study's preliminary results show how the integration of the hospital informative flow with the new clinical variables will be able to allow the promotion of the quality in the coding of the diagnosis and procedures, according to the current international innovations. This additional information will also be able to support the regional appropriateness and outcome of the treatments evaluation programs.

  15. Shared governance and empowerment in registered nurses working in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Barden, Agnes M; Griffin, Mary T Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2011-01-01

    Empowerment of registered nurses through professional practice models inclusive of shared governance has been proposed as essential to improve quality patient care, contain costs, and retain nursing staff. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceptions of governance and empowerment among nurses working in acute care hospital units in which a shared governance model had been in place for 6 to 12 months. The 158 nurses who participated perceived themselves to be moderately empowered and in an early implementation stage of shared governance. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between perceptions of shared governance and empowerment. Recommendations for professional practice and future research are included.

  16. Simulation of acute reference dose (ARfD) settings for pesticides in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Midori; Suzuki, Daisetsu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shirota, Mariko; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Morita, Takeshi; Ono, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop guidelines for setting acute reference doses (ARfDs) for pesticides in Japan, we conducted simulations of ARfD settings based on evaluation reports for 201 pesticides assessed by the Food Safety Commission (FSC) in Japan over the last 8 years. Our conceptual principles were based on the concepts written by Solecki et al. (2005) and were adapted for toxicological data required in Japan. Through this process, we were able to set the ARfDs for over 90% of the 201 pesticides tested. The studies that provided the rationale for ARfD setting were primarily reproductive and developmental toxicity studies, acute neurotoxicity studies, and pharmacology studies. For approximately 30% of the pesticides simulated in the present study, it was not necessary to establish ARfDs. Some of the simulated ARfDs resulting from their endpoints may be conservative estimates, because the evaluation reports were written for acceptable daily intake settings. Thus, it was sometimes difficult to distinguish acute toxic alerts from repeated toxicities. We were unable to set an ARfD for 14 pesticides because of insufficient data on acute toxicities. This could be improved by more complete recordkeeping. Furthermore, we categorized the 201 pesticides by mechanism of action or chemical structure. Our simulation indicates that the conceptual framework presented here can be used as a basis for the development of guidelines on ARfD settings for pesticides in Japan.

  17. Multi-unit Providers Survey. For-profits report decline in acute-care hospitals ... newcomers to top 10.

    PubMed

    Bellandi, D; Kirchheimer, B

    1999-05-24

    For-profit hospital systems cleaned house last year. After years of adding hospitals, investor-owned operators shed facilities in 1998, recording the first decline in the number of acute-care hospitals they've owned or managed since 1991, according to our 23rd annual Multi-unit Providers Survey.

  18. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  19. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Adjustment Authorized by Section 7(b)(1)(B) of Public Law 110-90 7. Background on the Application of the... Hospital-Specific Rates for FY 2011 and Subsequent Fiscal Years 9. Application of the Documentation and... (AutoLITT\\TM\\) 4. FY 2013 Applications for New Technology Add-On Payments a. Glucarpidase (Trade...

  20. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  1. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  2. Deconstructing myths, building alliances: a networking model to enhance tobacco control in hospital mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Ballbè, Montse; Gual, Antoni; Nieva, Gemma; Saltó, Esteve; Fernández, Esteve

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy for people with severe mental disorders is up to 25 years less in comparison to the general population, mainly due to diseases caused or worsened by smoking. However, smoking is usually a neglected issue in mental healthcare settings. The aim of this article is to describe a strategy to improve tobacco control in the hospital mental healthcare services of Catalonia (Spain). To bridge this gap, the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals launched a nationwide bottom-up strategy in Catalonia in 2007. The strategy relied on the creation of a working group of key professionals from various hospitals -the early adopters- based on Rogers' theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. In 2016, the working group is composed of professionals from 17 hospitals (70.8% of all hospitals in the region with mental health inpatient units). Since 2007, tobacco control has improved in different areas such as increasing mental health professionals' awareness of smoking, training professionals on smoking cessation interventions and achieving good compliance with the national smoking ban. The working group has produced and disseminated various materials, including clinical practice and best practice guidelines, implemented smoking cessation programmes and organised seminars and training sessions on smoking cessation measures in patients with mental illnesses. The next challenge is to ensure effective follow-up for smoking cessation after discharge. While some areas of tobacco control within these services still require significant improvement, the aforementioned initiative promotes successful tobacco control in these settings.

  3. [Acute hospital admissions among nursing home residents--benefits and potential harms].

    PubMed

    Bally, Klaus W; Nickel, Christian

    2013-08-07

    Nursing home residents are often referred by their general practitioners to the emergency department or to a geriatric hospital. Hospitalization is mainly perceived as a burden by elderly people; it may also contribute to a reduction of their mental abilities and functional decline. Reasons for admitting patients from nursing homes include infections, exacerbation of pre-existing cardiovascular disease and falls. GP presence in the nursing home, qualified nursing staff, early diagnosis of infections or acute on chronic episodes of e. g. heart failure and appropriate management of chronic diseases are essential to avoid unnecessary hospitalizations. Furthermore, physicians should identify palliative situations in a timely manner and should be familiar with the patients' preferences regarding hospitalization and place of death.

  4. A survey of U.S.A. acute care hospitals' computer-based provider order entry system infusion levels.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Guappone, Ken; Campbell, Emily M; Dykstra, Richard H; Ash, Joan S

    2007-01-01

    We developed and fielded a survey to help clinical information system designers, developers, and implementers better understand the infusion level, or the extent and sophistication of CPOE feature availability and use by clinicians within acute care hospitals across the United States of America. In the 176 responding hospitals, we found that CPOE had been in place a median of 5 years and that the median percentage of orders entered electronically was 90.5%. Greater than 96% of the sites used CPOE to enter pharmacy, laboratory and imaging orders; 82% were able to access all aspects of the clinical information system with a single sign-on; 86% of the respondents had order sets, drug-drug interaction warnings, and pop-up alerts even though nearly all hospitals were community hospitals with commercial systems; and 90% had a CPOE committee with a clinician representative in place. While CPOE has not been widely adopted after over 30 years of experimentation, there is still much that can be learned from this relatively small number of highly infused (with CPOE and clinical decision support) organizations.

  5. Rationale, Design, Methodology and Hospital Characteristics of the First Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE)

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Kadhim J.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Husam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of data on heart failure (HF) in the Gulf Middle East. The present paper describes the rationale, design, methodology and hospital characteristics of the first Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Materials and Methods: Gulf CARE is a prospective, multicenter, multinational registry of patients >18 year of age admitted with diagnosis of acute HF (AHF). The data collected included demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, precipitating factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with AHF. In addition, data about hospital readmission rates, procedures and mortality at 3 months and 1-year follow-up were recorded. Hospital characteristics and care provider details were collected. Data were entered in a dedicated website using an electronic case record form. Results: A total of 5005 consecutive patients were enrolled from February 14, 2012 to November 13, 2012. Forty-seven hospitals in 7 Gulf States (Oman, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, United Gulf Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain) participated in the project. The majority of hospitals were community hospitals (46%; 22/47) followed by non-University teaching (32%; 15/47 and University hospitals (17%). Most of the hospitals had intensive or coronary care unit facilities (93%; 44/47) with 59% (28/47) having catheterization laboratory facilities. However, only 29% (14/47) had a dedicated HF clinic facility. Most patients (71%) were cared for by a cardiologist. Conclusions: Gulf CARE is the first prospective registry of AHF in the Middle East, intending to provide a unique insight into the demographics, etiology, management and outcomes of AHF in the Middle East. HF management in the Middle East is predominantly provided by cardiologists. The data obtained from this registry will help the local clinicians to identify the deficiencies in HF management as well as provide a platform to implement evidence based preventive and treatment strategies to reduce the burden of HF in

  6. Exploratory Use of Microaerosol Decontamination Technology (PAEROSOL) in Enclosed, Unoccupied Hospital Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Rainina, Evguenia I.; McCune, D. E.; Luna, Maria L.; Cook, J. E.; Soltis, Michele A.; Demons, Samandra T.; Godoy-Kain, Patricia; Weston, J. H.

    2012-05-31

    The goal of this study was to validate the previously observed high biological kill performance of PAEROSOL, a semi-dry, micro-aerosol decontamination technology, against common HAI in a non-human subject trial within a hospital setting of Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to validating the disinfecting efficacy of PAEROSOL, the objectives of the trial included a demonstration of PAEROSOL environmental safety, (i.e., impact to hospital interior materials and electronic equipment exposed during testing) and PAEROSOL parameters optimization for future deployment.

  7. Evaluation of Alere i RSV for Rapid Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Children Hospitalized with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Peters, Rebecca Marie; Schnee, Sarah Valerie; Tabatabai, Julia; Schnitzler, Paul; Pfeil, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Alere i RSV is a novel rapid test which applies a nicking enzyme amplification reaction to detect respiratory syncytial virus in point-of-care settings. In this study, we evaluated the Alere i RSV assay by using frozen nasopharyngeal swab samples that were collected in viral transport medium from children hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection during the 2015-2016 winter season. Alere i RSV assay results were compared to those for Altona RealStar RSV real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). We found that the overall sensitivity and specificity of the Alere i RSV test was 100% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 93% to 100%) and 97% (95% CI, 89% to 100%), respectively. Positive samples were identified within 5 to 7 min from sample collection. Overall, the Alere i RSV test performed well compared to the RT-PCR assay and has the potential to facilitate the detection of RSV in point-of-care settings.

  8. Convergence and divergence: assessing criteria of consumer satisfaction across general practice, dental and hospital care settings.

    PubMed

    Williams, S J; Calnan, M

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the first-stage of a study carried out in the spring of 1988 in the South East of England. The study looked at general and specific aspects of consumer satisfaction with general practitioner services, general dental care services and hospital in-patients care. It also examined which specific consumer criteria were the key predictors of overall satisfaction within each of these particular medical care settings. A related aim was to assess the degree of congruence or divergence of consumer criteria across these differing medical care settings. The evidence suggests that whilst general levels of consumer satisfaction are high (i.e. 83-97%), questions of a more detailed and specific nature revealed greater levels of expressed dissatisfaction (e.g. 38% of the sample felt that they could not discuss personal problems with their GP, 51% felt their dentist was not easy to reach at weekends/holidays, whilst 35% felt hospital doctors did not give sufficient information). Whilst different areas of dissatisfaction were found in each specific medical care setting examined, what was particularly striking was the degree of convergence of the key predictors of overall consumer satisfaction across the medical care settings. That is to say, our findings clearly suggest that issues concerning 'professional competence', together with the nature and quality of the patient-professional relationship, are the key predictors of overall consumer satisfaction with general practice, dental and hospital care [e.g. GP giving sufficient information correlated 0.64 (P less than 0.001) with overall GP satisfaction scores; competent dentist 0.52 (P less than 0.001) with overall dental satisfaction scores; and full confidence in hospital doctors 0.49 (P less than 0.001) with overall hospital satisfaction scores]. The theoretical importance and policy implications of these findings, particularly in the light of the recent NHS reforms, are discussed.

  9. The Change in Body Weight During Hospitalization Predicts Mortality in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Komaki, Tomo; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Arimura, Tadaaki; Shiga, Yuhei; Morii, Joji; Kuwano, Takashi; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Kitajima, Ken; Iwata, Atsushi; Morito, Natsumi; Yahiro, Eiji; Fujimi, Kanta; Matsunaga, Akira; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    Background In our experience, the change in body weight (BW) during hospitalization varies greatly in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF). Since the clinical significance of a change in BW is not clear, we investigated whether a change in BW could predict mortality. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 130 patients (72 males; aged 68 ± 10 years) who were hospitalized due to acute decompensated HF and followed for 2 years after discharge. The change in the BW index during hospitalization (ΔBWI) was calculated as (BW at hospital admission minus BW at hospital discharge)/body surface area at hospital discharge. Results The patients were divided into quartiles according to ΔBWI, and the 2-year mortality rates in the quartiles with the lowest, second, third and highest ΔBWI were 18.8%, 12.1%, 3.1% and 9.1%, respectively. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis after adjusting for variables with a P value less than 0.05, ΔBWI was independently associated with 2-year mortality (P = 0.0002), and the quartile with the lowest ΔBWI had a higher relative risk (RR) for 2-year mortality than the quartile with the highest ΔBWI (RR: 7.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.03 - 53.99, P = 0.04). Conclusion In conclusion, ΔBWI was significantly associated with 2-year mortality after discharge, which indicates that ΔBWI might be a simple predictor of prognosis in acute decompensated HF. PMID:28179967

  10. Usefulness of Serum Triiodothyronine (T3) to Predict Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Rothberger, Gary D; Gadhvi, Sonya; Michelakis, Nickolaos; Kumar, Amit; Calixte, Rose; Shapiro, Lawrence E

    2017-02-15

    Thyroid hormone plays an important role in cardiac function. Low levels of serum triiodothyronine (T3) due to nonthyroidal illness syndrome may have adverse effects in heart failure (HF). This study was designed to assess the ability of T3 to predict in-hospital outcomes in patients with acute HF. In total, 137 patients without thyroid disease or treatment with drugs which affect TH levels, who were hospitalized with acute HF were prospectively enrolled and studied. TH levels were tested upon hospital admission, and outcomes were compared between patients with low (<2.3 pg/ml) and normal (≥2.3 pg/ml) free T3 levels as well as between those with low (<0.6 ng/ml) and normal (≥0.6 ng/ml) total T3 levels. Low free T3 correlated with an increased length of stay in the hospital (median 11 vs 7 days, p <0.001) and higher rates of intensive care unit admission (31.8% vs 16.9%, p = 0.047), with a trend toward increased need for invasive mechanical ventilation (9.0% vs 1.4%, p = 0.056). Low total T3 correlated with an increased length of stay in the hospital (median 11 vs 7 days, p <0.001) and increased need for invasive mechanical ventilation (9.8% vs 1.3%, p = 0.045). In conclusion, low T3 predicts worse hospital outcomes in patients with acute HF and can be useful in the risk stratification of these patients.

  11. Recording of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of COPD in UK electronic health care records

    PubMed Central

    Rothnie, Kieran J; Müllerová, Hana; Thomas, Sara L; Chandan, Joht S; Smeeth, Liam; Hurst, John R; Davis, Kourtney; Quint, Jennifer K

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate identification of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) within electronic health care records is important for research, public health, and to inform health care utilization and service provision. We aimed to develop a strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in secondary care data and to investigate the validity of strategies to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in primary care data. Methods We identified patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) with linked Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data. We used discharge summaries for recent hospitalizations for AECOPD to develop a strategy to identify the recording of hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES. We then used the HES strategy as a reference standard to investigate the positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of strategies for identifying AECOPD using general practice CPRD data. We tested two strategies: 1) codes for hospitalization for AECOPD and 2) a code for AECOPD other than hospitalization on the same day as a code for hospitalization due to unspecified reason. Results In total, 27,182 patients with COPD were included. Our strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES had a sensitivity of 87.5%. When compared with HES, using a code suggesting hospitalization for AECOPD in CPRD resulted in a PPV of 50.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 48.5%–51.8%) and a sensitivity of 4.1% (95% CI 3.9%–4.3%). Using a code for AECOPD and a code for hospitalization due to unspecified reason resulted in a PPV of 43.3% (95% CI 42.3%–44.2%) and a sensitivity of 5.4% (95% CI 5.1%–5.7%). Conclusion Hospitalization for AECOPD can be identified with high sensitivity in the HES database. The PPV and sensitivity of strategies to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in primary care data alone are very poor. Primary care data alone should not be used to identify

  12. The Economic Crisis and Acute Myocardial Infarction: New Evidence Using Hospital-Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Maggioni, Aldo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Objective This research sought to assess whether and to what extent the ongoing economic crisis in Italy impacted hospitalizations, in-hospital mortality and expenditures associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods The data were obtained from the hospital discharge database of the Italian Health Ministry and aggregated at the hospital level. Each hospital (n = 549) was observed for 4 years and was geographically located within a “Sistema Locale del Lavoro” (SLL, i.e., clusters of neighboring towns with a common economic structure). For each SLL, the intensity of the crisis was determined, defined as the 2012–2008 increase in the area-specific unemployment rate. A difference-in-differences (DiD) approach was employed to compare the increases in AMI-related outcomes across different quintiles of crisis intensity. Results Hospitals located in areas with the highest intensity of crisis (in the fifth quintile) had an increase of approximately 30 AMI cases annually (approximately 13%) compared with hospitals in area with lower crisis intensities (p<0.001). A significant increase in total hospital days was observed (13%, p<0.001) in addition to in-hospital mortality (17%, p<0.001). As a consequence, an increase of around €350.000 was incurred in annual hospital expenditures for AMI (approximately 36%, p<0.001). Conclusions More attention should be given to the increase in health needs associated with the financial crisis. Policies aimed to contrast unemployment in the community by keeping and reintegrating workers in jobs could also have positive impacts on adverse health outcomes, especially in areas of high crisis intensity. PMID:26574745

  13. Secular trends in acute coronary syndrome hospitalization from 1994 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Dennis T; Newman, Alice M; Alter, David A; Austin, Peter C; Chiu, Maria; Cox, Jafna L; Goodman, Shaun G; Tu, Jack V

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is one of the most frequent reasons for hospitalization worldwide. Although substantial advances have been made in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease, their impact on the rates of ACS hospitalization is unclear. METHODS: Data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database were used to estimate secular trends in ACS hospitalization. A total of 1.3 million ACS hospitalizations in Canada from April 1, 1994, to March 31, 2006, were examined. Overall hospitalization rates were standardized for age and sex using 1991 Canadian census data, and hospitalization rates were also stratified by age group, sex and Canadian province to assess trends in each subgroup. RESULTS: The Canadian age- and sex-standardized ACS hospitalization rate was 508 per 100,000 persons in 1994, and 317 per 100,000 persons in 2005 – a relative reduction of 37.8% and an average annual relative reduction of 3.9% per year. Declines in ACS hospitalization rates were observed among men (annual relative reduction 3.9%, relative reduction 39.0%) and women (annual relative reduction 3.8%, relative reduction 35.8%). Declining trends were also observed among patients of different age groups and among patients hospitalized across all Canadian provinces. INTERPRETATION: Over the past decade, a substantial decline in ACS hospitalization rates occurred, which has not been previously observed. This finding is likely due to improvements in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. The present study’s data should provide important insights and guidance for future health care planning in Canada. PMID:20352132

  14. Prevalence of nosocomial infections in acute care hospitals in Catalonia (VINCat Program).

    PubMed

    Olona, Montserrat; Limón, Enric; Barcenilla, Fernando; Grau, Santiago; Gudiol, Francesc

    2012-06-01

    The first objective of the Catalonian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (VINCat) is to monitor the prevalence (%) of patients with nosocomial infections (NI), patients undergoing urinary catheterization with closed circuit drainage (%) and patients undergoing antibiotic treatment (%). We present the results for the period 2008-2010. Comprehensive and point annual prevalence surveys were conducted that included conventionally hospitalized patients in acute care hospitals belonging to the VINCat Program. The number of participating hospitals was 46 (2008), 48 (2009) and 61 (2010), most belonging to the Network of Public Use Hospitals of Servei Català de la Salut. The results are presented globally and by hospital size (<200 beds, 200-500 beds, >500 beds). The prevalence of patients with active NI acquired during the current or the previous hospitalization (global NI/P%) was 7.6 (2008), 6.2 (2009) and 6.3 (2010). The prevalence of patients with active NI acquired during the current (actual NI/P%) was 6.2 (2008), 4.7 (2009) and 4.6 (2010).The results by hospital size shows that the variation occurred mainly in <200 beds hospitals. The proportion of closed circuit urinary catheterization use was 90.2%. The use of antibiotics varied between 34.6% and 37.6%, with no differences due to hospital size. The global prevalence of NI provides information on the burden of NI at the institutional and regional level. Between 17.3% and 26.9% of patients with NI at the time of the study had acquired it in a previous hospitalization at the same institution.

  15. Impact of the Syrian Crisis on the Hospitalization of Syrians in a Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Lama, Souaiby; François, Kazour; Marwan, Zoghbi; Sami, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Determine the impact of the Syrian crisis on the hospitalization of Syrians in a psychiatric setting. All Syrians admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Lebanon between the 1st of January 2009 and the 31st of December 2013 were included. Number of admissions, psychiatric disorders and demographic and clinical data relative to patients were compared between those admitted before and after the crisis. 44 patients were admitted before the crisis and 106 after it. The distribution of diagnosis varied significantly after the crisis (p = 0.056) with the majority of patients being admitted for schizophrenia (37.7 %). The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher after the crisis (p = 0.03) but suicidal attempts, need for electroconvulsive therapy and length of hospitalization did not differ significantly between both groups. Clinicians should be aware of the possible burden of mental illness in Syrians after the beginning of the Syrian crisis.

  16. Lactobacillus acidophilus Mixture in Treatment of Children Hospitalized With Acute Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jamie M; Petrova, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Despite unproven effectiveness, Lactobacillus acidophilus is a widely used probiotic in the treatment of pediatric diarrhea. In this report, we evaluated the association between length of stay (LOS) for 290 young children hospitalized with acute diarrhea and adjuvant therapy with a probiotic mixture containing 80% L acidophilus that was included in treatment for 22.4% of them. Overall, no association between LOS and use of L acidophilus was recorded after controlling for age, length of diarrhea symptoms, duration of intravenous fluids, and prior exposure to antibiotic. However, LOS was directly associated with use of L acidophilus in children with negative stool studies, and no such association was recorded in children with positive stool for rotavirus or other infections. We concluded that adjuvant therapy with L acidophilus mixture is not beneficial for young children hospitalized with acute diarrhea.

  17. Level of Physical Activity and In-Hospital Course of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Juliana de Goes; Santos, Marcos Antonio Almeida; Barreto Filho, José Augusto Soares; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes; de Melo, Enaldo Vieira; de Oliveira, Norma Alves; Faro, Gustavo Baptista de Almeida; Sousa, Antônio Carlos Sobral

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. A sedentary lifestyle, present in 85% of the Brazilian population, is considered a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease. However, the correlation of a sedentary lifestyle with cardiovascular events (CVE) during hospitalization for ACS is not well established. Objective To evaluate the association between physical activity level, assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), with in-hospital prognosis in patients with ACS. Methods Observational, cross-sectional, and analytical study with 215 subjects with a diagnosis of ACS consecutively admitted to a referral hospital for cardiac patients between July 2009 and February 2011. All volunteers answered the short version of the IPAQ and were observed for the occurrence of CVE during hospitalization with a standardized assessment conducted by the researcher and corroborated by data from medical records. Results The patients were admitted with diagnoses of unstable angina (34.4%), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without ST elevation (41.4%), and AMI with ST elevation (24.2%). According to the level of physical activity, the patients were classified as non-active (56.3%) and active (43.7%). A CVE occurred in 35.3% of the cohort. The occurrence of in-hospital complications was associated with the length of hospital stay (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15) and physical inactivity (OR = 2.54), and was independent of age, systolic blood pressure, and prior congestive heart failure. Conclusion A physically active lifestyle reduces the risk of CVE during hospitalization in patients with ACS. PMID:26690692

  18. The choice of alternatives to acute hospitalization: a descriptive study from Hallingdal, Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hallingdal is a rural region in southern Norway. General practitioners (GPs) refer acutely somatically ill patients to any of three levels of care: municipal nursing homes, the regional community hospital or the local general hospital. The objective of this paper is to describe the patterns of referrals to the three different somatic emergency service levels in Hallingdal and to elucidate possible explanations for the differences in referrals. Methods Quantitative methods were used to analyse local patient statistics and qualitative methods including focus group interviews were used to explore differences in referral rates between GPs. The acute somatic admissions from the six municipalities of Hallingdal were analysed for the two-year period 2010–11 (n = 1777). A focus group interview was held with the chief municipal medical officers of the six municipalities. The main outcome measure was the numbers of admissions to the three different levels of acute care in 2010–11. Reflections of the focus group members about the differences in admission patterns were also analysed. Results Acute admissions at a level lower than the local general hospital ranged from 9% to 29% between the municipalities. Foremost among the local factors affecting the individual doctor’s admission practice were the geographical distance to the different places of care and the GP’s working experience in the local community. Conclusion The experience from Hallingdal demonstrates that GPs use available alternatives to hospitalization but to varying degrees. This can be explained by socio-demographic factors and factors related to the medical reasons for admission. However, there are also important local factors related to the individual GP and the structural preparedness for alternatives in the community. PMID:23800090

  19. Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Jusela, Cheryl; Struble, Laura; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Redman, Richard W; Ziemba, Rosemary A

    2017-03-01

    . 2. Describe the significance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of quality health care. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the author have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The purpose of the current project was to (a) examine the type of information accompanying patients on transfer from acute care to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), (b) discuss how these findings meet existing standards, and (c) make recommendations to improve transfer of essential information. The study was a retrospective convenience sample chart audit in one SNF. All patients admitted from an acute care hospital to the SNF were examined. The audit checklist was developed based on recommendations by local and national standards. One hundred fifty-five charts were reviewed. Transferring of physician contact information was missing in 65% of charts. The following information was also missing from charts: medication lists (1%), steroid tapering instructions (42%), antiarrhythmic instructions (38%), duration/indication of anticoagulant medications (25%), and antibiotic medications (22%). Findings support the need for improved transitional care models and better communication of information between care settings. Recommendations include designating accountability and chart audits comparing timeliness, completeness, and accuracy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(3), 19-28.].

  20. Mobile Phones as a Potential Vehicle of Infection in a Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Chao Foong, Yi; Green, Mark; Zargari, Ahmad; Siddique, Romana; Tan, Vanessa; Brain, Terry; Ogden, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the potential role of mobile phones as a reservoir for bacterial colonization and the risk factors for bacterial colonization in a hospital setting. We screened 226 staff members at a regional Australian hospital (146 doctors and 80 medical students) between January 2013 and March 2014. The main outcomes of interest were the types of microorganisms and the amount of contamination of the mobile phones. This study found a high level of bacterial contamination (n = 168/226, 74%) on the mobile phones of staff members in a tertiary hospital, with similar organisms isolated from the staff member's dominant hand and mobile phones. While most of the isolated organisms were normal skin flora, a small percentage were potentially pathogenic (n = 12/226, 5%). Being a junior medical staff was found to be a risk factor for heavy microbial growth (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.54, 10.37). Only 31% (70/226) of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely, and only 21% (47/226) reported using alcohol containing wipes on their phones. This study demonstrates that mobile phones are potentially vehicles for pathogenic bacteria in a hospital setting. Only a minority of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely. Disinfection guidelines utilizing alcohol wipes should be developed and implemented.

  1. Do acute myocardial infarction and stroke mortality vary by distance to hospitals in Switzerland? Results from the Swiss National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zwahlen, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Switzerland has mountains and valleys complicating the access to a hospital and critical care in case of emergencies. Treatment success for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or stroke depends on timely treatment. We examined the relationship between distance to different hospital types and mortality from AMI or stroke in the Swiss National Cohort (SNC) Study. Design and setting The SNC is a longitudinal mortality study of the census 2000 population of Switzerland. For 4.5 million Swiss residents not living in a nursing home and older than 30 years in the year 2000, we calculated driving time and straight-line distance from their home to the nearest acute, acute with emergency room, central and university hospital (in total 173 hospitals). On the basis of quintiles, we used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models to estimate HRs of AMI and stroke mortality for driving time distance groups compared to the closest distance group. Results Over 8 years, 19 301 AMI and 21 931 stroke deaths occurred. Mean driving time to the nearest acute hospital was 6.5 min (29.7 min to a university hospital). For AMI mortality, driving time to a university hospital showed the strongest association among the four types of hospitals with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.19 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.30) and 1.10 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.20) for men and women aged 65+ years when comparing the highest quintile with the lowest quintile of driving time. For stroke mortality, the association with university hospital driving time was less pronounced than for AMI mortality and did not show a clear incremental pattern with increasing driving time. There was no association with driving time to the nearest hospital. Conclusions The increasing AMI mortality with increasing driving time to the nearest university hospital but not to any nearest hospital reflects a complex interplay of many factors along the care pathway. PMID:27803109

  2. Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Hospital Setting Using Silicone Foam Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Grigson, Eileen; Patel, Maulik; Liu, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    Patient care is of the utmost importance in the hospital setting. Bedrest and immobility during hospitalization, especially in the surgical and intensive care setting, place the patient at high risk for pressure ulcers. It is very important to prevent or notice a pressure ulcer forming due to the significant health care costs involved and patient health associated with them. Various measures are in place to prevent patients from getting pressure ulcers, but a newer material, silicone foam dressings, has been introduced as an alternative solution for the prevention of these ulcers. We review the current literature to examine whether the standard protocol or silicone material is superior to the prevention of pressure ulcer formation. We conclude that silicone foam dressings, when used as prophylactic treatment, seems very promising and may even be superior to the standard care of prevention. However, there were limitations to some studies and further research is needed to confirm the role of silicone foam dressings. PMID:27630803

  3. Improving the reporting of adverse drug reactions in the hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Richard; Frassetto, Lynda; Tsourounis, Candy; Segal, Eleanor S; Kim, Stephanie

    2010-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is perceived by the public as having a substantial responsibility to ensure drug safety; however, the FDA has limited resources for active surveillance and relies on voluntary reporting of adverse events and potential adverse drug reactions. Studies have shown that underreporting of adverse events and adverse drug reactions is widespread. Furthermore, a review of several studies demonstrates that most adverse drug reactions are reported by pharmacists and nurses, with physicians reporting the fewest. The hospital setting, with its clearly defined patient population observed around the clock, is an ideal setting in which to identify potential adverse drug reaction signals and to report them to either the drug manufacturer or the FDA. In this article we describe the present system for addressing adverse events, obstacles to reporting them, and the important role any hospital physician could play in reporting adverse events and potential adverse drug reactions.

  4. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  5. A Physician's Practice Profile: Application for a Teaching Hospital Ambulatory Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Retchin, Sheldon M.; Blish, Christine S.

    1984-01-01

    A computer generated report (Practice Profile) summarizing epidemiologic, demographic and utilization data from a general internal medicine practice, was developed and implemented in a teaching hospital setting. Using a computerized medical record system, the Profile displays individual and group practice data. It is used for enhancing the physicians' understanding of their ambulatory practices and for raising important quality assurance issues. The Practice Profile is also used for improving educational activities in the residency program and for stimulating research opportunities within the practice.

  6. Evaluating a moving target: Using Practical Participatory Evaluation (P-PE) in hospital settings

    PubMed Central

    Wharton, Tracy; Alexander, Neil

    2014-01-01

    This article describes lessons learned about implementing evaluations in hospital settings. In order to overcome the methodological dilemmas inherent in this environment, we used a practical participatory evaluation strategy to engage as many stakeholders as possible in the process of evaluating a clinical demonstration project. Demonstration projects, in this context, push the envelope about what is known about effectiveness in novel settings, and turnover of staff and patient populations can present challenges to gathering optimal data. By using P-PE, we built capacity in the environment while expanding possibilities for data collection. Suggestions are made based on our experience. PMID:24860251

  7. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  8. Plasma glucose, lactate, sodium, and potassium levels in children hospitalized with acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Tõnisson, Mailis; Tillmann, Vallo; Kuudeberg, Anne; Väli, Marika

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our research was to study prevalence of changes in plasma levels of lactate, potassium, glucose, and sodium in relation to alcohol concentration in children hospitalized with acute alcohol intoxication (AAI). Data from 194 under 18-year-old children hospitalized to the two only children's hospital in Estonia over a 2-year period were analyzed. The pediatrician on call filled in a special form on the clinical symptoms of AAI; a blood sample was drawn for biochemical tests, and a urine sample taken to exclude narcotic intoxication. The most common finding was hyperlactinemia occurring in 66% of the patients (n=128) followed by hypokalemia (<3.5 mmol/L) in 50% (n=97), and glucose above of reference value (>6.1 mmol/L) in 40.2% of the children (n=78). Hypernatremia was present in five children. In conclusion, hyperlactinemia, hypokalemia, and glucose levels above of reference value are common biochemical findings in children hospitalized with acute AAI.

  9. Acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after percutaneous coronary interventions Eptifibatide versus Abciximab

    SciTech Connect

    Ajani, Andrew E.; Waksman, Ron; Gruberg, Luis; Sharma, Arvind K.; Lew, Robert; Pinnow, Ellen; Canos, Daniel A.; Cheneau, Edouard; Castagna, Marco; Satler, Lowell; Pichard, Augusto; Kent, Kenneth M

    2003-03-01

    Background: Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists reduce peri-angioplasty ischemic complications and improve in-hospital outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Prior studies have demonstrated favorable results with both eptifibatide and abciximab. The purpose of this study was to assess whether there are any differences in rates of acute procedural complications and in-hospital events with the use of these two agents. Methods: A retrospective review of 359 elective PCIs from June 1998 to August 2000 identified 152 PCIs treated with eptifibatide (bolus 180 {mu}g/kg, infusion 2 {mu}g/kg/min for 12-48 h) and 205 PCIs treated with abciximab (bolus 0.25 mg/kg, infusion 10 {mu}g/min for 12 h). All patients received IIb/IIIa antagonists at the initiation of the intervention. Results: The clinical demographics, the angiographic morphology, the indications, and the procedural details were similar in both groups. In the eptifibatide group, the maximum ACT was lower (235{+-}45 vs. 253{+-}40, P<.0001). The incidence of major procedural and in-hospital events was compared. Eptifibatide and abciximab had similar rates of major complications (death or myocardial infarction) (1.4% vs. 2.9%), repeat PTCA (3.4% vs. 1.9%), and major bleeding (3.3% vs. 4.3%). Conclusions: Eptifibatide is comparable to abciximab in regards to acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after PCI.

  10. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  11. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  12. The Study of the Optimal Parameter Settings in a Hospital Supply Chain System in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hung-Chang; Chen, Meng-Hao; Wang, Ya-huei

    2014-01-01

    This study proposed the optimal parameter settings for the hospital supply chain system (HSCS) when either the total system cost (TSC) or patient safety level (PSL) (or both simultaneously) was considered as the measure of the HSCS's performance. Four parameters were considered in the HSCS: safety stock, maximum inventory level, transportation capacity, and the reliability of the HSCS. A full-factor experimental design was used to simulate an HSCS for the purpose of collecting data. The response surface method (RSM) was used to construct the regression model, and a genetic algorithm (GA) was applied to obtain the optimal parameter settings for the HSCS. The results show that the best method of obtaining the optimal parameter settings for the HSCS is the simultaneous consideration of both the TSC and the PSL to measure performance. Also, the results of sensitivity analysis based on the optimal parameter settings were used to derive adjustable strategies for the decision-makers. PMID:25250397

  13. The Conscientious Practice Policy: a futility policy for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2005-08-01

    Much attention has been paid in recent years to the conflict that may occur when patients or their families insist on a therapy that the physician feels would be futile. In 1999 the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association recommended that all health-care institutions adopt a policy on medical futility that follows a fair process. Development of such a policy has proved problematic for many hospitals. The Conscientious Practice Policy at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital was developed as a response to the AMA recommendation. It outlines a specific process to be followed in the event that a physician wishes to refuse to provide a requested therapy, whether that refusal is based on perceived futility or other concerns. The policy was subsequently modified slightly and adopted by two other Connecticut acute care hospitals.

  14. Acute traumatic coagulopathy among major trauma patients in an urban tertiary hospital in sub Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mortality from trauma remains a major public health issue as it is the leading cause of death in persons aged 5 to 44 years .Uncontrolled hemorrhage and coagulopathy is responsible for over 50% of all trauma related deaths within the first 48hrs of admission. Coagulation profiles are not routinely done among trauma patients in resource limited settings and there is a paucity of data on acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in sub Saharan Africa. The study was conducted to evaluate the prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time (PT/PTT) as predictors of mortality and morbidity among major trauma patients. Methods A prospective cohort study was carried out, in which major trauma patients admitted in A&E department between December 2011 to April 2012 were recruited. Five (5) mls of venous blood was drawn from a convenient vein within 10 minutes of the patient’s arrival at A&E for analysis of PT/PTT. Patients were stratified into two groups by the presence/absence of coagulopathy then followed up for a 2 week period for morbidity and mortality. Results A total of 182 major trauma patients were recruited; 149 (81.9%) were males, the mean age was 29.5 years (SD 9.8). Prevalence of coagulopathy was 54% (98/182). The mean ISS for the ATC group was 36.9 and the non ATC group was 26.9 (p=0.001). Patients with ATC stayed longer in hospital 11.24 days than non ATC patients 8 days (p=0.001). ATC was strongly associated with ARI (p= 0.003). Mortality was more in the ATC group 29 deaths compared to 9 deaths in the non ATC group. PTT was a strong independent predictor of mortality. Conclusion A significant proportion of major trauma patients were coagulopathic. Initial coagulation profile is useful in predicting outcomes for major trauma patients. PMID:23150904

  15. Invited Commentary on Wallace and Beange (2008): "On the Need for a Specialist Service within the Generic Hospital Setting"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, David

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on the paper "On the need for a specialist service within the generic hospital setting" (Wallace & Beange, 2008), which raises critical issues regarding effective models of healthcare delivery for individuals with intellectual disability (ID), particularly within a hospital setting (but not…

  16. Delay to reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction presenting to acute care hospitals: an international perspective

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Frederick A.; Montalescot, Gilles; Fox, Keith A.A.; Goodman, Shaun G.; Granger, Christopher B.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Oliveira, Gustavo B.F.; Anderson, Frederick A.; Eagle, Kim A.; Fitzgerald, Gordon; Gore, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To examine the extent of delay from initial hospital presentation to fibrinolytic therapy or primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), characteristics associated with prolonged delay, and changes in delay patterns over time in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and results We analysed data from 5170 patients with STEMI enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events from 2003 to 2007. The median elapsed time from first hospital presentation to initiation of fibrinolysis was 30 min (interquartile range 18–60) and to primary PCI was 86 min (interquartile range 53–135). Over the years under study, there were no significant changes in delay times to treatment with either strategy. Geographic region was the strongest predictor of delay to initiation of fibrinolysis >30 min. Patient's transfer status and geographic location were strongly associated with delay to primary PCI. Patients treated in Europe were least likely to experience delay to fibrinolysis or primary PCI. Conclusion These data suggest no improvements in delay times from hospital presentation to initiation of fibrinolysis or primary PCI during our study period. Geographic location and patient transfer were the strongest predictors of prolonged delay time, suggesting that improvements in modifiable healthcare system factors can shorten delay to reperfusion therapy even further. PMID:20231154

  17. Aetiological characteristics of adult acute diarrhoea in a general hospital of Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Ni, B; Wang, Y; Shen, X; Zhang, C; Liu, J; Li, S

    2017-02-01

    Epidemic surveillance is an effective means to determine the characteristics of acute diarrhoea and the benefits of disease control and prevention. The epidemiological, clinical, and aetiological data of adult (aged ⩾15 years) acute diarrhoea in a general hospital in Shanghai were collected and analysed. Out of 2430 acute diarrhoea patients, 162 subjects were sampled (sample ratio 15:1). The sampled subjects had an average age (±s.d.) of 44 ± 18 years; 142 (87·7%) had a history that indicated ingestion of contaminated food; and 40 (24·7%), 54 (33·3%), and 73 (45·1%) patients had diarrhoea that was attributed to viral, bacterial, and unknown aetiological origins respectively. Viral diarrhoea is mainly prevalent during the winter and spring months, while bacterial and diarrhoea of unknown aetiology occur mainly in the summer months. The average age of the unknown aetiology group (48 ± 19 years) was significantly older than that of the viral diarrhoea group (39 ± 16 years). The number of patients with vomiting in the viral group (30·6%) was significantly higher than that in the bacterial (17·1%) and unknown aetiology (8·2%) groups. Viral and bacterial infections are the main cause of acute diarrhoea in Shanghai. However, further effective technological means are needed to improve the surveillance, control, and prevention of acute diarrhoea.

  18. [Characteristics of acute renal failure in elderly patients admitted to a small town hospital].

    PubMed

    Lou, L M; Boned, B; Gimeno, J A; Beguer, P; Cruz, A; Telmo, S; Lou, M T; Gómez Sánchez, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the features of acute renal failure (ARF) in elderly patients treated in a hospital, without an intensive care unit, to identify etiological factors and establish adequate preventive measures and treatment. During twelve consecutive months we studied prospectively 99 patients with ARF diagnosed by conventional criteria, an incidence of 1,238 cases per million per year. ARF affected 1.78% of patients admitted to hospital. We analyzed age, sex, serum creatinine, diuresis, etiology, type of ARF, preexisting chronic diseases, treatment, complications and outcome. Preexisting chronic diseases were common, the most frequent being hypertension (54%) and diabetes (39%). Previous treatments for cardiovascular diseases were frequent (angiotensin-renin system blockade 35.4%, diuretics 50.5%). 79% of ARF arose in hospital, 21% outside hospital. ARF was pre-renal in 60%, renal in 31% and post-renal in 9%. 34.7% were caused by volume depletion, 23.4% by low cardiac output and 23.4% by infection. 44.4% of ARF patients had oliguria or anuria latrogenic factors contributed to the ethiology of ARF in 35.3% of patients. Hospital stay was doubled by ARF the presence of ARF and the mortality was 36.4%. The rate was higher in ARF arising in hospital than in ARF acquired before admission. Factors that had a significant influence on the mortality rate were comorbid conditions, oliguroanuria, ARF of renal origin and serum albumin. We conclude that ARF has a high incidence, morbidity and mortality in this elderly population. Volume depletion, associated cardiovascular pathology and pharmacological treatment are important etiological factors in those with ARF outside hospital. Adequate treatment of ARF and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications are necessary in hospital.

  19. Curriculum on Resident Education in Care of Older Adults in Acute, Transitional and Extended Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Chandrika; Bensadon, Benjamin A.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Cooney, Leo M.

    2016-01-01

    Most geriatric care is provided in non-hospital settings. Internal Medicine and Family Medicine residents should therefore learn about these different clinical sites and acuity levels of care. To help facilitate this learning, a geriatrics training curriculum for internal medicine residents was developed that focused on cognition, function, goals…

  20. Management of acute coronary occlusion during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: experience of complications in a hospital without on site facilities for cardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, S G; Morton, P; Murtagh, J G; O'Keeffe, D B; Murphy, P; Scott, M E

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty may be safely performed in cardiology centres in the United Kingdom without immediate on site cardiac surgical cover for complications arising at angioplasty. DESIGN--Retrospective review of coronary angioplasties and complications in a hospital without on site cardiac surgical cover. SETTING--All angioplasties were performed in the catheterisation laboratory of the Belfast City Hospital. Revascularisation surgery for complicated coronary angioplasty was performed in the cardiac surgical unit of the Royal Victoria Hospital, 2.4 km away from the catheterisation laboratory. PATIENTS--540 Coronary angioplasties were performed on 512 patients between late 1982 and November 1988. Indications included stable angina, unstable rest angina, and suitable coronary disease at coronary arteriography after myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--In hospital mortality after complicated coronary angioplasty and delay to surgical revascularisation after acute coronary occlusion at angioplasty. RESULTS--Coronary angioplasty was successful in 444 cases (82%). Acute coronary occlusion occurred in 35 cases (6.5%). Twelve patients required urgent revascularisation surgery and were transferred safely to the surgical unit; none of these patients died. A mean delay of 268 minutes (range 180-390 minutes) occurred before revascularisation compared with 273 minutes (range 108-420 minutes) in the Royal Victoria Hospital, where on site surgical cover was available. The principal cause of delay was the wait for a cardiac operating theatre to become available and not the transfer time between hospitals. Five deaths occurred after coronary angioplasty, a mortality of 0.9%. Three deaths were related to acute coronary occlusion. The absence of immediate surgical help did not influence the outcome in any patient. CONCLUSION--With careful selection of patients coronary angioplasty may be safely performed in a hospital

  1. On Arrival High Blood Glucose Level is Associated With Detrimental and Fatal Hospitalization Outcomes for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartopo, Anggoro B.; Setianto, Budi Y.; Gharini, Putrika P.R.; Dinarti, Lucia K.

    2011-01-01

    Background High blood glucose level is frequently encountered in acute coronary syndrome. We investigated the effects of high blood glucose measured on arrival on hospitalization adverse events in acute coronary syndrome. Our study patients were Javanese in ethnicity, which constitute half of population in Indonesia. We hypothesized that elevated blood glucose has detrimental effects on hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome. Methods We designed an observasional cohort study and recruited 148 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome. Venous blood was collected on hospital arrival. High blood glucose level was determined as plasma glucose > 140 mg/dL. Adverse hospitalization events were recorded, i.e. mortality, acute heart failure, cardiogenic shock and heart rhythm disorders. Echocardiography examination was performed to determine left ventricular function. Results The prevalence of on arrival high blood glucose among Javanese patients with acute coronary syndrome was considerably high (36%). On arrival high blood glucose was associated with acute heart failure (P < 0.001) and shock cardiogenic (P = 0.02). Heart rhythm disorders were higher in high blood glucose patients (P = 0.004). Left ventricular dysfunction was more prevalent in high blood glucose patients (P = 0.001) and ejection fraction was lower (P = 0.001). On arrival high blood glucose was independently associated with hospitalization adverse events (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.9, P = 0.03) and hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 6.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-38.6, P = 0.03). Conclusions Our study suggests that on arrival high blood glucose among Javanese patients with acute coronary syndrome is considerably high and is associated with detrimental and fatal hospitalization outcomes.

  2. Effects of reduction of acute hospital services on district nursing services: implications for quality assurance.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, L D; Addington-Hall, J M; Hennessy, D A; Gould, T R

    1991-01-01

    Two questions of importance to those concerned with maintaining standards and increasing the efficiency of Community Nursing are: (1) does reducing hospital provision alter the number of patients referred for Community Nursing or the type of care provided; (2) are Community Nursing Services directed towards those who most require them? A base-line study was carried out in the first quarter of 1988, before the closure of one of two general hospitals in an inner London Health Authority and was replicated in the same quarter of 1989, after all acute inpatient services had been transferred to the other hospital. Comparison of patients discharged before and after closure showed no significant differences in patients' age, sex, proportion living alone, length of stay in hospital, readmissions or deaths within one month of discharge. There was some decline in general nursing care. Total discharges declined by 20% while the number of referrals remained the same, indicating that proportionately more patients were discharged with a referral. Comparing referred and unreferred patients showed that Community Nursing Services were already being directed towards those most in need both before and after hospital closure. Results suggest that Community Nursing helps to maintain patients in the community.

  3. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  4. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Edwine W; Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), a review of documents, and non-participant observations within the hospitals over a 7 month period. We applied an evaluative framework that considers both consequentialist and proceduralist conditions as important to the quality of priority-setting processes. The budgeting and planning process in the case study hospitals was characterized by lack of alignment, inadequate role clarity and the use of informal priority-setting criteria. With regard to consequentialist conditions, the hospitals incorporated economic criteria by considering the affordability of alternatives, but rarely considered the equity of allocative decisions. In the first hospital, stakeholders were aware of - and somewhat satisfied with - the budgeting and planning process, while in the second hospital they were not. Decision making in both hospitals did not result in reallocation of resources. With regard to proceduralist conditions, the budgeting and planning process in the first hospital was more inclusive and transparent, with the stakeholders more empowered compared to the second hospital. In both hospitals, decisions were not based on evidence, implementation of decisions was poor and the community was not included. There were no mechanisms for appeals or to ensure that the proceduralist conditions were met in both hospitals. Public hospitals in Kenya could improve their budgeting and planning processes by harmonizing these processes, improving role clarity, using explicit priority-setting criteria, and by incorporating both consequentialist (efficiency, equity, stakeholder satisfaction and understanding, shifted priorities

  5. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Barasa, Edwine W.; Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), a review of documents, and non-participant observations within the hospitals over a 7 month period. We applied an evaluative framework that considers both consequentialist and proceduralist conditions as important to the quality of priority-setting processes. The budgeting and planning process in the case study hospitals was characterized by lack of alignment, inadequate role clarity and the use of informal priority-setting criteria. With regard to consequentialist conditions, the hospitals incorporated economic criteria by considering the affordability of alternatives, but rarely considered the equity of allocative decisions. In the first hospital, stakeholders were aware of - and somewhat satisfied with - the budgeting and planning process, while in the second hospital they were not. Decision making in both hospitals did not result in reallocation of resources. With regard to proceduralist conditions, the budgeting and planning process in the first hospital was more inclusive and transparent, with the stakeholders more empowered compared to the second hospital. In both hospitals, decisions were not based on evidence, implementation of decisions was poor and the community was not included. There were no mechanisms for appeals or to ensure that the proceduralist conditions were met in both hospitals. Public hospitals in Kenya could improve their budgeting and planning processes by harmonizing these processes, improving role clarity, using explicit priority-setting criteria, and by incorporating both consequentialist (efficiency, equity, stakeholder satisfaction and understanding, shifted priorities, implementation

  6. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  7. Acute pain management services: a comparison between Air Force and U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rayos, C L; McDonough, J P

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess the prevalence of acute pain management services (APMS) in Air Force medical facilities. There are no published reports on the current status of Air Force pain programs. This study used a telephone survey to all facilities worldwide that house an anesthesia department. Anesthesia providers in charge of pain services or department chiefs were interviewed from December 1996 to May 1997. Respondents were asked questions related to the initiation of a formal APMS, components, and familiarity with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines on pain management. Data analysis described current practices and used chi 2 analysis to compare results with a national study of U.S. hospitals. Air Force anesthesia departments (45%) had established as many acute pain services as U.S. hospitals (42%). Formal pain programs are becoming more prevalent in Air Force hospitals. These findings suggest an increased awareness of the need for pain management and future establishment of pain programs.

  8. Intranet usage and potential in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring Intranet and its potential in health care. The survey measured the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. Business-to-business electronic commerce and electronic commerce for customers were measured. Since the Intranet was not studied in survey-1997, no comparisons could be made. Therefore the results were presented and discussed. The Intranet data were compared with the Internet data and statistically significant differences were presented and analyzed. This information will assist hospitals to plan Internet and Intranet technology. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the Survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.(1) The first article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2) The second article based upon the survey results discusses distribution of Internet usage and rating of Internet usage applied to specific applications. Homepages, advertising, and electronic commerce are discussed from an Internet perspective.

  9. Patients with acute chest pain - experiences of emergency calls and pre-hospital care.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Kihlgren, Mona; Ostman, Ingela; Sørlie, Venke

    2005-01-01

    Acute chest pain is a common reason why people call an emergency medical dispatch (EMD) centre. We examined how patients with acute chest pain experience the emergency call and their pre-hospital care. A qualitative design was used with a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Thirteen patients were interviewed, three women and 10 men. The patients were grateful that their lives had been saved and in general were satisfied with their pre-hospital contact. Sometimes they felt that it took too long for the emergency operators to answer and to understand the urgency. They were in a life-threatening situation and their feeling of vulnerability and dependency was great. Time seemed to stand still while they were waiting for help during their traumatic experience. The situation was fraught with pain, fear and an experience of loneliness. A sense of individualized care is important to strengthen trust and confidence between the patient and the pre-hospital personnel. Patients were aware of what number to call to reach the EMD centre, but were uncertain about when to call. More lives can be saved if people do not hesitate to call for help.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  11. The Frequency and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury in a Tertiary Hospital: Which Factors Affect Mortality?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Arı, Derya; Ozkan, Gulsum; Cansız, Muammer; Kaynar, Kubra

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. Incidence and mortality rates vary from country to country, and according to different in-hospital monitoring units and definitions of AKI. The aim of this study was to determine factors affecting frequency of AKI and mortality in our hospital. We retrospectively evaluated data for 1550 patients diagnosed with AKI and 788 patients meeting the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline AKI criteria out of a total of 174 852 patients hospitalized in our institution between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Staging was performed based on KDIGO Clinical Practice for Acute Kidney Injury and RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function and End-stage renal failure). Demographic and biochemical data were recorded and correlations with mortality were assessed. The frequency of AKI in our hospital was 0.9%, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 34.6%. At multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.87-0.92; P < 0.001), monitoring in the intensive care unit (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09-0.38; P < 0.001), urine output (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.03-7.89; P < 0.001), duration of oliguria (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.69; P < 0.001), length of hospitalization (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79-0.88; P < 0.001), dialysis requirement (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.12-4.71; P < 0.05), APACHE II score (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.24; P < 0.001), and albumin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.50; P < 0.001) were identified as independent determinants affecting mortality. Frequency of AKI and associated mortality rates in our regional reference hospital were compatible with those in the literature. This study shows that KDIGO criteria are more sensitive in determining AKI. Mortality was not correlated with staging based on RIFLE or KDIGO. Nonetheless, our identification of urine output as one of the independent determinants of mortality suggests that this

  12. Prevalence of Echocardiography Use in Patients Hospitalized with Confirmed Acute Pulmonary Embolism: A Real-World Observational Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Bing, Rong; Chow, Vincent; Lau, Jerrett K.; Thomas, Liza; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) carries an increased risk of death. Using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to assist diagnosis and risk stratification is recommended in current guidelines. However, its utilization in real-world clinical practice is unknown. We conducted a retrospective observational study to delineate the prevalence of inpatient TTE use following confirmed acute PE, identify predictors for its use and its impact on patient’s outcome. Methods Clinical details of consecutive patients (2000 to 2012) from two tertiary-referral hospitals were retrieved from dedicated PE databases. All-cause and cause-specific mortality was tracked from a state-wide death registry. Results In total, 2306 patients were admitted with confirmed PE, of whom 687 (29.8%) had inpatient TTE (39.3% vs 14.4% between sites, P<0.001). Site to which patient presented, older age, cardiac failure, atrial fibrillation and diabetes were independent predictors for inpatient TTE use, while malignancy was a negative predictor. Overall mortality was 41.4% (mean follow-up 66.5±49.5months). Though inpatient TTE use was not an independent predictor for all-cause or cardiovascular mortality in multivariable analysis, in the inpatient TTE subgroup, right ventricle-right atrial pressure gradient (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02 per-1mmHg increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.03) and moderate/severe aortic stenosis (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.20–4.27) independently predicted all-cause mortality. Conclusions Inpatient TTE is used infrequently in real-world clinical settings following acute PE despite its usefulness in risk stratification, prognostication and assessing comorbid cardiac pathologies. Identifying patients that will benefit most from a TTE assessment following an acute PE episode and reducing barriers in accessing TTE should be explored. PMID:27977781

  13. Management of children with acute malnutrition in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kenneth H; Nyirandutiye, Daniele H; Jungjohann, Svenja

    2009-11-01

    Approximately 11% of children worldwide suffer from moderate or severe acute malnutrition, which is defined as low weight for height or mid-upper arm circumference with respect to international standards, or the presence of bipedal edema. These children have a considerably increased risk of dying. Experience from the past two decades indicates that children with uncomplicated moderate or severe acute malnutrition can be managed successfully as outpatients, by use of appropriate treatment of infections and either lipid-based, ready-to-use therapeutic foods or appropriately formulated home diets, along with psychosocial care. Children's caregivers prefer community-based treatment, which is also less costly than inpatient care. Children with severe acute malnutrition and life-threatening complications require short-term inpatient care for treatment of infections, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and metabolic abnormalities. Initial dietary management relies on low-lactose, milk-based, liquid formulas but semi-solid or solid foods can be started as soon as appetite permits, after which children can be referred for ambulatory treatment. National programs for the community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) provide periodic anthropometric and clinical screening of young children, and referral of those who meet established criteria. This Review describes the main components of the treatment of young children with acute malnutrition in resource poor settings and some recent advances in CMAM programs.

  14. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  15. Setting up robotic surgery in gynaecology: the experience of the Strasbourg teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Sananès, N; Garbin, O; Hummel, M; Youssef, C; Vizitiu, R; Lemaho, D; Rottenberg, D; Diemunsch, P; Wattiez, A

    2011-06-01

    Teleoperated surgical robots could provide a genuine breakthrough in laparoscopy and it is for this reason that the development of robot-assisted laparoscopy is one of the priorities of the Strasbourg University Hospitals' strategic plan. The hospitals purchased a da Vinci S(®) robot in June 2006 and Strasbourg has, in IRCAD, one of the few robotic surgery training centres in the world. Our experience has, however, revealed the difficulties involved in setting up robotic surgery, the first of which are organizational issues. This prospective work was carried out between December 2007 and September 2008, primarily to examine the possibility of setting up robotic surgery on a regular basis for gynaecological surgical procedures at the Strasbourg University Hospitals. We maintained a "logbook" in which we prospectively noted all the resources implemented in setting up the robotic surgery service. The project was divided into two phases: the preparatory phase up until the first hysterectomy and then the second phase with the organization of subsequent hysterectomies. The first surgical procedure took 5 months to organize, and followed 25 interviews, 10 meetings, 53 telephone conversations and 48 e-mails with a total of 40 correspondents. The project was presented to seven separate groups, including the hospital medical commission, the gynaecology unit committee and the surgical staff. Fifteen members of the medical and paramedical team attended a two-day training course. Preparing the gynaecology department for robotic surgery required freeing up 8.5 days of "physician time" and 12.5 days of "nurse time". In the following five months, we performed five hysterectomies. Preparation for each procedure involved on average 5 interviews, 19 telephone conversations and 11 e-mails. The biggest obstacle was obtaining an operating slot, as on average it required 18 days, four telephone calls and four e-mails to be assigned a slot in the operating theatre schedule, which is

  16. Building a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donnelle; Matzel, Stephen Chavez

    2013-01-01

    A transdisciplinary team is an essential component of palliative and end-of-life care. This article will demonstrate how to develop a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care, incorporating nursing, social work, spiritual care, and pharmacy in an acute care setting. Objectives included: identifying transdisciplinary roles contributing to care in the acute care setting; defining the palliative care model and mission; identifying patient/family and institutional needs; and developing palliative care tools. Methods included a needs assessment and the development of assessment tools, an education program, community resources, and a patient satisfaction survey. After 1 year of implementation, the transdisciplinary palliative care team consisted of seven palliative care physicians, two social workers, two chaplains, a pharmacist, and End-of-Life Nursing Consortium (ELNEC) trained nurses. Palomar Health now has a palliative care service with a consistent process for transdisciplinary communication and intervention for adult critical care patients with advanced, chronic illness.

  17. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation.

  18. Exploring Differences in Patient-Centered Practices among Healthcare Professionals in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Sidani, Souraya; Reeves, Scott; Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; van Soeren, Mary; Fox, Mary; Collins, Laura

    2017-04-12

    There is limited evidence of the extent to which Healthcare professionals implement patient-centered care (PCC) and of the factors influencing their PCC practices in acute care organizations. This study aimed to (1) examine the practices reported by health professionals (physicians, nurses, social workers, other healthcare providers) in relation to three PCC components (holistic, collaborative, and responsive care), and (2) explore the association of professionals' characteristics (gender, work experience) and a contextual factor (caseload), with the professionals' PCC practices. Data were obtained from a large scale cross-sectional study, conducted in 18 hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Consenting professionals (n = 382) completed a self-report instrument assessing the three PCC components and responded to standard questions inquiring about their characteristics and workload. Small differences were found in the PCC practices across professional groups: (1) physicians reported higher levels of enacting the holistic care component; (2) physicians, other healthcare providers, and social workers reported implementing higher levels of the collaborative care component; and (3) physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers reported higher levels of providing responsive care. Caseload influenced holistic care practices. Interprofessional education and training strategies are needed to clarify and address professional differences in valuing and practicing PCC components. Clinical guidelines can be revised to enable professionals to engage patients in care-related decisions, customize patient care, and promote interprofessional collaboration in planning and implementing PCC. Additional research is warranted to determine the influence of professional, patient, and other contextual factors on professionals' PCC practices in acute care hospitals.

  19. A qualitative study of nursing care for hospitalized patients with acute mania.

    PubMed

    Daggenvoorde, Thea; Geerling, Bart; Goossens, Peter J J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with a bipolar disorder and currently experiencing acute mania often require hospitalization. We explored patient problems, desired patient outcomes, and nursing interventions by individually interviewing 22 nurses. Qualitative content analysis gave a top five of patients problems, desired patient outcomes and nursing interventions, identified as most important in the interviews. We then conducted three focus group meetings to gain greater insight into these results. Intensive nursing care is needed, fine-tuning on the patient as a unique person is essential, taking into account the nature and severity of the manic symptoms of the patient.

  20. Management of medical technology: case study of a major acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian; Smale, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results of a Capital Equipment Management Plan undertaken at a major acute hospital in Australia. By classifying existing equipment using a threshold replacement value into Major and Minor items, detailed planning information was collected for 527 items of Major equipment representing 80% of the hospital's total equipment stock. A number of meaningful views of this significant asset base are presented, and a prioritisation method used to provide recommendations for future equipment replacement and acquisition for a 5 year planning period. The survey work to identify and document actual equipment items provides a convincing argument for the funding levels required for capital equipment replacement and acquisition, and evidence for the extent of technology reliance in modern health care facilities.

  1. The role of rhinovirus in children hospitalized for acute respiratory disease, Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Juan Manuel; Molina, Fabiana; Díaz, Rocío; Bonet, Virginia; Ortellao, Lucila; Cantarutti, Diego; Gómez, Alejandra; Pierini, Judith; Cociglio, Raquel; Kusznierz, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were historically considered upper airway pathogens. However, they have recently been proven to cause infections in the lower respiratory tract, resulting in hospitalization of children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and chronic pulmonary obstruction. In this report, HRV frequency and seasonality are described together with patient clinical-epidemiological aspects. From a total of 452 surveyed samples, the HRV nucleic acids was detected in 172 (38.1%) and found in every month of the study year. 60% of inpatients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) associated with HRV were under 6 months of age and 31% had a clinical history, being preterm birth and recurrent wheezing the prevailing conditions. The most frequent discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (35.2%), bronchiolitis (32.4%), and bronchitis (12.4%). Fifteen point nine percent of patients required admission into intensive care units. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the association between HRV and children hospitalizations caused by ARI.

  2. Identification of cerebral perfusion using arterial spin labeling in patients with seizures in acute settings

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Roh-Eul; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kang, Koung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sun-Won; Han, Moon Hee

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the utility of arterial spin labeling perfusion-weighted imaging (ASL-PWI) in patients with suspected seizures in acute settings. A total of 164 patients who underwent ASL-PWI for suspected seizures in acute settings (with final diagnoses of seizure [n = 129], poststroke seizure [n = 18], and seizure mimickers [n = 17]), were included in this retrospective study. Perfusion abnormality was analyzed for: (1) pattern, (2) multifocality, and (3) atypical distribution against vascular territories. Perfusion abnormality was detected in 39% (50/129) of the seizure patients, most (94%, 47/50) being the hyperperfusion pattern. Of the patients with perfusion abnormality, multifocality or hemispheric involvement and atypical distribution against vascular territory were revealed in 46% (23/50) and 98% (49/50), respectively. In addition, seizures showed characteristic features including hyperperfusion (with or without non-territorial distribution) on ASL-PWI, thus differentiating them from poststroke seizures or seizure mimickers. In patients in whom seizure focus could be localized on both EEG and ASL-PWI, the concordance rate was 77%. The present study demonstrates that ASL-PWI can provide information regarding cerebral perfusion status in patients with seizures in acute settings and has the potential to be used as a non-invasive imaging tool to identify the cerebral perfusion in patients with seizures. PMID:28291816

  3. Prognostic indicators of adverse renal outcome and death in acute kidney injury hospital survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamzić-Mehmedbašić, Aida; Rašić, Senija; Balavac, Merima; Rebić, Damir; Delić-Šarac, Marina; Durak-Nalbantić, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding prognostic factors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in acute kidney injury (AKI) hospital survivors are scarce and controversial. Objectives: We aimed to identify predictors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in AKI hospital survivors. Patients and Methods: The study group consisted of 84 AKI hospital survivors admitted to the tertiary medical center during 2-year period. Baseline clinical parameters, with renal outcome 3 months after discharge and 6-month mortality were evaluated. According survival and renal function outcome, patients were divided into two groups. Results: Patients who did not recover renal function were statistically significantly older (P < 0.007) with higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (P < 0.000) and more likely to have anuria and oliguria (P = 0.008) compared to those with recovery. Deceased AKI patients were statistically significantly older (P < 0.000), with higher CCI score (P < 0.000), greater prevalence of sepsis (P =0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.017) and ferritin (P < 0.051) and lower concentrations of albumin (P<0.01) compared to survivors. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of adverse renal outcome were female gender (P =0.033), increasing CCI (P =0.000), presence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease (P =0.000) and diabetes mellitus (P =0.019) as well as acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (P =0.032), while protective factor for renal function outcome was higher urine output (P =0.009). Independent predictors of post-discharge mortality were female gender (P =0.04), higher CCI score (P =0.001) and sepsis (P =0.034). Conclusion: Female AKI hospital survivors with increasing burden of comorbidities, diagnosis of sepsis and ADHF seem to be at high-risk for poor post-discharge outcome. PMID:27471736

  4. Surgical salvage of acute renal artery occlusion in the setting of a solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patrick; Mossalllati, Adam S; Schlarb, Haley; Schlarb, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Management of acute renal artery occlusion in patients with a solitary kidney has a poorly defined prognosis. Loss of renal function is reported by some when acute warm ischemia reaches 2 hours. We report a unique case of a patient that had a 24-hour onset of anuria and acute renal failure upon arrival to the hospital. Nuclear imaging showed trace uptake of the right kidney, without evidence of excretion. Conventional digital subtraction angiography was performed; however, evidence of nephrogram or distal filling of the renal artery was not demonstrated. Secondary to conflicting studies, a computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with intravenous contrast revealed only minimal cortical perfusion despite complete occlusion of the previously grafted right renal artery. Patient was taken for urgent hepatorenal bypass surgery. Intraoperative return of urine output occurred immediately after completion of the bypass. Hemodialysis, which was required preoperatively, was stopped after <30 days of bypass procedure. Over 2 years following successful renal salvage, the patient has maintained a normal glomerular filtration rate and patency of her bypass by duplex follow-up.

  5. Summertime extreme heat events and increased risk of acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jared A; Jiang, Chengsheng; Soneja, Sutyajeet I; Mitchell, Clifford; Puett, Robin C; Sapkota, Amir

    2017-02-08

    Few studies have examined the association between exposure to extreme heat events and risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or demonstrated which populations are most vulnerable to the effects of extreme heat. We defined extreme heat events as days when the daily maximum temperature (TMAX) exceeded the location- and calendar day-specific 95th percentile of the distribution of daily TMAX during the 30-year baseline period (1960-1989). We used a time-stratified case-crossover design to analyze the association between exposure to extreme heat events and risk of hospitalization for AMI in the summer months (June-August) with 0, 1, or 2 lag days. There were a total of 32,670 AMI hospitalizations during the summer months in Maryland between 2000 and 2012. Overall, extreme heat events on the day of hospitalization were associated with an increased risk of AMI (lag 0 OR=1.11; 95% CI: 1.05-1.17). Results considering lag periods immediately before hospitalization were comparable, but effect estimates varied among several population subgroups. As extreme weather events are expected to become more frequent and intense in response to our changing climate, community-specific adaptation strategies are needed to account for the differential susceptibility across ethnic subgroups and geographic areas.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 8 February 2017; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.83.

  6. A systematic review of the prevalence and risk factors for adverse drug reactions in the elderly in the acute care setting

    PubMed Central

    Alhawassi, Tariq M; Krass, Ines; Bajorek, Beata V; Pont, Lisa G

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important health issue. While prevalence and risk factors associated with ADRs in the general adult population have been well documented, much less is known about ADRs in the elderly population. The aim of this study was to review the published literature to estimate the prevalence of ADRs in the elderly in the acute care setting and identify factors associated with an increased risk of an ADR in the elderly. A systematic review of studies published between 2003 and 2013 was conducted in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, Google Scholar and MEDLINE. Key search terms included: “adverse drug reactions”, “adverse effects”, “elderly patients and hospital admission”, “drug therapy”, “drug adverse effects”, “drug related”, “aged”, “older patients”, “geriatric”, “hospitalization”, and “emergency admissions”. For inclusion in the review, studies had to focus on ADRs in the elderly and had to include an explicit definition of what was considered an ADR and/or an explicit assessment of causality, and a clear description of the method used for ADR identification, and had to describe factors associated with an increased risk of an ADR. Fourteen hospital-based observational studies exploring ADRs in the elderly in the acute care setting were eligible for inclusion in this review. The mean prevalence of ADRs in the elderly in the studies included in this review was 11.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1%–16.8%). The median prevalence of ADRs leading to hospitalization was 10.0% (95% CI: 7.2%–12.8%), while the prevalence of ADRs occurring during hospitalization was 11.5% (95% CI: 0%–27.7%). There was wide variation in the overall ADR prevalence, from 5.8% to 46.3%. Female sex, increased comorbid complexity, and increased number of medications were all significantly associated with an increased risk of an ADR. Retrospective studies and those relying on identification by the

  7. [Spiritual care in hospitals and other healthcare settings in Israel--a profession in the making].

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Bentur, Netta; Schultz, Michael; Corn, Benjamin W

    2014-05-01

    Faced with a serious, incurable illness, disability, and other symptoms, both physical and mental, some patients find themselves wondering about the meaning of their Lives. They need the help of a professional who can perceive their mental turmoil and identify their spiritual needs, and who knows how to help them find meaning in their uncertain state. Spiritual care providers are professionals whose role it is to provide patients with support in their hour of need, to help them preserve their identity in life-threatening situations, and to help them re-endow their world with meaning, employing a special language and set of tools that enable patients to get in touch with their spiritual resources and internal powers of healing. Spiritual care providers serve on the medical staff in Western countries. In the United States, some 2,600 are employed in general hospitals, psychiatric hospitals, long-term care facilities, and palliative care units. Approximately ten years ago, the profession began developing in Israel. Today, dozens of spiritual care providers are now working in the healthcare system. There is a spiritual care network with 21 member organizations. Although the profession is laying down roots in the healthcare system in this country, it is still in its infancy and has to contend with substantial barriers and challenges, including professional recognition, creating positions, and identifying sources of funding for positions. The profession still has much room to grow as it is further incorporated into the healthcare system and continues undergoing adaptation to the Israeli cultural setting.

  8. Asenapine augmentation and treatment-resistant schizophrenia in the high-secure hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Durge, Vijay; Sengupta, Samrat; Das, Mrigendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Asenapine is a novel, recently introduced antipsychotic drug. It has a unique receptor profile and it is licensed in the UK for the treatment of bipolar-affective disorder. However, there is some evidence for its effectiveness in schizophrenia and it is licensed for schizophrenia treatment in a number of countries. Significant numbers of patients within the high-secure hospital setting suffer from treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Many patients fail to respond to adequate antipsychotic trials, and require trials of augmentation with other medications. Methods: We report on our experience of using asenapine for augmentation of other antipsychotic medications in two male patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and histories of interpersonal violence. The patients provided informed consent to participate in this case series. Data were collected from the patients’ clinical records, incident reports and hospital medical centre records. These records were used to derive primary and secondary outcome measures. These included time spent in seclusion, verbal and physical aggression, numbers of incidents and metabolic parameters. Symptoms were rated pre- and postaugmentation using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Clinical Global Impression rating scales. Results: Both patients showed an improvement after the addition of asenapine. These improvements were characterized by a reduction in global PANSS scores, in the PANSS excitability component, a reduction in scores of violence, overall incidents and reduction in seclusion hours. Conclusions: We found asenapine to be an effective augmentation agent with other antipsychotics in both patients. Clinical improvement was noted within weeks. The case-series nature and small sample size limited our ability to draw firm conclusions from our data. However, retrospective analysis has allowed us to take a naturalistic approach that this augmentation strategy may be advantageous on an

  9. Acute Q fever in Portugal. Epidemiological and clinical features of 32 hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Carolina; Badura, Robert; Valadas, Emília

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. The main characteristic of acute Q fever is its clinical polymorphism, usually presenting as a febrile illness with varying degrees of hepatitis and/or pneumonia. Q fever is endemic in Portugal, and it is an obligatory notifiable disease since 1999. However, its epidemiological and clinical characteristics are still incompletely described. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 32 cases admitted in the Infectious Diseases Department, Santa Maria’s University Hospital, from January 2001 to December 2010, in whom acute Q fever was diagnosed by the presence of antibodies to phase II Coxiella burnetii antigens associated with a compatible clinical syndrome. Results Out of the 32 cases recorded, 29 (91%) were male, with a male:female ratio of 9.7:1. Individuals at productive age were mainly affected (88%, n=28, with ages between 25 and 64 years). Clinically, the most common manifestation of acute Q fever was hepatic involvement (84%, n=27), which occurred isolated in 53% (n=17) of the cases. Hepatitis was more severe, presenting with higher values of liver function tests, in patients presenting both pulmonary and hepatic involvement. Additionally, we report one case of myocarditis and another one with neurological involvement. Empiric but appropriate antibiotic therapy was given in 66% (n=21) of the cases. There was a complete recovery in 94% (n=30) of the patients, and one death. We confirmed the sub-notification of this disease in Portugal, with only 47% (n=15) of the cases notified. Conclusion In Portugal further studies are needed to confirm our results. From the 32 cases studied, acute Q fever presented more frequently as a febrile disease with hepatic involvement affecting mainly young male individuals. Furthermore, acute Q fever is clearly underdiagnosed and underreported in Portugal, which suggests that an increased awareness of the disease is needed, together with a broader use

  10. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  11. Support for compassionate care: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of Schwartz Center Rounds in an acute general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Muncer, Steven J; Hannon, Bronagh C; Goodrich, Joanna; Cornwell, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of Schwartz Center Rounds, a multi-disciplinary forum to reflect on the emotional consequences of working in healthcare, on the staff of a large acute general hospital over a three-year period. Design Evaluation data following each Round were collected routinely from all staff attending over this period and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Setting An integrated university teaching trust with both acute hospital and community services in the North East of England. Participants Over the three-year period of the study, 795 participant evaluation forms were returned by staff attending the Rounds. Main outcome measures A standard evaluation form completed at the end of each Round by those present, including ratings on a five-point scale against each of eight statements and an opportunity to offer additional free text comments. Results The findings show a very positive response to all aspects of the Rounds by staff who attended. The most highly rated statement was: ‘I have gained insight into how others think/feel in caring for patients’. This was reinforced by the qualitative analysis in which the primary theme was found to be Insight. There were no significant differences between disciplines/staff groups, indicating that all staff whether clinical or non-clinical responded to the Rounds equally positively. Conclusions Schwartz Rounds are highly valued by staff from all disciplines, and by managers and other non-clinicians as well as clinicians. They appear to have the potential to increase understanding between different staff, and so to reduce isolation and provide support. PMID:28050259

  12. Indications and Types of Antibiotic Agents Used in 6 Acute Care Hospitals, 2009-2010: A Pragmatic Retrospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Braykov, Nikolay; Uslan, Daniel Z; Morgan, Daniel J; Gandra, Sumanth; Johannsson, Birgir; Schweizer, Marin L; Weisenberg, Scott A; Young, Heather; Cantey, Joseph; Perencevich, Eli; Septimus, Edward; Srinivasan, Arjun; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To design better antimicrobial stewardship programs, detailed data on the primary drivers and patterns of antibiotic use are needed. OBJECTIVE To characterize the indications for antibiotic therapy, agents used, duration, combinations, and microbiological justification in 6 acute-care US facilities with varied location, size, and type of antimicrobial stewardship programs. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND SETTING Retrospective medical chart review was performed on a random cross-sectional sample of 1,200 adult inpatients, hospitalized (>24 hrs) in 6 hospitals, and receiving at least 1 antibiotic dose on 4 index dates chosen at equal intervals through a 1-year study period (October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010). METHODS Infectious disease specialists recorded patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, microbiological and radiological testing, and agents used, dose, duration, and indication for antibiotic prescriptions. RESULTS On the index dates 4,119 (60.5%) of 6,812 inpatients were receiving antibiotics. The random sample of 1,200 case patients was receiving 2,527 antibiotics (average: 2.1 per patient); 540 (21.4%) were prophylactic and 1,987 (78.6%) were therapeutic, of which 372 (18.7%) were pathogen-directed at start. Of the 1,615 empirical starts, 382 (23.7%) were subsequently pathogen-directed and 1,231 (76.2%) remained empirical. Use was primarily for respiratory (27.6% of prescriptions) followed by gastrointestinal (13.1%) infections. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins together accounted for 47.1% of therapy-days. CONCLUSIONS Use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy was prevalent in 6 US acute care facilities and in most instances was not subsequently pathogen directed. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins were the most frequently used antibiotics, particularly for respiratory indications. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):70-79.

  13. Rehab rounds: overcoming barriers to individualized psychosocial rehabilitation in an acute treatment unit of a state hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, A S; Dollieslager, L P

    2000-03-01

    bring psychiatric rehabilitation into the forefront of their clinical enterprise. To enable readers to learn from their successful experience and adapt some of the administrative and clinical procedures that worked in Virginia, Dr. Dhillon and Ms. Dollieslager describe the operational details of their odyssey. We believe that their effectiveness in changing a traditional institution can be duplicated in many other places-in units within general hospitals or other community-based settings-as well as in state psychiatric hospitals, where acute treatment has been limited to pharmacotherapy and recreational and diversional activities.

  14. Experiences of parenting a child with medical complexity in need of acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Monica; Ehnfors, Margareta; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with medical complexity have described being responsible for providing advanced care for the child. When the child is acutely ill, they must rely on the health-care services during short or long periods of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to describe parental experiences of caring for their child with medical complexity during hospitalization for acute deterioration, specifically focussing on parental needs and their experiences of the attitudes of staff. Data were gathered through individual interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The care period can be interpreted as a balancing act between acting as a caregiver and being in need of care. The parents needed skilled staff who could relieve them of medical responsibility, but they wanted to be involved in the care and in the decisions taken. They needed support, including relief, in order to meet their own needs and to be able to take care of their children. It was important that the child was treated with respect in order for the parent to trust the staff. An approach where staff view parents and children as a single unit, as recipients of care, would probably make the situation easier for these parents and children.

  15. A Study of Acute Poisoning Cases Admitted to the University Hospital Emergency Department in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Oraie, Mehdi; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Islambulchilar, Mina; Hosseini, Seyed-Hasan; Ahadi-Barzoki, Mehdi; Sadr, Habib; Yaghoubi, Hashem

    2017-03-01

    Chemical substances have an important threat due to extensive use in medicine, agriculture, industry and environment. In this retrospective study, etiological and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning cases admitted to a hospital in Iran were investigated. We compared these data with those reported from other parts of the country and the international experiences to evaluate any difference if exists. 7 052 poisoned cases admitted to the hospital from April 2006 to March 2013, by data collected from the medical record in poison center section. According to our results there is a predominance of male patients and the majority of the poisoned patients were between 20-30 years old. Drug poisoning was the most common cause of poisonings. The most frequently involved drugs were benzodiazepines and antidepressants. The seasonal distribution of our study showed a peak in summer. To prevent acute poisonings, the social education about the risk assessment of central nervous system-acting drugs and reduction of the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. This study suggested a proper educational program for the public and primary care units. Our results provide useful information for preventive strategies.

  16. Simple In-Hospital Interventions to Reduce Door-to-CT Time in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheraghdam, Aliakbar; Rikhtegar, Reza; Mehrvar, Kaveh; Mehrara, Mehrdad; Hassasi, Rogayyeh; Aliyar, Hannane; Farzi, Mohammadamin; Hasaneh Tamar, Somayyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, a time dependent therapy, can reduce the morbidity and mortality of acute ischemic stroke. This study was designed to assess the effect of simple in-hospital interventions on reducing door-to-CT (DTC) time and reaching door-to-needle (DTN) time of less than 60 minutes. Methods. Before any intervention, DTC time was recorded for 213 patients over a one-year period at our center. Five simple quality-improvement interventions were implemented, namely, call notification, prioritizing patients for CT scan, prioritizing patients for lab analysis, specifying a bed for acute stroke patients, and staff education. After intervention, over a course of 44 months, DTC time was recorded for 276 patients with the stroke code. Furthermore DTN time was recorded for 106 patients who were treated with IV thrombolytic therapy. Results. The median DTC time significantly decreased in the postintervention period comparing to the preintervention period [median (IQR); 20 (12–30) versus 75 (52.5–105), P < 0.001]. At the postintervention period, the median (IQR) DTN time was 55 (40–73) minutes and proportion of patients with DTN time less than 60 minutes was 62.4% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Our interventions significantly reduced DTC time and resulted in an acceptable DTN time. These interventions are feasible in most hospitals and should be considered. PMID:27478641

  17. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain

    PubMed Central

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas. PMID:26810147

  18. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-04-02

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas.

  19. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features.

  20. Epidemiology of Acute Pancreatitis in Hospitalized Children in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Chaitanya; Deshpande, Abhishek; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Anderson, Michael P.; Bitar, Anas; Steele, Marilyn I.; Bass, Pat F.; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Single-center studies suggest an increasing incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) in children. Our specific aims were to (i) estimate the recent secular trends, (ii) assess the disease burden, and (iii) define the demographics and comorbid conditions of AP in hospitalized children within the United States. Methods We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for the years 2000 to 2009. Extracted data were weighted to generate national-level estimates. We used the Cochrane-Armitage test to analyze trends; cohort-matching to evaluate the association of AP and in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and charges; and multivariable logistic regression to test the association of AP and demographics and comorbid conditions. Results We identified 55,012 cases of AP in hospitalized children (1–20 years of age). The incidence of AP increased from 23.1 to 34.9 (cases per 10,000 hospitalizations per year; P<0.001) and for all-diagnoses 38.7 to 61.1 (P<0.001). There was an increasing trend in the incidence of both primary and all-diagnoses of AP (P<0.001). In-hospital mortality decreased (13.1 to 7.6 per 1,000 cases, P<0.001), median length of stay decreased (5 to 4 days, P<0.001), and median charges increased ($14,956 to $22,663, P<0.001). Children with AP compared to those without the disease had lower in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, aOR 0.86, 95% CI, 0.78–0.95), longer lengths of stay (aOR 2.42, 95% CI, 2.40–2.46), and higher charges (aOR 1.62, 95% CI, 1.59–1.65). AP was more likely to occur in children older than 5 years of age (aORs 2.81 to 5.25 for each 5-year age interval). Hepatobiliary disease was the comorbid condition with the greatest association with AP. Conclusions These results demonstrate a rising incidence of AP in hospitalized children. Despite improvements in mortality and length of stay, hospitalized children with AP have significant morbidity. PMID

  1. Management of euvolemic hyponatremia attributed to SIADH in the hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Peri, A; Giuliani, C

    2014-03-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients. Acute and severe hyponatremia can be a life-threatening condition, but recent evidence indicates that also mild and chronic hyponatremia is associated with neurological and extra-neurological signs, such as gait disturbances, attention deficits, falls and fracture occurrence, and bone loss. The syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatremia. Hyponatremia secondary to SIADH may result for instance from ectopic release of ADH in lung cancer, from diseases affecting the central nervous system, from pneumonia or other pneumopathies or as a side-effect of various drugs In SIADH, hyponatremia results from a pure disorder of water handling by the kidney, whereas external sodium balance is usually well regulated. Despite increased total body water, only minor changes of urine output and modest oedema are usually seen. Neurological impairment may range from subclinical to life-threatening, depending on the degree and mostly on the rate of serum sodium reduction. The management of hyponatremia secondary to SIADH is largely dependent on the symptomatology of the patient. This review briefly summarizes the main aspects related to hyponatremia and then discusses the available treatment options for the management of SIADH, including vaptans, which are vasopressin receptor antagonists targeted for the correction of euvolemic hyponatremia, such as that observed in SIADH.

  2. Outcomes of patients hospitalized for acute decompensated heart failure: does nesiritide make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Richard J; Mulla, Zuber D; Hauck, Loran D; Westbrook, Audrey

    2007-01-01

    Background Nesiritide is indicated in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure. However, a recent meta-analysis reported that nesiritide may be associated with an increased risk of death. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of nesiritide treatment on four outcomes among adults hospitalized for congestive heart failure (CHF) during a three-year period. Methods CHF patients discharged between 1/1/2002 and 12/31/2004 from the Adventist Health System, a national, not-for-profit hospital system, were identified. 25,330 records were included in this retrospective study. Nesiritide odds ratios (OR) were adjusted for various factors including nine medications and/or an APR-DRG severity score. Results Initially, treatment with nesiritide was found to be associated with a 59% higher odds of hospital mortality (Unadjusted OR = 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.31–1.93). Adjusting for race, low economic status, APR-DRG severity of illness score, and the receipt of nine medications yielded a nonsignificant nesiritide OR of 1.07 for hospital death (95% CI: 0.85–1.35). Nesiritide was positively associated with the odds of prolonged length of stay (all adjusted ORs = 1.66) and elevated pharmacy cost (all adjusted ORs > 5). Conclusion In this observational study, nesiritide therapy was associated with increased length of stay and pharmacy cost, but not hospital mortality. Randomized trials are urgently needed to better define the efficacy, if any, of nesiritide in the treatment of decompensated heart failure. PMID:18039381

  3. Citicoline for acute ischemic stroke in Mexican hospitals: a retrospective postmarketing analysis.

    PubMed

    Leon-Jimenez, C; Chiquete, E; Cantu, C; Miramontes-Saldana, M J; Andrade-Ramos, M A; Ruiz-Sandoval, J L

    2010-06-01

    Some neuroprotective agents have shown benefits in animal models, but disappointing results in humans. Citicoline is used in several countries as coadjuvant treatment in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients; however, there are no retrospective postmarketing surveillances on the experience of citicoline in Mexico. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between citicoline exposure and functional outcome at discharge and at 30 and 90 days post-stroke, in a retrospective case-control design on systematic descriptive databases from three referral hospitals. Clinical records of 173 consecutively registered patients were analyzed, 86 of whom were treated with citicoline within the first 48 h after AIS and the remaining 87 were untreated, randomly selected controls matched for age (+/- 5 years), gender and NIHSS (+/- 1 point) at hospital admission. Pretreatment conditions were similar between groups. Compared with controls, exposure to citicoline was associated with a significantly lower 30-day mean and median modified Rankin score (in both, P < 0.05). After paired multivariate analyses (controlled for NIHSS, age, gender, hospital arrival in < 24 h, thrombolysis and comorbidities) citicoline was independently associated with a lower 90-day mortality risk (P = 0.047) and with fewer in-hospital complications (mainly infections and sepsis, P = 0.001). In this observational study, citicoline use was associated with a better functional status and lower rates of short-term mortality, possibly due to fewer in-hospital systemic complications. The putative benefits should be interpreted as clinical associations, since this is not a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  4. Risk Factors of Acute Behavioral Regression in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Périsse, Didier; Amiet, Claire; Consoli, Angèle; Thorel, Marie-Vincente; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Guinchat, Vincent; Barthélémy, Catherine; Cohen, David

    2010-01-01

    Aim: During adolescence, some individuals with autism engage in severe disruptive behaviors, such as violence, agitation, tantrums, or self-injurious behaviors. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute states and regression in adolescents with autism in an inpatient population. Method: Between 2001 and 2005, we reviewed the charts of all adolescents with autism (N=29, mean age=14.8 years, 79% male) hospitalized for severe disruptive behaviors in a psychiatric intensive care unit. We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), associated organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. Results: All patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability, and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. Fifteen subjects exhibited epilepsy, including three cases in which epilepsy was unknown before the acute episode. For six (21%) of the subjects, uncontrolled seizures were considered the main cause of the disruptive behaviors. Other suspected risk factors associated with disruptive behavior disorders included adjustment disorder (N=7), lack of adequate therapeutic or educational management (N=6), depression (N=2), catatonia (N=2), and painful comorbid organic conditions (N=3). Conclusion: Disruptive behaviors among adolescents with autism may stem from diverse risk factors, including environmental problems, comorbid acute psychiatric conditions, or somatic diseases such as epilepsy. The management of these behavioral changes requires a multidisciplinary functional approach. PMID:20467546

  5. Factors Affecting Recovery Time of Pulmonary Function in Hospitalized Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Jaemoon; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Park, So-Young; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation is a significant burden on asthmatics, and management of these patients needs to be improved. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with a longer recovery time of pulmonary function among asthmatic patients hospitalized due to a severe asthma exacerbation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 89 patients who were admitted for the management of acute asthma exacerbations. The recovery time of pulmonary function was defined as the time from the date each patient initially received treatment for asthma exacerbations to the date the patient reached his or her previous best FEV1% value. We investigated the influence of various clinical and laboratory factors on the recovery time. Results The median recovery time of the patients was 1.7 weeks. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that using regular inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) before an acute exacerbation of asthma and concurrent with viral infection at admission were associated with the prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function. Conclusions The prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after a severe asthma exacerbation was not shown to be directly associated with poor adherence to ICS. Therefore the results indicate that an unknown subtype of asthma may be associated with the prolonged recovery of pulmonary function time after an acute exacerbation of asthma despite regular ICS use. Further prospective studies to investigate factors affecting the recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation are warranted. PMID:27582400

  6. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff.

    PubMed

    Langhan, Melissa L; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2015-01-01

    Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practice. This study elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within 10 emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practice, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff and user friendliness were facilitators. This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology.

  7. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    PubMed

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  8. Predictors of hypoxaemia in hospital admissions with acute lower respiratory tract infection in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M.; Usen, S.; Palmer, A.; Jaffar, S.; Mulholland, E

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 5 November 1996
 Since oxygen has to be given to most children in developing countries on the basis of clinical signs without performing blood gas analyses, possible clinical predictors of hypoxaemia were studied. Sixty nine children between the ages of 2 months and 5 years admitted to hospital with acute lower respiratory tract infection and an oxygen saturation (SaO2) < 90% were compared with 67 children matched for age and diagnosis from the same referral hospital with an SaO2 of 90% or above (control group 1), and 44unreferred children admitted to a secondary care hospital with acute lower respiratory infection (control group 2). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, sleepiness, arousal, quality of cry, cyanosis, head nodding, decreased air entry, nasal flaring, and upper arm circumference were found to be independent predictors of hypoxaemia on comparison of the cases with control group 1.Using a simple model of cyanosis or head nodding or not crying, the sensitivity to predict hypoxaemia was 59%, and the specificity 94% and 93% compared to control groups 1 and 2, respectively; 80% of the children with an SaO2 < 80% were identified by the combination of these signs. Over half of the children with hypoxaemia could be identified with a combination of three signs: extreme respiratory distress, cyanosis, and severely compromised general status. Further prospective validation of this model with other datasets is warranted. No other signs improved the sensitivity without compromising specificity. If a higher sensitivity is required, pulse oximetry has to be used.

 PMID:9166021

  9. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  10. Descriptions of Acute Transfusion Reactions in the Teaching Hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. Material and Methods The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. Results In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). Conclusion It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable. PMID:24505522

  11. C-reactive protein and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide as biomarkers in acute exacerbations of COPD leading to hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Virginia; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Leipsic, Jonathon A.; Hague, Cameron J.; DeMarco, Mari L.; FitzGerald, J. Mark; McManus, Bruce M.; Ng, Raymond T.; Sin, Don D.

    2017-01-01

    There are currently no accepted and validated blood tests available for diagnosing acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). In this study, we sought to determine the discriminatory power of blood C-reactive protein (CRP) and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in the diagnosis of AECOPD requiring hospitalizations. The study cohort consisted of 468 patients recruited in the COPD Rapid Transition Program who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AECOPD, and 110 stable COPD patients who served as controls. Logistic regression was used to build a classification model to separate AECOPD from convalescent or stable COPD patients. Performance was assessed using an independent validation set of patients who were not included in the discovery set. Serum CRP and whole blood NT-proBNP concentrations were highest at the time of hospitalization and progressively decreased over time. Of the 3 classification models, the one with both CRP and NT-proBNP had the highest AUC in discriminating AECOPD (cross-validated AUC of 0.80). These data were replicated in a validation cohort with an AUC of 0.88. A combination of CRP and NT-proBNP can reasonably discriminate AECOPD requiring hospitalization versus clinical stability and can be used to rapidly diagnose patients requiring hospitalization for AECOPD. PMID:28328968

  12. C-reactive protein and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide as biomarkers in acute exacerbations of COPD leading to hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wei Roy; Chen, Virginia; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Leipsic, Jonathon A; Hague, Cameron J; DeMarco, Mari L; FitzGerald, J Mark; McManus, Bruce M; Ng, Raymond T; Sin, Don D

    2017-01-01

    There are currently no accepted and validated blood tests available for diagnosing acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). In this study, we sought to determine the discriminatory power of blood C-reactive protein (CRP) and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in the diagnosis of AECOPD requiring hospitalizations. The study cohort consisted of 468 patients recruited in the COPD Rapid Transition Program who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AECOPD, and 110 stable COPD patients who served as controls. Logistic regression was used to build a classification model to separate AECOPD from convalescent or stable COPD patients. Performance was assessed using an independent validation set of patients who were not included in the discovery set. Serum CRP and whole blood NT-proBNP concentrations were highest at the time of hospitalization and progressively decreased over time. Of the 3 classification models, the one with both CRP and NT-proBNP had the highest AUC in discriminating AECOPD (cross-validated AUC of 0.80). These data were replicated in a validation cohort with an AUC of 0.88. A combination of CRP and NT-proBNP can reasonably discriminate AECOPD requiring hospitalization versus clinical stability and can be used to rapidly diagnose patients requiring hospitalization for AECOPD.

  13. Acute myocardial infarction hospitalization statistics: apparent decline accompanying an increase in smoke-free areas.

    PubMed

    Villalbí, Joan R; Castillo, Antonia; Cleries, Montse; Saltó, Esteve; Sánchez, Emília; Martínez, Rosa; Tresserras, Ricard; Vela, Emili

    2009-07-01

    Recent research suggests that the introduction of antismoking regulations reduces the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to analyze changes in AMIs in the Barcelona metropolitan area in Spain following implementation of the 2006 antismoking law. Data was collected on all discharges from hospitals funded by the Catalan Health Service in 2004-2006. All patients aged over 24 years who lived in the area and who received a primary diagnosis of AMI were included. Annual AMI hospitalization rates, with 95% confidence intervals, were estimated for each year and stratified according to age and sex. The 2004 rate was higher than the 2005 rate for most age and sex groups, though confidence intervals overlapped. The 2006 rates were lower than the 2005 rates for all age groups, and there was no overlap in confidence intervals in men. In conclusion, the introduction of regulations on smoke-free areas was accompanied by a reduction in the AMI hospitalization rate.

  14. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Man Sik

    2015-11-13

    Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004-2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07-1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04-1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas.

  15. Clothing norms as markers of status in a hospital setting: A Bourdieusian analysis.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Tania M

    2014-09-01

    This article uses a Bourdieusian framework to understand the importance of clothing norms for symbolizing and reproducing social, as well as professional, hierarchy in hospitals. Using data from participant observation, it examines how a complex yet informal dress code has emerged at a community hospital in the Northeastern United States, in a setting where very few formal guidelines exist on how to dress. By conceptualizing professionals as holders of various types of capital (economic, cultural, and symbolic), this article expands previous research which considered clothing only as a marker of professional identity. The findings demonstrate (1) how clothing norms are used in subtle, but purposeful, ways to reflect varying degrees of cultural and economic capital and (2) how these complex norms also reflect professional boundaries in medical authority (symbolic capital), which is important during critical moments where clothing can quickly signal who can take control. The discussion borrows Bourdieu's concepts of habitus and field to explain why subordinates subscribe to these clothing norms, in the absence of a formal organizational dress code.

  16. Human caliciviruses detected in Mexican children admitted to hospital during 1998-2000, with severe acute gastroenteritis not due to other enteropathogens.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Escolano, Ana Lorena; Velázquez, F Raúl; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; López Saucedo, Catalina; Torres, Javier; Estrada-García, Teresa

    2010-04-01

    Few studies exist regarding the frequency of human caliciviruses as single etiologic agents in sporadic cases, or in outbreaks occurring in children hospitalized for acute gastroenteritis. In this study, a total of 1,129 children of <5 years of age and hospitalized due to acute diarrhea were enrolled from three main hospitals in Mexico City during a period of 3 years (March 1998 to December 2000). After analyzing all fecal samples for several enteropathogens, 396 stools that remained negative were further screened for human caliciviruses by RT-PCR using a primer set specific to norovirus and sapovirus. Human caliciviruses were detected in 5.6% (22/396) of the children. The minimum incidence rate for 1999 were 5.3% (7/132) for 1999 and 7.8% (13/167) for 2000, since only fecal specimens that tested negative to other enteric pathogens were examined. Positive samples were further characterized using specific GI and GII primers and sequencing. Norovirus GII was detected in 19/22 samples, most of them were GII/4, while sapovirus GI/2 was detected in one sample. Associations between the presence of human calicivirus and clinical and epidemiological data revealed that diarrhea occurred with a seasonal pattern, and that children hospitalized due to human calicivirus disease scored an average of 13 +/- 3.2 (SD) points on the Vesikari scale, which corresponded to severe episodes. These results highlight that human caliciviruses, by themselves, are enteropathogens of acute severe diarrhea among young Mexican children requiring hospitalization and that their detection is important in order to reduce the diagnosis gap.

  17. [Nursing students' perception of the learning process in a hospital setting].

    PubMed

    Alves, Elcilene Andreíne Terra Durgante; Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identijf how nursing students perceive and experience the learning process during curricular practice in a hospital setting. A qualitative, retrospective, documentary study was developed in an undergraduate nursing course. Data were comprised of 162 posts made by 34 students in the online discussion forum of the Learning Management System Moodle, during the first half of 2011. The following themes emergedfrom t he thematic content analysis: "nursing students' understanding about the professional practice," and "the teaching and learning process in the perspective of nursing students." The study demonstrated that the forum was a place for reporting experiences such as the description of the physical area, performing procedures, perception of nursing care activities, conJlicts with peers, coping with death and learning evaluation. The online discussion forum needs to be used by professors as a space of interaction so as to contribute to professional training.

  18. POST DISCHARGE DROPOUT OF ALCOHOLICS - A NATURALISTIC STUDY IN A GENERAL HOSPITAL SETTING

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Somnath; Kar, N.; Sharma, P.S.V.N.; Rao, Gaunasagari

    2001-01-01

    In a naturalistic longitudinal design 133 consecutive inpatients with alcohol dependence syndrome were followed up for one year following discharge from the hospital. 59 patients (group 1) paid follow up visit at regular intervals whereas 28 subjects (group 2)never returned despite three consecutive postal intimations. Rest of the patient were irregular in follow up. The individuals in group 1 were compared with those in group 2 on various sociodemographic and clinical variables with the aim of delineating the characteristics that could define the alcoholics who dropped out following discharge. It was found that such patient were relatively younger with lower level of education, less frequently married, had earlier onset of problem drinking with poor social support and higher rates of mental problems. It was concluded that post discharge attrition of alcoholics could be a social as well as a clinical problem in any setting rendering long treatment for alcoholism. PMID:21407859

  19. Temporal trends for pregnancy length in a hospital setting of Southern Spain.

    PubMed

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Villegas, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    For centuries it has been considered that the due date for delivery in our species is 280 days after the onset of the last menstruation. However, in most cases this statement is not accurate. The main objective of this study was to determine the mean duration of pregnancy in our setting and whether it has experienced changes in recent years. A retrospective, population-based descriptive study was made of 102,169 deliveries assisted in Malaga University Hospital (Malaga, Andalusia, Spain) during the period 1998-2015. The mean gestational age at delivery was 269 days (SD 16 days), with a modal gestational age of 273 days. The mean duration of the singleton and multiple pregnancies was 271 days (SD 17 days) and 242 days (SD 20 days), respectively. A significant shortening of the duration of pregnancy was observed in the course of the study period.

  20. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose) fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Marcello; Porreca, Ettore

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH), or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily) of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients hospitalized in intensive care units with no contraindications, LMWH or UFH are recommended, with frequent and careful assessment of the risk of bleeding. In this review, we discuss the evidence for use of thromboprophylaxis for VTE in acutely ill hospitalized medical patients, with a focus on (low-dose) fondaparinux.

  1. Clinical Setting Influences Off-Label and Unlicensed Prescribing in a Paediatric Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Czarniak, Petra; Bint, Lewis; Favié, Laurent; Parsons, Richard; Hughes, Jeff; Sunderland, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the prevalence of off-label and unlicensed prescribing during 2008 at a major paediatric teaching hospital in Western Australia. Methods A 12-month retrospective study was conducted at Princess Margaret Hospital using medication chart records randomly selected from 145,550 patient encounters from the Emergency Department, Inpatient Wards and Outpatient Clinics. Patient and prescribing data were collected. Drugs were classified as off-label or unlicensed based on Australian registration data. A hierarchical system of age, indication, route of administration and dosage was used. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code. Results A total of 1,037 paediatric patients were selected where 2,654 prescriptions for 330 different drugs were prescribed to 699 patients (67.4%). Most off-label drugs (n = 295; 43.3%) were from the nervous system; a majority of unlicensed drugs were systemic hormonal preparations excluding sex hormones (n = 22, 32.4%). Inpatients were prescribed more off-label drugs than outpatients or Emergency Department patients (p < 0.0001). Most off-label prescribing occurred in infants and children (31.7% and 35.9% respectively) and the highest percentage of unlicensed prescribing (7.2%) occurred in infants (p < 0.0001). There were 25.7% of off-label and 2.6% of unlicensed medications prescribed across all three settings. Common reasons for off-label prescribing were dosage (47.4%) and age (43.2%). Conclusion This study confirmed off-label and unlicensed use of drugs remains common. Further, that prevalence of both is influenced by the clinical setting, which has implications in regards to medication misadventure, and the need to have systems in place to minimise medication errors. Further, there remains a need for changes in the regulatory system in Australia to ensure that manufacturers incorporate, as it becomes available, evidence regarding efficacy and safety of their drugs in children in the

  2. Effectiveness of an educational video in improving oral health knowledge in a hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Naseem; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Kathuria, Vartika; Gupta, Tanupriya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prevention of oral diseases can be achieved by preventive measures. There is an educational component associated to the preventive aspect. Health education is a cornerstone to the success of a preventive programme. Health education has always been regarded as a primary tool in imparting awareness, bringing changes in healthy behaviors and improved life. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of an Educational Video in improving oral health knowledge of subjects in a hospital setting. Methodology: The study was conducted in Outpatient Department, CDER, AIIMS. This was a cross sectional interventional study. In the present study a total of 109 subjects were considered those who completed pre and post intervention questionnaire. In order to assess baseline oral health knowledge, a-14 itemed questionnaire was specially designed, based on the contents of video and was pre-tested on 10 patients. Pre-intervention knowledge was assessed and then the 30-minute video was shown. Following this, post-exposure knowledge was assessed using the same questionnaire. Change in the knowledge score amongst the subjects was assessed pre and post-intervention (showing the video film). Results: Paired t- test was used to analyze the data. Pre-intervention mean knowledge score was 9.49±2.09 which increased to 11.55±1.60 post-intervention; the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: It was found that increase in knowledge score was statistically significant after exposure to an educational video film in a hospital setting. Incorporation of video in imparting oral health education can be an effective tool in improving oral health knowledge, which can impact the oral health behavior of people and community. PMID:27433049

  3. Measuring executive dysfunction in an acute rehabilitation setting: using the dysexecutive questionnaire (DEX).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Pauleen C; Ong, Ben; Ponsford, Jennie

    2005-07-01

    It is recognized that existing neuropsychological measures of executive dysfunction lack adequate sensitivity and selectivity. While attempts have been made to develop improved measures, these have not yet been of great value to those who need to accurately identify executive deficits in a clinical setting. Several behavioral rating scales have been developed for this reason, including the 20-item Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX), which forms part of the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) test battery. To investigate the ability of the DEX to identify executive dysfunction in an acute rehabilitation setting, the BADS was administered to 64 persons who had sustained traumatic brain injury. It was found to be almost as sensitive to executive dysfunction, as measured by the total score obtained on the BADS battery, as an extended 65-item version of the scale, when completed by either the occupational therapist or clinical neuropsychologist working with each patient. Family members and the patient themselves provided, as expected, less accurate information. Our results indicate that the DEX can be used with some confidence as a screening instrument to identify executive dysfunction in an acute rehabilitation setting, provided it is completed by professional personnel, trained to be sensitive to the cognitive and behavioral concomitants of this disorder.

  4. Prevalence of anemia and its impact on mortality in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a developing country setting.

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein; Sadighi, Tannaz; Rabieepour, Masomeh; Dinparast, Reza; RahimiRad, Shagayegh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is going to be the third most common cause of death worldwide. The natural course of COPD is interrupted by acute exacerbations (AECOPD) with an overall mortality rate of 10%. Anemia is a well-known independent predictor of mortality in several chronic diseases. Little is known about the impact of anemia on mortality in AECOPD. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia in AECOPD patients and its impact on mortality in a developing country setting. We retrospectively studied 200 hospitalized patients with AECOPD (100 died in hospital and 100 survived) in Imam Khomeini teaching hospital, Urmia, Iran. Prevalence of anemia between deceased and surviving patients compared by using x-square test. Mean admission day Hb and Hct level were compared between the two groups by using Student t-test. Anemia was defined according to WHO criteria: Hb<13 g/dl in males; Hb<12 g/dl in females. The prevalence of anemia was significantly higher in patients who died in hospital compared to those who survived (72% vs. 49%, p=0.001 and OR=2.68). The mean ±SD Hb level was 11.5±2.7 g/dl among deceased patients vs. 13.0±2.0 g/dl among survivors (p value<0.001). The duration of hospitalization was significantly higher (p<0,001) in anemic patients (mean 13.28 days in anemic vs. 7.0 days in non-anemic patients). In bivariate correlation analysis, Hb was positively correlated with FEV1 (r=+0.210, p=0.011) and negatively with duration of hospitalization (r=-0.389, p=0.000). Anemia was common in AECOPD patients in this developing country setting and was significantly associated with in hospital mortality.

  5. Evaluation of Dabigatran for Appropriateness of Use and Bleeding Events in a Community Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Anastasia L.; Buehler, Katie S.; Min, Sun H.; Riley, Margaret; Daly, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Warfarin has been the predominant anticoagulant for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Its disadvantages are well-known and include a narrow therapeutic index, drug interactions, and the need for frequent monitoring. Dabigatran etexilate, a direct thrombin inhibitor, presents less complexity in prescribing and has emerged as an alternate therapy to warfarin. Although dabigatran does not require routine monitoring, concerns associated with its use include the lack of a reversal agent, complex dose adjustments, and limited guidance to the management of drug interactions. Objectives The goals of this study are to describe and to evaluate the use of dabigatran at a community hospital to identify areas for improvement in its prescribing. Methods This retrospective chart review of patients at a community hospital in St Louis, MO, included patients who received at least 1 dose of dabigatran between December 2010 and June 2012. The appropriateness of dabigatran was evaluated based on recommendations approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for stroke prophylaxis in the setting of NVAF. The composite end point of bleeding included hospital readmission within 1 year of receiving at least 1 dose of dabigatran at the study institution secondary to bleeding, bleeding associated with a decrease in hemoglobin level by ≥2 g/dL or transfusion of ≥2 units of blood, or a notation of bleeding in the patient's medical record. Results Of the 458 patients included in the evaluation, 76 (16.6%) patients receiving dabigatran were using an inappropriate regimen of this drug, based on dose and frequency on the first day of therapy of dabigatran or the presence of valvular disease. Many patients (42.3%) received at least 1 dose of a concomitant parenteral anticoagulant. The composite end point for bleeding was reported in 66 (14.4%) patients, including 23 (5%) with confirmed gastrointestinal bleeding

  6. Reducing Length of Hospital Stay Does Not Increase Readmission Rates in Early-Stage Gastric, Colon, and Lung Cancer Surgical Cases in Japanese Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kunisawa, Susumu; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The Japanese government has worked to reduce the length of hospital stay by introducing a per-diem hospital payment system that financially incentivizes the timely discharge of patients. However, there are concerns that excessively reducing length of stay may reduce healthcare quality, such as increasing readmission rates. The objective of this study was to investigate the temporal changes in length of stay and readmission rates as quality indicators in Japanese acute care hospitals. Methods We used an administrative claims database under the Diagnosis Procedure Combination Per-Diem Payment System for Japanese hospitals. Using this database, we selected hospitals that provided data continuously from July 2010 to March 2014 to enable analyses of temporal changes in length of stay and readmission rates. We selected stage I (T1N0M0) gastric, colon, and lung cancer surgical patients who had been discharged alive from the index hospitalization. The outcome measures were length of stay during the index hospitalization and unplanned emergency readmissions within 30 days after discharge. Results From among 804 hospitals, we analyzed 42,585, 15,467, and 40,156 surgical patients for gastric, colon, and lung cancer, respectively. Length of stay was reduced by approximately 0.5 days per year. In contrast, readmission rates were generally stable at approximately 2% or had decreased slightly over the 4-year period. Conclusions In early-stage gastric, colon, and lung cancer surgical patients in Japan, reductions in length of stay did not result in increased readmission rates. PMID:27832182

  7. Retrospective Comparison of Clinical Characteristics and In-Hospital Outcomes among Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Adults with Acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Sanjeev R; Trivedi, Renu S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute Pyelonephritis (APN) is a common infection in community. Diabetes Mellitus (DM) may have different effect on clinical characteristics and outcomes of APN compared to non-diabetic individuals. Aim To compare clinical characteristics and assess outcomes of APN patients with and without DM. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of 122 patients with DM (n=61) and without DM (n=61) was conducted at a single, private, urban set-up from Gujarat, India. Clinical symptoms, laboratory investigations, antibiotics treatment and outcomes in terms of mortality and prolonged hospitalization (10 days and above) were compared in two groups. Results Mean age was significantly higher in diabetics than non-diabetics (55.2±12.5 vs 41.5±17.3, p<0.0001) and females were proportionally higher in both groups (65.6% Vs 62.3%, p=0.706). Fever was most frequent symptom (83.6% Vs 90.2%, p=0.283) followed by nausea/vomiting (50.8% Vs 63.9%, p=0.143), dysuria (66.7% Vs 74.4%, p=0.433) and flank pain (8.2 Vs 13.1, p=0.379). Backache/back pain (47.5% Vs 29.5%, p=0.041) and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) (63.9% Vs 45.9%, p=0.045) were significantly higher in diabetics than non-diabetics. Mean hospital stay did not vary significantly in two groups (7.0±3.2 Vs 6.50±2.9, p=0.346) but proportion of patients with longer hospital stay was higher in DM (16.4% Vs 8.2%). Elevated white cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine and presence of red cell in urine (> 5/ high power field [hpf]) did not vary significantly in two groups. Cephalosporin-beta-lactamase inhibitor (Cefaperazone-Sulbactam/Cefepime-Tazobactam) was the most prescribed antibiotic in both the groups. No deaths were observed in any group during this evaluation period. Only raised ESR (>30 mm/hr) {Odds Ratio (OR): 1.58, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.36-1.82, p=0.004} and presence of CKD (OR: 1.71, 95% CI 1.30-2.25, p=0.008) were found to be the significant predictors of

  8. Using decision trees to manage hospital readmission risk for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, John P; Zasadil, Scott; Keyser, Donna J; Peele, Pamela B

    2014-12-01

    To improve healthcare quality and reduce costs, the Affordable Care Act places hospitals at financial risk for excessive readmissions associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Although predictive analytics is increasingly looked to as a means for measuring, comparing, and managing this risk, many modeling tools require data inputs that are not readily available and/or additional resources to yield actionable information. This article demonstrates how hospitals and clinicians can use their own structured discharge data to create decision trees that produce highly transparent, clinically relevant decision rules for better managing readmission risk associated with AMI, HF, and PN. For illustrative purposes, basic decision trees are trained and tested using publically available data from the California State Inpatient Databases and an open-source statistical package. As expected, these simple models perform less well than other more sophisticated tools, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (or AUC) of 0.612, 0.583, and 0.650, respectively, but achieve a lift of at least 1.5 or greater for higher-risk patients with any of the three conditions. More importantly, they are shown to offer substantial advantages in terms of transparency and interpretability, comprehensiveness, and adaptability. By enabling hospitals and clinicians to identify important factors associated with readmissions, target subgroups of patients at both high and low risk, and design and implement interventions that are appropriate to the risk levels observed, decision trees serve as an ideal application for addressing the challenge of reducing hospital readmissions.

  9. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization.

  10. Optimizing laboratory test utilization in long-term acute care hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Brian S.; Grigonis, Antony M.; Dawson, Amanda; Jing, Yuqing; Hammerman, Samuel I.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory tests can be considered inappropriate if overused or when repeated, unnecessary “routine” testing occurs. For chronically critically ill patients treated in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs), inappropriate testing may result in unnecessary blood draws that could potentially harm patients or increase infections. A quality improvement initiative was designed to increase physician awareness of their patterns of lab utilization in the LTACH environment. Within a large network of LTACHs, 9 hospitals were identified as having higher patterns of lab utilization than other LTACHs. Meetings were held with administrative staff and physicians, who designed and implemented hospital-specific strategies to address lab utilization. Lab utilization was measured in units of lab tests ordered per inpatient day (lab UPPD) for 8 months prior to the initial meeting and 7 months after the meeting. A repeated measures mixed model determined that postintervention lab utilization improved, on average and adjusted by case mix index, by 0.37 lab UPPD (t = −3.61, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.58) compared to the preintervention period. Overall, the case mix index 8 months prior to the intervention was no different than it was 7 months after the initial meeting (t[8] = −0.96, P = 0.37). Patient safety and outcome measures, including percentage of patients weaned from a ventilator, readmission rates, central catheter utilization rates, and the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other multidrug resistant organisms, showed no significant change. Hospital staff meetings focused on lab utilization and the development and deployment of tailored lab utilization strategies were associated with LTACHs achieving significantly lower lab utilization without negatively impacting quality outcomes. PMID:28127124

  11. Acute and Chronic Effects of Particles on Hospital Admissions in New-England

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Coull, Brent A.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have reported significant associations between exposure to PM2.5 and hospital admissions, but all have focused on the effects of short-term exposure. In addition all these studies have relied on a limited number of PM2.5 monitors in their study regions, which introduces exposure error, and excludes rural and suburban populations from locations in which monitors are not available, reducing generalizability and potentially creating selection bias. Methods Using our novel prediction models for exposure combining land use regression with physical measurements (satellite aerosol optical depth) we investigated both the long and short term effects of PM2.5 exposures on hospital admissions across New-England for all residents aged 65 and older. We performed separate Poisson regression analysis for each admission type: all respiratory, cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke and diabetes. Daily admission counts in each zip code were regressed against long and short-term PM2.5 exposure, temperature, socio-economic data and a spline of time to control for seasonal trends in baseline risk. Results We observed associations between both short-term and long-term exposure to PM2.5 and hospitalization for all of the outcomes examined. In example, for respiratory diseases, for every10-µg/m3 increase in short-term PM2.5 exposure there is a 0.70 percent increase in admissions (CI = 0.35 to 0.52) while concurrently for every10-µg/m3 increase in long-term PM2.5 exposure there is a 4.22 percent increase in admissions (CI = 1.06 to 4.75). Conclusions As with mortality studies, chronic exposure to particles is associated with substantially larger increases in hospital admissions than acute exposure and both can be detected simultaneously using our exposure models. PMID:22529923

  12. Predictors and in-hospital prognosis of recurrent acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Cheng-Fu; Li, Su-Fang; Chen, Hong; Song, Jun-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the contributing factors and in-hospital prognosis of patients with or without recurrent acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods A total of 1686 consecutive AMI patients admitted to Peking University People's Hospital from January 2010 to December 2015 were recruited. Their clinical characteristics were retrospectively compared between patients with or without a recurrent AMI. Then multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the predictors of recurrent myocardial infarction. Results Recurrent AMI patients were older (69.3 ± 11.5 vs. 64.7 ± 12.8 years, P < 0.001) and had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) (52.2% vs. 35.0%, P < 0.001) compared with incident AMI patients, they also had worse heart function at admission, more severe coronary disease and lower reperfusion therapy. Age (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.02–1.05; P < 0.001), DM (OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.37–2.52; P < 0.001) and reperfusion therapy (OR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.52–0.89; P < 0.001) were independent risk factors for recurrent AMI. Recurrent AMI patients had a higher in-hospital death rate (12.1% vs. 7.8%, P = 0.039) than incident AMI patients. Conclusions Recurrent AMI patients presented with more severe coronary artery conditions. Age, DM and reperfusion therapy were independent risk factors for recurrent AMI, and recurrent AMI was related with a high risk of in-hospital death. PMID:27928225

  13. Can the US minimum data set be used for predicting admissions to acute care facilities?

    PubMed

    Abbott, P A; Quirolgico, S; Candidate, D; Manchand, R; Canfield, K; Adya, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper is intended to give an overview of Knowledge Discovery in Large Datasets (KDD) and data mining applications in healthcare particularly as related to the Minimum Data Set, a resident assessment tool which is used in US long-term care facilities. The US Health Care Finance Administration, which mandates the use of this tool, has accumulated massive warehouses of MDS data. The pressure in healthcare to increase efficiency and effectiveness while improving patient outcomes requires that we find new ways to harness these vast resources. The intent of this preliminary study design paper is to discuss the development of an approach which utilizes the MDS, in conjunction with KDD and classification algorithms, in an attempt to predict admission from a long-term care facility to an acute care facility. The use of acute care services by long term care residents is a negative outcome, potentially avoidable, and expensive. The value of the MDS warehouse can be realized by the use of the stored data in ways that can improve patient outcomes and avoid the use of expensive acute care services. This study, when completed, will test whether the MDS warehouse can be used to describe patient outcomes and possibly be of predictive value.

  14. Measuring efficiency in acute care hospitals: an application of data envelopment analysis.

    PubMed

    Dittman, D A; Capettini, R; Morey, R C

    1991-01-01

    In this article, the authors attempted to demonstrate how DEA can be useful to hospital administrators and health care planners. They used actual data collected by the American Hospital Association through its Monitrend Data Service. Since these were national data, they are presented here for illustrative purposes only. The efficiency with which a hospital operates may well depend upon the local or regional labor market, the competition among health care providers in that market, and the demographics of the service area. The choice of variables was dictated by reasonableness and availability of data. Given the routine collection of case mix data by DRG since 1984, the use of a different set of output variables for any future studies would be quite appropriate. Additionally, if DEA were to be used, a consensus concerning relevant controllable and non-controllable input variables would need to be achieved. There are more technical caveats of which the reader should be aware. 1) The efficiency scores are all relative and are based on the performance of the other hospitals being compared; nothing can be said about the absolute efficiency of a given hospital. However, the relative ratings are conservative in that the approach "bends over backwards" to give the individual hospital the benefit of the doubt in terms of the relative importance of the various outputs and inputs utilized. The approach maintains equity in that any weights chosen for a given hospital must be feasible for all of the other hospitals. 2. The ratings assume a causal impact of the inputs on the outputs. In addition, it is possible that inclusion of additional inputs and outputs could modify the relative scores and/or help explain the differences. However, based on the factors available, any unit rated inefficient is inferior in a very real and demonstrable sense. 3. DEA is based on the generalized notion of convexity which assumes that the performance arrived at by taking any linear weighted

  15. Tutorial on technology transfer and survey design and data collection for measuring Internet and Intranet existence, usage, and impact (survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-02-01

    This paper provides a tutorial of technology transfer for management information systems in health care. Additionally it describes the process for a national survey of acute care hospitals using a random sample of 813 hospitals. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and with customers. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, user satisfaction and decision-making will be studied. Changes with results of a prior survey conducted in 1997 can be studied and enabling and inhabiting factors identified. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals.

  16. Effectiveness of acute geriatric units on functional decline, living at home, and case fatality among older patients admitted to hospital for acute medical disorders: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-García, Francisco M; López-Arrieta, Jesús; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of acute geriatric units compared with conventional care units in adults aged 65 or more admitted to hospital for acute medical disorders. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library up to 31 August 2008, and references from published literature. Review methods Randomised trials, non-randomised trials, and case-control studies were included. Exclusions were studies based on administrative databases, those that assessed care for a single disorder, those that evaluated acute and subacute care units, and those in which patients were admitted to the acute geriatric unit after three or more days of being admitted to hospital. Two investigators independently selected the studies and extracted the data. Results 11 studies were included of which five were randomised trials, four non-randomised trials, and two case-control studies. The randomised trials showed that compared with older people admitted to conventional care units those admitted to acute geriatric units had a lower risk of functional decline at discharge (combined odds ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.99) and were more likely to live at home after discharge (1.30, 1.11 to 1.52), with no differences in case fatality (0.83, 0.60 to 1.14). The global analysis of all studies, including non-randomised trials, showed similar results. Conclusions Care of people aged 65 or more with acute medical disorders in acute geriatric units produces a functional benefit compared with conventional hospital care, and increases the likelihood of living at home after discharge. PMID:19164393

  17. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  18. Acute sensory responses of nonsmokers at very low environmental tobacco smoke concentrations in controlled laboratory settings.

    PubMed Central

    Junker, M H; Danuser, B; Monn, C; Koller, T

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a basis for effectively protecting nonsmokers from acute sensory impacts and for preventing deterioration of indoor air quality caused by environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) emissions. With an olfactory experiment we determined odor detection thresholds (OT) of sidestream ETS (sETS), and with a full-body exposure experiment we investigated sensory symptoms at very low sETS exposure concentrations. OT concentrations for sETS are three and more orders of magnitude lower than ETS concentrations measured in field settings and correspond to a fresh air dilution volume of > 19,000 m(3) per cigarette, over 100 times more than had previously been suggested for acceptable indoor air conditions. Eye and nasal irritations were observed at one order of magnitude lower sETS concentrations than previously reported, corresponding to a fresh air dilution volume of > 3,000 m(3) per cigarette. These findings have great practical implications for defining indoor air quality standards in indoor compartments where ETS emissions occur. Our study strongly supports the implementation and control of smoking policies such as segregating smoking areas from areas where smoking is not permitted or instituting smoking bans in public buildings. PMID:11675270

  19. Successful Escape of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients from Hospital to Home: Clinical Note

    PubMed Central

    Tei, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    I describe four patients who successfully escaped from the hospital to their own home during the acute phase of ischemic stroke. This is a very rare phenomenon (seen in 0.35% of 1150 consecutive patients with first ischemic stroke within 24 h after onset), but the patients had rather uniform clinical characteristics. All were male, around 60 years old, had moderate to severe aphasia (Wernicke’s in 2 patients, Broca's in 1, and transcortical motor in 1), and cerebral infarction of the left middle cerebral artery territory. None had significant motor weakness, hemispatial neglect, or hemianopia at the time of escape. Overall functional outcome was good for all but one patient, but aphasia persisted in three. Although none of the four patients sustained serious injury during the escape, patients with such clinical characteristics must be managed cautiously to prevent serious consequences. PMID:22425726

  20. Viruses associated with acute respiratory infections in children admitted to hospital in Naples, 1979-82*

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, D.; Ribera, G.; Attena, F.; Schioppa, F.; Romano, F.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of the virological and epidemiological features of acute respiratory diseases in children admitted to hospital in Naples has been carried out; the results of three years of research are reported. Between April 1979 and March 1982, 787 nasopharyngeal swabs were examined. There were 287 (36.5%) positive samples, with the highest isolation rate being found in children with bronchiolitis (39.5%). Among the different viruses isolated, adenovirus was the most common (161 positive samples, 56%); this agent appeared regularly in the different age and disease groups, with a marked increase in prevalence during the winter of 1980. Isolations of herpesvirus, respiratory syncytial virus and enterovirus were less frequent; however, echovirus 3 caused an epidemic in the summer of 1980. Influenza and parainfluenza viruses were seen fairly infrequently; two cases of Reye's syndrome yielded strains of influenza B. PMID:6325032

  1. Enteropathogens associated with acute diarrhea in community and hospital patients in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Oyofo, Buhari A; Subekti, Decy; Tjaniadi, Periska; Machpud, Nunung; Komalarini, S; Setiawan, B; Simanjuntak, C; Punjabi, Narain; Corwin, Andrew L; Wasfy, Momtaz; Campbell, James R; Lesmana, Murad

    2002-10-11

    The prevalence of bacteria, parasite and viral pathogens in 3875 patients with diarrhea in community and hospital settings from March 1997 through August 1999 in Jakarta, Indonesia was determined using routine bacteriology and molecular assay techniques. Bacterial pathogens isolated from hospital patients were, in decreasing frequency, Vibrio cholerae O1, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter jejuni, while S. flexneri, V. cholerae O1, Salmonella spp. and C. jejuni were isolated from the community patients. V. cholerae O1 was isolated more frequently (P<0.005) from the hospital patients than the community patients. Overall, bacterial pathogens were isolated from 538 of 3875 (14%) enrolled cases of diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli were detected in 218 (18%) of 1244 rectal swabs. A small percentage of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (1%) and of Clostridium difficile (1.3%) was detected. Parasitic examination of 389 samples resulted in 43 (11%) positives comprising Ascaris lumbricoides (1.5%), Blastocystis hominis (5.7%), Giardia lamblia (0.8%), Trichuris trichiura (2.1%) and Endolimax nana (0.5%). Rotavirus (37.5%), adenovirus (3.3%) and Norwalk-like virus (17.6%) were also detected. Antimicrobial resistance was observed among some isolates. Bacterial isolates were susceptible to quinolones, with the exception of some isolates of C. jejuni which were resistant to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and norfloxacin. Data obtained from this community- and hospital-based study will enable the Indonesian Ministry of Health to plan relevant studies on diarrheal diseases in the archipelago.

  2. Efficacy of Infection Control Interventions in Reducing the Spread of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms in the Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    D'Agata, Erika M. C.; Horn, Mary Ann; Ruan, Shigui; Webb, Glenn F.; Wares, Joanna R.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) continue to spread in hospitals globally, but the population-level impact of recommended preventive strategies and the relative benefit of individual strategies targeting all MDRO in the hospital setting are unclear. To explore the dynamics of MDRO transmission in the hospital, we develop a model extending data from clinical individual-level studies to quantify the impact of hand hygiene, contact precautions, reducing antimicrobial exposure and screening surveillance cultures in decreasing the prevalence of MDRO colonization and infection. The effect of an ongoing increase in the influx of patients colonized with MDRO into the hospital setting is also quantified. We find that most recommended strategies have substantial effect in decreasing the prevalence of MDRO over time. However, screening for asymptomatic MDRO colonization among patients who are not receiving antimicrobials is of minimal value in reducing the spread of MDRO. PMID:22363420

  3. Strategic change in hospitals: an examination of the response of the acute care hospital to the turbulent environment of the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Ginn, G O

    1990-10-01

    Changes in strategies of hospitals responding to the turbulent health care environment of the 1980s are examined both in the aggregate and from the perspective of the individual hospital. The Miles and Snow typology is used to determine strategy type. Both investor-owned and not-for-profit hospitals were well represented in the broad mix of hospital types sampled. In addition, freestanding hospitals and members of multihospital systems were present in the sample. Last, hospitals of all sizes were included. Strategic change was evaluated by classifying hospitals by strategy type in each of two consecutive five-year time periods (1976 through 1980 and 1981 through 1985). Changes in reimbursement policies, the emergence of new technologies, changing consumer expectations, and new sources of competition made the environment for hospitals progressively more turbulent in the latter period and provided an opportune setting to evaluate strategic change. Results showed that a significant number of hospitals did change strategy as the environment changed, and in the direction anticipated. Logistic regression was used to determine whether prior strategy, type of ownership, system membership, or size would predict which hospitals would change strategy as the environment changed: only prior strategy was found to be a predictor of strategy change.

  4. Strategic change in hospitals: an examination of the response of the acute care hospital to the turbulent environment of the 1980s.

    PubMed Central

    Ginn, G O

    1990-01-01

    Changes in strategies of hospitals responding to the turbulent health care environment of the 1980s are examined both in the aggregate and from the perspective of the individual hospital. The Miles and Snow typology is used to determine strategy type. Both investor-owned and not-for-profit hospitals were well represented in the broad mix of hospital types sampled. In addition, freestanding hospitals and members of multihospital systems were present in the sample. Last, hospitals of all sizes were included. Strategic change was evaluated by classifying hospitals by strategy type in each of two consecutive five-year time periods (1976 through 1980 and 1981 through 1985). Changes in reimbursement policies, the emergence of new technologies, changing consumer expectations, and new sources of competition made the environment for hospitals progressively more turbulent in the latter period and provided an opportune setting to evaluate strategic change. Results showed that a significant number of hospitals did change strategy as the environment changed, and in the direction anticipated. Logistic regression was used to determine whether prior strategy, type of ownership, system membership, or size would predict which hospitals would change strategy as the environment changed: only prior strategy was found to be a predictor of strategy change. PMID:2211128

  5. Adaption and validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire for the Danish hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Sabroe, Svend; Bartels, Paul; Mainz, Jan; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Measuring and developing a safe culture in health care is a focus point in creating highly reliable organizations being successful in avoiding patient safety incidents where these could normally be expected. Questionnaires can be used to capture a snapshot of an employee’s perceptions of patient safety culture. A commonly used instrument to measure safety climate is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The purpose of this study was to adapt the SAQ for use in Danish hospitals, assess its construct validity and reliability, and present benchmark data. Materials and methods The SAQ was translated and adapted for the Danish setting (SAQ-DK). The SAQ-DK was distributed to 1,263 staff members from 31 in- and outpatient units (clinical areas) across five somatic and one psychiatric hospitals through meeting administration, hand delivery, and mailing. Construct validity and reliability were tested in a cross-sectional study. Goodness-of-fit indices from confirmatory factor analysis were reported along with inter-item correlations, Cronbach’s alpha (α), and item and subscale scores. Results Participation was 73.2% (N=925) of invited health care workers. Goodness-of-fit indices from the confirmatory factor analysis showed: c2=1496.76, P<0.001, CFI 0.901, RMSEA (90% CI) 0.053 (0.050–0056), Probability RMSEA (p close)=0.057. Inter-scale correlations between the factors showed moderate-to-high correlations. The scale stress recognition had significant negative correlations with each of the other scales. Questionnaire reliability was high, (α=0.89), and scale reliability ranged from α=0.70 to α=0.86 for the six scales. Proportions of participants with a positive attitude to each of the six SAQ scales did not differ between the somatic and psychiatric health care staff. Substantial variability at the unit level in all six scale mean scores was found within the somatic and the psychiatric samples. Conclusion SAQ-DK showed good construct validity and

  6. Graduated compression stockings to prevent venous thromboembolism in hospital: evidence from patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Kearon, Clive; O'Donnell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of death in hospital patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is cost-saving in high-risk patients. Low-dose anticoagulation is very effective at preventing VTE but increases bleeding. Graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices are also used to prevent VTE and do not increase bleeding, which makes their use appealing in patients who cannot tolerate bleeding, such as patients with acute stroke. Studies that evaluated mechanical methods of preventing VTE were small and mainly used asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), detected using screening tests, as the study outcome. The recently published CLOTS Trial 1 (Clots in Legs Or sTockings after Stroke) compared thigh-level compression stockings with no stockings in about 2500 patients with stroke and immobility, and found that thigh-level stockings were not effective. Indirectly, the findings of this study question the ability of stockings to prevent VTE in other patient groups, including those after surgery. CLOTS 1 compared thigh-level and below-knee stockings in about 3000 patients with acute stroke. Given that thigh-level stockings were ineffective in CLOTS 1, it is surprising that they were more effective than below-knee stockings in CLOTS Trial 2. A possible explanation is that below-knee stockings increase DVT, although this seems unlikely. CLOTS 1 and CLOTS 2 question whether graduated compression stockings prevent VTE and suggest the need for further trials evaluating their efficacy in medical and surgical patients.

  7. Nurses' knowledge of and compliance with universal precautions in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chan, Regina; Molassiotis, Alexander; Chan, Eunice; Chan, Virene; Ho, Becky; Lai, Chit-ying; Lam, Pauline; Shit, Frances; Yiu, Ivy

    2002-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the nurses' knowledge of and compliance with Universal Precautions (UP) in an acute hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 450 nurses were randomly selected from a population of acute care nurses and 306 were successfully recruited in the study. The study revealed that the nurses' knowledge of UP was inadequate. In addition, UP was not only insufficiently and inappropriately applied, but also selectively practiced. Nearly all respondents knew that used needles should be disposed of in a sharps' box after injections. However, nurses had difficulty in distinguishing between deep body fluids and other general body secretions that are not considered infectious in UP. A high compliance was reported regarding hand-washing, disposal of needles and glove usage. However, the use of other protective wear such as masks and goggles was uncommon. The results also showed no significant relationships between the nurses' knowledge and compliance with UP. It is recommended that UP educational programmes need to consider attitudes in conjunction with empirical knowledge. Nurse managers and occupational health nurses should take a leadership role to ensure safe practices are used in the care of patients.

  8. Comparative analysis of acute toxic poisoning in 2003 and 2011: analysis of 3 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jung-Youn; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Hong, Yun-Sik; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Social factors may affect the available sources of toxic substances and causes of poisoning; and these factors may change over time. Additionally, understanding the characteristics of patients with acute toxic poisoning is important for treating such patients. Therefore, this study investigated the characteristics of patients with toxic poisoning. Patients visiting one of 3 hospitals in 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Data on all patients who were admitted to the emergency departments with acute toxic poisoning were retrospectively obtained from medical records. Total 939 patients were analyzed. The average age of patients was 40.0 ± 20 yr, and 335 (36.9%) patients were men. Among the elements that did not change over time were the facts that suicide was the most common cause, that alcohol consumption was involved in roughly 1 of 4 cases, and that there were more women than men. Furthermore, acetaminophen and doxylamine remained the most common poisoning agents. In conclusion, the average patient age and psychotic drug poisoning has increased over time, and the use of lavage treatment has decreased.

  9. Adaptation and implementation of standardized order sets in a network of multi-hospital corporations in rural Ontario.

    PubMed

    Meleskie, Jessica; Eby, Don

    2009-01-01

    Standardized, preprinted or computer-generated physician orders are an attractive project for organizations that wish to improve the quality of patient care. The successful development and maintenance of order sets is a major undertaking. This article recounts the collaborative experience of the Grey Bruce Health Network in adapting and implementing an existing set of physician orders for use in its three hospital corporations. An Order Set Committee composed of primarily front-line staff was given authority over the order set development, approval and implementation processes. This arrangement bypassed the traditional approval process and facilitated the rapid implementation of a large number of order sets in a short time period.

  10. The Use of Albuterol in Young Infants Hospitalized with Acute RSV Bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Michael T; Doerr, Laura E; Gaughan, John P

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of albuterol use in young infants admitted with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis with regards to length of time on supplemental oxygen and length of stay (LOS). To consider the possibility that albuterol use may increase the need for supplemental oxygen and increase LOS. Design, Setting, and Participants. Full-term infants between the ages of 11 days and 90 days (N = 316) were included in this retrospective study. Infants included were hospitalized with a diagnosis of RSV bronchiolitis at a university-affiliated children's hospital. Results. In 4 of 5 severity groups, patients who received albuterol required more time on supplemental oxygen and had longer LOS. The differences only reached statistical significance in one of the severity groups in regards to LOS. Conclusions. The use of albuterol does not appear to be useful in the treatment of young infants with RSV bronchiolitis and may actually be harmful, in regards to increased supplemental oxygen need.

  11. The relationship between business process re-engineering and Internet usage: survey of acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    1999-12-01

    The data from a national survey of acute care hospitals was used for analysis. Hatcher discusses the complete questionnaire, data collection procedure, and sample selection. The relationship between business process re-engineering, total quality management, innovation system approaches, and Internet usage and potential usage will be reported and discussed.

  12. Molecular detection of human calicivirus in young children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Melbourne, Australia, during 1999.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, C D; Bishop, R F

    2001-07-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR and sequence analysis identified calciviruses in 32 of 60 stool specimens (negative for other enteric pathogens) obtained from children admitted to our hospital with acute gastroenteritis. The overall annual incidence rate for calcivirus was 9% (32 of 354 children). Molecular analysis identified 30 "Norwalk-like virus" genogroup II (predominantly Lordsdale cluster) and 2 "Sapporo-like virus" strains.

  13. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Nurse Planning Information Series 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John P.; And Others

    A critical review of literature on factors affecting nurse staffing in acute care hospitals, with particular regard for the consequences of a movement from team nursing to primary nursing care, was conducted. The literature search revealed a need for more research on the philosophy of nursing and nursing goals and policy as they relate to nurse…

  14. Outcomes associated with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder requiring hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S; Rajesh, BP; Chaudhury, Alisha; Hattiholi, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (AECOPD) are known to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality and have a significant socioeconomic impact. The factors that determine frequent hospital readmissions for AECOPD are poorly understood. The present study was done to ascertain failures rates following AECOPD and to evaluate factors associated with frequent readmissions. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 186 patients with COPD with one or more admissions for acute exacerbations in a tertiary care hospital. Frequency of previous re-admissions for AECOPD in the past year, and clinical characteristics, including spirometry were ascertained in the stable state both before discharge and at 6-month post-discharge. Failure rates following treatment were ascertained during the follow-up period. All the patients were followed up for a period of 2 years after discharge to evaluate re-admissions for the AECOPD. Results: Of 186 COPD patients admitted for AECOPD, 54% had one or more readmission, and another 45% had two or more readmissions over a period of 2 years. There was a high prevalence of current or ex-heavy smokers, associated co-morbidity, underweight patients, low vaccination prevalence and use of domiciliary oxygen therapy among COPD patients. A total of 12% mortality was observed in the present study. Immediate failure rates after first exacerbation was observed to be 34.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that duration >20 years (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.10-0.86), use of Tiotropium (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12-4.69) and use of co-amoxiclav during first admission (OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.21-4.79) were significantly associated with higher immediate failure rates. The multivariate analysis for repeated admissions revealed that disease duration >10 years (OR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.27-0.93), low usage of inhaled ICS + LABA (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.08-4.54), and MRC dyspnea grade >3 (OR = 2.51; 95% CI: 1.08-5.82) were

  15. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cabri, Giulio; Carretti, Eleonora; Galli, Giacomo; Giambalvo, Nina; Rioli, Giulia; Saraceni, Serena; Spiga, Giulia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Ferri, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI), which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town), who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for <72 hours. We collected the demographic and clinical variables of our sample (n=135). We statistically analyzed PDI scores, performing Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation. We concomitantly administered to our sample other scales (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD) with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient =0.93). The factorial analysis showed the following three factors with eigenvalue >1 (Kaiser’s criterion), which explained >80% of total variance with good internal consistency: 1) “Loss of self-identity and social role”, 2) “Anxiety and uncertainty for future” and 3) “Loss of personal autonomy”. The PDI and the three-factor scores were statistically significantly positively correlated with the Hamilton Scales for Depression and Anxiety but not with other scale scores. Conclusion Our preliminary research suggests that PDI can be a reliable tool to assess patients’ dignity perception in a psychiatric setting, until now

  16. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  17. Antimicrobial Stewardship in a Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Using Offsite Electronic Medical Record Audit.

    PubMed

    Beaulac, Kirthana; Corcione, Silvia; Epstein, Lauren; Davidson, Lisa E; Doron, Shira

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To offer antimicrobial stewardship to a long-term acute care hospital using telemedicine. METHODS We conducted an uninterrupted time-series analysis to measure the impact of antimicrobial stewardship on hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates and antimicrobial use. Simple linear regression was used to analyze changes in antimicrobial use; Poisson regression was used to estimate the incidence rate ratio in CDI rates. The preimplementation period was April 1, 2010-March 31, 2011; the postimplementation period was April 1, 2011-March 31, 2014. RESULTS During the preimplementation period, total antimicrobial usage was 266 defined daily doses (DDD)/1,000 patient-days (PD); it rose 4.54 (95% CI, -0.19 to 9.28) per month then significantly decreased from preimplementation to postimplementation (-6.58 DDD/1,000 PD [95% CI, -11.48 to -1.67]; P=.01). The same trend was observed for antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (-2.97 DDD/1,000 PD per month [95% CI, -5.65 to -0.30]; P=.03). There was a decrease in usage of anti-CDI antibiotics by 50.4 DDD/1,000 PD per month (95% CI, -71.4 to -29.2; P<.001) at program implementation that was maintained afterwards. Anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics increased after implementation (30.6 DDD/1,000 PD per month [95% CI, 4.9-56.3]; P=.02) but with ongoing education this trend reversed. Intervention was associated with a decrease in hospital-acquired CDI (incidence rate ratio, 0.57 [95% CI, 0.35-0.92]; P=.02). CONCLUSION Antimicrobial stewardship using an electronic medical record via remote access led to a significant decrease in antibacterial usage and a decrease in CDI rates.

  18. Activity Monitoring and Heart Rate Variability as Indicators of Fall Risk: Proof-of-Concept for Application of Wearable Sensors in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Razjouyan, Javad; Grewal, Gurtej Singh; Rishel, Cindy; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Mohler, Jane; Najafi, Bijan

    2017-03-02

    Growing concern for falls in acute care settings could be addressed with objective evaluation of fall risk. The current proof-of-concept study evaluated the feasibility of using a chest-worn sensor during hospitalization to determine fall risk. Physical activity and heart rate variability (HRV) of 31 volunteers admitted to a 29-bed adult inpatient unit were recorded using a single chest-worn sensor. Sensor data during the first 24-hour recording were analyzed. Participants were stratified using the Hendrich II fall risk assessment into high and low fall risk groups. Univariate analysis revealed age, daytime activity, nighttime side lying posture, and HRV were significantly different between groups. Results suggest feasibility of wearable technology to consciously monitor physical activity, sleep postures, and HRV as potential markers of fall risk in the acute care setting. Further study is warranted to confirm the results and examine the efficacy of the proposed wearable technology to manage falls in hospitals. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.].

  19. Bordetella pertussis in infants hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms remains a concern

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preliminary results suggest that pertussis infection might be considered in infants during a seasonal respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak. Methods In order to analyze clinical features and laboratory findings in infants with pertussis hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms during a seasonal RSV outbreak, we conducted a retrospective single-center study on 19 infants with pertussis (6 boys; median age 72 days) and 19 matched controls (RSV-bronchiolitis), hospitalized from October 2008 to April 2010. B. pertussis and RSV were detected from nasopharyngeal washes with Real Time-PCR. Results Infants with pertussis were less often breastfeed than infants with RSV bronchiolitis (63.2% vs 89.5%; p <0.06). Clinically, significantly fewer infants with pertussis than controls had more episodes of whooping cough (63.2% vs 0.0%; p < 0.001) and also less frequently fever at admission (15.8% vs 68.4%; p <0.01), apnea (52.6% vs 10.5%; p <0.006), and cyanosis (52.6% vs 10.5%; p < 0.006). Infants with pertussis had more often no abnormal chest sounds on auscultation than infants with RSV bronchiolitis (0% vs 42,1%; p < 0.005). The absolute blood lymphocyte and eosinophil counts were higher in infants with B. pertussis than in controls with bronchiolitis (23886 ± 16945 vs 10725 ± 4126 cells/mm3, p < 0.0001 and 13.653 ± 10.430 vs 4.730 ± 2.400 cells/mm3, p < 0.001). The molecular analysis of 2 B. pertussis isolates for ptxA1, ptxP3, and prn2 genes showed the presence of gene variants. Conclusions When infants are hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms, physicians should suspect a pertussis infection, seek for specific clinical symptoms, investigate lymphocyte and eosinophil counts and thus diagnose infection early enough to allow treatment. PMID:24209790

  20. The Impact of Hospital/Surgeon Volume on Acute Renal Failure and Mortality in Liver Transplantation: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lin, Jr-Rung; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the case volume of surgeons and hospitals affects the rates of postoperative complications and survival after liver transplantation. This population-based retrospective cohort study included 2938 recipients of liver transplantation performed between 1998 and 2012, enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. They were divided into two groups, according to the cumulative case volume of their operating surgeons and the case volume of their hospitals. The duration of intensive care unit stay and post-transplantation hospitalization, postoperative complications, and mortality were analyzed. The results showed that, in the low and high case volume surgeons groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred at the rate of 14.11% and 5.86% (p<0.0001), and the overall mortality rates were 19.61% and 12.44% (p<0.0001). In the low and high case volume hospital groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred in 11% and 7.11% of the recipients (p = 0.0004), and the overall mortality was 18.44% and 12.86% (p<0.0001). These findings suggest that liver transplantation recipients operated on higher case volume surgeons or in higher case volume hospitals have a lower rate of acute renal failure and mortality. PMID:27706183

  1. Rates and predictors of depression status among caregivers of patients with COPD hospitalized for acute exacerbations: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; García-Guillamón, Gloria; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; García-Vidal, José Antonio; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization is common for acute exacerbation of COPD, but little is known about its impact on the mental health of caregivers. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the rates and predictors of depressive symptoms in caregivers at the time of hospitalization for acute exacerbation of COPD and to identify the probability and predictors of subsequent changes in depressive status 3 months after discharge. Materials and methods This was a prospective study. Depression symptoms were measured in 87 caregivers of patients hospitalized for exacerbation at hospitalization and 3 months after discharge. We measured factors from four domains: context of care, caregiving demands, caregiver resources, and patient characteristics. Univariate and multivariate multiple logistic regressions were used to determine the predictors of depression at hospitalization and subsequent changes at 3 months. Results A total of 45 caregivers reported depression at the time of hospitalization. After multiple adjustments, spousal relationship, dyspnea, and severe airflow limitation were the strongest independent predictors of depression at hospitalization. Of these 45 caregivers, 40% had a remission of their depression 3 months after discharge. In contrast, 16.7% of caregivers who were not depressive at hospitalization became depressive at 3 months. Caregivers caring >20 hours per week for patients with dependencies had decreased odds of remission, and patients having dependencies after discharge increased the odds of caregivers becoming depressed. Conclusion Depressive symptoms are common among caregivers when patients are hospitalized for exacerbation of COPD. Although illness factors are determinants of depression at hospitalization, patient dependence determines fluctuations in the depressive status of caregivers. PMID:28008245

  2. Parental perceptions of giardiasis: a study in an outpatient paediatric hospital setting in havana, cuba.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Pedro; Escobedo, Angel A; Salazar, Yohana; Alfonso, Maydel; Avila, Ivonne; Cimerman, Sergio; Dawkins, Isabel V

    2013-01-01

    Background. Giardia lamblia is an important cause of diarrhoeal disease throughout the world. Giardiasis- a mild and self-limiting disease that this protozoan causes- is perceived as a harmful disease. Aim. To explore the general level of awareness about giardiasis, clinical features, mode of transmission, prevention, and consequences and describe the sources and channels of information caregivers would prefer using to be informed about this disease. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among caregivers attending to the outpatient paediatric hospital setting in Havana. Results. A total of 202 caregivers were interviewed. Nearly 73% considered giardiasis as a modern problem, and 39% considered that it could be a fatal disease. Although 76.7% were aware that small intestine is the organ affected, other localizations were cited. Abdominal pain and diarrhoea were recognized as the commonest symptoms. Around one-third could identify that giardiasis may spread through drinking unboiled water and unwashed vegetables other incorrect ways were mentioned; respondents with more than 12 years of formal education were more likely to have better knowledge. Discussion. Strategies to control giardiasis need to be through an integrated approach aiming at boosting caregivers' knowledge and encouraging healthcare workers to act as a readily available source for health information.

  3. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: a multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Kroezen, M; Mistiaen, P; van Dijk, L; Groenewegen, P P; Francke, A L

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and healthcare professionals renegotiate formal policies in the workplace. This paper studies the division of jurisdictional control over prescribing between nurse specialists and medical specialists in the workplace, and examines the relationship between workplace jurisdiction and legal jurisdiction over prescribing. Data collection took place in the Netherlands during the first half of 2013. The study used in-depth interviews with fifteen nurse specialists and fourteen medical specialists, non-participant observation of nurse specialists' prescribing consultations and document analysis. Great variety was found in the extent to which and way in which nurse specialists' legal prescriptive authority had been implemented. These findings suggest that there is considerable discrepancy between the division of jurisdictional control over prescribing at the macro (legal) level and the division at the micro (workplace) level.

  4. Governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting: a mixed methods study1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, José Luís Guedes; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to elaborate an interpretative model for the governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting. Method: a mixed methods study with concurrent triangulation strategy, using data from a cross-sectional study with 106 nurses and a Grounded Theory study with 63 participants. The quantitative data were collected through the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised and underwent descriptive statistical analysis. Qualitative data were obtained from interviews and analyzed through initial, selective and focused coding. Results: based on the results obtained with the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, it is possible to state that nurses perceived that they had autonomy, control over the environment, good relationships with physicians and organizational support for nursing governance. The governance of the professional nursing practice is based on the management of nursing care and services carried out by the nurses. To perform these tasks, nurses aim to get around the constraints of the organizational support and develop management knowledge and skills. Conclusion: it is important to reorganize the structures and processes of nursing governance, especially the support provided by the organization for the management practices of nurses. PMID:26625992

  5. Cancer patient experience with navigation service in an urban hospital setting: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Gotlib Conn, L; Hammond Mobilio, M; Rotstein, O D; Blacker, S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer patient navigators are increasingly present on the oncology health care team. The positive impact of navigation on cancer care is recognised, yet a clear understanding of what the patient navigator does and how he/she executes the role continues to emerge. This study aimed to understand cancer patients' perceptions of, and experiences with patient navigation, exploring how navigation may enhance the patient experience in an urban hospital setting where patients with varying needs are treated. A qualitative study using a constructionist approach was conducted. Fifteen colorectal cancer patients participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. Data were analyzed inductively and iteratively. Findings provide insight into two central aspects of cancer navigation: navigation as patient-centred coordination and explanation of clinical care, and navigation as individualised, holistic support. Within these themes, the key benefits of navigation from the patients' perspective were demystifying the system; ensuring comprehension, managing expectations; and, delivering patient-centred care. The navigator provided individualised and extended family support; a holistic approach; and, addressed emotional and psychological needs. These findings provide a means to operationalise and validate an emerging role description and competency framework for the cancer navigator who must identify and adapt to patients' varying needs throughout the cancer care continuum.

  6. In-Hospital Outcome of Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results from Royal Hospital Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Mukhaini, Mohammed; Al-Riyami, Abdullah; El-Deeb, Mohammad; Rahman, Said Abdul; Al-Riyami, Mohammed B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiogenic shock (CS) is still the leading cause of in-hospital mortality in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to determine the in-hospital mortality and clinical outcome in AMI patients presenting with CS in a tertiary hospital in Oman. Methods This retrospective observational study included patients admitted to the cardiology department between January 2013 and December 2014. A purposive sampling technique was used, and 63 AMI patients with CS admitted to (36.5%) or transferred from a regional hospital (63.5%) were selected for the study. Results Of 63 patients, 73% (n = 46) were Omani and 27% (n = 17) were expatriates: 79% were male and 21% were female. The mean age of patients was 60±12 years. The highest incidence of CS (30%) was observed in the 51–60 year age group. Diabetes mellitus (43%) and hypertension (40%) were the predominant risk factors. Ninety-two percent of patients had ST-elevation MI, 58.7% patients were thrombolysed, and 8% had non-ST-elevation MI. Three-quarters (75%) of CS patients had severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (defined as ejection fraction <30%). Coronary angiogram showed single vessel disease in 17%, double vessel disease in 40%, and triple vessel disease in 32% and left main disease in 11%. The majority of the patients (93.6%) underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), among them 23 (36.5%) underwent primary PCI. In-hospital mortality was 52.4% in this study. Conclusions CS in AMI patients presenting to a tertiary hospital in Oman have high in-hospital mortality despite the majority undergoing PCI. Even though the in-hospital mortality is comparable to other studies and registries, there is an urgent need to determine the causes and find any remedies to provide better care for such patients, specifically concentrating on the early transfer of patients from regional hospitals for early PCI. PMID:26814946

  7. The barriers to and enablers of providing reasonably adjusted health services to people with intellectual disabilities in acute hospitals: evidence from a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Goulding, Lucy; Giatras, Nikoletta; Abraham, Elisabeth; Gillard, Steve; White, Sarah; Edwards, Christine; Hollins, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the factors that promote and compromise the implementation of reasonably adjusted healthcare services for patients with intellectual disabilities in acute National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Design A mixed-methods study involving interviews, questionnaires and participant observation (July 2011–March 2013). Setting Six acute NHS hospital trusts in England. Methods Reasonable adjustments for people with intellectual disabilities were identified through the literature. Data were collected on implementation and staff understanding of these adjustments. Results Data collected included staff questionnaires (n=990), staff interviews (n=68), interviews with adults with intellectual disabilities (n=33), questionnaires (n=88) and interviews (n=37) with carers of patients with intellectual disabilities, and expert panel discussions (n=42). Hospital strategies that supported implementation of reasonable adjustments did not reliably translate into consistent provision of such adjustments. Good practice often depended on the knowledge, understanding and flexibility of individual staff and teams, leading to the delivery of reasonable adjustments being haphazard throughout the organisation. Major barriers included: lack of effective systems for identifying and flagging patients with intellectual disabilities, lack of staff understanding of the reasonable adjustments that may be needed, lack of clear lines of responsibility and accountability for implementing reasonable adjustments, and lack of allocation of additional funding and resources. Key enablers were the Intellectual Disability Liaison Nurse and the ward manager. Conclusions The evidence suggests that ward culture, staff attitudes and staff knowledge are crucial in ensuring that hospital services are accessible to vulnerable patients. The authors suggest that flagging the need for specific reasonable adjustments, rather than the vulnerable condition itself, may address some of the barriers

  8. China PEACE risk estimation tool for in-hospital death from acute myocardial infarction: an early risk classification tree for decisions about fibrinolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Li, Jing; Masoudi, Frederick A; Spertus, John A; Lin, Zhenqiu; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives As the predominant approach to acute reperfusion for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in many countries, fibrinolytic therapy provides a relative risk reduction for death of ∼16% across the range of baseline risk. For patients with low baseline mortality risk, fibrinolytic therapy may therefore provide little benefit, which may be offset by the risk of major bleeding. We aimed to construct a tool to determine if it is possible to identify a low-risk group among fibrinolytic therapy-eligible patients. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE) study includes a nationally representative retrospective sample of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in 162 hospitals. Participants 3741 patients with STEMI who were fibrinolytic-eligible but did not receive reperfusion therapy. Main outcome measures In-hospital mortality, which was defined as a composite of death occurring within hospitalisation or withdrawal from treatment due to a terminal status at discharge. Results In the study cohort, the in-hospital mortality was 14.7%. In the derivation cohort and the validation cohort, the combination of systolic blood pressure (≥100 mm Hg), age (<60 years old) and gender (male) identified one-fifth of the cohort with an average mortality rate of <3.0%. Half of this low risk group—those with non-anterior AMI—had an average in-hospital death risk of 1.5%. Conclusions Nearly, one in five patients with STEMI who are eligible for fibrinolytic therapy are at a low risk for in-hospital death. Three simple factors available at the time of presentation can identify these individuals and support decision-making about the use of fibrinolytic therapy. Trial registration number NCT01624883. PMID:27798032

  9. Role of hepcidin in the setting of hypoferremia during acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Deschemin, Jean-Christophe; Vaulont, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease (also called anemia of inflammation) is an acquired disorder of iron homeostasis associated with infection, malignancy, organ failure, trauma, or other causes of inflammation. It is now widely accepted that induction of hepcidin expression in response to inflammation might explain the characteristic hypoferremia associated with this condition. To determine the role of hepcidin in acute inflammation and the regulation of its receptor, the iron exporter, ferroportin, wild-type, heterozygote and hepcidin knockout mice (Hepc-/-) were challenged with sublethal doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six hours after injection, ferroportin mRNA and protein levels were assessed in the duodenum and the spleen and plasma iron was determined. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin is crucial, though not the sole mediator of LPS-mediated acute hypoferremia, and also that hepcidin major contribution relies on decreased ferroportin protein levels found in the spleen. Furthermore, we establish that LPS-mediated repression of the membrane iron transporter DMT1 and oxidoreductase Dcytb in the duodenum is independent of hepcidin. Finally, our results in the hepc+/- mice indicate that elevated hepcidin gene expression is not a prerequisite for the setting of hypoferremia during early inflammatory response, and they highlight the intimate crosstalk between inflammatory and iron-responsive pathways for the control of hepcidin.

  10. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Scrub Typhus and Murine Typhus among Hospitalized Patients with Acute Undifferentiated Fever in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Sugihiro; Cuong, Ngo Chi; Tra, Doan Thu; Doan, Yen Hai; Shimizu, Kenta; Tuan, Nguyen Quang; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Mai, Le Quynh; Duc-Anh, Dang; Ando, Shuji; Arikawa, Jiro; Parry, Christopher M; Ariyoshi, Koya; Thuy, Pham Thanh

    2015-05-01

    A descriptive study on rickettsiosis was conducted at the largest referral hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam, to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of specific rickettsiosis. Between March 2001 and February 2003, we enrolled 579 patients with acute undifferentiated fever (AUF), excluding patients with malaria, dengue fever, and typhoid fever, and serologically tested for Orientia tsutsugamushi and Rickettsia typhi. Of the patients, 237 (40.9%) and 193 (33.3%) had scrub and murine typhus, respectively, and 149 (25.7%) had neither of them (non-scrub and murine typhus [non-ST/MT]). The proportion of murine typhus was highest among patients living in Hanoi whereas that of scrub typhus was highest in national or regional border areas. The presence of an eschar, dyspnea, hypotension, and lymphadenopathy was significantly associated with a diagnosis of scrub typhus (OR = 46.56, 10.90, 9.01, and 7.92, respectively). Patients with murine typhus were less likely to have these findings but more likely to have myalgia, rash, and relative bradycardia (OR = 1.60, 1.56, and 1.45, respectively). Scrub typhus and murine typhus were shown to be common causes of AUF in northern Vietnam although the occurrence of spotted fever group rickettsiae was not determined. Clinical and epidemiological information may help local clinicians make clinical diagnosis of specific rickettsioses in a resource-limited setting.

  11. Selection of first-line i.v. antibiotics for acute pyelonephritis in patients requiring emergency hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Yasufuku, Tomihiko; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamashita, Masuo; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2011-04-01

    Febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) often require the intravenous infusion of antibiotics and/or hospitalization. Acute pyelonephritis (AP) is one of the most severe forms of UTI, and the antibiotics we should use as the first line and the risk factors for treatment failure remain controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of i.v. antibiotics selected for the treatment of febrile AP and to examine the risk factors for antibiotic resistance. We set risk factors for antibiotic treatment failure such as age, sex, and the presence of underlying urinary tract disease. We classified all cases into 49 cases of complicated AP and 24 cases of uncomplicated AP according to the presence of underlying urinary tract diseases, and examined the characteristics of the patients and the efficacy of the antibiotics used in this study. We investigated risk factors which relate to initial treatment failure and the duration of antibiotic treatment. Initial antibiotic treatment failure was significantly correlated to C-reactive protein in complicated AP and to positive blood culture in uncomplicated AP. We revealed a significant correlation between the duration of the given antibiotics and diabetes mellitus or positive blood culture in uncomplicated AP, and tazobactam/piperacillin was significantly related to prolongation of antibiotic treatment in complicated AP. In conclusion, in this study, a positive blood culture was the representative risk factor that related to both initial treatment failure and longer duration of the given antibiotics in uncomplicated AP.

  12. Ipratropium bromide for acute asthma exacerbations in the emergency setting: a literature review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Dotson, Kurtis; Dallman, Michael; Bowman, C Michael; Titus, M Olivia

    2009-10-01

    Since the 1970s, when inhaled anticholinergic agents were first introduced as adjunct therapies for the immediate treatment of pediatric asthma exacerbations, several trials have shown varying degrees of benefit from their use as bronchodilators in combination with inhaled short-acting beta-adrenergic agonists and systemic corticosteroids. Although other anticholinergics exist, ipratropium bromide (IB) specifically has emerged as the overwhelming choice of pulmonologists and emergency physicians because of its limited systemic absorption from the lungs when given as an inhaled preparation. However, although the varying trials, predominantly in the emergency department setting, have typically shown a trend toward improved outcomes, none has set forth clear dosing protocol recommendations for use by practicing physicians. It is our goal in this review of the available literature on the use of IB, as an adjunct to inhaled short-acting beta-adrenergic agonists, to summarize practical, evidence-based recommendations for use in the pediatric emergency department setting for acute asthma exacerbations. We also hope to better delineate the most effective dosing regimen in those patients who might benefit most from the addition of IB and to explore proposed additional benefits it may have as a modulator of cholinergic-induced effects from high-dose beta-agonist therapy and viral triggers.

  13. Patient and organisational variables associated with pressure ulcer prevalence in hospital settings: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Ida Marie; Bjøro, Karen; Gunningberg, Lena; Hofoss, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association of ward-level differences in the odds of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) with selected ward organisational variables and patient risk factors. Design Multilevel approach to data from 2 cross-sectional studies. Settings 4 hospitals in Norway were studied. Participants 1056 patients at 84 somatic wards. Primary outcome measure HAPU. Results Significant variance in the odds of HAPUs was found across wards. A regression model using only organisational variables left a significant variance in the odds of HAPUs across wards but patient variables eliminated the across-ward variance. In the model including organisational and patient variables, significant ward-level HAPU variables were ward type (rehabilitation vs surgery/internal medicine: OR 0.17 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.66)), use of preventive measures (yes vs no: OR 2.02 (95% CI 1.12 to 3.64)) and ward patient safety culture (OR 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.99)). Significant patient-level predictors were age >70 vs <70 (OR 2.70 (95% CI 1.54 to 4.74)), Braden scale total score (OR 0.73 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.80)) and overweight (body mass index 25–29.99 kg/m2) (OR 0.32 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.62)). Conclusions The fact that the odds of HAPU varied across wards, and that across-ward variance was reduced when the selected ward-level variables entered the explanatory model, indicates that the HAPU problem may be reduced by ward-level organisation of care improvements, that is, by improving the patient safety culture and implementation of preventive measures. Some wards may prevent pressure ulcers better than other wards. The fact that ward-level variation was eliminated when patient-level HAPU variables were included in the model indicates that even wards with the best HAPU prevention will be challenged by an influx of high-risk patients. PMID:26316647

  14. Pre-Stage Acute Kidney Injury Can Predict Mortality and Medical Costs in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin Young; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    The significance of minimal increases in serum creatinine below the levels indicative of the acute kidney injury (AKI) stage is not well established. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-stage AKI (pre-AKI) on clinical outcomes. We enrolled a total of 21,261 patients who were admitted to the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. Pre-AKI was defined as a 25–50% increase in peak serum creatinine levels from baseline levels during the hospital stay. In total, 5.4% of the patients had pre-AKI during admission. The patients with pre-AKI were predominantly female (55.0%) and had a lower body weight and lower baseline levels of serum creatinine (0.63 ± 0.18 mg/dl) than the patients with AKI and the patients without AKI (P < 0.001). The patients with pre-AKI had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (25.1%) and malignancy (32.6%). The adjusted hazard ratio of in-hospital mortality for pre-AKI was 2.112 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.143 to 3.903]. In addition, patients with pre-AKI had an increased length of stay (7.7 ± 9.7 days in patients without AKI, 11.4 ± 11.4 days in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) and increased medical costs (4,061 ± 4,318 USD in patients without AKI, 4,966 ± 5,099 USD in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) during admission. The adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality for pre-AKI during the follow-up period of 2.0 ± 0.6 years was 1.473 (95% CI, 1.228 to 1.684). Although the adjusted hazard ratio of pre-AKI for overall mortality was not significant among the patients admitted to the surgery department or who underwent surgery, pre-AKI was significantly associated with mortality among the non-surgical patients (adjusted HR 1.542 [95% CI, 1.330 to 1.787]) and the patients admitted to the medical department (adjusted HR 1.384 [95% CI, 1.153 to 1.662]). Pre-AKI is associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and increased medical costs during admission. More attention

  15. High Prevalence of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Hospitalized Acute Heart Failure Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Pedro; Timenetsky, Karina T.; Casalaspo, Thaisa Juliana André; Gonçalves, Louise Helena Rodrigues; Yang, Angela Shu Yun; Eid, Raquel Caserta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Muscle Weakness (RMW) has been defined when the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is lower than 70% of the predictive value. The prevalence of RMW in chronic heart failure patients is 30 to 50%. So far there are no studies on the prevalence of RMW in acute heart failure (AHF) patients. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence of RMW in patients admitted because of AHF and the condition of respiratory muscle strength on discharge from the hospital. Methods Sixty-three patients had their MIP measured on two occasions: at the beginning of the hospital stay, after they had reached respiratory, hemodynamic and clinical stability and before discharge from the hospital. The apparatus and technique to measure MIP were adapted because of age-related limitations of the patients. Data on cardiac ejection fraction, ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and on the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) were collected. Results The mean age of the 63 patients under study was 75 years. On admission the mean ejection fraction was 33% (95% CI: 31–35) and the BNP hormone median value was 726.5 pg/ml (range: 217 to 2283 pg/ml); 65% of the patients used NIV. The median value of MIP measured after clinical stabilization was -52.7 cmH2O (range: -20 to -120 cmH2O); 76% of the patients had MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. On discharge, after a median hospital stay of 11 days, the median MIP was -53.5 cmH2O (range:-20 to -150 cmH2O); 71% of the patients maintained their MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. The differences found were not statistically significant. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted with AHF may present a high prevalence of RMW on admission; this condition may be maintained at similar levels on discharge in a large percentage of these patients, even after clinical stabilization of the heart condition. PMID:25671566

  16. How well is acute pain in children managed? A snapshot in one English hospital.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Alison; Collis, Sue

    2013-12-01

    This study set out to obtain a picture of pediatric pain management practices in one English hospital. Data were collected on two wards. Nonparticipant observation combined with a chart audit was used to collect data about actual practices. Questionnaires were used to collect information from parents and young people. Observational data showed that practices conformed to current guidelines in some but not all areas. When prescribed, the dosage of analgesic drugs complied with the hospital's guidelines, and drugs were usually administered as prescribed. There was some involvement of parents in decision making but this was usually initiated by them rather than the nurses. Pain assessment tools were not always used nor was a pain history routinely taken. Documentation about pain management was limited and there was little evidence of nonpharmacologic methods of pain relief being used. Parents and young people felt that their pain management was of an acceptable level or very good. This was despite the fact that 58% of children experienced severe pain and 24% moderate pain. The results provide a snapshot of pain management in one English hospital. As in other studies, pain management practices do not adhere to current guidelines in all areas, and children appear to be experiencing moderate to severe pain. Despite this, parents and children indicated that they were happy with the quality of pain management. There is a need to explore this further and to identify strategies that support the implementation of guidelines in practice.

  17. Operation Safe Haven: an evaluation of health surveillance and monitoring in an acute setting.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C; Mein, J; Beers, M; Harvey, B; Vemulpad, S; Chant, K; Dalton, C

    2000-02-17

    From May to June 1999, 3,920 ethnic Albanians from Kosovo arrived in Australia as part of Operation Safe Haven. These people were evacuated from refugee camps in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Initial processing in Australia occurred at East Hills Reception Centre, and accommodation for the duration of stay was provided in eight Haven Centres in five States. The arrival of a large number of refugees in a short time frame is unprecedented in Australia. A health surveillance system was developed and critical health data were collected to assess health status and needs, plan care, monitor for potential outbreaks of communicable diseases, track service use, to meet international reporting requirements and document our response to this crisis. In this article the health surveillance system is evaluated and suggestions are offered for the formulation of specific guidelines necessary for health surveillance in acute settings.

  18. Evaluating and managing neonatal acute renal failure in a resource-poor setting.

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, Tinuade A; Adekanmbi, Folasade

    2009-03-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is encountered in neonatal care where it may be associated with significant morbidities. Pre-renal failure, which is due to impaired renal tissue perfusion, is the commonest type of ARF. It is amenable to treatment with excellent prognosis following prompt diagnosis and timely institution of appropriate intervention. Unfortunately, ARF in the newborn is usually asymptomatic and it is only suspected when a newborn infant has not been observed to pass urine over several hours or when serum Creatinine is observed to be elevated or rising. In resource-poor settings, it is often difficult to conduct detailed evaluation of suspected cases of newborn ARF due to lack of appropriate equipments and infrastructure. Similarly, therapeutic facilities are sparse and there is heavy reliance on conservative management of cases. Such difficulties encountered in the evaluation and management of newborns with ARF in most parts of the developing world, like Nigeria, where diagnostic and therapeutic facilities are limited are highlighted.

  19. Televisitation: virtual transportation of family to the bedside in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Televisitation is the virtual transportation of a patient's family to the bedside, regardless of the patient's location within an acute care setting. This innovation in the Telemedicine Program at Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre (TBRHSC) in Ontario, Canada, embraces the concept of patient- and family-centered care and has been identified as a leading practice by Accreditation Canada. The need to find creative ways to link patients to their family and friend supports hundreds of miles away was identified more than ten years ago. The important relationship between health outcomes and the psychosocial needs of patients and families has been recognized more recently. TBRHSC's patient- and family-centered model of care focuses on connecting patients with their families. First Nations renal patients with family in remote communities were some of the earliest users of videoconferencing technology for this purpose.

  20. Communicating with culturally and linguistically diverse patients in an acute care setting: nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, R N Jane

    2003-03-01

    Communication with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) patients has been shown to be difficult. This study describes nurses' experiences of communicating with CLD patients in an acute care setting. A purposive sample of registered nurses and certified midwives (n=23) were interviewed. Main findings were: interpreters, bilingual health workers and combinations of different strategies were used to communicate with CLD patients; some nurses showed empathy, respect and a willingness to make an effort in the communication process with others showing an ethnocentric orientation. Main recommendations were: prioritising access to appropriate linguistic services, providing nurses with support from health care workers, e.g., bilingual health care workers who are able to provide more in-depth information, increasing nurses' understanding of legal issues within patient encounters, supporting nurses to translate their awareness of cultural diversity into acceptance of, appreciation for and commitment to CLD patients and their families.

  1. Enhancing adult therapeutic interpersonal relationships in the acute health care setting: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Kornhaber, Rachel; Walsh, Kenneth; Duff, Jed; Walker, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic interpersonal relationships are the primary component of all health care interactions that facilitate the development of positive clinician–patient experiences. Therapeutic interpersonal relationships have the capacity to transform and enrich the patients’ experiences. Consequently, with an increasing necessity to focus on patient-centered care, it is imperative for health care professionals to therapeutically engage with patients to improve health-related outcomes. Studies were identified through an electronic search, using the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO databases of peer-reviewed research, limited to the English language with search terms developed to reflect therapeutic interpersonal relationships between health care professionals and patients in the acute care setting. This study found that therapeutic listening, responding to patient emotions and unmet needs, and patient centeredness were key characteristics of strategies for improving therapeutic interpersonal relationships. PMID:27789958

  2. [Rad-Esito: new informational additions in the integration of content of hospital discharge cards for acute patients].

    PubMed

    Rini, F; Piscioneri, C; Consolante, C; Fara, G M

    2009-01-01

    Since the January 2008 the tracking of additional information about hospital discharge card's content has been activated in Latium. The new data, noticed by RAD-Esito card, regard the hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarction, femoral neck fracture and coronary artery bypass surgery. This study's objective has been to evaluate the quality of the data collected with the new card, at the end of the 1st semester of experimentation, concerning two institutes of care of Latium, the Casilino Polyclinic (ASL Rome B) and the Anzio-Nettuno hospital (Assembled Hospitals, ASL Rome H). Furthermore, any significant correlation's existence between a few variables for acute myocardial infarction and femoral fracture with the mortality rate and the average hospitalization period has been statistically verified. This study's preliminary results show how the integration of the hospital informative flow with the new clinical variables will be able to allow the promotion of the quality in the coding of the diagnosis and procedures, according to the current international innovations. This additional information will also be able to support the regional appropriateness and outcome of the treatments evaluation programs.

  3. Predicting frequent hospital admission risk in Singapore: a retrospective cohort study to investigate the impact of comorbidities, acute illness burden and social determinants of health

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Wang, Sijia; Thumboo, Julian; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of comorbidities, acute illness burden and social determinants of health on predicting the risk of frequent hospital admissions. Design Multivariable logistic regression was used to associate the predictive variables extracted from electronic health records and frequent hospital admission risk. The model's performance of our predictive model was evaluated using a 10-fold cross-validation. Setting A single tertiary hospital in Singapore. Participants All adult patients admitted to the hospital between 1 January 2013 and 31 May 2014 (n=25 244). Main outcome measure Frequent hospital admissions, defined as 3 or more inpatient admissions within 12 months of discharge. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the predictive model, and the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values for various cut-offs. Results 4322 patients (17.1%) met the primary outcome. 11 variables were observed as significant predictors and included in the final regression model. The strongest independent predictor was treatment with antidepressants in the past 1 year (adjusted OR 2.51, 95% CI 2.26 to 2.78). Other notable predictors include requiring dialysis and treatment with intravenous furosemide during the index admission. The predictive model achieved an AUC of 0.84 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.85) for predicting frequent hospital admission risk, with a sensitivity of 73.9% (95% CI 72.6% to 75.2%), specificity of 79.1% (78.5% to 79.6%) and positive predictive value of 42.2% (95% CI 41.1% to 43.3%) at the cut-off of 0.235. Conclusions We have identified several predictors for assessing the risk of frequent hospital admissions that achieved high discriminative model performance. Further research is necessary using an external validation cohort. PMID:27742630

  4. Outcomes of Patients Discharged to Skilled Nursing Facilities After Acute Care Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Hakkarainen, Timo W.; Arbabi, Saman; Willis, Margaret M.; Davidson, Giana H.; Flum, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate previously independent older patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and identify risk factors for failure to return home and death and development of a predictive tool to determine likelihood of adverse outcome. Background Little is known about the likelihood of return to home, and higher than expected mortality rates in SNFs have recently been described, which may represent an opportunity for quality improvement. Methods Retrospective cohort of older hospitalized patients discharged to SNFs during 2007 to 2009 in 5 states using Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services linked minimum data set data from SNFs. We assessed mortality, hospital readmission, discharge to home, and logistic regression models for predicting risk of each outcome. Results Of 416,997 patients, 3.8% died during the initial SNF stay, 28.6% required readmission, and 60.5% were ultimately discharged home. Readmission to a hospital was the strongest predictor of death in the years after SNF admission (unadjusted hazard ratio, 28.2; 95% confidence interval, 27.2–29.3; P < 0.001). Among all patients discharged to SNFs, 7.8% eventually died in an SNF and overall 1-year mortality was 26.1%. Risk factors associated with mortality and failure to return home were increasing age, male sex, increasing comorbidities, decreased cognitive function, decreased functional status, parenteral nutrition, and pressure ulcers. Conclusions A large proportion of older patients discharging to SNFs never return home. A better understanding of the natural history of patients sent to SNFs after hospitalization and risk factors for failure to return to home, readmission, and death should help identify opportunities for interventions to improved outcome. PMID:26445466

  5. Creating a Nurse-Led Culture to Minimize Horizontal Violence in the Acute Care Setting: A Multi-Interventional Approach.

    PubMed

    Parker, Karen M; Harrington, Ann; Smith, Charlene M; Sellers, Kathleen F; Millenbach, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal violence (HV) is prevalent in nursing. However, few strategies are identified to address this phenomenon that undermines communication and patient safety. Nurses at an acute care hospital implemented multiple interventions to address HV resulting in increased knowledge of hospital policies regarding HV, and significantly (p < .05) less HV prevalence than was reported by nurses in other organizations throughout New York State. With the aid and oversight of nursing professional development specialists, evidence-based interventions to address HV were developed including policies, behavioral performance reviews, and staff/manager educational programs.

  6. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  7. Randomised pragmatic comparison of UK and US treatment of acute asthma presenting to hospital

    PubMed Central

    Innes, N; Stocking, J; Daynes, T; Harrison, B

    2002-01-01

    Background: Systemic corticosteroids and inhaled ß2 agonists are accepted first line treatments for acute severe asthma, but there is no consensus on their optimum dosage and frequency of administration. American regimens include higher initial dosages of ß2 agonists and corticosteroids than UK regimens. Methods: In a prospective, pragmatic, randomised, parallel group study, 170 patients of mean (SD) age 37 (12) years with acute asthma (peak expiratory flow (PEF) 212 (80) l/min) presenting to hospital received treatment with either high dose prednisolone and continuous nebulised salbutamol as recommended in the US or lower dose prednisolone and bolus nebulised salbutamol as recommended in the UK by the BTS. Results: Outcome measures were: ΔPEF at 1 hour (BTS 89 l/min, US 106 l/min, p=0.2, CI –8 to 41) and at 2 hours (BTS 49 l/min, US 101 l/min, p<0.0001, CI 28 to 77); time to discharge if admitted (BTS 4 days, US 4 days); rates of achieving discharge PEF (>60%) at 2 hours (BTS 64%, US 78%, p=0.04); time to regain control of asthma as measured by PEF ≥80% best with ≤20% variability (BTS 3 days, US 4 days, p=0.6); PEF at 24 hours in patients admitted (BTS 293 l/min, US 288 l/min, p=0.8); and control of asthma in the subsequent month (no significant differences). Conclusions: Treatment with higher doses of continuous nebulised salbutamol leads to a greater immediate improvement in PEF but the degree of recovery at 24 hours and speed of recovery thereafter is achieved as effectively with lower corticosteroid doses as recommended in the British guidelines. PMID:12454298

  8. Demographic, seasonal, and spatial differences in acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital in Melbourne Australia

    PubMed Central

    Loughnan, Margaret E; Nicholls, Neville; Tapper, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    Background Seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the northern hemisphere are well described in the literature. More recently age and gender differences in cardiac mortality and to a lesser extent morbidity have been presented. To date spatial differences between the seasonal patterns of cardiac disease has not been presented. Literature relating to seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the southern hemisphere and in Australia in particular is scarce. The aim of this paper is to describe the seasonal, age, gender, and spatial patterns of cardiac disease in Melbourne Australia by using acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital as a marker of cardiac disease. Results There were 33,165 Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) admissions over 2186 consecutive days. There is a seasonal pattern in AMI admissions with increased rates during the colder months. The peak month is July. The admissions rate is greater for males than for females, although this difference decreases with advancing age. The maximal AMI season for males extends from April to November. The difference between months of peak and minimum admissions was 33.7%. Increased female AMI admissions occur from May to November, with a variation between peak and minimum of 23.1%. Maps of seasonal AMI admissions demonstrate spatial differences. Analysis using Global and Local Moran's I showed increased spatial clustering during the warmer months. The Bivariate Moran's I statistic indicated a weaker relationship between AMI and age during the warmer months. Conclusion There are two distinct seasons with increased admissions during the colder part of the year. Males present a stronger seasonal pattern than females. There are spatial differences in AMI admissions throughout the year that cannot be explained by the age structure of the population. The seasonal difference in AMI admissions warrants further investigation. This includes detailing the prevalence of cardiac disease in the community and examining

  9. Nurses' Comfort Level with Emergency Interventions in the Rural Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Erin L.; Bell, Sue E.

    2009-01-01

    Context: One quarter of the persons living in the United States receive their emergency care in a rural hospital. Nurses employed in these hospitals see few emergencies but must be prepared to provide expert and efficient care when they do occur. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of registered nurses' certifications…

  10. Children and Young People in Hospitals: Doing Youth Work in Medical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Scott; Payne, Malcolm; Dyson, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Young people in hospitals face a range of challenging issues. Many have chronic conditions and experience stigmatisation, anxiety and family conflict. They may also experience social isolation in hospitals, separation from local peer groups and sources of support, and separation from trusted carers during transition to adult care. These issues can…

  11. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Bankole Peter; Bello, Emmanuel Olasehinde; Jegede, Tolulope Opeoluwa; Olubosede, Omolayo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5%) of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2%) of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0%) survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P < 0.05). None of these factors however independently predict mortality. Conclusion: Childhood bacterial meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying. PMID:26752902

  12. "It's the people that make the environment good or bad": the patient's experience of the acute care hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Hogan, Beverly; Thomas, Sandra P

    2005-01-01

    A review of contemporary nursing research reveals a tendency to focus on select aspects of the hospital environment such as noise, light, and music. Although studies such as these shed light on discrete aspects of the hospital environment, this body of literature contributes little to an understanding of the entirety of that world as the patient in the sickbed experiences it. The purpose of the study detailed in this article was to describe the patient's experience of the acute care hospital environment. Nondirective, in-depth phenomenological interviews were conducted, then transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for themes. Against the backdrop of "I lived and that's all that matters," there were 3 predominant themes in patients' experience of the acute care environment: (1) disconnection/connection, (2) fear/less fear, and (3) confinement/freedom. In this environment, human-to-human contact increased security and power in an environment that was described as sterile, disorienting, and untrustworthy. Acute and critical care nurses and other caregivers can use the findings to create less noxious hospital environments.

  13. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in a Hospital Setting for Children with Severe Emotional and/or Behaviour Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Lay See; Wong, Margaret; Gerken, Kathryn; Ansley, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural therapy programme for 13 children treated for severe emotional or behaviour disorders in a hospital setting. Data were obtained from multiple informants at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and three months follow-up. Results indicated statistically significant improvement in the…

  14. Evaluating a Moving Target: Lessons Learned from Using Practical Participatory Evaluation (P-PE) in Hospital Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharton, Tracy; Alexander, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This article describes lessons learned about implementing evaluations in hospital settings. In order to overcome the methodological dilemmas inherent in this environment, we used a practical participatory evaluation (P-PE) strategy to engage as many stakeholders as possible in the process of evaluating a clinical demonstration project.…

  15. 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' predicts mortality and length of hospital stay in acutely ill elderly.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Rebecca J; King, Claire L; Stroud, Mike A; Jackson, Alan A; Elia, Marinos

    2006-02-01

    Malnutrition and its impact on clinical outcome may be underestimated in hospitalised elderly as many screening procedures require measurements of weight and height that cannot often be undertaken in sick elderly patients. The 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' ('MUST') has been developed to screen all adults, even if weight and/or height cannot be measured, enabling more complete information on malnutrition prevalence and its impact on clinical outcome to be obtained. In the present study, 150 consecutively admitted elderly patients (age 85 (sd 5.5) years) were recruited prospectively, screened with 'MUST' and clinical outcome recorded. Although only 56 % of patients could be weighed, all (n 150) could be screened with 'MUST'; 58 % were at malnutrition risk and these individuals had greater mortality (in-hospital and post-discharge, P<0.01) and longer hospital stays (P=0.02) than those at low risk. Both 'MUST' categorisation and component scores (BMI, weight loss, acute disease) were significantly related to mortality (P<0.03). Those patients with no measured or recalled weight ('MUST' subjective criteria used) had a greater risk of malnutrition (P=0.01) and a poorer clinical outcome (P<0.002) than those who could be weighed and, within both groups, clinical outcome was worse in those at risk of malnutrition. The present study suggests that 'MUST' predicts clinical outcome in hospitalised elderly, in whom malnutrition is common (58 %). In those who cannot be weighed, a higher prevalence of malnutrition and associated poorer clinical outcome supports the importance of routine screening with a tool, like 'MUST', that can be used to screen all patients.

  16. Are inspectors’ assessments reliable? Ratings of NHS acute hospital trust services in England

    PubMed Central

    Addicott, Rachael; Robertson, Ruth; Ross, Shilpa; Walshe, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    The credibility of a regulator could be threatened if stakeholders perceive that assessments of performance made by its inspectors are unreliable. Yet there is little published research on the reliability of inspectors’ assessments of health care organizations’ services. Objectives We investigated the inter-rater reliability of assessments made by inspectors inspecting acute hospitals in England during the piloting of a new regulatory model implemented by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) during 2013 and 2014. Multi-professional teams of inspectors rated service provision on a four-point scale for each of five domains: safety; effectiveness; caring; responsiveness; and leadership. Methods In an online survey, we asked individual inspectors to assign a domain and a rating to each of 10 vignettes of service information extracted from CQC inspection reports. We used these data to simulate the ratings that might be produced by teams of inspectors. We also observed inspection teams in action, and interviewed inspectors and staff from hospitals that had been inspected. Results Levels of agreement varied substantially from vignette to vignette. Characteristics such as professional background explained only a very small part of the variation. Overall, agreement was higher on ratings than on domains, and for groups of inspectors compared with individual inspectors. A number of potential causes of disagreement were identified, such as differences regarding the weight that should be given to contextual factors and general uncertainty about interpreting the rating and domain categories. Conclusion Groups of inspectors produced more reliable assessments than individual inspectors, and there is evidence to support the utility of appropriate discussions between inspectors in improving reliability. The reliability of domain allocations was lower than for ratings. It is important to define categories and rating levels clearly, and to train inspectors in their use. Further

  17. Predictors of acute diarrhoea among hospitalized children in Gaza Governorates: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Alnawajha, Samer Khader; Bakry, Ghadeer Abdo; Aljeesh, Yousef Ibrahim

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to determine the predictors of acute diarrhoea among hospitalized children in the Gaza Governorates. The case-control design included 140 children (70 cases and 70 controls) in a stratified cluster sample from Naser Medical Complex and Alnasser Pediatric Hospital. An interview questionnaire was used, and face and content validations were performed. Multiple logistic regression was used for the multivariate analysis of risk factors of diarrhoea in children aged less than five years. Results showed a significant association between diarrhoea and family income, residence, complementary feeding, and age of weaning (p<0.05). Children living in villages had lower odds of having diarrhoea by 53.2% than children living in cities. Children of families with incomes between US$ 485 and 620 had lower odds of having diarrhoea by 80.8% than children of families with incomes less than US$ 485. Moreover, children who did not receive complementary feeding had lower odds of having diarrhoea by 59.0%. We found that, for one month increase in weaning age, the odds of diarrhoea decreased by 1.06 times (adjusted OR=1.05, 95% CI 1.0180-1.100). The study concludes that urban residence, lower family income, complementary feeding, and lower age of weaning are risk factors of diarrhoea among children aged less than five years in the Gaza Strip. The results of the study suggest that children of low-income families and those who were not naturally breastfed may warrant more attention for prevention and/or treatment of diarrhoea.

  18. Quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in South Western Nigeria: A report of clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Adeoti, Adekunle Olatayo; Ogunmola, Olarinde Jeffrey; Fadare, Joseph Olusesan; Kolawole, Tolutope Fasanmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: To audit the quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in the southwestern region of Nigeria and to compare the clinical practice against the recommendations of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of 101 patients who presented with acute exacerbation of asthma to the hospital between November 2010 and October 2015. Results: Majority of the cases were females (66.3%), <45 years of age (60.4%), and admitted in the wet season (64.4%). The median duration of hospital stay was 2 days (interquartile range; 1–3 days) and the mortality was 1.0%. At admission, 73 (72.3%) patients had their triggering factors documented and 33 (32.7%) had their severity assessed. Smoking status, medication adherence, serial oxygen saturation, and peak expiratory flow rate measurement were documented in less than half of the cases, respectively. Seventy-six (75.2%) patients had nebulized salbutamol, 89 (88.1%) had systemic corticosteroid, and 78 (77.2%) had within 1 h. On discharge, 68 (67.3%) patients were given follow-up appointment and 32 (31.7%) were reviewed within 30 days after discharge. Less than half were prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), a self-management plan, or had their inhaler technique reviewed or controller medications adjusted. Overall, adherence to the GINA guideline was not satisfactory and was very poor among the medical officers. Conclusion: The quality of acute asthma care in our setting is not satisfactory, and there is a low level of compliance with most recommendations of asthma guidelines. This audit has implicated the need to address the non-performing areas and organizational issues to improve the quality of care. PMID:27942102

  19. Recovery and outcome of patients with stroke treated in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, R W; Kloter, K; Cooper, J

    1991-01-01

    This retrospective study of patients with stroke was performed to describe the patients' functional independence on admission to and discharge from physical therapy treatment, determine whether significant functional recovery occurred during the treatment period, and identify independent variables correlating with recovery and outcome at discharge. The Functional Independence Measurement (FIM) system was used to score performance in bed mobility, transfers, locomotion, and stairs. Outcome was indicated by the discharge FIM scores and discharge habitat. The 105 patients whose acute care records were reviewed demonstrated significant improvements between admission and discharge in all functions. Among the variables that correlated significantly with recovery were number of treatments and admission FIM scores. Age and number of treatments correlated significantly with discharge habitat. All FIM scores (admission and discharge) correlated significantly with discharge habitat. Results suggest that FIM scores can be used to document the functional status of patients with stroke in an acute care setting and that the scores have value as predictors of recovery and outcome.

  20. The Relationship between Local Economic Conditions and Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Utilization by Adults and Seniors in the United States, 1995–2011

    PubMed Central

    Carls, Ginger Smith; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Karaca, Zeynal; Marder, William D; Wong, Herbert S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between aggregate unemployment and hospital discharges for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among adults and seniors, 1995–2011. Data Sources/Study Setting Community hospital discharge data from states collected for the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SID) and economic data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1995–2011. Study Design Quarterly time series study of unemployment and aggregate hospital discharges in local areas using fixed effects to control for differences between local areas. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Secondary data on inpatient stays and unemployment rates aggregated to micropolitan and metropolitan areas. Principal Findings For both adults and seniors, a 1 percentage point increase in the contemporaneous unemployment rate was associated with a statistically significant 0.80 percent (adults) to 0.96 percent (seniors) decline in AMI hospitalization during the first half of the study but was unrelated to the economic cycle in the second half of the study period. Conclusions The study found evidence that the aggregate relationship between health and the economy may be shifting for cardiovascular events, paralleling recent research that has shown a similar shift for some types of mortality (Ruhm 2013), self-reported health, and inpatient use among seniors (McInerney and Mellor 2012). PMID:25772510

  1. A hospital-level analysis of the work environment and workforce health indicators for registered nurses in Ontario's acute-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shamian, J; Kerr, M S; Laschinger, H K; Thomson, D

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between hospital-level indicators of the work environment and aggregated indicators of health and well-being amongst registered nurses working in acute-care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. This ecological analysis used data from a self-reported survey instrument randomly allocated to nurses using a stratified sampling approach. Multivariable linear regression models were used to examine hospital-level associations for burnout, musculoskeletal pain, self-rated general health, and absence due to illness. The unit of analysis was the hospital (n = 160), with individual nurse responses (n = 6,609) aggregated within hospitals. After controlling for basic differences in nurse workforces, including mean age and education, higher (better) work-environment scores were found to be generally associated with higher health-indicator scores, while a larger proportion of full-time than part-time nurses was found to be associated with lower (poorer) health scores. This study may provide direction for policy-makers in coping with the recruitment and retention of nursing staff in light of the current nursing shortage.

  2. Why a successful task substitution in glaucoma care could not be transferred from a hospital setting to a primary care setting: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare systems are challenged by a demand that exceeds available resources. One policy to meet this challenge is task substitution-transferring tasks to other professions and settings. Our study aimed to explore stakeholders’ perceived feasibility of transferring hospital-based monitoring of stable glaucoma patients to primary care optometrists. Methods A case study was undertaken in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital (REH) using semi-structured interviews and document reviews. They were inductively analysed using three implementation related theoretical perspectives: sociological theories on professionalism, management theories, and applied political analysis. Results Currently it is not feasible to use primary care optometrists as substitutes for optometrists and ophthalmic technicians working in a hospital-based glaucoma follow-up unit (GFU). Respondents’ narratives revealed that: the glaucoma specialists’ sense of urgency for task substitution outside the hospital diminished after establishing a GFU that satisfied their professionalization needs; the return on investments were unclear; and reluctant key stakeholders with strong power positions blocked implementation. The window of opportunity that existed for task substitution in person and setting in 1999 closed with the institutionalization of the GFU. Conclusions Transferring the monitoring of stable glaucoma patients to primary care optometrists in Rotterdam did not seem feasible. The main reasons were the lack of agreement on professional boundaries and work domains, the institutionalization of the GFU in the REH, and the absence of an appropriate reimbursement system. Policy makers considering substituting tasks to other professionals should carefully think about the implementation process, especially in a two-step implementation process (substitution in person and in setting) such as this case. Involving the substituting professionals early on to ensure all stakeholders see the change as a

  3. Comparison of the ICF Core Set for Cardiopulmonary Conditions in the Acute Hospital Setting among Different Types of Transplant Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Xinhua

    2010-01-01

    To compare the functioning profiles of patients receiving different types of organ transplants using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The patients (n=102) were enrolled between days 5 and 10 after discharge following receipt of an organ transplant, and assessed for sociodemographic variables, the Functional…

  4. Invasive Candidiasis in Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Experience from a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Baronia, Arvind Kumar; Azim, Afzal; Ahmed, Armin; Gurjar, Mohan; Marak, Rungmei S. K.; Yadav, Reema; Sharma, Preeti

    2017-01-01

    Background: Invasive candidiasis (IC) is associated with increased morbidity in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). There is limited information regarding the predisposing factors, Candida species distribution and in vitro susceptibility. Methodology: Current data have been derived from a larger prospective nonintervention study conducted on 200 critically ill patients which was done to study the antifungal prescription practices, collect epidemiological data, and perform an external validation of risk prediction models for IC under senior research associateship program of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research New Delhi. Of these critically ill patients, thirty had SAP and were included for analysis. Results: There were 23 males and 7 females. Out of eight patients (27%) who developed IC, three had isolated candidemia, two had isolated deep-seated candidiasis while three had both candidemia and deep-seated candidiasis. SAP patients with IC had a longer duration of Intensive Care Unit stay, hospital stay, days on mechanical ventilation and duration of shock. Mortality was not different between SAP patients with or without IC. Conclusion: There is a high rate of Candida infection in SAP. More studies are needed to generate epidemiological data and develop antifungal stewardship in this subset of high-risk population. PMID:28197050

  5. Characterisation of metabolic acidosis in Kenyan children admitted to hospital for acute non-surgical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sasi, P; English, M; Berkley, J; Lowe, B; Shebe, M; Mwakesi, R; Kokwaro, G

    2006-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with most severe malaria deaths in African children, and most deaths occur before maximum antimalarial action is achieved. Thus, specific acidosis treatment may reduce mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood and no specific interventions have been developed. A detailed characterisation of this acidosis is critical in treatment development. We used the traditional and Stewart's approach to characterise acidosis in consecutive paediatric admissions for malaria and other acute non-surgical conditions to Kilifi District Hospital in Kenya. The overall acidosis prevalence was 21%. Gastroenteritis had the highest prevalence (61%). Both the mean albumin-corrected anion gap and the strong ion gap were high (>13 mmol/l and >0 mmol/l, respectively) in malaria, gastroenteritis, lower respiratory tract infection and malnutrition. Presence of salicylate in plasma was not associated with acidosis but was associated with signs of severe illness (odds ratio 2.11, 95% CI 1.1-4.2). In malaria, mean (95% CI) strong ion gap was 15 (14-7) mmol/l, and lactate, creatinine and inorganic phosphorous explained only approximately 40% of the variability in base excess (adjusted R2 = 0.397). Acidosis may be more common than previously recognised amongst paediatric admissions in Africa and is characterised by the presence of currently unidentified strong anions. In malaria, lactate and ketones, but not salicylate, are associated with acidosis. However, unidentified anions may be more important.

  6. Assessing resident knowledge of acute pain management in hospitalized children: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Saroyan, John M; Schechter, William S; Tresgallo, Mary E; Sun, Lena; Naqvi, Zoon; Graham, Mark J

    2008-12-01

    This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the hypotheses that there are differences in pediatric pain management (PPM) knowledge across resident specialties, that questions in the form of multiple-choice items could detect such differences, and that resident knowledge of analgesic-related adverse drug events (ADEs) would be greater than knowledge of PPM. Questions were based on two general categories of knowledge within acute pain management in hospitalized children: pediatric pain assessment and treatment, and identification of analgesic-related ADEs. As part of the pilot nature of this study, a convenience sample of 60 residents completed a 10-item PPM knowledge assessment prior to a PPM lecture. Twenty-six were pediatric residents (43%), 19 were orthopedic residents (32%), and 15 were anesthesiology residents (25%). All items had content validity. When controlling for resident year, performance by resident specialty was significantly different between anesthesia and orthopedics (P=0.006) and between anesthesia and pediatrics (P<0.001). Resident knowledge of analgesic-related ADEs was not greater than knowledge of PPM. The most difficult topics were opioid equianalgesia, assessment of the cognitively impaired child, and maximal acetaminophen doses. Repeated administration of the PPM knowledge assessment at multiple institutions will allow further evaluation of our initial findings, and with directed educational interventions, provide opportunity for measurement of improvement.

  7. [Lactose intolerance in hospitalized infants with acute diarrhea due to classic enteropathogenic Escherichia coil (EPEC)].

    PubMed

    Moreira, C R; Fagundes-Neto, U

    1997-01-01

    Three hundred and eleven hospitalized weaned infants with acute diarrhea, all under 12 months of age, were studied in order to evaluate the development of lactose intolerance and its association with age, nutritional status, birth weight, dehydration and enteropathogenic agents identified in fecal samples. After been rehydrated the infants received whole cow' milk assuring the intake of 100 kcal/kg per day. Lactose intolerance was defined according t the following criteria: 1) persistence of diarrhea associated with weight loss during 48 hours, 2) development of vomiting and/or abdominal distention associated with excretion of carbohydrate in feces and/or acids tools, 3) metabolic acidosis associated with abdominal distention at anytime of refeeding period. Lactose intolerance was detected in 52.1% (162/311) of the patients and it was significantly associated with age under 6 months (P < 0.01), birth weight under 3000 grams (P < 0.01), development of dehydration (P < 0.01) and with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) serotypes infection (P < 0.01).

  8. Detection of Rotavirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Zagazig University Hospitals in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salwa Badrelsabbah; El-Bialy, Abdallah Abdelkader; Mohammed, Mervat Soliman; El-Sheikh, Azza Omar; Elhewala, Ahmed; Bahgat, Shereen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and young children all over the world. The objective of the study was to compare different methods for detecting rotavirus and to assess the burden of rotavirus as a causative agent for AGE in children younger than five. Methods: This case control study included 65 children with AGE and 35 healthy control children. They were chosen from the Pediatric Department of Zagazig University Hospitals from October 2014 to March 2015. Stool samples were obtained and assayed for rotavirus by the immunochromatography test (ICT), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qr RT-PCR). Results: Fifty out of the 65 patients (76.9%) were positive for qr RT-PCR. Forty-five (69.2%) and 44 (67.7%) were positive for ICT and ELISA, respectively. There was a significant association between the severity of the disease as determined by the Vesikari score and rotavirus infection. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that ICT is a useful method for the rapid screening of group A rotavirus in fecal specimens, because it is rapid, inexpensive, easy to perform, and requires very little equipment. In addition, this study highlights the substantial health burden of rotavirus AGE among children less than five. PMID:26435821

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract disease: incidence and associated risks.

    PubMed

    Riccetto, Adriana Gut Lopes; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco da; Almeida, Renata Servan de; Arns, Clarice Weis; Baracat, Emílio Carlos Elias

    2006-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the main causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections worldwide. We examined the incidence and associated risks for RSV infection in infants hospitalized in two university hospitals in the state of São Paulo. We made a prospective cohort study involving 152 infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI) in two university hospitals in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, between April and September 2004. Clinical and epidemiological data were obtained at admission. RSV was detected by direct immunofluorescence of nasopharyngeal secretions. Factors associated with RSV infection were assessed by calculating the relative risk (RR). The incidence of RSV infection was 17.5%. Risk factors associated with infection were: gestational age less than 35 weeks (RR: 4.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.21-7.87); birth weight less than or equal to 2,500 grams (RR: 2.69; 95% CI 1.34-5.37); mother's educational level less than five years of schooling (RR: 2.28; 95% CI 1.13-4.59) and pulse oximetry at admission to hospital lower than 90% (RR: 2.19; 95% CI 1.10-4.37). Low birth weight and prematurity are factors associated with respiratory disease due to RSV in infants. Low educational level of the mother and poor socioeconomic conditions also constitute risk factors. Hypoxemia in RSV infections at admission indicates potential severity and a need for early oxygen therapy.

  10. Burden of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in London acute hospitals: retrospective on a voluntary surveillance programme.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, S; Bishop, L A; Wright, A L; Kanfoudi, L; Duckworth, G; Fraser, G G

    2011-12-01

    Although meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is recognized as an important cause of hospital and community healthcare-associated morbidity, and colonization as a precursor to infection, few studies have attempted to assess the burden of both colonization and infection across acute healthcare providers within a defined health economy. This study describes the prevalence and incidence of MRSA colonization and infection in acute London hospital Trusts participating in a voluntary surveillance programme in 2000-2001. Hospital infection control staff completed a weekly return including details on incident and prevalent colonizations, bacteraemias and other significant infections due to MRSA. Incidence and prevalence rates were calculated for hospitals with sufficient participation across both years. Colonizations accounted for 79% of incident MRSA cases reported; 4% were bacteraemias, and 17% other significant infections. There was no change in incidence of colonization of hospital patients between 2000 and 2001. By contrast, there was an unexplained 49% increase in prevalence of colonizations over this period. For any given month, prevalent colonizations outnumbered incident colonizations at least twofold. This MRSA surveillance programme was unusual for prospective ascertainment of incident and prevalent cases of both colonization and infection within an English regional health economy. Consistent with other studies, the incidence and prevalence of colonization substantially exceeded infection. Given the small contribution of bacteraemias to the overall MRSA burden, and the surveillance, screening and control interventions of recent years, it may be appropriate to review the present reliance on bacteraemia surveillance.

  11. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the outpatient ambulatory surgery setting compared with the inpatient hospital setting: analysis of 1000 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Tim; Godil, Saniya S; Mehrlich, Melissa; Mendenhall, Stephen; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In an era of escalating health care costs and pressure to improve efficiency and cost of care, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) have emerged as lower-cost options for many surgical therapies. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is one of the most prevalent spine surgeries performed, and the frequency of its performance is rapidly increasing as the aging population grows. Although ASCs offer significant cost advantages over hospital-based surgical centers, concern over the safety of outpatient ACDF has slowed its adoption. The authors intended to 1) determine the safety of the first 1000 consecutive ACDF surgeries performed in their outpatient ASC, and 2) compare the safety of these outpatient ACDFs with that of consecutive ACDFs performed during the same time period in the hospital setting. METHODS A total of 1000 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF in an ACS (outpatient ACDF) and 484 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF at Vanderbilt University Hospital (inpatient ACDF) from 2006 to 2013 were included in this retrospective study of patients' medical records. Data were collected on patient demographics, comorbidities, operative details, and perioperative and 90-day morbidity. Perioperative morbidity and hospital readmission were compared between the outpatient and inpatient ACDF groups. RESULTS Of the first 1000 outpatient ACDF cases performed in the authors' ASC, 629 (62.9%) were 1-level and 365 (36.5%) were 2-level ACDFs. Mean patient age was 49.5 ± 8.6, and 484 (48.4%) were males. All patients were observed postoperatively at the ASC postanesthesia care unit (PACU) for 4 hours before being discharged home. Eight patients (0.8%) were transferred from the surgery center to the hospital postoperatively (for pain control [n = 3], chest pain and electrocardiogram changes [n = 2], intraoperative CSF leak [n = 1], postoperative hematoma [n = 1], and profound postoperative weakness and surgical reexploration [n = 1]). No perioperative

  12. Nuclear medicine in the acute clinical setting: indications, imaging findings, and potential pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Uliel, Livnat; Mellnick, Vincent M; Menias, Christine O; Holz, Andrew L; McConathy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging provides valuable functional information that complements information obtained with anatomic imaging techniques in the evaluation of patients with specific acute clinical manifestations. Nuclear medicine studies are most often used in conjunction with other imaging modalities and as a problem-solving tool. Under certain circumstances a nuclear medicine study may be indicated as the first-line imaging modality, as in the case of renal scintigraphy for transplant dysfunction in the early postoperative period. Nuclear imaging may be preferred when a conventional first-line study is contraindicated or when it is important to minimize radiation exposure. The portability of nuclear imaging offers particular advantages for the evaluation of critically ill patients whose clinical condition is unstable and who cannot be safely transported out of the intensive care unit. The ability to visualize physiologic and pathophysiologic processes over relatively long time periods without adding to the patient's radiation exposure contributes to the high diagnostic sensitivity of several types of nuclear medicine studies. Viewing the acquired images in the cine mode adds to the value of these studies for diagnosing and characterizing dynamic abnormalities such as intermittent internal bleeding and bile or urine leakage. In this pictorial review, the spectrum of nuclear medicine studies commonly performed in the acute care setting is reviewed according to body systems and organs, with detailed descriptions of the indications, technical considerations, findings, and potential pitfalls of each type of study. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.332125098/-/DC1.

  13. Maximizing the Functional Status of Geriatric Patients in an Acute Community Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meissner, Paul; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Compared patients (N=103) admitted to inpatient geriatric care unit focusing on restoration of functional status to control-unit patients (N=75). Found greater improvement in basic functional capabilities of study-unit than control-unit patients. Found mixed picture when length of stay and total charges of study- and control-unit patients were…

  14. [Quality indicators in the acute coronary syndrome for the analysis of the pre- and in-hospital care process].

    PubMed

    Felices-Abad, F; Latour-Pérez, J; Fuset-Cabanes, M P; Ruano-Marco, M; Cuñat-de la Hoz, J; del Nogal-Sáez, F

    2010-01-01

    We present a map of 27 indicators to measure the care quality given to patients with acute coronary syndrome attended in the pre- and hospital area. This includes technical process indicators (registration of care intervals, performance of electrocardiogram, monitoring and vein access, assessment of prognostic risk, hemorrhage and in-hospital mortality, use of reperfusion techniques and performance of echocardiograph), pharmacological process indicators (platelet receptors inhibition, anticoagulation, thrombolysis, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting inhibitors and lipid lowering drugs) and outcomes indicators (quality scales of the care given and mortality).

  15. Hospitalization for acute pyelonephritis in Manitoba, Canada, during the period from 1989 to 1992; impact of diabetes, pregnancy, and aboriginal origin.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, L E; Friesen, D; Harding, G K; Roos, L L

    1996-06-01

    Population-based rates of hospitalization for acute pyelonephritis were estimated over 3 years with use of provincial administrative data on health care. Retrospective review of records of ICD9-CM discharge codes of pyelonephritis and urinary infection was performed in two acute care institutions to validate the discharge diagnosis; 80% of patients with a discharge diagnosis of pyelonephritis and 7% to 20% of patients with a discharge diagnosis of urinary infection met clinical criteria for admission for acute pyelonephritis. Mean rates of hospitalization +/- SD for acute pyelonephritis were 10.86 +/- 0.51 per 10,000 population among women and 3.32 +/- 0.27 per 10,000 population among men. From 18% to 31% of hospitalized women aged 20-39 years pregnant; 36% of 797 hospitalized women and 21% of 402 hospitalized men 40 years of age or older were diabetic. The hospitalization rates among Native American women with treaty status were five to 20 times greater than those among other women, which was partially attributable to a significantly greater frequency of pregnancy and diabetes in the former women. Hospitalization for acute pyelonephritis is common, and pregnancy and diabetes contribute substantially to hospitalization rates. The increased hospitalization rate among Native American women with treaty status is not fully explained by pregnancy or diabetes.

  16. Complementary and Integrative Healthcare for Patients with Mechanical Low Back Pain in a U.S. Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Taeho Greg; Leininger, Brent D.; Ghildayal, Neha; Evans, Roni L.; Dusek, Jeffery A.; Johnson, Pamela Jo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Complementary and integrative healthcare (CIH) is commonly used to treat low back pain (LBP). While the use of CIH within hospitals is increasing, little is known regarding the delivery of these services within inpatient settings. We examine the patterns of CIH services among inpatients with mechanical LBP in a hospital setting. Methods This is a retrospective, practice-based study conducted at Abbot Northwestern hospital in Minnesota. Using electronic health record data from July 2009 to December 2012, 8,095 inpatients with mechanical LBP were identified using ICD-9 codes. We classified patients by reason for hospitalization. We examined demographic and clinical characteristics by receipt of CIH services. Then, we estimated the prevalence of types of CIH delivered and clinical foci for CIH visits among inpatients with mechanical LBP. Results Most inpatients with mechanical LBP (>90%) were hospitalized for surgical procedures. Overall, 14.2% received inpatient CIH services. All demographic and clinical characteristics differed by receipt of CIH (P<0.001), except race/ethnicity. CIH recipients were in poorer health than those who did not. Most commonly delivered CIH services were massage (62.1%), relaxation techniques (42.0%) and acupuncture (25.7%). Pain (45.1%), relaxation (17.5%), and comfort (8.2%) were the top three reasons for CIH visits. Conclusion There are important differences between CIH recipients and non-CIH recipients among patients with mechanical LBP within a hospital setting. The reasons documented for CIH visits included addressing physical, emotional and/or mental conditions of patients. Future studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of CIH services health and wellbeing outcomes in this population. PMID:26860795

  17. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Shoveller, Jean; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kenyon, Cynthia; Cechetto, David F.; Lynd, Larry D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+)–a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program–in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children. Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children. Results Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services). However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated. Conclusions Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies

  18. Implementing the use of donor milk in the hospital setting: implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Breast milk is the ideal choice for neonates, particularly for the more vulnerable neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). When milk from the mother is not available, pasteurized donor milk is an important option, because it maintains many of its health benefits after pasteurization. Yet there are barriers to implementing the use of donor milk at a hospital. This article discusses the implementation of a donor program for pasteurized donor breast milk in the NICUs of three hospitals.

  19. The Effects of Hospital Length of Stay on Readmissions for Children With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Mary F; Dennis, Robyn; Sturm, Mollie; Koch, Terah; Stanek, Joseph; O'Brien, Sarah H

    2016-07-01

    Although regimens for induction therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are similar across the United States, typical practice with regard to inpatient length of stay (LOS) varies by institution. US children's hospitals were categorized by typical induction LOS; and readmissions, pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admissions, and average adjusted charges were compared for the first 30 days from initial admission. Using Pediatric Health Information System data, we extracted ALL induction admissions from 2007 to 2013. We categorized hospitals into 3 categories based on median LOS: short (≤7 d), medium (8 to 15 d), or long (≥16 d). Median LOS varied from 5 to 31 days across hospitals. Thirty-day median inpatient costs per patient ranged from $32 K for short LOS, $40 K for medium LOS, and $47 K for long LOS. Compared with short LOS hospitals (n=14), medium LOS (n=8) and long LOS hospitals (n=8) had lower odds of PICU readmissions (odds ratio [OR], 0.68; P=0.0124 and OR, 0.31; P<0.001, respectively), and long LOS hospitals had lower odds of any readmission (OR, 0.44; P<0.0001). Average LOS for children with newly diagnosed ALL varies widely by institution. Children's hospitals that typically admit new ALL patients for >7 days have fewer PICU readmissions but substantial increase in total induction inpatient costs.

  20. Mortality Trends in Patients Hospitalized with the Initial Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Middle Eastern Country over 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; El-Menyar, Ayman; AlBinali, Hajar A. H.; Gehani, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to define the temporal trend in the initial Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) management and outcome during the last two decades in a Middle Eastern country. A total of 10,915 patients were admitted with initial AMI with mean age of 53 ± 11.8 years. Comparing the two decades (1991–2000) to (2001–2010), the use of antiplatelet drugs increased from 84% to 95%, β-blockers increased from 38% to 56%, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) increased from 12% to 36% (P < 0.001 for all). The rates of PCI increased from 2.5% to 14.6% and thrombolytic therapy decreased from 71% to 65% (P < 0.001 for all). While the rate of hospitalization with Initial MI increased from 34% to 66%, and the average length of hospital stay decreased from 6.4 ± 3 to 4.6 ± 3, all hospital outcomes parameters improved significantly including a 39% reduction in in-hospital Mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that higher utilization of antiplatelet drugs, β-blockers, and ACEI were the main contributors to better hospital outcomes. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the hospitalization rate in patients presenting with initial AMI. Evidence-based medical therapies appear to be associated with a substantial improvement in outcome and in-hospital mortality. PMID:24868481

  1. The bacterial contamination rate of glucose meter test strips in the hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Saeb, Amr T. M.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra M.; AlQumaidi, Hamed M.; AlMogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of the multi-use vial and single-use packed glucose meter strips, and to identify the type and frequency of various bacterial contamination in different hospital wards. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted by a team from the Strategic Center for Diabetes Research in 7 general hospitals in the Central region of Saudi Arabia during the period from August to September 2014 to assess the bacterial contamination rate of the unused strips. A total of 10,447 strips were cultured using proper agar media and incubated both aerobically and anaerobically. Results: The total bacterial contamination rate for the multi-use vials glucose strips was 31.7%, while single-use packed strips were not contaminated at all. Ministry of Health hospitals had the highest contamination rates compared with other hospitals. Critical, obstetric, and surgical wards had the highest bacterial isolates number, where most were in the risk group 3 according to the National Institute of Health guidelines. Staphylococcus species were the most common bacteria found. Conclusion: Glucose meter strips should be recognized as a source of bacterial contamination that could be behind serious hospital acquired infections. The hospital infection control team should adopt proper measures to implement protocols for glucose meter cleaning and glucose strips handling. PMID:27570855

  2. The diagnosis of delirium in an acute-care hospital in Moscow: what does the Pandora’s box contain?

    PubMed Central

    Tkacheva, Olga N; Runikhina, Nadezda K; Vertkin, Arkadiy L; Voronina, Irina V; Sharashkina, Natalia V; Mkhitaryan, Elen A; Ostapenko, Valentina S; Prokhorovich, Elena A; Freud, Tamar; Press, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Background Delirium, a common problem among hospitalized elderly patients, is not usually diagnosed by doctors for various reasons. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a short training course on the identification of delirium and the diagnostic rate of delirium among hospitalized patients aged ≥65 years. The secondary aim was to identify the risk factors for delirium. Methods A prospective study was conducted in an acute-care hospital in Moscow, Russia. Six doctors underwent a short training course on delirium. Data collected included assessment by the confusion assessment method for the intensive care units, sociodemographic data, functional state before hospitalization, comorbidity, and hospitalization indices (indication for hospitalization, stay in intensive care unit, results of laboratory tests, length of hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality). Results Delirium was diagnosed in 13 of 181 patients (7.2%) who underwent assessment. Cognitive impairment was diagnosed more among patients with delirium (30.0% vs 6.1%, P=0.029); Charlson comorbidity index was higher (3.6±2.4 vs 2.3±1.8, P=0.013); and Barthel index was lower (43.5±34.5 vs 94.1±17.0, P=0.000). The length of hospitalization was longer for patients with delirium at 13.9±7.3 vs 8.8±4.6 days (P=0.0001), and two of the 13 patients with delirium died during hospitalization compared with none of the 168 patients without delirium (P=0.0001). Conclusion Although the rate of delirium was relatively low compared with studies from the West, this study proves that an educational intervention among doctors can bring about a significant change in the diagnosis of the condition. PMID:28260868

  3. Quantifying alcohol-related emergency admissions in a UK tertiary referral hospital: a cross-sectional study of chronic alcohol dependency and acute alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Vardy, J; Keliher, T; Fisher, J; Ritchie, F; Bell, C; Chekroud, M; Clarey, F; Blackwood, L; Barry, L; Paton, E; Clark, A; Connelly, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Alcohol is responsible for a proportion of emergency admissions to hospital, with acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependency (CAD) implicated. This study aims to quantify the proportion of hospital admissions through our emergency department (ED) which were thought by the admitting doctor to be (largely or partially) a result of alcohol consumption. Setting ED of a UK tertiary referral hospital. Participants All ED admissions occurring over 14 weeks from 1 September to 8 December 2012. Data obtained for 5497 of 5746 admissions (95.67%). Primary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions related to alcohol as defined by the admitting ED clinician. Secondary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions due to alcohol diagnosed with acute alcohol intoxication or CAD according to ICD-10 criteria. Results 1152 (21.0%, 95% CI 19.9% to 22.0%) of emergency admissions were thought to be due to alcohol. 74.6% of patients admitted due to alcohol had CAD, and significantly greater than the 26.4% with ‘Severe’ or ‘Very Severe’ acute alcohol intoxication (p<0.001). Admissions due to alcohol differed to admissions not due to alcohol being on average younger (45 vs 56 years, p<0.001) more often male (73.4% vs 45.1% males, p<0.001) and more likely to have a diagnosis synonymous with alcohol or related to recreational drug use, pancreatitis, deliberate self-harm, head injury, gastritis, suicidal ideation, upper gastrointestinal bleeds or seizures (p<0.001). An increase in admissions due to alcohol on Saturdays reflects a surge in admissions with acute alcohol intoxication above the weekly average (p=0.003). Conclusions Alcohol was thought to be implicated in 21% of emergency admissions in this cohort. CAD is responsible for a significantly greater proportion of admissions due to alcohol than acute intoxication. Interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related admissions must incorporate measures to tackle CAD. PMID:27324707

  4. Molecular Detection of Human Calicivirus in Young Children Hospitalized with Acute Gastroenteritis in Melbourne, Australia, during 1999

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Carl D.; Bishop, Ruth F.

    2001-01-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR and sequence analysis identified calciviruses in 32 of 60 stool specimens (negative for other enteric pathogens) obtained from children admitted to our hospital with acute gastroenteritis. The overall annual incidence rate for calcivirus was 9% (32 of 354 children). Molecular analysis identified 30 “Norwalk-like virus” genogroup II (predominantly Lordsdale cluster) and 2 “Sapporo-like virus” strains. PMID:11427606

  5. Reducing Length of Acute Inpatient Hospitalization Using a Residential Step Down Model for Patients with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Zarzar, Theodore; Sheitman, Brian; Cook, Alan; Robbins, Brian

    2017-02-23

    Psychiatric inpatient bed numbers have been markedly reduced in recent decades often resulting in long emergency department wait times for acutely ill psychiatric patients. The authors describe a model utilizing short-term residential treatment to substitute for acute inpatient care when the barrier to discharge for patients with serious mental illness (SMI) is finding appropriate community placement. Thirty-eight patients (community hospital (n = 30) and a state hospital (n = 8)) were included. Clinical variables, pre-/post-step down length of stay, and adverse outcomes are reported. Thirty of the 38 patients completed treatment on the residential unit and were discharged to the community. Five of the patients required readmission to an inpatient unit and the other three had pre-planned state hospital discharges. The majority of patients with SMI awaiting placement can be stepped down to residential treatment, potentially freeing up an inpatient bed for an acutely ill patient. Reforms in healthcare funding are necessary to incentivize such an approach on a larger scale, despite likely cost savings.

  6. [Nutritional support groups at a hospital setting. Size, composition, relationships and actions].

    PubMed

    Santana Porbén, S; Barreto Penié, J

    2007-01-01

    The hospital Nutricional Support Group (NSG) represents the ultimate step in the evolution of the forms of provision of nutritional and feeding care to hospitalized patients. The NSG outdoes other preceeding forms for its harmony and cohesion among its members, the multi-, inter- and transdisciplinarity, the dedication to the activity on a full time basis, and the capability to self-finance by means of the savings derived from the implementation of a nutritional policy consistent with the Good Practices of Feeding and Nutrition. It is to be expected that the inception and operation of a NSG in a hospital environment allows the realization of the benefits embedded into the Metabolic, Nutritional and Feeding Intervention Programs. Guidelines and recommendations for the definition of the size and composition of an hospital NSG are presented in this article, along with the responsabilities, functions and tasks to be assumed by its members, and a timetable for its implementation, always from the experiencies of the authors after conducting a NSG in a tertiary-care hospital in Havana (Cuba).

  7. An investigation and evaluation on species and characteristics of pathogenic microorganisms in Chinese local hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Lü, Xiaoli; Cao, Weiping; Zhang, Chunxia; Xu, Rongfa; Meng, Xu; Chen, Keping

    2015-12-01

    There are currently great concerns about the level of bacterial contamination in hospitals, as well as resistance to antimicrobial agents. The species and characteristics of microbes in Chinese hospitals are closely related to healthcare safety and the prevention and control of infections. However, data on the exposure of patients to microbes in Chinese hospitals are limited. The present study investigated the genera of microorganisms in Chinese hospitals. We evaluated their characteristics, such as antibiotic susceptibility, tolerance to disinfectants, and toxicity, using silkworms (Bombyx mori) as an animal model. Twenty-six distinct bacterial strains were isolated, and their genera were determined by sequencing their 16S rDNA regions. Twenty-five strains were resistant to one or more antibiotics, and six strains were resistant to multiple antibiotics. The results of minimal inhibitory concentration testing showed that eight strains were resistant to a chlorine-containing disinfectant, and 12 strains were resistant to Povidone-iodine. Following the injection of bacterial cultures into the silkworm hemolymph, 15 strains killed all of the silkworms within 5 d. Additionally, bacterial strain 14 killed all of silkworms within 12 h with a median lethal dose of 4 × 10(4) colony-forming units/larva. This study provides useful information for healthcare safety in Chinese hospitals.

  8. Relationship Between Severity Classification of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Clinical Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Pilar; Huerta, Arturo; Nieto-Codesido, Irene; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Lucía; Sibila, Oriol; Restrepo, Marcos I

    2017-01-01

    Background Limited data are available regarding the impact of the potential validation of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) guidelines recommendations in classifying patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) in simple and complex. The aim of the present study was to assess the CTS recommendations regarding risk stratification on clinical outcomes among patients hospitalized with an AECOPD. Methods We developed a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to one tertiary hospital with a diagnosis of AECOPD. The main clinical outcome was the percentage of treatment failure. Secondary outcomes were 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year readmission and mortality rate, length of stay in hospital, intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate, time to readmission, and time to death. Multivariate analyses were performed using 1-year mortality rate as the dependent measures. Results One hundred forty-three patients composed the final study population, most of them (106 [74.1%)] classified as complex acute exacerbation (C-AE) of COPD. C-AE patients had similar rate of treatment failure compared with simple acute exacerbation (S-AE) of COPD (31.1% vs. 27%; p = 0.63). There were no differences regarding the length of stay in hospital, ICU admission rate, and 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year readmission rate. C-AE patients had faster declined measures on time to death (691.6 ± 430 days vs. 998.1 ± 355 days; p = 0.02). In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for comorbidity, lung function and previous treatment, C-AE patients had a significant higher mortality at one year (Odds Ratio [OR] = 4.9 (Confidence Interval [CI] 95%: 1.16-21); p = 0.031). Conclusions In hospitalized patients with an AECOPD, CTS classification, according to the presence of risk factors, was not associated with worse short-term clinical outcomes although it is related with long-term mortality.  PMID:28265524

  9. Reducing Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing for Adults With Acute Bronchitis in an Urgent Care Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative.

    PubMed

    Link, Tamara L; Townsend, Mary L; Leung, Eugene; Kommu, Sekhar; Vega, Rhonda Y; Hendrix, Cristina C

    Acute bronchitis is a predominantly viral illness and, according to clinical practice guidelines, should not be treated with antibiotics. Despite clear guidelines, acute bronchitis continues to be the most common acute respiratory illness for which antibiotics are incorrectly prescribed. Although the national benchmark for antibiotic prescribing for adults with acute bronchitis is 0%, a preliminary record review before implementing the intervention at the project setting showed that 96% (N = 30) of adults with acute bronchitis in this setting were prescribed an antibiotic. This quality improvement project utilized a single-group, pre-post design. The setting for this project was a large urgent care network with numerous locations in central North Carolina. The purpose was to determine whether nurse practitioners and physician assistants, after participating in a multifaceted provider education session, would reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for healthy adults with acute uncomplicated bronchitis. Twenty providers attended 1 of 4 training sessions offered in October and November 2015. The face-to-face interactive training sessions focused on factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, current clinical practice guidelines, and patient communication skills. Retrospective medical record review of 217 pretraining and 335 posttraining encounters for acute bronchitis by 19 eligible participating providers demonstrated a 61.9% reduction in immediate antibiotic prescribing from 91.7% to 29.8%. Delayed prescribing, which accounted for a small percentage of the total prescriptions given, had a small but significant increase of 9.3% after training. Overall, this multifaceted, interactive provider training resulted in significant reductions in inappropriate prescriptions.

  10. Assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke in China: Findings from the China National Stroke Registry II.

    PubMed

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Li, Zixiao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Xingquan; Li, Hao; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Chunjuan; Meng, Xia; Wang, Anxin; Pan, Yuesong; Peterson, Eric D; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Background Stroke rehabilitation improves functional recovery among stroke patients. However, little is known about clinical practice in China regarding the assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients with acute ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the frequency and determinants of an assessment for rehabilitation among acute ischemic stroke patients from the China National Stroke Registry II. Methods Data for 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to 219 hospitals from June 2012 to January 2013 were analyzed. The multivariable logistic regression model with the generalized estimating equation method accounting for in-hospital clustering was used to identify patient and hospital factors associated with having a rehabilitation assessment during the acute hospitalization. Results Among 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients, 11,451 (59.4%) were assessed for rehabilitation. Rates of rehabilitation assessment varied among 219 hospitals (IQR 41.4% vs 81.5%). In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with increased likelihood of a rehabilitation assessment ( p < 0.05) included disability prior to stroke, higher NIHSS on admission, receipt of a dysphagia screen, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, carotid vessel imaging, longer length of stay, and treatment at a hospital with a higher number of hospital beds (per 100 units). In contrast, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and hospitals with higher number of annual stroke discharges (per 100 patients) were less likely to receive rehabilitation assessment during the acute stroke hospitalization. Conclusions Rehabilitation assessment among acute ischemic stroke patients was suboptimal in China. Rates varied considerably among hospitals and support the need to improve adherence to recommended care for stroke survivors.

  11. The effectiveness of computerized order entry at reducing preventable adverse drug events and medication errors in hospital settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act subsidizes implementation by hospitals of electronic health records with computerized provider order entry (CPOE), which may reduce patient injuries caused by medication errors (preventable adverse drug events, pADEs). Effects on pADEs have not been rigorously quantified, and effects on medication errors have been variable. The objectives of this analysis were to assess the effectiveness of CPOE at reducing pADEs in hospital-related settings, and examine reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors. Methods Articles were identified using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Econlit, web-based databases, and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews (September 2013). Eligible studies compared CPOE with paper-order entry in acute care hospitals, and examined diverse pADEs or medication errors. Studies on children or with limited event-detection methods were excluded. Two investigators extracted data on events and factors potentially associated with effectiveness. We used random effects models to pool data. Results Sixteen studies addressing medication errors met pooling criteria; six also addressed pADEs. Thirteen studies used pre-post designs. Compared with paper-order entry, CPOE was associated with half as many pADEs (pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.47, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71) and medication errors (RR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.60). Regarding reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors, five intervention factors and two contextual factors were sufficiently reported to support subgroup analyses or meta-regression. Differences between commercial versus homegrown systems, presence and sophistication of clinical decision support, hospital-wide versus limited implementation, and US versus non-US studies were not significant, nor was timing of publication. Higher baseline rates of medication errors predicted greater reductions (P < 0.001). Other context and

  12. Clinical and functional outcomes of acute lower extremity compartment syndrome at a Major Trauma Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lollo, Loreto; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute lower extremity compartment syndrome (CS) is a condition that untreated causes irreversible nerve and muscle ischemia. Treatment by decompression fasciotomy without delay prevents permanent disability. The use of intracompartmental pressure (iCP) measurement in uncertain situations aids in diagnosis of severe leg pain. As an infrequent complication of lower extremity trauma, consequences of CS include chronic pain, nerve injury, and contractures. The purpose of this study was to observe the clinical and functional outcomes for patients with lower extremity CS after fasciotomy. Methods: Retrospective chart analysis for patients with a discharge diagnosis of CS was performed. Physical demographics, employment status, activity at time of injury, injury severity score, fracture types, pain scores, hours to fasciotomy, iCP, serum creatine kinase levels, wound treatment regimen, length of hospital stay, and discharge facility were collected. Lower extremity neurologic examination, pain scores, orthopedic complications, and employment status at 30 days and 12 months after discharge were noted. Results: One hundred twenty-four patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred and eight patients were assessed at 12 months. Eighty-one percent were male. Motorized vehicles caused 51% of injuries in males. Forty-one percent of injuries were tibia fractures. Acute kidney injury occurred in 2.4%. Mean peak serum creatine kinase levels were 58,600 units/ml. Gauze dressing was used in 78.9% of nonfracture patients and negative pressure wound vacuum therapy in 78.2% of fracture patients. About 21.6% of patients with CS had prior surgery. Nearly 12.9% of patients required leg amputation. Around 81.8% of amputees were male. Sixty-seven percent of amputees had associated vascular injuries. Foot numbness occurred in 20.5% of patients and drop foot palsy in 18.2%. Osteomyelitis developed in 10.2% of patients and fracture nonunion in 6.8%. About 14.7% of patients

  13. Predictive value of serum uric acid in hospitalized adolescents and adults with acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abdulnaby, Nasser Keshar; Sayed, Ashraf Othman; Shalaby, Nehad Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background High serum uric acid (sUA) is an indicator of oxidative stress and is linked to tissue hypoxia in asthma. The objective of this case series was to investigate the prognostic role of sUA in patients with acute asthma exacerbations and the link between sUA and spirometric lung tests. Patients and methods This cross-sectional observational study included 120 patients with acute asthma exacerbations and 120 controls, categorized according to peak expiratory flow rate into moderate, and severe and life-threatening asthma. On admission, a detailed history was obtained and investigations were carried out regarding oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial blood gas, spirometry, sUA, number of asthma exacerbations, smoking status, history of previous hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, and mechanical ventilation. Results The current study revealed higher sUA in asthmatic patients compared with healthy subjects and in severe asthma patients compared with moderate asthma patients (P<0.001). A positive correlation of sUA with asthma severity, number of asthma exacerbations and smoking index (r=0.6, 0.42 and 0.29, respectively, P<0.001) and a negative correlation of sUA with SaO2, partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2), percent predicted forced vital capacity, percent predicted forced expiratory volume (FEV%) and peak expiratory flow rate percent of predicted (PEFR%; r=−0.48, −0.29, −0.44, −0.44 and −0.66, respectively, P<0.001) were observed. Degree of asthma severity, number of asthma exacerbations, and smoking index were significant predictors of high sUA (R2=0.43, P<0.001) in multiple linear regression model 1. SaO2 and PEFR% were significant predictors of high uric acid (R2=0.50, P<0.001) in model 2. The sensitivity and specificity of sUA in predicting severity of asthma at the cutoff point of 6.3 mg/dL were 80% and 90%, respectively. The odds ratios of sUA, number of asthma exacerbations, and asthma duration were 5.4, 1.95 and 1

  14. [Improvement of medical equipment setting for the hospital link of the medical service during wartime].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Yu V; Goryachev, A B; Popov, A A; Rodionov, E O

    2016-04-01

    One of the priorities of the military health care is to improve the system of rationing medical equipment for the hospital unit of the medical service of the Armed Forces in wartime. This is determined the fact that the effectiveness of measures to provide military field hospitals with medical supplies depends on the quality of medical care for the wounded and sick, as well as the level of their return to duty. The article presents the characteristics of modern standards medical supplies procurement of military field hospitals included in the new regulatory legal act of the Russian Federation Ministry of Defence--"Standards of supplies medical supplies medical and pharmaceutical organizations (units) of the Russian Federation on the wartime armed forces", approved and put into effect in 2015 by order of the Minister of Defence of the Russian Federation.

  15. Diagnostic Stability of Acute and Transient Psychotic Disorders in Developing Country Settings: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shubham

    2015-01-01

    Acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPD), introduced in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) diagnostic system in 1992, are not receiving much attention in developing countries. Therefore, the main objective of this article is to review the literature related to the diagnostic stability of ATPD in developing countries. A PubMed search was conducted to review the studies concerned with this issue in the context of developing countries, as diagnostic stability is more of a direct test of validity of psychiatric diagnoses. Four publications were found. According to the literature search, the stability percentage of the ICD-10 ATPD diagnosis is 63-100%. The diagnostic shift is more commonly either towards bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, if any. Shorter duration of illness (<1 month) and abrupt onset (<48 hours) predict a stable diagnosis of ATPD. Based on available evidence, the diagnosis of ATPD appears to be relatively stable in developing countries. However, it is difficult to make a definitive conclusion, as there is a substantial lack of literature in developing country settings. PMID:26266021

  16. Collegial relationship breakdown: a qualitative exploration of nurses in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Leanne S

    2013-01-01

    Poor collegial relations can cause communication breakdown, staff attrition and difficulties attracting new nursing staff. Underestimating the potential power of nursing team relationships means that opportunities to create better working environments and increase the quality of nursing care can be missed. Previous research on improving collegiality indicates that professionalism and work satisfaction increases and that staff attrition decreases. This study explores challenges, strengths and strategies used in nursing team communication in order to build collegial relationships. A qualitative approach was employed to gather nurses experiences and discussion of communication within their nursing teams and a constant comparison method was utilised for data analysis. A convenience sampling technique was employed to access both Registered Nurses and Enrolled Nurses to partake in six focus groups. Thirty mostly female nurses (ratio of 5:1) participated in the study. Inclusion criteria consisted of being a nurse currently working in acute care settings and the exclusion criteria included nursing staff currently working in closed specialty units (i.e. intensive care units). Results revealed three main themes: (1) externalisation and internalisation of nursing team communication breakdown, (2) the importance of collegiality for retention of nurses and (3) loss of respect, and civility across the healthcare workplace. A clear division between hierarchies of nurses was apparent in how nursing team communication was delivered and managed. Open, respectful and collegial communication is essential in today's dynamic and complex health environments. The nurses in this study highlighted how important nursing communication can be to work motivation and how leadership fosters teamwork.

  17. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Hyland, Andrew; Bianco, Eduardo; Glantz, Stanton A; Cummings, K Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Stimulated by the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, many countries in Latin America adopted comprehensive smoke-free policies. In March 2006, Uruguay became the first Latin American country to adopt 100% smoke-free national legislation, which ended smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The objective of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease 2 years before and 2 years after the policy was implemented in Uruguay. Methods Reports of hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (International Classification of Disease-10 I21) from 37 hospitals (79% of all hospital admissions in the country), representing the period 2 years before and 2 years after the adoption of a nationwide smoke-free policy in Uruguay (between 1 March 2004 and 29 February 2008), were reviewed. A time series analysis was undertaken to compare the average monthly number of events of hospital admission for AMI before and after the smoke-free law. Results A total of 7949 hospital admissions for AMI were identified during the 4-year study period. Two years after the smoke-free policy was enacted, hospital admissions for AMI fell by 22%. The same pattern and roughly the same magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions were observed for patients seen in public and private hospitals, men, women and people aged 40–65 years and older than 65 years. Conclusions The national smoke-free policy implemented in Uruguay in 2006 was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for AMI. PMID:22337557

  18. Cooperation between Japanese and Cambodian Dietitians in Setting up a Hospital Diet Management System.

    PubMed

    Ly, Koung Ry; Saito, Shino; Kusama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Cambodia faces a considerably high percentage of the stunted under 5 (Unicef, 2014). Despite the National Nutrition Strategy Launched by the Ministry of Health in cooperation with development partners, nutrition improvement projects have not always been effective. It is generally said these issues are addressed in many other developing nations, and the literature largely documented that successful nutrition programmes are community-based programmes because of their sustainability and the intensive communications between health workers and beneficiaries. Learning from the past experiences, the Foundation for International Development/Relief organized a project team with a Cambodian dietitian and an experienced Japanese dietitian to implement a hospital diet programme for children from April 2006 to March 2014 in the National Pediatric Hospital (NPH) in Cambodia. The project has two objectives: establishing a hospital diet management system, and developing the capacity of NPH staff. Hospital food menus were created paying particular attention to Cambodian culture, eating habits and accessibility to the ingredients for the purpose of continuous supply. We have also put emphasis on the communication between dietitians and family members of the children to let them understand the importance of a nutritious diet. After 8 y of project implementation, the hospital diet management system was established providing 7 types of menu with nutritious diets. The final evaluation of the project showed that NPH staff have the intention to continue hospital food supply with their acquired knowledge and capacity. In practice, a Cambodian dietitian currently takes the initiative for a continuous nutritional diet in NPH. The key to this success is the collaboration between Japanese dietitians with experience and Cambodian dietitians with knowledge of Cambodian eating habits. Taking our experience into account, it is highly recommended to educate Cambodian dietitians, as they are

  19. Quality improvement activity in radiology reading and reporting in a rural setting hospital in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Frelita, Grace; Wongso, Christlyn; Pasaribu, Marganda Dapot Asi

    2012-01-01

    The Republic of Indonesia is an archipelago country, which is located between Asia and Australia. With a population of more than 200 million people, Indonesia only has about 600 Radiologists, whose majority resides in urban areas. In such a challenging situation, the Siloam Hospitals Group (SHG) established a strategy to improve its remote hospitals' Radiologists' quality care standard of patient safety. Although the strategy has produced a positive result, resistance towards cultural change was unavoidable throughout the strategy implementation. By learning from several resources and experiences, SHG's leaders tried to develop a strategy improvement towards better processes, particularly in recognizing and solving interpersonal conflicts.

  20. A practical method of predicting client revisit intention in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyun Jick

    2005-01-01

    Data mining (DM) models are an alternative to traditional statistical methods for examining whether higher customer satisfaction leads to higher revisit intention. This study used a total of 906 outpatients' satisfaction data collected from a nationwide survey interviews conducted by professional interviewers on a face-to-face basis in South Korea, 1998. Analyses showed that the relationship between overall satisfaction with hospital services and outpatients' revisit intention, along with word-of-mouth recommendation as intermediate variables, developed into a nonlinear relationship. The five strongest predictors of revisit intention were overall satisfaction, intention to recommend to others, awareness of hospital promotion, satisfaction with physician's kindness, and satisfaction with treatment level.

  1. Acute Liver Failure Due to Budd-Chiari Syndrome in the Setting of Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jonathan G; Newton, Kelly; Vinayak, Ajeet G

    2015-04-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the heart, specifically cardiac sarcomas, are rare and mainly diagnosed at autopsy. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome is a recognized cause of acute liver failure and has been associated with several rare cardiac tumors: atrial myxoma, caval rhabdomyosarcoma, and primary cardiac adenocarcinoma. We present the first case of a fatal, highly differentiated cardiac synovial sarcoma that presented as acute liver failure from Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  2. Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 reduces the duration of diarrhoea, length of emergency care and hospital stay in children with acute diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Dinleyici, E C; Kara, A; Dalgic, N; Kurugol, Z; Arica, V; Metin, O; Temur, E; Turel, O; Guven, S; Yasa, O; Bulut, S; Tanir, G; Yazar, A S; Karbuz, A; Sancar, M; Erguven, M; Akca, G; Eren, M; Ozen, M; Vandenplas, Y

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from the literature has shown that Saccharomyces boulardii provides a clinically significant benefit in the treatment of acute infectious diarrhoea in children. In this multicentre, randomised, prospective, controlled, single blind clinical trial performed in children with acute watery diarrhoea, we aimed to evaluate the impact of S. boulardii CNCM I-745 in hospitalised children, in children requiring emergency care unit (ECU) stay and in outpatient settings. The primary endpoint was the duration of diarrhoea (in hours). Secondary outcome measures were duration of hospitalisation and diarrhoea at the 3(rd) day of intervention. In the whole study group (363 children), the duration of diarrhoea was approximately 24 h shorter in the S. boulardii group (75.4±33.1 vs 99.8±32.5 h, P<0.001). The effect of S. boulardii (diarrhoea-free children) was observed starting at 48 h. After 72 h, only 27.3% of the children receiving probiotic still had watery diarrhoea, in contrast to 48.5% in the control group (P<0.001). The duration of diarrhoea was significantly reduced in the probiotic group in hospital, ECU and outpatient settings (P<0.001, P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). The percentage of diarrhoea-free children was significantly larger after 48 and 72 h in all settings. The mean length of hospital stay was shorter with more than 36 h difference in the S. boulardii group (4.60±1.72 vs 6.12±1.71 days, P<0.001). The mean length of ECU stay was shorter with more than 19 h difference in the probiotic group (1.20±0.4 vs 2.0±0.3 days, P<0.001). No adverse effects related to the probiotic were noted. Because treatment can shorten the duration of diarrhoea and reduce the length of ECU and hospital stay, there is likely a social and economic benefit of S. boulardii CNCM I-745 in adjunction to oral rehydration solution in acute infectious gastroenteritis in children.

  3. Staffing in acute hospital wards: part 2. Relationships between grade mix, staff stability and features of ward organizational environment.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ann; Bond, Senga

    2003-09-01

    This paper explores relationships between grade mix, staff stability, care organization and nursing practice. The data were collected in the mid-1990s from a nationally representative sample of 100 acute hospital wards and 825 nurses. Analyses provides important insights for managers seeking to achieve the strategic aims set out in consecutive National Health Service (NHS) human resource management policies. Hypotheses about ward clinical grade mix were not well supported. Where there was rich grade mix, nurses reported better collaborative working with other disciplines and greater influence. However, it was expected that wards practising 'devolved' nursing would have a richer grade mix and that the latter would lead to more innovative practice and nurses experiencing greater job satisfaction. No evidence to support any of these hypotheses was found although the opposite scenario - a link between poor grade mix, unprogressive practice and perceived lower standards of care - was supported. Wards practising the 'devolved' system rely on adequate numbers of nurses rather than a rich grade mix, and do not necessarily provide a more stable, retentive work environment for nurses. By contrast, findings about staff stability were largely as expected. A strong link between staff stability and standards of professional nursing practice was found, indicating that staff stability is more important than a rich grade mix for achieving innovative, research-based practice. However, staff instability undermined cohesion with nurse colleagues, collaborative working with doctors, and nurses' ability to cope with the workload. Overall, both the papers demonstrate that staffing resources and prevailing ethos of care are more important predictors of care processes and job satisfaction than organizational systems. They identify the detrimental effects on nurses and their work of having few staff and a weak grade mix, and the importance of staff stability. Higher standards of nursing

  4. Gram-negative bacteraemia; a multi-centre prospective evaluation of empiric antibiotic therapy and outcome in English acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J M; Biswas, J S; Edgeworth, J D; Islam, J; Jenkins, N; Judge, R; Lavery, A J; Melzer, M; Morris-Jones, S; Nsutebu, E F; Peters, J; Pillay, D G; Pink, F; Price, J R; Scarborough, M; Thwaites, G E; Tilley, R; Walker, A S; Llewelyn, M J

    2016-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance makes choosing antibiotics for suspected Gram-negative infection challenging. This study set out to identify key determinants of mortality among patients with Gram-negative bacteraemia, focusing particularly on the importance of appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment. We conducted a prospective observational study of 679 unselected adults with Gram-negative bacteraemia at ten acute english hospitals between October 2013 and March 2014. Appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment was defined as intravenous treatment on the day of blood culture collection with an antibiotic to which the cultured organism was sensitive in vitro. Mortality analyses were adjusted for patient demographics, co-morbidities and illness severity. The majority of bacteraemias were community-onset (70%); most were caused by Escherichia coli (65%), Klebsiella spp. (15%) or Pseudomonas spp. (7%). Main foci of infection were urinary tract (51%), abdomen/biliary tract (20%) and lower respiratory tract (14%). The main antibiotics used were co-amoxiclav (32%) and piperacillin-tazobactam (30%) with 34% receiving combination therapy (predominantly aminoglycosides). Empiric treatment was inappropriate in 34%. All-cause mortality was 8% at 7 days and 15% at 30 days. Independent predictors of mortality (p <0.05) included older age, greater burden of co-morbid disease, severity of illness at presentation and inflammatory response. Inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy was not associated with mortality at either time-point (adjusted OR 0.82; 95% CI 0.35-1.94 and adjusted OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.50-1.66, respectively). Although our study does not exclude an impact of empiric antibiotic choice on survival in Gram-negative bacteraemia, outcome is determined primarily by patient and disease factors.

  5. Gut Microbiota in Children Hospitalized with Oedematous and Non-Oedematous Severe Acute Malnutrition in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Kia Hee Schultz; Wiese, Maria; Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov; Özçam, Mustafa; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Namusoke, Hanifa; Friis, Henrik; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) among children remains a major health problem in many developing countries. SAM manifests in both an oedematous and a non-oedematous form, with oedematous malnutrition in its most severe form also known as kwashiorkor. The pathogenesis of both types of malnutrition in children remains largely unknown, but gut microbiota (GM) dysbiosis has recently been linked to oedematous malnutrition. In the present study we aimed to assess whether GM composition differed between Ugandan children suffering from either oedematous or non-oedematous malnutrition. Methodology/Principal Findings As part of an observational study among children hospitalized with SAM aged 6–24 months in Uganda, fecal samples were collected at admission. Total genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples, and PCR amplification was performed followed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and tag-encoded 16S rRNA gene-targeted high throughput amplicon sequencing. Alpha and beta diversity measures were determined along with ANOVA mean relative abundance and G-test of independence followed by comparisons between groups. Of the 87 SAM children included, 62% suffered from oedematous malnutrition, 66% were boys and the mean age was 16.1 months. GM composition was found to differ between the two groups of children as determined by DGGE (p = 0.0317) and by high-throughput sequencing, with non-oedematous children having lower GM alpha diversity (p = 0.036). However, beta diversity analysis did not reveal larger differences between the GM of children with oedematous and non-oedematous SAM (ANOSIM analysis, weighted UniFrac, R = -0.0085, p = 0.584; unweighted UniFrac, R = 0.0719, p = 0.011). Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that non-oedematous SAM children have lower GM diversity compared to oedematous SAM children, however no clear compositional differences were identified. PMID:26771456

  6. Guide for Referral and Case Coordination for Young Children in Hospital Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Cordelia C.; And Others

    The Early Referral and Follow-up Project of the University of Nebraska Medical Center was designed to facilitate developmental assessment and intervention with long-term or repeatedly hospitalized children from birth to 3 years of age. Developmentally delayed children, handicapped children, and children at risk for delays were eligible for…

  7. Development of Intentionality in the Vocalization of Handicapped Infants Reared in a Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochner, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    The 15-month study followed the vocal development of five handicapped (Down Syndrome, hydrocephalus, and spina bifida) hospital reared infants. Results suggested that only the two less handicapped infants demonstrated use of sounds for social interaction and that the other infants used vocalization primarily as protest or self-stimulation.…

  8. Evaluation of ATP bioluminescence assays for potential use in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Zoie A; Wilson, Michael; Pratten, Jonathan

    2011-05-01

    ATP bioluminescence is being applied in hospitals to measure surface contamination. We compared commercial luminometers for detecting the number Staphylococcus aureus associated with surfaces. The data showed that the ATP bioluminescence methods tested were not robust enough to generate quantitative data on bacterial numbers, especially at low concentrations.

  9. Pediatric Heart Failure, Lagging, and Sagging of Care in Low Income Settings: A Hospital Based Review of Cases in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Solmon; Moges, Tamirat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Causes of acute heart failure in children range from simple myocarditis complicating chest infection to complex structural heart diseases. Objective. To describe patterns, predictors of mortality, and management outcomes of acute heart failure in children. Methods. In retrospective review, between February 2012 and October 2015 at a tertiary center, 106 admitted cases were selected consecutively from discharge records. Data were extracted from patients chart and analyzed using SPSS software package. t-test and statistical significance at P value < 0.05 with 95% CI were used. Result. Acute heart failure accounted for 2.9% of the total pediatric admissions. The age ranged from 2 months up to 14 years with mean age of 8 years. Male to female ratio is 1 : 2.1. Rheumatic heart disease accounted for 53.7%; pneumonia, anemia, infective endocarditis, and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever were the main precipitating causes. Death occurred in 19% of cases. Younger age at presentation, low hemoglobin concentration, and undernutrition were associated with death with P value of 0.00, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively. Conclusions and Recommendation. Pediatric heart failure in our settings is diagnosed mainly in older age groups and mostly precipitated due to preventable causes. Significant mortality is observed in relation to factors that can be preventable in children with underlying structural heart disease. Early suspicion and diagnosis of cases may reduce the observed high mortality.

  10. Pediatric Heart Failure, Lagging, and Sagging of Care in Low Income Settings: A Hospital Based Review of Cases in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebremariam, Solmon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Causes of acute heart failure in children range from simple myocarditis complicating chest infection to complex structural heart diseases. Objective. To describe patterns, predictors of mortality, and management outcomes of acute heart failure in children. Methods. In retrospective review, between February 2012 and October 2015 at a tertiary center, 106 admitted cases were selected consecutively from discharge records. Data were extracted from patients chart and analyzed using SPSS software package. t-test and statistical significance at P value < 0.05 with 95% CI were used. Result. Acute heart failure accounted for 2.9% of the total pediatric admissions. The age ranged from 2 months up to 14 years with mean age of 8 years. Male to female ratio is 1 : 2.1. Rheumatic heart disease accounted for 53.7%; pneumonia, anemia, infective endocarditis, and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever were the main precipitating causes. Death occurred in 19% of cases. Younger age at presentation, low hemoglobin concentration, and undernutrition were associated with death with P value of 0.00, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively. Conclusions and Recommendation. Pediatric heart failure in our settings is diagnosed mainly in older age groups and mostly precipitated due to preventable causes. Significant mortality is observed in relation to factors that can be preventable in children with underlying structural heart disease. Early suspicion and diagnosis of cases may reduce the observed high mortality. PMID:27974990

  11. The relationship between fragmentation on electrocardiography and in-hospital prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Ersin; Karaçimen, Denizhan; Özcan, Kazım Serhan; Osmonov, Damirbek; Türkkan, Ceyhan; Altay, Servet; Ceylan, Ufuk Sadik; Uğur, Murat; Bozbay, Mehmet; Erdinler, İzzet

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), QRS fragmentation was determined as one of the indicators of mortality and morbidity. The development of fragmented QRS (fQRS) is related to defects in the ventricular conduction system and is linked to myocardial scar and fibrosis. Material/Methods We prospectively enrolled 355 consecutive patients hospitalized in the coronary intensive care unit of our hospital with STEMI between the years 2010 and 2012 and their electrocardiographic features and the frequency of in-hospital cardiac events were evaluated. Results There were 217 cases in the fQRS group and 118 cases in the control group. QRS fragmentation was found to be a predictor for major cardiac events. In the fragmented QRS group, the frequency of in-hospital major cardiac events (MACE) and death were higher (MACE p<0.001; death p<0.003). In the fragmented QRS group, the cardiac enzymes (Troponin-I, CK-MB) were significantly higher than in the control group (p<0.001). In subgroup analyses, apart from the presence of fragmentation, the presence of more than 1 type of fragmentation and the number of fragmented deviations were also found to be related with MACE. A significant negative correlation was observed with the ejection fraction and, in particular, the number of fragmented deviations. Conclusions Fragmented QRS has emerged as a practical and easily identifiable diagnostic tool for predicting in-hospital cardiac events in acute coronary syndromes. Patients who present with a fragmented QRS demonstrate increased rates of major cardiac events, death risk, and low ejection fraction. In patients with STEMI, the presence of fQRS on the ECG and number of fQRS derivations are a significant predictor of in-hospital major cardiac events. PMID:24892768

  12. The impact of PPS on hospital-sponsored post-acute services: a case study of Delaware Medicare providers.

    PubMed

    Kulesher, Robert R; Wilder, Margaret G

    2008-01-01

    Hospitals were the first providers to experience the change in Medicare reimbursement from a cost basis to the prospective payment system (PPS). In the 1980s, this switch was accomplished through the development of diagnosis-related groups, a unique formula for Medicare reimbursement of inpatient hospital services. During that time, the concern was that, with the anticipated reduced payments to hospitals, adverse impacts on Medicare beneficiaries were likely, including premature release of patients from hospital care resulting in medical complications, increased readmissions, prolonged episodes of recuperation, and preventable mortality. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) mandated the implementation of the PPS for Medicare providers of skilled nursing home care and home health care. This change from cost-based reimbursement to PPS raised concerns that these providers would react as hospitals had done-that is, skilled nursing homes might limit their admission of Medicare patients and home health agencies might cut back on visits. As a result of that, hospitals might be faced with providing care for these post-acute patients without receiving additional reimbursement, and these changes in utilization patterns would be of critical importance to both providers and Medicare beneficiaries. This article examines the decisions that providers made in response to the perceived impact of the BBA. Qualitative data were derived from provider interviews. The article concludes with a discussion of how changes in Medicare reimbursement policy have influenced providers of post-acute care services to alter their level of participation in Medicare and the impact this may have on the general public as well as on Medicare beneficiaries.

  13. Using lean methodology to improve efficiency of electronic order set maintenance in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Idemoto, Lori; Williams, Barbara; Blackmore, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Order sets, a series of orders focused around a diagnosis, condition, or treatment, can reinforce best practice, help eliminate outdated practice, and provide clinical guidance. However, order sets require regular updates as evidence and care processes change. We undertook a quality improvement intervention applying lean methodology to create a systematic process for order set review and maintenance. Root cause analysis revealed challenges with unclear prioritization of requests, lack of coordination between teams, and lack of communication between producers and requestors of order sets. In March of 2014, we implemented a systematic, cyclical order set review process, with a set schedule, defined responsibilities for various stakeholders, formal meetings and communication between stakeholders, and transparency of the process. We first identified and deactivated 89 order sets which were infrequently used. Between March and August 2014, 142 order sets went through the new review process. Processing time for the build duration of order sets decreased from a mean of 79.6 to 43.2 days (p<.001, CI=22.1, 50.7). Applying Lean production principles to the order set review process resulted in significant improvement in processing time and increased quality of orders. As use of order sets and other forms of clinical decision support increase, regular evidence and process updates become more critical.

  14. Acute Kidney Injury, Risk Factors, and Prognosis in Hospitalized HIV-Infected Adults in South Africa, Compared by Tenofovir Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Neil; Motlhaoleng, Katlego; Abraham, Pattamukkil; Mancama, Dalu; Naicker, Saraladevi; Variava, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are limited data describing acute kidney injury (AKI) in HIV-infected adult patients in resource-limited settings where tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), which is potentially nephrotoxic, is increasingly prescribed. We describe risk factors for and prognosis of AKI in HIV-infected individuals, stratified by those receiving and those naive to TDF. A prospective case cohort study of hospitalized HIV-infected adults with AKI stratified by TDF exposure. Adults (≥18 years) were recruited: clinical and biochemical data were collected at admission; their renal recovery, discharge, or mortality was ascertained as an in-patient and, subsequently, to a scheduled 3-month follow-up. Among this predominantly female (61%), almost exclusively black African cohort of 175 patients with AKI, 93 (53%) were TDF exposed; median age was 41 years (interquartile range 35–50). Median CD4 count and viral load and creatinine at baseline were 116 cells/mm3 and 110,159 copies/ml, respectively. A greater proportion of the TDF group had severe AKI on admission (61% vs. 43%, p = .014); however, both groups had similar rates of newly diagnosed tuberculosis (TB; 52%) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID; 32%) use. Intravenous fluid was the therapeutic mainstay; only seven were dialyzed. Discharge median serum creatinine (SCr) was higher in the TDF group (p = .032) and fewer in the TDF group recovered renal function after 3 months (p = .043). Three-month mortality was 27% in both groups, but 55% of deaths occurred in hospital. Those that died had a higher SCr and more severe AKI than survivors; TB was diagnosed in 33 (70%) of those who died. AKI was more severe and renal recovery slower in the TDF group; comorbidities, risk factors, and prognosis were similar regardless of TDF exposure. Because TB is linked to higher mortality, TB coinfection in HIV-infected patients with AKI warrants more intensive monitoring. In all those with poor renal recovery, our

  15. Insulin pump patient characteristics and glucose control in the hospitalized setting.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Subramanian; Satra, Ankita; Calogeras, Ellen; Lock, Patricia; Lansang, M Cecilia

    2014-05-01

    Patients' knowledge of their insulin pumps and glucose control during hospitalization has not been studied. The aim was to study the determinants of glycemic control in patients using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in the hospital. Three groups of patients were identified: those who did not need any inpatient education and continued on CSII (gorup A), those who received education then continued on CSII (group B), and those for whom CSII was not appropriate and were treated with multiple daily insulin injections (gorup C). We compared the measures of glycemic control between the 3 groups and analyzed which variables impacted glucose control. There were 50 patients, with 51 hospital admissions, 57% males, mean age 48 ± 13 years, 86% had type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The mean DM duration was 26 ± 14 years, mean duration of CSII use was 8.7 ± 6 years, and mean HbA1c was 7.6 ± 1.4%. The mean duration of hospital stay was 5.6 ± 4.6 days. Mean blood glucose (BG) and frequency of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemic events among the 3 groups adjusted for their duration of hospital stay were not statistically different. None of the patients developed diabetic ketoacidosis while using their pump. Stepwise multivariate analysis revealed knowledge of hypoglycemia correction was the single most important predictor of mean BG (P < .001). Patients who received inpatient education performed similarly to patients who did not need inpatient education. Patients who receive inpatient education on CSII fare similar as patients who did not require inpatient education.

  16. Acute and Chronic Effects of Alcohol on Trail Making Test Performance Among Underage Drinkers in a Field Setting

    PubMed Central

    Day, Anne M.; Lisman, Stephen A.; Johansen, Gerard E.; Spear, Linda P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol’s effects on executive functioning are well documented. Research in this area has provided much information on both the acute and chronic effects of alcohol on processes such as working memory and mental flexibility. However, most research on the acute effects of alcohol is conducted with individuals older than 21 years of age. Using field recruitment methods can provide unique empirical data on the acute effects of alcohol on an underage population. Method: The current study examined the independent effects of acute alcohol intoxication (measured by breath alcohol content) and chronic alcohol use (measured by years drinking) on a test of visuomotor performance and mental flexibility (Trail Making Test) among 91 drinkers ages 18–20 years recruited from a field setting. Results: Results show that breath alcohol predicts performance on Trails B, but not on Trails A, and that years drinking, above and beyond acute intoxication, predicts poorer performance on both Trails A and B. Conclusions: These data suggest that, independent of the acute effects of alcohol, chronic alcohol consumption has deleterious effects on executive functioning processes among underage drinkers. Our discussion focuses on the importance of these data in describing the effect of alcohol on adolescents and the potential for engaging in risky behavior while intoxicated. PMID:23739029

  17. Functional Changes during Hospital Stay in Older Patients Admitted to an Acute Care Ward: A Multicenter Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    De Buyser, Stefanie L.; Petrovic, Mirko; Taes, Youri E.; Vetrano, Davide L.; Corsonello, Andrea; Volpato, Stefano; Onder, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Changes in physical performance during hospital stay have rarely been evaluated. In this study, we examined functional changes during hospital stay by assessing both physical performance and activities of daily living. Additionally, we investigated characteristics of older patients associated with meaningful in-hospital improvement in physical performance. Methods The CRiteria to assess appropriate Medication use among Elderly complex patients project recruited 1123 patients aged ≥65 years, consecutively admitted to geriatric or internal medicine acute care wards of seven Italian hospitals. We analyzed data from 639 participating participants with a Mini Mental State Examination score ≥18/30. Physical performance was assessed by walking speed and grip strength, and functional status by activities of daily living at hospital admission and at discharge. Meaningful improvement was defined as a measured change of at least 1 standard deviation. Multivariable logistic regression models predicting meaningful improvement, included age, gender, type of admission (through emergency room or elective), and physical performance at admission. Results Mean age of the study participants was 79 years (range 65–98), 52% were female. Overall, mean walking speed and grip strength performance improved during hospital stay (walking speed improvement: 0.04±0.20 m/s, p<0.001; grip strength improvement: 0.43±5.66 kg, p = 0.001), no significant change was observed in activities of daily living. Patients with poor physical performance at admission had higher odds for in-hospital improvement. Conclusion Overall, physical performance measurements show an improvement during hospital stay. The margin for meaningful functional improvement is larger in patients with poor physical function at admission. Nevertheless, most of these patients continue to have poor performance at discharge. PMID:24820733

  18. Despite Federal Legislation, Shortages Of Drugs Used In Acute Care Settings Remain Persistent And Prolonged.

    PubMed

    Chen, Serene I; Fox, Erin R; Hall, M Kennedy; Ross, Joseph S; Bucholz, Emily M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2016-05-01

    Early evidence suggests that provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act of 2012 are associated with reductions in the total number of new national drug shortages. However, drugs frequently used in acute unscheduled care such as the care delivered in emergency departments may be increasingly affected by shortages. Our estimates, based on reported national drug shortages from 2001 to 2014 collected by the University of Utah's Drug Information Service, show that although the number of new annual shortages has decreased since the act's passage, half of all drug shortages in the study period involved acute care drugs. Shortages affecting acute care drugs became increasingly frequent and prolonged compared with non-acute care drugs (median duration of 242 versus 173 days, respectively). These results suggest that the drug supply for many acutely and critically ill patients in the United States remains vulnerable despite federal efforts.

  19. Predictive value of D-dimer test for recurrent venous thromboembolism at hospital discharge in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Luo, Qin; Zhao, Zhi-Hui; Zhao, Qing

    2011-11-01

    D-dimer can be used to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE) for its high negative predictive value (NPV). Also, it is a predictor of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) after anticoagulation withdrawal. The aim of the present study was to assess the predictive value of D-dimer for recurrent VTE when tested at hospital discharge. Plasma D-dimer levels were repeatedly measured at hospital discharge in 204 consecutive patients with the first episode of acute pulmonary embolism. Patients were categorized to two groups by D-dimer levels at hospital discharge and followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. The primary end point was symptomatic, recurrent fatal or nonfatal VTE. D-dimer levels were persistently abnormal in 66 patients (32%). After 31±19 months follow-up, patients with persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels showed a higher rate of of recurrent VTE (14 patients, 21%) compared to those with D-dimer regression (8 patients, 6%) (P = 0.001). At the multivariate analysis, after adjustment for other relevant factors, persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels were an independent predictor of recurrent VTE in all subjects investigated, (hazard ratio, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.61-10.39; P = 0.003), especially in those with unprovoked PE (hazard ratio, 4.61; 95% CI, 1.85-11.49; P = 0.001). The negative predictive value of D-dimer was 94.2 and 92.9% in all subjects or those with unprovoked PE, respectively. Persistently abnormal D-dimer level levels at hospital discharge have a high negative predictive value for recurrence in patients with acute pulmonary embolism, especially in subjects with an unprovoked previous event.

  20. Bioterrorism preparedness--Part II. Smallpox vaccination in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lenworth M; Emanuelsen, Kathy; McKay, Charles; Burns, Karyl

    2004-01-01

    The threat of using smallpox as an agent for bioterrorism resulted in a directive for the creation of smallpox response teams. In Connecticut, The Commissioner of the Department of Public Health convened public health and hospital leadership to plan for the vaccination of these teams. The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of the vaccination program at Hartford Hospital, a Center of Excellence for Bioterrorism Preparedness, and to report the results of a survey of the vaccinees regarding the vaccination experience. Ninety persons were vaccinated. Six individuals experienced low-grade fever and 10 had axillary node swelling. One individual experienced significant fatigue. A total of six persons lost time from work. Four lost one day and two persons lost between four to five days of work. There was no autoinoculation, transfer inoculation, vaccinia or any other significant complication. Survey results indicate that most vaccinees felt positive about the experience.

  1. Improving Medication Administration Safety in a Community Hospital Setting Using Lean Methodology.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all health care organizations have goals of improving patient safety, but despite clear goals and considerable investments, gains have been limited. This article explores a community hospital's resounding success using Lean methodology to improve medication administration safety with process changes designed by engaged employees and leaders with the knowledge and skill to effect improvements. This article inspires an interdisciplinary approach to quality improvement using reproducible strategies.

  2. Validation of dipslides as a tool for environmental sampling in a real-life hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ibfelt, T; Foged, C; Andersen, L P

    2014-05-01

    Environmental sampling in hospitals is becoming increasingly important because of the rise in nosocomial infections. In order to monitor and track these infections and optimize cleaning and disinfection, we need to be able to locate the fomites with the highest amount of microorganisms, but the optimal method for this is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate which of four different dipslides or a standard TSA contact plate were best at recovering human bacteria from the environment. We tested four different dipslides with selective and non-selective agars versus a standard TSA contact plate in order to find the best sampling media. Two hundred sites in a children's medical ward in Copenhagen University hospital were sampled in autumn 2012. There was no difference in total bacteria count between the TSA contact plate and the dipslides. Faecal indicator bacteria recovery was the same for the dipslides and the TSA contact plate. Dipslides may be equally well suited for environmental sampling and hygiene assessment as TSA contact plates. Dipslides have some advantages, such as better sample security, easier sampling in confined spaces and longer shelf life that may speak in favour of choosing these for bacteria environmental sampling in hospitals, depending on the task.

  3. Genetic similarity between staphylococcus sp isolated from human and hospital settings, and susceptibility to different antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Fabiano, Telma Luciana Trovó; de Ávila, Bruna Helena Pinheiro; Dias, Cleusa Cascaes; Maluta, Renato Pariz; de Ávila, Fernando Antonio

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and forty-three samples from human hands and hospital beds were collected at a teaching hospital in the city of Ribeirão Preto/SP by swabs, and placed in BHI broth. Following a 24 h incubation period at 37°C, they were seeded on Petri dishes containing Agar “Staphylococcus Medium 110”. Colonies typical of the genus Staphylococcus were collected and stored at 4°C until tested for catalase, mannitol, hemolysis, DNAse and coagulase. Strains were analyzed by RAPD-PCR to verify their similarity, and tested for sensitivity to ten different antibiotics. From the ninety-two isolated strains, 67 (72,8%) were coagulase- negative and 25 (27,2%) coagulase-positive. Similarity analysis showed a great heterogeneity among strains, but some presented 100% similarity. Resistance to oxacilin was encountered in 39 (42%) of the strains. Two coagulase-negative strains were resistant to vancomycin, and eleven (12%) were considered multiresistant. Measures such as hand disinfection of the staff and hospital beds and rationalization of antibiotic use could contribute to decrease pathogen transmission and selection pressure, diminishing the frequency and lethality of nosocomial infections. PMID:24031283

  4. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea.

  5. Comparing the validity of different measures of illness severity: a hospital-level analysis for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gandjour, Afschin; Ku-Goto, Meei-Hsiang; Ho, Vivian

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the validity of three measures of illness severity (prior year's hospital expenditures, Charlson and Elixhauser indices), by analysing the effect of introducing report cards on hospitals treating patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Medicare claims data were obtained for 1992-1997 for AMI patients aged 65+. We used differences-in-differences regression analysis to assess the impact of report cards introduced in New Jersey and Pennsylvania on the illness severity of AMI patients with and without coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (relative to states without report cards). The analysis was conducted at the hospital level. For validation we used raw mortality and re-admission trends for AMI patients. While prior hospital expenditures suggest a considerable change in the illness severity of AMI patients in Pennsylvania relative to other states, raw mortality and re-admission trends in Pennsylvania are relatively consistent with the trend in the rest of the USA. In line with raw mortality and re-admission data, the Charlson and Elixhauser indices do not imply a considerable change in the severity of AMI patients in Pennsylvania. For CABG patients, illness severity - as measured by all three severity measurement methods - decreased after introduction of report cards, particularly in Pennsylvania. In conclusion, for AMI patients the Charlson and Elixhauser indices are a more valid measure of illness severity than prior year's hospital expenditures. After report cards were introduced, healthier AMI patients were more likely to receive CABG surgery, while sicker patients were avoided.

  6. Acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis: current prevalence at Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University Medical School.

    PubMed

    Belczak, Sergio Quilici; Cleva, Roberto D E; Utiyama, Edivaldo M; Cecconello, Ivan; Rasslan, Samir; Parreira, José Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Postsurgical acute suppurative parotitis is a bacterial gland infection that occurs from a few days up to some weeks after abdominal surgical procedures. In this study, the authors analyze the prevalence of this complication in Hospital das Clínicas/São Paulo University Medical School by prospectively reviewing the charts of patients who underwent surgeries performed by the gastroenterological and general surgery staff from 1980 to 2005. Diagnosis of parotitis or sialoadenitis was analyzed. Sialolithiasis and chronic parotitis previous to hospitalization were exclusion criteria. In a total of 100,679 surgeries, 256 patients were diagnosed with parotitis or sialoadenitis. Nevertheless, only three cases of acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis associated with the surgery were identified giving an incidence of 0.0028%. All patients presented with risk factors such as malnutrition, immunosuppression, prolonged immobilization and dehydration. In the past, acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis was a relatively common complication after major abdominal surgeries. Its incidence decreased as a consequence of the improvement of perioperative antibiotic therapy and postoperative support. In spite of the current low incidence, we believe it is important to identify risks and diagnose as quick as possible, in order to introduce prompt and appropriate therapeutic measures and avoid potentially fatal complications with the evolution of the disease.

  7. Reliability of Predicting Early Hospital Readmission After Discharge For An Acute Coronary Syndrome using Claims-Based Data

    PubMed Central

    McManus, David D.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Lessard, Darleen; Waring, Molly E.; Allison, Jeroan; Parish, David C.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Ash, Arlene; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2015-01-01

    Early rehospitalization after discharge for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), including acute myocardial infarction (AMI), is generally considered undesirable. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) base hospital financial incentives on risk-adjusted readmission rates following AMI, using claims data in its adjustment models. Little is known about the contribution to readmission risk of factors not captured by claims. For 804 consecutive patients over 65 years old discharged in 2011–13 from 6 hospitals in Massachusetts and Georgia after an ACS, we compared a CMS-like readmission prediction model with an enhanced model incorporating additional clinical, psychosocial, and sociodemographic characteristics, after principal components analysis. Mean age was 73 years, 38% were women, 25% college educated, 32% had a prior AMI; all-cause re-hospitalization occurred within 30 days for 13%. In the enhanced model, prior coronary intervention [Odds Ratio=2.05 95% Confidence Interval (1.34, 3.16)], chronic kidney disease [1.89 (1.15, 3.10)], low health literacy [1.75 (1.14, 2.69)], lower serum sodium levels, and current non-smoker status were positively associated with readmission. The discriminative ability of the enhanced vs. the claims-based model was higher without evidence of over-fitting. For example, for patients in the highest deciles of readmission likelihood, observed readmissions occurred in 24% for the claims-based model and 33% for the enhanced model. In conclusion, readmission may be influenced by measurable factors not in CMS’ claims-based models and not controllable by hospitals. Incorporating additional factors into risk-adjusted readmission models may improve their accuracy and validity for use as indicators of hospital quality. PMID:26718235

  8. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Faheem, Muhammad; Fahim, Ammad; Innocent, Haran; Mansoor, Zainab; Rizvi, Shehrbano; Farrukh, Hizra

    2016-01-01

    Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS). Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7%) patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient's awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7%) uneducated patients, 85 (59.4%) were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients. PMID:27752508

  9. The impact of severe obesity on post-acute rehabilitation efficiency, length of stay, and hospital costs.

    PubMed

    Padwal, Raj S; Wang, Xiaoming; Sharma, Arya M; Dyer, David

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective. The purpose of this retrospective observational study was to examine the influence of severe obesity on length of stay (LOS), rehabilitation efficiency, and hospital costs post-acute rehabilitation in a population-based, tertiary care, publicly-funded regional rehabilitation center. Participants. 42 severely obese subjects (mean age 53 y; mean BMI 50.9 kg/m(2)) and 42 nonobese controls (mean age 59 y; mean BMI 23.0 kg/m(2)) matched by sex and admitting diagnosis. Main Outcome Measures. Total LOS, rehab LOS, waiting for transfer LOS, Fuctional Independence Measure (FIM) efficiency, and hospital costs. Results. Compared to controls, severely obese subjects experienced longer total LOS (98.4 vs. 37.4 days; P = 0.03), rehabilitation LOS (55.8 vs. 37.4 days; P = 0.04), and waiting for transfer LOS (42.6 vs. 0 days; P = 0.006); increased hospital costs ($115,822 vs. $43,969; P = 0.03); and similar FIM efficiency (0.58 vs. 0.67; P = 0.27). Severe obesity was an independent predictor of total LOS (beta-coefficient 0.51; P = 0.03), rehab LOS (0.46; P = 0.02) but not FIM efficiency (-0.63; P = 0.06). Conclusion. Severe obesity adversely affects rehabilitation LOS and expenditures. Targeted interventions in severely obese individuals to optimize post-acute rehabilitation care delivery are needed.

  10. Deprescribing medicines in the acute setting to reduce the risk of falls

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Ward, Emily; Poots, Alan J; Heard, Katie; Rajagopalan, Arvind; Jubraj, Barry

    2017-01-01

    Background Falls are a common cause of morbidity and hospitalisation in older people. Inappropriate prescribing and polypharmacy contribute to falls risk in elderly patients. This study's aim was to quantify the problem and find out if medication review in the hospital setting led to deprescribing of medicines associated with falls risk. Methods Admissions records for elderly patients were examined to identify those whose presenting complaint included a fall. Inpatient medication charts, pharmaceutical care notes, medical notes and discharge summaries were examined to identify any falls-risk medicines from admission histories and to determine if any medication review took place, and whether or not changes were made as a result. In particular deprescribing and dose reduction details were analysed. Results 100 patients over 70 years old were admitted following a fall during the 2 months study period. The mean number of medicines on admission was 6.8 per patient with polypharmacy found in 62/100 (62%). One or more falls-risk medicine was found in 65/100 (65%) patients. Medicines review was carried out in 86/100 (86%) of patients, and 59/697 (8.5%) medicines were deprescribed. Pharmacist involvement in medication review led to a significant reduction in the number of falls-risk medicines per patient (p=0.002). Conclusions Inappropriate prescribing and polypharmacy are found frequently in elderly patients at admission following a fall. Comprehensive medicines reviews should be carried out in all such patients with the objective of deprescribing or reducing doses to minimise risk of harm. Involvement of a pharmacist improves the rate of reduction of falls-risk medicines. PMID:28184303

  11. Evaluating the influence of perceived pain control on patient satisfaction in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Craig, Angela R; Otani, Koichiro; Herrmann, Patrick A

    2015-01-01

    The authors evaluated whether a patient's perceived pain control influenced the relationships between four attributes (nursing, physician, staff, and environment) and patient satisfaction. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine overall satisfaction and intention to recommend, controlling for race, gender, age, and education. The authors found that no matter the level of pain control, nursing was always the most influential attribute in patient satisfaction. The influence of the other attributes varied, depending on the patients' pain control. Hospital managers may improve patient satisfaction by focusing on pain management nursing care.

  12. Canada acute coronary syndrome score was a stronger baseline predictor than age ≥75 years of in-hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome patients in western Romania

    PubMed Central

    Pogorevici, Antoanela; Citu, Ioana Mihaela; Bordejevic, Diana Aurora; Caruntu, Florina; Tomescu, Mirela Cleopatra

    2016-01-01

    Background Several risk scores were developed for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, but their use is limited by their complexity. Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify predictors at admission for in-hospital mortality in ACS patients in western Romania, using a simple risk-assessment tool – the new Canada acute coronary syndrome (C-ACS) risk score. Patients and methods The baseline risk of patients admitted with ACS was retrospectively assessed using the C-ACS risk score. The score ranged from 0 to 4; 1 point was assigned for the presence of each of the following parameters: age ≥75 years, Killip class >1, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, and heart rate >100 bpm. Results A total of 960 patients with ACS were included, 409 (43%) with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 551 (57%) with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). The C-ACS score predicted in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93–0.96), in STEMI patients with a C-statistic of 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89–0.94), and in NSTE-ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95–0.98). Of the 960 patients, 218 (22.7%) were aged ≥75 years. The proportion of patients aged ≥75 years was 21.7% in the STEMI subgroup and 23.4% in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (P>0.05). Age ≥75 years was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in ACS patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.25, 95% CI: 1.24–8.25) and in the STEMI subgroup (OR >3.99, 95% CI: 1.28–12.44). Female sex was strongly associated with mortality in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (OR: 27.72, 95% CI: 1.83–39.99). Conclusion We conclude that C-ACS score was the strongest predictor of in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients while age ≥75 years predicted the mortality well in the STEMI subgroup. PMID:27217732

  13. Differences between determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs for patients with acute heart failure: a nationwide observational study from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Noriko; Kunisawa, Susumu; Ikai, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although current case-mix classifications in prospective payment systems were developed to estimate patient resource usage, whether these classifications reflect clinical outcomes remains unknown. The efficient management of acute heart failure (AHF) with high mortality is becoming more important in many countries as its prevalence and associated costs are rapidly increasing. Here, we investigate the determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs to clarify the impact of severity factors on these outcomes in patients with AHF, and examine the level of agreement between the predicted values of mortality and costs. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting and participants A total of 19 926 patients with AHF from 261 acute care hospitals in Japan were analysed using administrative claims data. Main outcome measures Multivariable logistic regression analysis and linear regression analysis were performed to examine the determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs, respectively. The independent variables were grouped into patient condition on admission, postadmission procedures indicating disease severity (eg, intra-aortic balloon pumping) and other high-cost procedures (eg, single-photon emission CT). These groups of independent variables were cumulatively added to the models, and their effects on the models' abilities to predict the respective outcomes were examined. The level of agreement between the quartiles of predicted mortality and predicted costs was analysed using Cohen's κ coefficient. Results In-hospital mortality was associated with patient's condition on admission and severity-indicating procedures (C-statistics 0.870), whereas hospitalisation costs were associated with severity-indicating procedures and high-cost procedures (R2 0.32). There were substantial differences in determinants between the outcomes. In addition, there was no consistent relationship observed (κ=0.016, p<0.0001) between the

  14. Is locating acute wards in the general hospital an essential element in psychiatric reform? The U.K. experience.

    PubMed

    Totman, Jonathan; Mann, Farhana; Johnson, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals has long been seen in many countries as a key element in the reform of services to promote community integration of the mentally ill. In the U.K., however, this is no longer a policy priority, and the recent trend has been towards small freestanding inpatient units, located either within the communities they serve, or on general hospital sites, but separate from the main building. Whether locating the psychiatric wards in the general hospital is essential to psychiatric reform has been little discussed, and we can find no relevant evidence. Perceived strengths of general hospital psychiatric wards are in normalisation of mental health problems, accessibility to local communities, better availability of physical health care resources, and integration of psychiatry with the rest of the medical profession, which may faclilitate recruitment. However, difficulties seem to have been encountered in establishing well-designed psychiatric wards with access to open space in general hospitals. Also, physical proximity may not be enough to achieve the desired reduction in stigma, and complaints from the general hospital may sometimes result in undue restrictions on psychiatric ward patients. There are strong arguments both for and against locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals: an empirical evidence base would be helpful to inform important decisions about the best setting for wards.

  15. e-Prescribing in the Acute Care Setting: Determining the Educational and Motivational Needs of Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor, Sally; Walker, Tara; Fetters, Lisa; McCoy, Maryanne

    2017-03-16

    The study sought to determine the barriers to e-prescribing particular to the acute care setting, the educational and motivational needs of acute care providers, and the optimal process for incentive, education, and implementation of e-prescribing. A theoretically based survey instrument was adapted from previous work. Four domains were assessed: finesse, intent to use, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use. The survey was offered to a group of acute care providers. The educational and motivational needs of acute care providers are different from those in primary care. Perceived barriers centered on uncertain pharmacy hours, unconfirmed transmittal, and accidental transmission to wrong pharmacy. Healthcare providers with more self-assessed knowledge of e-prescribing are more likely to use e-prescribing. Providers with fewer years in practice seem to have greater knowledge of e-prescribing. Providing education and exposure to e-prescribing has the potential to decrease perception of barriers and increase perceived usefulness for acute care providers. Software redesign may be needed to remove barriers associated with uncertain pharmacy hours, controlled substance prescribing, transmittal confirmation, and bidirectional communication needs, thereby improving motivation to e-prescribe.

  16. Knowledge based functions for routine use at a German university hospital setting: the issue of fine tuning.

    PubMed Central

    Bürkle, T.; Prokosch, H. U.; Hussak, G.; Dudeck, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present the introduction of knowledge based functions into clinical routine at Giessen University Hospital. For this purpose a therapy planning module at the medical intensive care unit has been extensively redesigned in order to support the structured documentation of drug prescriptions. After introduction of this new HIS component in January 1996 research has been initiated to establish a basic drug therapy knowledge base. The main components of a knowledge based system have been fully incorporated into the hospital information system WING and are in routine use since December 1996. During a pre-production phase warnings of reminder functions were logged and reviewed by an interdisciplinary team in order to adapt the system to the actual clinical environment. The paper describes experiences during this fine tuning and adaptation process which was necessary to bring a small set of knowledge modules into clinical routine. PMID:9357589

  17. A multilevel intervention to increase community hospital use of alteplase for acute stroke (INSTINCT): a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Phillip A; Meurer, William J; Frederiksen, Shirley M; Kalbfleisch, John D; Xu, Zhenzhen; Haan, Mary N; Silbergleit, Robert; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Use of alteplase improves outcome in some patients with stroke. Several types of barrier frequently prevent its use. We assessed whether a standardised, barrier-assessment, multicomponent intervention could increase alteplase use in community hospitals in Michigan, USA. Methods In a cluster-randomised controlled trial, we selected adult, non-specialty, acute-care community hospitals in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, USA. Eligible hospitals discharged at least 100 patients who had had a stroke per year, had less than 100 000 visits to the emergency department per year, and were not academic comprehensive stroke centres. Using a computer-generated randomisation sequence, we selected 12 matched pairs of eligible hospitals. Within pairs, the hospitals were allocated to intervention or control groups with restricted randomisation in January, 2007. Between January, 2007, and December, 2007, intervention hospitals implemented a multicomponent intervention that included qualitative and quantitative assessment of barriers to alteplase use and ways to address the findings, and provided additional support. The primary outcome was change in alteplase use in patients with stroke in emergency departments between the pre-intervention period (January, 2005, to December, 2006) and the post-intervention period (January, 2008, to January, 2010). Physicians in participating hospitals and the coordinating centre could not be masked to group assignment, but were masked to progress made in paired control hospitals. External medical reviewers who were masked to group assignment assessed outcomes. We did intention-to-treat (ITT) and target-population (without one pair that was excluded after randomisation) analyses. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00349479. Findings All 24 hospitals completed the study. Overall, 745 of 40 823 patients with stroke received intravenous alteplase treatment. In the ITT analysis, the proportion of patients with

  18. Characteristics of effective electronic mail messages distributed to healthcare professionals in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Kaltschmidt, Jens; Schmitt, Simon P W; Pruszydlo, Markus G; Haefeli, Walter E

    2008-01-01

    Electronic mailing systems (e-mail) are an important means to disseminate information within electronic networks. However, in large business communities including the hectic environment of hospitals it may be difficult to induce account holders to read the e-mail. In two mailings disseminated in a large university hospital we evaluated the impact of e-mail layout (three e-mail text versions, two e-mails with graphics) on the willingness of its approximately 6500 recipients to seek additional electronic information and open an integrated link. Overall access rates after 90 days were 21.1 and 23.5% with more than 70% of the respondents opening the link within 3 days. Differences between different layouts were large and artwork text, HTML text, animated GIF, and static image prompted 1.2, 1.7, 1.8, and 2.3 times more often access than the courier plain text message (p

  19. A metasynthesis of midwives' experience of hospital practice in publicly funded settings: compliance, resistance and authenticity.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Rhona; Downe, Soo

    2009-11-01

    Worldwide, increasing percentages of women are giving birth in centralized hospitals in the belief that this maximizes safety for themselves and their babies. In parallel, there is international recognition that the number of birth interventions used in the routine care of labouring women is rising. This is fuelling concern about iatrogenesis, and, particularly, maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. It also has an adverse impact on the economics of health care. National and international policy characterizes midwives as the guardians of normal childbirth. This guardianship appears to be failing. The objective of this metasynthesis is to explore midwives' perceptions of hospital midwifery with a focus on labour ward practice to examine professional discourses around midwifery work in the current modernist, risk averse and consumerist childbirth context. Based on an iterative search strategy, 14 studies were selected for the metasynthesis. Three overarching themes were identified: 'power and control'; 'compliance with cultural norms'; and 'attempting to normalize birth'. Most midwives aimed to provide what they characterized as 'real midwifery' but this intention was often overwhelmed with heavy workloads and the normative pressure to provide equitable care to all women. This raises questions of authenticity, both in terms of midwives living out their beliefs, and in terms of acknowledgement of the power to resist. The theoretical insights generated by the metasynthesis could have resonance for other professional and occupational groups who wish to offer autonomous individualized services in an increasingly risk-averse target driven global society.

  20. What Influences Treatment Satisfaction in Patients with Personality Disorders? A Naturalistic Investigation in a Hospitalization Setting

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, Stefan; Huber, Martin Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Treatment satisfaction of different mental disorders is still poorly understood, but of high clinical interest. Inpatients of a general psychiatric care hospital were asked to fill out questionnaires on satisfaction and clinical variables at admission and discharge. On the basis of an exploratory approach, differences in treatment satisfaction among diagnostic groups were examined by means of one-way analysis of variance. Potential associated clinical and socio-demographic variables were studied using multi/univariate tests. Patients with personality disorders (n=18) showed a significantly lower treatment satisfaction (ZUF-8, Zurich Satisfaction Questionnaire) and a slightly lower improvement of symptoms (CGI, Clinical Global Impression) and global functioning (GAF, Global Assessment of Functioning scale) than that of other diagnostic groups (n=95). Satisfaction in patients with personality disorders correlated much stronger with the symptom improvement and slightly with the functioning level than in patients without personality disorders. Interestingly, in patients with personality disorders psychopharmacological treatment in general (present versus not present) was independent from satisfaction. This exploratory investigation suggests that a lower satisfaction of patients with personality disorders in a general psychiatric hospital is mainly based on a reduced improvement of the symptoms and of the global functioning level. PMID:28217274

  1. Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy with Severe Elevation of Bile Acids in the Setting of Acute Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, Agatha S.

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a complication of pregnancy resulting in elevation of serum bile acid levels. ICP is often associated with underlying liver disease, including hepatitis C. Bile acids in relationship to the acute infection of hepatitis C virus have not yet been delineated in the literature. A 26-year-old gravida 4 para 2103 with dichorionic, diamniotic twin gestation and history of intravenous drug abuse developed ICP in the setting of acute hepatitis C infection. In addition to clinical symptoms of pruritus and right upper quadrant pain, she developed severe elevation in bile acids, 239 micromol/L, and transaminitis aspartate aminotransferase 1033 U/L, and alanine aminotransferase 448 U/L. She received ursodeoxycholic acid and antenatal testing was performed. Patient delivered vaginally at 33-week gestation following preterm rupture of membranes. Neonates were admitted to NICU and had uncomplicated neonatal courses. In the setting of ICP with significant transaminitis and severe elevation of bile acids, consideration of acute viral hepatitis is important, especially considering the worsening opioid epidemic and concurrent increase in intravenous drug use in the United States. Further study is needed regarding the acute form of HCV infection and its effect on ICP and associated bile acids. PMID:27891271

  2. [Surgical treatment in severe acute pancreatitis. Last 15 years of experience in Emergency County Hospital of Baia Mare].

    PubMed

    Leşe, Mihaela; Tămăşan, Anca; Stoicescu, B; Brânduşe, M; Puia, Ioana; Mare, C; Lazăr, C

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the particular course of the patients operated for severe acute pancreatitis in a period of 15 years in surgical department of Emergency County Hospital of Baia Mare. Medical records of 202 patients admitted and operated for severe acute pancreatitis, were studied. Follow-up parameters were: age, gender, etiology, moment of operation, the type of operations and postoperative evolution of this patients. In the group of deceased patients alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis was prevailing. Almost a half of patients were operated in the first day of admission. A high number of patients were operated for diagnosis of acute abdomen with intention of exploratory laparotomy. In the last years, besides the usual closed drainage, open drainage and planning drainage were performed. Postoperative mortality is still high. The diagnose of severe acute pancreatitis is difficult in emergency. Global mortality in pancreatitis remains high, especially in the period of enzymatic shock, and is correlated with masculine gender, alcoholic etiology and somewhat with precocity of operation.

  3. Hypotension During Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure Is Independently Associated With 30-Day Mortality: Findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyesh A.; Heizer, Gretchen; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Hasselblad, Vic; Mills, Roger M.; McMurray, John J.; Starling, Randall C.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes associated with episodes of hypotension while hospitalized are not well understood. Methods and Results Using data from ASCEND-HF, we assessed factors associated with inhospital hypotension and subsequent 30-day outcomes. Patients were classified as having symptomatic or asymptomatic hypotension. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with in-hospital hypotension, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between hypotension and 30-day outcomes. We also tested for treatment interaction with nesiritide on 30-day outcomes and the association between inhospital hypotension and renal function at hospital discharge. Overall, 1555/7141 (21.8%) patients had an episode of hypotension, of which 73.1% were asymptomatic and 26.9% were symptomatic. Factors strongly associated with in-hospital hypotension included randomization to nesiritide (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.76–2.23; p<0.001), chronic metolazone therapy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.60; p<0.001), and baseline orthopnea (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.13–1.52; p=0.001) or S3 gallop (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06–1.40; p=0.006). In-hospital hypotension was associated with increased hazards of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.57–2.61; p<0.001), 30-day heart failure (HF) hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34–1.86; p<0.001), and 30-day all-cause hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.22–1.61; p<0.001). Nesiritide had no interaction on the relationship between hypotension and 30-day outcomes (interaction p=0.874 for death, p=0.908 for death/HF hospitalization, p=0.238 death/all-cause hospitalization). Conclusions Hypotension while hospitalized for acute decompensated HF is an independent risk factor for adverse 30-day outcomes, and its occurrence highlights the need for modified treatment strategies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT

  4. Variability of hospital resources for acute care of COPD patients: the European COPD Audit.

    PubMed

    López-Campos, Jose Luis; Hartl, Sylvia; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Roberts, C Michael

    2014-03-01

    Studies have suggested that larger hospitals have better resources and provide better care than smaller ones. This study aimed to explore the relationship between hospital size, resources, organisation of care and adherence to guidelines. The European COPD Audit was designed as a pilot study of clinical care and a survey of resources and organisation of care. Data were entered by clinicians to a multilingual web tool and analysed centrally. Participating hospitals were divided into tertiles on the basis of bed numbers and comparisons made of the resources, organisation of care and adherence to guidelines across the three size groups. 13 national societies provided data on 425 hospitals. The mean number of beds per tertile was 220 (lower), 479 (middle), and 989 (upper). Large hospitals were more likely to have resources and increased numbers of staff; hospital performance measures were related in a minority of indicators only. Adherence to guidelines also varied with hospital size, but the differences were small and inconsistent. There is a wide variation in the size, resources and organisation of care across Europe for hospitals providing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease care. While larger hospitals have more resources, this does not always equate to better accessibility or quality of care for patients.

  5. A multicentre survey of the current acute post-operative pain management practices in tertiary care teaching hospitals in Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Samina Khaliloddin; Razvi, Syed Shamim; Kulkarni, Sadhana Sudhir; Parab, Swapnil

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Undertreated pain can have negative consequences on patients' health as well as the health-care system. The present study was aimed at identifying the current trends in post-operative pain management and availability of acute pain services (APS). In addition, it is also an attempt to assess the availability of analgesia for non-surgical cases, and the attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions of clinicians regarding acute pain management in the tertiary hospitals in the state of Maharashtra (India). Methods: This was a cross-sectional, multicentre questionnaire survey involving the anaesthesiologists and surgeons. Percentages, median, interquartile ranges were calculated and compared by employing a Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results: Data from thirty centres revealed that the surgeons played a major role in treating pain, while most of the anaesthesiologists treated pain primarily in the operation theatre and recovery room. An APS was operational in seven hospitals. The most frequently employed techniques to achieve analgesia were the administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids and epidural analgesia. The majority of the centres had no written protocol and dedicated staff for pain management, pain assessment was not adequately stressed, and only five out of the thirty centres included in the study provided ongoing pain education to health professionals even when the hospitals claimed to provide APS. The major hurdles in providing optimal analgesia and implementing APS were a lack of pain education, equipment and administrative problems. Conclusion: Thus, the tertiary centres in Maharashtra fall short of providing optimal acute post-operative pain management.

  6. Eptifibatide and Cirrhosis: Rethinking GPIIb-IIIa Inhibitors for Acute Coronary Syndrome in the Setting of Liver Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Michael; Mendoza, Dexter; Pettei, Thomas; Grayver, Evelina

    2014-01-01

    Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) inhibitors, such as eptifibatide, are routinely used in the setting of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) prior to or during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). While numerous studies have demonstrated improved clinical outcomes with eptifibatide use, adverse effects including thrombocytopenia have also been noted. For this reason, patients with baseline thrombocytopenia or liver disease should be cautiously evaluated prior to drug administration. Here we report a case of acute profound and prolonged eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia in a patient with cirrhotic liver dysfunction. We propose and discuss the need for a risk stratification tool to be established for identifying which patients with ACS in the setting of chronic liver disease receive GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors. PMID:28352453

  7. Evaluation of an intervention to increase screening colonoscopy in an urban public hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Nash, Denis; Azeez, Sulaiman; Vlahov, David; Schori, Melissa

    2006-03-01

    Only 50% of New Yorkers aged 50 and over reported ever being screened for colorectal cancer by any modality according to a recent household survey. The objective of this investigation was to assess the impact of a hospital-based intervention aimed at eliminating health care system barriers to timely colorectal cancer screening at Lincoln Medical Center, a large, urban public hospital in one of the nation's poorest census tracts. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all colonoscopies performed over an 11-month period, during which a multi-pronged intervention to increase the number of screening colonoscopies took place. Two "patient navigators" were hired during the study period to provide continuity for colonoscopy patients. A Direct Endoscopic Referral System (DERS) was also implemented. Enhancements to the gastrointestinal (GI) suite were also made to improve operational efficiency. Immediately following the introduction of the patient navigators, there was a dramatic and sustained decline in the broken appointment rates for both screening and diagnostic colonoscopy (from 67% in May of 2003 to 5% in June of 2003). The likelihood of keeping the appointment for colonoscopy after the patient navigator intervention increased by nearly 3-fold (relative risk = 2.6, 95% CI 2.2-3.0). The rate of screening colonoscopies increased from 56.8 per month to 119 per month. The screening colonoscopy coverage provided by this facility among persons aged 50 and over in surrounding Zip codes increased from 5.2 to 15.6% (RR 3.0, 95% CI 1.9-4.7). Efforts to increase the number of screening colonoscopies were highly successful, due in large part to the influence of patient navigators, a streamlined referral system, and GI suite enhancements. These findings suggest that there are significant health-care system barriers to colonoscopy that, when addressed, could have a significant impact on screening colonoscopy rates in the general population.

  8. Palliative and Curative Care Nurses' Attitudes Toward Dying and Death in the Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Edward H.

    1986-01-01

    Examined sociodemographic background, nursing unit, amount of experience caring for dying patients, death anxiety, and attitudes toward working with dying patients among 56 nurses in palliative, surgical, and pediatric services. Work setting was found to be a more significant force in shaping attitudes toward caring for the dying than was…

  9. Acute Psychiatric Hospital Admissions of Adults and Elderly Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Examination of the records of 240 inpatients with mental retardation and 7 with autism discharged from a university hospital indicated that elderly adults had more medical problems than did adults, more elderly adults were transferred to a state hospital, and the most common diagnosis in both adults and elderly adults was chronic schizophrenia,…

  10. The effect of a sweet potato, footbath, and acupressure intervention in preventing constipation in hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kai; Qiu, Jingbo; Wang, Xiaohua; Niu, Fenglin; Jiang, Tingbo

    2012-01-01

    Constipation is a common health problem that adversely affects quality of life and the prognosis of hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The purpose of this study was to develop and test the sweet potato/footbath/acupressure massage (SFA) intervention as a safe treatment for prevention of constipation and to increase satisfaction with bowel emptying in hospitalized patients with ACS. The study was a prospective, randomized controlled trial with a sample of 93 patients (SFA group, n = 44; usual care group, n = 49). Patients in the SFA group received SFA intervention combined with usual care. The results showed that there were statistical differences between the two groups in terms of (1) the incidence of constipation; (2) the use of laxatives and enemas; (3) patients' subjective satisfaction with their bowel emptying during hospitalization; and (4) sensation of incomplete evacuation and anorectal obstruction/blockade. The SFA intervention was more effective, economical, and practical than usual care alone in managing constipation and satisfaction with defecation in patients hospitalized with ACS.

  11. Imaging of acute cholecystitis and cholecystitis-associated complications in the emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Ashish; Bosco, Jerome Irai; Lim, Tze Chwan; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Teh, Hui Seong; Shenoy, Jagadish Narayana

    2015-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a common cause of right upper quadrant pain in patients presenting at the emergency department. Early diagnosis and recognition of associated complications, though challenging, are essential for timely management. Imaging studies, including ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are increasingly utilised for the evaluation of suspected cases of cholecystitis. These investigations help in diagnosis, identification of complications and surgical planning. Imaging features of acute cholecystitis have been described in the literature and are variable, depending on the stage of inflammation. This article discusses the spectrum of cholecystitis-associated complications and their imaging manifestations. We also suggest a checklist for the prompt and accurate identification of complications in acute cholecystitis. PMID:26311909

  12. Imaging of acute cholecystitis and cholecystitis-associated complications in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Bosco, Jerome Irai; Lim, Tze Chwan; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Teh, Hui Seong; Shenoy, Jagadish Narayana

    2015-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a common cause of right upper quadrant pain in patients presenting at the emergency department. Early diagnosis and recognition of associated complications, though challenging, are essential for timely management. Imaging studies, including ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are increasingly utilised for the evaluation of suspected cases of cholecystitis. These investigations help in diagnosis, identification of complications and surgical planning. Imaging features of acute cholecystitis have been described in the literature and are variable, depending on the stage of inflammation. This article discusses the spectrum of cholecystitis-associated complications and their imaging manifestations. We also suggest a checklist for the prompt and accurate identification of complications in acute cholecystitis.

  13. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands1

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Elmer; Delsing, Corine E.; Sprong, Tom; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower respiratory tract symptoms, or fever and hepatitis, but had negative serologic results for Q fever. Patients with acute Q fever were younger and had higher C-reactive protein levels but lower leukocyte counts. However, a large overlap was found. In patients with an indication for prophylaxis, chronic Q fever did not develop after patients received prophylaxis but did develop in 50% of patients who did not receive prophylaxis. Differentiating acute Q fever from other respiratory infections, fever, or hepatitis is not possible without serologic testing or PCR. If risk factors for chronic Q fever are present, prophylactic treatment is advised. PMID:26196955

  14. Acute schistosomiasis in travelers: 14 years' experience at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London.

    PubMed

    Logan, Sarah; Armstrong, Margaret; Moore, Elinor; Nebbia, Gaia; Jarvis, Joseph; Suvari, Muhiddin; Bligh, John; Chiodini, Peter L; Brown, Michael; Doherty, Tom

    2013-06-01

    We report 79 cases of acute schistosomiasis. Most of these cases were young, male travelers who acquired their infection in Lake Malawi. Twelve had a normal eosinophil count at presentation and 11 had negative serology, although two had neither eosinophilia nor positive serology when first seen. Acute schistosomiasis should be considered in any febrile traveler with a history of fresh water exposure in an endemic area once malaria has been excluded.

  15. RecoverNow: Feasibility of a Mobile Tablet-Based Rehabilitation Intervention to Treat Post-Stroke Communication Deficits in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Dale; Finestone, Hillel M.; Hatcher, Simon; Lumsden, Jim; Momoli, Franco; Shamy, Michel C. F.; Stotts, Grant; Swartz, Richard H.; Yang, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 40% of patients diagnosed with stroke experience some degree of aphasia. With limited health care resources, patients’ access to speech and language therapies is often delayed. We propose using mobile-platform technology to initiate early speech-language therapy in the acute care setting. For this pilot, our objective was to assess the feasibility of a tablet-based speech-language therapy for patients with communication deficits following acute stroke. Methods We enrolled consecutive patients admitted with a stroke and communication deficits with NIHSS score ≥1 on the best language and/or dysarthria parameters. We excluded patients with severe comprehension deficits where communication was not possible. Following baseline assessment by a speech-language pathologist (SLP), patients were provided with a mobile tablet programmed with individualized therapy applications based on the assessment, and instructed to use it for at least one hour per day. Our objective was to establish feasibility by measuring recruitment rate, adherence rate, retention rate, protocol deviations and acceptability. Results Over 6 months, 143 patients were admitted with a new diagnosis of stroke: 73 had communication deficits, 44 met inclusion criteria, and 30 were enrolled into RecoverNow (median age 62, 26.6% female) for a recruitment rate of 68% of eligible participants. Participants received mobile tablets at a mean 6.8 days from admission [SEM 1.6], and used them for a mean 149.8 minutes/day [SEM 19.1]. In-hospital retention rate was 97%, and 96% of patients scored the mobile tablet-based communication therapy as at least moderately convenient 3/5 or better with 5/5 being most “convenient”. Conclusions Individualized speech-language therapy delivered by mobile tablet technology is feasible in acute care. PMID:28002479

  16. The Dynamics of Visual Art Dialogues: Experiences to Be Used in Hospital Settings with Visual Art Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Britt-Maj

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Given that hospitals have environmental enrichment with paintings and visual art arrangement, it would be meaningful to develop and document how hospital art could be used by health professionals. Methods. The study was undertaken at an art site in Sweden. During 1-hour sessions, participants (n = 20) get together in an art gallery every second week five times. Results. According to the participants a new value was perceived. From qualitative analyses, three themes appear: raise association, mentally present, and door-opener. In addition 72% of the participants reported makes me happy and gives energy and inspiration, and 52% reported that dialogues increase inspiration, make you involved, and stimulate curiosity. Conclusion. The present study supported the view that visual art dialogue could be used by health care professionals in a structured manner and that meaningful art stimulation, related to a person's experiences, could be of importance for the patients. Implementing art dialogues in hospital settings could be a fruitful working tool for nurses, a complementary manner of patient communication. PMID:22242200

  17. Hospital preparedness in community measles outbreaks-challenges and recommendations for low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Sadia; Mir, Fatima; Zaidi, Anita K M; Zafar, Afia

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed various strategies involved in containment of measles in healthcare facilities during community outbreaks. The strategies that are more applicable to resource-poor settings, such as natural ventilation, mechanical ventilation with heating and air-conditioning systems allowing unidirectional air-flow, and protection of un-infected patients and healthcare workers (HCWs), have been examined. Ventilation methods need innovative customization for resource-poor settings followed by validation and post-implementation analysis for impact. Mandatory vaccination of all HCWs with two doses of measles-containing vaccine, appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis of immunocompromised inpatients, and stringent admission criteria for measles cases can contribute toward reduction of nosocomial and secondary transmission within facilities.

  18. Hospital preparedness in community measles outbreaks—challenges and recommendations for low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Sadia; Mir, Fatima; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Zafar, Afia

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed various strategies involved in containment of measles in healthcare facilities during community outbreaks. The strategies that are more applicable to resource-poor settings, such as natural ventilation, mechanical ventilation with heating and air-conditioning systems allowing unidirectional air-flow, and protection of un-infected patients and healthcare workers (HCWs), have been examined. Ventilation methods need innovative customization for resource-poor settings followed by validation and post-implementation analysis for impact. Mandatory vaccination of all HCWs with two doses of measles-containing vaccine, appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis of immunocompromised inpatients, and stringent admission criteria for measles cases can contribute toward reduction of nosocomial and secondary transmission within facilities. PMID:25882388

  19. Aetiology, epidemiology and clinical characteristics of acute moderate-to-severe diarrhoea in children under 5 years of age hospitalized in a referral paediatric hospital in Rabat, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Benmessaoud, Rachid; Jroundi, Imane; Nezha, Mouane; Moraleda, Cinta; Tligui, Houssain; Seffar, Myriam; Alvarez-Martínez, Miriam J; Pons, Maria J; Chaacho, Saad; Hayes, Edward B; Vila, Jordi; Alonso, Pedro L; Bassat, Quique; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the aetiology, epidemiology and clinical characteristics of the principal causes of acute infectious diarrhoea requiring hospitalization among children under 5 years of age in Rabat, Morocco. A prospective study was conducted from March 2011 to March 2012, designed to describe the main pathogens causing diarrhoea in hospitalized children >2 months and less than 5 years of age. Among the 122 children included in the study, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) and rotavirus were the main aetiological causes of diarrhoea detected. Twelve (9.8 %) children were referred to an intensive care unit, while two, presenting infection by EAEC, and EAEC plus Shigella sonnei, developed a haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Additionally, six (4.9 %) deaths occurred, with EAEC being isolated in four of these cases. Diarrhoeagenic E. coli and rotavirus play a significant role as the two main causes of severe diarrhoea, while other pathogens, such as norovirus and parasites, seem to have a minimal contribution. Surveillance and prevention programmes to facilitate early recognition and improved management of potentially life-threatening diarrhoea episodes are needed.

  20. Estimation of exposure from spilled glutaraldehyde solutions in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Niven, K J; Cherrie, J W; Spencer, J

    1997-12-01

    Glutaraldehyde is commonly used in hospitals for cold disinfection of instruments which may be damaged by autoclaving. The increased use of automatic washer/disinfection machines has resulted in a greater risk of spills than with manual methods. A series of experiments was conducted to answer two related research questions: what was the likely range of airborne concentrations when glutaraldehyde is spilled, and are commonly used personal protective equipment ensembles effective and practicable in use? Objective measurements using three sampling methods (two pumped methods based on OSHA 64, one using treated filters and the other based on adsorbent tubes, and a Glutaraldemeter direct reading instrument) were conducted with spills of various surface areas of both 2 and 50% solutions of glutaraldehyde. Results ranged between < 0.01 and 1.4 ppm. Two personal protective equipment ensembles were tested. One was based on a half-facepiece respirator with gas-tight goggles, while the other comprised a full-facepiece cartridge respirator. Both ensembles gave adequate protection against irritation, although in use the half-facepiece respirator and goggles tended to interfere with each other. The direct reading instrument generally underestimated the glutaraldehyde concentrations, although there was a significant association with the results obtained using the method based on adsorbent tubes.

  1. Setting up a Tissue Bank in India: The Tata Memorial Hospital Experience.

    PubMed

    Gajiwala, A L

    2003-01-01

    In India, the procurement of tissues for transplantation is governed by the Transplantation of Human Organs Act, 1994. However, although this law exists, it is primarily applied to organ transplantation and rules and regulations that are specific to tissue banking have yet to be developed.The Tata Memorial Hospital (TMH) Tissue Bank was started in 1988 as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) programme to promote the use of ionising radiation for the sterilisation of biological tissues. It represents the Government of India within this project and was the first such facility in the country. It is registered with the Health Services Maharashtra State and provides lyophilised amnion, dura mater, skin and bone that have been terminally sterilised with exposure to 25 kGy of gamma radiation from a Cobalt 60 source. These are obtained either from cadavers or live donors.To date the TMH Tissue Bank has provided 6328 allografts for use as biological dressings or in various reconstructive procedures.The TMH Tissue Bank has helped initiate a Tissue Bank at the Defence Laboratory (DL), Jodhpur. At present these are the only two Banks in the country using radiation for terminal sterilisation of banked tissues.The availability of safe, clinically useful and cost effective grafts have resulted in changes in surgical treatment with a concomitant increase in demand for grafts and an interest in developing more tissue banks. The availability of donor tissue however, continues to be a major limitation.

  2. Exploring the impacts of personal factors on self-leadership in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ugurluoglu, Ozgur; Saygılı, Meltem; Ozer, Ozlem; Santas, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Se