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Sample records for acute hospitalized patients

  1. Respect in the care of older patients in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Jaana; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older patients and their next of kin with regards to respect in the care given in an acute hospital. The data were collected using tape-recorded interviews (10 patients and 10 next of kin) and analysed via inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, the concept of respect can be defined by the actions taken by nurses (polite behaviour, the patience to listen, reassurance, response to information needs, assistance in basic needs, provision of pain relief, response to wishes and time management) and next of kin (support, assistance and advocacy) and by factors related to the environment (appreciation of older people in society, management of health-care organizations, the nursing culture, the flow of information and patient placement). The information will be used to develop an instrument for assessing how well respect is maintained in the care of older patients. PMID:23131699

  2. Cognitive Status in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Seth N.; Hajduk, Alexandra M.; McManus, David D.; Darling, Chad E.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Spencer, Frederick A.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Saczynski, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in patients with heart failure and is associated with adverse outcomes. However, whether specific cognitive abilities (e.g., memory versus executive function) are impaired in heart failure has not been fully examined. We investigated the prevalence of impairment in three cognitive domains in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and the associations of impairment with demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods The sample included 744 patients hospitalized with ADHF (mean age = 72 years, 46% female) at 5 medical centers. Impairment was assessed in three cognitive domains (memory, processing speed, executive function) using standardized measures. Demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained from a structured interview and medical record review. Results A total of 593 of 744 (80%) patients were impaired in at least one cognitive domain; 32%, 31%, and 17% of patients were impaired in one, two, or all three cognitive domains, respectively. Patients impaired in more than one cognitive domain were significantly older, had less formal education, and had more non-cardiac comorbidities (all p’s < 0.05). In multivariable adjusted analyses, patients with older age and lower education had higher odds of impairment in two or more cognitive domains. Depressed patients had twice the odds of being impaired in all three cognitive domains (OR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.08, 3.64). Conclusion Impairments in executive function, processing speed and memory are common among patients hospitalized for ADHF. Recognition of these prevalent cognitive deficits is critical for the clinical management of these high risk patients. PMID:25458656

  3. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  4. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin in acutely hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Steichen, O; Bouvard, E; Grateau, G; Bailleul, S; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin as an adjunct to diagnose bacterial infections in older patients. One hundred seventy-two patients admitted to an acute-care geriatric unit during a 6-month period were prospectively included, 39 of them with an invasive bacterial infection. The best cut-off value to rule in a bacterial infection was 0.51 microg/l with sensitivity 64% and specificity 94%. The best cut-off value to rule out a bacterial infection was 0.08 microg/l with sensitivity 97% and specificity 20%. Procalcitonin was inconclusive (between 0.08 and 0.51 microg/l) for 112 admissions. Procalcitonin over 0.51 microg/l was useless 22 times out of 33 (infection already ruled in on clinical grounds) and misleading in eight of the 11 remaining cases (no infection). Procalcitonin below 0.08 microg/l was useless 23 times out of 27 (infection already ruled out on clinical grounds) and misleading in one of the four remaining cases (infection). Despite a good overall diagnostic accuracy, the clinical usefulness of PCT to diagnose invasive bacterial infections in elderly patients hospitalized in an acute geriatric ward appears to be very limited. PMID:19727867

  5. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. PMID:26560255

  6. Characteristics, Treatment Practices, and In-Hospital Outcomes of Older Patients Hospitalized With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Yang; McManus, David D.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Gore, Joel M.; Yarzebski, Jorge; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives The objectives of our study were to examine overall, and decade-long trends(1999-2009),patient characteristics, treatment practices, and hospital outcomes among patients≥65 years hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and describe how these factors varied in the youngest, middle, and oldest-old patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Population-based Worcester Heart Attack Study. Measurements We conducted analyses examining the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, cardiac treatments, and hospital outcomesof olderpatients in 3age strata (65-74, 75-84, and ≥85 years). Participants The study sample consisted of 3,851 patientsaged ≥65 yearshospitalized with AMI during 6 biennial years between 1999and 2009;32% were aged 65-74 years, 43% were aged 75-84 years, and 25% were ≥85 years. Results Advancing age was inversely associated with receipt of evidence-based cardiac therapies. After multivariable adjustment, the odds of dying during hospitalization was1.46times higher in patients aged 75-84 years, and 1.78times higher in those aged ≥85 years, compared with those aged 65-74 years. The oldest-old patients had an approximate 25% decreased odds of a prolonged hospital stay (>3 days) compared with those aged 65-74 years. Decade-long trends in our principal study outcomes were also examined.Although the oldest-old patients hospitalized for AMIwere at the greatest risk for dying among olderpatients, we observed persistent age-related differences in hospital treatment practices.Similar results were observed after excluding patients with a DNR order in their medical records. Conclusion While there are persistent disparities in care and outcomes of older patients hospitalized with AMI, additional studies are needed to delineate the extent to which less aggressive care reflects patient preferences and appropriate implementation of palliative care approaches. PMID:25116983

  7. Achieving better in-hospital and after-hospital care of patients with acute cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Denaro, Charles P; Bennett, Cameron J; Hickey, Annabel C; Mudge, Alison M; Flores, Judy L; Sanders, Daniela C J; Thiele, Justine M; Wenck, Beres; Bennett, John W; Jones, Mark A

    2004-05-17

    In patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and congestive heart failure (CHF), evidence suggests opportunities for improving in-hospital and after-hospital care, patient self-care, and hospital-community integration. A multidisciplinary quality improvement program was designed and instigated in Brisbane in October 2000 involving 250 clinicians at three teaching hospitals, 1080 general practitioners (GPs) from five Divisions of General Practice, 1594 patients with ACS and 904 patients with CHF. Quality improvement interventions were implemented over 17 months after a 6-month baseline period and included: clinical decision support (clinical practice guidelines, reminders, checklists, clinical pathways); educational interventions (seminars, academic detailing); regular performance feedback; patient self-management strategies; and hospital-community integration (discharge referral summaries; community pharmacist liaison; patient prompts to attend GPs). Using a before-after study design to assess program impact, significantly more program patients compared with historical controls received: ACS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and lipid-lowering agents at discharge, aspirin and beta-blockers at 3 months after discharge, inpatient cardiac counselling, and referral to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. CHF: Assessment for reversible precipitants, use of prophylaxis for deep-venous thrombosis, beta-blockers at discharge, ACE inhibitors at 6 months after discharge, imaging of left ventricular function, and optimal management of blood pressure levels. Risk-adjusted mortality rates at 6 and 12 months decreased, respectively, from 9.8% to 7.4% (P = 0.06) and from 13.4% to 10.1% (P = 0.06) for patients with ACS and from 22.8% to 15.2% (P < 0.001) and from 32.8% to 22.4% (P = 0.005) for patients with CHF. Quality improvement programs that feature multifaceted interventions across the continuum of care can change clinical culture, optimise care

  8. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  9. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  10. Implementation of an Acute Care Surgery Service in a Community Hospital: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A service led by acute care surgeons managing trauma, critically ill surgical, and emergency general surgery patients via an acute care surgery model of patient care improves hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at university-affiliated hospitals and American College of Surgeons-verified trauma centers. Our goal was to determine whether an acute care surgeon led service, entitled the Surgical Trauma and Acute Resuscitative Service (STARS) that implemented an acute care surgery model of patient care, could improve hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at a community hospital. A total of 492 patient charts were reviewed, which included 230 before the implementation of the STARS [pre-STARS (control)] and 262 after the implementation of the STARS [post-STARS (study)]. Demographics included age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score, and medical comorbidities. Efficiency data included length of stay in emergency department (ED-LOS), length of stay in surgical intensive care unit (SICU-LOS), and length of stay in hospital (H-LOS), and total in hospital charges. Average age was 64.1 + 16.4 years, 255 males (51.83%) and 237 females (48.17%). Average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score was 11.9 + 5.8. No significant differences in demographics were observed. Average decreases in ED-LOS (9.7 + 9.6 hours, pre-STARS versus 6.6 + 4.5 hours, post-STARS), SICU-LOS (5.3 + 9.6 days, pre-STARS versus 3.5 + 4.8 days, post-STARS), H-LOS (12.4 + 12.7 days, pre-STARS versus 11.4 + 11.3 days, post-STARS), and total in hospital charges ($419,602.6 + $519,523.0 pre-STARS to $374,816.7 + $411,935.8 post-STARS) post-STARS. Regression analysis revealed decreased ED-LOS-2.9 hours [P = 0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): -7.0, 1.2], SICU-LOS-6.3 days (P < 0.001; 95% CI: -9.3, -3.2), H-LOS-7.6 days (P = 0.001; 95% CI: -12.1, -3.1), and 3.4 times greater odds of survival (P = 0.04; 95% CI: 1.1, 10.7) post-STARS. In conclusion, implementation of

  11. Initiation or maintenance of beta-blocker therapy in patients hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Passos, Luiz Carlos; Oliveira, Márcio Galvão; Duraes, Andre Rodrigues; Trindade, Thiago Moreira; Barbosa, Andréa Cristina Costa

    2016-08-01

    Background Beta-blockers have been recommended for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction for their long-term benefits. However, the tolerance to betablockers in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure should be evaluated. Objective To estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure who can tolerate these agents in clinical practice and compare the clinical outcomes of patients who can and cannot tolerate treatment with beta-blockers. Setting Two reference hospitals in cardiology. Methods Retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients hospitalized for acute heart failure between September 2008 and May 2012. Population-based sample. During the study period, 325 patients were admitted consecutively, including 194 individuals with an acute heart failure diagnosis and systolic left ventricular dysfunction and ejection fraction ≤45 %, who were candidates for the initiation or continuation of beta-blockers. Main outcome measure The percentage of patients intolerant to beta-blockers and the clinical characteristics of patients. Results On admission, 61.8 % of patients were already using beta-blockers, and 73.2 % were using beta-blockers on discharge. During hospitalization, 85 % of patients used these agents for some period. The main reasons for not using betablockers were low cardiac output syndrome (24.4 %), bradycardia (24.4 %), severe hypotension or shock (17.8 %), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (13.3 %). Patients who were intolerant or did not use a beta-blocker had a longer hospital stay (18.3 vs. 11.0 days; p < .001), greater use of vasoactive drugs (41.5 vs. 16.3 %; p < .001, CI 1.80-7.35), sepsis and septic shock (RR = 3.02; CI 95 % 1.59-5.75), and higher mortality rate during hospitalization (22.6 vs. 2.9 %; p < .001; CI 3.05-32.26). Conclusion Beta-blockers could be used in 73.2 % of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure. Patients who can not tolerate BB presented

  12. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mirghani, Hyder O.; Elnour, Mohammed A.; Taha, Akasha M.; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P < 0.05). No differences were found with regard to age, hypertension, diabetes, family history of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and in-hospital acute coronary complications (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications. PMID:27186156

  13. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  14. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  15. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  16. Predicting mortality in acutely hospitalized older patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    de Gelder, Jelle; Lucke, Jacinta A; Heim, Noor; de Craen, Antonius J M; Lourens, Shantaily D; Steyerberg, Ewout W; de Groot, Bas; Fogteloo, Anne J; Blauw, Gerard J; Mooijaart, Simon P

    2016-06-01

    Acutely hospitalized older patients have an increased risk of mortality, but at the moment of presentation this risk is difficult to assess. Early identification of patients at high risk might increase the awareness of the physician, and enable tailored decision-making. Existing screening instruments mainly use either geriatric factors or severity of disease for prognostication. Predictive performance of these instruments is moderate, which hampers successive interventions. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all patients aged 70 years and over who were acutely hospitalized in the Acute Medical Unit of the Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands in 2012. We developed a prediction model for 90-day mortality that combines vital signs and laboratory test results reflecting severity of disease with geriatric factors, represented by comorbidities and number of medications. Among 517 patients, 94 patients (18.2 %) died within 90 days after admission. Six predictors of mortality were included in a model for mortality: oxygen saturation, Charlson comorbidity index, thrombocytes, urea, C-reactive protein and non-fasting glucose. The prediction model performs satisfactorily with an 0.738 (0.667-0.798). Using this model, 53 % of the patients in the highest risk decile (N = 51) were deceased within 90 days. In conclusion, we are able to predict 90-day mortality in acutely hospitalized older patients using a model with directly available clinical data describing disease severity and geriatric factors. After further validation, such a model might be used in clinical decision making in older patients. PMID:26825335

  17. Level of Physical Activity and In-Hospital Course of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Juliana de Goes; Santos, Marcos Antonio Almeida; Barreto Filho, José Augusto Soares; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes; de Melo, Enaldo Vieira; de Oliveira, Norma Alves; Faro, Gustavo Baptista de Almeida; Sousa, Antônio Carlos Sobral

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. A sedentary lifestyle, present in 85% of the Brazilian population, is considered a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease. However, the correlation of a sedentary lifestyle with cardiovascular events (CVE) during hospitalization for ACS is not well established. Objective To evaluate the association between physical activity level, assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), with in-hospital prognosis in patients with ACS. Methods Observational, cross-sectional, and analytical study with 215 subjects with a diagnosis of ACS consecutively admitted to a referral hospital for cardiac patients between July 2009 and February 2011. All volunteers answered the short version of the IPAQ and were observed for the occurrence of CVE during hospitalization with a standardized assessment conducted by the researcher and corroborated by data from medical records. Results The patients were admitted with diagnoses of unstable angina (34.4%), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without ST elevation (41.4%), and AMI with ST elevation (24.2%). According to the level of physical activity, the patients were classified as non-active (56.3%) and active (43.7%). A CVE occurred in 35.3% of the cohort. The occurrence of in-hospital complications was associated with the length of hospital stay (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15) and physical inactivity (OR = 2.54), and was independent of age, systolic blood pressure, and prior congestive heart failure. Conclusion A physically active lifestyle reduces the risk of CVE during hospitalization in patients with ACS. PMID:26690692

  18. Health Literacy and Mortality: A Cohort Study of Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio for death among patients with low health literacy was 1.34 (95% CI 1.04, 1.73, P=0.02) compared to Brief Health Literacy Screen >9. Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Conclusions Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. PMID:25926328

  19. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  20. The Clinical Course of Cirrhosis Patients Hospitalized for Acute Hepatic Deterioration: A Prospective Bicentric Study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Yan, Huadong; Zhou, Zhibo; Fang, Hong; Li, Jiawei; Ye, Honghua; Sun, Wenjie; Zhou, Wenhong; Ye, Jingfen; Yang, Qiao; Yang, Ying; Hu, Yaoren; Chen, Zhi; Sheng, Jifang

    2015-11-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are vulnerable to acute hepatic insults and are more likely to develop rapid hepatic deterioration. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical course of patients with cirrhosis and hospitalized for acute hepatic deterioration (AHD).This is a prospective study involving 163 patients with cirrhosis and AHD. The occurrence of organ failures, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and infections during hospital stay were recorded and the relationship between organ failure and death or SIRS/infection was subsequently analyzed.Of 163 patients, 35 did not develop any organ failure during in-hospital follow-ups (90-day mortality: 0%); 84 had intrahepatic organ failures (IH-OFs, defined by liver and/or coagulation failure) (90-day mortality: 22.0%); and 44 patients developed extra-hepatic organ failures (EH-OFs, defined by kidney, cerebral, circulation, and respiratory failure) on the basis of IH-OF with a 90-day mortality of 90.9%. On multivariable analysis by a Cox proportion hazard model, age, WBC, presence of IH-OF, and EH-OF all predicted 90-day death. A logistic regression analysis identified SIRS being associated with the development of EH-OF. Furthermore, IH-OF at admission and infections occurred during the hospital stay were shown to be another 2 potential risk factors.The clinical course of cirrhosis patients with acute hepatic injury was characterized by 3 consecutive stages (AHD, IH-OF, and EH-OF), which provided a clear risk stratification. The PIRO criteria provided an accurate frame for prognostication of those patients. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome may be a target for blocking the progression to the EH-OF stage. PMID:26632701

  1. Prevalence of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection in Patients With Out-Of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Sakata, Kenji; Sakurai, Yasuo; Yoshimuta, Tsuyoshi; Morishita, Yuka; Nara, Satoshi; Takahashi, Isao; Hirokami, Mitsugu; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2016-06-01

    Postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) has been recently reported to be useful for detecting causes of death in the emergency department. In this study, the incidence and causes of death of type A acute aortic dissection (AAD) were investigated in patients who experienced out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCPA) using PMCT. PMCT or enhanced computed tomography was performed in 311 of 528 consecutive patients experiencing OHCPA. A total of 23 (7%) of 311 patients were diagnosed with type A AAD based on clinical courses and CT findings. Eighteen consecutive patients who did not experience OHCPA were diagnosed with type A AAD during the same period. Pre-hospital death was observed in 21 (51%) of 41 patients with type A AAD. Bloody pericardial effusion was observed more frequently in patients who experienced OHCPA with type A AAD than in those who did not experience OHCPA with type A AAD (91% vs 28%, respectively; p <0.05). In conclusion, the incidence of type A AAD was common (7%) in patients who experienced OHCPA, with a high rate of pre-hospital death. Aortic rupture to the intrapericardial space was considered the major cause of death in patients who experienced OHCPA with type A AAD. PMID:27067619

  2. Prevalence of blood eosinophilia in hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    In this cohort of 3084 patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD), we found that 17% had blood eosinophilia (≥300 cells/μL); the use of an alternative cut-off level (≥2%) demonstrated that 40% had elevated eosinophil count. Patients with eosinophilia had higher frequency of readmission for AECOPD during 1-year follow-up period. This is the first study to investigate the prevalence of eosinophilia among inpatients with AECOPD-the population with the highest morbidity and health-care utilization. PMID:26699685

  3. Correlation Between the Type of Acute Coronary Syndrome With the Needs of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Polikandrioti, Maria; Goudevenos, John; Michalis, Lampros K.; Koutelekos, Ioannis; Georgiadi, Elpida; Karakostas, Kostas; Elisaf, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) comprise life-threatening health problems that demand emergency care and immediate intervention. As patients are abruptly transitioning from healthy state into suffering, they consequently experience several needs, mainly attributed to the type of the syndrome including the therapeutic regimen. Objectives: To access the correlation between the type of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with the needs of hospitalized patients. Methods: A sample of 454 hospitalized patients with ACS, recruited from 4 hospitals in Greece, was enrolled in the study. Data were collected by the completion of questionnaire which apart from socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, it also included the questionnaire “Needs of hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease” which is consisted 6 subscales: a) need for support and guidance, b) need for information from the medical-nursing staff, c) need for being in contact with other patient groups and ensuring communication with relatives, d) need for individualized treatment and for the patient’s personal participation to his/her treatment e) need to meet the emotional and physical needs f) need to trust the medical-nursing staff. Statistical methods used were Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, chi2 test of independence, Kruskal wallis-test and multiple regression. Results: The type of ACS was statistically significant correlated with the place of residence (p=0.002), management of disease (p<0.001) and prior experience of hospitalization (p=0.003). All six needs were statistically significantly correlated with the type of ACS, (p<0.001 for the need for support and guidance, p<0.001 for the need to be informed from the medical and nursing staff, p<0.001 for the need for being in contact with other patient groups, and ensuring communication with relatives, p<0.001 for the need for individualized treatment and for the patient’s personal participation to his/her treatment, p<0.001 for the need

  4. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Acute Variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hassanien, Moataz; EL-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; EL-Ghannam, Maged; El Ray, Ahmed; Ali, Abdel Aziz; Taleb, Hoda Abu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients remains a serious, unsolved problem, and the risk factors for acute variceal bleeding (AVB) in HCC patients remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the in-hospital mortality (IHM) and factors influencing the clinical outcomes of AVB in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Methods This was a retrospective, non-randomized, clinical study that was conducted in 2014. The study was conducted on 70 patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC presenting by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIH). All patients were examined endoscopically within 24 hours from presentation and bleeding varices accounted for AUGIH. Full medical history, clinical examination, and laboratory and radiologic data were collected from admission charts, and hospital medical records were statistically analyzed with SSPS version 22. Results Thirty-two patients (45.7%) survived and 38 died (54.3%). Survivors are more likely to be Child-Pugh class A or B, and the non-survivors were class C. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) was highly predictive of IHM at an optimized cut-off value of ≥ 12.9. Higher esophageal varices grades and presence of active bleeding on index endoscopy were significant (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors compared to survivors. Complications of liver cirrhosis and associated major comorbidity were significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors than the survivors. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified higher Grade Esophageal Varices and number of transfused packed red blood cells units as two independent predictors of IHM. Conclusions IHM was particularly high (54.3%) among HCC patients with AVB who had MELD score > 12.9, higher grade Esophageal Varices, active bleeding on index endoscopy, more increased needs for blood transfusion, longer hospital stay, decompensated liver disease with major comorbidity. PMID:26516439

  5. Disparities between black and white patients in functional improvement after hospitalization for an acute illness.

    PubMed

    Sands, Laura P; Landefeld, C Seth; Ayers, Sandra Moody; Yaffe, Kristine; Palmer, Robert; Fortinsky, Richard; Counsell, Steven R; Covinsky, Kenneth E

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether older black and white patients experience different rates of improvement in functioning after being acutely hospitalized. Of the 2,364 community-living patients in this prospective cohort study, 25% self-reported their race/ethnicity to be black. The outcomes were improvement in basic activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) from admission to discharge and 90 days postdischarge. Multivariable models that included statistical adjustment for age, illness severity, in-hospital social service referral, dementia, admission level of functioning, and change in functioning from 2 weeks before admission were computed to determine whether black and white patients experienced significantly different rates of recovery at discharge and 90 days after discharge in ADL and IADL functioning. Black patients were as likely as white patients to improve in ADL functioning by discharge (odds ratio (OR)=0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.76-1.24) or by 90 days after discharge (OR=0.95, 95% CI=0.73-1.24) but significantly less likely to improve IADL functioning by discharge (OR=0.72, 95% CI=0.56-0.93) or by 90 days after discharge (OR=0.68, 95% CI=0.51-0.90). The findings suggest that differential rates of recovery in functioning after an acute hospitalization may contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in IADL functioning, which has implications for the setting of future interventions oriented toward reducing these disparities. PMID:16181184

  6. How can we keep patients with dementia safe in our acute hospitals? A review of challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    George, Jim; Long, Susannah; Vincent, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining patient safety in acute hospitals is a global health challenge. Traditionally, patient safety measures have been concentrated on critical care and surgical patients. In this review the medical literature was reviewed over the last ten years on aspects of patient safety specifically related to patients with dementia. Patients with dementia do badly in hospital with frequent adverse events resulting in the geriatric syndromes of falls, delirium and loss of function with increased length of stay and increased mortality. Contributory factors include inadequate assessment and treatment, inappropriate intervention, discrimination, low staff levels and lack of staff training. Unfortunately there is no one simple solution to this problem, but what is needed is a multifactorial, multilevel approach at the seven levels of care – patient, task, staff, team, environment, organisation and institution. Improving safety and quality of care for patients with dementia in acute hospitals will benefit all patients and is an urgent priority for the NHS. PMID:23759885

  7. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  8. Metrics of High-Density Lipoprotein Function and Hospital Mortality in Acute Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Potočnjak, Ines; Degoricija, Vesna; Trbušić, Matias; Terešak, Sanda Dokoza; Radulović, Bojana; Pregartner, Gudrun; Berghold, Andrea; Tiran, Beate; Marsche, Gunther; Frank, Saša

    2016-01-01

    Objective The functionality of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is impaired in chronic ischaemic heart failure (HF). However, the relationship between HDL functionality and outcomes in acute HF (AHF) has not been studied. The present study investigates whether the metrics of HDL functionality, including HDL cholesterol efflux capacity and HDL-associated paraoxonase (PON)-1 arylesterase (AE) activity are associated with hospital mortality in AHF patients. Methods and Results The study was performed as a prospective, single-centre, observational research on 152 patients, defined and categorised according to the ESC and ACCF/AHA Guidelines for HF by time of onset, final clinical presentation and ejection fraction. The mean age of the included patients (52% female) was 75.2 years (SD 10.3) and hospital mortality was 14.5%. HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was examined by measuring the capacity of apoB depleted serum to remove tritium-labelled cholesterol from cultured macrophages. The AE activity of the HDL fraction was examined by a photometric assay. In a univariable regression analysis, low cholesterol efflux, but not AE activity, was significantly associated with hospital mortality [odds ratio (OR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64–0.96, p = 0.019]. In multivariable analysis progressively adjusting for important clinical and laboratory parameters the association obtained for cholesterol efflux capacity and hospital mortality by univariable analysis, despite a stable OR, did not stay significant (p = 0.179). Conclusion Our results suggest that HDL cholesterol efflux capacity (but not AE activity) contributes to, but is not an independent risk factor for, hospital mortality in AHF patients. Larger studies are needed to draw firm conclusions. PMID:27304214

  9. Risk-prediction model for ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (from the global registry of acute coronary events [GRACE]).

    PubMed

    Park, Kay Lee; Budaj, Andrzej; Goldberg, Robert J; Anderson, Frederick A; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Kennelly, Brian M; Gurfinkel, Enrique P; Fitzgerald, Gordon; Gore, Joel M

    2012-09-01

    The risk of stroke in patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) ranges from <1% to ≥ 2.5%. The aim of this study was to develop a simple predictive tool for bedside risk estimation of in-hospital ischemic stroke in patients with ACS to help guide clinicians in the acute management of these high-risk patients. Data were obtained from 63,118 patients enrolled from April 1999 to December 2007 in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE), a multinational registry involving 126 hospitals in 14 countries. A regression model was developed to predict the occurrence of in-hospital ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with an ACS. The main study outcome was the development of ischemic stroke during the index hospitalization for an ACS. Eight risk factors for stroke were identified: older age, atrial fibrillation on index electrocardiogram, positive initial cardiac biomarkers, presenting systolic blood pressure ≥ 160 mm Hg, ST-segment change on index electrocardiogram, no history of smoking, higher Killip class, and lower body weight (c-statistic 0.7). The addition of coronary artery bypass graft surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention into the model increased the prediction of stroke risk. In conclusion, the GRACE stroke risk score is a simple tool for predicting in-hospital ischemic stroke risk in patients admitted for the entire spectrum of ACS, which is widely applicable to patients in various hospital settings and will assist in the management of high-risk patients with ACS. PMID:22608950

  10. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  11. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  12. Acute Q fever in Portugal. Epidemiological and clinical features of 32 hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Carolina; Badura, Robert; Valadas, Emília

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. The main characteristic of acute Q fever is its clinical polymorphism, usually presenting as a febrile illness with varying degrees of hepatitis and/or pneumonia. Q fever is endemic in Portugal, and it is an obligatory notifiable disease since 1999. However, its epidemiological and clinical characteristics are still incompletely described. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 32 cases admitted in the Infectious Diseases Department, Santa Maria’s University Hospital, from January 2001 to December 2010, in whom acute Q fever was diagnosed by the presence of antibodies to phase II Coxiella burnetii antigens associated with a compatible clinical syndrome. Results Out of the 32 cases recorded, 29 (91%) were male, with a male:female ratio of 9.7:1. Individuals at productive age were mainly affected (88%, n=28, with ages between 25 and 64 years). Clinically, the most common manifestation of acute Q fever was hepatic involvement (84%, n=27), which occurred isolated in 53% (n=17) of the cases. Hepatitis was more severe, presenting with higher values of liver function tests, in patients presenting both pulmonary and hepatic involvement. Additionally, we report one case of myocarditis and another one with neurological involvement. Empiric but appropriate antibiotic therapy was given in 66% (n=21) of the cases. There was a complete recovery in 94% (n=30) of the patients, and one death. We confirmed the sub-notification of this disease in Portugal, with only 47% (n=15) of the cases notified. Conclusion In Portugal further studies are needed to confirm our results. From the 32 cases studied, acute Q fever presented more frequently as a febrile disease with hepatic involvement affecting mainly young male individuals. Furthermore, acute Q fever is clearly underdiagnosed and underreported in Portugal, which suggests that an increased awareness of the disease is needed, together with a broader use

  13. High Prevalence of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Hospitalized Acute Heart Failure Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Pedro; Timenetsky, Karina T.; Casalaspo, Thaisa Juliana André; Gonçalves, Louise Helena Rodrigues; Yang, Angela Shu Yun; Eid, Raquel Caserta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Muscle Weakness (RMW) has been defined when the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is lower than 70% of the predictive value. The prevalence of RMW in chronic heart failure patients is 30 to 50%. So far there are no studies on the prevalence of RMW in acute heart failure (AHF) patients. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence of RMW in patients admitted because of AHF and the condition of respiratory muscle strength on discharge from the hospital. Methods Sixty-three patients had their MIP measured on two occasions: at the beginning of the hospital stay, after they had reached respiratory, hemodynamic and clinical stability and before discharge from the hospital. The apparatus and technique to measure MIP were adapted because of age-related limitations of the patients. Data on cardiac ejection fraction, ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and on the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) were collected. Results The mean age of the 63 patients under study was 75 years. On admission the mean ejection fraction was 33% (95% CI: 31–35) and the BNP hormone median value was 726.5 pg/ml (range: 217 to 2283 pg/ml); 65% of the patients used NIV. The median value of MIP measured after clinical stabilization was -52.7 cmH2O (range: -20 to -120 cmH2O); 76% of the patients had MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. On discharge, after a median hospital stay of 11 days, the median MIP was -53.5 cmH2O (range:-20 to -150 cmH2O); 71% of the patients maintained their MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. The differences found were not statistically significant. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted with AHF may present a high prevalence of RMW on admission; this condition may be maintained at similar levels on discharge in a large percentage of these patients, even after clinical stabilization of the heart condition. PMID:25671566

  14. Urine Microscopy Is Associated with Severity and Worsening of Acute Kidney Injury in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Steven G.; Hall, Isaac E.; Iyanam, Umo; Koraishy, Madiha; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Serum creatinine concentration at the time of nephrology consultation is not necessarily indicative of the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). Although urine microscopy is useful to differentiate AKI, its role in predicting adverse clinical outcomes has not been well described. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The relationship between urine microscopy findings at the time of nephrology consultation for AKI and clinical outcomes was evaluated prospectively. A urinary sediment scoring system was created on the basis of the number of renal tubular epithelial cells and granular casts. The primary outcome was worsening of AKI (progressing to higher AKI Network stage, dialysis, or death) during hospitalization. Results: Of 249 patients consulted for AKI, 197 had acute tubular necrosis or prerenal AKI and were included in the analysis. At consultation, 80 (40%) had stage 1, 53 (27%) had stage 2, and 66 (33%) had stage 3 AKI. The urinary sediment combined scores were lowest in those with stage 1 and highest in stage 3 AKI. Seventy-nine patients (40%) experienced worsening of AKI from the time of consultation. The urinary scoring system was significantly associated with increased risk of worsening AKI (adjusted relative risk: 7.3; 95% confidence interval: 4.5 to 9.7 for worsening with score of ≥3 versus score of 0) and was more predictive than AKI Network stage at the time of consultation. Conclusions: The urinary sediment score may be a useful tool to predict worsening of AKI due to either acute tubular necrosis or prerenal AKI during hospitalization. PMID:20089493

  15. Graduated compression stockings to prevent venous thromboembolism in hospital: evidence from patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Kearon, Clive; O'Donnell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of death in hospital patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is cost-saving in high-risk patients. Low-dose anticoagulation is very effective at preventing VTE but increases bleeding. Graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices are also used to prevent VTE and do not increase bleeding, which makes their use appealing in patients who cannot tolerate bleeding, such as patients with acute stroke. Studies that evaluated mechanical methods of preventing VTE were small and mainly used asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), detected using screening tests, as the study outcome. The recently published CLOTS Trial 1 (Clots in Legs Or sTockings after Stroke) compared thigh-level compression stockings with no stockings in about 2500 patients with stroke and immobility, and found that thigh-level stockings were not effective. Indirectly, the findings of this study question the ability of stockings to prevent VTE in other patient groups, including those after surgery. CLOTS 1 compared thigh-level and below-knee stockings in about 3000 patients with acute stroke. Given that thigh-level stockings were ineffective in CLOTS 1, it is surprising that they were more effective than below-knee stockings in CLOTS Trial 2. A possible explanation is that below-knee stockings increase DVT, although this seems unlikely. CLOTS 1 and CLOTS 2 question whether graduated compression stockings prevent VTE and suggest the need for further trials evaluating their efficacy in medical and surgical patients. PMID:21346697

  16. Human metapneumovirus in patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Annick; Manoha, Catherine; Bour, Jean-Baptiste; Abbas, Rachid; Fournel, Isabelle; Tiv, Michel; Pothier, Pierre; Astruc, Karine; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig Serge

    2016-08-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the prevalence of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in patients hospitalized for acute respiratory infection (ARI) and to study factors associated with this prevalence. Medline and ScienceDirect databases were searched for prospective observational studies that screened hospitalized patients with ARI for hMPV by RT-PCR, with data available at December 27, 2014. The risk of bias was assessed regarding participation rate, definition of ARI, description of diagnostic technique, method of inclusion identical for all subjects, standardized and identical sampling method for all subjects, analysis performed according to the relevant subgroups, and presentation of data sources. Random-effect meta-analysis with arcsine transformation and meta-regressions was used. In the 75 articles included, the prevalence of hMPV among hospitalized ARI was 6.24% (95% CI 5.25-7.30). An effect of the duration of the inclusion period was observed (p=0.0114), with a higher prevalence of hMPV in studies conducted during periods of 7-11 months (10.56%, 95% CI 5.97-16.27) or complete years (7.55%, 95% CI 5.90-9.38) than in periods of 6 months or less (5.36%, 95% CI 4.29-6.54). A significant increase in the incidence with increasing distance from the equator was observed (p=0.0384). hMPV should be taken into account as a possible etiology in hospitalized ARI. PMID:27337518

  17. Treating Long-Stay Patients in Acute Hospital Beds: An Economic Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochstein, Alan

    1985-01-01

    A study of 105 medical files from three Montreal hospitals suggests that long-stay patients are inactive users of many hospital services; estimated reduction in cost per day for these patients due to their earlier discharge is only about 24-30 percent of the hospital's per diem.

  18. B-type natriuretic peptide-directed ultrafiltration improves care in acutely hospitalized dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tapolyai, Mihály; Uysal, Aşkin; Maeweathers, Gail; Bahta, Elias; Dossabhoy, Neville R

    2009-01-01

    In an observational study in 19 consecutive acutely hospitalized dialysis patients, ultrafiltration (UF) volume was determined by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Patients were ultrafiltrated daily until they achieved a target BNP level <500 pg/mL. The UF volumes ranged from 2 to 5 L per session. All patients were male veterans aged 68+/-11 years (mean +/- SD), 74% were diabetic, 47% were African Americans, 58% underwent prevalent dialysis, and 53% had an arteriovenous fistula. Left ventricular ejection fraction on 2-dimensional echocardiography was 43.8%+/-27.9% (n=16). The admission BNP was 2412+/-1479 pg/mL (range, 561-5000 pg/mL) and BNP at hospital discharge was 1245+/-1173 pg/mL (range, 345-5000 pg/mL) (nonparametric Wilcoxon P=.0013). Admission weight was 88.9+/-27.9 kg and at discharge was 78.1+/-25.6 kg (P=.0002). The number of antihypertensive medications taken was 3.8+/-2.0 at admission and 2.3+/-1.7 at discharge (P=.0005). The number of patients with >2 blood pressure medications decreased from 14 to 6 (Fisher exact test, P=.02). The systolic/diastolic/mean arterial blood pressure decreased from admission to discharge (153.6+/-43.8/80.6+/-21.8/102.4+/-27.3 to 132.1+/-27.9/68.9+/-14.6/89.9+/-16.5 mm Hg; P=.0222/.0139/.0329, respectively). Although all patients were volume-overloaded at admission according to BNP criteria (>500), only 42% were identified as having heart failure. BNP-directed UF is safe because it minimizes symptomatic hypotension, identifies occult congestive heart failure in a large number of patients, and significantly reduces blood pressure in addition to reducing body weight and number of medications used. PMID:19522962

  19. Creatinine clearance and adverse hospital outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes: findings from the global registry of acute coronary events (GRACE)

    PubMed Central

    Santopinto, J J; Fox, K A A; Goldberg, R J; Budaj, A; Piñero, G; Avezum, A; Gulba, D; Esteban, J; Gore, J M; Johnson, J; Gurfinkel, E P

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether creatinine clearance at the time of hospital admission is an independent predictor of hospital mortality and adverse outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Design: A prospective multicentre observational study, GRACE (global registry of acute coronary events), of patients with the full spectrum of ACS. Setting: Ninety four hospitals of varying size and capability in 14 countries across four continents. Patients: 11 774 patients hospitalised with ACS, including ST and non-ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina. Main outcome measures: Demographic and clinical characteristics, medication use, and in-hospital outcomes were compared for patients with creatinine clearance rates of > 60 ml/min (normal and minimally impaired renal function), 30–60 ml/min (moderate renal dysfunction), and < 30 ml/min (severe renal dysfunction). Results: Patients with moderate or severe renal dysfunction were older, were more likely to be women, and presented to participating hospitals with more comorbidities than those with normal or minimally impaired renal function. In comparison with patients with normal or minimally impaired renal function, patients with moderate renal dysfunction were twice as likely to die (odds ratio 2.09, 95% confidence interval 1.55 to 2.81) and those with severe renal dysfunction almost four times more likely to die (odds ratio 3.71, 95% confidence interval 2.57 to 5.37) after adjustment for other potentially confounding variables. The risk of major bleeding episodes increased as renal function worsened. Conclusion: In patients with ACS, creatinine clearance is an important independent predictor of hospital death and major bleeding. These data reinforce the importance of increased surveillance efforts and use of targeted intervention strategies in patients with acute coronary disease complicated by renal dysfunction. PMID:12923009

  20. Paradoxical Association of Smoking With In‐Hospital Mortality Among Patients Admitted With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed F.; Smith, Eric E.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to those who never smoked, a paradoxical effect of smoking on reducing mortality in patients admitted with myocardial ischemia has been reported. We sought to determine if this effect was present in patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke. Methods and Results Using the local Get with the Guidelines‐Stroke registry, we analyzed 4305 consecutively admitted ischemic stroke patients (March 2002–December 2011). The sample was divided into smokers versus nonsmokers. The main outcome of interest was the overall inpatient mortality. Compared to nonsmokers, tobacco smokers were younger, more frequently male and presented with fewer stroke risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation. Smokers also had a lower average NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and fewer received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Patients in both groups had similar adherence to early antithrombotics, dysphagia screening prior to oral intake, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis. Smoking was associated with lower all‐cause in‐hospital mortality (6.6% versus 12.4%; unadjusted OR 0.46; CI [0.34 to 0.63]; P<0.001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, CAD, atrial fibrillation, NIHSS, and tPA, smoking remained independently associated with lower mortality (adjusted OR 0.64; CI [0.42 to 0.96]; P=0.03). Conclusions Similar to myocardial ischemia, smoking was independently associated with lower inpatient mortality in acute ischemic stroke. This effect may be due to tobacco‐induced changes in cerebrovascular vasoreactivity, or may be due in part to residual confounding. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to confirm the finding and the effect on 30‐day and 1‐year mortality. PMID:23782919

  1. Mortality and Treatment Patterns Among Patients Hospitalized With Acute Cardiovascular Conditions During Dates of National Cardiology Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Anupam B.; Prasad, Vinay; Goldman, Dana P.; Romley, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Thousands of physicians attend scientific meetings annually. Although hospital physician staffing and composition may be affected by meetings, patient outcomes and treatment patterns during meeting dates are unknown. OBJECTIVE To analyze mortality and treatment differences among patients admitted with acute cardiovascular conditions during dates of national cardiology meetings compared with nonmeeting dates. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective analysis of 30-day mortality among Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or cardiac arrest from 2002 through 2011 during dates of 2 national cardiology meetings compared with identical nonmeeting days in the 3 weeks before and after conferences (AMI, 8570 hospitalizations during 82 meeting days and 57 471 during 492 nonmeeting days; heart failure, 19 282 during meeting days and 11 4591 during nonmeeting days; cardiac arrest, 1564 during meeting days and 9580 during nonmeeting days). Multivariable analyses were conducted separately for major teaching hospitals and nonteaching hospitals and for low-and high-risk patients. Differences in treatment utilization were assessed. EXPOSURES Hospitalization during cardiology meeting dates. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Thirty-day mortality, procedure rates, charges, length of stay. RESULTS Patient characteristics were similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates. In teaching hospitals, adjusted 30-day mortality was lower among high-risk patients with heart failure or cardiac arrest admitted during meeting vs nonmeeting dates (heart failure, 17.5% [95% CI, 13.7%–21.2%] vs 24.8% [95% CI, 22.9%–26.6%]; P < .001; cardiac arrest, 59.1% [95% CI, 51.4%–66.8%] vs 69.4% [95% CI, 66.2%–72.6%]; P = .01). Adjusted mortality for high-risk AMI in teaching hospitals was similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates (39.2% [95% CI, 31.8%–46.6%] vs 38.5% [95% CI, 35.0%–42.0%]; P = .86), although adjusted percutaneous

  2. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Results: Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of any PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p < 0.001) and discontinued PIMs (p < 0.001) significantly more often than other medical wards. No relations between number of PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Conclusion: Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids.KEY POINTSAcute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications.Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced.The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more

  3. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  4. Use of ED and Hospital Services for Patients with Acute Leukemia after Induction Therapy: One year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Ashley Leak; Deal, Allison M.; Walton, AnnMarie; Wood, William; Muss, Hyman; Mayer, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have documented use of health care services by oncology patients in the Emergency Department (ED), but little is known about the utilization of health services of patients with acute leukemia after induction therapy. The aim of this study was to examine chief reasons for ED and hospital use by patients newly diagnosed with acute leukemia patients after induction therapy up to one year after discharge. A retrospective, longitudinal study of all visits to the ED or unplanned hospital admissions at a single institution for patients with acute leukemia was conducted. Inclusion criteria were patients ≥18 years of age at time of diagnosis, a confirmed diagnosis of AML or ALL, and received and discharged from induction treatment between 2007–2010. Donabedian’s structure-process-outcome framework guided this study examining health services utilization and assessing patient outcomes. 80 patients met the inclusion criteria; 52 had AML and 28 had ALL; median age was 48 (range: 18–76) and 29% (n=23) were non-Caucasian. 70% (n=56) were discharged from induction in remission. 81% (n=65) had at least 1 ED or hospitalization event, and 44% (n=35) had 2 or more events. Of 137 events in 65 patients, the most common reason was neutropenic fever/infection (55%), bleeding (12%), and GI problems (11%). Mean number of events for ALL was 2.43 compared to 1.33 for AML patients (p=0.02), and 2.23 for <50 years of age compared to 1.20 for those older (p=0.002). 20 patients died within one year of diagnosis. Findings from this study can help inform health services delivery and utilization among patients with acute leukemia after induction therapy. Oncology providers can anticipate discharge needs and enhance follow-up care for those at higher risk for problems needing hospitalization. PMID:25711944

  5. Chikungunya Fever Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Galate, Lata Baswanna; Agrawal, Sachee R; Shastri, Jayanthi S; Londhey, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chikungunya fever (CHIK) is an arboviral disease. Dengue fever (DENG) and CHIK are indistinguishable clinically and need to be differentiated by laboratory investigations. Purpose: This study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence of CHIK mono-infection and CHIK and DENG dual infection in suspected patients. We also analyzed the age, sex distribution, joint involvement, and relation of joint movement restriction with visual analog scale (VAS). Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients clinically suspected with DENG and CHIK were enrolled from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai from April 2012 to October 2013. The detailed history and examination findings were recorded. Serum samples were subjected to DENG and CHIK immunoglobulin G (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The seroprevalence of CHIK was 12.5%. Mono-infection of CHIK was 3%, and CHIK and DENG dual infection was 9.5%. Most affected age group in CHIK cases was 46–60 years wherein female preponderance was seen. All 6 patients with CHIK mono-infection had fever and joint involvement; knee and elbow were the most commonly affected joints. All CHIK patients had VAS score of 6–10 with restricted joint movement. Of the patients with dual infection, the majorities were from 31 to 45 years with male preponderance; all had fever and joint pain mainly affecting knee and elbow. Of patients who had VAS score 6–10 in patients with dual infection, only 5.26% had restricted joint movement. Conclusion: IgM ELISA for Chikungunya infection should be included in the routine laboratory tests for acute febrile illness. PMID:27365916

  6. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed. PMID:26317762

  7. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.7±3.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Children’s Hospital. PMID:24358438

  8. Decade-long trends (1999–2009) in the characteristics, management, and hospital outcomes of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction with prior diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Tisminetzky, Mayra; McManus, David D; Dor, Alon; Miozzo, Ruben; Yarzebski, Jorge; Gore, Joel M; Goldberg, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing magnitude and impact, there are limited data available on the clinical management and in-hospital outcomes of patients who have diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at the time of hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The objectives of our population-based observational study in residents of central Massachusetts were to describe decade-long trends (1999–2009) in the characteristics, in-hospital management, and hospital outcomes of AMI patients with and without these comorbidities. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 6,018 persons who were hospitalized for AMI on a biennial basis between 1999 and 2009 at all eleven medical centers in central Massachusetts. Our sample consisted of the following four groups: DM with CKD (n=587), CKD without DM (n=524), DM without CKD (n=1,442), and non-DM/non-CKD (n=3,465). Results Diabetic patients with CKD were more likely to have a higher prevalence of previously diagnosed comorbidities, to have developed heart failure acutely, and to have a longer hospital stay compared with non-DM/non-CKD patients. Between 1999 and 2009, there were marked increases in the prescribing of beta-blockers, statins, and aspirin for patients with CKD and DM as compared to those without these comorbidities. In-hospital death rates remained unchanged in patients with DM and CKD, while they declined markedly in patients with CKD without DM (20.2% dying in 1999; 11.3% dying in 2009). Conclusion Despite increases in the prescribing of effective cardiac medications, AMI patients with DM and CKD continue to experience high in-hospital death rates. PMID:25999755

  9. Impact of Coronary Dominance on In-Hospital Outcomes after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Toshiki; Numasawa, Yohei; Miyata, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Sueyoshi, Koichiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Negishi, Koji; Kawamura, Akio; Kohsaka, Shun; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the manner in which coronary dominance affects in-hospital outcomes of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background Previous studies have shown that left dominant coronary anatomies are associated with worse prognoses in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods Data were analyzed from 4873 ACS patients undergoing PCI between September 2008 and April 2013 at 14 hospitals participating in the Japanese Cardiovascular Database Registry. The patients were grouped based on diagnostic coronary angiograms performed prior to PCI; those with right- or co-dominant anatomy (RD group) and those with left-dominant anatomy (LD group). Results The average patient age was 67.6±11.8 years and both patient groups had similar ages, coronary risk factors, comorbidities, and prior histories. The numbers of patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure, cardiogenic shock, or cardiopulmonary arrest were significantly higher in the LD group than in the RD group (heart failure: 650 RD patients [14.7%] vs. 87 LD patients [18.8%], P = 0.025; cardiogenic shock: 322 RD patients [7.3%] vs. 48 LD patients [10.3%], P = 0.021; and cardiopulmonary arrest: 197 RD patients [4.5%] vs. 36 LD patients [7.8%], P = 0.003). In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among LD patients than among RD patients (182 RD patients [4.1%] vs. 36 LD patients [7.8%], P = 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that LD anatomy was an independent predictor for in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–2.89; P = 0.030). Conclusion Among ACS patients who underwent PCI, LD patients had significantly worse in-hospital outcomes compared with RD patients, and LD anatomy was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. PMID:23991136

  10. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands1

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Elmer; Delsing, Corine E.; Sprong, Tom; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower respiratory tract symptoms, or fever and hepatitis, but had negative serologic results for Q fever. Patients with acute Q fever were younger and had higher C-reactive protein levels but lower leukocyte counts. However, a large overlap was found. In patients with an indication for prophylaxis, chronic Q fever did not develop after patients received prophylaxis but did develop in 50% of patients who did not receive prophylaxis. Differentiating acute Q fever from other respiratory infections, fever, or hepatitis is not possible without serologic testing or PCR. If risk factors for chronic Q fever are present, prophylactic treatment is advised. PMID:26196955

  11. Incidence, prognosis, and factors associated with cardiac arrest in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes (the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Registry)

    PubMed Central

    McManus, David D.; Aslam, Farhan; Goyal, Parag; Goldberg, Robert J.; Huang, Wei; Gore, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Contemporary data are lacking with respect to the incidence rates of, factors associated with, and impact of cardiac arrest from ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia (VF-CA) on hospital survival in patients admitted with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The objectives of this multinational study were to characterize trends in the magnitude of in-hospital VF-CA complicating an ACS and to describe its impact over time on hospital prognosis. Methods In 59 161 patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Study between 2000 and 2007, we determined the incidence, prognosis, and factors associated with VF-CA. Results Overall, 3618 patients (6.2%) developed VF-CA during their hospitalization for an ACS. Incidence rates of VF-CA declined over time. Patients who experienced VF-CA were on average older and had a greater burden of cardiovascular disease, yet were less likely to receive evidence-based cardiac therapies than patients in whom VF-CA did not occur. Hospital death rates were 55.3% and 1.5% in patients with and without VF-CA, respectively. There was a greater than 50% decline in the hospital death rates associated with VF-CA during the years under study. Patients with a VF-CA occurring after 48 h were at especially high risk for dying during hospitalization (82.8%). Conclusion Despite reductions in the magnitude of, and short-term mortality from, VF-CA, VF-CA continues to exert an adverse effect on survival among patients hospitalized with an ACS. Opportunities exist to improve the identification and treatment of ACS patients at risk for VF-CA to reduce the incidence of, and mortality from, this serious arrhythmic disturbance. PMID:22157357

  12. Length of hospital stay is shorter in South Asian patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie F; Gollop, Nicholas D; Uppal, Hardeep; Chandran, Suresh; Potluri, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common diagnosis in UK hospitals and confers a significant hospital stay (LOS). There is very little evidence concerning ethnic variations on LOS in patients with PE. We sought to investigate ethnic variations in LOS in a large sample of 3440 patients with PE from 2000 to 2013 across seven hospitals in the north west of UK. We found that South Asian patients have significantly lower LOS compared with Caucasian patients. We discuss possible reasons for, and implications of, this finding.

  13. Characterization of patients treated by rehabilitation service after establishing of an acute stroke unit in a Brazilian hospital

    PubMed Central

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Gameiro, Mônica de Oliveira Orsi; Schelp, Arthur Oscar; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Ribeiro, Priscila Watson; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study aimed to characterize patients treated by rehabilitation section after establishment of an acute stroke unit. [Subjects and Methods] Medical consultation records of individuals with ischemic stroke were studied retrospectively, excluding individuals with hemorrhagic stroke, thrombolysis, previous Modified Rankin Scale ≥ 1, prior stroke, structural bone deformities, associated neurological disease, and prior cognitive deficit. The data evaluated were age, gender, etiology, localization, treatment received, ictus onset, hospitalization time, discharge date, and date of first evaluation at the rehabilitation center. The Modified Rankin Scale in 90 days after ictus was utilized to measure functional incapacity with the individuals divided into two groups, before and after acute stroke unit implementation (2010). Functional incapacity was compared between before and after acute stroke unit implementation by the Mann-Whitney test, χ2 test and Fisher’s exact test. [Results] The medical records of 170 patients were evaluated. In the group evaluated after 2010, the patients were significantly older and presented a shorter time between hospitalization and discharge, shorter time until the first evaluation in rehabilitation, and increased percentage of mild incapacity (Modified Rankin Scale = 0 to 2). [Conclusion] After acute stroke unit implementation, the patients treated in the rehabilitation section presented a shorter hospitalization time and rehabilitation delay and less functional incapacity. PMID:26355915

  14. A 35-year Perspective (1975-2009) into the Long-term Prognosis and Hospital Management of Patients Discharged from the Hospital after a First Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Yang; Gore, Joel M.; Lapane, Kate L.; Yarzebski, Jorge; Person, Sharina D.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    There are limited population-based data available describing trends in the long-term prognosis of patients discharged from the hospital after an initial acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our objectives were to describe multi-decade trends in post-discharge mortality, and their association with hospital management practices, among patients discharged from all central Massachusetts (MA) medical centers after a first AMI. Residents of the Worcester, MA, metropolitan area discharged from all central MA hospitals after a first AMI between 1975 and 2009 comprised the study population (n=8,728). Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between year of hospitalization and 1-year post-discharge mortality. The average age of this population was 66 years and 40% were women. Patients hospitalized in 1999-2009, as compared with those discharged in 1975-1984, were older, more likely to be women, and have multiple previously-diagnosed comorbidities. Hospital use of invasive cardiac interventions and medications increased markedly over time. Unadjusted 1-year mortality rates were 12.9%, 12.5%, and 15.8% for patients discharged during 1975-1984, 1986-1997, and 1999-2009, respectively. After adjusting for several demographic characteristics, clinical factors, and in-hospital complications, there were no significant differences in the odds of dying at 1 year post-discharge during the years under study. After further adjustment for hospital treatment practices, the odds of dying at 1 year post-discharge was 2.43 (95% confidence intervals=1.83-3.23) times higher in patients hospitalized in1999-2009 than in 1975-1984. In conclusion, the increased use of invasive cardiac interventions and pharmacotherapies was associated with enhanced long-term survival among patients hospitalized for a first AMI. PMID:25933734

  15. Posttraumatic Stress and Myocardial Infarction Risk Perceptions in Hospitalized Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Donald; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Denton, Ellen-Ge; Shimbo, Daichi; Clemow, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS; i.e., myocardial infarction or unstable angina) recurrence and poor post-ACS adherence to medical advice. Since risk perceptions are a primary motivator of adherence behaviors, we assessed the relationship of probable PTSD to ACS risk perceptions in hospitalized ACS patients (n = 420). Participants completed a brief PTSD screen 3–7 days post-ACS, and rated their 1-year ACS recurrence risk relative to other men or women their age. Most participants exhibited optimistic bias (mean recurrence risk estimate between “average” and “below average”). Further, participants who screened positive for current PTSD (n = 15) showed significantly greater optimistic bias than those who screened negative (p < 0.05), after adjustment for demographics, ACS severity, medical comorbidities, depression, and self-confidence in their ability to control their heart disease. Clinicians should be aware that psychosocial factors, and PTSD in particular, may be associated with poor adherence to medical advice due to exaggerated optimistic bias in recurrence risk perceptions. PMID:22593749

  16. Pharmacological Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients With Acute Medical Illness: An Electronic Medical Records Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc; Liu, Xianchen; Phatak, Hemant; Qi, Rong; Teal, Evgenia; Nisi, Daniel; Liu, Larry Z; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with acute medical illness have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). American College of Chest Physicians guidelines list various chronic illnesses, sepsis, advanced age, history of VTE, and immobility as risk factors and recommend prophylactic anticoagulation using fondaparinux, low-molecular weight heparin, or low-dose unfractionated heparin. The objectives of this study were to examine pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE among hospitalized medically ill patients and to assess demographic and clinical correlates related to VTE prophylaxis. A retrospective (1999-2010) electronic medical records study included patients aged 40 years and older hospitalized for at least 3 days, with significant medical illness or with a VTE hospitalization 30-365 days before admission. Each patient's first qualifying hospitalization was analyzed. Exclusions were if VTE treatment was started within 1 day of admission, or if warfarin (and not heparin or enoxaparin) was used. Prophylaxis was defined if the first inpatient dose of subcutaneous heparin or enoxaparin was at prophylaxis levels (lower than treatment levels). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with VTE prophylaxis. Among 12,980 patients, 22.1% received prophylaxis (11.8% with enoxaparin, 10.3% with heparin). VTE prophylaxis was positively associated with year of hospitalization, subcutaneous heparin in the month before admission, aspirin, self-pay status, age, and sepsis. VTE prophylaxis was negatively associated with smoking, alcohol, warfarin in the past 30 days, and primary diagnoses of stroke, infectious disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. Pharmacological VTE prophylaxis has increased significantly over the past 12 years but is still largely underused in patients hospitalized with acute medical illness. Multiple demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors are associated with inpatient VTE prophylaxis. PMID:26720163

  17. Association of renal insufficiency with in-hospital mortality among Japanese patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Masuda, Yuichiro; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Iguchi, Akihisa; Kimata, Takaya; Uemura, Kazumasa

    2006-09-01

    It is not yet clear whether a difference in in-hospital morality between patients with and without renal insufficiency undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) exists. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if such as association exists in Japan. Data from the Tokai Acute Myocardial Infarction Study II were used. This was a prospective study of all 3274 patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to the 15 participating hospitals from 2001 to 2003. We abstracted the baseline and procedural characteristics as well as in-hospital mortality from detailed chart reviews. Patients were stratified into 2 groups according to the estimated creatinine clearance on admission. The creatinine clearance values were available in 2116, 107 of whom had renal insufficiency. The patients with renal insufficiency were more likely to be older, female, not independent in their daily activities, have lower body mass index and higher heart rate values on admission, lower prevalences of hypercholesterolemia and peptic ulcers, greater prevalences of diabetes, angina, previous heart failure, previous renal failure, previous cerebrovascular disease, aortic aneurysm, worse clinical course such as bleeding, and a multivessel coronary disease. Vasopressors, an intra-aortic balloon pump, and mechanical ventilation were frequently used in the patients with renal insufficiency, while thrombolytics were used less frequently. The patients with renal insufficiency had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than those without. Multivariate analysis identified renal insufficiency as an independent predictor of in-hospital death. The results suggest that renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital death among AMI patients undergoing PCI. PMID:17106145

  18. Identifying Patients in the Acute Psychiatric Hospital Who May Benefit From a Palliative Care Approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, M Caroline; Warren, Mark; Cha, Stephen S; Stevens, Maria; Blommer, Megan; Kung, Simon; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-04-01

    Identifying patients who will benefit from a palliative care approach is the first critical step in integrating palliative with curative therapy. Criteria are established that identify hospitalized medical patients who are near end of life, yet there are no criteria with respect to hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The records of 276 consecutive patients admitted to a dedicated inpatient psychiatric unit were reviewed to identify prognostic criteria predictive of mortality. Mortality predictors were 2 or more admissions in the past year (P = .0114) and older age (P = .0006). Twenty-two percent of patients met National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization noncancer criteria for dementia. Palliative care intervention should be considered when treating inpatients with psychiatric disorders, especially older patients who have a previous hospitalization or history of dementia. PMID:25318929

  19. Factors predisposing to acute and recurrent bacterial non-necrotizing cellulitis in hospitalized patients: a prospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Karppelin, M; Siljander, T; Vuopio-Varkila, J; Kere, J; Huhtala, H; Vuento, R; Jussila, T; Syrjänen, J

    2010-06-01

    Acute non-necrotizing cellulitis is a skin infection with a tendency to recur. Both general and local risk factors for erysipelas or cellulitis have been recognized in previous studies using hospitalized controls. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for cellulitis using controls recruited from the general population. We also compared patients with a history of previous cellulitis with those suffering a single episode, with regard to the risk factors: length of stay in hospital, duration of fever, and inflammatory response as measured by C-reactive protein (CRP) level and leukocyte count. Ninety hospitalized cellulitis patients and 90 population controls matched for age and sex were interviewed and clinically examined during the period April 2004 to March 2005. In multivariate analysis, chronic oedema of the extremity, disruption of the cutaneous barrier and obesity were independently associated with acute cellulitis. Forty-four (49%) patients had a positive history (PH) of at least one cellulitis episode before entering the study. Obesity and previous ipsilateral surgical procedure were statistically significantly more common in PH patients, whereas a recent (<1 month) traumatic wound was more common in patients with a negative history (NH) of cellulitis. PH patients had longer duration of fever and hospital stay, and their CRP and leukocyte values more often peaked at a high level than those of NH patients. Oedema, broken skin and obesity are risk factors for acute cellulitis. The inflammatory response as indicated by CRP level and leukocyte count is statistically significantly more severe in PH than NH patients. PMID:19694769

  20. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  1. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Agustín; Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82-0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  2. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  3. Thirty day hospital re-admissions in patients with non ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tisminetzky, Mayra; McManus, David D.; Erskine, Nathaniel; Saczynski, Jane S.; Yarzebski, Jorge; Granillo, Edgard; Gore, Joel; Goldberg, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited data exist about relatively recent trends in the magnitude and characteristics of patients who are rehospitalized shortly after admission for a non ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). This observational study describes decade-long trends (1999-2009) in the magnitude and characteristics of patients readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of hospitalization for an incident (initial) episode of NSTEMI. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 2,249 residents of the Worcester (MA) metropolitan area who were hospitalized for an initial NSTEMI in 6 biennial periods between 1999 and 2009 at 3 central MA medical centers. Results The average age of our study population was 72 years, 90% were white, and 46% were women. The proportion of patients who were readmitted to the hospital for any cause within 30 days after discharge for a NSTEMI remained unchanged between 1999 and 2009 (approximately 15%) in both crude and multivariable adjusted analyses. Slight declines were observed for cardiovascular disease-related 30-day readmissions over the ten-year study period. Women, elderly patients, those with multiple chronic comorbidities, a prolonged index hospitalization, and patients who developed heart failure during their index hospitalization were at higher risk for being readmitted within 30-days than respective comparison groups. Conclusions Thirty day hospital readmission rates after hospital discharge for a first NSTEMI remained stable between 1999 and 2009. We identified several groups at higher risk for hospital readmission in whom further surveillance efforts and/or tailored educational and treatment approaches remain needed. PMID:25660250

  4. The application of a trauma index to assess injury severity and prognosis in hospitalized patients with acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hailin; Ge, Wenhan; Li, Bing; Zhu, Yuanqun; Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the application value of a trauma index (TI) to assess condition and likelihood of death in hospitalized patients with acute trauma (AT). Methods: Trauma index scores and injury severity scores (ISS) were assessed in 1,802 randomly selected cases of AT-hospitalized patients. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to compare the clinical values of TI and ISS values to predict outcomes in AT-hospitalized patients. Results: The area under the ROC curve for TI scores was 0.896 (95% CI [0.881, 0.909]), while for ISS, it was 0.792 (95% CI [0.773, 0.811]). This difference was not statistically significant (z = 3.236, P = 0.001). Potentially critical disease conditions in AT-hospitalized patients were best identified when TI scores were ≥ 16 points and ISS values were ≥ 22 points. Conclusions: Trauma Index scores exhibited a higher resolution for outcome prediction in AT-hospitalized patients compared to ISS values. The implementation of this scale was simple, reliable, easy to learn, and could quickly identify disease, which is vital for early detection and treatment of critical trauma patients. PMID:26770541

  5. Trends in Outcome and Hospitalization Cost among Adult Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Hussam A.; Al-Qudah, Zaid A.; Khan, Hafiz M. R.; Farhad, Khosro; Ji, Andrew Bo-Hua; Souayah, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction New treatments for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have been introduced and are expected to improve patients’ overall outcomes. We assessed the impact of new therapeutic strategies on outcome and cost of hospitalization among adult patients with AIS in the United States. Methods Patients with AIS admitted in the United States in 1993–1994 and 2006–2007 were listed using the Nationwide Inpatient Survey database. We determined the rates of occurrence, hospitalization outcomes, and mean hospital charges for all patients. We further analyzed these variables in the ventilated and nonventilated patients. Results We identified 386,043 patients with AIS admitted in the United States in 1993–1994 and 749,766 patients in 2006–2007. The length of hospitalization was significantly higher in 1993–1994 compared with 2006–2007: 6.9 ± 4.2 days versus 4.66 ± 3 days, respectively. In-hospital mortality rate was 8.9% in 1993–1994 and 5.6% in 2006–2007 (P < 0.0001). There was a significant increase in mean hospital charges in 2006–2007 compared with 1993–1994 ($21,916 ± $14,117 versus $9,646 ± $5,727). The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in 2006–2007 in nonventilated patients. There was a significant increase in mean hospital charges in 2006–2007 compared with 1993–1994 in both ventilated ($81,528 ± $64,526 versus $25,143 ± $17,172, P<0.0001) and nonventilated patients ($21,085 ± $13,042 versus $10,000 ± $6,300, P<0.0001). The mortality rate was significantly lower in 2006–2007 in both subgroups: 46.5% versus 59.8% in ventilated patients and 4.2% versus 8.2% in nonventilated patients (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Our study suggests that new therapeutic strategies have improved outcomes and increased cost of hospitalization among adult patients with AIS in the United States over a period of 13 years. The hospitalization cost was significantly higher in the ventilated and nonventilated patients in 2006–2007, which may

  6. Mortality Trends in Patients Hospitalized with the Initial Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Middle Eastern Country over 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; El-Menyar, Ayman; AlBinali, Hajar A. H.; Gehani, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to define the temporal trend in the initial Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) management and outcome during the last two decades in a Middle Eastern country. A total of 10,915 patients were admitted with initial AMI with mean age of 53 ± 11.8 years. Comparing the two decades (1991–2000) to (2001–2010), the use of antiplatelet drugs increased from 84% to 95%, β-blockers increased from 38% to 56%, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) increased from 12% to 36% (P < 0.001 for all). The rates of PCI increased from 2.5% to 14.6% and thrombolytic therapy decreased from 71% to 65% (P < 0.001 for all). While the rate of hospitalization with Initial MI increased from 34% to 66%, and the average length of hospital stay decreased from 6.4 ± 3 to 4.6 ± 3, all hospital outcomes parameters improved significantly including a 39% reduction in in-hospital Mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that higher utilization of antiplatelet drugs, β-blockers, and ACEI were the main contributors to better hospital outcomes. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the hospitalization rate in patients presenting with initial AMI. Evidence-based medical therapies appear to be associated with a substantial improvement in outcome and in-hospital mortality. PMID:24868481

  7. Postinduction Supportive Care of Pediatric Acute Myelocytic Leukemia: Should Patients be Kept in the Hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Susumu; Khan, Isra'a; Mushtaq, Rao; Carson, Dawn; Saah, Elna; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2014-01-01

    Children with AML become profoundly neutropenic while they undergo remission induction chemotherapy. It is unknown whether these children should be kept in the hospital while they are severely neutropenic to prevent life-threatening complications associated with neutropenia and reduce fatality. We at our institution routinely discharge patients after completing remission induction chemotherapy in the presence of profound neutropenia, unless it is clinically contraindicated. We reviewed all AML patients who were consecutively treated at our hospital from 1989 to 2011. Thirteen patients were electively discharged after completion of induction I chemotherapy. Of the 13, 4 died due to relapse or complications of stem cell transplants (not due to neutropenia related complications). Another eight are long term survivors. In this very small series, discharge from the hospital even though patients were severely neutropenic did not adversely affect the survival. PMID:25349742

  8. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD).Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk.Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis.A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007).In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  9. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD). Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk. Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28–2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007). In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  10. [Psychotherapy impact on effectiveness of in-hospital physical rehabilitation in patients with acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sumin, A N; Khaĭredinova, O P; Sumina, L Iu; Variushkina, E V; Doronin, D V; Galimzianov, D M; Masin, A N; Gol'dberg, G A

    2000-01-01

    Of 103 patients with acute coronary syndrome (mean age 51.6 +/- 0.9 years) 47 patients participated in 5 group psychotherapeutic sessions added to conversional rehabilitation program. Psychotherapy included progressive muscular relaxation, neurolinguistic programming, eriksonian hypnosis, therapeutic metaphora. Psychotherapy decreased the hear rate, number of ventricular extrasystoles, stimulated tonicity of the parasympathetic nervous system. Compared to the controls, the test patients developed higher exercise tolerance and lower reactivity of the central hemodynamics in all the exercise tests. PMID:10900863

  11. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  12. Acute Care Hospitals' Accountability to Provincial Funders

    PubMed Central

    Kromm, Seija K.; Ross Baker, G.; Wodchis, Walter P.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  13. The effect of a sweet potato, footbath, and acupressure intervention in preventing constipation in hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kai; Qiu, Jingbo; Wang, Xiaohua; Niu, Fenglin; Jiang, Tingbo

    2012-01-01

    Constipation is a common health problem that adversely affects quality of life and the prognosis of hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The purpose of this study was to develop and test the sweet potato/footbath/acupressure massage (SFA) intervention as a safe treatment for prevention of constipation and to increase satisfaction with bowel emptying in hospitalized patients with ACS. The study was a prospective, randomized controlled trial with a sample of 93 patients (SFA group, n = 44; usual care group, n = 49). Patients in the SFA group received SFA intervention combined with usual care. The results showed that there were statistical differences between the two groups in terms of (1) the incidence of constipation; (2) the use of laxatives and enemas; (3) patients' subjective satisfaction with their bowel emptying during hospitalization; and (4) sensation of incomplete evacuation and anorectal obstruction/blockade. The SFA intervention was more effective, economical, and practical than usual care alone in managing constipation and satisfaction with defecation in patients hospitalized with ACS. PMID:22847287

  14. Factors Associated with Early Hospital Arrival in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dongbeom; Tanaka, Eijirou; Lee, Kijeong; Sato, Shoichiro; Koga, Masatoshi; Kim, Young Dae; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Factors associated with early arrival may vary according to the characteristics of the hospital. We investigated the factors associated with early hospital arrival in two different stroke centers located in Korea and Japan. Methods Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke arrived hospital within 48 hours of onset between January 2011 and December 2012 were identified and the clinical and time variables were retrieved from the prospective stroke registries of Severance Hospital of Yonsei University Health System (YUHS; Seoul, Korea) and National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center (NCVC; Osaka, Japan). Subjects were dichotomized into early (time from onset to arrival ≤4.5 hours) and late (>4.5 hours) arrival groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors associated with early hospital arrival. Results A total of 1,966 subjects (992 from YUHS; 974 from NCVC) were included in this study. The median time from onset to arrival was 6.1 hours [interquartile range, 1.7-17.8 hours]. In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with early arrival were atrial fibrillation (Odds ratio [OR], 1.505; 95% confidence interval [CI], [1.168-1.939]), higher initial National Institute of Health Stroke Scale scores (OR, 1.037; 95% CI [1.023-1.051]), onset during daytime (OR, 2.799; 95% CI [2.173-3.605]), and transport by an emergency medical service (OR, 2.127; 95% CI [1.700-2.661]). These factors were consistently associated with early arrival in both hospitals. Conclusions Despite differences between the hospitals, there were common factors related to early arrival. Efforts to identify and modify these factors may promote early hospital arrival and improve stroke outcome. PMID:26060803

  15. Comparison of Unit-Level Patient Turnover Measures in Acute Care Hospital Settings.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Hye; Dunton, Nancy; Blegen, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    High patient turnover is a critical factor increasing nursing workload. Despite the growing number of studies on patient turnover, no consensus about how to measure turnover has been achieved. This study was designed to assess the correlation among patient turnover measures commonly used in recent studies and to examine the degree of agreement among the measures for classifying units with different levels of patient turnover. Using unit-level data collected for this study from 292 units in 88 hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators®, we compared four patient turnover measures: the inverse of length of stay (1/LOS), admissions, discharges, and transfers per daily census (ADTC), ADTC with short-stay adjustment, and the number of ADTs and short-stay patients divided by the total number of treated patients, or Unit Activity Index (UAI). We assessed the measures' agreement on turnover quartile classifications, using percent agreement and Cohen's kappa statistic (weighted and unweighted). Pearson correlation coefficients also were calculated. ADTC with or without adjustment for short-stay patients had high correlations and substantial agreement with the measure of 1/LOS (κ = .62 to .91; r = .90 to .95). The UAI measure required data less commonly collected by participating hospital units and showed only moderate correlations and fair agreement with the other measures (κ = .23 to .39; r = .41 to .45). The UAI may not be comparable and interchangeable with other patient turnover measures when data are obtained from multiple units and hospitals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26998744

  16. Canada acute coronary syndrome score was a stronger baseline predictor than age ≥75 years of in-hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome patients in western Romania

    PubMed Central

    Pogorevici, Antoanela; Citu, Ioana Mihaela; Bordejevic, Diana Aurora; Caruntu, Florina; Tomescu, Mirela Cleopatra

    2016-01-01

    Background Several risk scores were developed for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, but their use is limited by their complexity. Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify predictors at admission for in-hospital mortality in ACS patients in western Romania, using a simple risk-assessment tool – the new Canada acute coronary syndrome (C-ACS) risk score. Patients and methods The baseline risk of patients admitted with ACS was retrospectively assessed using the C-ACS risk score. The score ranged from 0 to 4; 1 point was assigned for the presence of each of the following parameters: age ≥75 years, Killip class >1, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, and heart rate >100 bpm. Results A total of 960 patients with ACS were included, 409 (43%) with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 551 (57%) with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). The C-ACS score predicted in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93–0.96), in STEMI patients with a C-statistic of 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89–0.94), and in NSTE-ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95–0.98). Of the 960 patients, 218 (22.7%) were aged ≥75 years. The proportion of patients aged ≥75 years was 21.7% in the STEMI subgroup and 23.4% in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (P>0.05). Age ≥75 years was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in ACS patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.25, 95% CI: 1.24–8.25) and in the STEMI subgroup (OR >3.99, 95% CI: 1.28–12.44). Female sex was strongly associated with mortality in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (OR: 27.72, 95% CI: 1.83–39.99). Conclusion We conclude that C-ACS score was the strongest predictor of in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients while age ≥75 years predicted the mortality well in the STEMI subgroup. PMID:27217732

  17. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved

  18. An update on prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Samama, Meyer Michel; Kleber, Franz-Xaver

    2006-01-01

    Both the recently updated consensus guidelines published by the American College of Chest Physicians, and the International Union of Angiology recommend thromboprophylaxis with either low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or unfractionated heparin (UFH) in medical patients at risk of VTE. However, no guidance is given regarding the appropriate dosing regimens that should be used for thromboprophylaxis in this patient group. LMWH (enoxaparin and dalteparin) and UFH have been shown to be effective for thromboprophylaxis in at-risk hospitalized medical patients. Although LMWH once daily (o.d.) has been shown to be as effective as UFH three times daily (t.i.d.) for thromboprophylaxis in at-risk medical patients, there are no data to show that UFH twice daily (b.i.d) is as effective as either LMWH o.d. or UFH t.i.d. On the basis of currently available evidence, the LMWHs enoxaparin and dalteparin are more attractive alternatives to UFH for the prevention of VTE in hospitalized medical patients because of their convenient once-daily administration and better safety profile, demonstrated in terms of reduced bleeding, HIT, and other adverse events. PMID:16817957

  19. Instruments for assessing the risk of falls in acute hospitalized patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Falls are a serious problem for hospitalized patients, reducing the duration and quality of life. It is estimated that over 84% of all adverse events in hospitalized patients are related to falls. Some fall risk assessment tools have been developed and tested in environments other than those for which they were developed with serious validity discrepancies. The aim of this review is to determine the accuracy of instruments for detecting fall risk and predicting falls in acute hospitalized patients. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main databases, related websites and grey literature were searched. Two blinded reviewers evaluated title and abstracts of the selected articles and, if they met inclusion criteria, methodological quality was assessed in a new blinded process. Meta-analyses of diagnostic ORs (DOR) and likelihood (LH) coefficients were performed with the random effects method. Forest plots were calculated for sensitivity and specificity, DOR and LH. Additionally, summary ROC (SROC) curves were calculated for every analysis. Results Fourteen studies were selected for the review. The meta-analysis was performed with the Morse (MFS), STRATIFY and Hendrich II Fall Risk Model scales. The STRATIFY tool provided greater diagnostic validity, with a DOR value of 7.64 (4.86 - 12.00). A meta-regression was performed to assess the effect of average patient age over 65 years and the performance or otherwise of risk reassessments during the patient’s stay. The reassessment showed a significant reduction in the DOR on the MFS (rDOR 0.75, 95% CI: 0.64 - 0.89, p = 0.017). Conclusions The STRATIFY scale was found to be the best tool for assessing the risk of falls by hospitalized acutely-ill adults. However, the behaviour of these instruments varies considerably depending on the population and the environment, and so their operation should be tested prior to implementation. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of the

  20. From hospice to hospital: short-term follow-up study of hospice patient outcomes in a US acute care hospital surveillance system

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Elizabeth Barnett; Wieten, Sarah; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In the USA, there is little systematic evidence about the real-world trajectories of patient medical care after hospice enrolment. The objective of this study was to analyse predictors of the length of stay for hospice patients who were admitted to hospital in a retrospective analysis of the mandatorily reported hospital discharge data. Setting All acute-care hospitals in Florida during 1 January 2010 to 30 June 2012. Participants All patients with source of admission coded as ‘hospice’ (n=2674). Primary outcome measures The length of stay and discharge status: (1) died in hospital; (2) discharged back to hospice; (3) discharged to another healthcare facility; and (4) discharged home. Results Patients were elderly (median age=81) with a high burden of disease. Almost half died (46%), while the majority of survivors were discharged to hospice (80% of survivors, 44% of total). A minority went to a healthcare facility (5.6%) or to home (5.2%). Only 9.2% received any procedure. Respiratory services were received by 29.4% and 16.8% were admitted to the intensive care unit. The median length of stay was 1 day for those who died. In an adjusted survival model, discharge to a healthcare facility resulted in a 74% longer hospital stay compared with discharge to hospice (event time ratio (ETR)=1.74, 95% CI 1.54 to 1.97 p<0.0001), with 61% longer hospital stays among patients discharged home (ETR=1.61, 95% CI 1.39 to 1.86 p<0.0001). Total financial charges for all patients exceeded $25 million; 10% of patients who appeared to exit hospice incurred 32% of the charges. Conclusions Our results raise significant questions about the ethics and pragmatics of end-of-life medical care, and the intentions and scope of hospices in the USA. Future studies should incorporate prospective linkage of subjective patient-centred data and objective healthcare encounter data. PMID:25052170

  1. Longitudinal Association of Registered Nurse National Nursing Specialty Certification and Patient Falls in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Diane K.; Cramer, Emily; Potter, Catima; Staggs, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers have studied inpatient falls in relation to aspects of nurse staffing, focusing primarily on staffing levels and proportion of nursing care hours provided by registered nurses (RNs). Less attention has been paid to other nursing characteristics, such as RN national nursing specialty certification. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the relationship over time between changes in RN national nursing specialty certification rates and changes in total patient fall rates at the patient care unit level. Methods We used longitudinal data with standardized variable definitions across sites from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. The sample consisted of 7,583 units in 903 hospitals. Relationships over time were examined using multilevel (units nested in hospitals) latent growth curve modeling. Results The model indices indicated a good fit of the data to the model. At the unit level, there was a small statistically significant inverse relationship (r = −.08, p = .04) between RN national nursing specialty certification rates and total fall rates; increases in specialty certification rates over time tended to be associated with improvements in total fall rates over time. Discussion Our findings may be supportive of promoting national nursing specialty certification as a means of improving patient safety. Future study recommendations are (a) modeling organizational leadership, culture, and climate as mediating variables between national specialty certification rates and patient outcomes and (b) investigating the association of patient safety and specific national nursing specialty certifications which test plans include patient safety, quality improvement, and diffusion of innovation methods in their certifying examinations. PMID:26049719

  2. Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury and In-Hospital Mortality in Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Woo; Yu, Mi-yeon; Lee, Hajeong; Ahn, Shin Young; Kim, Sejoong; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most frequent complication in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), few studies have been conducted on the risk factors of AKI. We performed this study to identify the risk factors of AKI associated with in-hospital mortality. Methods Data from 322 adult patients receiving ECMO were analyzed. AKI and its stages were defined according to Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) classifications. Variables within 24 h before ECMO insertion were collected and analyzed for the associations with AKI and in-hospital mortality. Results Stage 3 AKI was associated with in-hospital mortality, with a hazard ratio (HR) (95% CI) of 2.690 (1.472–4.915) compared to non-AKI (p = 0.001). The simplified acute physiology score 2 (SAPS2) and serum sodium level were also associated with in-hospital mortality, with HRs of 1.02 (1.004–1.035) per 1 score increase (p = 0.01) and 1.042 (1.014–1.070) per 1 mmol/L increase (p = 0.003). The initial pump speed of ECMO was significantly related to in-hospital mortality with a HR of 1.333 (1.020–1.742) per 1,000 rpm increase (p = 0.04). The pump speed was also associated with AKI (p = 0.02) and stage 3 AKI (p = 0.03) with ORs (95% CI) of 2.018 (1.129–3.609) and 1.576 (1.058–2.348), respectively. We also found that the red cell distribution width (RDW) above 14.1% was significantly related to stage 3 AKI. Conclusion The initial pump speed of ECMO was a significant risk factor of in-hospital mortality and AKI in patients receiving ECMO. The RDW was a risk factor of stage 3 AKI. PMID:26469793

  3. Hospital-Based Surveillance for Infectious Etiologies Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness in Georgia, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Mamuchishvili, Nana; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Gatserelia, Lana; Makhviladze, Manana; Kanashvili, Marine; Mikautadze, Teona; Nanuashvili, Alexander; Kiknavelidze, Khatuni; Kokaia, Nora; Makharadze, Manana; Clark, Danielle V; Bautista, Christian T; Farrell, Margaret; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Maksoud, Mohamed Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J; Rivard, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Information on the infectious causes of undifferentiated acute febrile illness (AFI) in Georgia is essential for effective treatment and prevention. In May 2008, a hospital-based AFI surveillance was initiated at six hospitals in Georgia. Patients aged ≥ 4 years with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours were eligible for surveillance. Blood culture and serologic testing were conducted for Leptospira spp., Brucella spp., West Nile virus (WNV), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Coxiella burnetii, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), hantavirus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), and Rickettsia typhi. Of 537 subjects enrolled, 70% were outpatients, 54% were males, and the mean age was 37 years. Patients reported having fatigue (89%), rigors (87%), sweating (83%), pain in joints (49%), and sleep disturbances (42%). Thirty-nine (7%) patients were seropositive for R. typhi, 37 (7%) for Brucella spp., 36 (7%) for TBEV, 12 (2%) for Leptospira spp., 10 (2%) for C. burnetii, and three (0.6%) for S. Typhi. None of the febrile patients tested positive for WNV antibodies. Of the patients, 73% were negative for all pathogens. Our results indicate that most of the targeted pathogens are present in Georgia, and highlight the importance of enhancing laboratory capacity for these infectious diseases. PMID:26438032

  4. Alexithymia Affects Pre-Hospital Delay of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Meta-Analysis of Existing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Preti, Antonio; Sancassiani, Federica; Cadoni, Federica; Carta, Mauro Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background: The time between the onset of symptoms and reperfusion is a critical determinant of the clinical course of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Any delay in seeking help will affect patient’s outcome. Alexithymia can influence the information processing but also the skills to detect the signal of an ongoing AMI. Method: Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies investigating the role of alexithymia in pre-hospital delay after AMI. Pubmed/Medline and PsychINFO/Ovid search from 1990 until 2012. Results: Out of 29 studies investigating the role of psychological factors in pre-hospital delay after AMI, 3 studies specifically assessed alexithymia, involving 258 patients. All studies used the Toronto Alexithymia Scale to group patients into clusters by time to presentation after AMI. Meta-analysis of data showed that the patients with higher emotional awareness (i.e., low alexithymia) had shorter time to presentation after AMI. Conclusions: Preliminary evidence indicates that alexithymia may have a role in seeking help delay after AMI. Further studies are necessary to better appreciate how alexithymia influence help-seeking in patients with an evolving AMI and in what extent their ineffective behavior can be changed. PMID:23878612

  5. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  6. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  7. Acute Kidney Injury in ICU Patients Following Non-Cardiac Surgery at Masih Daneshvari Hospital: Joint Modeling Application

    PubMed Central

    Khoundabi, Batoul; Mansourian, Marjan; Kazempoor Dizaji, Mehdi; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) is often complicated by early acute kidney injury (AKI). AKI is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Risk factors and incidence of AKI have been notably high following non-cardiac surgery in the past decade. The aim of this study was to determine the hazard rate of AKI, the effect of risk factors of AKI and also to assess the changes in urine output (UO) as a predictor of AKI using joint modeling in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, 400 non-cardiac-operated patients admitted during 3 years to the ICU of Masih Daneshvari Hospital were selected according to the consecutive sample selection method. Random mixed effect model and survival model were used to assess UO changes and the effect of UO and other risk factors on the hazard rate of AKI using joint analysis. Results: AKI occurred in 8.8% of the Iranian non-cardiac-operated patients. Survival model showed that the risk of AKI in lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP), higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (APACHE II score), emergency surgery, longer hospitalization and male patients was higher (P=0.001). Using joint modeling, an association was found between the risk of AKI and UO (−0.19, P=0.002). Conclusion: Several predictors were found to be associated with AKI in the Iranian patients after non-cardiac surgery. A relationship between longitudinal and survival responses was found in this study and joint modeling caused considerable improvement in estimations compared to separate longitudinal and survival models. PMID:26221152

  8. The experience of daily life of acutely admitted frail elderly patients one week after discharge from the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Jane; Lund, Hans; Aadahl, Mette; Sørensen, Erik E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Frail elderly are at higher risk of negative outcomes such as disability, low quality of life, and hospital admissions. Furthermore, a peak in readmission of acutely admitted elderly patients is seen shortly after discharge. An investigation into the daily life experiences of the frail elderly shortly after discharge seems important to address these issues. The aim of this study was to explore how frail elderly patients experience daily life 1 week after discharge from an acute admission. Methods The qualitative methodological approach was interpretive description. Data were gathered using individual interviews. The participants were frail elderly patients over 65 years of age, who were interviewed at their home 1 week after discharge from an acute admission to a medical ward. Results Four main categories were identified: “The system,” “Keeping a social life,” “Being in everyday life,” and “Handling everyday life.” These categories affected the way the frail elderly experienced daily life and these elements resulted in a general feeling of well-being or non-well-being. The transition to home was experienced as unsafe and troublesome especially for the more frail participants, whereas the less frail experienced this less. Conclusion and discussion Several elements and stressors were affecting the well-being of the participants in daily life 1 week after discharge. In particular, contact with the health care system created frustrations and worries, but also physical disability, loneliness, and inactivity were issues of concern. These elements should be addressed by health professionals in relation to the transition phase. Future interventions should incorporate a multidimensional and bio-psycho-social perspective when acutely admitted frail elderly are discharged. Stakeholders should evaluate present practice to seek to improve care across health care sectors. PMID:26037333

  9. Short- and Long-Term Prognostic Implications of Jugular Venous Distension in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Chernomordik, Fernando; Berkovitch, Anat; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Goldenberg, Ilan; Rott, David; Arbel, Yaron; Elis, Avishai; Klempfner, Robert

    2016-07-15

    The present study was designed to assess the role of jugular venous distension (JVD) as a predictor of short- and long-term mortality in a "real-life" setting. The independent association between the presence of admission JVD and the 30-day, 1- and 10-year mortality was assessed among 2,212 patients hospitalized with acute heart failure (HF) who were enrolled in the Heart Failure Survey in Israel (2003). Independent predictors of JVD finding in study patients included: the presence of significant hyponatremia (odds ratio [OR] 1.48; p = 0.03), reduced left ventricular ejection fraction ([LVEF] OR 1.24; p = 0.03), anemia (OR 1.3; p = 0.01), New York Heart Association III to IV (OR 1.34; p <0.01) and age >75 years (OR 1.32; p = 0.01). The presence of JVD versus its absence at the time of HF hospitalization was associated with increased 30-day mortality (7.2% vs 4.9%, respectively; p = 0.02), 1-year (33% vs 28%, respectively; p <0.001), and greater 10-year mortality (91.8% vs 87.2%, respectively; p <0.001). Consistently, interaction term analysis demonstrated that the presence of JVD at the time of the index HF hospitalization was independently associated with a significant increased risk for 10-year mortality, with a more pronounced effect among younger patients, patients with reduced LVEF, preserved renal function, and chronic HF. In conclusion, in patients admitted with HF, JVD is associated with specific risk factors and is independently associated with increased risk of both short- and long-term mortality. These findings can be used for improved risk assessment and management of this high-risk population. PMID:27287063

  10. Triage and clinical management of patients with acute pesticide self-poisoning presenting to small rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Eddleston, Michael; Dawson, Andrew H

    2012-07-01

    Acute pesticide self-poisoning is the single most important cause of fatal self-harm worldwide, killing at least 250,000 people every year, the vast majority in rural Asia. However, for many years the problem was little studied and no systematic approach taken to reduce harm and prevent deaths. Eight years ago this changed when the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed an inter-sectoral public health campaign to improve patient management, prevention, knowledge of its epidemiology, and information dissemination. One aim was to improve the triage and acute care of pesticide self-poisoned patients presenting to small rural hospitals with few resources. To this end, a WHO meeting was held in Bangkok at the end of 2007 that developed a protocol for triage and early care that was published online. Unfortunately, this approach has not resulted in dissemination or uptake and, 4 years later, the guidance has not been widely read, critiqued, or used. In this commentary, we describe the basis for the guidance that was produced. We hope it will bring the work to a wider clinical toxicology audience, to ultimately improve management of pesticide poisoned patients, and to encourage clinicians to take part in this important campaign. Future attempts to improve clinical care in rural Asia will need to better understand and utilise methods for influencing policy makers and clinicians in target areas if practice is to be changed. PMID:22651884

  11. Aetiologies of Acute Undifferentiated Febrile illness in Adult Patients – an Experience from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sohaib; Agarwal, R K; Dhar, Minakshi; Mittal, Manish; Sharma, Shiwani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) is a common clinical entity in most of the hospitals. The fever can be potentially fatal if the aetiology is not recognized and appropriately treated early. Aim To describe the aetiology of fever among patients in a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Materials and Methods A one-year retro-prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age>18years) presenting with undifferentiated febrile illness (of duration 5-14 days). Diagnosis was confirmed by suitable laboratory tests after exhaustive clinical examination. Results A total of 2547 patients with AUFI were evaluated. Of these, 1663 (65.3%) were males and 884 (34.7%) were females. Dengue (37.54%); enteric fever (16.5%); scrub typhus (14.42%); bacterial sepsis (10.3%); malaria (6.8%); hepatitis A (1.9%); hepatitis E (1.4%); leptospirosis (0.14%); were the main infections while no specific diagnosis could be delineated in 11%. Mixed infections were noted in 48 (1.9%) patients. Conclusion A good clinical acumen supported by the basic investigations can help diagnose the cause of fever with reasonable certainty. PMID:26816892

  12. Increase in the proportion of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction with do-not-resuscitate orders already in place between 2001 and 2007: a nonconcurrent prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Saczynski, Jane S; Gabbay, Ezra; McManus, David D; McManus, Richard; Gore, Joel M; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Lessard, Darleen; Goldberg, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective Shared decision making and advance planning in end-of-life decisions have become increasingly important aspects of the management of seriously ill patients. Here, we describe the use and timing of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Study design and setting The nonconcurrent prospective study population consisted of 4182 patients hospitalized with AMI in central Massachusetts in four annual periods between 2001 and 2007. Results One-quarter (25%) of patients had a DNR order written either prior to or during hospitalization. The frequency of DNR orders remained constant (24% in 2001; 26% in 2007). Among patients with DNR orders, there was a significant increase in orders written prior to hospitalization (2001: 9%; 2007: 55%). Older patients and those with a medical history of heart failure or myocardial infarction were more likely to have prior DNR orders than respective comparison groups. Patients with prior DNR orders were less likely to die 1 month after hospitalization than patients whose DNRs were written during hospitalization. Conclusion Although the use of DNR orders in patients hospitalized with AMI was stable during the period under study, in more recent years, patients are increasingly being hospitalized with DNR orders already in place. PMID:23118551

  13. Acute myocardial infarction and diagnosis-related groups: patient classification and hospital reimbursement in 11 European countries

    PubMed Central

    Quentin, Wilm; Rätto, Hanna; Peltola, Mikko; Busse, Reinhard; Häkkinen, Unto

    2013-01-01

    Aims As part of the diagnosis related groups in Europe (EuroDRG) project, researchers from 11 countries (i.e. Austria, England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and Sweden) compared how their DRG systems deal with patients admitted to hospital for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The study aims to assist cardiologists and national authorities to optimize their DRG systems. Methods and results National or regional databases were used to identify hospital cases with a primary diagnosis of AMI. Diagnosis-related group classification algorithms and indicators of resource consumption were compared for those DRGs that individually contained at least 1% of cases. Six standardized case vignettes were defined, and quasi prices according to national DRG-based hospital payment systems were ascertained. European DRG systems vary widely: they classify AMI patients according to different sets of variables into diverging numbers of DRGs (between 4 DRGs in Estonia and 16 DRGs in France). The most complex DRG is valued 11 times more resource intensive than an index case in Estonia but only 1.38 times more resource intensive than an index case in England. Comparisons of quasi prices for the case vignettes show that hypothetical payments for the index case amount to only €420 in Poland but to €7930 in Ireland. Conclusions Large variation exists in the classification of AMI patients across Europe. Cardiologists and national DRG authorities should consider how other countries' DRG systems classify AMI patients in order to identify potential scope for improvement and to ensure fair and appropriate reimbursement. PMID:23364755

  14. A Study on the Epidemiology and Aetiology of Acute Gastroenteritis in Adult Patients Presenting at the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Tirana, Albania

    PubMed Central

    Stroni, Gentian P.; Dhimolea, Majlinda M.; Pipero, Pëllumb S.; Kraja, Dhimiter V.; Sallavaci, Suela Y.; Bino, Silva F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute gastroenteritis remains a common cause of hospital emergency room visits in Albania. However, the aetiology of severe gastroenteritis leading to hospitalization in adults frequently remains unclear. Aims: Our objective was to study the epidemiology and causes of community-acquired, acute gastroenteritis in adult patients presenting to hospital. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Methods: A prospective study was conducted from January 2010 to January 2012, among patients ≥15 years old with community-acquired gastroenteritis presenting to the emergency room of the University Hospital “Mother Theresa” in Tirana, Albania. Stool samples and rectal swabs were collected from the patients for microbiological testing. Results: The median age of the study patients was 33 (15–88) years and 577 (58%) were females. The median age of males was 35 (15–87) years. The vast majority of cases occurred in urban area (849, 85%), p<0.01. Patients were admitted throughout the year with peak admissions for patients infected by bacterial pathogens in summer and those affected by viral pathogens in autumn. A total of 917 (91.7%) patients underwent a laboratory examination. The overall isolation rate was 51%. Bacterial pathogens were found in 29%, viral pathogens in 19% and protozoal pathogens in 2.5% of patients. No aetiological agent or other cause of acute diarrhoea was found in 449 (49%) patients. Twenty-nine (3.2%) patients were hospitalized. Conclusion: Despite extensive laboratory investigations, enteropathogens were detected in only 51% of adult patients who presented to the hospital ER with acute gastroenteritis. Viral infections ranked as the second most common cause of gastroenteritis in adults. PMID:25625016

  15. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  16. Risk taking in hospitalized patients with acute and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Shirley; Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; García-Molina, Alberto; Kumru, Hatiche; Vergara, Raúl Pelayo; Bernabeu, Monste; Roig, Teresa; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Tormos, José Maria

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation can improve cognitive deficits observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, despite rehabilitation, the ability of making a choice often remains impaired. Risk taking is a daily activity involving numerous cognitive processes subserved by a complex neural network. In this work we investigated risk taking using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) in patients with acute TBI and healthy controls. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI will take less risk at the BART as compared to healthy individuals. We also predicted that within the TBI group factors such as the number of days since the injury, severity of the injury, and sites of the lesion will play a role in risk taking as assessed with the BART. Main findings revealed that participants with TBI displayed abnormally cautious risk taking at the BART as compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, healthy individuals showed increased risk taking throughout the task which is in line with previous work. However, individuals with TBI did not show this increased risk taking during the task. We also investigated the influence of three patients' characteristics on their performance at the BART: Number of days post injury, Severity of the head injury, and Status of the frontal lobe. Results indicate that performance at the BART was influenced by the number of days post injury and the status of the frontal lobe, but not by the severity of the head injury. Reported findings are encouraging for risk taking seems to naturally improve with time postinjury. They support the need of conducting longitudinal prospective studies to ultimately identify impaired and intact cognitive skills that should be trained postinjury. PMID:24386232

  17. Point-of-care procalcitonin test to reduce antibiotic exposure in patients hospitalized with acute exacerbation of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Caspar; Fally, Markus; Fabricius-Bjerre, Andreas; Mortensen, Katrine; Jensen, Birgitte Nybo; Andreassen, Helle F; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to investigate whether point-of-care (POC) procalcitonin (PCT) measurement can reduce redundant antibiotic treatment in patients hospitalized with acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD). Methods One-hundred and twenty adult patients admitted with AECOPD were enrolled in this open-label randomized trial. Patients were allocated to either the POC PCT-guided intervention arm (n=62) or the control arm, in which antibiotic therapy followed local guidelines (n=58). Results The median duration of antibiotic exposure was 3.5 (interquartile range [IQR] 0–10) days in the PCT-arm vs 8.5 (IQR 1–11) days in the control arm (P=0.0169, Wilcoxon) for the intention-to-treat population. The proportion of patients using antibiotics for ≥5 days within the 28-day follow-up was 41.9% (PCT-arm) vs 67.2% (P=0.006, Fisher’s exact) in the intention-to-treat population. For the per-protocol population, the proportions were 21.1% (PCT-arm) vs 73.9% (P<0.00001, Fisher’s exact). Within 28-day follow-up, one patient died in the PCT-arm and two died in the control arm. A composite harm end point consisting of death, rehospitalization, or intensive care unit admission, all within 28 days, showed no apparent difference. Conclusion Our study shows that the implementation of a POC PCT-guided algorithm can be used to substantially reduce antibiotic exposure in patients hospitalized with AECOPD, with no apparent harm. PMID:27382274

  18. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Scrub Typhus and Murine Typhus among Hospitalized Patients with Acute Undifferentiated Fever in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Sugihiro; Cuong, Ngo Chi; Tra, Doan Thu; Doan, Yen Hai; Shimizu, Kenta; Tuan, Nguyen Quang; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Mai, Le Quynh; Duc-Anh, Dang; Ando, Shuji; Arikawa, Jiro; Parry, Christopher M; Ariyoshi, Koya; Thuy, Pham Thanh

    2015-05-01

    A descriptive study on rickettsiosis was conducted at the largest referral hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam, to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of specific rickettsiosis. Between March 2001 and February 2003, we enrolled 579 patients with acute undifferentiated fever (AUF), excluding patients with malaria, dengue fever, and typhoid fever, and serologically tested for Orientia tsutsugamushi and Rickettsia typhi. Of the patients, 237 (40.9%) and 193 (33.3%) had scrub and murine typhus, respectively, and 149 (25.7%) had neither of them (non-scrub and murine typhus [non-ST/MT]). The proportion of murine typhus was highest among patients living in Hanoi whereas that of scrub typhus was highest in national or regional border areas. The presence of an eschar, dyspnea, hypotension, and lymphadenopathy was significantly associated with a diagnosis of scrub typhus (OR = 46.56, 10.90, 9.01, and 7.92, respectively). Patients with murine typhus were less likely to have these findings but more likely to have myalgia, rash, and relative bradycardia (OR = 1.60, 1.56, and 1.45, respectively). Scrub typhus and murine typhus were shown to be common causes of AUF in northern Vietnam although the occurrence of spotted fever group rickettsiae was not determined. Clinical and epidemiological information may help local clinicians make clinical diagnosis of specific rickettsioses in a resource-limited setting. PMID:25778504

  19. Evaluation of Xpert® Norovirus Assay performance in comparison with real-time RT-PCR in hospitalized adult patients with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Francesca; Premoli, Marta; Campanini, Giulia; Sarasini, Antonella; Baldanti, Fausto

    2016-08-01

    Xpert® Norovirus Assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) was compared with a laboratory-developed real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of Norovirus GI and GII in hospitalized patients with acute gastroenteritis. The two assays showed a high level of concordance but Xpert® Norovirus Assay allowed faster detection of Norovirus and a simpler sample handling. PMID:27233425

  20. The impact of cardiac and noncardiac comorbidities on the short-term outcomes of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction: a population-based perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Yang; Saczynski, Jane S; McManus, David D; Lessard, Darleen; Yarzebski, Jorge; Lapane, Kate L; Gore, Joel M; Goldberg, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of our large observational study were to describe the prevalence of cardiac and noncardiac comorbidities in a community-based population of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at all medical centers in central Massachusetts, and to examine whether multiple comorbidities were associated with in-hospital death rates and hospital length of stay. Methods The study sample consisted of 2,972 patients hospitalized with AMI at all eleven greater Worcester medical centers in central Massachusetts during the three study years of 2003, 2005, and 2007. Results The average age of this hospitalized population was 71 years, 55% were men, 93% were Caucasian, and approximately one third had developed an ST segment elevation AMI during the years under study. Hypertension (75%) was the most common cardiac condition identified in patients hospitalized with AMI whereas renal disease (22%) was the most common noncardiac comorbidity diagnosed in this study population. Approximately one in every four hospitalized patients had any four or more of the seven cardiac conditions examined, while one in 13 had any three or more of the five noncardiac conditions studied. Patients with four or more cardiac comorbidities were more than twice as likely to have died during hospitalization and have a prolonged hospital length of stay, compared to those without any cardiac comorbidities. Patients with three or more noncardiac comorbidities had markedly increased odds of dying during hospitalization and having a prolonged hospital stay compared to those with no noncardiac comorbidities previously diagnosed. Conclusion Our findings highlight the need for additional contemporary data to improve the short-term outcomes of patients hospitalized with AMI and multiple concurrent medical illnesses. PMID:24235847

  1. Effect of emergency percutaneous coronary intervention on in-hospital mortality of very elderly (80+ years of age) patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Masuda, Yuichiro; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Kimata, Takaya; Iguchi, Akihisa; Uemura, Kazumasa

    2006-09-01

    It is still controversial whether percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is effective in improving in-hospital survival in very elderly patients. Therefore, using data from the Tokai Acute Myocardial Infarction Study II, we studied the effect of emergency PCI on the in-hospital mortality of very elderly (80+ years of age) patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The study was a prospective study of all consecutive patients admitted to the 15 acute care hospitals in the Tokai region with the diagnosis of AMI from 2001 to 2003. A total of 211 patients undergoing emergency PCI and 176 patients not undergoing PCI were included in the present analysis. We compared the baseline and procedural characteristics and the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Patients without emergency PCI were older and had an increased prevalence of female gender, ADL impairment, and dementia in comparison with those with PCI. They also showed poorer clinical conditions. They were less likely to be transferred to intensive care or coronary care units and to be given intra-aortic balloon pumps. The patients with emergency PCI had nearly one-third the in-hospital mortality rate of the patients without emergency PCI. According to multivariate analysis, emergency PCI was still identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital death, with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.26 (95% CI, 0.07-0.97). The results indicated that emergency PCI has a preventative effect on in-hospital mortality in Japanese AMI patients 80 years of age and older. PMID:17106137

  2. Frailty as a Predictor of Acute Kidney Injury in Hospitalized Elderly Patients: A Single Center, Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seon Ha; Lee, Sung Woo; Kim, Sun-wook; Ahn, Shin young; Yu, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Kwang-il; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    Background Elderly patients have an increased risk for acute kidney injury (AKI). However, few studies have reported on predictors for AKI in geriatric patients. Therefore, we aimed at determining the effect of frailty as a predictor of AKI. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 533 hospitalized elderly patients (aged ≥ 65 years) who had their creatinine levels measured (≥ 1 measurement) during admission for a period of 1 year (2013) and conducted a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) within 1 year before the index hospitalization. We examined five variables (activity of daily living [ADL] and instrumental ADL dependence, dementia, nutrition, and polypharmacy) from CGA. We categorized the patients into 3 groups according to the tertile of aggregate frailty scores: Group 1, score 1–2; Group 2, score 3–4; Group 3, score 5–8). Results Fifty-four patients (10.1%) developed AKI (median duration, 4 days). The frailest group (Group 3) showed an increased risk of AKI as compared to Group 1, (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.536, P = 0.002). We found that discriminatory accuracy for AKI improved with the addition of the tertile of aggregate frailty score to covariates (area under the receiver operator characteristics curves [AUROC] 0.641, AUROC 0.739, P = 0.004). Forty-six patients (8.6%) were transferred to nursing facilities and 477 patients (89.5%) were discharged home. The overall 90-day and 1-year mortality for elderly inpatients were 7.9% and 26.3%. The frailest group also demonstrated an increased risk of discharge to nursing facilities, and 90-day and 1-year mortality as compared to Group 1, independent of AKI severity (nursing facilities: odd ratio = 4.843, P = 0.002; 90-day mortality: HR = 6.555, P = 0.002; 1-year mortality: HR = 3.249, P = 0.001). Conclusions We found that frailty may independently predict the development of AKI and adverse outcomes in geriatric inpatients. PMID:27257823

  3. Association of persistent and transient worsening renal function with mortality risk, readmissions risk, length of stay, and costs in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jacqueline B; Friedman, Howard S; Waltman Johnson, Katherine; Navaratnam, Prakash; Gottlieb, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Background Data comparing effects of transient worsening renal function (WRFt) and persistent WRF (WRFp) on outcomes in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure (AHF) are lacking. We determined the characteristics of hospitalized AHF patients who experienced no worsening renal function (non-WRF), WRFt, or WRFp, and the relationship between cohorts and AHF-related outcomes. Methods and results A patient’s first AHF hospitalization (index) was identified in the Cerner Health Facts® database (January 2008−March 2011). Patients had WRF if serum creatinine (SCr) was ≥0.3 mg/dL and increased ≥25% from baseline, and they were designated as WRFp if present at discharge or WRFt if not present at discharge. A total of 55,436 patients were selected (non-WRF =77%, WRFp =10%, WRFt =13%). WRFp had greater comorbidity burden than WRFt. At index hospitalization, WRFp patients had the highest mortality, whereas WRFt patients had the longest length of stay (LOS) and highest costs. These trends were observed at 30, 180, and 365 days postdischarge and confirmed by multivariable analyses. WRF patients had more AHF-related readmissions than non-WRF patients. In sensitivity analyses of the patient subset with live index hospitalization discharges, postdischarge LOS and costs were highest in WRFt patients, whereas mortality associated with a HF hospitalization was significantly higher for WRF patients vs non-WRF patients, with no difference between WRFp and WRFt. Conclusion In patients hospitalized for AHF, WRFp was associated with the highest mortality, whereas WRFt was associated with the highest LOS and costs. WRF patients had higher readmissions than non-WRF patients. Transient increases in SCr appear to be associated with detrimental outcomes, especially longer LOS and higher costs. PMID:26150730

  4. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  5. National Assessment of Statin Therapy in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insight from China PEACE-Retrospective AMI Study, 2001, 2006, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Li, Jing; Li, Xi; Nasir, Khurram; Zhang, Haibo; Wu, Yongjian; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Qing; Downing, Nicholas S.; Desai, Nihar R.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Spertus, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Background Statin therapy is among the most effective treatments to improve short- and long-term mortality after acute myocardial infarction. The use of statin, and the intensity of their use, has not been described in acute myocardial infarction patients in China, a country with a rapidly growing burden of cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results Using a nationally representative sample of patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to 162 Chinese hospitals in 2001, 2006 and 2011, we identified 14,958 patients eligible for statin therapy to determine rates of statin use and the intensity of statin therapy, defined as those statin regimens with expected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering of at least 40%, to identify factors associated with the use of statin therapy. Statin use among hospitalized patients with acute myocardial infarction increased from 27.9% in 2001 to 72.5% in 2006, and 88.8% in 2011 (P<0.001 for trend). Regional variation in statin use correspondingly decreased over time. Among treated patients, those receiving intensive statin therapy increased from 1.0% in 2001 to 24.2% in 2006 to 57.2% in 2011(P<0.001 for trend). Patients without low-density lipoprotein cholesterol measured were less likely to be treated with statin or to receive intensive therapy. Conclusions The use of statin therapy has dramatically increased over the past decade in Chinese patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, half of patients still did not receive intensive statin therapy in 2011.Given that guidelines strongly endorse intensive statin therapy for acute myocardial infarction patients, initiatives promoting the use of statin therapy, with attention to treatment intensity, would support further improvements in practice. PMID:27058862

  6. C-Reactive Protein at Discharge, Diabetes Mellitus and ≥ 1 Hospitalization During Previous Year Predict Early Readmission in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Ernesto; Torres, Antoni; Huerta, Arturo; Méndez, Raúl; Guerrero, Mónica; Martinez, Raquel; Liapikou, Adamantia; Soler, Néstor; Sethi, Sanjay; Menéndez, Rosario

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent hospitalizations in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) patients have clinical and economic consequences; particularly those readmitted soon after discharge. The aim of our observational study was to determine predictors of early readmission to hospital (30 days from discharge). Prospective data on 125 hospitalized AECOPD patients were collected over a 30-month period at two Spanish university hospitals. Based on readmission after discharge, patients were divided into non-readmitted (n = 96) and readmitted (n = 29). Measures of serum inflammatory biomarkers were recorded on admission to hospital, at day 3 and at discharge; data on clinical, laboratory, microbiological and severity features were also recorded. In a multivariate model, C-reactive protein (CRP) at discharge ≥ 7.6 mg/L, presence of diabetes and ≥ 1 hospitalization for AECOPD during previous year were significant risk factors for predicting readmission. Presence of all 3 risk factors perfectly identified the readmitted patients (positive and negative predictive values of 1.000; 95% CI, 1.00-1.00). A combination of 3 readily available clinical and biochemical parameters is accurate in identifying hospitalized AECOPD patients at risk for early readmission. PMID:25279441

  7. Effect of the Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease on Risk-Adjusted Mortality in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction, Congestive Heart Failure and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D.; Zhou, Ying; Alexoff, Aimee; Melitas, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Measurement of mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF) and pneumonia (PN) is a high priority since these are common reasons for hospitalization. However, mortality in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that are hospitalized for these common medical conditions is unknown. Methods A retrospective review of the 2005–2011 National Inpatient Sample (NIS), (approximately a 20% sample of discharges from community hospitals) was performed. A dataset for all patients with ICD-9-CM codes for primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia or congestive heart failure with a co-diagnosis of IBD, Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). 1:3 propensity score matching between patients with co-diagnosed disease vs. controls was performed. Continuous variables were compared between IBD and controls. Categorical variables were reported as frequency (percentage) and analyzed by Chi-square tests or Fisher’s exact test for co-diagnosed disease vs. control comparisons. Propensity scores were computed through multivariable logistic regression accounting for demographic and hospital factors. In-hospital mortality between the groups was compared. Results Patients with IBD, CD and UC had improved survival after AMI compared to controls. 94/2280 (4.1%) of patients with IBD and AMI died, compared to 251/5460 (5.5%) of controls, p = 0.01. This represents a 25% improved survival in IBD patients that were hospitalized with AMI. There was a 34% improved survival in patients with CD and AMI. There was a trend toward worsening survival in patients with IBD and CHF. Patients with CD and PN had improved survival compared to controls. 87/3362 (2.59%) patients with CD and PN died, compared to 428/10076 (4.25%) of controls, p < .0001. This represents a 39% improved survival in patients with CD that are hospitalized for PN. Conclusion IBD confers a survival benefit for patients hospitalized with AMI. A

  8. Frequent Prescription of Antibiotics and High Burden of Antibiotic Resistance among Deceased Patients in General Medical Wards of Acute Care Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yee Gyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Baek-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are often administered to terminally ill patients until death, and antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). We investigated antibiotic use and the isolation of MDROs among patients who died in general medical wards. Methods All adult patients who died in the general internal medicine wards at four acute care hospitals between January and June 2013 were enrolled. For comparison with these deceased patients, the same number of surviving, discharged patients was selected from the same divisions of internal medicine subspecialties during the same period. Results During the study period, 303 deceased patients were enrolled; among them, 265 (87.5%) had do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in their medical records. Antibiotic use was more common in patients who died than in those who survived (87.5% vs. 65.7%, P<0.001). Among deceased patients with DNR orders, antibiotic use was continued in 59.6% of patients after obtaining their DNR orders. Deceased patients received more antibiotic therapy courses (two [interquartile range (IQR) 1–3] vs. one [IQR 0–2], P<0.001). Antibiotics were used for longer durations in deceased patients than in surviving patients (13 [IQR 5–23] vs. seven days [IQR 0–18], P<0.001). MDROs were also more common in deceased patients than in surviving patients (25.7% vs. 10.6%, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients who died in the general medical wards of acute care hospitals were exposed to more antibiotics than patients who survived. In particular, antibiotic prescription was common even after obtaining DNR orders in patients who died. The isolation of MDROs during the hospital stay was more common in these patients who died. Strategies for judicious antibiotic use and appropriate infection control should be applied to these patient populations. PMID:26761461

  9. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    Aims There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. Methods The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Results The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51−0.99; P = 0.043). Conclusions Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients. PMID:26562780

  10. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with acute venous thrombo-embolism: the SWIss Venous ThromboEmbolism Registry (SWIVTER)

    PubMed Central

    Spirk, David; Husmann, Marc; Hayoz, Daniel; Baldi, Thomas; Frauchiger, Beat; Engelberger, Rolf; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Baumgartner, Iris; Kucher, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Aims Although acute venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) often afflicts patients with advanced age, the predictors of in-hospital mortality for elderly VTE patients are unknown. Methods and results Among 1247 consecutive patients with acute VTE from the prospective SWIss Venous ThromboEmbolism Registry (SWIVTER), 644 (52%) were elderly (≥65 years of age). In comparison to younger patients, the elderly more often had pulmonary embolism (PE) (60 vs. 42%; P< 0.001), cancer (30 vs. 20%; P< 0.001), chronic lung disease (14 vs. 8%; P= 0.001), and congestive heart failure (12 vs. 2%; P< 0.001). Elderly VTE patients were more often hospitalized (75 vs. 52%; P< 0.001), and there was no difference in the use of thrombolysis, catheter intervention, or surgical embolectomy between the elderly and younger PE patients (5 vs. 6%; P= 0.54), despite a trend towards a higher rate of massive PE in the elderly (8 vs. 4%; P= 0.07). The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 6.6% in the elderly vs. 3.2% in the younger VTE patients (P= 0.033). Cancer was associated with in-hospital death both in the elderly [hazard ratio (HR) 4.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.32–10.38; P< 0.001] and in the younger patients (HR 4.90, 95% CI 1.37–17.59; P= 0.015); massive PE was a predictor of in-hospital death in the elderly only (HR 3.77, 95% CI 1.63–8.74; P= 0.002). Conclusion Elderly patients had more serious VTE than younger patients, and massive PE was particularly life-threatening in the elderly. PMID:22036872

  11. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Barr, David; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months post burn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children prior to discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Methods Twenty-four children, aged 4–17 years, with burns ≥ 40% total body surface area (TBSA) underwent a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) prior to discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared to published OGTT data from healthy, non-burned children. Results There was a significant difference between severely burned children and non-burned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53±1.62 compared to the value in non-burned healthy children was 1.28±0.16 (p<0.05). Conclusion Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury. PMID:20634704

  12. Effects of an immunostimulating agent on acute exacerbations and hospitalizations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The PARI-IS Study Steering Committee and Research Group. Prevention of Acute Respiratory Infection by an Immunostimulant.

    PubMed

    Collet, J P; Shapiro, P; Ernst, P; Renzi, T; Ducruet, T; Robinson, A

    1997-12-01

    The PARI-IS Study is a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial to study the effect of an immunostimulating agent to prevent acute respiratory exacerbation in patients with COPD. Three hundred eighty-one ambulatory patients (190 placebo and 191 immunostimulant) were followed at home for 6 mo by experienced research nurses. The risk of having at least one episode of acute exacerbation (primary outcome) was similar in the two groups (p = 0.872). In contrast, the total number of days of hospitalization for a respiratory problem was 55% less in the group treated with OM-85 BV (287 d) than in the group treated with placebo (642 d). Patients treated with OM-85 BV spent an average of 1.5 d in hospital compared with 3.4 d for patients treated with placebo (p = 0.037). The risk of being hospitalized for a respiratory problem was 30% lower in the treated group (16.2%) than in the placebo group (23.2%); p = 0.089. Eight deaths were observed: two in patients treated with OM-85 BV and six in patients treated with placebo (p = 0.153). During the course of the study dyspnea improved slightly in patients treated with OM-85 BV, whereas it deteriorated slightly in patients receiving placebo (p = 0.028). These results suggest that this immunostimulating agent may be beneficial for patients with COPD by reducing the likelihood of severe respiratory events leading to hospitalization. PMID:9412546

  13. Prognostic significance of prevalent and incident atrial fibrillation among patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome: findings from the Gulf RACE-2 Registry.

    PubMed

    Hersi, Ahmad; Alhabib, Khalid F; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Alfaleh, Hussam F; Alsaif, Shukri; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Asaad, Nidal; Haitham, Amin; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Suwaidi, Jassim; Shehab, Abdullah

    2012-08-01

    There is a paucity of data on atrial fibrillation (AF) complicating acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Arabian Gulf countries. Thus, we assessed the incidence of AF in patients with ACS in these countries and examined the associated in-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year adverse outcomes. The population comprised 7930 patients enrolled in the second Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2). Of 7930 patients with ACS, 217 (2.7%) had AF. Compared with patients without AF, patients with AF were less likely to be male (65.9 vs 79.1%) and were older (mean age 64.6 vs 56.6 years). Compared with patients without AF, in-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year mortality were significantly higher in patients with any AF (odds ratio [OR]: 2.7, 2.2, 1.9, respectively; P < .001) and in patients with new-onset AF (OR: 5.2, 3.9, 3.1, respectively; P < .001. In conclusion, AF in patients with ACS was associated with significantly higher short- and long-term mortality. PMID:22144666

  14. In‐Hospital Mortality Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results From the National Inpatient Sample, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Bina; Davis, Herbert T.; Laskey, Warren K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Case‐fatality rates in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have significantly decreased; however, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a risk factor for AMI, has increased. The purposes of the present study were to assess the prevalence and clinical impact of DM among patients hospitalized with AMI and to estimate the impact of important clinical characteristics associated with in‐hospital mortality in patients with AMI and DM. Methods and Results We used the National Inpatient Sample to estimate trends in DM prevalence and in‐hospital mortality among 1.5 million patients with AMI from 2000 to 2010, using survey data‐analysis methods. Clinical characteristics associated with in‐hospital mortality were identified using multivariable logistic regression. There was a significant increase in DM prevalence among AMI patients (year 2000, 22.2%; year 2010, 29.6%, Ptrend<0.0001). AMI patients with DM tended to be older and female and to have more cardiovascular risk factors. However, age‐standardized mortality decreased significantly from 2000 (8.48%) to 2010 (4.95%) (Ptrend<0.0001). DM remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio 1.069, 95% CI 1.051 to 1.087; P<0.0001). The adverse impact of DM on in‐hospital mortality was unchanged over time. Decreased death risk over time was greatest among women and elderly patients. Among younger patients of both sexes, there was a leveling off of this decrease in more recent years. Conclusions Despite increasing DM prevalence and disease burden among AMI patients, in‐hospital mortality declined significantly from 2000 to 2010. The adverse impact of DM on mortality remained unchanged overall over time but was age and sex dependent. PMID:25158866

  15. Differences in care between general medicine and respiratory specialists in the management of patients hospitalized for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wijayaratne, Kurugamage; Wilson, Jessica; Sivakumaran, Pathmanathan; Sriram, Krishna B.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Hospitalized patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) may be managed by either respiratory specialists (RS) or general medicine physicians (GMP). While previous studies have audited the hospital AECOPD management of RS, only a small number of studies have evaluated the management of GMP. AIMS: The aims of this study were to firstly examine the differences in AECOPD management of GMP and RS and secondly compare their care to national COPD guidelines. METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of consecutive AECOPD patients admitted to two hospitals (one hospital where all AECOPD patients were managed by RS and another where all AECOPD patients were managed by GMP) over a 3-month period. Electronic medical records, medical case notes, pathology and radiology data for the admission were reviewed. RESULTS: There were 201 COPD exacerbations in 169 patients (49.7% male, mean age 72.3). GMP managed 84 (41.7%) exacerbations. In comparison to RS, GMP performed fewer spirometry tests, blood gas analysis and less frequently treated patients with guideline-recommended medications. Referral to pulmonary rehabilitation was poor for both groups of clinicians. Median length of stay was shorter in GMP patients versus RS patients (3 days vs. 5 days, P = 0.001). There were no differences in the 12-month re-admission (41.7% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.664) and mortality rates (10.7% vs. 6%, P = 0.292) between both groups of patients. CONCLUSION: Our study found differences in the hospital AECOPD management of GMP and RS, but these did not translate into different clinical outcomes between their patients. We also found suboptimal adherence to national COPD guidelines, suggesting that there is scope for improvement in the AECOPD management of both groups of clinicians. PMID:24250732

  16. Early Discharge in Low-Risk Patients Hospitalized for Acute Coronary Syndromes: Feasibility, Safety and Reasons for Prolonged Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Laurencet, Marie-Eva; Girardin, François; Rigamonti, Fabio; Bevand, Anne; Meyer, Philippe; Carballo, David; Roffi, Marco; Noble, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Length of hospital stay (LHS) is an indicator of clinical effectiveness. Early hospital discharge (≤72 hours) is recommended in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) at low risk of complications, but reasons for prolonged LHS poorly reported. Methods We collected data of ACS patients hospitalized at the Geneva University Hospitals from 1st July 2013 to 30th June 2015 and used the Zwolle index score to identify patients at low risk (≤ 3 points). We assessed the proportion of eligible patients who were successfully discharged within 72 hours and the reasons for prolonged LHS. Outcomes were defined as adherence to recommended therapies, major adverse events at 30 days and patients' satisfaction using a Likert-scale patient-reported questionnaire. Results Among 370 patients with ACS, 255 (68.9%) were at low-risk of complications but only 128 (50.2%)were eligible for early discharge, because of other clinical reasons for prolonged LHS (e.g. staged coronary revascularization, cardiac monitoring) in 127 patients (49.8%). Of the latter, only 45 (35.2%) benefitted from an early discharge. Reasons for delay in discharge in the remaining 83 patients (51.2%) were mainly due to delays in additional investigations, titration of medical therapy, admission or discharge during weekends. In the early discharge group, at 30 days, only one patient (2.2%) had an adverse event (minor bleeding), 97% of patients were satisfied by the medical care. Conclusion Early discharge was successfully achieved in one third of eligible ACS patients at low risk of complications and appeared sufficiently safe while being overall appreciated by the patients. PMID:27551861

  17. Baseline characteristics, management practices, and in-hospital outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndromes: Results of the Saudi project for assessment of coronary events (SPACE) registry

    PubMed Central

    AlHabib, Khalid F.; Hersi, Ahmad; AlFaleh, Hussam; AlNemer, Khalid; AlSaif, Shukri; Taraben, Amir; Kashour, Tarek; Bakheet, Anas; Qarni, Ayed Al; Soomro, Tariq; Malik, Asif; Ahmed, Waqar H.; Abuosa, Ahmed M.; Butt, Modaser A.; AlMurayeh, Mushabab A.; Zaidi, Abdulaziz Al; Hussein, Gamal A.; Balghith, Mohammed A.; Abu-Ghazala, Tareg

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The Saudi Project for Assessment of Coronary Events (SPACE) registry is the first in Saudi Arabia to study the clinical features, management, and in-hospital outcomes of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. Methods We conducted a prospective registry study in 17 hospitals in Saudi Arabia between December 2005 and December 2007. ACS patients included those with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina; both were reported collectively as NSTEACS (non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome). Results 5055 patients were enrolled with mean age ± SD of 58 ± 12.9 years; 77.4% men, 82.4% Saudi nationals; 41.5% had STEMI, and 5.1% arrived at the hospital by ambulance. History of diabetes mellitus was present in 58.1%, hypertension in 55.3%, hyperlipidemia in 41.1%, and 32.8% were current smokers; all these were more common in NSTEACS patients, except for smoking (all P < 0.0001). In-hospital medications were: aspirin (97.7%), clopidogrel (83.7%), beta-blockers (81.6%), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (75.1%), and statins (93.3%). Median time from symptom onset to hospital arrival for STEMI patients was 150 min (IQR: 223), 17.5% had primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), 69.1% had thrombolytic therapy, and 14.8% received it at less than 30 min of hospital arrival. In-hospital outcomes included recurrent myocardial infarction (1.5%), recurrent ischemia (12.6%), cardiogenic shock (4.3%), stroke (0.9%), major bleeding (1.3%). In-hospital mortality was 3.0%. Conclusion ACS patients in Saudi Arabia present at a younger age, have much higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, less access to ambulance use, delayed treatment by thrombolytic therapy, and less primary PCI compared with patients in the developed countries. This is the first national ACS registry in our country and it demonstrated knowledge-care gaps that require further improvements. PMID

  18. Comparison of severe acute respiratory illness (sari) and clinical pneumonia case definitions for the detection of influenza virus infections among hospitalized patients, western Kenya, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Makokha, Caroline; Mott, Joshua; Njuguna, Henry N; Khagayi, Sammy; Verani, Jennifer R; Nyawanda, Bryan; Otieno, Nancy; Katz, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Although the severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) case definition is increasingly used for inpatient influenza surveillance, pneumonia is a more familiar term to clinicians and policymakers. We evaluated WHO case definitions for severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) and pneumonia (Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) for children aged <5 years and Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illnesses (IMAI) for patients aged ≥13 years) for detecting laboratory-confirmed influenza among hospitalized ARI patients. Sensitivities were 84% for SARI and 69% for IMCI pneumonia in children aged <5 years and 60% for SARI and 57% for IMAI pneumonia in patients aged ≥13 years. Clinical pneumonia case definitions may be a useful complement to SARI for inpatient influenza surveillance. PMID:27219455

  19. Assessments of urine cofilin-1 in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units with acute kidney injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yi-Jang; Chao, Cheng-Han; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien

    2013-02-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family has been reported to be associated with ischemia induced renal disorders. Here we examine if cofilin-1 is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). We exploited a 96-well based fiber-optic biosensor that uses conjugated gold nanoparticles and a sandwich immunoassay to detect the urine cofilin-1 level of AKI patients. The mean urine cofilin-1 level of the AKI patients was two-fold higher than that of healthy adults. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that cofilin-1 is a potential biomarker for discriminating AKI patients from healthy adults for intensive care patients.

  20. Pre-hospital diagnosis and transfer of patients with acute myocardial infarction--a decade long experience from one of Europe's largest STEMI networks.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Peter; Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Lindholm, Matias Greve; Rasmussen, Lars S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Pedersen, Frants; Jørgensen, Erik; Holmvang, Lene; Sejersten, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Early reperfusion in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is essential. Although primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) is the preferred revascularization technique, it often involves longer primary transportation or secondary inter-hospital transfers and thus longer system related delays. The current ESC Guidelines state that PCI should be performed within 120 minutes from first medical contact, and door-to-balloon time should be <60 minutes in order to reduce long term mortality. STEMI networks should be established with regionalization of pPCI treatment to address the challenges regarding pre-hospital treatment, triage and transport of STEMI patients and collaborations between hospitals and Emergency Medical Services (EMS). We report on a regional decade long experience from one of Europe's largest STEMI networks located in Eastern Denmark, which serves a catchment area of 2.5 million inhabitants by processing ~4000 prehospital ECGs annually transmitted from 4 EMS systems to a single pPCI center treating 1100 patients per year. This organization has led to a significant improvement of the standard of therapy for acute myocardial infarction (MI) patients leading to historically low 30-day mortality for STEMI patients (<6%). About 70-80% of all STEMI patients are being triaged from the field and rerouted to the regional pPCI center. Significant delays are still found among patients who present to local hospitals and for those who are first admitted to a local emergency room and thus subject to inter-hospital transfer. In the directly transferred group, approximately 80% of patients can be treated within the current guideline time window of 120 minutes when triaged within a 185 km (~115 miles) radius. Since 2010, a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service has been implemented for air rescue. Air transfer was associated with a 20-30 minute decrease from first medical contact to pPCI, at distances down to 90 km from the pPCI center

  1. Efficacy of Chinese Herbal Medicine as an Adjunctive Therapy on in-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tuo; Zhan, Libin; Fan, Zhiwei; Bai, Lizhi; Song, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to systematically assess the efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) as an adjunctive therapy on in-hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods. We did a systematic review of articles published in any language up until Jun 23, 2015, by searching PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CBM, and CNKI. We included all RCTs that compared outcomes of patients with AKI taking CHM plus Western treatment (WT) with those taking WT alone. We applied Cochrane risk-of-bias tool to assess the methodological quality of the included trials. Results. Of 832 citations, 15 studies involving 966 patients met inclusion criteria. The methodological quality was assessed with unclear risk of bias. In the primary outcome of meta-analysis, pooled outcome of in-hospital mortality showed that patients randomly assigned to CHM treatment group were associated with low risk of in-hospital mortality compared with those randomly assigned to WT alone (RR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.24 to 0.71; P = 0.001). Conclusions. CHM as an adjunctive therapy is associated with a decreased risk of in-hospital mortality compared with WT in patients with AKI. Further studies with high quality and large sample size are needed to verify our conclusions. PMID:27127528

  2. Impact of regional pre-hospital emergency medical services in treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sozener, Cemal B; Barsan, William G

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a major public health concern afflicting an estimated 795,000 Americans annually. The associated morbidity and mortality is staggering. Early treatment with thrombolytics is beneficial. The window for treatment is narrow and minimization of the time from symptom onset to treatment is vital. The general population is not well informed as to the warning signs or symptoms of stroke, leading to substantial delays in emergency medical services (EMS) activation. Ambulance transport of stroke patients to the hospital has demonstrated improvements in key benchmarks such as door to physician evaluation, door to CT initiation, and increased thrombolytic treatment. Pre-hospital notification of the impending arrival of a stroke patient allows for vital preparation in the treating emergency department, and improving timely evaluation and treatment upon arrival of the stroke patient. EMS systems are a vital component of the management of stroke patients, and resources used to improve these systems are beneficial. PMID:22994221

  3. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  4. [Effect of transthoracic galvanization on the nature and incidence of complications at the hospital stage of treating patients with acute myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Maslov, A G

    1993-01-01

    The impact of transcardiac galvanization on the pattern and incidence of complications occurring in the hospital period was studied by using the data of examination of 110 patients with primary uncomplicated large anterior myocardial infarction who had been admitted to the hospital no later than 6 hours of the onset. ECG monitoring, echocardiography, X-ray graphy, echocardiography, and clinical study were used. It was found that a course of transthoracic galvanization in the multimodality therapy for acute myocardial infarction contributed to a more rapid relief of the pain syndrome, to a decrease in the incidence of cardiac rhythm and conduction disturbances, in relapses of myocardial infarction, left ventricular aneurysm, early postinfarction angina pectoris in the hospital period. PMID:8154129

  5. Assessment of the Needs of Caregivers of Stroke Patients at State-Owned Acute-Care Hospitals in Southern Vietnam, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Hoang Hoa; Tai, Nguyen Anh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Care for stroke patients has improved steadily in southern Vietnam. Medical treatments such as thrombolytic therapy have been implemented at several hospitals, and stroke-care units composed of a team of various health professionals have been created. However, little attention has been focused on providing support to caregivers of stroke patients. This study aimed to characterize the caregivers of stroke patients who were treated in state-owned acute-care hospitals and to learn about their needs when patients are discharged. Such information can be used to enhance the caregiver’s support system. Methods We used questionnaires to conduct a descriptive study in 2011 at a state-owned acute-care hospital in southern Vietnam. We recruited study participants from among caregivers of stroke patients who had been informed of their hospital discharge date. We assessed 8 caregiver characteristics, and caregiver participants selected their needs from the survey’s list of 15 possible needs. We analyzed the data by using the independent sample t test and logistic regression. Results Of the 93 caregivers who consented to participate, 86 (92.5%) completed the survey and indicated their concerns at discharge. The most frequently cited need was information on how to prevent stroke recurrence (72, 83.7%), followed by which drugs are most effective in preventing a relapse (62, 72.1%), how long recovery would take (61, 70.9%), and availability of hospitals in the patient’s hometown (60, 69.8%). A little over half of caregivers indicated financial concerns. A caregiver’s need for information on diet for a stroke survivor increased with the caregiver’s education level. Conclusions This study revealed several needs among caregivers of stroke survivors in southern Vietnam that are similar to those found by studies of caregivers of stroke survivors in high-income countries. Our findings suggest that comprehensive stroke care that includes caregiver education about

  6. Multifaceted Intervention to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Medical Illness: A Multicenter Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Pierre-Marie; Rachas, Antoine; Meyer, Guy; Le Gal, Grégoire; Durieux, Pierre; El Kouri, Dominique; Honnart, Didier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Legall, Catherine; Hausfater, Pierre; Chrétien, Jean-Marie; Mottier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Misuse of thromboprophylaxis may increase preventable complications for hospitalized medical patients. Objectives To assess the net clinical benefit of a multifaceted intervention in emergency wards (educational lectures, posters, pocket cards, computerized clinical decision support systems and, where feasible, electronic reminders) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. Patients/Methods Prospective cluster-randomized trial in 27 hospitals. After a pre-intervention period, centers were randomized as either intervention (n = 13) or control (n = 14). All patients over 40 years old, admitted to the emergency room, and hospitalized in a medical ward were included, totaling 1,402 (712 intervention and 690 control) and 15,351 (8,359 intervention and 6,992 control) in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Results Symptomatic venous thromboembolism or major bleeding (primary outcome) occurred at 3 months in 3.1% and 3.2% of patients in the intervention and control groups, respectively (adjusted odds ratio: 1.02 [95% confidence interval: 0.78–1.34]). The rates of thromboembolism (1.9% vs. 1.9%), major bleedings (1.2% vs. 1.3%), and mortality (11.3% vs. 11.1%) did not differ between the groups. Between the pre-intervention and intervention periods, the proportion of patients who received prophylactic anticoagulant treatment more steeply increased in the intervention group (from 35.0% to 48.2%: +13.2%) than the control (40.7% to 44.1%: +3.4%), while the rate of adequate thromboprophylaxis remained stable in both groups (52.4% to 50.9%: -1.5%; 49.1% to 48.8%: -0.3%). Conclusions Our intervention neither improved adequate prophylaxis nor reduced the rates of clinical events. New strategies are required to improve thromboembolism prevention for hospitalized medical patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01212393 PMID:27227406

  7. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) survey

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). The aims of this paper are: (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii) to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46%) showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%), than in aggression toward other people (20%). A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%), followed by depression (16%) and personality disorders (14%), and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge), while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge) and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge). Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%). Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self-reported compliance

  8. Acute lower respiratory infections in ≥5 year -old hospitalized patients in Cambodia, a low-income tropical country: clinical characteristics and pathogenic etiology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few data exist on viral and bacterial etiology of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in ≥5 year –old persons in the tropics. Methods We conducted active surveillance of community-acquired ALRI in two hospitals in Cambodia, a low-income tropical country. Patients were tested for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) by direct sputum examination, other bacteria by blood and/or sputum cultures, and respiratory viruses using molecular techniques on nasopharyngeal/throat swabs. Pulmonologists reviewed clinical/laboratory data and interpreted chest X-rays (CXR) to confirm ALRI. Results Between April 2007 - December 2009, 1,904 patients aged ≥5 years were admitted with acute pneumonia (50.4%), lung sequelae-associated ALRI (24.3%), isolated pleural effusions (8.9%) or normal CXR-related ALRI (17.1%); 61 (3.2%) died during hospitalization. The two former diagnoses were predominantly due to bacterial etiologies while viral detection was more frequent in the two latter diagnoses. AFB-positive accounted for 25.6% of acute pneumonia. Of the positive cultures (16.8%), abscess-prone Gram-negative bacteria (39.6%) and Haemophilus influenzae (38.0%) were most frequent, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (17.7%). Of the identified viruses, the three most common viruses included rhinoviruses (49.5%), respiratory syncytial virus (17.7%) and influenza viruses (12.1%) regardless of the diagnostic groups. Wheezing was associated with viral identification (31.9% vs. 13.8%, p < 0.001) independent of age and time-to-admission. Conclusions High frequency of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae infections support the need for introduction of the respective vaccines in the national immunization program. Tuberculosis was frequent in patients with acute pneumonia, requiring further investigation. The relationship between respiratory viruses and wheezing merits further studies. PMID:23432906

  9. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  10. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during hospital admission on coronary events within 1 year in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencloviene, J.; Babarskiene, R.; Milvidaite, I.; Kubilius, R.; Stasionyte, J.

    2013-12-01

    Some evidence indicates the deterioration of the cardiovascular system during space storms. It is plausible that the space weather conditions during and after hospital admission may affect the risk of coronary events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed the data of 1400 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between geomagnetic storms (GS), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after hospital admission and the risk of cardiovascular death (CAD), non-fatal ACS, and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) during a period of 1 year; the evaluation was based on the multivariate logistic model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, GS occurring in conjunction with SF 1 day before admission increased the risk of CAD by over 2.5 times. GS 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the risk of CAD and CABG by over 2.8 times. The risk of CABG increased by over 2 times in patients admitted during the day of GS and 1 day after SPE. The risk of ACS was by over 1.63 times higher for patients admitted 1 day before or after solar flares.

  11. Prehospital and in-hospital use of healthcare resources in patients surviving acute coronary syndromes: an analysis of the EPICOR registry

    PubMed Central

    Annemans, Lieven; Danchin, Nicolas; Van de Werf, Frans; Pocock, Stuart; Licour, Muriel; Medina, Jesús; Bueno, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this report is to provide insight into real-world healthcare resource use (HCRU) during the critical management of patients surviving acute coronary syndromes (ACS), using data from EPICOR (long-tErm follow-up of antithrombotic management Patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients) (NCT01171404). Methods EPICOR was a prospective, multinational, observational study that enrolled 10 568 ACS survivors from 555 hospitals in 20 countries in Europe and Latin America, between September 2010 and March 2011. HCRU was evaluated in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS), with or without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Multivariable analysis was performed to determine factors that affected resource use. Results Before hospitalisation, more patients with STEMI than with NSTE-ACS had their first ECG (44.1% vs 36.4%, p<0.0001) and received antithrombotic medication (26.6% vs 15.2%, p<0.0001). Patients with NSTE-ACS with prior CVD were less likely than those without to be catheterised (73.1% vs 82.8%, p<0.0001). More patients with STEMI than with NSTE-ACS had percutaneous coronary intervention (77.1% vs 54.9%, p<0.0001), but fewer underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (1.2% vs 3.7%, p<0.0001). Multivariable analysis showed that resource use, including length of hospital stay and coronary revascularisation, was significantly influenced by multiple factors, including ACS type, site characteristics and region (all p≤0.05). Conclusions In this large-scale, real-life study, findings were generally in line with clinical logic, although site characteristics and region still significantly affected resource use. Moreover, and unexpectedly, resource use tended to be slightly higher in patients without a history of CVD. Trial registration number NCT01171404 (ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID:27127635

  12. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  13. Rubicon crossed in acute hospital design?

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2008-06-01

    With construction work now underway on the new pound sterling 227 million PFI-funded Pembury Hospital near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, Jonathan Baillie talks to John Cooper of architects Anshen + Allen, who is convinced that this exciting new acute facility will become the first of a new generation of 100% single-bedroom hospitals in the UK. PMID:18655662

  14. Efficacy and safety of once-monthly injection of paliperidone palmitate in hospitalized Asian patients with acute exacerbated schizophrenia: an open-label, prospective, noncomparative study

    PubMed Central

    Li, HuaFang; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This single-group, open-label, prospective, noncomparative, multicenter, Phase IV study explored the efficacy and tolerability of paliperidone palmitate (PP) in hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia. Methods Asian patients of either sex, between 18 and 65 years of age, diagnosed with schizophrenia (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) with acute exacerbations within the previous 4 weeks, were enrolled. Intramuscular PP was initiated at doses of 150 milligram equivalent (mg eq) (day 1) and 100 mg eq (day 8), followed by a monthly maintenance dose between 75 mg eq and 150 mg eq (days 36 and 64). Primary efficacy endpoint was the change from baseline in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (last-observation-carried-forward) at week 13. Results Of the 212 enrolled patients, 152 (71.7%) completed the 13-week treatment; withdrawal of consent (24 [11.3%] patients) was the most common reason for study discontinuation. Mean (standard deviation) PANSS total score from baseline (90.0 [17.41]) improved significantly at day 4 (−6.1 [9.27]; 95% confidence interval: −7.38, −4.85; P<0.001) and week 13 endpoint (−23.9 [23.24]; 95% confidence interval: −27.10, −20.78; P<0.001). Similarly, the secondary endpoints (Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Physical and Social Performance, each PANSS subscale, and Marder factor scores) improved significantly from baseline to week 13 endpoint (P<0.001 for all). At week 13, 112/210 (53.3%) patients had a 40% improvement in the PANSS total score (responder rate), and 133/212 (62.7%) patients were ready for hospital discharge. Overall, 139 (65.6%) patients experienced at least one treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE). Most common (>5%) TEAEs were hyperprolactinemia, constipation, nasopharyngitis, insomnia, increased weight, and tremor. Worsening of schizophrenia (3.3%) and sinus bradycardia (2.0%) were serious TEAEs; no deaths were

  15. Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Impact on Hospital and 30 Day Postdischarge Survival.

    PubMed

    Modrykamien, Ariel M; Hernandez, Omar O; Im, Yunhee; Walters, Ryan W; Schrader, Caleb L; Smith, Lauren E; Lima, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation support for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients involves the use of low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure. Nevertheless, the optimal ventilator strategy for ARDS patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy remains unknown. A retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of adult ARDS patients treated with V-V ECMO from October 2012 to May 2015 was performed. Mechanical ventilation data, as well as demographic and clinical data, were collected. We assessed the association between ventilator data and outcomes of interest. The primary outcome was hospital survival. Secondary outcome was 30 day survival posthospital discharge. Sixty-four ARDS patients were treated with ECMO. Univariate analysis showed that plateau pressure was independently associated with hospital survival. Tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and plateau were independently associated with 30 day survival. Multivariate analysis, after controlling for covariates, revealed that a 1 unit increase in plateau pressure was associated with a 21% decrease in the odds of hospital survival (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.39-33.42%, p = 0.007). In regards to 30 day survival postdischarge, a 1 unit increase in plateau pressure was associated with a 14.4% decrease in the odds of achieving the aforementioned outcome (95% CI = 1.75-25.4%, p = 0.027). Also, a 1 unit increase in PEEP was associated with a 36.2% decrease in the odds of 30 day survival (95% CI = 10.8-54.4%, p = 0.009). Among ARDS patients undergoing ECMO therapy, only plateau pressure is associated with hospital survival. Plateau pressure and PEEP are both associated with 30 day survival posthospital discharge. PMID:27347707

  16. Pattern and correlates of agitation in an acute psychiatry in-patient setting in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    George, Christina; Jacob, Tisha Rachel; Kumar, Arun V

    2016-02-01

    Agitation among psychiatry inpatients can be a distressing and burdensome entity for patients, caregivers and staff. It has been poorly studied in low-middle income countries such as India both within acute care as well as long stay settings. 272 psychiatry admissions had 19.9% prevalence of agitation with the most common form being non goal directed physical agitation (13.6%). Episodes of agitation were most likely to occur on the 3rd or 2nd day of admission. Substance abuse [O.R.=2.51(1.05-5.99)] and the presence of persecutory delusions [O.R.=2.62(1.34-5.15)] were independently associated with agitation. It is difficult to predict violence in acutely ill individuals and there is evidence that the emergence of more serious aggression may be preceded by milder forms of agitation. Therefore, there is a need to identify various forms of agitation and its correlates. An understanding of these factors may assist in planning appropriate interventions that could improve patient outcomes and reduce the burden on caregivers. PMID:26957342

  17. Trends in the Use of Guideline-Recommended Medications and In-Hospital Mortality of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Xie, Yanming; Shu, Zheng; Yang, Wei; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current practice guidelines recommend the routine use of several cardiac medications early in the course of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our objective was to analyze temporal trends in medication use and in-hospital mortality of AMI patients in a Chinese population. Methods This is a retrospective observational study using electronic medical records from the hospital information system (HIS) of 14 Chinese hospitals. We identified 5599 patients with AMI between 2005 and 2011. Factors associated with medication use and in-hospital mortality were explored by using hierarchical logistic regression. Results The use of several guideline-recommended medications all increased during the study period: statins (57.7%–90.1%), clopidogrel (61.8%–92.3%), β-Blockers (45.4%–65.1%), ACEI/ARB (46.7%–58.7%), aspirin (81.9%–92.9%), and the combinations thereof increased from 24.9% to 42.8% (P<0.001 for all). Multivariate analyses showed statistically significant increases in all these medications. The in-hospital mortality decreased from 15.9% to 5.7% from 2005 to 2011 (P<0.001). After multivariate adjustment, admission year was still a significant factor (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.79–0.96, P = 0.007), the use of aspirin (OR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.46–0.87), clopidogrel (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.31–0.61), ACEI/ARB (OR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.56–0.94) and statins (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.40–0.73) were associated with a decrease in in-hospital mortality. Patients with older age, cancer and renal insufficiency had higher in-hospital mortality, while they were generally less likely to receive all these medications. Conclusion Use of guideline-recommended medications early in the course of AMI increased between 2005 and 2011 in a Chinese population. During this same time, there was a decrease in in-hospital mortality. PMID:25706944

  18. Efficacy of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package in hospitalized elderly patients with acute exacerbation of COPD: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lin-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Min; Chung, Wei-Sheng; Chien, Jung-Yien

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials identifier NCT02329873 Background Acute exacerbation (AE) of COPD is characterized by a sudden worsening of COPD symptoms. Previous studies have explored the effectiveness of respiratory rehabilitation for patients with COPD; however, no training program specific to acute exacerbation in elderly patients or unstable periods during hospitalization has been developed. Objective To evaluate the effects of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package on dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration among hospitalized elderly patients with AECOPD. Methods A randomized control trial was conducted. Pretest and posttest evaluations of 61 elderly inpatients with AECOPD (experimental group n=30; control group n=31) were performed. The experimental group received respiratory rehabilitation exercise training twice a day, 10–30 minutes per session for 4 days. The clinical parameters (dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration) were assessed at the baseline and at the end of the fourth day. Results All participants (median age =70 years, male =60.70%, and peak expiratory flow 140 L) completed the study. In the patients of the experimental group, dyspnea and cough decreased and exercise tolerance and sputum expectoration increased significantly compared with those of the patients in the control group (all P<0.05). Within-group comparisons revealed that the dyspnea, cough, and exercise tolerance significantly improved in the experimental group by the end of the fourth day (all P<0.05). Conclusion Results of this study suggest that the respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package reduced symptoms and enhanced the effectiveness of the care of elderly inpatients with AECOPD. PMID:26345529

  19. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  20. Examination of hospital length of stay in Canada among patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Potashman, Michele H; Stokes, Michael; Liu, Jieruo; Lawrence, Robin; Harris, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Skin infections, particularly those caused by resistant pathogens, represent a clinical burden. Hospitalization associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to the economic burden of the disease. This study was conducted to provide current, real-world data on hospitalization patterns for patients with ABSSSI caused by MRSA across multiple geographic regions in Canada. Patients and methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated length of stay (LOS) for hospitalized patients with ABSSSI due to MRSA diagnosis across four Canadian geographic regions using the Discharge Abstract Database. Patients with ICD-10-CA diagnosis consistent with ABSSSI caused by MRSA between January 2008 and December 2014 were selected and assigned a primary or secondary diagnosis based on a prespecified ICD-10-CA code algorithm. Results Among 6,719 patients, 3,273 (48.7%) and 3,446 (51.3%) had a primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively. Among patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis, the cellulitis/erysipelas subtype was most common. The majority of patients presented with 0 or 1 comorbid condition; the most common comorbidity was diabetes. The mean LOS over the study period varied by geographic region and year; in 2014 (the most recent year analyzed), LOS ranged from 7.7 days in Ontario to 13.4 days in the Canadian Prairie for a primary diagnosis and from 18.2 days in Ontario to 25.2 days in Atlantic Canada for a secondary diagnosis. A secondary diagnosis was associated with higher rates of continuing care compared with a primary diagnosis (10.6%–24.2% vs 4.6%–12.1%). Conclusion This study demonstrated that the mean LOS associated with ABSSSI due to MRSA in Canada was minimally 7 days. Clinical management strategies, including medication management, which might facilitate hospital discharge, have the potential to reduce hospital LOS and related economic

  1. The delay in transfer between the emergency department and the critical care unit for patients with an acute cardiac event--in hospital factors.

    PubMed

    Grech, C; Pannell, D; Smith-Sparrow, T

    2001-11-01

    The Lyell McEwin Health Service (LMHS) is a major public hospital located in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, a region where the death rate from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is higher than the expected death rate in the population. A retrospective case note study conducted at this hospital investigated the duration that patients with unstable angina pectoris (UA) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI) spent in the emergency department (ED) before admission to the critical care unit (CCU) and the factors that contributed to delays of greater than 70 minutes. All patients admitted to the LMHS over an 18 month period with a discharge diagnosis related group (DRG) for AMI and UA were included in the study. A total of 667 case notes were examined; 403 of these cases met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean duration between arrival in the ED and subsequent admission to the CCU was found to be 161 minutes. DRG was a major factor in the length of time spent in the ED. The mean duration for patients with AMI was 124 minutes, whilst for UA the duration was 190 minutes (difference = 66 minutes, p<0.001). Other factors that were significant were gender (females = mean duration 29 minutes > males, p=0.015), and mode of transport to the ED (arrival by ambulance mean duration 30 minutes < private transport, Recommendations arising from this study included that a system be established to enable the rapid assessment of all patients suspected of suffering AMI and UA, inclusive of their expeditious transfer to the CCU. In addition, a staff development programme was proposed to ensure medical and nursing staff became aware of a bias in this hospital toward transferring male patients in a shorter timeframe than females with the same DRG. PMID:11806510

  2. Reduction of Behavioral Psychological Symptoms of Dementia by Multimodal Comprehensive Care for Vulnerable Geriatric Patients in an Acute Care Hospital: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Miwako; Ito, Mio; Ishikawa, Shogo; Takebayashi, Yoichi; Tierney, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Management of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a key challenge in geriatric dementia care. A multimodal comprehensive care methodology, Humanitude, with eye contact, verbal communication, and touch as its elements, was provided to three geriatric dementia patients for whom conventional nursing care failed in an acute care hospital. Each episode was evaluated by video analysis. All patients had advanced dementia with BPSD. Failure of care was identified by patient's shouting, screaming, or abrupt movements of limbs. In this case series, conventional care failed for all three patients. Each element of care communication was much shorter than in Humanitude care, which was accepted by the patients. The average of the elements performed during the care was eye contact 0.6%, verbal communication 15.7%, and touch 0.1% in conventional care and 12.5%, 54.8%, and 44.5% in Humanitude care, respectively. The duration of aggressive behavior of each patient during care was 25.0%, 25.4%, and 66.3% in conventional care and 0%, 0%, and 0.3% in Humanitude, respectively. In our case series, conventional care was provided by less eye contact, verbal communication, and touch. The multimodal comprehensive care approach, Humanitude, decreased BPSD and showed success by patients' acceptance of care. PMID:27069478

  3. Acute Cholecystitis in Patients with Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Ji, Misuk; Hwang, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Chung, Kyung Min; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a rare complication of scrub typhus. Although a few such cases have been reported in patients with scrub typhus, the clinical course is not well described. Of 12 patients, acute cholecystitis developed in 66.7% (8/12) of patients older than 60 yr. The scrub typhus group with acute cholecystitis had marginal significant longer hospital stay and higher cost than the group without cholecystitis according to propensity score matching. Scrub typhus should be kept in mind as a rare etiology of acute cholecystitis in endemic areas because the typical signs of scrub typhus such as skin rash and eschar can present after the abdominal pain. PMID:26539017

  4. An assessment of composite measures of hospital performance and associated mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction. Analysis of individual hospital performance and outcome for the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR)

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul D; Cattle, Brian A; Batin, Phillip D; Wilson, John I; West, Robert M; Hall, Alistair S; Weston, Clive F; Deanfield, John E; Fox, Keith A; Gale, Chris P

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether a hospital-specific opportunity-based composite score (OBCS) was associated with mortality in 136,392 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) using data from the Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP) 2008–2009. Methods and results: For 199 hospitals a multidimensional hospital OBCS was calculated on the number of times that aspirin, thienopyridine, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi), statin, β-blocker, and referral for cardiac rehabilitation was given to individual patients, divided by the overall number of opportunities that hospitals had to give that care. OBCS and its six components were compared using funnel plots. Associations between OBCS performance and 30-day and 6-month all-cause mortality were quantified using mixed-effects regression analysis. Median hospital OBCS was 95.3% (range 75.8–100%). By OBCS, 24.1% of hospitals were below funnel plot 99.8% CI, compared to aspirin (11.1%), thienopyridine (15.1%), β-blockers (14.7%), ACEi (19.1%), statins (12.1%), and cardiac rehabilitation (17.6%) on discharge. Mortality (95% CI) decreased with increasing hospital OBCS quartile at 30 days [Q1, 2.25% (2.07–2.43%) vs. Q4, 1.40% (1.25–1.56%)] and 6 months [Q1, 7.93% (7.61–8.25%) vs. Q4, 5.53% (5.22–5.83%)]. Hospital OBCS quartile was inversely associated with adjusted 30-day and 6-month mortality [OR (95% CI), 0.87 (0.80–0.94) and 0.92 (0.88–0.96), respectively] and persisted after adjustment for coronary artery catheterization [0.89 (0.82–0.96) and 0.95 (0.91–0.98), respectively]. Conclusions: Multidimensional hospital OBCS in AMI survivors are high, discriminate hospital performance more readily than single performance indicators, and significantly inversely predict early and longer-term mortality. PMID:24062929

  5. Effect of coronary artery revascularization on in-hospital outcomes and long-term prognoses in acute myocardial infarction patients with prior ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-Yu; Li, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Zhan-Yun; Li, Jing; Hua, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether coronary artery revascularization therapies (CART), including percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), can improve the in-hospital and long-term outcomes for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with prior ischemic stroke (IS). Methods A total of 387 AMI patients with prior IS were enrolled consecutively from January 15, 2005 to December 24, 2011 in this cohort study. All patients were categorized into the CART group (n = 204) or the conservative medications (CM) group (n = 183). In-hospital cardiocerebral events and long-term mortality of the two groups after an average follow-up of 36 months were recorded by Kaplan-Meier survival curves and compared by Logistic regression and the Cox regression model. Results The CART patients were younger (66.5 ± 9.7 years vs. 71.7 ± 9.7 years, P < 0.01), had less non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (11.8% vs. 20.8%, P = 0.016) and more multiple-vascular coronary lesions (50% vs. 69.4%, P = 0.031). The hospitalization incidence of cardiocerebral events in the CART group was 9.3% while 26.2% in the CM group (P < 0.01). CART significantly reduced the risk of in-hospital cardiocerebral events by 65% [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.13–0.92]. By the end of follow-up, 57 cases (41.6%) died in CM group (n = 137) and 24 cases (12.2%) died in CART group (n = 197). Cox regression indicated that CART decreased the long-term mortality by 72% [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.06–0.46], while categorical analysis indicated no significant difference between PCI and CABG. Conclusions CART has a significant effect on improving the in-hospital and long-term prognoses for AMI patients with prior IS. PMID:27168740

  6. Acute effects of low-level laser therapy irradiation on blood lactate and muscle fatigue perception in hospitalized patients with heart failure-a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bublitz, Caroline; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Ramos, Rodrigo Santin; Assis, Livia; Sellera, Carlos Alberto Cyrillo; Trimer, Renata; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Guizilini, Solange

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the acute effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on functional capacity, perceived exertion, and blood lactate in hospitalized patients with heart failure (HF). Patients diagnosed with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection fraction <45 %) were randomized and allocated prospectively into two groups: placebo LLLT group (n = 10)-subjects who were submitted to placebo laser and active LLLT group (n = 10)-subjects who were submitted to active laser. The 6-min walk test (6MWT) was performed, and blood lactate was determined at rest (before LLLT application and 6MWT), immediately after the exercise test (time 0) and recovery (3, 6, and 30 min). A multi-diode LLLT cluster probe (DMC, São Carlos, Brazil) was used. Both groups increased 6MWT distance after active or placebo LLLT application compared to baseline values (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively); however, no difference was observed during intergroup comparison. The active LLLT group showed a significant reduction in the perceived exertion Borg (PEB) scale compared to the placebo LLLT group (p = 0.006). In addition, the group that received active LLLT showed no statistically significant difference for the blood lactate level through the times analyzed. The placebo LLLT group demonstrated a significant increase in blood lactate between the rest and recovery phase (p < 0.05). Acute effects of LLLT irradiation on skeletal musculature were not able to improve the functional capacity of hospitalized patients with HF, although it may favorably modulate blood lactate metabolism and reduce perceived muscle fatigue. PMID:27250713

  7. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis. PMID:27354295

  8. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea. PMID:25331803

  9. Factor Analysis Influencing Postoperative Hospital Stay and Medical Costs for Patients with Definite, Suspected, or Unmatched Diagnosis of Acute Cholecystitis according to the Tokyo Guidelines 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaki, Aoi; Takahashi, Koji; Fujii, Takehiro; Kumamoto, Koji; Fujii, Koji; Matsumoto, Eiichi; Miyahara, Shigeki; Kusuta, Tsukasa; Azumi, Yoshinori; Isaji, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To identify significant independent preoperative factors influencing postoperative hospital stay (PHS) and medical costs (MC) in 171 patients who underwent cholecystectomy for benign gallbladder diseases and had definite, suspected, or unmatched acute cholecystitis (AC) diagnosis according to the Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13). Methods. The 171 patients were classified according to the combination of diagnostic criteria including local signs of inflammation (A), systemic signs of inflammation (B), and imaging findings (C): A+ B+ C (definite diagnosis, n = 84), A+ B (suspected diagnosis, n = 25), (A or B) + C (n = 10), A (n = 41), and B (n = 11). Results. The A+ B + C and (A or B) + C groups had equivalent PHS and MC, suggesting that imaging findings were essential for AC diagnosis. PHS and MC were significantly increased in the order of severity grades based on TG13. Performance status (PS), white blood cell count, and severity grade were identified as preoperative factors influencing PHS by multivariate analysis, and significant independent preoperative factors influencing MC were age, PS, preoperative biliary drainage, hospital stay before surgery, albumin, and severity grade. Conclusion. PS and severity grade significantly influenced prolonged PHS and increased MC. PMID:27239193

  10. Rural Hospital Patient Safety Systems Implementation in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniel R.; Hewett, John E.; Ge, Bin; Schubert, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: With heightened attention to medical errors and patient safety, we surveyed Utah and Missouri hospitals to assess the "state of the art" in patient safety systems and identify changes over time. This study examines differences between urban and rural hospitals. Methods: Survey of all acute care hospitals in Utah and Missouri…

  11. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. PMID:24782478

  12. Prediction of persistence of combined evidence-based cardiovascular medications in patients with acute coronary syndrome after hospital discharge using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Bourdès, Valérie; Ferrières, Jean; Amar, Jacques; Amelineau, Elisabeth; Bonnevay, Stéphane; Berlion, Maryse; Danchin, Nicolas

    2011-08-01

    In the PREVENIR-5 study, artificial neural networks (NN) were applied to a large sample of patients with recent first acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to identify determinants of persistence of evidence-based cardiovascular medications (EBCM: antithrombotic + beta-blocker + statin + angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor-ACEI and/or angiotensin-II receptor blocker-ARB). From October 2006 to April 2007, 1,811 general practitioners recruited 4,850 patients with a mean time of ACS occurrence of 24 months. Patient profile for EBCM persistence was determined using automatic rule generation from NN. The prediction accuracy of NN was compared with that of logistic regression (LR) using Area Under Receiver-Operating Characteristics-AUROC. At hospital discharge, EBCM was prescribed to 2,132 patients (44%). EBCM persistence rate, 24 months after ACS, was 86.7%. EBCM persistence profile combined overweight, hypercholesterolemia, no coronary artery bypass grafting and low educational level (Positive Predictive Value = 0.958). AUROC curves showed better predictive accuracy for NN compared to LR models. PMID:21598000

  13. Relevance of New Definitions to Incidence and Prognosis of Acute Kidney Injury in Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis: A Retrospective Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Puneeta; James, Matthew T.; Abraldes, Juan G.; Karvellas, Constantine J.; Ye, Feng; Pannu, Neesh

    2016-01-01

    Background The implementation of new serum creatinine (SCr)-based criteria for acute kidney injury (AKI) has brought to light several areas of uncertainty in patients with cirrhosis. Study Design Population-based cohort study. Setting & Participants Adults with cirrhosis hospitalized between 2002–2012. Predictor We aimed to address the prognostic implications of the new AKI criteria in cirrhosis. Outcomes Baseline kidney function was defined from all outpatient SCr within 3 months before hospitalization. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to examine associations between AKI, renal recovery and all-cause mortality. Results 4,733 patients were studied. The 30-day mortality was higher for participants with AKI (43.9% vs 8.5%; p-value<0.001), and increased with AKI severity. The highest incidence of AKI occurred when the lowest SCr within the three months prior to admission was used to define baseline. The hazard ratio for mortality using the lowest SCr within 3 months and the closest pre-admission SCr (definition suggested by the recent consensus guideline) were similar, validating the use of the latter measure. As compared to patients without AKI, stage 1 AKI with maximum SCr ≤132 mmol/L remained associated with a 3.5-fold increased hazard of death at 30 days (95% CI 2.6 to 4.7). Limitations As an observational study, the results were vulnerable to residual confounding and ascertainment bias in the use of laboratory data to identify AKI. We did not have access to liver function or disease etiology variables and were unable to adjust for these in our analyses. Conclusions These results confirm the graded relationship between AKI severity, renal recovery, and mortality and further clarify previously discordant reports about the prognostic relevance of new AKI criteria in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:27504876

  14. Factors influencing development and mortality of acute respiratory failure in hospitalized patient with active pulmonary tuberculosis: a 10-year retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Maneenil, Kunlatida

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis with acute respiratory failure is fatal and is a burden in the intensive care units and leads to mortality. This retrospective study identifies the factors influencing the development of pulmonary tuberculosis requiring mechanical ventilation (TBMV) and mortality in the hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods The medical records of hospitalized adult patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data, clinical presentations, radiographic findings, biochemical tests, and clinical outcomes were collected. Data were compared by Student’s t-test and Chi-square test between groups. Select variables that were statistically significant with P values <0.1 were introduced into a forward, stepwise, logistic regression model. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) identified the independent influencing factors in the development of TBMV and mortality. Results Of 268 enrolled patients, 185 (69.0%) were male. The patients were equally divided between the TBMV and non-TBMV groups. The shorter duration of illness (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.98–0.99), underlying disease of AIDS (OR, 14.55; 95% CI, 1.71–123.91), presentation of fever (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.20–3.71) and dyspnea (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 2.02–6.11), large amount of acid fast bacilli on sputum smear (OR, 3.76; 95% CI, 1.90–7.47), lower serum albumin level (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.26–0.59), and delayed initiation of anti-tuberculosis agents (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.00–1.12) were independent factors to develop TBMV. Male gender (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.01–4.61), consolidation pattern on chest X-ray (OR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.17–4.98), and lower serum albumin (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.21–0.71) were correlated to mortality. Conclusions The incidence and mortality rate of TBMV patients were high. Acute tuberculous pneumonia, underlying disease of AIDS, amount of acid fast bacilli, and delayed administration of anti-tuberculosis agents

  15. Hospital Based Prospective Observational Study to Audit the Prescription Practices and Outcomes of Paediatric Patients (6 months to 5 years age group) Presenting with Acute Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kondekar, Santosh; Rathi, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diarrhea is a leading killer of children, accounting for 9% of all deaths among under-five children worldwide. WHO protocol deviation in management of diarrheas in children is likely due to various reasons. Aim To study the prescription practices, regarding adherence to WHO protocol and deviations, in the management of acute diarrhea in children presenting at a tertiary care hospital and its impact on the outcome. Materials and Methods This was a prospective observational hospital based study at a tertiary care carried out over a 12-month period including all cases of acute diarrhea (defined as 3 or more loose stools in last 24 hours) in children belonging to the age group of 6 months to 5 years. Patients were followed up on day 3,7,14 and 28 from the day of presentation. Software SPSS Version 17.0 was used for analysis. Correlation regression analysis was used to study predictiveness of different variables affecting outcome. Results In this study, 447 children aged between 6 months and 5 years were enrolled, of which 45 cases were lost in follow-up and excluded. The median age was 14 months. Some deviation from WHO protocol was noted in 78.4% of the cases. Most common deviations from WHO protocol were addition of probiotics (78.1% of cases) and addition of race cadotril (15.9% of cases). Inadvertent use of antibiotics in diarrhea was noted in 12.2% of cases. Presence of fever was strong predictor for use of antibiotics. Cases of early recovery within 3 days of presentation were higher in WHO protocol deviation group. Use of probiotics had statistically significant association with early recovery. Conclusion In diarrhea management, WHO protocol deviation is common. Probiotics are likely to help in early recovery. PMID:27437317

  16. Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Japanese Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Akahito; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Goto, Atsushi; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to elucidate the epidemiology, patient demographics, and clinical outcomes of hospitalization for hypoglycemia in diabetic patients using a Japanese large-scale database. We conducted a retrospective study using a national inpatient database of acute care hospitals in Japan. Diabetic patients ages ≥15 years with hypoglycemia as a main diagnosis for hospitalization were eligible. We estimated the annual number of hospitalizations in Japan and compared the annual admission rate by age and treatment groups. We also analyzed the association between patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality. Among 22.7 million discharge records from July 2008 and March 2013, a total of 25,071 patients were eligible. The mean age was 73.4 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.3 kg/m2. The estimated annual hospitalization for hypoglycemia in Japan was ∼20,000. Annual admission rates for hypoglycemia per 1000 diabetic patients and 1000 diabetic patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents were 2.1 and 4.1, respectively. Patients <40 years and >70 years old were at a higher risk of hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 3.8%, and risk factors associated with poor survival were male sex, older age, lower bed capacity, community hospital, low BMI, coma at admission, and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index. To prevent severe hypoglycemia that leads to death and complications, individualized and careful glycemic control are important, especially in very old or young patients and in those with comorbid conditions or low BMI. PMID:26107672

  17. Characterising the aetiology of severe acute gastroenteritis among patients visiting a hospital in Qatar using real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) remains a common cause of clinic visits and hospitalizations, though its aetiology has not been determined in Qatar. Methods We performed a prospective, emergency department–based study of 288 children and adults with AGE. Stool specimens were collected at presentation from June to November 2009. Faecal specimens were tested, using real-time PCR, for a panel of four viral (norovirus, adenovirus, astrovirus and rotavirus) and bacterial pathogens. Results Viral and bacterial pathogens were detected in 131 (45.5%) and 34 (12.2%) of the 288 patients recruited. The most commonly detected pathogens were norovirus (28.5%), rotavirus (10.4%), followed by adenovirus (6.25%) and astrovirus (0.30%). Norovirus was the most commonly detected viral pathogen amongst all the age groups with an almost even distribution in all age groups. Rotavirus and adenovirus were more common in children under 5 yr of age. Astrovirus was found in only one person. Conclusions Viruses, especially noroviruses, are associated with severe diarrhoea in children and adults in Qatar. Further studies to confirm the findings and to explore the causes of illness among patients from whom a pathogen cannot be determined are needed. PMID:23865805

  18. Sex differences in hospital mortality following acute myocardial infarction in China: findings from a study of 45 852 patients in the COMMIT/CCS-2 study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiping; Jiang, Lixin; Smith, Margaret; Pan, Hongchao; Collins, Rory; Peto, Richard; Chen, Zhengming

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the sex difference in hospital mortality following ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in China. Design Observational study of patients enrolled into a large trial, adjusting for age, presenting characteristics and hospital treatments using logistic regression. Settings 1250 hospitals in China during 1999–2005. Patients 42 683 STEMI patients, including 31 309 men and 11 374 women. Intervention In the original trial, all patients received 162 mg of aspirin plus 75 mg of clopidogrel daily or matching placebo and metoprolol (15 mg intravenous then 200 mg oral daily) or matching placebo. All other aspects of patients' treatments were at the discretion of responsible doctors. Major outcomes Hospital mortality from any cause during the scheduled trial treatment period (ie, up to 4 weeks in hospital). Results Overall, 8% of the patients died in hospital, with the crude hospital mortality being twice as high in women as in men (12.6% vs 6.3%). After adjusting for age, the sex difference in hospital mortality attenuated but remained highly significant (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1.43 to 1.66). Further adjustment for other baseline characteristics and for the treatments given in hospital had little effect on the sex difference in hospital mortality (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.62). The difference in hospital mortality was greater at a younger age, with the adjusted ORs being 2.14, 1.70, 1.48 and 1.18, respectively, for ages <55, 55–64, 65–74 and ≥75 years (p=0.0001 for trend). Conclusion Compared with men of the same age, women had approximately a 50% higher mortality following hospital admission for STEMI, with a particularly higher excess risk at age <55 years. PMID:27326005

  19. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  20. Screening for Depression in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    ESMAEELI, Mohammad-Reza; ERFANI SAYAR, Reza; SAGHEBI, Ali; ELMI, Saghi; RAHMANI, Shagheyegh; ELMI, Sam; RABBANI JAVADI, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Objective In chronically ill children who are hospitalized, many mood changes occur. For example, in children with cancer or renal failure, prolonged hospitalization and chemotherapy can lead to depression. With the improved survival of childhood malignancies, the effect of treatment on child’s psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression in hospitalized children with chronic and acute conditions in Dr Sheikh Pediatrics Hospital in Mashhad. Materials & Methods After receiving the approval from the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, we did this cross-sectional descriptive study, from April to June 2012 in Dr Sheikh Pediatric Hospital in Mashhad. Ninety children, between 8 to 16 years, were screened for depression. The sampling method was census. Children with a history of depressive or other mental disorders were excluded. Three groups of children (children with chronic renal disease, malignancy, and acute disease) were evaluated for depression using standard Children Depression Inventory Questionnaire (CDI). Two specifically trained nurses filled out the questionnaires at patients’ bedside under the supervision of a psychiatrist. Depression scores were then analyzed by SPSS software. Results Of 90 children, 43(47.7%) were male and 47(52.2%) were female. The Children’s mean age was 11±2.3 years, and the mean length of hospitalization was 8±5.3 days. Depression was detected in various degrees in 63% of patients (N=57), and 36.6% of children (N=32) had no symptoms of depression. Severe depression was not seen in any of the patients with acute illness. More than half of patients with cancer and chronic kidney disease had moderate to severe depression. There was a significant statistical relationship between the duration of illness and severity of depression. There was also a significant correlation between severity of depression and frequency of hospitalization. Children

  1. Charlson comorbidity index as a predictor of in-hospital death in acute ischemic stroke among very old patients: a single-cohort perspective study.

    PubMed

    Falsetti, Lorenzo; Viticchi, Giovanna; Tarquinio, Nicola; Silvestrini, Mauro; Capeci, William; Catozzo, Vania; Fioranelli, Agnese; Buratti, Laura; Pellegrini, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Chronic diseases are increasing worldwide. Association of two or more chronic conditions is related with poor health status and reduced life expectancy, particularly among elderly patients. Comorbidities represent a risk factor for adverse events in several critical illnesses. We aimed to evaluate if elderly patients are affected by multiple chronic pathologies, assessed by Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), showed a reduced in-hospital survival after ischemic stroke. In a 3-year period, we evaluated all the subjects admitted to our internal medicine department for ischemic stroke. Age, sex, NIHSS score and all the comorbidities were recorded. Days of hospitalization, hospital-related infections and in-hospital mortality were also assessed. For each patient, we evaluated CCI, obtaining four classes: group 1 (CCI: 2-3), group 2 (CCI: 4-5), group 3 (CCI: 6-7) and group 4 (CCI: ≥8). Survival was evaluated with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. The complete model considered in-hospital death as the main outcome, days of hospitalization as the time variable and CCI as the main predictor, adjusting for NIHSS, sex and nosocomial infections. Patients in CCI group 3 and 4 had an increased risk of in-hospital mortality, independently of NIHSS, sex and nosocomial infections. Elderly patients with multiple comorbidities have higher risk of in-hospital death when affected by ischemic stroke. PMID:27166707

  2. Comparison of the ICF Core Set for Cardiopulmonary Conditions in the Acute Hospital Setting among Different Types of Transplant Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Xinhua

    2010-01-01

    To compare the functioning profiles of patients receiving different types of organ transplants using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The patients (n=102) were enrolled between days 5 and 10 after discharge following receipt of an organ transplant, and assessed for sociodemographic variables, the Functional…

  3. Hospital and patient characteristics of uncompensated hospital care: policy implications.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Zollinger, T W; Chu, D K; MacBeth, C A; Sechrist, M E

    1989-01-01

    For this study, a sample of 1,689 patients classified as "charity" and "bad debt" cases in 1986 were identified from 27 general acute care hospitals and one tertiary hospital in Indiana. Half of the hospitals were in rural areas and 57 percent were small (less than 150 beds). Most of the patients (87.2 percent) incurred uncompensated amounts under $2,500, and 40 percent of the cases were below $500. About 72 percent of the patients with uncompensated care were from the same county as the location of the hospital (range from 30.9% to 100.0%). The majority of the cases (79.4 percent) with over $5,000 in uncompensated care were treated in urban hospitals. The average age of these patients was 27.2 years. Fifty-four percent of the patients were single, 60.7 percent were female, and nearly all (83.0 percent) were discharged to home care. Only 44.6 percent of the patients with uncompensated care had no insurance; 46.8 percent had some form of commercial insurance which covered part of the charges for care. The most common diagnosis for these patients was pregnancy and childbirth (22.8 percent), with injury and poisoning second (10.7 percent). The cases with $5,000 or more in bad debt (about 4 percent of the cases) account for 28.3 percent of the total uncollected amount. Bad debt represents a cost of doing business. Any national effort to contain health care costs must address this problem. PMID:2738351

  4. Development and validation of the Thai version of the 4 ‘A’s Test for delirium screening in hospitalized elderly patients with acute medical illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Kuladee, Sanchai; Prachason, Thanavadee

    2016-01-01

    Background The English version of the 4 ‘A’s Test (4AT) is a rapid screening tool for delirium with a high sensitivity and specificity among hospitalized elderly patients. Objective To develop the Thai version of the 4AT (4AT-T) and assess its validity. Subjects and setting A total of 97 elderly patients aged 60 years or above who were admitted to the general medical wards were included. Methods Both authors independently translated the English version of the 4AT into Thai and thereafter developed a single reconciled forward translation by consensus. Back translation was performed by a bilingual native English speaker and it was then reviewed to ensure its agreement with the original one. After 24 hours of admission, subjects were enrolled and clinical data collected. Definite diagnosis of delirium was made by a psychiatrist using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text-Revision criteria and the 6-item Thai Delirium Rating Scale; the 4AT was then administered to participants by nurses within 30 minutes. A 4AT score ≥4 was considered positive for delirium screening. The optimal cut-off point of the 4AT-T was identified by Youden’s index. Results In all, 24 out of 97 participants met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text-Revision criteria for delirium. At a cut-off score of 4 or greater, the 4AT-T exhibited satisfactory diagnostic performance with a sensitivity of 83.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 62.6%–95.3%) and specificity of 86.3% (95% CI: 76.3%–93.2%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92. The specified score provided maximal Youden’s index, suggesting an optimal criterion value for delirium screening. Conclusion The 4AT-T is a valid delirium-screening instrument for hospitalized elderly patients with acute medical illnesses. PMID:26966365

  5. Hospital Patients Are Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffarella, Rosemary S.

    Patient education is recognized by health care providers and patients themselves as an important component of adequate health care for hospital patients. Through this informational process, patients receive information about specific health problems, learn the necessary competencies to deal with them, and develop accepting attitudes toward the…

  6. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  7. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  8. Innovative use of tele-ICU in long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mullen-Fortino, Margaret; Sites, Frank D; Soisson, Michael; Galen, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Tele-intensive care units (ICUs) typically provide remote monitoring for ICUs of acute care, short-stay hospitals. As part of a joint venture project to establish a long-term acute level of care, Good Shepherd Penn Partners became the first facility to use tele-ICU technology in a nontraditional setting. Long-term acute care hospitals care for patients with complex medical problems. We describe describes the benefits and challenges of integrating a tele-ICU program into a long-term acute care setting and the impact this model of care has on patient care outcomes. PMID:22828067

  9. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  10. [Prognostic significance of cytogenetic changes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (Analysis of results in 105 patients treated at the Hemato-oncology Clinic of the University Hospital in Olomouc from 1997 to 2000].

    PubMed

    Jarosová, M; Indrák, K; Holzerová, M; Hubácek, J; Faber, E; Papajík, T; Raida, L; Szotkowski, T; Knotková, R; Hlusí, T; Jedlicková, K; Pikalová, Z; Sulovská, I

    2001-09-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are one of the most important prognostic factors in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This work present analysis of conventional cytogenetic results completed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) obtained from 105 patients in the time of diagnosis of AML. The median age of patients was 51 years (range 19-79 years), with slight predominance of women (female to male ratio 1.2:1). The evaluated group involved all patients with AML diagnosis, treated by intensive induction chemotherapy in the Department of Hematology-oncology, University Hospital, Olomouc during last 4 years with assessable cytogenetic results. Chromosomal changes were found in 63 (60%) patients. The most often affected chromosomes in succession of frequency were 8, 17, 7, 5, 11, 15, 16 a 21. Based on found specific and frequent chromosomal changes the patients were divided into 3 prognostic subgroups and the significance of chromosomal aberrations was evaluated. The subgroup of 17 patients with good prognosis consisted of a patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia with translocation t(15;17), 4 patients with t(8;21) and 4 patients with inv(16). 14 patients of 17 live in complete remission, median of overall survival (OS) is 63 weeks. The subgroup of intermediate prognosis was formed by 60 patients, 42 had normal karyotype and 18 patients had other chromosomal abnormalities. Median OS of this group was 35 weeks. The third subgroup with poor prognosis consisted of 28 patients with changes of chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 11 and complex karyotype. 64.3% of patients received complete remission and median OS was 35 weeks. Statistical evaluation of OS showed significant difference (p = 0.002) in subgroup with good prognosis versus subgroup with poor prognosis and in subgroup with good prognosis versus subgroup with intermediate prognosis (p = 0.014). Statistical significance of OS in subgroup with intermediate prognosis versus subgroup with poor prognosis was not proved (p

  11. Hospital Libraries in Patient's Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iroka, Luke A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the positive effects of patient education, including the physician patient relationship, improvements in health status, and cost effectiveness. The status of hospital libraries in Nigeria is described, and suggestions for the implementation of patient education programs are made. (5 references) (CLB)

  12. Acute leukaemias in adult Ethiopians in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Shamebo, M

    1994-01-01

    Eighty-two consecutive cases of acute leukaemias in adult Ethiopians were admitted to the Tikur Anbessa (Black Lion) Hospital, a teaching and referral hospital in Addis Abeba, Ethiopia, from January 1982 to December 1992. These cases were studied to describe the clinical and haematological findings, response to therapy and prognosis. The age range was 13-78 (mean 29.6) years. The male to female ratio was 1.6:1. Acute myeloblastic (AML) and acute lymphoblastic (ALL) leukaemias occurred in 53.7% and 46.3%, respectively. The commonest symptoms were anaemia, fever and bleeding tendencies. The commonest signs were pallor, fever, sternal tenderness and purpura. Splenomegaly was more commonly seen in ALL patients. The haematological findings were anaemia (mean Hgb 6.35 g%), leucocytosis (mean WBC count 88,507/mm3) and thrombocytopenia (mean platelet count 31,700/mm3). Of the patients eligible for evaluation treated with chemotherapeutic agents, only 38.4% of ALL and 6.2% of AML achieved complete remission. Twenty-seven patients with ALL died from one day to 84 (median 1.0) months after diagnosis. Ten are lost to follow-up from two weeks to 36 (median 2.5) months, one is still alive 40 months after diagnosis. Thirty-nine of the AML patients died from one day to nine (median 0.3) months after diagnosis. Five are lost to follow-up from two weeks to two and a half (median 2.0) months. The causes of death were sepsis and bleeding, separately or in combination. Increasing numbers of acute leukaemia patients are being referred to this centre. Therefore, attempts should be made to equip it for the treatment of such cases. PMID:8187778

  13. Pre-hospital discharge planning: empowering elderly patients through choice.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Mary L

    2008-01-01

    Reductions in the length of stay for acute hospitalization have occurred as a result of Medicare cost containment strategies during the past 20 years. Thus, innovative approaches to the treatment of patients in the acute care hospital setting are necessary, particularly in the practice of discharge planning. The medical literature typically identifies the first day of admission as the time to begin discharge planning in order to minimize the patient's length of stay in the acute care hospital. This strategy has its limitations as elderly patients are often confused by unfamiliar surroundings, surgical anesthesia, postoperative pain, and the rapid pace of hospital recovery typically expected today. Consequently, options for discharge may be limited to the most expedient plan that will ensure safety and continued recovery. This article presents an alternative plan that begins with outpatient education preceding admission and follows the patient throughout the continuum of care including postdischarge. PMID:18316937

  14. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  15. Clinical management of patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a common and serious complication of congenital and acquired heart disease, and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. When a patient is admitted to the hospital with acute heart failure, there are several important goals for the hospital admission, including maintaining adequate perfusion, establishing the underlying aetiology for the heart failure, patient and family education, and discharge from the hospital in a stable condition. The pathway to home discharge is variable and may include inotropic therapy, mechanical circulatory support, and/or heart transplantation. This review will cover the epidemiology, presentation, and management of acute heart failure in children. PMID:26377712

  16. Hospital Choice of Rural Medicare Beneficiaries: Patient, Hospital Attributes, and the Patient–Physician Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wan-Tzu Connie; Porell, Frank W; Adams, E Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine how patient and hospital attributes and the patient–physician relationship influence hospital choice of rural Medicare beneficiaries. Data Sources Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Provider of Services (POS) file, American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and Medicare Hospital Service Area (HSA) files for 1994 and 1995. Study Design The study sample consisted of 1,702 hospitalizations of rural Medicare beneficiaries. McFadden's conditional logit model was used to analyze hospital choices of rural Medicare beneficiaries. The model included independent variables to control for patients' and hospitals' attributes and the distance to hospital alternatives. Principal Findings The empirical results show strong preferences of aged patients for closer hospitals and those of greater scale and service capacity. Patients with complex acute medical conditions and those with more resources were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospitals. Beneficiaries were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospital if they had no regular physician, had a shorter patient–physician tie, were dissatisfied with the availability of health care, and had a longer travel time to their physician's office. Conclusions The significant influences of patients' socioeconomic, health, and functional status, their satisfaction with and access to primary care, and their strong preferences for certain hospital attributes should inform federal program initiatives about the likely impacts of policy changes on hospital bypassing behavior. PMID:15533193

  17. In-hospital and six-month outcomes of elderly patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Noohi, Fereydoon; Hashemi, Isa; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Peighambari, Mohammad Mehdi; Kiavar, Majid; Maadani, Mohsen; Bassiri, Hossein Ali; Zahedmehr, Ali; Shakerian, Farshad; Firouzi, Ata; Kiani, Reza; Abdi, Seifollah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elderly patients constitute a rapidly growing proportion of the population, and hence the increasing rises in the number of patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), which is now established as the preferred reperfusion strategy in STEMI patients, has been inadequately investigated in this high-risk group. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in-hospital and 6-month outcomes of primary PCI in elderly patients (≥ 75 years) with STEMI. METHODS A total of 100 elderly patients with STEMI including those with cardiogenic shock were included. Primary PCI procedures were performed in a tertiary referral center between 2009 and 2014. In-hospital and 6-month outcomes of patients were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS The average age of the patients was 79.6 ± 3.8 years (range = 75-90 years) and 27.0% were women. Cardiovascular risk factors and prior events were common. Nearly, half of the patients had three-vessel disease and the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was the most common infarct-related artery. The presence of cardiogenic shock but not the other variables was associated with less anatomic and procedural success (P < 0.001). It was also the major independent predictors of 6-month mortality in the patients aged ≥ 75 years, [hazard ratio (HR) = 8.02; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.75-25.97, P < 0.001]. In-hospital mortality was 2.4% in the patients without and 83.0% in those with cardiogenic shock. CONCLUSION Primary PCI in aged patients could be associated with low complication rates and improved survival if performed in high-volume centers with experienced operators. Considering the very high rate of mortality in patients with cardiogenic shock, there should be measures to treat these patients before the onset of hemodynamic instability. PMID:27114734

  18. [Pre-hospital management of acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Hugues; Fradin, Jordan; Blgnand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The medical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) follows the recommendations of international medical societies. The call to the emergency services by the patient triggers a race against the clock in pre-hospital care. It is essential to reduce the duration of the inadequate perfusion of the heart in order to limit its consequences. An effective reperfusion strategy must be planned in advance taking into account the logistical constraints. It is crucial that the general public is educated to recognise the signs of ACS and to call the emergency services immediately (such as 15, 112 or 991). PMID:26040140

  19. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  20. Hospital and Emergency Department Factors Associated with Variations in Missed Diagnosis and Costs for Patients Age 65 Years and Older with Acute Myocardial Infarction Who Present to Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael; Welch, Jonathan; Schuur, Jeremiah; O’Laughlin, Kelli; Cutler, David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to measure the variation in missed diagnosis and costs of care for older acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs), and to identify the hospital and ED characteristics associated with this variation. Methods Using 2004–2005 Medicare inpatient and outpatient records, the authors identified a cohort of AMI patients age 65 years and older who presented to the ED for initial care. The primary outcome was missed diagnosis of AMI, i.e. AMI hospital admission within 7 days of an ED discharge for a condition suggestive of cardiac ischemia. Costs were defined as Medicare hospital payments for all services associated with and immediately resulting from the ED evaluation. The effect of ED and hospital characteristics on quality and costs were estimated using multilevel models with hospital random effects. Results There were 371,638 AMI patients age 65 and older included in the study, of whom 4,707 were discharged home from their initial ED visits and subsequently admitted to the hospital. The median unadjusted hospital-level missed diagnosis percentage was 0.52% (interquartile range [IQR] 0 to 3.45%). ED characteristics protective of adverse outcomes include higher ED chest pain acuity (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.23, 99% confidence interval [CI] = 0.19 to 0.27), and American Board of Emergency Medicine certification (aOR 0.60, 99% CI = 0.50 to 0.73). Protective hospital characteristics include larger hospital size (aOR 0.46, 99% CI = 0.37 to 0.57), and academic status (aOR 0.74, 99% CI = 0.58 to 0.94). All of these characteristics were associated with higher costs as well. Conclusions The proportion of missed AMI diagnoses and cost of care for patients age 65 years and older presenting to EDs with AMI varies across hospitals. Hospitals with more board-certified emergency physicians and higher average acuity are associated with significantly higher quality. All hospital characteristics associated with

  1. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  2. An analysis of catering options within NHS acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J L; Desombre, T; Eves, A; Kipps, M

    1999-01-01

    Reforms of the NHS's healthcare structure have placed additional pressure on all aspects of hospital management. Evaluation of the effects of these reforms is difficult without more information on current conditions. Hospital catering in acute care trusts has little contemporary background research available. With this in mind, a survey of all the acute care NHS trusts within the eight regions in England was undertaken to investigate the hospital meal service process. A mailed questionnaire asked for the meal production system, food service method and food delivery personnel used by each trust, and a copy of a weekly menu. Results, from an 80.7 per cent response rate, indicate that most trusts use batch cooking to prepare their meals, and plated meal service to deliver the food to the wards. Almost 75 per cent of the trusts use nurses, at least in part, to serve food. English foodstuffs dominate the menus. Most of the trusts have moved towards meeting the goals set by the Patients' Charter and other NHS recommendations. PMID:10724573

  3. Factors Affecting Well-being and Socio-occupational Functioning in Schizophrenia Patients Following an Acute Exacerbation: A Hospital Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Roopa; Behere, Rishikesh V.; Sharma, P.S.V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improving functioning levels are an important goal of treatment in schizophrenia. Most studies have described long-term course and outcome in schizophrenia. However, understanding factors influencing functioning in the immediate recovery period following an acute exacerbation may be of important clinical relevance. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the factors that influence well-being and socio-occupational functioning following an acute exacerbation in schizophrenia patients. Materials and Methods: The study included 40 patients during the period from June 2013 to June 2014. The possible effect of gender, duration of illness, duration of untreated psychosis, premorbid adjustment, cognitive impairment, facial affect perception and treatment compliance on well-being, and socio-occupational functioning was examined. Results: About 45% of the individuals experienced below average well-being. On logistic regression analysis poor compliance with medication and poorer cognitive functioning significantly differentiated the patient group with below average well-being from those with an above average well-being. Male gender, poor premorbid adjustment, poor compliance to treatment, poor cognitive functioning, and greater duration of untreated psychosis were found to be associated with a poorer socio-occupational functioning. Conclusion: Clinical interventions focusing on improving cognitive impairment and compliance to treatment could play a role in improving well-being, and socio-occupational functioning in schizophrenia patients following an acute exacerbation. PMID:26702175

  4. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates, including identification of a novel recombinant, in patients with acute HBV infection attending an Irish hospital.

    PubMed

    Laoi, Bairbre Ni; Crowley, B

    2008-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is known to show significant genetic diversity. There are eight HBV genotypes (A-H) characterized by distinct geographical distribution. Mutations in the HBV genome, in particular precore (PC) and basal core promoter (BCP) mutations, may be important factors in the pathogenesis of disease. In this study genetic heterogeneity and phylogenetic analysis of HBV isolates from 32 naïve patients with acute HBV infection was investigated. Eleven patients presented with severe infection, while the remaining 21 had self-limiting illness. Only four isolates from patients with severe HBV infection harbored the G1896A stop codon mutation. One isolate (Irish-13), collected from a patient with acute asymptomatic infection, had a G1896A mutation and a 243 bp deletion of the polymerase gene. A triple mutation, T1753C/A1762T/G1764A was identified in only one isolate (Irish-3) associated with severe infection. The latter also had a mutation, A2339G, in the core gene, not previously reported in severe acute infection caused by genotype D. Variations within the S gene were identified in 6 isolates, including Gly145Ala, associated with vaccine immune escape, Asp144Glu, Ser143Leu and Phe134Leu, each associated with failure to detect HBsAg. Phylogenetic analysis was determined using amplicons of the S gene (678 bp) and distal-X/PC region (672 bp). Genotype A was the most common (75%), followed by genotype D (15.6%), and equal proportions of C, E, F, and H. A novel recombinant of genotypes D and E was identified in an isolate originating from West Africa. Genetic heterogeneity of HBV isolates of HBV isolates from patients with acute infection needs further study of its significance. PMID:18649329

  5. [Management of the patient with COPD: home case or hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Aubert, John-David

    2013-05-01

    Acute exacerbation of COPD is one of the most common causes of hospital admission in patients affected with this disease. In most cases, consideration of differential diagnoses and assessment of important comorbidities will allow to make the decision whether or not the patient needs to be hospitalized. A decision to hospitalize will be based on specific symptoms and signs, as well on the patient's history. Contrary to bronchial asthma, a systematic action plan strategy is lacking for COPD. However, a disease management plan involving all the health care providers may have the potential to improve the patient's well being and to decrease costs related to these exacerbations. PMID:23644245

  6. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services. PMID:24310710

  7. Differences among hospitals in Medicare patient mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, M R; Park, R E; Lohr, K N; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1989-01-01

    Using hospital discharge abstract data for fiscal year 1984 for all acute care hospitals treating Medicare patients (age greater than or equal to 65), we measured four mortality rates: inpatient deaths, deaths within 30 days after discharge, and deaths within two fixed periods following admission (30 days, and the 95th percentile length of stay for each condition). The metric of interest was the probability that a hospital would have as many deaths as it did (taking age, race, and sex into account). Differences among hospitals in inpatient death rates were large and significant (p less than .05) for 22 of 48 specific conditions studied and for all conditions together; among these 22 "high-variation" conditions, medical conditions accounted for far more deaths than did surgical conditions. We compared pairs of conditions in terms of hospital rankings by probability of observed numbers of inpatient deaths; we found relatively low correlations (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.3 or lower) for most comparisons except between a few surgical conditions. When we compared different pairs of the four death measures on their rankings of hospitals by probabilities of the observed numbers of deaths, the correlations were moderate to high (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.54 to 0.99). Hospitals with low probabilities of the number of observed deaths were not distributed randomly geographically; a small number of states had significantly more than their share of these hospitals (p less than .01). Information from hospital discharge abstract data is insufficient to determine the extent to which differences in severity of illness or quality of care account for this marked variability, so data on hospital death rates cannot now be used to draw inferences about quality of care. The magnitude of variability in death rates and the geographic clustering of facilities with low probabilities, however, both argue for further study of hospital death rates. These data may prove

  8. Trajectories of risk after hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Angela F; Kulkarni, Vivek T; Lin, Zhenqiu; Ross, Joseph S; Horwitz, Leora I; Kim, Nancy; Suter, Lisa G; Lin, Haiqun; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the absolute risks for older patients of readmission to hospital and death in the year after hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 4767 hospitals caring for Medicare fee for service beneficiaries in the United States, 2008-10. Participants More than 3 million Medicare fee for service beneficiaries, aged 65 years or more, surviving hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia. Main outcome measures Daily absolute risks of first readmission to hospital and death for one year after discharge. To illustrate risk trajectories, we identified the time required for risks of readmission to hospital and death to decline 50% from maximum values after discharge; the time required for risks to approach plateau periods of minimal day to day change, defined as 95% reductions in daily changes in risk from maximum daily declines after discharge; and the extent to which risks are higher among patients recently discharged from hospital compared with the general elderly population. Results Within one year of hospital discharge, readmission to hospital and death, respectively, occurred following 67.4% and 35.8% of hospitalizations for heart failure, 49.9% and 25.1% for acute myocardial infarction, and 55.6% and 31.1% for pneumonia. Risk of first readmission had declined 50% by day 38 after hospitalization for heart failure, day 13 after hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction, and day 25 after hospitalization for pneumonia; risk of death declined 50% by day 11, 6, and 10, respectively. Daily change in risk of first readmission to hospital declined 95% by day 45, 38, and 45; daily change in risk of death declined 95% by day 21, 19, and 21. After hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia, the magnitude of the relative risk for hospital admission over the first 90 days was 8, 6, and 6 times greater than that

  9. Characteristics and dying trajectories of adult hospital patients from acute care wards who die following review by the rapid response team.

    PubMed

    Coombs, M A; Nelson, K; Psirides, A J; Suter, N; Pedersen, A

    2016-03-01

    A third of patients reviewed by rapid response teams (RRT) require end-of-life care. However, little is known about the characteristics and management of these patients following RRT review. This paper presents results of a retrospective, descriptive audit that explored the dying trajectory of adult ward inpatients who died outside of intensive care following RRT review. The study setting was a 430-bed tertiary New Zealand hospital during 2013. RRT, inpatient databases and hospital notes were used to identify 100 consecutive adult inpatients who died subsequent to RRT review. Outcome measures included time from RRT review to death, place of death, pre-existing co-morbidities and frequency of medical review. Results demonstrated that patients were old (median 77 years, IQR 63-85years), emergency admissions (n=100) and admitted under a medical specialty (n=71). All but one of the cohort had pre-existing co-morbidities (mean 3.2, SD 1.7), almost a third (n=31) had cancer and 51% had 1-4 previous inpatient admissions within the previous 12 months. The mean length of stay prior to RRT review was 4.9 days (SD 5.5) during which patients were frequently reviewed by senior medical staff (mean 6.8 times, SD 6.9, range 0-44). Twenty per cent of patients died after their first RRT review with a further 40% receiving treatment limitation/palliation. Fifty-two per cent of patients had a pre-existing DNAR. Eighty per cent of patients died in hospital. Whilst the RRT fulfils an unmet need in decision-making at end of life, there is a need to understand what RRT, instead of ward-based or palliative care teams, offers dying patients. PMID:27029659

  10. Bed bathing patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Downey, Lindsey; Lloyd, Hilary

    There are a number of circumstances that may affect an individual's ability to maintain personal hygiene. Hospitalised patients, and in particular those who are bedridden, may become dependent on nursing staff to carry out their hygiene needs. Assisting patients to maintain personal hygiene is a fundamental aspect of nursing care. However, it is a task often delegated to junior or newly qualified staff. This article focuses on the principles of bed bathing patients in hospital, correct procedure and the importance of maintaining patient dignity and respect in clinical practice. PMID:18543852

  11. The formation and design of the 'Acute Admission Database'- a database including a prospective, observational cohort of 6279 patients triaged in the emergency department in a larger Danish hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Management and care of the acutely ill patient has improved over the last years due to introduction of systematic assessment and accelerated treatment protocols. We have, however, sparse knowledge of the association between patient status at admission to hospital and patient outcome. A likely explanation is the difficulty in retrieving all relevant information from one database. The objective of this article was 1) to describe the formation and design of the 'Acute Admission Database', and 2) to characterize the cohort included. Methods All adult patients triaged at the Emergency Department at Hillerød Hospital and admitted either to the observationary unit or to a general ward in-hospital were prospectively included during a period of 22 weeks. The triage system used was a Danish adaptation of the Swedish triage system, ADAPT. Data from 3 different data sources was merged using a unique identifier, the Central Personal Registry number; 1) Data from patient admission; time and date, vital signs, presenting complaint and triage category, 2) Blood sample results taken at admission, including a venous acid-base status, and 3) Outcome measures, e.g. length of stay, admission to Intensive Care Unit, and mortality within 7 and 28 days after admission. Results In primary triage, patients were categorized as red (4.4%), orange (25.2%), yellow (38.7%) and green (31.7%). Abnormal vital signs were present at admission in 25% of the patients, most often temperature (10.5%), saturation of peripheral oxygen (9.2%), Glasgow Coma Score (6.6%) and respiratory rate (4.8%). A venous acid-base status was obtained in 43% of all patients. The majority (78%) had a pH within the normal range (7.35-7.45), 15% had acidosis (pH < 7.35) and 7% had alkalosis (pH > 7.45). Median length of stay was 2 days (range 1-123). The proportion of patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit was 1.6% (95% CI 1.2-2.0), 1.8% (95% CI 1.5-2.2) died within 7 days, and 4.2% (95% CI 3.7-4.7) died within

  12. Patient falls in hospitals: an increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Despite six decades of worldwide efforts that include publishing virtually hundreds of related epidemiological-type studies, there has been an increase (estimated to be 46% per 1000 patient days from 1954-6 to 2006-10) in the number of patient falls in hospitals and other health care facilities. These still occur most frequently near the bedside or in the bathroom, among mentally confused or physically impaired patients, and often involve those with greater comorbidity. The reasons that hospitals during the past half century have demonstrated a significant increase in patient falls per discharge or per patient days are numerous, are not completely surprising, and are certainly interrelated: improved accident reporting systems; on the average older, more impaired, more acutely ill, and more heavily sedated patients; and, less time spent by nursing personnel at the bedside. Most safety committees are not as effective as they should be, since they have difficulty in implementing a long-term, aggressive, facility-wide prevention program. Within that context, it may be worthwhile to discuss the advantages of nursing leadership rather than a representative of the facility's management staff to chair these safety committees. PMID:26304626

  13. Patient characteristics associated with risk of first hospital admission and readmission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following primary care COPD diagnosis: a cohort study using linked electronic patient records

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, L C; Lee, R J; Butcher, I; Weir, C J; Fischbacher, C M; McAllister, D; Wild, S H; Hewitt, N; Hardie, R M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patient characteristics of an unselected primary care population associated with risk of first hospital admission and readmission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Design Retrospective open cohort using pseudonymised electronic primary care data linked to secondary care data. Setting Primary care; Lothian (population approximately 800 000), Scotland. Participants Data from 7002 patients from 72 general practices with a COPD diagnosis date between 2000 and 2008 recorded in their primary care record. Patients were followed up until 2010, death or they left a participating practice. Main outcome measures First and subsequent admissions for AECOPD (International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 codes J44.0, J44.1 in any diagnostic position) after COPD diagnosis in primary care. Results 1756 (25%) patients had at least 1 AECOPD admission; 794 (11%) had at least 1 readmission and the risk of readmission increased with each admission. Older age at diagnosis, more severe COPD, low body mass index (BMI), current smoking, increasing deprivation, COPD admissions and interventions for COPD prior to diagnosis in primary care, and comorbidities were associated with higher risk of first AECOPD admission in an adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression model. More severe COPD and COPD admission prior to primary care diagnosis were associated with increased risk of AECOPD readmission in an adjusted Prentice-Williams-Peterson model. High BMI was associated with a lower risk of first AECOPD admission and readmission. Conclusions Several patient characteristics were associated with first AECOPD admission in a primary care cohort of people with COPD but fewer were associated with readmission. Prompt diagnosis in primary care may reduce the risk of AECOPD admission and readmission. The study highlights the important role of primary care in preventing or delaying a first AECOPD admission. PMID:26801463

  14. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  15. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  16. Patient- and Hospital-Level Determinants of Rehabilitation for In-Patient Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Tai; Chen, Chia-Pei; Kuang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Vinchi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During acute stroke care, rehabilitation usage may be influenced by patient- and hospital-related factors. We would like to identify patient- and hospital-level determinants of population-level inpatient rehabilitation usage associated with acute stroke care. From data obtained from the claim information from the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in Taiwan (2009–2011), we enrolled 82,886 stroke patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction from 207 hospitals. A generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) analyses with patient-level factors specified as random effects were conducted (for cross-level interactions). The rate of rehabilitation usage was 51% during acute stroke care. The hospital-related factors accounted for a significant amount of variability (intraclass correlation, 50%). Hospital type was the only significant hospital-level variable and can explain the large amount of variability (58%). Patients treated in smaller hospitals experienced few benefits of rehabilitation services, and those with surgery in a smaller hospital used fewer rehabilitation services. All patient-level variables were significant. With GLMM analyses, we identified the hospital type and its cross-level interaction, and explained a large portion of variability in rehabilitation for stroke patients in Taiwan. PMID:27175671

  17. Emergency preparedness of Research Center for Radiation Medicine and its hospital to admit and treat the patients with signs of acute radiation sickness.

    PubMed

    Belyi, D A; Khomenko, V I; Bebeshko, V G

    2009-06-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, the Research Center for Radiation Medicine (RCRM) was established in Kiev (Ukraine). Its main task was to maintain a high level of emergency preparedness and be ready to examine and treat patients who suffer as a result of hypothetical radiation accident. Based on the previous experience, this institution's specialists worked out new diagnostic criteria and drug treatment schemata for acute radiation sickness, created a database on 75 patients with this diagnosis and improved educational programmes for medical students and physicians working in the field of radiation medicine. RCRM collaborates fruitfully with western partners through the joint research projects and connects with the World Health Organization's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network centre. Collaboration with Kiev Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation allows RCRM to use aseptic wards having highly filtered air for the treatment of most severely irradiated patients. PMID:19429648

  18. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH Follow-up... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 414, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care; Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  19. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ..., phone 1-800-743-3951. Electronic Access This Federal Register document is also available from the... CFR Parts 412, 413, 415, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY2011...

  20. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  1. Hospital treatment of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Ola, Samuel Olawale

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria has progressed from the stage of inactivity, unconcern, abandonment and neglect to the present stage of holistic care involving treatment of the infection with Highly Active Anti Retroviral Agents, complications of the disease and side effects of antiretroviral therapy as well as that of human behavioural responses towards the disease with hope and promising outcome. The goal of the treatment is to prolong the patient's life while maintaining the best possible quality of health and life. It is now a continuum of care between the hospital and the different sectors of the community. Hospital treatment of patients with HIV-AIDS is complex and yet a simple task if there is healthy interaction of the patients and health care providers in a milieu of well equipped hospital setting with available treatment facilities for proper management of diseases. Similarly, for the care to achieve its goal, it requires a joint participation of the community and the commitment of the government not only on curtailment of the reservoir of HIV infection by antiretroviral therapy but total eradication of diseases, poverty and ignorance in all its entirety. PMID:18050774

  2. Early demographic and clinical predictors of developing acute kidney injury in snake bite patients: A retrospective controlled study from an Indian tertiary care hospital in North Eastern Uttar Pradesh India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R. R.; Uraiya, Dharmendra; Kumar, Anoop; Tripathi, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This study was conducted retrospectively to define early demographic and clinical predictors for acute kidney injury (AKI) among snake bite patients at the time of hospital admission. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 138 cases with a poisonous snake bite. Patients were classified into two groups according to the presence and absence of AKI. The data regarding clinical features and demographic profile of these patients were collected from the hospital records in a prestructured pro forma and statistically compared. Results: Of the 138 patients of venomous snake bite, 62 developed AKI (44.92%). Patients who developed AKI were older in age. Moreover, prolonged bite to anti-snake venom (ASV) time had a significant relationship in developing AKI (P < 0.05). Among the clinical features, there was an independent positive association of AKI with abdomen pain, tenderness and vomiting, cellulitis, bleeding tendencies, myalgia, and black or brown urine (P < 0.05). Neurological features were inversely associated with renal involvement. Conclusion: We found that marked abdominal pain, tenderness and vomiting, myalgia, black or brown urine, bite site cellulitis, bleeding tendencies, and prolonged (>2 h) bite to ASV time were significantly associated with the development of AKI in snake bite patients. PMID:27555694

  3. Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Services Planned and Levels of Implementation and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auslander, Gail K.; Soskolne, Varda; Stanger, Varda; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Kaplan, Giora

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the implementation, adequacy, and outcomes of discharge planning. The authors carried out a prospective study of 1,426 adult patients discharged from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel. Social workers provided detailed discharge plans on each patient. Telephone interviews were conducted two weeks post-discharge. Findings…

  4. Usefulness of the Hepatocyte Growth Factor as a Predictor of Mortality in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Heart Failure Regardless of Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Calvo, Juan-Ignacio; Morales-Rull, José-Luis; Gimeno-Orna, José-Antonio; Lasierra-Díaz, Pilar; Josa-Laorden, Claudia; Puente-Lanzarote, Juan-José; Bettencourt, Paulo; Pascual-Figal, Domingo A

    2016-08-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) plays a role in the improvement of cardiac function and remodeling. Their serum levels are strongly related with mortality in chronic systolic heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to study prognostic value of HGF in acute HF, interaction with ejection fraction, renal function, and natriuretic peptides. We included 373 patients (age 76 ± 10 years, left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] 46 ± 14%, 48% men) consecutively admitted for acute HF. Blood samples were obtained at admission. All patients were followed up until death or close of study (>1 year, median 371 days). HGF concentrations were determined using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (human HGF immunoassay). The predictive power of HGF was estimated by Cox regression with calculation of Harrell C-statistic. HGF had a median of 1,942 pg/ml (interquartile rank 1,354). According to HGF quartiles, mortality rates (per 1,000 patients/year) were 98, 183, 375, and 393, respectively (p <0.001). In Cox regression analysis, HGF (hazard ratio1SD = 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.1, p = 0.002) and N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP; hazard ratio1SD = 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 2.6, p = 0.002) were independent predictors of mortality. Interaction between HGF and LVEF, origin, and renal function was nonsignificant. The addition of HGF improved the predictive ability of the models (C-statistic 0.768 vs 0.741, p = 0.016). HGF showed a complementary value over NT-proBNP (p = 0.001): mortality rate was 490 with both above the median versus 72 with both below. In conclusion, in patients with acute HF, serum HGF concentrations are elevated and identify patients at higher risk of mortality, regardless of LVEF, ischemic origin, or renal function. HGF had independent and additive information over NT-proBNP. PMID:27338207

  5. Hospital Strategies for Reducing Risk-Standardized Mortality Rates in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.; Spatz, Erica S.; Herrin, Jeph; Cherlin, Emily J.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Thompson, Jennifer W.; Ting, Henry H.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite recent improvements in survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), U.S. hospitals vary 2-fold in their 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs). Nevertheless, information is limited on hospital-level factors that may be associated with RSMRs. Objective To identify hospital strategies that were associated with lower RSMRs. Design Cross-sectional survey of 537 hospitals (91% response rate) and weighted multivariate regression by using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to determine the associations between hospital strategies and hospital RSMRs. Setting Acute care hospitals with an annualized AMI volume of at least 25 patients. Participants Patients hospitalized with AMI between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Measurements Hospital performance improvement strategies, characteristics, and 30-day RSMRs. Results In multivariate analysis, several hospital strategies were significantly associated with lower RSMRs and in aggregate were associated with clinically important differences in RSMRs. These strategies included holding monthly meetings to review AMI cases between hospital clinicians and staff who transported patients to the hospital (RSMR lower by 0.70 percentage points), having cardiologists always on site (lower by 0.54 percentage points), fostering an organizational environment in which clinicians are encouraged to solve problems creatively (lower by 0.84 percentage points), not cross-training nurses from intensive care units for the cardiac catheterization laboratory (lower by 0.44 percentage points), and having physician and nurse champions rather than nurse champions alone (lower by 0.88 percentage points). Fewer than 10% of hospitals reported using at least 4 of these 5 strategies. Limitation The cross-sectional design demonstrates statistical associations but cannot establish causal relationships. Conclusion Several strategies, which are currently implemented by relatively few hospitals, are

  6. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute

  7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Gout at a University Hospital Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Radvanski, Diane C; Young, Tina C; McCoy, Jonathan V; Eisenstein, Robert; Moore, Dirk F

    2015-01-01

    Background : Acute gout attacks account for a substantial number of visits to the emergency department (ED). Our aim was to evaluate acute gout diagnosis and treatment at a University Hospital ED. Methods : Our study was a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of acute gout seen in the ED 1/01/2004 - 12/31/2010. We documented: demographics, clinical characteristics, medications given, diagnostic tests, consultations and whether patients were hospitalized. Descriptive and summary statistics were performed on all variables. Results : We found 541 unique ED visit records of patients whose discharge diagnosis was acute gout over a 7 year period. 0.13% of ED visits were due to acute gout. The mean patient age was 54; 79% were men. For 118 (22%) this was their first attack. Attack duration was ≤ 3 days in 75%. Lower extremity joints were most commonly affected. Arthrocentesis was performed in 42 (8%) of acute gout ED visits. During 355 (66%) of ED visits, medications were given in the ED and/or prescribed. An anti-inflammatory drug was given during the ED visit during 239 (44%) visits. Medications given during the ED visit included: NSAIDs: 198 (56%): opiates 190 (54%); colchicine 32 (9%) and prednisone 32 (9%). During 154 (28%) visits an anti-inflammatory drug was prescribed. Thirty two (6%) were given no medications during the ED visit nor did they receive a prescription. Acute gout rarely (5%) led to hospitalizations. Conclusion : The diagnosis of acute gout in the ED is commonly clinical and not crystal proven. Anti-inflammatory drugs are the mainstay of treatment in acute gout; yet, during more than 50% of ED visits, anti-inflammatory drugs were not given during the visit. Thus, improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of acute gout in the ED may be required. PMID:26106456

  8. Underreporting of Behavioral Problems in Older Hospitalized Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Helen D.; O'Hara, Ruth; Mumenthaler, Martin S.; Cassidy, Erin L.; Buffum, Martha; Kim, Janise M.; Danielsen, Claire E.; Noda, Art; Kraemer, Helena C.; Sheikh, Javaid I.

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study examined reports of behavioral problems among older patients hospitalized in acute care medical settings. Greater numbers of behavioral problems were reported by nursing staff on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire than were documented in medical charts over the same time period. Such underreporting may have…

  9. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  10. Comparison of in-hospital outcomes after coronary angioplasty with or without stent placement for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Vakili, B A; Brown, D L

    2000-11-01

    This study compared the in-hospital outcomes of patients treated with or without stent placement during mechanical revascularization for acute myocardial infarction. After correction for differences in baseline characteristics, patients treated with stent placement had lower in-hospital mortality. PMID:11053713

  11. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  12. Length of stay and hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chuck K.; Chambers, Catharine; Fang, Dianne; Mazowita, Garey; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare length of stay and total hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital under the care of family physicians who were their usual health care providers in the community (group A) and patients admitted to the same inpatient service under the care of family physicians who were not their usual health care providers (group B). Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A large urban hospital in Vancouver, BC. Participants All adult admissions to the family practice inpatient service between April 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008. Main outcome measures Ratio of length of stay to expected length of stay and total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the effect of admitting group (group A vs group B) on the natural logarithm transformations of the outcomes. Results The median acute length of stay was 8.0 days (interquartile range [IQR] 4.0 to 13.0 days) for group A admissions and 8.0 days (IQR 4.0 to 15.0 days) for group B admissions. The median (IQR) total hospital costs were $6498 ($4035 to $11 313) for group A admissions and $6798 ($4040 to $12 713) for group B admissions. After adjustment for patient characteristics, patients admitted to hospital under the care of their own family physicians did not significantly differ in terms of acute length of stay to expected length of stay ratio (percent change 0.6%, P = .942) or total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit (percent change −2.0%, P = .722) compared with patients admitted under the care of other family physicians. Conclusion These findings suggest that having networks of family physicians involved in hospital care for patients is not less efficient than having family physicians provide care for their own patients. PMID:22518905

  13. Clinical presentation and in-hospital death in acute pulmonary embolism: does cancer matter?

    PubMed

    Casazza, Franco; Becattini, Cecilia; Rulli, Eliana; Pacchetti, Ilaria; Floriani, Irene; Biancardi, Marco; Scardovi, Angela Beatrice; Enea, Iolanda; Bongarzoni, Amedeo; Pignataro, Luigi; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is one of the most common risk factors for acute pulmonary embolism (PE), but only few studies report on the short-term outcome of patients with PE and a history of cancer. The aim of the study was to assess whether a cancer diagnosis affects the clinical presentation and short-term outcome in patients hospitalized for PE who were included in the Italian Pulmonary Embolism Registry. All-cause and PE-related in-hospital deaths were also analyzed. Out of 1702 patients, 451 (26.5 %) of patients had a diagnosis of cancer: cancer was known at presentation in 365, or diagnosed during the hospital stay for PE in 86 (19 % of cancer patients). Patients with and without cancer were similar concerning clinical status at presentation. Patients with cancer less commonly received thrombolytic therapy, and more often had an inferior vena cava filter inserted. Major or intracranial bleeding was not different between groups. In-hospital all-cause death occurred in 8.4 and 5.9 % of patients with and without cancer, respectively. At multivariate analysis, cancer (OR 2.24, 95 % CI 1.27-3.98; P = 0.006) was an independent predictor of in-hospital death. Clinical instability, PE recurrence, age ≥75 years, recent bed rest ≥3 days, but not cancer, were independent predictors of in-hospital death due to PE. Cancer seems a weaker predictor of all-cause in-hospital death compared to other factors; the mere presence of cancer, without other risk factors, leads to a probability of early death of 2 %. In patients with acute PE, cancer increases the probability of in-hospital all-cause death, but does not seem to affect the clinical presentation or the risk of in-hospital PE-related death. PMID:27023066

  14. One-year outcomes of out-of-hospital administration of intravenous glucose, insulin, and potassium (GIK) in patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (from the IMMEDIATE [Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency Care] Trial).

    PubMed

    Selker, Harry P; Udelson, James E; Massaro, Joseph M; Ruthazer, Robin; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Griffith, John L; Sheehan, Patricia R; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Rosenberg, Yves; Tian, Xin; Vickery, Ellen M; Atkins, James M; Aufderheide, Tom P; Sayah, Assaad J; Pirrallo, Ronald G; Levy, Michael K; Richards, Michael E; Braude, Darren A; Doyle, Delanor D; Frascone, Ralph J; Kosiak, Donald J; Leaming, James M; Van Gelder, Carin M; Walter, Gert-Paul; Wayne, Marvin A; Woolard, Robert H; Beshansky, Joni R

    2014-05-15

    The Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency care Trial of very early intravenous glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in out-of-hospital emergency medical service (EMS) settings showed 80% reduction in infarct size at 30 days, suggesting potential longer-term benefits. Here we report 1-year outcomes. Prespecified 1-year end points of this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, effectiveness trial included all-cause mortality and composites including cardiac arrest, mortality, or hospitalization for heart failure (HF). Of 871 participants randomized to GIK versus placebo, death occurred within 1 year in 11.6% versus 13.5%, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57 to 1.23, p = 0.36). The composite of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality was 12.8% versus 17.0% (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.02, p = 0.06). The composite of hospitalization for HF or mortality within 1 year was 17.2% versus 17.2% (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.37, p = 0.92). The composite of mortality, cardiac arrest, or HF hospitalization within 1 year was 18.1% versus 20.4% (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.16, p = 0.30). In patients presenting with suspected ST elevation myocardial infarction, HRs for 1-year mortality and the 3 composites were, respectively, 0.65 (95% CI 0.33 to 1.27, p = 0.21), 0.52 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.92, p = 0.03), 0.63 (95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, p = 0.14), and 0.51 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.87, p = 0.01). In patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes, serious end points generally were lower with GIK than placebo, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, in those with ST elevation myocardial infarction, the composites of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality, and of cardiac arrest, mortality, or HF hospitalization within 1 year, were significantly reduced. PMID:24792735

  15. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  16. Metabolic Syndrome Augments the Risk of Early Neurological Deterioration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Independent of Inflammatory Mediators: A Hospital-Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohao; Sun, Zhiguang; Ding, Caixia; Tang, Yinyan; Jiang, Xuemei; Xie, Yi; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Lankun; Hu, Dan; Li, Tingting; Xu, Gelin; Sheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with occurrence and prognosis of ischemic stroke. This study aimed to evaluate whether an association exists between MetS and early neurological deterioration (END) following acute ischemic stroke and the possible role inflammatory biomarkers play. Methods and Results. We conducted a prospective cohort investigation that involved 208 stroke patients within 48 hours from symptom onset. MetS was determined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. END was defined as an increase of ⩾1 point in motor power or ⩾2 points in the total National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score within 7 days. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that patients with MetS had a 125% increased risk of END (OR 2.25; 95% CI 1.71–4.86, P = 0.005). After adjustment for fibrinogen and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, MetS remained significantly correlated to END (OR 2.20; 95% CI 1.10–4.04, P = 0.026) with a 77% elevated risk per additional MetS trait (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.23–2.58, P = 0.002). Conclusions. This study demonstrated that MetS may be a potential predictor for END after ischemic stroke, which was independent of raised inflammatory mediators. PMID:27119010

  17. Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis in Hospitalized Children: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokrollahi, Mohammad Reza; Noorbakhsh, Samileh; Monavari, Hamid Reza; Ghavidel Darestani, Sahar; Vosoughi Motlagh, Ahmad; Javadi Nia, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Viral acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of morbidity in childhood and leads to hospitalization in developed countries, such as Iran. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and viral types (rotavirus, adenovirus, human parechoviruses-1, and human bocavirus) of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in hospitalized children. Patients and Materials: This was a across-sectional prospective study performed at the Pediatric Department of Rasoul Hospital, Tehran, Iran (2009-2011) on 80 hospitalized children with viral AGE. All Stool samples were collected on viral transport media. Human bocavirus (HBoV) was detected using the Real-time PCR TaqMan method. Molecular detection of human parechovirus type 1 (HPeV-1) RNA in stool samples was done using a specific nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Rota and adeno virus antigens were sought by rapid chromatographic tests. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Fever was determined in 47.5% of cases (38), nausea and vomiting in 42.5% (34), respiratory symptoms in 16.3% (13), abdominal pain in 76%. Duration of diarrhea was 1-30 days (mean = 6.3 + 4.3 days). No dehydration was observed in 43.5% of subjects, mild dehydration in 33.8%, moderate dehydration in 17.5% and severe dehydration in 5% of cases. Positive rotavirus was found in 48.8% of cases (39), adenovirus in 20% (16), HBoV in 8% (6) and HPeV-1 in 23.2% (19), and adeno and rotaviruses co-infection in 6% (4). The frequency of positive HBoV was significantly lower than adeno and rotaviruses infection (P value = 0.0001). Rotavirus was more frequent in males (P value = 0.003) and in young children (17.49 months vs. 21.44 months) [P value = 0.03, CI = -13.4, 5.5]. Rotavirus infection was related to the degree of dehydration (P value = 0.001) but was not related to the presence of vomiting or fever (P value > 0.5). Conclusions: This study indicates that viral agents, especially rotavirus (48

  18. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  19. Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Antonio; Montoya, Mariano J; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Serrano, Andrés; Molina, Joaquín; Parrilla, Pascual

    2005-05-01

    Age is a risk factor in acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages (LGIH). The objectives here were to analyze: (1) diagnostic and therapeutic handling, (2) related morbidity and mortality, (3) the indications for surgery, and (4) the evolution of acute LGIH in patients > or =80 years. Forty-three patients >80 years with acute LGIH were reviewed retrospectively. In 86% (n = 37) related comorbidities were found, in 9% (n = 4) there had been prior colorectal surgery, 19% (n = 8) were antiaggregated, and 7% (n = 3) were anticoagulated. One hundred thirty-two cases of acute LGIH in patients <80 years were used as a control group. Student's t test and the chi-square test were applied. On arrival at the emergency ward 11 cases (26%) had hemodynamic instability and 8 of these were stabilized using conservative measures. In 39 cases an endoscopy was performed, allowing for an etiological diagnosis in 59% (n = 23) of cases, above all in those carried out in an urgent or semiurgent way. The arteriography permitted an etiological diagnosis in two of the four cases in which it was carried out. In seven patients (16%) urgent surgery was indicated: three were hemorrhoidectomies, three were subtotal colectomies, and one was a resection of the small intestine. The morbidity rate was 10% (n = 4) in the patients who were not treated and 14% (n = 1) in those treated, with a mortality rate of 8% (n = 3) and 14% (n = 1), respectively. The rate of relapse of bleeding after discharge from hospital was 42% (n = 18), with nine of these needing to be readmitted into hospital. In comparison with the control group, they present a different bleeding etiology (diverticulosis as opposed to the benign anal-rectal and small intestinal pathology in the younger population; P = 0.017), surgery is indicated with less frequency (9 versus 33%; P = 0.007), and there is a higher relapse rate (42 versus 26%; P = 0.045). Acute LGIH in geriatric patients relents in most cases with the use of conservative

  20. Effectiveness of Hospital Functions for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment on In-Hospital Mortality: Results From a Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Background Though evidence is limited in Japan, clinical controlled studies overseas have revealed that specialized care units are associated with better outcomes for acute stoke patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of hospital functions for acute care of ischemic stroke on in-hospital mortality, with statistical accounting for referral bias. Methods We derived data from a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database linked to the Survey of Medical Care Institutions and Hospital Report data. We compared the mortality of acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 41 476) in hospitals certified for acute stroke treatment with that in non-certified institutions. To adjust for potential referral bias, we used differential distance to hospitals from the patient’s residence as an instrumental variable and constructed bivariate probit models. Results With the ordinary probit regression model, in-hospital mortality in certified hospitals was not significantly different from that in non-certified institutions. Conversely, the model with the instrumental variable method showed that admission to certified hospitals reduced in-hospital mortality by 30.7% (P < 0.001). This difference remained after adjusting for hospital size, volume, staffing, and intravenous use of tissue plasminogen activator. Conclusions Comparison accounting for referral selection found that certified hospital function for acute ischemic stroke care was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality. Our results indicate that organized stroke care—with certified subspecialty physicians and around-the-clock availability of personnel, imaging equipment, and emergency neurosurgical procedures in an intensive stroke care unit—is effective in improving outcomes in acute ischemic stroke care. PMID:26165489

  1. Reducing time to angiography and hospital stay for patients with high-risk non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome: retrospective analysis of a paramedic-activated direct access pathway

    PubMed Central

    Koganti, S; Patel, N; Seraphim, A; Kotecha, T; Whitbread, M; Rakhit, R D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether a novel ‘direct access pathway’ (DAP) for the management of high-risk non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTEACS) is safe, results in ‘shorter time to intervention and shorter admission times’. This pathway was developed locally to enable London Ambulance Service to rapidly transfer suspected high-risk NSTEACS from the community to our regional heart attack centre for consideration of early angiography. Methods This is a retrospective case–control analysis of 289 patients comparing patients with high-risk NSTEACS admitted via DAP with age-matched controls from the standard pan-London high-risk ACS pathway (PLP) and the conventional pathway (CP). The primary end point of the study was time from admission to coronary angiography/intervention. Secondary end point was total length of hospital stay. Results Over a period of 43 months, 101 patients were admitted by DAP, 109 matched patients by PLP and 79 matched patients through CP. Median times from admission to coronary angiography for DAP, PLP and CP were 2.8 (1.5–9), 16.6 (6–50) and 60 (33–116) hours, respectively (p<0.001). Median length of hospital stay for DAP and PLP was similar at 3.0 (2.0–5.0) days in comparison to 5 (3–7) days for CP (p<0.001). Conclusions DAP resulted in a significant reduction in time to angiography for patients with high-risk NSTEACS when compared to existing pathways. PMID:27324709

  2. Components of nurse innovation: a model from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Neidlinger, S H; Drews, N; Hukari, D; Bartleson, B J; Abbott, F K; Harper, R; Lyon, J

    1992-12-01

    Components that promote nurse innovation in acute care hospitals are explicated in the Acute Care Nursing Innovation Model. Grounded in nursing care delivery systems and excellent management-organizations perspectives, nurse executives and 30 nurse "intrapreneurs" from 10 innovative hospitals spanning the United States shared their experiences and insights through semistructured, tape-recorded telephone interviews. Guided by interpretive interactionist strategies, the essential components, characteristics, and interrelationships are conceptualized and described so that others may be successful in their innovative endeavors. Successful innovation is dependent on the fit between and among the components; the better the fit, the more likely the innovation will succeed. PMID:1444282

  3. Hospital Closure and Insights into Patient Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Husk, G.; Nguyen, T.; Onyile, A.; Echezona, S.; Kuperman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hospital closures are becoming increasingly common in the United States. Patients who received care at the closing hospitals must travel to different, often farther hospitals for care, and nearby remaining hospitals may have difficulty coping with a sudden influx of patients. Objectives Our objectives are to analyze the dispersion patterns of patients from a closing hospital and to correlate that with distance from the closing hospital for three specific visit types: emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory. Methods In this study, we used data from a health information exchange to track patients from Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, a hospital in New York City that closed in 2010, to determine where they received emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory care following the closure. Results We found that patients went to the next nearest hospital for their emergency and inpatient care, but ambulatory encounters did not correlate with distance. Discussion It is likely that patients followed their ambulatory providers as they transitioned to another hospital system. Additional work should be done to determine predictors of impact on nearby hospitals when another hospital in the community closes in order to better prepare for patient dispersion. PMID:25848422

  4. Treating drug-dependent patients in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Skene, Loane; Keays, David; Gardner, Bruce

    2002-08-01

    Are hospital staff legally permitted to test drug-dependent patients for drugs or infectious disease without the patient's consent in order to treat the patient or to protect themselves or other patients? What should staff do with "suspicious" items in the patient's possession (drugs, credit cards in different names, firearms)? Can drug-dependent patients lawfully use illicit drugs in hospital? Who should supply and administer them? PMID:12242876

  5. Characteristics, treatment and in-hospital outcomes of patients with STEMI in a metropolitan area of a developing country: an initial report of the extended Jakarta Acute Coronary Syndrome registry

    PubMed Central

    Dharma, Surya; Andriantoro, Hananto; Purnawan, Ismi; Dakota, Iwan; Basalamah, Faris; Hartono, Beny; Rasmin, Ronaly; Isnanijah, Herawati; Yamin, Muhammad; Wijaya, Ika Prasetya; Pratama, Vireza; Gunawan, Tjatur Bagus; Juwana, Yahya Berkahanto; Suling, Frits R W; Witjaksono, A M Onny; Lasanudin, Hengkie F; Iskandarsyah, Kurniawan; Priatna, Hardja; Tedjasukmana, Pradana; Wahyumandradi, Uki; Kosasih, Adrianus; Budhiarti, Imelda A; Pribadi, Wisnoe; Wirianta, Jeffrey; Lubiantoro, Utojo; Pramesti, Rini; Widowati, Diah Retno; Aminda, Sissy Kartini; Basalamah, M Abas; Rao, Sunil V

    2016-01-01

    Objective We studied the characteristics of patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) after expansion of a STEMI registry as part of the STEMI network programme in a metropolitan city and the surrounding area covering ∼26 million inhabitants. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Emergency department of 56 health centres. Participants 3015 patients with acute coronary syndrome, of which 1024 patients had STEMI. Main outcome measure Characteristics of reperfusion therapy. Results The majority of patients with STEMI (81%; N=826) were admitted to six academic percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) centres. PCI centres received patients predominantly (56%; N=514) from a transfer process. The proportion of patients receiving acute reperfusion therapy was higher than non-reperfused patients (54% vs 46%, p<0.001), and primary PCI was the most common method of reperfusion (86%). The mean door-to-device (DTD) time was 102±68 min. In-hospital mortality of non-reperfused patients was higher than patients receiving primary PCI or fibrinolytic therapy (9.1% vs 3.2% vs 3.8%, p<0.001). Compared with non-academic PCI centres, patients with STEMI admitted to academic PCI centres who underwent primary PCI had shorter mean DTD time (96±44 min vs 140±151 min, p<0.001), higher use of manual thrombectomy (60.2% vs13.8%, p<0.001) and drug-eluting stent implantation (87% vs 69%, p=0.001), but had similar use of radial approach and intra-aortic balloon pump (55.7% vs 67.2%, and 2.2% vs 3.4%, respectively). In patients transferred for primary PCI, TIMI risk score ≥4 on presentation was associated with a prolonged door-in to door-out (DI-DO) time (adjusted OR 2.08; 95% CI 1.09 to 3.95, p=0.02). Conclusions In the expanded JAC registry, a higher proportion of patients with STEMI received reperfusion therapy, but 46% still did not. In developing countries, focusing the prehospital care in the network should be a major focus of care to improve the DI

  6. Predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome in acute stroke due to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Melissa J; Tayal, Ashis H; Schlenk, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of acute ischemic stroke that results in severe neurological disability and death despite treatment with intravenous thrombolysis (intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rtPA]). We performed a retrospective review of a single-center registry of patients treated with intravenous rtPA for stroke. The purposes of this study were to compare intravenous rtPA treated patients with stroke with and without AF to examine independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome (in-hospital death or hospital discharge to a skilled nursing facility, long-term acute care facility, or hospice care). A univariate analysis was performed on 144 patients receiving intravenous rtPA for stroke secondary to AF and 190 patients without AF. Characteristics that were significantly different between the two groups were age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, length of hospital stay, gender, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking status, presence of large cerebral infarct, and hospital discharge outcome. Bivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that patients with stroke secondary to AF with a poor hospital discharge outcome had a greater likelihood of older age, higher initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, longer length of hospital stay, intubation, and presence of large cerebral infarct compared with those with good hospital discharge outcome (discharged to home or inpatient rehabilitation or signed oneself out against medical advice). A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older age, longer length of hospital stay, and presence of large cerebral infarct were independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome. These predictors can guide nursing interventions, aid the multidisciplinary treating team with treatment decisions, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:25503541

  7. Patient Engagement in Hospital Fall Prevention.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Injurious falls are the most prevalent in-hospital adverse event, and hospitalized patients are at a greater risk of falling than the general population. Patient engagement in hospital fall prevention could be a possible approach to reducing falls and fall-related injuries. To engage patients, bedside nursing staff must first understand the concept of patient centeredness and then incorporate patient centeredness in clinical practice. Clinicians should move from being experts to being enablers. To conceptualize the knowledge gaps identified, a conceptual model was developed to guide future research and quality improvement efforts in hospital settings. This model could be used as a guide to advance nursing leadership in hospital fall prevention via promoting patient engagement (e.g., developing patient-centered fall prevention interventions with patients' input). PMID:26845821

  8. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  9. Acute bacterial meningitis in adults: a hospital based study in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Abdulrab, Amin; Algobaty, Faker; Salem, Ahmed K; Mohammed, Y A K

    2010-03-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis is an important cause of mortality and morbidity with high rates of long-term neurological sequelae. To determine the clinical presentation, complications, and outcome of acute meningitis in Yemen, a retrospective study in patients 15 years or older with acute bacterial meningitis who were admitted into Al-Thawra Teaching Hospital in Sana'a from January 2006 to December 2007 was carried out. There were 121 patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture was performed in 112 (92.6%). The most common pathogen was Streptococcus pneumoniae found in 47.4% of positive cultures, Neisseria meningitidis in 33.9%, and Haemophilus influenzae in 10.2%. The classical triad of acute bacterial meningitis was found in 65% of cases. The mortality rate was 22.3%, with 27 patients dying during hospitalization. S. pneumoniae had a case fatality rate of 35.7%. Frequent complications were impaired consciousness, recurrent convulsion, and chest infection, which occurred in 30.6, 16.5, and 10.7% of the patients, respectively. Risk factors for death among those with acute bacterial meningitis included older age (>or=45 years), altered mental status, chest infection, and S. pneumoniae infection. This study highlights the importance of bacterial meningitis as a serious disease of adults in Yemen and the need for effective methods to prevent its complications. PMID:20332577

  10. Impact of obesity on hospital complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Fayfman, Maya; Zhao, Liping; Weaver, Jeff; Buehler, Lauren; Smiley, Dawn; Pasquel, Francisco J; Vellanki, Priyathama; Haw, J Sonya; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular mortality. Several studies have reported increased length of hospital stay and complications; however, there are also reports of obesity having a protective effect on health, a phenomenon coined the ‘obesity paradox’. We aimed to investigate the impact of overweight and obesity on complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Research design and methods This retrospective analysis was conducted on 29 623 patients admitted to two academic hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia, between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were subdivided by body mass index into underweight (body mass index <18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2). Hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose >10 mmol/L during hospitalization. Hospital complications included a composite of pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, bacteremia and death. Results A total of 4.2% were underweight, 29.6% had normal weight, 30.2% were overweight, and 36% were obese. 27.2% of patients had diabetes and 72.8% did not have diabetes (of which 75% had hyperglycemia and 25% had normoglycemia during hospitalization). A J-shaped curve with higher rates of complications was observed in underweight patients in all glycemic groups; however, there was no significant difference in the rate of complications among normal weight, overweight, or obese patients, with and without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Underweight is an independent predictor for hospital complications. In contrast, increasing body mass index was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality, regardless of glycemic status. There was no evidence of an obesity paradox among inpatients with diabetes and hyperglycemia. PMID:27486518

  11. National Quality Assessment Evaluating Spironolactone Use During Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) in China: China Patient-centered Evaluation Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE)-Retrospective AMI Study, 2001, 2006, and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wenchi; Murugiah, Karthik; Downing, Nicholas; Li, Jing; Wang, Qing; Ross, Joseph S; Desai, Nihar R; Masoudi, Frederick A; Spertus, John A; Li, Xi; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Spironolactone, the only aldosterone antagonist available in China, improves outcomes in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among patients with systolic dysfunction and either diabetes or heart failure (HF). However, national practice patterns in the use of spironolactone in China are unknown. Methods and Results From a nationally representative sample of AMI patients from in 2001, 2006, and 2011, we identified 6906 patients with either diabetes or HF and classified them into 1 of 4 groups according to their eligibility for spironolactone—“ideal”(left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ≤40% and without contraindications), “contraindicated,” “not indicated” (neither ideal nor contraindicated), and “unknown indications” (LVEF unmeasured)—to determine how frequently patient eligibility for this drug is assessed in the hospital, how it is used in several groups, and to identify factors associated with the use in these groups. From 2001 to 2011, the proportion of patients whose eligibility for spironolactone was not assessed decreased (66.9% in 2001 to 32.8% in 2011). Spironolactone use significantly increased among ideal patients over this period (28.6% to 72.4%; P<0.001 for trend), but also in contraindicated patients (11.4% to 27.5%; P=0.002 for trend) and in other patients groups (not indicated: 27.5% to 38.3%; unknown indications: 21.3% to 35.1%; both P<0.01 for trend). In all 4 groups, patients presenting with HF on admission were more likely to receive spironolactone. Conclusions Although the appropriate use of spironolactone and assessment of eligibility increased in China over the past decade, there remains marked opportunities for improvement. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT01624883. PMID:26071031

  12. Factors associated with variations in hospital expenditures for acute heart failure in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ziaeian, Boback; Sharma, Puza P.; Yu, Tzy-Chyi; Johnson, Katherine Waltman; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Relatively little contemporary data are available that describe differences in acute heart failure (AHF) hospitalization expenditures as a function of patient and hospital characteristics, especially from a population-based investigation. This study aimed to evaluate factors associated with variations in hospital expenditures for AHF in the United States. Methods A cross-sectional analysis using discharge data from the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, was conducted. Discharges with primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, diagnosis codes for AHF in adults were included. Costs were estimated by converting Nationwide Inpatient Sample charge data using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Cost-to-Charge Ratio File. Discharges with highest (≥80th percentile) versus lowest (≤20th percentile) costs were compared for patient characteristics, hospital characteristics, utilization of procedures, and outcomes. Results Of the estimated 1 million AHF hospital discharges, the mean cost estimates were $10,775 per episode. Younger age, higher percentage of obesity, atrial fibrillation, pulmonary disease, fluid/electrolyte disturbances, renal insufficiency, and greater number of cardiac/noncardiac procedures were observed in stays with highest versus lowest costs. Highest-cost discharges were more likely to be observed in urban and teaching hospitals. Highest-cost AHF discharges also had 5 times longer length of stay, were 9 times more costly, and had higher in-hospital mortality (5.6% vs 3.5%) compared with discharges with lowest costs (all P < .001). Conclusions Acute heart failure hospitalizations are costly. Expenditures vary markedly among AHF hospitalizations in the United States, with substantial differences in patient and hospital characteristics, procedures, and in-hospital outcomes among discharges with highest compared with lowest costs. PMID:25641538

  13. Emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain among Tanzanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Nyerere, Joachim W; Matee, Mecky I; Simon, Elison NM

    2006-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, oral health services are mostly in the form of dental extractions aimed at alleviating acute dental pain. Conservative methods of alleviating acute dental pain are virtually non-existent. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine treatment success of emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain. Methods Setting: School of Dentistry, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Study design: Longitudinal study. Participants: 180 patients who presented with dental pain due to acute irreversible pulpitis during the study period between July and August 2001. Treatment and evaluation: Patients were treated by emergency pulpotomy on permanent posterior teeth and were evaluated for pain after one, three and six week's post-treatment. Pain, if present, was categorised as either mild or acute. Results Of the patients with treated premolars, 25 (13.9%) patients did not experience pain at all while 19 (10.6%) experienced mild pain. None of the patients with treated premolars experienced acute pain. Among 136 patients with treated molars 56 (31%) did not experience any pain, 76 (42.2%) experienced mild pain and the other 4 (2.2%) suffered acute pain. Conclusion The short term treatment success of emergency pulpotomy was high being 100% for premolars and 97.1% for molars, suggesting that it can be recommended as a measure to alleviate acute dental pain while other conservative treatment options are being considered. PMID:16426455

  14. Dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury among hospitalized adults with documented hepatitis C Virus infection: a nationwide inpatient sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, G N; Patel, A; Simoes, P K; Yacoub, R; Annapureddy, N; Kamat, S; Konstantinidis, I; Perumalswami, P; Branch, A; Coca, S G; Wyatt, C M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may cause kidney injury, particularly in the setting of cryoglobulinemia or cirrhosis; however, few studies have evaluated the epidemiology of acute kidney injury in patients with HCV. We aimed to describe national temporal trends of incidence and impact of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring renal replacement 'dialysis-requiring AKI' in hospitalized adults with HCV. We extracted our study cohort from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project using data from 2004 to 2012. We defined HCV and dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury based on previously validated ICD-9-CM codes. We analysed temporal changes in the proportion of hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring AKI and utilized survey multivariable logistic regression models to estimate its impact on in-hospital mortality. We identified a total of 4,603,718 adult hospitalizations with an associated diagnosis of HCV from 2004 to 2012, of which 51,434 (1.12%) were complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury. The proportion of hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury increased significantly from 0.86% in 2004 to 1.28% in 2012. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury vs those without (27.38% vs 2.95%; adjusted odds ratio: 2.09; 95% confidence interval: 1.74-2.51). The proportion of HCV hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury increased significantly between 2004 and 2012. Similar to observations in the general population, dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury was associated with a twofold increase in odds of in-hospital mortality in adults with HCV. These results highlight the burden of acute kidney injury in hospitalized adults with HCV infection. PMID:26189719

  15. One-Year Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Administration of Intravenous Glucose, Insulin, and Potassium (GIK) in Patients with Suspected Acute Coronary Syndromes (from the IMMEDIATE [Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency care] Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Selker, Harry P.; Udelson, James E.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Ruthazer, Robin; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Griffith, John L.; Sheehan, Patricia R.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Rosenberg, Yves; Tian, Xin; Vickery, Ellen M.; Atkins, James M.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Sayah, Assaad J.; Pirrallo, Ronald G.; Levy, Michael K.; Richards, Michael E.; Braude, Darren A.; Doyle, Delanor D.; Frascone, Ralph J.; Kosiak, Donald J.; Leaming, James M.; Van Gelder, Carin M.; Walter, Gert-Paul; Wayne, Marvin A.; Woolard, Robert H.; Beshansky, Joni R.

    2014-01-01

    The IMMEDIATE Trial of very early intravenous glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in out-of-hospital emergency medical service (EMS) settings showed 80% reduction in infarct size at 30 days, suggesting potential longer-term benefit. Here we report 1-year outcomes. Pre-specified 1-year endpoints of this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, effectiveness trial included all-cause mortality, and composites including cardiac arrest, mortality, or hospitalization for heart failure (HF). Among 871 participants randomized to GIK vs. placebo, respectively, death occurred within 1 year in 11.6% vs. 13.5% (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI 0.57, 1.23, P=0.36). The composite of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality was 12.8% vs. 17.0% (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.50, 1.02, P=0.06). The composite of hospitalization for HF or mortality within 1 year was 17.2% vs. 17.2% (HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.70, 1.37, P=0.92). The composite of mortality, cardiac arrest, or HF hospitalization within 1 year was 18.1% vs. 20.4% (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.62, 1.16, P=0.30). Among patients presenting with suspected ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), hazard ratios for 1-year mortality and the 3 composites were, respectively, 0.65 (95% CI 0.33, 1.27, P=0.21); 0.52 (95% CI 0.30, 0.92, P=0.03); 0.63 (95% CI 0.35, 1.16, P=0.14); and 0.51 (95% CI 0.30, 0.87, P=0.01). Among patients with suspected ACS, serious endpoints generally were lower with GIK than placebo, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, among those with STEMI, the composites of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality, and of cardiac arrest, mortality, or HF hospitalization within 1 year, were significantly reduced. PMID:24792735

  16. Method for Assigning Priority Levels in Acute Care (MAPLe-AC) predicts outcomes of acute hospital care of older persons - a cross-national validation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although numerous risk factors for adverse outcomes for older persons after an acute hospital stay have been identified, a decision making tool combining all available information in a clinically meaningful way would be helpful for daily hospital practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Method for Assigning Priority Levels for Acute Care (MAPLe-AC) to predict adverse outcomes in acute care for older people and to assess its usability as a decision making tool for discharge planning. Methods Data from a prospective multicenter study in five Nordic acute care hospitals with information from admission to a one year follow-up of older acute care patients were compared with a prospective study of acute care patients from admission to discharge in eight hospitals in Canada. The interRAI Acute Care assessment instrument (v1.1) was used for data collection. Data were collected during the first 24 hours in hospital, including pre-morbid and admission information, and at day 7 or at discharge, whichever came first. Based on this information a crosswalk was developed from the original MAPLe algorithm for home care settings to acute care (MAPLe-AC). The sample included persons 75 years or older who were admitted to acute internal medical services in one hospital in each of the five Nordic countries (n = 763) or to acute hospital care either internal medical or combined medical-surgical services in eight hospitals in Ontario, Canada (n = 393). The outcome measures considered were discharge to home, discharge to institution or death. Outcomes in a 1-year follow-up in the Nordic hospitals were: living at home, living in an institution or death, and survival. Logistic regression with ROC curves and Cox regression analyses were used in the analyses. Results Low and mild priority levels of MAPLe-AC predicted discharge home and high and very high priority levels predicted adverse outcome at discharge both in the Nordic and Canadian data sets

  17. The relationship between organizational culture and performance in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rowena; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw T O; Harrison, Stephen; Konteh, Fred; Walshe, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between senior management team culture and organizational performance in English acute hospitals (NHS Trusts) over three time periods between 2001/2002 and 2007/2008. We use a validated culture rating instrument, the Competing Values Framework, to measure senior management team culture. Organizational performance is assessed using a wide range of routinely collected indicators. We examine the associations between organizational culture and performance using ordered probit and multinomial logit models. We find that organizational culture varies across hospitals and over time, and this variation is at least in part associated in consistent and predictable ways with a variety of organizational characteristics and routine measures of performance. Moreover, hospitals are moving towards more competitive culture archetypes which mirror the current policy context, though with a stronger blend of cultures. The study provides evidence for a relationship between culture and performance in hospital settings. PMID:23159305

  18. Enlarging Red Blood Cell Distribution Width During Hospitalization Identifies a Very High-Risk Subset of Acutely Decompensated Heart Failure Patients and Adds Valuable Prognostic Information on Top of Hemoconcentration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Arrigo, Mattia; Medeiros, Pedro Bettencourt; Ricardo, Miguel Bento; Almeida, Tiago; Rola, Alexandre; Tolpannen, Heli; Laribi, Said; Gayat, Etienne; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Mueller, Christian; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Aragão, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) may serve as an integrative marker of pathological processes that portend worse prognosis in heart failure (HF). The prognostic value of RDW variation (ΔRDW) during hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF) has yet to be studied. We retrospectively analyzed 2 independent cohorts: Centro Hospitalar do Porto (derivation cohort) and Lariboisière hospital (validation cohort). In the derivation cohort a total of 170 patients (age 76.2 ± 10.3 years) were included and in the validation cohort 332 patients were included (age 76.4 ± 12.2 years). In the derivation cohort the primary composite outcome of HF admission and/or cardiovascular death occurred in 78 (45.9%) patients during the 180-day follow-up period. Discharge RDW and ΔRDW were both increased when hemoglobin levels were lower; peripheral edema was also associated with increased discharge RDW (all P < 0.05). Discharge RDW value was significantly associated with adverse events: RDW > 15% at discharge was associated with a 2-fold increase in event rate, HR = 1.95 (1.05–3.62), P = 0.04, while a ΔRDW >0 also had a strong association with outcome, HR = 2.47 (1.35–4.51), P = 0.003. The addition of both discharge RDW > 15% and ΔRDW > 0 to hemoconcentration was associated with a significant improvement in the net reclassification index, NRI = 18.3 (4.3–43.7), P = 0.012. Overlapping results were found in the validation cohort. As validated in 2 independent AHF cohorts, an in-hospital RDW enlargement and an elevated RDW at discharge are associated with increased rates of mid-term events. RDW variables improve the risk stratification of these patients on top of well-established prognostic markers. PMID:27057905

  19. Smoking restrictions and hospitalization for acute coronary events in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, James D.; Demidenko, Eugene; Malenka, David J.; Li, Zhongze; Gohlke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Aims To study the effects of smoking restrictions in Germany on coronary syndromes and their associated costs. Methods and results All German states implemented laws partially restricting smoking in the public and hospitality sectors between August 2007 and July 2008. We conducted a before-and-after study to examine trends for the hospitalization rate for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) for an insurance cohort of 3,700,384 individuals 30 years and older. Outcome measures were hospitalization rates for coronary syndromes, and hospitalization costs. Mean age of the cohort was 56 years, and two-thirds were female. Some 2.2 and 1.1% persons were hospitalized for angina pectoris and AMI, respectively, during the study period from January 2004 through December 2008. Law implementation was associated with a 13.3% (95% confidence interval 8.2, 18.4) decline in angina pectoris and an 8.6% (5.0, 12.2) decline in AMI after 1 year. Hospitalization costs also decreased significantly for the two conditions—9.6% (2.5, 16.6) for angina pectoris and 20.1% (16.0, 24.2) for AMI at 1 year following law implementation. Assuming the law caused the observed declines, it prevented 1,880 hospitalizations and saved 7.7 million Euros in costs for this cohort during the year following law implementation. Conclusions Partial smoking restrictions in Germany were followed by reductions in hospitalization for angina pectoris and AMI, declines that continued through 1 year following these laws and resulted in substantial cost savings. Strengthening the laws could further reduce morbidity and costs from acute coronary syndromes in Germany. PMID:22350716

  20. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  1. Homocysteine and disability in hospitalized geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Cossi, Stefania; De Martinis, Monica; Calabrese, Paolo A; Orini, Stefania; Grassi, Vittorio

    2004-08-01

    Elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations have been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease and dementia in old age. The present study was performed to identify the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and to analyze the association between tHcy concentration and sociodemographic characteristics, nutritional parameters, and cognitive and functional status in this sample of hospitalized geriatric patients. A total of 214 patients (77% females) 65+ years old admitted into an acute care geriatric ward of an internal medical department in the Northern Italy were studied. tHcy concentration was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-F). Information about nutrition (body mass index [BMI], serum albumin, cholesterol, and transferrin) was collected on admission. Functional status was investigated with the Basic Activities of Daily Living scale (ADL) and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale (IADL); cognitive and affective status were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The mean tHcy concentration was 18.4 +/- 13.1 micromol/L; 74.2% of males and 68.9% of females had HHcy (> 12 micromol/L). Sixty-four percent of patients with normal serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations had HHcy. Elevated tHcy concentrations were associated with older age, male gender, increasing serum creatinine, lower MMSE score, and disability. The mean tHcy concentration depended on the occurrence of different diseases. Patients affected by atherosclerotic diseases, such as ischemic heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and dementia had higher mean tHcy concentration than those without diagnosed vascular diseases. In multivariate analysis, vitamin B12, folate, serum albumin, creatinine, and disability emerged as factors associated with tHcy, adjusted for age, gender, education, MMSE score, and atherosclerotic diseases. Our results suggest that the

  2. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium. PMID:26511424

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia in the older patient.

    PubMed

    Godwin, John E; Smith, Scott E

    2003-10-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. The biology of AML is incompletely understood, but much data indicates that older patients have a more biologically diverse and chemotherapy resistant form of AML that is quite different from that seen in the younger patients. Approximately 60% of AML cases are in patients greater than 60 years of age, so the predominant burden is in older patients. This problem will be magnified in the future, because the US population is both growing and aging. When one examines the treatment outcomes of older AML patients over the last three decades, there is little progress in long-term survival. Nine major published randomized placebo controlled trials of myeloid growth factors given during induction for AML have been conducted. All of these trials with one exception demonstrated no significant impact on the clinical outcomes of complete response (CR) rate, disease-free, and overall survival. However, the duration of neutropenia was consistently and uniformly reduced by the use of growth factor in all nine of these trials. Because of the favorable impact of the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on resource use, antibiotic days, hospital days, etc., it can be more economical and beneficial to use CSFs in AML than to withhold use. The overall dismal outlook for the older AML patient can only be altered by clinical trials with new therapeutic agents. New cellular and molecularly targeted agents are entering clinical trials and bring hope for progress to this area of cancer therapy. PMID:14563517

  4. Rationale, Design, Methodology and Hospital Characteristics of the First Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE)

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Kadhim J.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Husam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of data on heart failure (HF) in the Gulf Middle East. The present paper describes the rationale, design, methodology and hospital characteristics of the first Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Materials and Methods: Gulf CARE is a prospective, multicenter, multinational registry of patients >18 year of age admitted with diagnosis of acute HF (AHF). The data collected included demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, precipitating factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with AHF. In addition, data about hospital readmission rates, procedures and mortality at 3 months and 1-year follow-up were recorded. Hospital characteristics and care provider details were collected. Data were entered in a dedicated website using an electronic case record form. Results: A total of 5005 consecutive patients were enrolled from February 14, 2012 to November 13, 2012. Forty-seven hospitals in 7 Gulf States (Oman, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, United Gulf Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain) participated in the project. The majority of hospitals were community hospitals (46%; 22/47) followed by non-University teaching (32%; 15/47 and University hospitals (17%). Most of the hospitals had intensive or coronary care unit facilities (93%; 44/47) with 59% (28/47) having catheterization laboratory facilities. However, only 29% (14/47) had a dedicated HF clinic facility. Most patients (71%) were cared for by a cardiologist. Conclusions: Gulf CARE is the first prospective registry of AHF in the Middle East, intending to provide a unique insight into the demographics, etiology, management and outcomes of AHF in the Middle East. HF management in the Middle East is predominantly provided by cardiologists. The data obtained from this registry will help the local clinicians to identify the deficiencies in HF management as well as provide a platform to implement evidence based preventive and treatment strategies to reduce the burden of HF in

  5. Serious Mental Illness and Acute Hospital Readmission in Diabetic Patientsa

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jennifer S.; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R.; Morgan, Daniel J.; Comer, Angela C.; Harris, Anthony D.; Furuno, Jon P.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. We hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary-care facility from 2005–2009. SMI was defined by ICD-9 discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizo-affective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26,878 eligible admissions, prevalence of SMI was 6% and incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (OR 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR 1.11, 95%CI: 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  6. Patient- and Hospital-Level Determinants of Rehabilitation for In-Patient Stroke Care: An Observation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Tai; Chen, Chia-Pei; Kuang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Vinchi

    2016-05-01

    During acute stroke care, rehabilitation usage may be influenced by patient- and hospital-related factors. We would like to identify patient- and hospital-level determinants of population-level inpatient rehabilitation usage associated with acute stroke care.From data obtained from the claim information from the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in Taiwan (2009-2011), we enrolled 82,886 stroke patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction from 207 hospitals. A generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) analyses with patient-level factors specified as random effects were conducted (for cross-level interactions).The rate of rehabilitation usage was 51% during acute stroke care. The hospital-related factors accounted for a significant amount of variability (intraclass correlation, 50%). Hospital type was the only significant hospital-level variable and can explain the large amount of variability (58%). Patients treated in smaller hospitals experienced few benefits of rehabilitation services, and those with surgery in a smaller hospital used fewer rehabilitation services. All patient-level variables were significant.With GLMM analyses, we identified the hospital type and its cross-level interaction, and explained a large portion of variability in rehabilitation for stroke patients in Taiwan. PMID:27175671

  7. Autologous blood donation in a small general acute-care hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Mott, L. S.; Jones, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Increased public concerns about infectious risk associated with homologous blood transfusions have led to a significant increase in autologous blood collections. In response, blood banks and large hospitals have implemented autologous blood donation programs (ABDPs). Small hospitals lack the technical resources and patient case loads to effectively institute ABDPs. A preoperative ABDP designed to increase availability and patient convenience--and, therefore, utilization--is described. The program created in a rural 90-bed general acute-care hospital processed 105 donors and collected 197 units over a 38-month period. The percentage of the collected units that were transfused was 44.7%, and only 6.1% of participating patients required homologous transfusions. Comparisons of hematological and clinical data with previously published results indicate that small-scale preoperative ABDPs are clinically effective, safe, and provide cost-efficient utilization of the safest blood supply available. PMID:7674344

  8. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  9. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Acute Calcular Cholecystitis in a Patient with Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Albarrak, Abdullah A.; Khairy, Sami; Ahmed, Alzahrani Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Management of patients who have ventriculoperitoneal shunt presenting with acute calcular cholecystitis has remained a clinical challenge. In this paper, the hospital course and the follow-up of a patient presenting with acute calcular cholecystitis and ventriculoperitoneal shunt managed with laparoscopic cholecystectomy are presented followed by literature review on the management of acute calcular cholecystitis in patients who have ventriculoperitoneal shunts. PMID:26798543

  10. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  11. Palliative care need and management in the acute hospital setting: a census of one New Zealand Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving palliative care management in acute hospital settings has been identified as a priority internationally. The aim of this study was to establish the proportion of inpatients within one acute hospital in New Zealand who meet prognostic criteria for palliative care need and explore key aspects of their management. Methods A prospective survey of adult hospital inpatients (n = 501) was undertaken. Case notes were examined for evidence that the patient might be in their last year of life according to Gold Standards Framework (GSF) prognostic indicator criteria. For patients who met GSF criteria, clinical and socio-demographic information were recorded. Results Ninety-nine inpatients met GSF criteria, representing 19.8% of the total census population. The patients’ average age was 70 years; 47% had a primary diagnosis of cancer. Two thirds had died within 6 months of their admission. Seventy-eight of the 99 cases demonstrated evidence that a palliative approach to care had been adopted; however documentation of discussion about goals of care was very limited and only one patient had evidence of an advance care plan. Conclusion One fifth of hospital inpatients met criteria for palliative care need, the majority of whom were aged >70 years. Whilst over three quarters were concluded to be receiving care in line with a palliative care approach, very little documented evidence of discussion with patients and families regarding end of life issues was evident. Future research needs to explore how best to support ‘generalist’ palliative care providers in initiating, and appropriately recording, such discussions. PMID:23537092

  12. Emergency department management of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and factors associated with hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Khialani, Bharat; Sivakumaran, Pathmanathan; Keijzers, Gerben; Sriram, Krishna Bajee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently there is a paucity of information about biomarkers that can predict hospitalization for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) patients presenting to the emergency department (ED). There is limited data on the consistency of ED management of AECOPD with local COPD guidelines. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers associated with hospitalization in AECOPD patients and to determine if the ED management was concordant with local COPD guidelines. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective audit of consecutive AECOPD patients presenting to the Gold Coast Hospital ED over a 6-month period. Results: During the study period, 122 AECOPD patients (51% male, mean age (SE) 71 (±11) years) presented to the ED. Ninety-eight (80%) patients were hospitalized. Univariate analysis identified certain factors associated with hospitalization: Older age, former smokers, home oxygen therapy, weekday presentation, SpO2 < 92%, and raised inflammatory markers (white cell count (WCC) and C-reactive protein (CRP)). After adjustment for multiple variable, increased age was significantly associated with hospitalization (odds ratio (OR) 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.18; P = 0.05). Radiology assessment and pharmacological management was in accordance with COPD guidelines. However, spirometry was performed in 17% of patients and 28% of patients with hypercapneic respiratory failure received noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Conclusion: We identified several factors on univariate analysis that were associated with hospitalization. Further research is required to determine the utility of these biomarkers in clinical practice. Also, while overall adherence to local COPD guidelines was good, there is scope for improvement in performing spirometry and provision of NIV to eligible patients. PMID:25097600

  13. Patient (customer) expectations in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Sedat; Acuner, Taner; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2007-06-01

    The expectations of patient are one of the determining factors of healthcare service. The purpose of this study is to measure the Patients' Expectations, based on Patient's Rights. This study was done with Likert-Survey in Trabzon population. The analyses showed that the level of the expectations of the patient was high on the factor of receiving information and at an acceptable level on the other factors. Statistical meaningfulness was determined between age, sex, education, health insurance, and the income of the family and the expectations of the patients (p<0.05). According to this study, the current legal regulations have higher standards than the expectations of the patients. The reason that the satisfaction of the patients high level is interpreted due to the fact that the level of the expectation is low. It is suggested that the educational and public awareness studies on the patients' rights must be done in order to increase the expectations of the patients. PMID:17028043

  14. Risk-adjusted antibiotic consumption in 34 public acute hospitals in Ireland, 2006 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Oza, Ajay; Donohue, Fionnuala; Johnson, Howard; Cunney, Robert

    2016-08-11

    As antibiotic consumption rates between hospitals can vary depending on the characteristics of the patients treated, risk-adjustment that compensates for the patient-based variation is required to assess the impact of any stewardship measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of patient-based administrative data variables for adjusting aggregate hospital antibiotic consumption rates. Data on total inpatient antibiotics and six broad subclasses were sourced from 34 acute hospitals from 2006 to 2014. Aggregate annual patient administration data were divided into explanatory variables, including major diagnostic categories, for each hospital. Multivariable regression models were used to identify factors affecting antibiotic consumption. Coefficient of variation of the root mean squared errors (CV-RMSE) for the total antibiotic usage model was very good (11%), however, the value for two of the models was poor (> 30%). The overall inpatient antibiotic consumption increased from 82.5 defined daily doses (DDD)/100 bed-days used in 2006 to 89.2 DDD/100 bed-days used in 2014; the increase was not significant after risk-adjustment. During the same period, consumption of carbapenems increased significantly, while usage of fluoroquinolones decreased. In conclusion, patient-based administrative data variables are useful for adjusting hospital antibiotic consumption rates, although additional variables should also be employed. PMID:27541730

  15. Does Hospital Competition Save Lives? Evidence from the English NHS Patient Choice Reforms*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zack; Gibbons, Stephen; Jones, Simon; McGuire, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Recent substantive reforms to the English National Health Service expanded patient choice and encouraged hospitals to compete within a market with fixed prices. This study investigates whether these reforms led to improvements in hospital quality. We use a difference-in-difference-style estimator to test whether hospital quality (measured using mortality from acute myocardial infarction) improved more quickly in more competitive markets after these reforms came into force in 2006. We find that after the reforms were implemented, mortality fell (i.e. quality improved) for patients living in more competitive markets. Our results suggest that hospital competition can lead to improvements in hospital quality. PMID:25821239

  16. Temporal Trends in Hospitalization for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure in the United States, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sunil K; Wruck, Lisa; Quibrera, Miguel; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Loehr, Laura R; Chang, Patricia P; Rosamond, Wayne D; Wright, Jacqueline; Heiss, Gerardo; Coresh, Josef

    2016-03-01

    Estimates of the numbers and rates of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) hospitalization are central to understanding health-care utilization and efforts to improve patient care. We comprehensively estimated the frequency, rate, and trends of ADHF hospitalization in the United States. Based on Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study surveillance adjudicating 12,450 eligible hospitalizations during 2005-2010, we developed prediction models for ADHF separately for 3 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code 428 discharge diagnosis groups: 428 primary, 428 nonprimary, or 428 absent. We applied the models to data from the National Inpatient Sample (11.5 million hospitalizations of persons aged ≥55 years with eligible ICD-9-CM codes), an all-payer, 20% probability sample of US community hospitals. The average estimated number of ADHF hospitalizations per year was 1.76 million (428 primary, 0.80 million; 428 nonprimary, 0.83 million; 428 absent, 0.13 million). During 1998-2004, the rate of ADHF hospitalization increased by 2.0%/year (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 2.5) versus a 1.4%/year (95% CI: 0.8, 2.1) increase in code 428 primary hospitalizations (P < 0.001). In contrast, during 2005-2011, numbers of ADHF hospitalizations were stable (-0.5%/year; 95% CI: -1.4, 0.3), while the numbers of 428-primary hospitalizations decreased by -1.5%/year (95% CI: -2.2, -0.8) (P for contrast = 0.03). In conclusion, the estimated number of hospitalizations with ADHF is approximately 2 times higher than the number of hospitalizations with ICD-9-CM code 428 in the primary position. The trend increased more steeply prior to 2005 and was relatively flat after 2005. PMID:26895710

  17. Geographic variation of failure-to-rescue in public acute hospitals in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Hassan; Ou, Lixin; Chen, Jack; Hillman, Kenneth; Flabouris, Arthas; Hollis, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide acceptance of Failure-to-Rescue (FTR) as a patient safety indicator (defined as the deaths among surgical patients with treatable complications), no study has explored the geographic variation of FTR in a large health jurisdiction. Our study aimed to explore the spatiotemporal variations of FTR rates across New South Wales (NSW), Australia. We conducted a population-based study using all admitted surgical patients in public acute hospitals during 2002-2009 in NSW, Australia. We developed a spatiotemporal Poisson model using Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) methods in a Bayesian framework to obtain area-specific adjusted relative risk. Local Government Area (LGA) was chosen as the areal unit. LGA-aggregated covariates included age, gender, socio-economic and remoteness index scores, distance between patient residential postcode and the treating hospital, and a quadratic time trend. We studied 4,285,494 elective surgical admissions in 82 acute public hospitals over eight years in NSW. Around 14% of patients who developed at least one of the six FTR-related complications (58,590) died during hospitalization. Of 153 LGAs, patients who lived in 31 LGAs, accommodating 48% of NSW patients at risk, were exposed to an excessive adjusted FTR risk (10% to 50%) compared to the state-average. They were mostly located in state's centre and western Sydney. Thirty LGAs with a lower adjusted FTR risk (10% to 30%), accommodating 8% of patients at risk, were mostly found in the southern parts of NSW and Sydney east and south. There were significant spatiotemporal variations of FTR rates across NSW over an eight-year span. Areas identified with significantly high and low FTR risks provide potential opportunities for policy-makers, clinicians and researchers to learn from the success or failure of adopting the best care for surgical patients and build a self-learning organisation and health system. PMID:25310260

  18. Early hospital discharge after direct angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, J T; Combs, D T; McLellan, B A; Railsback, L; Haugen, S

    1995-07-01

    To determine the feasibility and safety of early hospital discharge after myocardial infarction, we reviewed a 3-yr experience with direct angioplasty: 204 patients had direct angioplasty with in-hospital mortality of 3.4%. Of these patients, 125 were discharged < 5 days after infarction and 98% of these were available for 30-day follow-up. There was one early death (0.8% mortality), two early readmissions without complications, and three late readmissions. Thus early hospital discharge a mean of 3.4 days after infarction can be achieved in > 60% of patients undergoing direct angioplasty with no significant early complications and excellent 30-day survival (99.2%). PMID:7553817

  19. A Hospital-based Patient Legal Clinic.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Liz; Shahkhan, Hana; Loff, Bebe

    2016-03-01

    The HeLP Patient Legal Clinic has provided free legal advice to public hospital patients with health-related problems since March 2014. This article reports on the findings of a study of the first six months of HeLP's operation. The study adopted qualitative methods informed by grounded theory and sought to understand patient and social worker experiences of HeLP. Interviews were conducted with 13 patients and 10 next of kin. Focus group discussions were carried out with 19 social workers who referred patients to HeLP. Locating the legal service in the hospital's social work department enabled and expedited access to legal advice; a team-based approach to patient problems emerged that enhanced patient outcomes; and provision of legal advice relieved the anxiety experienced by patients, allowing them to focus better on their health concern. PMID:27323643

  20. Microbial biofilms on needleless connectors for central venous catheters: comparison of standard and silver-coated devices collected from patients in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M Ryan; Donlan, Rodney M

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P=0.11). There were no significant associations (P>0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P=0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P=0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  1. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  2. Magnet Hospitals: Higher Rates of Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah A

    2014-06-10

    Patient satisfaction with care is an important indicator of quality of care. As of 2013-2014, 30% of the Value-Based Purchasing score Medicare is using to determine hospital reimbursement is based on patient reports of care. This study determined whether significant relationships exists between Magnet (N = 160), Magnet-in-progress (N = 99), and non-Magnet hospital (N = 1,742) status and the highest ratings on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey questions related to patient satisfaction with care. This study was a secondary analysis of data collected and compiled from three sources (the American Hospital Association, American Nurses Credentialing Center, and HCAHPS databases). Analysis revealed that Magnet and Magnet-in-progress hospitals have significantly (p < .007) higher scores than non-Magnet hospitals on six of the seven questions regarding patient-reported satisfaction with care. The implications of these results for nursing are discussed. PMID:24915864

  3. Hyponatremia and in-hospital mortality in patients admitted for heart failure (from the ATTEND registry).

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Kajimoto, Katsuya; Munakata, Ryo; Minami, Yuichiro; Mizuno, Masayuki; Aokage, Toshiyuki; Asai, Kuniya; Sakata, Yasushi; Yumino, Dai; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Takano, Teruo

    2013-04-01

    Hyponatremia is known to be a poor prognostic factor in patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF), however not well studied in Japan. The aims of this study were to characterize hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF and to clarify the relations between hyponatremia and detailed in-hospital outcomes in Japan. Among 4,837 hospitalized patients with HF enrolled in the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Syndromes (ATTEND) registry, patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality in those with hyponatremia were examined. Hyponatremia (sodium <135 mEq/L) was observed in 11.6% of patients. Patients with hyponatremia were of similar age, included fewer men, and had a higher proportion of previous hospitalizations for HF compared to those with normonatremia. On admission, lower heart rates and blood pressures and higher brain natriuretic peptide levels were observed in patients with hyponatremia. During hospitalization, inotrope levels and mechanical device use were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia. Rates of all-cause and cardiac death were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia, 15.0% and 11.4%, respectively, compared to 5.3% and 3.6%, respectively, in those with normonatremia. In hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF, cardiac death accounted for 76.2% of all-cause death. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in Japan hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with HF is relatively common and is associated with a very high in-hospital mortality. PMID:23312128

  4. Simple In-Hospital Interventions to Reduce Door-to-CT Time in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheraghdam, Aliakbar; Rikhtegar, Reza; Mehrvar, Kaveh; Mehrara, Mehrdad; Hassasi, Rogayyeh; Aliyar, Hannane; Farzi, Mohammadamin; Hasaneh Tamar, Somayyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, a time dependent therapy, can reduce the morbidity and mortality of acute ischemic stroke. This study was designed to assess the effect of simple in-hospital interventions on reducing door-to-CT (DTC) time and reaching door-to-needle (DTN) time of less than 60 minutes. Methods. Before any intervention, DTC time was recorded for 213 patients over a one-year period at our center. Five simple quality-improvement interventions were implemented, namely, call notification, prioritizing patients for CT scan, prioritizing patients for lab analysis, specifying a bed for acute stroke patients, and staff education. After intervention, over a course of 44 months, DTC time was recorded for 276 patients with the stroke code. Furthermore DTN time was recorded for 106 patients who were treated with IV thrombolytic therapy. Results. The median DTC time significantly decreased in the postintervention period comparing to the preintervention period [median (IQR); 20 (12–30) versus 75 (52.5–105), P < 0.001]. At the postintervention period, the median (IQR) DTN time was 55 (40–73) minutes and proportion of patients with DTN time less than 60 minutes was 62.4% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Our interventions significantly reduced DTC time and resulted in an acceptable DTN time. These interventions are feasible in most hospitals and should be considered. PMID:27478641

  5. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  6. Diastolic Timed Vibrator: Noninvasive Pre-Hospitalization Treatment of Acute Coronary Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Marzencki, Marcin; Kajbafzadeh, Behrad; Khosrow-Khavar, Farzad; Tavakolian, Kouhyar; Kaminska, Bozena; Menon, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    The speed of intervention is one of the major factors in increasing the survival rate of patients suffering from acute coronary ischemia. The two principal techniques currently in use: pharmacological and interventional, can be employed to re-canalize coronary arteries, but the former is slow acting and often leads to incomplete reperfusion, while the latter requires specialized personnel in a hospital with a cardiac catheterization laboratory. In this paper, we introduce a novel method intended for pre-hospitalization treatment of patients with acute coronary ischemia that can be safely applied by a minimally trained individual prior to or during patient transportation to hospital. It consists in applying low frequency mechanical vibrations to the left intercostal space of patient's chest during diastole of the heart cycle, to induce vibrations of the heart and thus of the coronary arteries. Mechanical vibrations stimulate mixing of blood which improves drug delivery to the occlusion site, applies mechanical force on the clot leading to its faster dissolution and finally acts as a strong vasodilator in case of spasms. We introduce the principle of operation and the architecture of the Diastolic Timed Vibrator (DTV), including a custom ECG processing algorithm, vibration pattern generator and active braking methods. Experimental results demonstrate the functionality of the DTV device and pave way for in-vivo tests necessary for clinical confirmation of the proposed method. PMID:23934670

  7. Alternate Level of Care Patients in Hospitals: What Does Dementia Have To Do With This?

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Rose; Jarrett, Pamela; Stewart, Connie; Nicholson, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients in acute care hospitals no longer in need of acute care are called Alternate Level of Care (ALC) patients. This is growing and common all across Canada. A better understanding of this patient population would help to address this problem. Methods A chart review was conducted in two hospitals in New Brunswick. All patients designated as ALC on July 1, 2009 had their charts reviewed. Results Thirty-three per cent of the hospital beds were occupied with ALC patients; 63% had a diagnosis of dementia. The mean length of stay was 379.6 days. Eighty-six per cent were awaiting a long-term care bed in the community. Most patients experienced functional decline during their hospitalization. One year prior to admission, 61% had not been admitted to hospital and 59.2% had had at least one visit to the emergency room. Conclusions The majority of the ALC patients in hospital have a diagnosis of dementia and have been waiting in hospital for over one year for a long-term care bed in the community. Many participants were recipients of maximum home care in the community, suggesting home maker services alone may not be adequate for some community-dwelling older adults. Early diagnosis of dementia, coupled with appropriate care in the community, may help to curtail the number of patients with dementia who end up in hospital as ALC patients. PMID:25232367

  8. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  9. Acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after percutaneous coronary interventions Eptifibatide versus Abciximab

    SciTech Connect

    Ajani, Andrew E.; Waksman, Ron; Gruberg, Luis; Sharma, Arvind K.; Lew, Robert; Pinnow, Ellen; Canos, Daniel A.; Cheneau, Edouard; Castagna, Marco; Satler, Lowell; Pichard, Augusto; Kent, Kenneth M

    2003-03-01

    Background: Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists reduce peri-angioplasty ischemic complications and improve in-hospital outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Prior studies have demonstrated favorable results with both eptifibatide and abciximab. The purpose of this study was to assess whether there are any differences in rates of acute procedural complications and in-hospital events with the use of these two agents. Methods: A retrospective review of 359 elective PCIs from June 1998 to August 2000 identified 152 PCIs treated with eptifibatide (bolus 180 {mu}g/kg, infusion 2 {mu}g/kg/min for 12-48 h) and 205 PCIs treated with abciximab (bolus 0.25 mg/kg, infusion 10 {mu}g/min for 12 h). All patients received IIb/IIIa antagonists at the initiation of the intervention. Results: The clinical demographics, the angiographic morphology, the indications, and the procedural details were similar in both groups. In the eptifibatide group, the maximum ACT was lower (235{+-}45 vs. 253{+-}40, P<.0001). The incidence of major procedural and in-hospital events was compared. Eptifibatide and abciximab had similar rates of major complications (death or myocardial infarction) (1.4% vs. 2.9%), repeat PTCA (3.4% vs. 1.9%), and major bleeding (3.3% vs. 4.3%). Conclusions: Eptifibatide is comparable to abciximab in regards to acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after PCI.

  10. Epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wu-Chien; Pai, Lu; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Heng-Chang

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies based on either single hospital data or sampling of specific groups of hospitalized burns victims in Taiwan have provided only minimal epidemiological information. The study is designed to provide additional data on the epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan. Data were obtained from the Burn Injury Information System (BIIS), which brings together information supplied by 34 contracted hospitals. The study time course spanned a 2-year period from July 1997 to June 1999. Patient characteristics (age, sex, education level, etc.), causes and severity of injuries, and medical care measures were explored. A total of 4741 patients were registered with BIIS over the study period. The majority of hospitalized patients (67%) were male. The age distribution of burns patients showed peaks occurring at the age groups of 0-5 and 35-44 years. Over the time course of a day, burn injuries occurred more frequently from 10:00 to 12:00 h and 16:00 to 18:00 h. Injuries suspected as the result of suicide, homicide or child abuse accounted for 4.8% of hospitalized cases. More than 48% of the burns occurred in the home. The leading type of burn injury was scalding, followed by naked flame, explosion, electrical burns, and chemical burns due to caustic or corrosive substances. The mean percent total body surface area (%TBSA) for adults was 19%, and for young children was 12%. The average length of hospital stay was 18 days. In conclusion, children under 5 years and adults between 35 and 44 years of age are two high-risk groups for burn injuries. Corresponding to meal preparation time, hot substances such as boiling water, hot soup, etc. are the most common agents responsible for scalds. Prevention programs for reducing the risk of burn injuries during cooking and eating are required, especially for parents with young children. PMID:12927984

  11. Obstetric Acute Kidney Injury; A Three Year Experience at a Medical College Hospital in North Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, K.S.; Gorikhan, Gousia; M.M., Umadi; S.T., Kalsad; M.P., Madhavaranga; Dambal, Amrut; Padaki, Samata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury is a rare and sometimes fatal complication of pregnancy, the incidence of which has been declining worldwide, though still high in developing countries. There are recent observations of increasing incidence in some developed countries attributed to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have analysed the records of all patients referred to the dialysis unit of a medical college hospital in Karnataka for acute kidney injury related to pregnancy. AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network) criteria for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury were adapted. Age, parity, gestational age, causative factors for acute kidney injury, mode of delivery, access to antenatal care, operative procedures, blood component transfusions, number of haemodialysis, time for initiation of haemodialysis, duration of hospital stay and mortality were analysed by finding mean, standard deviation and standard error. Results: Fifteen patients out of 21563 who delivered in our hospital developed acute kidney injury. These (n=15) were out of 149 patients of acute kidney injury of various aetiologies who underwent haemodialysis between 2012 and 2014. Of these two were unregistered for antenatal care. Ten were multiparous, Eleven were from rural background, one had home delivery, six had vaginal delivery, seven had caesarean section and two had second trimester abortion. Placental abruption with intrauterine death was the commonest Cause in 9 out of 15 cases. All had severe anaemia. Patients received a mean of 3.9 (SD+/- 2.4) sessions of haemodialysis. Eleven patients recovered completely, two died and two left against medical advice. Conclusion: Obstetric acute kidney injury is associated with poor access to antenatal care, multiparity and rural background. Placental abruption is the commonest cause of obstetric acute kidney injury. Blood component transfusions, avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs and early initiation of haemodialysis are

  12. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  13. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  14. [Three years of acute bacterial meningitis in the pediatric service at the Temuco Regional Hospital].

    PubMed

    Boehme, C; Soto, L; Rodríguez, G; Serra, J; Illesca, V; Reydet, P

    1993-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the clinical, epidemiological and laboratory features of 90 children, hospitalized between 1988 and 1991 with the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis in a region with a high proportion of aboriginal population. Twenty six percent of studied patients were of mapuche origin. The causative organism was identified in 82% of cases (H influenzae in 38% of cases, S pneumoniae in 29% and N meningitidis in 10%). H influenzae was resistant to ampicillin in 16% of cases and resistant to chloramphenicol in 4%. This agent was identified in 52% of patients of mapuche origin compared with 33% of non mapuche patients. Seventy three percent of children were less than 2 years old. Thirty seven percent of children had complications during hospitalization, 12 children died (13.3%) and 38% of children had neurological sequelae at the moment of discharge. PMID:8278698

  15. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  16. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  17. Effect of Early Statin Treatment in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Doo Sun; Cho, Kyung Hoon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Chae, Shung Chull; Hong, Taek Jong; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Kim, Chong Jin; Cho, Myeong Chan; Rha, Seung-Woon; Bae, Jang Ho; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The benefit of early statin treatment following acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated with cardiogenic shock (CS) has not been well studied. We sought to assess the effect of early statin therapy in patients with CS complicating acute MI. Subjects and Methods We studied 553 statin-naive patients with acute MI and CS (Killip class IV) who underwent revascularization therapy between November 2005 and January 2008 at 51 hospitals in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received statins during hospitalization (n=280) and those who did not (n=273). The influence of statin treatment on a 12-month clinical outcome was examined using a matched-pairs analysis (n=200 in each group) based on the propensity for receiving statin therapy during hospitalization. Results Before adjustment, patients receiving statin, compared to those not receiving statin, had a more favorable clinical profile, were less likely to suffer procedural complications, and more likely to receive adequate medical therapy. Patients receiving statin had lower unadjusted in-hospital mortality and composite rate of mortality, MI, and repeat revascularization at 12 months, which remained significantly lower after adjustment for patient risk, procedural characteristics, and treatment propensity. Conclusion In CS patients with acute MI undergoing revascularization therapy, early statin treatment initiated during hospitalization was associated with lower rates of in-hospital death and 12-month adverse cardiac events. PMID:23508129

  18. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  19. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field. PMID:16649506

  20. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  1. Impact of transfer status on hospitalization cost and discharge disposition for acute ischemic stroke across the US.

    PubMed

    Sonig, Ashish; Lin, Ning; Krishna, Chandan; Natarajan, Sabareesh K; Mokin, Maxim; Hopkins, L Nelson; Snyder, Kenneth V; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT In this study, the authors used information provided in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) to study the impact of transferring stroke patients from one facility to a center where they received some form of active stroke intervention (intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, thrombectomy, or a combination of both therapies). METHODS Patient demographic characteristics and hospital factors obtained from the 2008-2010 acute stroke NIS data were analyzed. Discharge disposition, hospitalization cost, and mortality were the dependent variables studied. Univariate analysis and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Data analysis focused on the cohort of acute stroke patients who received some form of active intervention (55,913 of 1,311,511 patients in the NIS). RESULTS When overall outcome was considered, transferred patients had a significantly higher number of other-than-routine (OTR, i.e., other than discharge to home without home health care) discharge dispositions (p < 0.0001). In multivariate regression analysis including pertinent patient and hospital factors, transfer-in patients had significantly worse OTR discharge disposition (p < 0.0001, odds ratio [OR] 2.575, 95% CI 2.341-2.832). Mean hospitalization cost including an intervention was $70,325.11 for direct admissions and $97,546.92 for transferred patients. Transfer from another facility (p < 0.001, OR 1.677, 95% CI 1.548-1.817) was associated with higher hospitalization cost. CONCLUSIONS The study showed that hospital cost for acute stroke intervention is significantly higher for a transferred patient than for a direct admission. Moreover, the frequency of OTR discharge was significantly higher among transferred patients than direct admissions. Future strategies should focus on ways and means of transporting patients appropriately and directly to stroke centers. PMID:26452123

  2. EHR prescription for small, medium, and large hospitals: an exploratory study of Texas acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stacy; Yaylacicegi, Ulku

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals invest in information technology to lower costs and to improve quality of care. With presidential leaders backing an in place policy that requires Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to be implemented in all hospitals by 2014 and the unveiling of a $1.2 billion grant for these systems, it is essential to understand the operational impacts of EHRs. This study explores EHRs in a hospital environment and investigates their relationship to quality of care and patient safety. EHRs are categorised into four functional groups: patient information data, results management, order entry, and decision support. This new knowledge will provide a better understanding of the relationship between EHRs and operational outcomes by showing the impact of various EHR functions on patient safety and quality of care. PMID:23079027

  3. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. PMID:25128363

  4. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the hospital should be regarded as the ideal setting for the care of these individuals. Before starting any dental intervention, a correct patient evaluation is needed, based on a correct anamnesis, medical records and interconsultation reports, and with due assessment of the medical risks involved. The hospital setting offers the advantage of access to electronic medical records and to data referred to any complementary tests that may have been made, and we moreover have the possibility of performing treatments under general anesthesia. In this context, ambulatory major surgery is the best approach when considering general anesthesia in patients of this kind. Key words:Hospital dentistry, special patients, medically compromised patients. PMID:24121921

  5. Trends of hospitalizations, fatality rate and costs for acute myocardial infarction among Spanish diabetic adults, 2001-2006

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the more frequent reasons diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, and there are reports that the long-term prognosis after an AMI is much worse in these patients than in non-diabetic patients. This study aims to compare hospital admissions and costs in Spanish diabetic and non-diabetic subjects due to AMI during the period 2001-2006. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 6 years of national hospitalization data associated with diabetes using the Minimum Basic Data Set. National hospitalization rates were calculated for AMI among diabetic and non-diabetic adults. Fatality rates, mean hospital stay and direct medical costs related to hospitalization were analyzed. Costs were calculated using Diagnosis-Related Groups for AMI in diabetics and non-diabetics patients. Results During the study period, a total of 307,099 patients with AMI were admitted to Spanish hospitals. Diabetic patients made up 29.6% of the total. The estimated incidence due to AMI in diabetics increased from 54.7 cases per 100,000 in 2001 to 64.1 in 2006. Diabetic patients had significantly higher mortality than nondiabetic patients after adjusting for age, gender, and year (OR 1.11 [95% CI, 1.08-1.14]). The cost among diabetic patients increased by 21.3% from 2001 to 2006. Conclusions Diabetic patients have higher rates of hospital admission and fatality rates during the hospitalization after an AMI than nondiabetic patients. Diabetic adults who have suffered an AMI have a greater than expected increase in direct hospital costs over the period 2001-2006. PMID:20205960

  6. Diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in older patients.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Corey; Clark, Dwayne C

    2006-11-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions such as abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and mesenteric ischemia. Changes that occur in the biliary system because of aging make older patients vulnerable to acute cholecystitis, the most common indication for surgery in this population. In older patients with appendicitis, the initial diagnosis is correct only one half of the time, and there are increased rates of perforation and mortality when compared with younger patients. Medication use, gallstones, and alcohol use increase the risk of pancreatitis, and advanced age is an indicator of poor prognosis for this disease. Diverticulitis is a common cause of abdominal pain in the older patient; in appropriately selected patients, it may be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics. Small and large bowel obstructions, usually caused by adhesive disease or malignancy, are more common in the aged and often require surgery. Morbidity and mortality among older patients presenting with acute abdominal pain are high, and these patients often require hospitalization with prompt surgical consultation. PMID:17111893

  7. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  8. The impact of a new acute oncology service in acute hospitals: experience from the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre and Merseyside and Cheshire Cancer Network.

    PubMed

    Neville-Webbe, H L; Carser, J E; Wong, H; Andrews, J; Poulter, T; Smith, R; Marshall, E

    2013-12-01

    The 2008 National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcomes and Death highlighted an urgent need to improve the quality, safety and efficiency of care for cancer patients following emergency presentation to acute general hospitals. A network-wide acute oncology service (AOS) was therefore commissioned and implemented on the basis of recommendations from the National Chemotherapy Advisory Group (NCAG). Through a continuous programme of raising awareness regarding both the role of the AOS and the necessity of early patient referral to acute oncology teams, we have been able to establish an AOS across all acute trusts in our cancer network. The network-wide AOS has improved communication across clinical teams, enabled rapid review of over 3,000 patients by oncology staff, reduced hospital stay, increased understanding of oncology emergencies and their treatment, and enhanced pathways for rapid diagnosis and appropriate referrals for patients presenting with malignancy of undefined origin (MUO). These achievements have been made by developing a network protocol book for managing common oncology emergencies, by introducing local pathways for managing MUO and by collaborating with palliative care teams to introduce local acute oncology (AO) multi-disciplinary team (MDT) meetings. PMID:24298102

  9. [Respect of patient's dignity in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Duguet, A-M

    2010-12-01

    Every code of ethics of health professionals in France considers the respect of dignity as a fundamental duty. The French 2002 Law on patient rights says that the person has the right to respect of dignity and of private life. After a presentation of the articles of ethics codes regarding dignity, this paper presents recommendations to deliver medical care in situations where dignity might be endangered such as for patients hospitalized in psychiatric services without consent, or for medical examination of prisoners or medical care to vulnerable patients unable to express their will, especially in palliative care or at the end of life. Respect of dignity after death is illustrated by the reflection conducted by the Espace Ethique de l'AP-HP (Paris area hospitals) and in the Chart of the mortuary yard. A survey of the patients' letters of complaint received by the emergency service of the Toulouse University Hospital showed that, in five years, there were 188 letters and 18 pointed out infringements to the dignity of the person. The health professional team is now aware of this obligation, and in the accreditation of the hospitals, the respect of dignity is one of the indicators of the quality of medical care. PMID:21766725

  10. Complications Requiring Hospital Admission and Causes of In-Hospital Death over Time in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Yeon; Kim, Chang Wook; Choi, Jong Young; Lee, Chang Don; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Moon Young; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Woo, Hyun Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Data on the epidemiology of alcoholic cirrhosis, especially in Asian countries, are limited. We compared the temporal evolution of patterns of alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis over the last decade. Methods We retrospectively examined the inpatient datasets of five referral centers during 2002 and 2011. The study included patients who were admitted due to specific complications of liver cirrhosis. We compared the causes of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths between patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Results Among the included 2,799 hospitalizations (2,165 patients), 1,496 (1,143 patients) were from 2002, and 1,303 (1,022 patients) were from 2011. Over time, there was a reduction in the rate of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) as a cause of hospitalization and an increase in the rate of hepatocellular carcinoma. Deaths that were attributable to HE or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) significantly decreased, whereas those due to hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) significantly increased over time in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. However, in patients with nonalcoholic cirrhosis, hepatic failure and HRS remained the principal causes of in-hospital death during both time periods. Conclusions The major causes of in-hospital deaths have evolved from acute cirrhotic complications, including HE or SBP to HRS in alcoholic cirrhosis, whereas those have remained unchanged in nonalcoholic cirrhosis during the last decade. PMID:26087788

  11. Comparative analysis of acute toxic poisoning in 2003 and 2011: analysis of 3 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jung-Youn; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Hong, Yun-Sik; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Social factors may affect the available sources of toxic substances and causes of poisoning; and these factors may change over time. Additionally, understanding the characteristics of patients with acute toxic poisoning is important for treating such patients. Therefore, this study investigated the characteristics of patients with toxic poisoning. Patients visiting one of 3 hospitals in 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Data on all patients who were admitted to the emergency departments with acute toxic poisoning were retrospectively obtained from medical records. Total 939 patients were analyzed. The average age of patients was 40.0 ± 20 yr, and 335 (36.9%) patients were men. Among the elements that did not change over time were the facts that suicide was the most common cause, that alcohol consumption was involved in roughly 1 of 4 cases, and that there were more women than men. Furthermore, acetaminophen and doxylamine remained the most common poisoning agents. In conclusion, the average patient age and psychotic drug poisoning has increased over time, and the use of lavage treatment has decreased. PMID:24133344

  12. Are housestaff identifying malnourished hospitalized medicine patients?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael A; Duerksen, Donald R; Rahman, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Clinical nutrition and nutritional assessment are often a neglected component of medical school curriculums despite the high prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study found that medical housestaff performed nutritional assessments in only 4% of admitted patients despite a high rate of malnutrition (57%). Survey results show housestaff lack knowledge in the area of malnutrition. Medical schools and training programs must place greater emphasis of providing qualified physician nutrition specialists to implement effective nutrition instruction. PMID:25061765

  13. Prevention of Pulmonary Emboli in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    The risk of pulmonary infarction in any hospitalized population is high. To decrease this dreaded complication, the high risk population must be identified. These are chiefly elderly patients with a history of previous DVTP, cancer, cardiac disease, trauma to a lower limb or a history of recent surgery. All methods of reducing venous stasis should be used, and most of these patients should be treated prophylactically with subcutaneous heparin. PMID:21283325

  14. The role of rhinovirus in children hospitalized for acute respiratory disease, Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Juan Manuel; Molina, Fabiana; Díaz, Rocío; Bonet, Virginia; Ortellao, Lucila; Cantarutti, Diego; Gómez, Alejandra; Pierini, Judith; Cociglio, Raquel; Kusznierz, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were historically considered upper airway pathogens. However, they have recently been proven to cause infections in the lower respiratory tract, resulting in hospitalization of children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and chronic pulmonary obstruction. In this report, HRV frequency and seasonality are described together with patient clinical-epidemiological aspects. From a total of 452 surveyed samples, the HRV nucleic acids was detected in 172 (38.1%) and found in every month of the study year. 60% of inpatients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) associated with HRV were under 6 months of age and 31% had a clinical history, being preterm birth and recurrent wheezing the prevailing conditions. The most frequent discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (35.2%), bronchiolitis (32.4%), and bronchitis (12.4%). Fifteen point nine percent of patients required admission into intensive care units. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the association between HRV and children hospitalizations caused by ARI. PMID:25983014

  15. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811

  16. Prognostic indicators of adverse renal outcome and death in acute kidney injury hospital survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamzić-Mehmedbašić, Aida; Rašić, Senija; Balavac, Merima; Rebić, Damir; Delić-Šarac, Marina; Durak-Nalbantić, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding prognostic factors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in acute kidney injury (AKI) hospital survivors are scarce and controversial. Objectives: We aimed to identify predictors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in AKI hospital survivors. Patients and Methods: The study group consisted of 84 AKI hospital survivors admitted to the tertiary medical center during 2-year period. Baseline clinical parameters, with renal outcome 3 months after discharge and 6-month mortality were evaluated. According survival and renal function outcome, patients were divided into two groups. Results: Patients who did not recover renal function were statistically significantly older (P < 0.007) with higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (P < 0.000) and more likely to have anuria and oliguria (P = 0.008) compared to those with recovery. Deceased AKI patients were statistically significantly older (P < 0.000), with higher CCI score (P < 0.000), greater prevalence of sepsis (P =0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.017) and ferritin (P < 0.051) and lower concentrations of albumin (P<0.01) compared to survivors. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of adverse renal outcome were female gender (P =0.033), increasing CCI (P =0.000), presence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease (P =0.000) and diabetes mellitus (P =0.019) as well as acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (P =0.032), while protective factor for renal function outcome was higher urine output (P =0.009). Independent predictors of post-discharge mortality were female gender (P =0.04), higher CCI score (P =0.001) and sepsis (P =0.034). Conclusion: Female AKI hospital survivors with increasing burden of comorbidities, diagnosis of sepsis and ADHF seem to be at high-risk for poor post-discharge outcome. PMID:27471736

  17. Drug and alcohol abuse in patients with acute burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Swenson, J R; Dimsdale, J E; Rockwell, E; Carroll, W; Hansbrough, J

    1991-01-01

    We reviewed records of adult patients admitted to our burn unit who were reported to abuse drugs or alcohol from 1985 to 1988. The proportion of patients reported as abusing drugs increased significantly from 1987 to 1988, compared to previous years. However, there was no increase in the proportion of patients reported to abuse alcohol. Patients identified as abusing drugs had longer hospital stays, compared to patients who were not reported to abuse substances. Methamphetamine and cocaine were the drugs most often abused by patients who abused drugs or both drugs and alcohol. Mechanisms of burn injury in these patients included "accidental" burn injury related to acute intoxication, and self-injury due to psychosis or depression. PMID:1882020

  18. The incidence of acute hospital-treated eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Karlson, T A; Klein, B E

    1986-10-01

    Little information is available on the incidence and severity of eye injuries despite the disfigurement and vision loss they cause. From a population-based study in Dane County, Wisconsin, the incidence of acute hospital-treated eye injuries was 423/100,000 residents in 1979. The most common causes of eye injuries were assaults, work-related events, sports and recreational activities, motor vehicle crashes, and falls. Consumer products were involved in almost 70% (9/13) of severe eye injuries classified as severe. Injuries from fireworks were not found at all in this population. Implementing known strategies for eye injury prevention would substantially reduce their incidence. These include requiring certified eye protectors at workplaces and in sports activities whenever possible rather than making their use voluntary. For the preponderance of eye injuries, however, modifying potentially hazardous consumer products, including the interior of passenger cars, will be necessary. PMID:3767676

  19. Improving patients' and staff's experiences of acute care.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Rob; Crawshaw, Jacob; Hood, Chloe

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this audit was to assess the effect of the Quality Mark programme on the quality of acute care received by older patients by comparing the experiences of staff and older adults before and after the programme. Data from 31 wards in 12 acute hospitals were collected over two stages. Patients and staff completed questionnaires on the perceived quality of care on the ward. Patients rated improved experiences of nutrition, staff availability and dignity. Staff received an increase in training and reported better access to support, increased time and skill to deliver care and improved morale, leadership and teamwork. Problems remained with ward comfort and mealtimes. Overall, results indicated an improvement in ratings of care quality in most domains during Quality Mark data collection. Further audits need to explore ways of improving ward comfort and mealtime experience. PMID:25727634

  20. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  1. The Influence of Hospital Market Competition on Patient Mortality and Total Performance Score.

    PubMed

    Haley, Donald Robert; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron; Hamadi, Hanadi; Xu, Jing; Yeomans, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 launch of Medicare Value-Based Purchasing has become the platform for payment reform. It is a mechanism by which buyers of health care services hold providers accountable for high-quality and cost-effective care. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between quality of hospital care and hospital competition using the quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior. The quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Data from the American Hospital Association database, the Hospital Compare database, and the Area Health Resources Files database were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effect of hospital competition on patient mortality. Hospital market competition was significantly and negatively related to the 3 mortality rates. Consistent with the literature, hospitals located in more competitive markets had lower mortality rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The results suggest that hospitals may be more readily to compete on quality of care and patient outcomes. The findings are important because policies that seek to control and negatively influence a competitive hospital environment, such as Certificate of Need legislation, may negatively affect patient mortality rates. Therefore, policymakers should encourage the development of policies that facilitate a more competitive and transparent health care marketplace to potentially and significantly improve patient mortality. PMID:27455368

  2. Patient Preferences for Information on Post-Acute Care Services.

    PubMed

    Sefcik, Justine S; Nock, Rebecca H; Flores, Emilia J; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore what hospitalized patients would like to know about post-acute care (PAC) services to ultimately help them make an informed decision when offered PAC options. Thirty hospitalized adults 55 and older in a Northeastern U.S. academic medical center participated in a qualitative descriptive study with conventional content analysis as the analytical technique. Three themes emerged: (a) receiving practical information about the services, (b) understanding "how it relates to me," and (c) having opportunities to understand PAC options. Study findings inform clinicians what information should be included when discussing PAC options with older adults. Improving the quality of discharge planning discussions may better inform patient decision making and, as a result, increase the numbers of patients who accept a plan of care that supports recovery, meets their needs, and results in improved quality of life and fewer readmissions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(4):175-182.]. PMID:26815304

  3. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  4. Neuroanatomical Predictors of Awakening in Acutely Comatose Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Robert G.; Buitrago, Manuel M.; Duckworth, Josh; Chonka, Zachary D.; Puttgen, H. Adrian; Stevens, Robert D.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lateral brain displacement has been associated with loss of consciousness and poor outcome in a range of acute neurologic disorders. We studied the association between lateral brain displacement and awakening from acute coma. Methods This prospective observational study included all new onset coma patients admitted to the Neurosciences Critical Care Unit (NCCU) over 12 consecutive months. Head computed tomography (CT) scans were analyzed independently at coma onset, after awakening, and at follow-up. Primary outcome measure was awakening, defined as the ability to follow commands before hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures were discharge Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), modified Rankin Scale, Glasgow Outcome Scale, and hospital and NCCU lengths of stay. Results Of the 85 patients studied, the mean age was 58 ± 16 years, 51% were female, and 78% had cerebrovascular etiology of coma. Fifty-one percent of patients had midline shift on head CT at coma onset and 43 (51%) patients awakened. In a multivariate analysis, independent predictors of awakening were younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.039, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.002–1.079, p = 0.040), higher GCS score at coma onset (OR = 1.455, 95% CI = 1.157–1.831, p = 0.001), nontraumatic coma etiology (OR = 4.464, 95% CI = 1.011–19.608, p = 0.048), lesser pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 1.316, 95% CI = 1.073–1.615, p = 0.009), and reduction or no increase in pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 11.628, 95% CI = 2.207–62.500, p = 0.004). Interpretation Reversal and/or limitation of lateral brain displacement are associated with acute awakening in comatose patients. These findings suggest objective parameters to guide prognosis and treatment in patients with acute onset of coma. PMID:25628166

  5. Viral etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized young children in a children's referral hospital in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mahmoudi, Shima; Movahedi, Zahra; Halimi, Shahnaz; Momeni, Shervin; Hosseinpour-Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are considered major causes of acute respiratory tract infections among children under 5 years old. In this study we investigated the prevalence of three respiratory viruses--respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus (INF) and adenovirus (ADV)--among hospitalized children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children under five who had been hospitalized for LRTIs. The clinical data, including demographic data (age and sex), vital symptoms and signs at admission, duration of fever, duration of hospitalization, chest X-ray findings and outcome were considered. All inpatient specimens were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV and the INF-A, INF-B and parainfluenza viruses and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ADV. Out of those from 232 patients, 58 (25%) specimens were positive for either RSV, INF or ADV. The most predominant pathogens were RSV (40 cases, 17.2%), followed by INF (10 cases, 4%; including 8 type A and 2 type B) and ADV (8 cases, 3.4%). A total of 32 (55.1%) viral cases were identified in the spring, followed by 19 (32.7%) in the autumn and 7 (12%) in the winter. There was no significant correlation between clinical symptoms and the individual virus detected. In our study, RSV and INF were the two most common causes of LRTIs. These data are helpful for guiding the development of further vaccines as well as the use of antiviral drugs. Further studies will be needed to investigate other respiratory viruses such as parainfluenza, human metapneumovirus and rhinovirus. PMID:25818953

  6. Compliance with Evidence-Based Guidelines in Acute Pancreatitis: an Audit of Practices in University of Toronto Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J A; Hsu, J; Bawazeer, M; Marshall, J; Friedrich, J O; Nathens, A; Coburn, N; Huang, H; McLeod, R S

    2016-02-01

    Despite existing evidence-based practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, clinical compliance with recommendations is poor. We conducted a retrospective review of 248 patients admitted between 2010 and 2012 with acute pancreatitis at eight University of Toronto affiliated hospitals. We included all patients admitted to ICU (52) and 25 ward patients from each site (196). Management was compared with the most current evidence used in the Best Practice in General Surgery Management of Acute Pancreatitis Guideline. Fifty-six patients (22.6 %) had only serum lipase tested for biochemical diagnosis. Admission ultrasound was performed in 174 (70.2 %) patients, with 69 (27.8 %) undergoing ultrasound and CT. Of non-ICU patients, 158 (80.6 %) were maintained nil per os, and only 18 (34.6 %) ICU patients received enteral nutrition, commencing an average 7.5 days post-admission. Fifty (25.5 %) non-ICU patients and 25 (48.1 %) ICU patients received prophylactic antibiotics. Only 24 patients (22.6 %) with gallstone pancreatitis underwent index admission cholecystectomy. ERCP with sphincterotomy was under-utilized among patients with biliary obstruction (16 [31 %]) and candidates for prophylactic sphincterotomy (18 [22 %]). Discrepancies exist between the most current evidence and clinical practice within the University of Toronto hospitals. A guideline, knowledge translation strategy, and assessment of barriers to clinical uptake are required to change current clinical practice. PMID:26621675

  7. Trends in the Incidence of Hospitalized Acute Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Korea, 2006-2010

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Rock Bum; Kim, Byoung-Gwon; Kim, Yu-Mi; Seo, Jeong Wook; Lim, Young Shil; Kim, Hee Sook; Lee, Hey Jean; Moon, Ji Young; Kim, Keon Yeop; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Park, Hyeung-Keun; Song, Jung-Kook; Park, Ki-Soo; Jeong, Baek Geun; Park, Chan Gyeong; Shin, Hee-Young; Kang, Jong-Won; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lee, Young-Hoon; Seong, In-Whan; Yoo, Weon-Seob

    2013-01-01

    This study attempted to calculate and investigate the incidence of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke in Korea. Using the National Health Insurance claim data, we investigated patients whose main diagnostic codes included AMI or stroke during 2006 to 2010. As a result, we found out that the number of AMI hospitalized patients had decreased since 2006 and amounted to 15,893 in 2010; and that the number of those with stroke had decreased since 2006 and amounted to 73,501 in 2010. The age-standardized incidence rate of hospitalized AMI, after adjustment for readmission, was 41.6 cases per 100,000-population in 2006, and had decreased to 29.4 cases in 2010 (for trend P < 0.001). In the case of stroke was estimated at 172.8 cases per 100,000-population in 2006, and had decreased to 135.1 cases in 2010 (for trend P < 0.001). In conclusion, the age-standardized incidence rates of both hospitalized AMI and stroke in Korea had decreased continuously during 2006 to 2010. We consider this decreasing trend due to the active use of pharmaceuticals, early vascular intervention, and the national cardio-cerebrovascular disease care project as the primary and secondary prevention efforts. PMID:23341707

  8. Aspiration-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Acute Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of oral or gastric contents into the larynx and lower respiratory tract is a common problem in acute stroke patients, which significantly increases the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of aspiration-related ARDS in acute stroke patients. Methods Over 17-month period a retrospective cohort study was done on 1495 consecutive patients with acute stroke. The data including demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, and hospital discharge status were collected to analysis. Results Aspiration-related ARDS was diagnosed in 54 patients (3.6%). The most common presenting symptom was tachypnea (respiratory rate ≥25 breaths/min) in 50 cases. Computed tomography (CT) images usually demonstrated diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and inhomogeneous patchy consolidations involving the low lobes. Age, NIHSS score, GCS score, dysphagia, dysarthria, hemoglobin concentration, serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin, serum sodium, and admission glucose level were independently associated with aspiration-related ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.04–1.07); OR 2.87, (2.68–3.63); OR 4.21, (3.57–5.09); OR 2.18, (1.23–3.86); OR 1.67, (1.31–2.14); OR 2.31, (1.11–4.84); OR 1.68, (1.01–2.80); OR 2.15, (1.19–3.90); OR 1.92, (1.10–3.36) and OR 1.14, (1.06–1.21) respectively). Conclusions Aspiration-related ARDS frequently occurs in acute stroke patient with impairment consciousness. It is advisable that performing chest CT timely may identify disease early and prompt treatment to rescue patients. PMID:25790377

  9. Incidence and consequence of acute kidney injury in unselected emergency admissions to a large acute UK hospital trust

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background AKI is common among hospital in-patients and places a huge financial burden on the UK National Health Service, causing increased length of hospital stay and use of critical care services, with increased requirement for complex interventions including dialysis. This may account for up to 0.6% of the total Health Service budget. To investigate the incidence and consequences of AKI, all unselected emergency admissions to a large acute UK single centre University Teaching Hospital over two separate 7 day periods were reviewed. Methods A retrospective audit of 745 case records was undertaken (54.6% male) including laboratory data post-discharge or death, with classification of AKI by RIFLE, AKIN and AKIB criteria. Participants were included whether admitted via their general practitioners, the emergency department, or as tertiary specialty transfers. Outcome measures were presence or absence of AKI recorded using each of the three AKI criteria, length of hospital stay (LOS), admission to, and LOS in critical care, and mortality. The most severe grade of AKI only, at any time during the admission, was recorded to prevent double counting. Renal outcome was determined by requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT), and whether those receiving RRT remained dialysis dependent or not. Results AKI incidence was 25.4% overall. With approximately one third present on admission and two thirds developing post admission. The AKI group had LOS almost three times higher than the non AKI group (10 vs 4 days). Requirement for critical care beds was 8.1% in the AKI group compared to 1.7% in non AKI group. Overall mortality was 5.5%, with the AKI group at 11.4% versus 3.3% in the non AKI group. Conclusions AKI in acute unselected hospital admissions is more common than existing literature suggests, affecting 25% of unselected admissions. In many this is relatively mild and may resolve spontaneously, but is associated with increased LOS, likelihood of admission to

  10. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features. PMID:10436614

  11. Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

    2004-01-01

    One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

  12. Respiratory Viral Testing and Influenza Antiviral Prescriptions During Hospitalization for Acute Respiratory Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly M.; Meek, James I.; Fry, Alicia M.; Chaves, Sandra S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined respiratory viral testing and influenza antiviral prescriptions at a US tertiary care hospital. During the 2010–11 to 2012–13 influenza seasons, antiviral prescriptions among acute respiratory illness (ARI) hospitalizations were associated with viral testing (rate ratio = 15.0), and empiric prescriptions were rare (<1% of ARI hospitalizations). PMID:26885545

  13. Bringing the Hospital to the Patient: First Treatment of Stroke Patients at the Emergency Site

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Silke; Kostpopoulos, Panagiotis; Haass, Anton; Helwig, Stefan; Keller, Isabel; Licina, Tamara; Schlechtriemen, Thomas; Roth, Christian; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Anna; Vierra, Julio; Körner, Heiko; Schmidt, Kathrin; Romann, Marie-Sophie; Alexandrou, Maria; Yilmaz, Umut; Grunwald, Iris; Kubulus, Darius; Lesmeister, Martin; Ziegeler, Stephan; Pattar, Alexander; Golinski, Martin; Liu, Yang; Volk, Thomas; Bertsch, Thomas; Reith, Wolfgang; Fassbender, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Background Early treatment with rt-PA is critical for favorable outcome of acute stroke. However, only a very small proportion of stroke patients receive this treatment, as most arrive at hospital too late to be eligible for rt-PA therapy. Methods and Findings We developed a “Mobile Stroke Unit”, consisting of an ambulance equipped with computed tomography, a point-of-care laboratory system for complete stroke laboratory work-up, and telemedicine capabilities for contact with hospital experts, to achieve delivery of etiology-specific and guideline-adherent stroke treatment at the site of the emergency, well before arrival at the hospital. In a departure from current practice, stroke patients could be differentially treated according to their ischemic or hemorrhagic etiology even in the prehospital phase of stroke management. Immediate diagnosis of cerebral ischemia and exclusion of thrombolysis contraindications enabled us to perform prehospital rt-PA thrombolysis as bridging to later intra-arterial recanalization in one patient. In a complementary patient with cerebral hemorrhage, prehospital diagnosis allowed immediate initiation of hemorrhage-specific blood pressure management and telemedicine consultation regarding surgery. Call-to-therapy-decision times were 35 minutes. Conclusion This preliminary study proves the feasibility of guideline-adherent, etiology-specific and causal treatment of acute stroke directly at the emergency site. PMID:21060800

  14. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection. PMID:22490115

  15. Rehospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits after Hospital Discharge in Patients Receiving Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Harel, Ziv; Wald, Ron; McArthur, Eric; Chertow, Glenn M; Harel, Shai; Gruneir, Andrea; Fischer, Hadas D; Garg, Amit X; Perl, Jeffrey; Nash, Danielle M; Silver, Samuel; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-12-01

    Clinical outcomes after a hospital discharge are poorly defined for patients receiving maintenance in-center (outpatient) hemodialysis. To describe the proportion and characteristics of these patients who are rehospitalized, visit an emergency department, or die within 30 days after discharge from an acute hospitalization, we conducted a population-based study of all adult patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis who were discharged between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2011, from 157 acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. For patients with more than one hospitalization, we randomly selected a single hospitalization as the index hospitalization. Of the 11,177 patients included in the final cohort, 1926 (17%) were rehospitalized, 2971 (27%) were treated in the emergency department, and 840 (7.5%) died within 30 days of discharge. Complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus were the most common reason for rehospitalization, whereas heart failure was the most common reason for an emergency department visit. In multivariable analysis using a cause-specific Cox proportional hazards model, the following characteristics were associated with 30-day rehospitalization: older age, the number of hospital admissions in the preceding 6 months, the number of emergency department visits in the preceding 6 months, higher Charlson comorbidity index score, and the receipt of mechanical ventilation during the index hospitalization. Thus, a large proportion of patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis will be readmitted or visit an emergency room within 30 days of an acute hospitalization. A focus on improving care transitions from the inpatient setting to the outpatient dialysis unit may improve outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. PMID:25855772

  16. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGÁLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ranson´s scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  17. A retrospective study of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Etiological diagnosis is an important part of the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis. Hantavirus infection is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, which is easy to ignore. There is a need to analyze clinical features of acute pancreatitis caused by Hantavirus. Methods This is a retrospective study conducted from May 1, 2006 to May 31, 2012 on patients diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome at our hospital. We reviewed these patients medical records, laboratory results and radiologic examinations to determine the prevalence and summarize clinical features of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Results A total of 218 patients were diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome during the 6-year study period. Only 2.8% (6/218) of the total hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome patients were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The first symptom for all six of the patients with acute pancreatitis was fever. All six patients experienced hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia during the disease course, which was different from general acute pancreatitis. In addition, we presented two misdiagnosed clinical cases. Conclusions Acute pancreatitis is not a frequent complication in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Clinicians should be alerted to the possibility of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome when acute pancreatitis patients with epidemiological data have high fever before abdominal pain. PMID:24345089

  18. Patient Safety Outcomes in Small Urban and Small Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M.; Vaughn, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patient safety outcomes in small urban and small rural hospitals and to examine the relationship of hospital and patient factors to patient safety outcomes. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. To increase comparability, the study sample was…

  19. Patient satisfaction after acute admission for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bø, Beate; Ottesen, Øyvind H; Gjestad, Rolf; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Kroken, Rune A; Løberg, Else-Marie; Johnsen, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Background Measuring patient satisfaction in mental health care potentially provides valuable information, but studies in acutely admitted psychosis patients are scarce. Aims The aims were to assess satisfaction among patients acutely admitted with psychosis, to compare satisfaction in voluntarily versus involuntarily admitted patients, and to assess the influence of symptom load and insight. Methods The UKU Consumer Satisfaction Rating Scale (UKU-ConSat) was used. A total of 104 patients completed the UKU-ConSat at discharge/follow-up (between 6-11 weeks after admittance if not discharged earlier) (mean duration of stay 4 weeks), thus corresponding to the end of the acute treatment phase. Results A total of 88.4% had total scores above zero (satisfied). Only three of the eight single items were statistically significantly different among patients admitted voluntarily versus involuntarily, and only the information item score remained significantly different in adjusted analyses. Insight level at admittance, and an increasing level of insight during the acute phase were positively associated with patient satisfaction, whereas levels and changes in positive and negative psychosis symptoms were indirectly related to satisfaction via this process of insight. Conclusions The vast majority of the acutely admitted patients were satisfied with treatment. There were few differences between the involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patient groups, except that the involuntary care group was clearly less satisfied with the information provided. Poor insight had a major negative impact on treatment satisfaction in psychosis. The provision of sufficient and adequate information is an important target for mental health care service improvement. PMID:26750532

  20. A comprehensive approach to improving patient flow in our hospitals--the 'left to right, over and under' concept.

    PubMed

    Ardagh, Michael

    2015-08-21

    It is essential we manage the capacity of our hospitals so that acute demand can be accommodated without developing queues for care and backlogs of work. This paper presents a comprehensive model for improving patient flow in our hospitals by attending carefully to both the demand and capacity states of the hospital and maximising efficient flow of our acute patient journeys. The model includes attention to the patient journey as the central focus, with an overarching governance structure and an underpinning sophisticated operations structure. PMID:26367513

  1. Prevalence and predictors of hospital prealerting in acute stroke: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, J P; Lindenmeyer, A; Mellor, R M; Greenfield, S; Mant, J; Quinn, T; Rosser, A; Sandler, D; Sims, D; Ward, M; McManus, R J

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis can significantly reduce the burden of stroke but the time window for safe and effective treatment is short. In patients travelling to hospital via ambulance, the sending of a ‘prealert’ message can significantly improve the timeliness of treatment. Objective Examine the prevalence of hospital prealerting, the extent to which prealert protocols are followed and what factors influence emergency medical services (EMS) staff's decision to send a prealert. Methods Cohort study of patients admitted to two acute stroke units in West Midlands (UK) hospitals using linked data from hospital and EMS records. A logistic regression model examined the association between prealert eligibility and whether a prealert message was sent. In semistructured interviews, EMS staff were asked about their experiences of patients with suspected stroke. Results Of the 539 patients eligible for this study, 271 (51%) were recruited. Of these, only 79 (29%) were eligible for prealerting according to criteria set out in local protocols but 143 (53%) were prealerted. Increasing number of Face, Arm, Speech Test symptoms (1 symptom, OR 6.14, 95% CI 2.06 to 18.30, p=0.001; 2 symptoms, OR 31.36, 95% CI 9.91 to 99.24, p<0.001; 3 symptoms, OR 75.84, 95% CI 24.68 to 233.03, p<0.001) and EMS contact within 5 h of symptom onset (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.37 to 6.50 p=0.006) were key predictors of prealerting but eligibility for prealert as a whole was not (OR 1.92, 95% CI 0.85 to 4.34 p=0.12). In qualitative interviews, EMS staff displayed varying understanding of prealert protocols and described frustration when their interpretation of the prealert criteria was not shared by ED staff. Conclusions Up to half of the patients presenting with suspected stroke in this study were prealerted by EMS staff, regardless of eligibility, resulting in disagreements with ED staff during handover. Aligning the expectations of EMS and ED staff, perhaps through simplified prealert protocols, could be

  2. Improving acute care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate

    People with dementia are more likely to experience a decline in function, fall or fracture when admitted to hospital than the general hospital population. Informal carers' views were sought on the care their relative with dementia received in hospital. Participants were concerned about a lack of essential nursing care, harmful incidents, a decline in patient function, poor staff communication and carers' needs not being acknowledged. Care can be improved through further training, more effective communication, consideration of the appropriate place to care for people and more use of carers' knowledge. PMID:27017677

  3. The delay to thrombolysis: an analysis of patient and hospital characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, J M; Diodati, J G; Bogaty, P; Théroux, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the various components of the delay to thrombolytic treatment for patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to identify the hospital and patient characteristics related to these delays. DESIGN: Cohort analysis from a hospital registry of patients receiving thrombolytic treatment. SETTING: Forty acute care hospitals in Quebec. SUBJECTS: All 1357 patients who received thrombolysis between January 1995 and May 1996. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Time from onset of symptoms to arrival at hospital and the various components of the in-hospital delay. RESULTS: The median delay before presentation to hospital was 98 (interquartile range [IR] 56 to 180) minutes and was longer for women (p < 0.001), patients over 65 years of age (p < 0.001) and patients with diabetes mellitus (p < 0.01). The median time from arrival at hospital to thrombolysis was 59 (IR 41 to 89) minutes, the medical decision-making component taking a median of 12 (IR 4 to 27) minutes. Women (p < 0.005), older patients (p < 0.001) and patients with a past history of MI (p < 0.001) had increased in-hospital delays to thrombolysis. Delays were longer in community hospitals (p < 0.05) and low-volume centres (p < 0.01) and when a cardiologist made the decision to administer thrombolysis (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that increased age (odds ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 1.7, p < 0.001) and having the medical decision made by a cardiologist (odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.6 to 2.0, p < 0.001) were independently associated with an increased risk of being in the upper median of in-hospital delays. CONCLUSIONS: Despite certain improvements, there remain substantial delays between symptom onset and the administration of thrombolysis for patients with acute MI. A large part of the delay is due to the hesitation of patients (particularly women, older patients and patients with diabetes) to seek medical attention. Although the median time for medical decision

  4. Does ultrasonography accurately diagnose acute cholecystitis? Improving diagnostic accuracy based on a review at a regional hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hamish; Marsh, Ian; Doyle, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute cholecystitis is one of the most common diseases requiring emergency surgery. Ultrasonography is an accurate test for cholelithiasis but has a high false-negative rate for acute cholecystitis. The Murphy sign and laboratory tests performed independently are also not particularly accurate. This study was designed to review the accuracy of ultrasonography for diagnosing acute cholecystitis in a regional hospital. Methods We studied all emergency cholecystectomies performed over a 1-year period. All imaging studies were reviewed by a single radiologist, and all pathology was reviewed by a single pathologist. The reviewers were blinded to each other’s results. Results A total of 107 patients required an emergency cholecystectomy in the study period; 83 of them underwent ultrasonography. Interradiologist agreement was 92% for ultrasonography. For cholelithiasis, ultrasonography had 100% sensitivity, 18% specificity, 81% positive predictive value (PPV) and 100% negative predictive value (NPV). For acute cholecystitis, it had 54% sensitivity, 81% specificity, 85% PPV and 47% NPV. All patients had chronic cholecystitis and 67% had acute cholecystitis on histology. When combined with positive Murphy sign and elevated neutrophil count, an ultrasound showing cholelithiasis or acute cholecystitis yielded a sensitivity of 74%, specificity of 62%, PPV of 80% and NPV of 53% for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Conclusion Ultrasonography alone has a high rate of false-negative studies for acute cholecystitis. However, a higher rate of accurate diagnosis can be achieved using a triad of positive Murphy sign, elevated neutrophil count and an ultrasound showing cholelithiasis or cholecystitis. PMID:24869607

  5. Impact of individualized care on readmissions after a hospitalization for acute exacerbation of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Simon L; Burns, Jane; Camp, Pat G; Sin, Don D; van Eeden, Stephan F

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) increase COPD morbidity and mortality and impose a great burden on health care systems. Early readmission following a hospitalization for AECOPD remains an important clinical problem. We examined how individualized comprehensive care influences readmissions following an index hospital admission for AECOPD. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data of patients admitted for AECOPD to two inner-city teaching hospitals to determine the impact of a comprehensive and individualized care management strategy on readmissions for AECOPD. The control group consisted of 271 patients whose index AECOPD occurred the year before the comprehensive program, and the experimental group consisted of 191 patients who received the comprehensive care. The primary outcome measure was the total number of readmissions in 30- and 90-day postindex hospitalizations. Secondary outcome measures included the length of time between the index admission and first readmission and all-cause mortality. Results The two groups were similar in terms of age, sex, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, body mass index (BMI), pack-years, and the number and types of comorbidities. Comprehensive care significantly reduced 90-day readmission rates in females (P=0.0205, corrected for age, BMI, number of comorbidities, substance abuse, and mental illness) but not in males or in the whole group (P>0.05). The average times between index admission and first readmission were not different between the two groups. Post hoc multivariate analysis showed that substance abuse (P<0.01) increased 30- and 90-day readmissions (corrected for age, sex, BMI, number of comorbidities, and mental illness). The 90-day all-cause in-hospital mortality rates were significantly less in the care package group (2.67% versus 7.97%, P=0.0268). Conclusion Comprehensive individualized care for subjects admitted to hospital for AECOPD did not reduce 30- and 90-day

  6. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  7. Clinical significance of lactate in acute cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lactate, as a metabolite of easy and quick assessment, has been studied over time in critically ill patients in order to evaluate its prognostic ability. The present review is focused on the prognostic role of lactate levels in acute cardiac patients (that is with acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, non including post cardiac surgery patients). In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with mechanical revascularization, hyperlactatemia identified a subset of patients at higher risk for early death and in-hospital complications, being strictly related mainly to hemodynamic derangement. The prognostic impact of hyperlactatemia on mortality has been documented in patients with cardiogenic shock and in those with cardiac arrest even if there is no cut-off value of lactate to be associated with worse outcome or to guide resuscitation or hemodynamic management. Therapeutic hypothermia seems to affect per se lactate values which have been shown to progressively decrease during hypothermia. The mechanism(s) accounting for lactate levels during hypothemia seem to be multiple ranging from the metabolic effects of reduced temperatures to the hemodynamic effects of hypothermia (i.e., reduced need of vasopressor agents). Serial lactate measurements over time, or lactate clearance, have been reported to be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value also in acute cardiac patients. Despite differences in study design, timing of lactate measurements and type of acute cardiac conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, refractory cardiac arrest), available evidence strongly suggests that higher lactate levels can be observed on admission in non-survivors and that higher lactate clearance is associated with better outcome. PMID:26322188

  8. Physiologic imaging in acute stroke: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Clinton D; Stephens, Marcus; Zuckerman, Scott L; Waitara, Magarya S; Morone, Peter J; Dewan, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is changing, as endovascular intervention becomes an important adjunct to tissue plasminogen activator. An increasing number of sophisticated physiologic imaging techniques have unique advantages and applications in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment-decision making of acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we first highlight the strengths, weaknesses, and possible indications for various stroke imaging techniques. How acute imaging findings in each modality have been used to predict functional outcome is discussed. Furthermore, there is an increasing emphasis on using these state-of-the-art imaging modalities to offer maximal patient benefit through IV therapy, endovascular thrombolytics, and clot retrieval. We review the burgeoning literature in the determination of stroke treatment based on acute, physiologic imaging findings. PMID:26063695

  9. Role of the acute care nurse in managing patients with heart failure using evidence-based care.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sara; Hice, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a major US public health problem, accounting for more than 1 million hospitalizations each year. As part of the health care team, nurses play an important role in the evaluation and management of patients presenting to the emergency department with acute decompensated heart failure. Once acute decompensation is controlled, nurses also play a critical role in preparing patients for hospital discharge and educating patients and caregivers about strategies to improve long-term outcomes and prevent future decompensation and rehospitalization. Nurses' assessment skills and comprehensive knowledge of acute and chronic heart failure are important to optimize patient care and improve outcomes from initial emergency department presentation through discharge and follow-up. This review presents an overview of current heart failure guidelines, with the goal of providing acute care cardiac nurses with information that will allow them to better use their knowledge of heart failure to facilitate diagnosis, management, and education of patients with acute heart failure. PMID:25185764

  10. Adverse Effects of Oral Nonselective and cyclooxygenase-2-Selective NSAIDs on Hospitalization for Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-I.; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Yung-Tai; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Chih-Yu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chu, Dachen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the association between the use of nonselective or cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in a general Asian population. We conducted an observational, nationwide, nested case–control cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database between 2010 and 2012. AKI cases were defined as hospitalization with a principle diagnosis of AKI. Each case was matched to 4 randomly selected controls based on age, sex, and the month and year of cohort entry. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to demonstrate the association between hospitalization for AKI and current, recent, or past use of an oral NSAID. During the study period, we identified 6199 patients with AKI and 24,796 matched controls. Overall, current users (adjusted OR 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.28–3.28) and recent users (adjusted OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01–1.35) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization for AKI. The risk was also similar for nonselective NSAIDs. However, neither current nor recent use of COX-2 inhibitors was significantly associated with AKI events. Our study supported that the initiation of nonselective NSAIDs rather than COX-2 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of AKI requiring hospitalization. Future randomized trials are needed to elucidate these findings. PMID:26945352

  11. Acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Islambulchilar, M; Islambulchilar, Z; Kargar-Maher, M H

    2009-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the etiological and demographical characteristics of acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran. This retrospective study was performed on 1342 poisoning admissions to a university hospital from 2003 to 2005, by data collection from the medical records of patients. Poisonings were 5.40% of the total admissions. There was a predominance of female patients (55.7%) compared to male patients (44.3%) with a female-to-male ratio of 1.2:1. Most poisonings occurred in the age range of 11-20 years (38.9%). Drugs were the most common cause of poisonings (60.8%). Among the drug poisonings, benzodiazepines (40.31%) were the most frequent agents, followed by antidepressants (31.98%). The seasonal distribution in poisoning patients suggested a peak in spring (28%) and summer (27.5%). In 9.8% of cases accidental and in 90.2% intentional poisonings were evident. Most suicide attempts were made by women (58.51%) and unmarried people (51.4%).The mean duration of hospitalization was 3.02 +/- 2.8 days. There were 28 (2.3%) deaths; the majority (13 cases) was due to pesticides. This was a university hospital-based study, so these results may not be representative of the general population. Despite this drawback, these data still provide important information on the characteristics of the poisoning in this part of Iran. To prevent such poisonings, the community education about the danger of central nervous system-acting drugs and reducing the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. PMID:19734268

  12. Acute hemolysis in a patient with a newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian G; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-07-01

    We describe a 62-year-old of Egyptian origin who presented with sudden, severe and symptomatic anemia requiring hospitalization shortly after beginning concurrent radiation and temozolomide for his newly diagnosed glioblastoma. He had also recently been started on steroids, anticonvulsants and Pneumocystis jirovecii prophylaxis. He was ultimately diagnosed with G6PD deficiency with an acute hemolytic anemia precipitated by dapsone. Screening for G6PD deficiency should be considered in high-risk patient populations where P. jirovecii prophylaxis is planned. PMID:27230975

  13. Prevalence, causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions after acute stroke and transient ischemic attack: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Geng, Na; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Zhenguang; Cao, Lili

    2016-08-01

    Acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a great burden not only during hospitalization but also after hospital discharge. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the hospital readmissions, causes and risk factors after survival of acute stroke and TIA. Pubmed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, OVID and EMBASE databases were searched to identify studies reporting hospital readmissions after acute stroke and TIA. The primary outcomes were hospital readmission rates during 30 days and 1 year after discharge. The primary causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions were also identified. Ten studies with 253,680 patients were eligible for inclusion. The pooled 30-day and 1-year hospital readmission rates were 17.4 % (95 % CI, 12.7-23.5 %) and 42.5 % (95 % CI, 34.1-51.3 %), respectively. The three major causes of 30-day hospital readmissions were infection (19.9 %), coronary artery disease (CAD) (17.8 %) and recurrent stroke (16.0 %) successively, while the three major causes were recurrent stroke (19.4 %), infection (19.3 %) and CAD (16.3 %) during 1 year's follow-up. There were more patients with CAD in readmits group than that in control group (p = 0.030). The length of index admission, defined as any eligible admission to an acute care hospital assessed in the measure for the outcome, was longer (p = 0.000) and admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) was higher (p = 0.002) in readmits group than these in control group. In conclusion, there is high risk of early and long-term hospital readmissions after survival of acute stroke and TIA. These patients with coronary artery disease, longer length of index admission and higher NIHSS deserve deep attention after hospital discharge. PMID:27129874

  14. Exploring Reasons for Bed Pressures in Winnipeg Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menec, Verena H.; Bruce, Sharon; MacWilliam, Leonard R.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital overcrowding has plagued Winnipeg and other Canadian cities for years. This study explored factors related to overcrowding. Hospital files were used to examine patterns of hospital use from fiscal years 1996/1997 to 1999/2000. Chart reviews were conducted to examine appropriateness of admissions and hospital stays during one pressure…

  15. The Group Dynamic and Poetry: A Support Source for Hospitalized Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carty, Laurie

    1988-01-01

    Describes two-week clinical experience assigned to nursing students in an acute short-term psychiatric hospital. Selected voluntary large group meetings to promote social skills and group belonging; and small groups, based on level of patient functioning, to enhance change and growth. Describes the groups and the value of poetry and artistic…

  16. Incidence, Outcomes, and Risk Factors of Community-Acquired and Hospital-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lee, Chien-Te; Su, Chien-Hao; Wang, Yu-Ching Lily; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The disease burden and outcomes of community-acquired (CA-) and hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) are not well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors of AKI in a large Taiwanese adult cohort. This retrospective cohort study examined 734,340 hospital admissions from a group of hospitals within an organization in Taiwan between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014. Patients with AKI at discharge were classified as either CA- or HA-AKI based on the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end stage of kidney disease) classification criteria. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality, dialysis, recovery of renal function, and length of stay. Risks of developing AKI were determined using multivariate logistic regression based on demographic and baseline clinical characteristics and nephrotoxin use before admission. AKI occurred in 1.68% to 2% hospital discharges among adults without and with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD), respectively. The incidence of CA-AKI was 17.25 and HA-AKI was 8.14 per 1000 admissions. The annual rate of CA-AKI increased from 12.43 to 19.96 per 1000 people, but the change in HA-AKI was insignificant. Comparing to CA-AKI, those with HA-AKI had higher levels of in-hospital mortality (26.07% vs 51.58%), mean length of stay (21.25 ± 22.35 vs 35.84 ± 34.62 days), and dialysis during hospitalization (1.45% vs 2.06%). Preexisting systemic diseases, including CKD were associated with increased risks of CA-AKI, and nephrotoxic polypharmacy increased risk of both CA- and HA-AKI. Patients with HA-AKI had more severe outcomes than patients with CA-AKI, and demonstrated different spectrum of risk factors. Although patients with CA-AKI with better outcomes, the incidence increased over time. It is also clear that optimal preventive and management strategies of HA- and CA-AKI are urgently needed to limit the risks in susceptible individuals. PMID:27175701

  17. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    BERTI-COUTO, Soraya de Azambuja; COUTO-SOUZA, Paulo Henrique; JACOBS, Reinhilde; NACKAERTS, Olivia; RUBIRA-BULLEN, Izabel Regina Fischer; WESTPHALEN, Fernando Henrique; MOYSÉS, Samuel Jorge; IGNÁCIO, Sérgio Aparecido; da COSTA, Maitê Barroso; TOLAZZI, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. Material and Methods A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years). Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom), chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. Results Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9%) presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p<0.05). Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life. PMID:22666830

  18. Correlates of syncope in patients with acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Jenab, Yaser; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Alemzadeh-Ansari, Mohammad-Javad; Seyyedi, Seyyed Reza; Shirani, Shapoor; Soudaee, Mehdi; Ghaffari-Marandi, Neda

    2015-11-01

    Identification of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), as a cause of syncope, is important and may be life saving. We prospectively analyzed data on 335 patients with acute PTE. Relationships between syncope secondary to acute PTE and clinical findings, risk factors, and imaging modalities were analyzed. Of the 335 patients, 36 (10.7%) had syncope at presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher frequency of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction (94.3% vs 72.1%, respectively; P value = .004) and saddle embolism (24.2% vs 10.9%, respectively; P value = .044). Frequency of RV dysfunction was similar between patients with and without saddle embolism. Although not significant, more patients with syncope had a history of previous PTE (P value = .086). By multivariable analysis, RV dysfunction and saddle embolism were independent correlates of syncope in patients with PTE. In-hospital mortality was not significantly different between the groups. In conclusion, among patients with PTE, RV dysfunction and saddle embolism were the independent correlates of syncope. PMID:24989710

  19. The influence of insurance status on waiting times in German acute care hospitals: an empirical analysis of new data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing debate in Germany about the assumption that patients with private health insurance (PHI) benefit from better access to medical care, including shorter waiting times (Lüngen et al. 2008), compared to patients with statutory health insurance (SHI). Problem Existing analyses of the determinants for waiting times in Germany are a) based on patient self-reports and b) do not cover the inpatient sector. This paper aims to fill both gaps by (i) generating new primary data and (ii) analyzing waiting times in German hospitals. Methods We requested individual appointments from 485 hospitals within an experimental study design, allowing us to analyze the impact of PHI versus SHI on waiting times (Asplin et al. 2005). Results In German acute care hospitals patients with PHI have significantly shorter waiting times than patients with SHI. Conclusion Discrimination in waiting times by insurance status does occur in the German acute hospital sector. Since there is very little transparency in treatment quality in Germany, we do not know whether discrimination in waiting times leads to discrimination in the quality of treatment. This is an important issue for future research. PMID:20025744

  20. Effectiveness of the influenza vaccine at preventing hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of cardiopulmonary disease in Korea from 2011 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu Bin; Choi, Won Suk; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jacob; Song, Joon Young; Lee, Jin Soo; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of targeted studies to validate the effectiveness of influenza vaccination on the reduction in influenza-related hospitalizations among patients with co-morbidities. In this study, we estimate the effectiveness of influenza vaccination on preventing hospitalizations in persons with cardiopulmonary disease and establish an evidence base for recommendations on influenza vaccination in this population. During the influenza epidemic in 2011-2012, we performed a multicenter, retrospective case-control study. Cases were patients hospitalized due to acute exacerbation of asthma, COPD, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and congestive heart failure (CHF). Controls were selected from outpatients who visited study hospitals but who were not hospitalized. Cases and controls were matched 1:1 based on age, gender, and date of hospital visit. Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to determine the effectiveness of vaccination. Between 25 December 2011 and 5 May 2012, 828 of each hospitalized and control subjects were identified. The influenza vaccination rate of the hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients was 54.2% and 60.4%, respectively (P = 0.006). The overall vaccine effectiveness for preventing hospitalization was 33.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.0-49.0%; P = 0.002). Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that influenza vaccination significantly reduced the risk of hospitalization, especially due to acute exacerbation of IHD and CHF, in patients aged 65 y and older. The estimated vaccine effectiveness in these patients was 56.0% (95% CI 32.1-71.4%, P = 0.002). Influenza vaccination was associated with a reduction in the risk of hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of cardiopulmonary disease. We recommend the vaccine be given primarily to patients with underlying cardiovascular disease, particularly those 65 y of age and older. PMID:24161939

  1. Thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke by tenecteplase in the emergency department of a Moroccan hospital

    PubMed Central

    Belkouch, Ahmed; Jidane, Said; Chouaib, Naoufal; Elbouti, Anass; Nebhani, Tahir; Sirbou, Rachid; Bakkali, Hicham; Belyamani, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thrombolysis has radically changed the prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. Tenecteplase is a modified form of rt-PA with greater specificity for fibrin and a longer half-life. We report the experience of a Moroccan tertiary hospital in thrombolysis using Tenecteplase. Methods We conducted an open prospective study of all patients who were treated with Tenecteplase for an acute ischemic stroke admitted to our emergency department. Tenecteplase was administered intravenously at a dose of 0.4 mg/kg single bolus. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients achieving significant early neurological recovery defined as an improvement of 4 or more points on the NIHSS score at 24h. Results 13 patients had been treated by intravenous thrombolysis. 31% were women. Mean age was 63 years old. The mean NIHSS score at admission was 14.3 and 24h after was at 9.1. The right middle cerebral artery was involved in 69% of cases. The carotid atherosclerosis was predominant 63.3% and the cardio embolic etiology 27%. The mean time to the first medical contact after the onset of symptoms was 3h 30 min. One patient presented a capsulo-lenticular hematoma of 5 mm3 in the same side of the ischemic stroke. Conclusion Tenecteplase is a more interesting thrombolytic than alteplase, it seems to be more suitable for thrombolysis in our center. PMID:26405473

  2. Brucellosis among Hospitalized Febrile Patients in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Bouley, Andrew J.; Biggs, Holly M.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Bartlett, John A.; Afwamba, Isaac A.; Maro, Venance P.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  3. Brucellosis among hospitalized febrile patients in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bouley, Andrew J; Biggs, Holly M; Stoddard, Robyn A; Morrissey, Anne B; Bartlett, John A; Afwamba, Isaac A; Maro, Venance P; Kinabo, Grace D; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A

    2012-12-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  4. Audit of acute asthma management at the Paediatric Emergency Department at Wad Madani Children’s Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salma M. H.; Haroun, Huda M.; Ali, Hassan M.; Tag Eldeen, Imad Eldeen M.

    2012-01-01

    This audit of hospital care of acute wheeze and asthma aimed to assess the degree of adherence of the acute care of the asthma patients to the published international guidelines. Information was collected in six key areas: patient demographics; initial asthma severity assessment; in-hospital treatment; asthma prophylaxis; asthma education and emergency planning; and follow-up arrangements. The area of initial asthma severity assessment showed defciencies in the clinical measures currently used to verify case severity. In- hospital treatment on the other hand was consistent with recommendations in the use of the inhaled β-2 agonist salbutamol as bronchodilator, the discrete use of aminophylline and the small number of patients ordered chest X-ray. However, the treatment was incoherent with recommendations in the delivery method used for inhaled bronchodilator in relation to the age group of treated patients, absence of ipratropium bromide as a bronchodilator in the management and the large use of antibiotics. Assessment of the areas of asthma prophylaxis, asthma education and emergency- planning and follow-up arrangements illustrated that little efforts were made to assure safe discharge, although these measures have been shown to reduce morbidity after the exacerbation and reduce relapse rates and signifcantly reduce hospitalizations, unscheduled acute visits, missed work days, as well as improving quality of life. This audit emphasizes the need for the adoption of a management protocol for acute asthma care in the emergency department based on published international guidelines and the assurance of its implementation, monitoring and evaluation using the right tools to improve patient care.

  5. Comparison of Frequency of Frailty and Severely Impaired Physical Function in Patients ≥60 Years Hospitalized With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Versus Chronic Stable Heart Failure With Reduced and Preserved Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gordon R; Whellan, David J; Patel, Mahesh J; O'Connor, Christopher M; Duncan, Pamela; Eggebeen, Joel D; Morgan, Timothy M; Hewston, Leigh A; Pastva, Amy M; Kitzman, Dalane W

    2016-06-15

    Older patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) have persistently poor outcomes including frequent rehospitalization despite guidelines-based therapy. We hypothesized that such patients have multiple, severe impairments in physical function, cognition, and mood that are not addressed by current care pathways. We prospectively examined frailty, physical function, cognition, mood, and quality of life in 27 consecutive older patients with ADHF at 3 medical centers and compared these with 197 participants in 3 age-matched cohorts: stable heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (n = 80), stable HF with reduced ejection fraction (n = 56), and healthy older adults (n = 61). Based on Fried criteria, frailty was present in 56% of patients with ADHF versus 0 for the age-matched chronic HF and health cohorts. Patients with ADHF had markedly reduced Short Physical Performance Battery score (5.3 ± 2.8) and 6-minute walk distance (178 ± 102 m) (p <0.001 vs other cohorts), with severe deficits in all domains of physical function: balance, mobility, strength, and endurance. In the patients with ADHF, cognitive impairment (78%) and depression (30%) were common, and quality of life was poor. In conclusion, older patients with ADHF are frequently frail with severe and widespread impairments in physical function, cognition, mood, and quality of life that may contribute to their persistently poor outcomes, are frequently unrecognized, are not addressed in current ADHF care paradigms, and are potentially modifiable with targeted interventions. PMID:27156830

  6. Translating Research into Practice Intervention Improves Management of Acute Pain in Older Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Titler, Marita G; Herr, Keela; Brooks, John M; Xie, Xian-Jin; Ardery, Gail; Schilling, Margo L; Marsh, J Lawrence; Everett, Linda Q; Clarke, William R

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test an interdisciplinary, multifaceted, translating research into practice (TRIP) intervention to (a) promote adoption, by physicians and nurses, of evidence-based (EB) acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults, (b) decrease barriers to use of EB acute pain management practices, and (c) decrease pain intensity of older hospitalized adults. Study Design Experimental design with the hospital as the unit of randomization. Study Setting Twelve acute care hospitals in the Midwest. Data Sources (a) Medical records (MRs) of patients ≥65 years or older with a hip fracture admitted before and following implementation of the TRIP intervention and (b) physicians and nurses who care for those patients. Data Collection Data were abstracted from MRs and questions distributed to nurses and physicians. Principal Findings The Summative Index for Quality of Acute Pain Care (0–18 scale) was significantly higher for the experimental (10.1) than comparison group (8.4) at the end of the TRIP implementation phase. At the end of the TRIP implementation phase, patients in the experimental group had a lower mean pain intensity rating than those in the comparison group (p<.0001). Conclusion The TRIP intervention improved quality of acute pain management of older adults hospitalized with a hip fracture. PMID:19146568

  7. Diagnostic and Prognostic Properties of Osteoprotegerin in Patients with Acute Dyspnoea: Observations from the Akershus Cardiac Examination (ACE) 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Pervez, Mohammed Osman; Pedersen, Marit Holmefjord; Brynildsen, Jon; Høiseth, Arne Didrik; Hagve, Tor-Arne; Røsjø, Helge; Omland, Torbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels are increased in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). The diagnostic and prognostic merit of OPG measurement in patients admitted with acute dyspnoea is unknown. Objectives To evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of measuring OPG in patients admitted to hospital with acute dyspnoea. Methods OPG was analysed by ELISA in 308 patients admitted due to acute dyspnoea. Investigators blinded to OPG results adjudicated the diagnosis for the index hospitalization. Clinical outcomes were obtained from hospital records. Results In total, 139 patients (45%) were hospitalized with acute HF. OPG levels on hospital admission were higher in patients with acute HF vs. no acute HF, 7.8 (5.5–10.4) vs. 5.4 (3.8–7.2) pmol/L, p<0.001. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC AUC) of OPG to discriminate between HF vs. non-HF was 0.695 [95% CI 0.636–0.754]. OPG did not provide incremental information to the ED physician’s prediction or N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide regarding the diagnosis of acute HF. OPG levels (log transformed) were associated with mortality in crude analysis (HR (95% CI) 1.87 (1.34 to 2.61), p<0.001), but this association was attenuated and no longer significant after including established cardiac biomarkers into the model. Conclusion In patients admitted to hospital with acute dyspnoea, OPG levels are higher in patients with acute HF than in those with dyspnoea from other causes. However, OPG does not provide incremental information beyond ED physician assessment for the diagnosis of acute HF or beyond clinical risk variables and established cardiac biomarkers concerning prognosis. PMID:27463973

  8. A Comparison of Free-Standing versus Co-Located Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Barnato, Amber E.; Lave, Judith R.; Pike, Francis; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Le, Tri Q.; Angus, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term acute care hospitals (LTACs) provide specialized treatment for patients with chronic critical illness. Increasingly LTACs are co-located within traditional short-stay hospitals rather than operated as free-standing facilities, which may affect LTAC utilization patterns and outcomes. Methods We compared free-standing and co-located LTACs using 2005 data from the United States Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. We used bivariate analyses to examine patient characteristics and timing of LTAC transfer, and used propensity matching and multivariable regression to examine mortality, readmissions, and costs after transfer. Results Of 379 LTACs in our sample, 192 (50.7%) were free-standing and 187 (49.3%) were co-located in a short-stay hospital. Co-located LTACs were smaller (median bed size: 34 vs. 66, p <0.001) and more likely to be for-profit (72.2% v. 68.8%, p = 0.001) than freestanding LTACs. Co-located LTACs admitted patients later in their hospital course (average time prior to transfer: 15.5 days vs. 14.0 days) and were more likely to admit patients for ventilator weaning (15.9% vs. 12.4%). In the multivariate propensity-matched analysis, patients in co-located LTACs experienced higher 180-day mortality (adjusted relative risk: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00–1.11, p = 0.04) but lower readmission rates (adjusted relative risk: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.75–0.98, p = 0.02). Costs were similar between the two hospital types (mean difference in costs within 180 days of transfer: -$3,580, 95% CI: -$8,720 –$1,550, p = 0.17). Conclusions Compared to patients in free-standing LTACs, patients in co-located LTACs experience slightly higher mortality but lower readmission rates, with no change in overall resource use as measured by 180 day costs. PMID:26440102

  9. A retrospective analysis of treatment-related hospitalization costs of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Korgenski, Ernest Kent; Ying, Jian; Ng, Christi F; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Nelson, Richard E; Andrews, Seth; Raetz, Elizabeth; Fluchel, Mark; Lemons, Richard; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study examined the longitudinal hospital outcomes (costs adjusted for inflation, hospital days, and admissions) associated with the treatment of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients between one and 26 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL, who were treated at Primary Children's Hospital (PCH) in Salt Lake City, Utah were included. Treatment and hospitalization data were retrieved from system-wide cancer registry and enterprise data warehouse. PCH is a member of the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and patients were treated on, or according to, active COG protocols. Treatment-related hospital costs of ALL were examined by computing the average annual growth rates (AAGR). Longitudinal regressions identified patient characteristics associated with costs. A total of 505 patients (46.9% female) were included. The majority of patients had B-cell lineage ALL, 6.7% had T-ALL, and the median age at diagnosis was 4 years. Per-patient, first-year ALL hospitalization costs at PCH rose from $24,197 in 1998 to $37,924 in 2012. The AAGRs were 6.1, 13.0, and 7.6% for total, pharmacy, and room and care costs, respectively. Average days (AAGR = 5.2%) and admissions (AAGR = 3.8%) also demonstrated an increasing trend. High-risk patients had 47% higher costs per 6-month period in the first 5 years from diagnosis than standard-risk patients (P < 0.001). Similarly, relapsed ALL and stem cell transplantations were associated with significantly higher costs than nonrelapsed and no transplantations, respectively (P < 0.001). Increasing treatment-related costs of ALL demonstrate an area for further investigation. Value-based interventions such as identifying low-risk fever and neutropenia patients and managing them in outpatient settings should be evaluated for reducing the hospital burden of ALL. PMID:26714675

  10. A Comparison of Direct and Two-Stage Transportation of Patients to Hospital in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Rosiek, Anna; Rosiek-Kryszewska, Aleksandra; Leksowski, Łukasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rapid international expansion of telemedicine reflects the growth of technological innovations. This technological advancement is transforming the way in which patients can receive health care. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Poland, at the Department of Cardiology of the Regional Hospital of Louis Rydygier in Torun. The researchers analyzed the delay in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome. The study was conducted as a survey and examined 67 consecutively admitted patients treated invasively in a two-stage transport system. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Two-stage transportation does not meet the timeframe guidelines for the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Intervals for the analyzed group of patients were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Direct transportation of the patient to a reference center with interventional cardiology laboratory has a significant impact on reducing in-hospital delay in case of patients with acute coronary syndrome. Perspectives: This article presents the results of two-stage transportation of the patient with acute coronary syndrome. This measure could help clinicians who seek to assess time needed for intervention. It also shows how time from the beginning of pain in chest is important and may contribute to patient disability, death or well-being. PMID:25918911

  11. [Management of acute pain therapy: guidelines, recommendations and current practice in german hospitals].

    PubMed

    Erlenwein, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Organisational requirements and the education and training of stuff provide the basis for an adequate supply of quality in acute pain and should be the focus of efforts. Although organizational recommendations of the German guideline on "treatment of acute perioperative and post-traumatic pain" have been increasingly established in practice within the last few years, in many German hospitals there is still lagging far behind in the implementation of general supply conditions, such as regular pain measurement or the introduction of appropriate standardized treatment protocols for all areas of the hospital.As specialized care structures acute pain services have been implemented in 80% of the German hospitals, but only 45% of them meet quality criteria. Due to the heterogeneous realization of acute pain management in different hospitals, it comes apparent, that general guideline recommendations and binding definitions are required to achieve adequate supply conditions. PMID:26863643

  12. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves. PMID:27139406

  13. The New Zealand national junior doctors' strike: implications for the provision of acute hospital medical services.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Geoffrey; McCann, Kieran; Freeman, Peter; Beasley, Richard

    2008-06-01

    The New Zealand junior doctors' strike provided an opportunity to consider strategies that might be employed to overcome the international shortage of junior doctors. This article reports the experience of the emergency department (ED) and internal medicine (IM) services at Wellington Hospital during the national strike, in which medical services were primarily provided by specialist consultants in addition to, or as part of, their routine work. During the strike, elective admissions and outpatient clinics were mostly cancelled. In the ED, the waiting times and length of stay were markedly reduced. In IM, the proportion of patients admitted to the short stay unit rather than the general medical wards increased. Notwithstanding the different work circumstances, in both services one senior doctor carried the workload of at least two junior doctors. The deployment of additional senior medical staff to acute hospital services could greatly reduce the total number of doctors required. This strategy would have implications in terms of supporting acute medicine specialty initiatives, training, quality of care and funding. PMID:18624033

  14. Highlighting Hospital and Patient Concerns this Election Year.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Campaign 2016 is in full swing, and the American Hospital Association is seizing the opportunity to make sure the concerns of patients and hospitals are heard. On the front burner: escalating drug prices. PMID:27180391

  15. Flu Shot Safe for Surgery Patients in Hospital: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157754.html Flu Shot Safe for Surgery Patients in Hospital: Study ... increased risk for complications if they receive a flu shot in the hospital, a new study suggests. ...

  16. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world. PMID:25782187

  17. Intravenous heparin dosing strategy in hospitalized patients with atrial dysrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Roswell, Robert O; Greet, Brian; Shah, Sunny; Bernard, Samuel; Milin, Alexandra; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2016-08-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) have an elevated stroke risk that is 2-7 times greater than in those without AF. Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) is commonly used for hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AFL) to prevent stroke. Dosing strategies exist for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with acute coronary syndromes and venous thromboembolic diseases, but there are no data to guide providers on a dosing strategy for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with AF/AFL. 996 hospitalized patients with AF/AFL on UFH were evaluated. Bolus dosing and initial infusion rates of UFH were recorded along with rates of stroke, thromboemobolic events, and bleeding events as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis criteria. Among 226 patients included in the analysis, 76 bleeding events occurred. Using linear regression analysis, initial rates of heparin infusion ranging from 9.7 to 11.8 units/kilogram/hour (U/kg/h) resulted in activated partial thromboplastin times that were within therapeutic range. The median initial infusion rate in patients with bleeding was 13.3 U/kg/h, while in those without bleeding it was 11.4 U/kg/h; p = 0.012. An initial infusion rate >11.0 U/kg/h yielded an OR 1.95 (1.06-3.59); p = 0.03 for any bleeding event. Using IV heparin boluses neither increased the probability of attaining a therapeutic aPTT (56.1 vs 56.3 %; p = 0.99) nor did it significantly increase bleeding events in the study (35.7 vs 31.3 %; p = 0.48). The results suggest that higher initial rates of heparin are associated with increased bleeding risk. From this dataset, initial heparin infusion rates of 9.7-11.0 U/kg/h without a bolus can result in therapeutic levels of anticoagulation in hospitalized patients with AF/AFL without increasing the risk of bleeding. PMID:26951166

  18. Outcomes associated with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder requiring hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S; Rajesh, BP; Chaudhury, Alisha; Hattiholi, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (AECOPD) are known to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality and have a significant socioeconomic impact. The factors that determine frequent hospital readmissions for AECOPD are poorly understood. The present study was done to ascertain failures rates following AECOPD and to evaluate factors associated with frequent readmissions. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 186 patients with COPD with one or more admissions for acute exacerbations in a tertiary care hospital. Frequency of previous re-admissions for AECOPD in the past year, and clinical characteristics, including spirometry were ascertained in the stable state both before discharge and at 6-month post-discharge. Failure rates following treatment were ascertained during the follow-up period. All the patients were followed up for a period of 2 years after discharge to evaluate re-admissions for the AECOPD. Results: Of 186 COPD patients admitted for AECOPD, 54% had one or more readmission, and another 45% had two or more readmissions over a period of 2 years. There was a high prevalence of current or ex-heavy smokers, associated co-morbidity, underweight patients, low vaccination prevalence and use of domiciliary oxygen therapy among COPD patients. A total of 12% mortality was observed in the present study. Immediate failure rates after first exacerbation was observed to be 34.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that duration >20 years (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.10-0.86), use of Tiotropium (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12-4.69) and use of co-amoxiclav during first admission (OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.21-4.79) were significantly associated with higher immediate failure rates. The multivariate analysis for repeated admissions revealed that disease duration >10 years (OR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.27-0.93), low usage of inhaled ICS + LABA (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.08-4.54), and MRC dyspnea grade >3 (OR = 2.51; 95% CI: 1.08-5.82) were

  19. [Diagnosing the cause of acute dyspnea in elderly patients: role of biomarkers in emergencies].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Legrain, Sylvie; Ray, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Acute dyspnea is one of the leading causes of emergency hospitalization of elderly patients. Clinical diagnostic procedures are difficult in this geriatric population. Acute heart failure is the most frequent cause of acute dyspnea in geriatric patients. The use of plasma B natriuretic peptide (BNP) assays in the general population has profoundly improved its medical management. There has also been progress recently for other frequent causes of dyspnea in the elderly, including infection and venous thromboembolic disease. Procalcitonin assays may be useful as a prognostic factor for infectious disease. Nevertheless, the real value of BNP assays in geriatric populations must be clarified by interventional studies. PMID:19297125

  20. Validation of the DECAF score to predict hospital mortality in acute exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, C; Steer, J; Heslop-Marshall, K; Stenton, SC; Hickey, PM; Hughes, R; Wijesinghe, M; Harrison, RN; Steen, N; Simpson, AJ; Gibson, GJ; Bourke, SC

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalisation due to acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is common, and subsequent mortality high. The DECAF score was derived for accurate prediction of mortality and risk stratification to inform patient care. We aimed to validate the DECAF score, internally and externally, and to compare its performance to other predictive tools. Methods The study took place in the two hospitals within the derivation study (internal validation) and in four additional hospitals (external validation) between January 2012 and May 2014. Consecutive admissions were identified by screening admissions and searching coding records. Admission clinical data, including DECAF indices, and mortality were recorded. The prognostic value of DECAF and other scores were assessed by the area under the receiver operator characteristic (AUROC) curve. Results In the internal and external validation cohorts, 880 and 845 patients were recruited. Mean age was 73.1 (SD 10.3) years, 54.3% were female, and mean (SD) FEV1 45.5 (18.3) per cent predicted. Overall mortality was 7.7%. The DECAF AUROC curve for inhospital mortality was 0.83 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.87) in the internal cohort and 0.82 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.87) in the external cohort, and was superior to other prognostic scores for inhospital or 30-day mortality. Conclusions DECAF is a robust predictor of mortality, using indices routinely available on admission. Its generalisability is supported by consistent strong performance; it can identify low-risk patients (DECAF 0–1) potentially suitable for Hospital at Home or early supported discharge services, and high-risk patients (DECAF 3–6) for escalation planning or appropriate early palliation. Trial registration number UKCRN ID 14214. PMID:26769015

  1. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism. PMID:26072605

  2. The role of glycemia in acute heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Seferović, Jelena P; Milinković, Ivan; Tešić, Milorad; Ristić, Arsen; Lalić, Nebojša; Simeunović, Dejan; Zivković, Ivana; Di Somma, Salvatore; Seferovic, Petar M

    2014-10-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the most important cardiovascular syndromes associated with high cardiovascular morbidity, and is the major cause of admission in emergency departments worldwide. The clinical complexity of AHF has significantly increased, mostly due to the comorbidities: diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, peripheral vascular disease, renal insufficiency and anemia. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated a frequent association of AHF and diabetes. Since AHF is a very heterogeneous condition, it is important to identify clinical and laboratory parameters useful for risk stratification of these populations. Hyperglycemia may be one of the most convenient, since it is widely measured, easily interpreted, and inexpensive. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), arrhythmias and poor compliance to chronic medications are considered to be the most frequent precipitating factors of AHF in diabetics. Several studies identified diabetes as the most prominent independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The following parameters were identified as the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF and diabetes: older age, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, ACS, non-compliance, history of hypertension, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%, serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, marked elevation of natriuretic peptides, hyponatremia, treatment at admission without ACE inhibitors/ARBs/β-blockers, and no percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a treatment modality. The most frequent cause of AHF is ACS, both with ST segment elevation (STEMI) or without (NSTEMI). Hyperglycemia is very common in these patients and although frequently unrecognized and untreated, has a large in-hospital and mortality significance. PMID:24988247

  3. Using decision trees to manage hospital readmission risk for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, John P; Zasadil, Scott; Keyser, Donna J; Peele, Pamela B

    2014-12-01

    To improve healthcare quality and reduce costs, the Affordable Care Act places hospitals at financial risk for excessive readmissions associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Although predictive analytics is increasingly looked to as a means for measuring, comparing, and managing this risk, many modeling tools require data inputs that are not readily available and/or additional resources to yield actionable information. This article demonstrates how hospitals and clinicians can use their own structured discharge data to create decision trees that produce highly transparent, clinically relevant decision rules for better managing readmission risk associated with AMI, HF, and PN. For illustrative purposes, basic decision trees are trained and tested using publically available data from the California State Inpatient Databases and an open-source statistical package. As expected, these simple models perform less well than other more sophisticated tools, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (or AUC) of 0.612, 0.583, and 0.650, respectively, but achieve a lift of at least 1.5 or greater for higher-risk patients with any of the three conditions. More importantly, they are shown to offer substantial advantages in terms of transparency and interpretability, comprehensiveness, and adaptability. By enabling hospitals and clinicians to identify important factors associated with readmissions, target subgroups of patients at both high and low risk, and design and implement interventions that are appropriate to the risk levels observed, decision trees serve as an ideal application for addressing the challenge of reducing hospital readmissions. PMID:25160603

  4. A Comprehensive Review of Prehospital and In-hospital Delay Times in Acute Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Foraker, Randi; Morris, Dexter L.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize prehospital and in-hospital stroke evaluation and treatment delay times. We identified 123 unique peer-reviewed studies published from 1981 to 2007 of prehospital and in-hospital delay time for evaluation and treatment of patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms. Based on studies of 65 different population groups, the weighted Poisson regression indicated a 6.0% annual decline (p<0.001) in hours/year for prehospital delay, defined from symptom onset to emergency department (ED) arrival. For in-hospital delay, the weighted Poisson regression models indicated no meaningful changes in delay time from ED arrival to ED evaluation (3.1%, p=0.49 based on 12 population groups). There was a 10.2% annual decline in hours/year from ED arrival to neurology evaluation or notification (p=0.23 based on 16 population groups) and a 10.7% annual decline in hours/year for delay time from ED arrival to initiation of computed tomography (p=0.11 based on 23 population groups). Only one study reported on times from arrival to computed tomography scan interpretation, two studies on arrival to drug administration, and no studies on arrival to transfer to an in-patient setting, precluding generalizations. Prehospital delay continues to contribute the largest proportion of delay time. The next decade provides opportunities to establish more effective community based interventions worldwide. It will be crucial to have effective stroke surveillance systems in place to better understand and improve both prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke care. PMID:19659821

  5. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  6. Pain Assessment with Cognitively Impaired Older People in the Acute Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Research reveals that older people continue to experience much suffering from acute and chronic pain conditions. People with cognitive impairment receive less analgesia than their cognitively intact peers. Postoperative pain assessment with older people in the acute hospital setting remains a challenge. Context and culture have a significant impact of pain assessment practices. Due to a paucity of research exploring how pain assessment and management practices with cognitively impaired older people may be realised in the acute hospital setting, there is a need for further research to be conducted. PMID:26524985

  7. A Comparative Study of Terminally Ill Hospice and Hospital Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labus, Janet G.; Dambrot, Faye H.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated differences between 28 hospice and 28 hospital patients who died. Comparison found that hospice patients were younger, had more people living in the home, and had shorter disease history. Age, number of people living in the home, and primary cancer site significantly discriminated between hospice and hospital patients and predicted…

  8. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  9. TSOC-HFrEF Registry: A Registry of Hospitalized Patients with Decompensated Systolic Heart Failure: Description of Population and Management

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Hung-Yu; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Wu, Yen-Wen; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Hsin; Wen, Ming-Shien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Long; Chen, Shyh-Ming; Yang, Ning-I; Chang, Heng-Chia; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Chan, Kuei-Chuan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Wang, Ji-Hung; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Cherng, Wen-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure (HF) is a medical condition with a rapidly increasing incidence both in Taiwan and worldwide. The objective of the TSOC-HFrEF registry was to assess epidemiology, etiology, clinical management, and outcomes in a large sample of hospitalized patients presenting with acute decompensated systolic HF. Methods The TSOC-HFrEF registry was a prospective, multicenter, observational survey of patients presenting to 21 medical centers or teaching hospitals in Taiwan. Hospitalized patients with either acute new-onset HF or acute decompensation of chronic HFrEF were enrolled. Data including demographic characteristics, medical history, primary etiology of HF, precipitating factors for HF hospitalization, presenting symptoms and signs, diagnostic and treatment procedures, in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and discharge medications, were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 1509 patients were enrolled into the registry by the end of October 2014, with a mean age of 64 years (72% were male). Ischemic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy were diagnosed in 44% and 33% of patients, respectively. Coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and chronic renal insufficiency were the common comorbid conditions. Acute coronary syndrome, non-compliant to treatment, and concurrent infection were the major precipitating factors for acute decompensation. The median length of hospital stay was 8 days, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 2.4%. At discharge, 62% of patients were prescribed either angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, 60% were prescribed beta-blockers, and 49% were prescribed mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. Conclusions The TSOC-HFrEF registry provided important insights into the current clinical characteristics and management of hospitalized decompensated systolic HF patients in Taiwan. One important observation was that adherence to guideline-directed medical therapy was suboptimal

  10. Leadership-organizational culture relationship in nursing units of acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Casida, Jesus; Pinto-Zipp, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    The phenomena of leadership and organizational culture (OC) has been defined as the driving forces in the success or failure of an organization. Today, nurse managers must demonstrate leadership behaviors or styles that are appropriate for the constantly changing, complex, and turbulent health care delivery system. In this study, researchers explored the relationship between nurse managers' leadership styles and OC of nursing units within an acute care hospital that had achieved excellent organizational performance as demonstrated by a consistent increase in patient satisfaction ratings. The data from this study support that transformational and transactional contingent reward leaderships as nurse manager leadership styles that are associated with nursing unit OC that have the ability to balance the dynamics of flexibility and stability within their nursing units and are essential for maintaining organizational effectiveness. It is essential for first-line nursing leaders to acquire knowledge and skills on organizational cultural competence. PMID:18389837

  11. Sleep Apnea Prevalence in Acute Myocardial Infarction - the Sleep Apnea in Post Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients (SAPAMI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ludka, Ondrej; Stepanova, Radka; Vyskocilova, Martina; Galkova, Lujza; Mikolaskova, Monika; Belehrad, Milos; Kostalova, Jana; Mihalova, Zuzana; Drozdova, Adela; Hlasensky, Jiri; Gacik, Michal; Pudilova, Lucie; Mikusova, Tereza; Fischerova, Blanka; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima; Kara, Tomas; Spinar, Jindrich; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Background While sleep apnea (SA) might be a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, recent data suggest that SA is severely underdiagnosed in patients after acute myocardial infarction (MI). There is limited evidence about day-night variation of onset of MI on dependence of having SA. We therefore investigated the prevalence of SA and examined the day-night variation of onset of MI in acute MI patients. Methods We prospectively studied 782 consecutive patients admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute MI. All subjects underwent sleep evaluations using a portable device after at least 48 hours post-admission. Using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), groups were defined as patients without SA (<5 events/hour), mild SA (5–15 events/hour), moderate SA (15–30 events/hour), and severe SA (≥30 events/hour). Results Almost all patients (98%) underwent urgent coronary angiography and 91% of patients underwent primary PCI. Using a threshold of AHI ≥ 5 events/hour, SA was present in 65.7% of patients after acute MI. Mild SA was present in 32.6%, moderate in 20.4% and severe in 12.7%. The day-night variation in the onset of MI in all groups of SA patients was similar to that observed in non-SA patients. From 6AM–12PM, the frequency of MI was higher in both SA and non-SA patients, as compared to the interval from 12AM–6AM (all p<0.05). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of SA in patients presenting with acute MI. Peak time of MI onset in SA patients was between 6AM–noon, similar to that in the general population. Whether diagnosis and treatment of SA after MI will significantly improve outcomes in these patients remains to be determined. PMID:25064202

  12. Distress in patients with acute leukemia: A concept analysis

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Tara A.; Rosenzweig, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with acute leukemia require immediate and aggressive in-patient treatment that results in many weeks to months of hospitalization. Thus, it is not surprising that distress has been found in as many as 45.5% of patients. While distress is a regularly reported outcome measure in clinical research, currently there is a lack of a clear consistent and universal definition of this concept. Objective The purpose of this article is to examine the current state of the science surrounding the concept of distress and propose a model of distress for patients with acute leukemia. Interventions/Methods The Walker and Avant framework was used to guide the analysis of the concept of distress in patients with AL. The findings from this analysis were then used to generate a model guided by the current science. Results Distress in AL is generally accepted as multi-dimensional, quantifiable, subjective and temporal. Antecedents to distress include: demographics; intrinsic factors; social support; disease progression; treatment; and communication. Consequences to distress include: decreased quality of life; patient outcomes; as well as the severity of physical and psychological symptoms. Conclusions Distress is an outcome measure that is frequently assessed and reported within the literature. The operationalization of distress varies by investigator, limiting its generalizabiliy. Implications for Practice The proposed conceptual model may be used to guide further research on distress in patients with AL at high risk for negative outcomes. Improved understanding of patient distress may guide interventions aimed at managing the psychosocial needs for patients receiving treatment for AL. PMID:23632470

  13. Burden of stroke and other cardiovascular complications in patients with atrial fibrillation hospitalized in France

    PubMed Central

    Cotté, Francois-Emery; Chaize, Gwendoline; Gaudin, Anne-Françoise; Samson, Adeline; Vainchtock, Alexandre; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Aims Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with numerous cardiovascular complications. We sought to estimate the annual burden of cardiovascular complications in AF patients in French hospitals. Methods and results All AF patients hospitalized in France in 2012 were identified from the national public/private hospital database. Comorbid conditions and medical histories were documented using medical records dating back 5 years. Reasons for hospitalization, type of admission (emergency or otherwise), length of stay, rehabilitation transfers, and death at discharge were identified and costs of acute and rehabilitation care determined (2012 Euros). In total, 533 044 AF patients (mean age ± SD 78.0 ± 11.4 years, 47.1% women) were hospitalized in 2012 for any reason. Hospitalizations were cardiovascular-related in 267 681 patients [22.5% cardiac dysrhythmia, 18.3% heart failure, 7.1% vascular/ischaemic diseases, 6.9% stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA)/systemic embolism (SE), and 1.3% haemorrhages]. Patients with stroke/TIA/SE had higher rates of emergency admission (68.1%), transfer to rehabilitation unit (28.1%), and death at discharge (13.7%) than those with other cardiovascular complications, with the exception of haemorrhages, where emergency admission rates were similar. They also had longer mean lengths of stay (12.6 ± 13.2 days for acute care and 46.8 ± 42.5 days for rehabilitation). The annual total cost (acute care and rehabilitation) for all hospitalized cardiovascular events was €1.94 billion, of which heart failure represented €805 million, vascular/ischaemic diseases €386 million, stroke €362 million, cardiac dysrhythmia €341 million, and haemorrhage €48 million. Conclusion Half a million patients with AF were hospitalized in France in 2012. Cardiovascular-related hospitalizations involved half of these admissions, for a global burden of almost €2 billion, equivalent to 2.6% of total expenditure in French hospitals. Among these

  14. Patients in a globalized world: keeping hospitals in perspective.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Carolyn

    2003-01-01

    The challenge of globalization could be the burning platform on which Canadian health providers finally learn that there is more to gain from collaboration than competition. Change in this globalized world cannot mean morphing into (publicly funded) entrepreneurial organizations and competing among other Canadian institutions prospecting for their global market share. Hospitals must understand that if they are firstly integrated into a proper, seamless healthcare system, they could then have extraordinary power in a globalized world. The VISA model should be examined as an example of the collaboration and co-operation that has allowed thousands of highly competitive financial institutions to come together with a common governance structure and an IT system that benefits everyone. VISA is doing very well in a globalized world. Perhaps it is because of our hospital-centric approach to acute care that we have continued to view healthcare as simple or merely complicated instead of as a complex, adaptive system. Only by focusing on creating a (real) healthcare system here in Canada with the patient in the centre will we be able to ensure that Canadians will receive the benefits of globalization and that Canada will, as Commissioner Romanow said in his report, (take an international leadership role in sharing its expertise and helping developing countries improve their healthcare systems and the health of their people.) PMID:14660885

  15. Comparison of fecal pyruvate kinase isoform M2 and calprotectin in acute diarrhea in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Elzbieta; Nowak, Jan K.; Moczko, Jerzy; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Fecal concentrations of pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (M2-PK) and calprotectin (FC) serve as biomarkers of inflammation of gastrointestinal mucosa. The value of M2-PK in discriminating between patients with viral and bacterial acute diarrhea (AD) is currently unknown. We analyzed M2-PK and FC concentrations in fifty hospitalized children with AD (29 of which were caused by rotavirus and 21 by Salmonella enteritidis) as well as 32 healthy subjects. There was no difference in the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves plotted for the two tests in differentiating rotaviral from bacterial AD. The sensitivity and specificity of M2-PK at optimal cut-off (20 U/g) were 75.9% and 71.4%, respectively. M2-PK and FC had similar values in distinguishing between children with AD caused by rotavirus and Salmonella enteritidis. The performance of both tests in hospitalized patients did not meet the needs of everyday clinical practice. Moreover, no advantage of fecal tests over the measurement of CRP was documented. PMID:24759699

  16. Management of acute heart failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Arrigo, Mattia; Tolppanen, Heli; Gayat, Etienne; Laribi, Said; Metra, Marco; Seronde, Marie France; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common cause of unplanned hospital admissions, and is associated with high mortality rates. Over the next few decades, the combination of improved cardiovascular disease survival and progressive ageing of the population will further increase the prevalence of AHF in developed countries. New recommendations on the management of AHF have been published recently, but as elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials, and scientific evidence is often lacking, the diagnosis and management of AHF in this population is challenging. The clinical presentation of AHF, especially in patients aged>85years, differs substantially from that in younger patients, with unspecific symptoms, such as fatigue and confusion, often overriding dyspnoea. Older patients also have a different risk profile compared with younger patients: often heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and infection as the most frequent precipitating factor of AHF. Moreover, co-morbidities, disability and frailty are common, and increase morbidity, recovery time, readmission rates and mortality; their presence should be detected during a geriatric assessment. Diagnostics and treatment for AHF should be tailored according to cardiopulmonary and geriatric status, giving special attention to the patient's preferences for care. Whereas many elderly AHF patients may be managed similarly to younger patients, different strategies should be applied in the presence of relevant co-morbidities, disability and frailty. The option of palliative care should be considered at an early stage, to avoid unnecessary and harmful diagnostics and treatments. PMID:27185193

  17. Survival of 1476 patients initially resuscitated from out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Cobbe, S. M.; Dalziel, K.; Ford, I.; Marsden, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the short and long term outcome of patients admitted to hospital after initially successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest out of hospital. DESIGN--Review of ambulance and hospital records. Follow up of mortality by "flagging" with the registrar general. Cox proportional hazards analysis of predictors of mortality in patients discharged alive from hospital. SETTING--Scottish Ambulance Service and acute hospitals throughout Scotland. SUBJECTS--1476 patients admitted to a hospital ward, of whom 680 (46%) were discharged alive. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Survival to hospital discharge, neurological status at discharge, time to death, and cause of death after discharge. RESULTS--The median duration of hospital stay was 10 days (interquartile range 8-15) in patients discharged alive and 1 (1-4) day in those dying in hospital. Neurological status at discharge in survivors was normal or mildly impaired in 605 (89%), moderately impaired in 58 (8.5%), and severely impaired in 13 (2%); one patient was comatose. Direct discharge to home occurred in 622 (91%) cases. The 680 discharged survivors were followed up for a median of 25 (range 0-68) months. There were 176 deaths, of which 81 were sudden cardiac deaths, 55 were non-sudden cardiac deaths, and 40 were due to other causes. The product limit estimate of 4 year survival after discharge was 68%. The independent predictors of mortality on follow up were increased age, treatment for heart failure, and cardiac arrest not due to definite myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION--About 40% of initial survivors of resuscitation out of hospital are discharged home without major neurological disability. Patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac death can be identified and may benefit from further cardiological evaluation. PMID:8664715

  18. Comparing the validity of different measures of illness severity: a hospital-level analysis for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gandjour, Afschin; Ku-Goto, Meei-Hsiang; Ho, Vivian

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the validity of three measures of illness severity (prior year's hospital expenditures, Charlson and Elixhauser indices), by analysing the effect of introducing report cards on hospitals treating patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Medicare claims data were obtained for 1992-1997 for AMI patients aged 65+. We used differences-in-differences regression analysis to assess the impact of report cards introduced in New Jersey and Pennsylvania on the illness severity of AMI patients with and without coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (relative to states without report cards). The analysis was conducted at the hospital level. For validation we used raw mortality and re-admission trends for AMI patients. While prior hospital expenditures suggest a considerable change in the illness severity of AMI patients in Pennsylvania relative to other states, raw mortality and re-admission trends in Pennsylvania are relatively consistent with the trend in the rest of the USA. In line with raw mortality and re-admission data, the Charlson and Elixhauser indices do not imply a considerable change in the severity of AMI patients in Pennsylvania. For CABG patients, illness severity - as measured by all three severity measurement methods - decreased after introduction of report cards, particularly in Pennsylvania. In conclusion, for AMI patients the Charlson and Elixhauser indices are a more valid measure of illness severity than prior year's hospital expenditures. After report cards were introduced, healthier AMI patients were more likely to receive CABG surgery, while sicker patients were avoided. PMID:23135888

  19. Acute chest pain in a patient treated with capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Camaro, C; Danse, P W; Bosker, H A

    2009-08-01

    A 61-year-old male with a history of metastatic colorectal cancer was referred to our hospital for primary coronary intervention because of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography, however, revealed no significant stenoses. When asked, the patient revealed that capecitabine (Xeloda(R)) was started by his oncologist one day before admission. It is known that this oral 5-FU analogue drug, used in metastatic colorectal cancer, can cause coronary artery spasms. The main treatment of capecitabine-induced vasospasm is discontinuation of the drug. Indeed, after cessation of the drug the patient remained free of symptoms and the ECG abnormalities normalised. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:288-91.). PMID:19789697

  20. Coronary computed tomography angiography for the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Rajani, R; Brum, R L; Preston, R; Carr-White, G; Berman, D S

    2011-12-01

    Acute chest pain is a common presenting complaint of patients attending emergency room departments. Despite this, it can often be challenging to completely exclude a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome following an initial standard clinical and biochemical evaluation. As a result of this, patients are often admitted to hospital until the treating clinician is satisfied that this diagnosis can be excluded. This process imparts a significant health economic burden by not only increasing hospital bed occupancy rates but also by the unnecessary layering of diagnostic investigations. With the rapid advances in coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), there has been considerable interest in whether coronary CTA may be a viable alternative to this current standard care. We review the current literature and supporting evidence for utilising coronary CTA in the evaluation of patients presenting with acute chest pain in terms of its diagnostic accuracy, safety, cost-effectiveness and prognostic implications. PMID:22093533

  1. Shallow medication extraction from hospital patient records.

    PubMed

    Boytcheva, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for shallow Information Extraction (IE) from the free text zones of hospital Patient Records (PRs) in Bulgarian language in the Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication (PSIP) project. We extract automatically information about drug names, dosage, modes and frequency and assign the corresponding ATC code to each medication event. Using various modules for rule-based text analysis, our IE components in PSIP perform a significant amount of symbolic computations. We try to address negative statements, elliptical constructions, typical conjunctive phrases, and simple inferences concerning temporal constraints and finally aim at the assignment of the drug ACT code to the extracted medication events, which additionally complicates the extraction algorithm. The prototype of the system was used for experiments with a training corpus containing 1,300 PRs and the evaluation results are obtained using a test corpus containing 6,200 PRs. The extraction accuracy (f-score) for drug names is 98.42% and for dose 93.85%. PMID:21685617

  2. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  3. Should Blood Cultures Be Performed for Patients with Acute Prostatitis? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Manuel; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Chapuzet, Claire; Bourgeois, Ingrid; Chavanet, Pascal; Caron, François

    2010-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic values of blood cultures (BC) for 347 acute prostatitis inpatients were evaluated. BC were positive for 21% of patients and contributed to the microbiological diagnosis for 5%. Fever duration, length of hospitalization, use of an antibiotic combination, duration of antibiotic use, and urine bacterial titers increased when BC were positive. PMID:20237098

  4. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-01-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between the governing board structure of 109 acute care hospitals and their overall business strategy. Strategy also accounted for more of the variance in board structure than either organization size or system membership. Finally, the greater the match between board structure and hospital strategy, the stronger the hospitals' financial performance. PMID:1399656

  5. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Andrea; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Caso, Valeria; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Early seizure (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke. Patients and methods A total of 638 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke (543 ischemic, 95 hemorrhagic), admitted to our Stroke Unit, were included in this prospective study. ES were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. Results Thirty-one patients (4.8%) had ES. Seizures were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke. ES was not associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). After multivariate analysis, hemorrhagic transformation resulted as an independent predictive factor for ES (OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 1.95–22.61; p = 0.003). Conclusion ES occur in about 5% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES does not seem to be associated with an adverse outcome at hospital discharge after acute stroke. PMID:18827922

  6. Aetiology of Acute Febrile Episodes in Children Attending Korogwe District Hospital in North-Eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mahende, Coline; Ngasala, Billy; Lusingu, John; Butichi, Allvan; Lushino, Paminus; Lemnge, Martha; Premji, Zul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the burden of malaria in many parts of Tanzania has declined, the proportion of children with fever has not changed. This situation underscores the need to explore the possible causes of febrile episodes in patients presenting with symptoms at the Korogwe District Hospital (KDH). Methods A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted at KDH, north-eastern Tanzania. Patients aged 2 to 59 months presenting at the outpatient department with an acute medical condition and fever (measured axillary temperature ≥37.5°C) were enrolled. Blood samples were examined for malaria parasites, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and bacterial infections. A urine culture was performed in selected cases to test for bacterial infection and a chest radiograph was requested if pneumonia was suspected. Diagnosis was based on both clinical and laboratory investigations. Results A total of 867 patients with a median age of 15.1 months (Interquartile range 8.6–29.9) were enrolled from January 2013 to October 2013. Respiratory tract infections were the leading clinical diagnosis with 406/867 (46.8%) of patients diagnosed with upper respiratory tract infection and 130/867 (15.0%) with pneumonia. Gastroenteritis was diagnosed in 184/867 (21.2%) of patients. Malaria infection was confirmed in 72/867 (8.3%) of patients. Bacterial infection in blood and urine accounted for 26/808 (3.2%) infections in the former, and 66/373 (17.7%) infections in the latter. HIV infection was confirmed in 10/824 (1.2%) of patients. Respiratory tract infections and gastroenteritis were frequent in patients under 36 months of age (87.3% and 91.3% respectively). Co-infections were seen in 221/867 (25.5%) of patients. The cause of fever was not identified in 65/867 (7.5%) of these patients. Conclusions The different proportions of infections found among febrile children reflect the causes of fever in the study area. These findings indicate the need to optimise patient management by

  7. Hot bitumen burns: 92 hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Baruchin, A M; Schraf, S; Rosenberg, L; Sagi, A A

    1997-08-01

    Bitumen burns while comprising a small percentage of all types of burns are troublesome. They affect persons engaged in gainful employment which the burns then curtail, as well as requiring special attention because the substance adheres to the skin and is therefore difficult to remove. Ninety-two consecutive patients with such burns who were admitted as in-patients over a 10-year period (1985-1995) have been reviewed. Most of the burns occurred on a worksite and involved active young persons (mean age 29.6 years) the mean size of the burn was 3.87 per cent TBSA, mainly affecting the upper extremities and hands. Mean hospitalization time was 10.6 days. Bitumen burns are fully predictable and can easily be prevented by avoiding unsafe practice and/or equipment. Bitumen is a general term for petroleum-derived substances ranging from true petroleum through so-called mineral tars, to asphalt. Asphalt (Asphaltum) is a semi-solid mixture of several hydrocarbons probably formed by the evaporation of the lighter or more volatile constituents. It is amorphous of low specific gravity, 1-2, with a black or brownish black colour and pitchy lustre. At room temperature it is solid becoming molten and spreadable when heated to 93 degrees C and over. Roofing tars and asphalts are usually heated to temperatures of 232 degrees C to achieve desirable viscosities (e.g. for spraying), whereas lower temperatures are required for the manageable form to pave roads. Notable localities for asphaltum are the island of Trinidad and the Dead Sea region where lake asphaltums were long known to the ancient. Ironically, none of the 92 patients who were treated for bitumen injuries in the 'Soroka' (Beer-Sheba, Israel) and 'Barzilai' (Ashkelon, Israel) Medical Centres (80 and 150 km from the lake respectively) had anything to do with the Dead Sea area. PMID:9426915

  8. 6-PACK programme to decrease fall injuries in acute hospitals: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Renata T; Wolfe, Rory; Brand, Caroline A; Haines, Terry P; Hill, Keith D; Brauer, Sandra G; Botti, Mari; Cumming, Robert G; Livingston, Patricia M; Sherrington, Catherine; Zavarsek, Silva; Lindley, Richard I; Kamar, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the 6-PACK programme on falls and fall injuries in acute wards. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Six Australian hospitals. Participants All patients admitted to 24 acute wards during the trial period. Interventions Participating wards were randomly assigned to receive either the nurse led 6-PACK programme or usual care over 12 months. The 6-PACK programme included a fall risk tool and individualised use of one or more of six interventions: “falls alert” sign, supervision of patients in the bathroom, ensuring patients’ walking aids are within reach, a toileting regimen, use of a low-low bed, and use of a bed/chair alarm. Main outcome measures The co-primary outcomes were falls and fall injuries per 1000 occupied bed days. Results During the trial, 46 245 admissions to 16 medical and eight surgical wards occurred. As many people were admitted more than once, this represented 31 411 individual patients. Patients’ characteristics and length of stay were similar for intervention and control wards. Use of 6-PACK programme components was higher on intervention wards than on control wards (incidence rate ratio 3.05, 95% confidence interval 2.14 to 4.34; P<0.001). In all, 1831 falls and 613 fall injuries occurred, and the rates of falls (incidence rate ratio 1.04, 0.78 to 1.37; P=0.796) and fall injuries (0.96, 0.72 to 1.27; P=0.766) were similar in intervention and control wards. Conclusions Positive changes in falls prevention practice occurred following the introduction of the 6-PACK programme. However, no difference was seen in falls or fall injuries between groups. High quality evidence showing the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in acute wards remains absent. Novel solutions to the problem of in-hospital falls are urgently needed. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000332921. PMID:26813674

  9. [Frequency of drug adverse reactions among hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    González Martínez, L

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the frequency of adverse reactions to drugs in a sample of hospitalized patients in the internal medicine ward seen during a year's term. Of 61 medical charts, we found 8 patients with adverse reactions to drugs during their hospital stay and another 4 patients hospitalized due to adverse reactions to drugs. The majority of the adverse reactions were of moderate degree (75%) and were related to drugs of cardiovascular action (58%). The frequency of reactions in hospitalized patients (13%) is comparable with the results obtained from other hospitals. Yet, the real magnitude of the problem is probably greater since the source of information (hospital charts) the totality of the clinical manifestations are not registered. PMID:8581452

  10. Direct Medical Cost of Influenza-Related Hospitalizations among Severe Acute Respiratory Infections Cases in Three Provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Gao, Lidong; Li, Zhong; Feng, Ao; Jin, Hui; Wang, Shiyuan; Su, Qiru; Xu, Zhen; Feng, Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza-related hospitalizations impose a considerable economic and social burden. This study aimed to better understand the economic burden of influenza-related hospitalizations among patients in China in different age and risk categories. Methods Laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations between December 2009 and June 2011 from three hospitals participating in the Chinese Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) sentinel surveillance system were included in this study. Hospital billing data were collected from each hospital’s Hospital Information System (HIS) and divided into five cost categories. Demographic and clinical information was collected from medical records. Mean (range) and median (interquartile range [IQR]) costs were calculated and compared among children (≤15 years), adults (16–64 years) and elderly (≥65 years) groups. Factors influencing cost were analyzed. Results A total of 106 laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations were identified, 60% of which were children. The mean (range) direct medical cost was $1,797 ($80–$27,545) for all hospitalizations, and the median (IQR) direct medical cost was $231 ($164), $854 ($890), and $2,263 ($7,803) for children, adults, and elderly, respectively. Therapeutics and diagnostics were the two largest components of direct medical cost, comprising 57% and 23%, respectively. Cost of physician services was the lowest at less than 1%. Conclusion Direct medical cost of influenza-related hospitalizations imposes a heavy burden on patients and their families in China. Further study is needed to provide more comprehensive evidence on the economic burden of influenza. Our study highlights the need to increase vaccination rate and develop targeted national preventive strategies. PMID:23717485

  11. Utilization of Acute Care among Patients with ESRD Discharged Home from Skilled Nursing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Toles, Mark; Massing, Mark; Jackson, Eric; Peacock-Hinton, Sharon; O’Hare, Ann M.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Older adults with ESRD often receive care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) after an acute hospitalization; however, little is known about acute care use after SNF discharge to home. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study used Medicare claims for North and South Carolina to identify patients with ESRD who were discharged home from a SNF between January 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Nursing Home Compare data were used to ascertain SNF characteristics. The primary outcome was time from SNF discharge to first acute care use (hospitalization or emergency department visit) within 30 days. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify patient and facility characteristics associated with the outcome. Results Among 1223 patients with ESRD discharged home from a SNF after an acute hospitalization, 531 (43%) had at least one rehospitalization or emergency department visit within 30 days. The median time to first acute care use was 37 days. Characteristics associated with a shorter time to acute care use were black race (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.04 to 1.51), dual Medicare-Medicaid coverage (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50), higher Charlson comorbidity score (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.12), number of hospitalizations during the 90 days before SNF admission (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.22), and index hospital discharge diagnoses of cellulitis, abscess, and/or skin ulcer (HR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.45). Home health use after SNF discharge was associated with a lower rate of acute care use (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.87). There were no statistically significant associations between SNF characteristics and time to first acute care use. Conclusions Almost one in every two older adults with ESRD discharged home after a post–acute SNF stay used acute care services within 30 days of discharge. Strategies to reduce acute care utilization in these patients are needed. PMID:25649158

  12. The Inequality of Patient Profile Information in Japanese Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yukio; Ishida, Haku; Kimura, Ezen; Gochi, Akira; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Shimai, Ken-Ichiro; Nakajima, Noriaki; Tanaka, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kiyomu; Oohara, Michihiro; Sonoda, Takeharu; Takai, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    A model dataset of patient profile information was created based on the items used at five Japanese university hospitals, the patient information data elements in Health Level 7 (HL7) v2.5, and the standard datasets for medical information exchange used in Japan. In order to check the validity of the model dataset, a cross-sectional survey was performed. A preliminary analysis of 20 Japanese hospitals found that most items were implemented at some hospitals, but the number of items implemented at many hospitals was rather small. This result strongly shows the necessity for a standardized dataset of patient profile information. PMID:27577415

  13. Medical students' and doctors' attitudes towards older patients and their care in hospital settings: a conceptualisation

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Rajvinder; Griffiths, Amanda; Cox, Tom; Conroy, Simon; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: despite assertions in reports from governmental and charitable bodies that negative staff attitudes towards older patients may contribute to inequitable healthcare provision for older patients when compared with younger patients (those aged under 65 years), the research literature does not describe these attitudes in any detail. Objective: this study explored and conceptualised attitudes towards older patients using in-depth interviews. Methods: twenty-five semi-structured interviews with medical students and hospital-based doctors in a UK acute teaching hospital were conducted. Participants were asked about their beliefs, emotions and behavioural tendencies towards older patients, in line with the psychological literature on the definition of attitudes (affective, cognitive and behavioural information). Data were analysed thematically. Results: attitudes towards older patients and their care could be conceptualised under the headings: (i) beliefs about older patients; (ii) older patients' unique needs and the skills required to care for them and (iii) emotions and satisfaction with caring for older patients. Conclusions: our findings outlined common beliefs and stereotypes specific to older patients, as opposed to older people in general. Older patients had unique needs concerning their healthcare. Participants typically described negative emotions about caring for older patients, but the sources of dissatisfaction largely related to the organisational setting and system in which the care is delivered to these patients. This study marks one of the first in-depth attempts to explore attitudes towards older patients in UK hospital settings. PMID:26185282

  14. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  15. 76 FR 59263 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... care hospital quality measures. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective... 9A. In Table 9C.--Hospitals Redesignated as Rural Under Section 1886(d)(8)(E) of the Act--FY 2012,...

  16. Evaluation of Patient Safety Indicators in Semnan City Hospitals by Using the Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI)

    PubMed Central

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Nemati, Roghayeh Khabiri; Nobahar, Monir; Keighobady, Seifullah; Ghazavi, Soheila; Izadi-Sabet, Farideh; Najafpour, Zhila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, patient safety issue is among one of the main concerns of the hospital policy worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the patient safety status in hospitals affiliated to Semnan city, using the WHO model for Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiatives (PSFHI) in summer 2014. Methods: That was a cross sectional descriptive study that addressed patient safety, which explained the current status of safety in the Semnan hospitals using by instrument of Patient safety friendly initiative standards (PSFHI). Data was collected from 5 hospitals in Semnan city during four weeks in May 2014. Results: The finding of 5 areas examined showed that some components in critical standards had disadvantages. Critical standards of hospitals including areas of leadership and administration, patient and public involvement and safe evidence-based clinical practice, safe environment with and lifetime education in a safe and secure environment were analyzed. The domain of patient and public involvement obtained the lowest mean score and the domain of safe environment obtained the highest mean score in the surveyed hospitals. Conclusion: All the surveyed hospitals had a poor condition regarding standards based on patient safety. Further, the identified weak points are almost the same in the hospitals. Therefore, In order to achieve a good level of all aspects of the protocol, the goals should be considered in the level of strategic planning at hospitals. An effective execution of patient safety creatively may depend on the legal infrastructure and enforcement of standards by hospital management, organizational liability to expectation of patients, safety culture in hospitals. PMID:27045391

  17. Loyalty of hospital patients: a vital marketing objective.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1987-01-01

    Hospitals must strive for patient loyalty as a top priority objective in their marketing strategies. Loyal patients are sources of repeat business, potential users of new services, and positive spokespersons in word-of-mouth advertising. PMID:3583719

  18. Managing Opioid Use Disorder During and After Acute Hospitalization: A Case-Based Review Clarifying Methadone Regulation for Acute Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Noska, Amanda; Mohan, Aron; Wakeman, Sarah; Rich, Josiah; Boutwell, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Treatment with an opioid agonist such as methadone or buprenorphine is the standard of care for opioid use disorder. Persons with opioid use disorder are frequently hospitalized, and may be undertreated due to provider misinformation regarding the legality of prescribing methadone for inpatients. Using a case-based review, this article aims to describe effective management of active opioid withdrawal and ongoing opioid use disorder using methadone or buprenorphine among acutely ill, hospitalized patients. Methods We reviewed pertinent medical and legal literature and consulted with national legal experts regarding methadone for opioid withdrawal and opioid maintenance therapy in hospitalized, general medical and surgical patients, and describe a real-life example of successful implementation of inpatient methadone for these purposes. Results Patients with opioid use disorders can be effectively and legally initiated on methadone maintenance therapy or buprenorphine during an inpatient hospitalization by clinical providers and successfully transitioned to an outpatient methadone maintenance or buprenorphine clinic after discharge for ongoing treatment. Conclusions Inpatient methadone or buprenorphine prescribing is safe and evidence-based, and can be used to effectively treat opioid withdrawal and also serves as a bridge to outpatient treatment of opioid use disorders. PMID:26258153

  19. Factors contributing to the hospitalization of patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, M H; Goldman, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study identifies acute precipitants of hospitalization and evaluates utilization of angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitors in patients admitted with congestive heart failure. METHODS: Cross-sectional chart-review study was done of 435 patients admitted nonelectively from February 1993 to February 1994 to an urban university hospital with a complaint of shortness of breath or fatigue and evidence of congestive heart failure. RESULTS: The most common identifiable abnormalities associated with clinical deterioration prior to admission were acute anginal chest pain (33%), respiratory infection (16%), uncontrolled hypertension with initial systolic blood pressure > or = 180 mm Hg (15%), atrial arrhythmia with heart rate > or = 120 (8%), and noncompliance with medications (15%) or diet (6%); in 34% of patients, no clear cause could be identified. After exclusion of those who were already on a different vasodilator or who had relative contraindications, 18 (32%) of the patients with ejection fractions < or = 0.35 measured prior to admission were not taking an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor on presentation to the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions to improve compliance, the control of hypertension, and the appropriate use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may prevent many hospitalizations of heart-failure patients. PMID:9146445

  20. Acute myocardial infarction in the obstetric patient

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Tabassum; Magee, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infraction (AMI) in the obstetric patient is a rare event, although the incidence is rising due to advancing maternal age and pre-existing cardiac risk factors and medical co-morbidities. While atherosclerotic disease is the leading cause of AMI, coronary artery dissection is an important consideration in pregnancy and in the postpartum period. The physiological changes of pregnancy as well as pregnancy-specific risk factors can predispose the obstetric patient to AMI. Diagnosis of AMI can be challenging as symptoms may be atypical. Furthermore, diagnostic tests must be interpreted in the context of pregnancy. While the overall management of the obstetric patient with AMI is similar to that outside of pregnancy, drug therapy requires modification as some medications may be contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding. There is limited information about prognosis and risk stratification but it is anticipated that future studies will address this issue.

  1. Nurses' knowledge of and compliance with universal precautions in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chan, Regina; Molassiotis, Alexander; Chan, Eunice; Chan, Virene; Ho, Becky; Lai, Chit-ying; Lam, Pauline; Shit, Frances; Yiu, Ivy

    2002-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the nurses' knowledge of and compliance with Universal Precautions (UP) in an acute hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 450 nurses were randomly selected from a population of acute care nurses and 306 were successfully recruited in the study. The study revealed that the nurses' knowledge of UP was inadequate. In addition, UP was not only insufficiently and inappropriately applied, but also selectively practiced. Nearly all respondents knew that used needles should be disposed of in a sharps' box after injections. However, nurses had difficulty in distinguishing between deep body fluids and other general body secretions that are not considered infectious in UP. A high compliance was reported regarding hand-washing, disposal of needles and glove usage. However, the use of other protective wear such as masks and goggles was uncommon. The results also showed no significant relationships between the nurses' knowledge and compliance with UP. It is recommended that UP educational programmes need to consider attitudes in conjunction with empirical knowledge. Nurse managers and occupational health nurses should take a leadership role to ensure safe practices are used in the care of patients. PMID:11755446

  2. Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients Hospitalized Following Pulmonary Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Festic, Emir; Park, Pauline K.; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Dabbagh, Ousama; Adesanya, Adebola; Gajic, Ognjen; Bartz, Raquel R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary aspiration is an important recognized cause of ARDS. Better characterization of patients who aspirate may allow identification of potential risks for aspiration that could be used in future studies to mitigate the occurrence of aspiration and its devastating complications. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of the Lung Injury Prediction Score cohort to better characterize patients with aspiration, including their potential risk factors and related outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 5,584 subjects at risk for ARDS and who required hospitalization, 212 (3.8%) presented with aspiration. Subjects who aspirated were likely to be male (66% vs 56%, P < .007), slightly older (59 years vs 57 years), white (73% vs 61%, P = .0004), admitted from a nursing home (15% vs 5.9%, P < .0001), have a history of alcohol abuse (21% vs 8%, P < .0001), and have lower Glasgow Coma Scale (median, 13 vs 15; P < .0001). Aspiration subjects were sicker (higher APACHE [Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation] II score), required more mechanical ventilation (54% vs 32%, P < .0001), developed more moderate to severe ARDS (12% vs 3.8%, P < .0001), and were twofold more likely to die in-hospital, even after adjustment for severity of illness (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-3.6). Neither obesity nor gastroesophageal reflux was associated with aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Aspiration was more common in men with alcohol abuse history and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale who were admitted from a nursing home. It is independently associated with a significant increase in the risk for ARDS as well as morbidity and mortality. Findings from this study may facilitate the design of future clinical studies of aspiration-induced lung injury. PMID:24811480

  3. The effect of hospital volume on the in-hospital complication rate in knee replacement patients.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, E C; Garfinkel, S A; McQuay, L J; Heck, D A; Wright, J G; Dittus, R; Lubitz, R M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of hospital volume on in-hospital surgical outcomes for knee replacement using six years of Medicare claims data. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The data include inpatient claims for a 100 percent sample of Medicare patients who underwent primary knee replacement during 1985-1990. We supplemented these data with information from HCFA's denominator files, the Area Resource File, and the American Hospital Association survey files. STUDY DESIGN: We estimated the probability that a patient has an in-hospital complication in the initial hospitalization for the first primary knee replacement, using a Logit model, for three definitions of complication. The models controlled for hospital volume, other hospital characteristics, patient demographics, and patient health status. We tested for the endogeneity of hospital volume. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: A panel of two orthopaedic surgeons and two internists reviewed diagnosis codes to determine whether a complication was likely, possible, or due to anemia. After removing the few observations with bad or missing data, the final population has 295,473 observations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The probability of a likely in-hospital complication declines rapidly from 53 through 107 operations per year, then levels off. Statistical tests imply that hospital volume is exogenous in this patient-level data. Complication rates increased steadily through the study period. Although obesity appeared to lower the probability of a complication, a counterintuitive result, further investigation revealed this to be an artifact of the claims data limit of listing no more than five diagnoses. Controlling for this restriction reversed the effect of obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Rather than uncontrolled expansion of knee surgery to small hospitals, decentralization to regional centers where at least about 50, and preferably about 100, operations per year are assured appears to be the optimal policy to reduce in-hospital

  4. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-11-01

    Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients.A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr.The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%-9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770-0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  5. Integrating COPD into Patient-Centered Hospital Readmissions Reduction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Gussin, Hélène A.; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Sullivan, Jamie L.; Zaidi, Farhan; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 5 patients hospitalized for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States are readmitted within 30 days. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently expanded its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program to financially penalize hospitals with higher than expected all-cause 30-day readmission rates following a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. In October 2013, the COPD Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder National COPD Readmissions Summit to summarize our understanding of how to reduce hospital readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations. Over 225 individuals participated in the Summit, including patients, clinicians, health service researchers, policy makers and representatives of academic health care centers, industry, and payers. Summit participants recommend that programs to reduce hospital readmissions: 1) Include specific recommendations about how to promote COPD self-management skills training for patients and their caregivers; 2) Adequately address co-existing disorders common to COPD in care plans during and after hospitalizations; 3) Include an evaluation of adverse events when implementing strategies to reduce hospital readmissions; and 4) Develop a strategy (e.g., a learning collaboratory) to connect groups who are engaged in developing, testing, and implementing programs to reduce hospital readmissions for COPD and other conditions. PMID:25927076

  6. Influence of heart failure on the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction in southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    DENG, FUXUE; XIA, YONG; FU, MICHAEL; HU, YUNFENG; JIA, FANG; RAHARDJO, YEFFRY; DUAN, YINGYI; HE, LINJING; CHANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    The impact of heart failure (HF) on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients from southwestern China remains unclear. The present study aimed to compare in-hospital cardiovascular events, mortality and clinical therapies in AMI patients with or without HF in southwestern China. In total, 591 patients with AMI hospitalized between February 2009 and December 2012 were examined; those with a history of HF were excluded. The patients were divided into four groups according to AMI type (ST-elevated or non-ST-elevated AMI) and the presence of HF during hospitalization. Clinical characteristics, in-hospital cardiovascular events, mortality, coronary angiography and treatment were compared. Clinical therapies, specifically evidence-based drug use were analyzed in patients with HF during hospitalization, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and β-blockers (BBs). AMI patients with HF had a higher frequency of co-morbidities, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, longer length of hospital stay and a greater risk of in-hospital mortality compared with AMI patients without HF. AMI patients with HF were less likely to be examined by cardiac angiography or treated with reperfusion therapy or recommended medications. AMI patients with HF co-treated with ACEIs and BBs had a significantly higher survival rate (94.4 vs. 67.5%; P<0.001) compared with untreated patients or patients treated with either ACEIs or BBs alone. Logistic regression analysis revealed that HF and cardiogenic shock in patients with AMI were the strongest predictors of in-hospital mortality. AMI patients with HF were at a higher risk of adverse outcomes. Cardiac angiography and timely standard recommended medications were associated with improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27284294

  7. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  8. North vs south differences in acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage in Croatia: hospitalization incidence trends, clinical features, and 30-day case fatality

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Pavić, Tajana; Budimir, Ivan; Puljiz, Željko; Bišćanin, Alen; Bratanić, Andre; Nikolić, Marko; Hrabar, Davor; Troskot, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the seven-year trends of hospitalization incidence due to acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage (APUH) and associated risk factors, and examine the differences in these trends between two regions in Croatia. Methods The study collected sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic data on 2204 patients with endoscopically confirmed APUH who were admitted to the Clinical Hospital Center “Sestre Milosrdnice,” Zagreb and Clinical Hospital Center Split between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We determined hospitalization incidence rates, 30-day case fatality rate, clinical outcomes, and incidence-associated factors. Results No differences were observed in APUH hospitalization incidence rates between the regions. Age-standardized one-year cumulative APUH hospitalization incidence rate calculated using the European Standard Population was significantly higher in Zagreb than in Split region (43.2/100 000 vs 29.2/100,000). A significantly higher APUH hospitalization incidence rates were observed in the above 65 years age group. Overall 30-day case fatality rate was 4.9%. Conclusion The hospitalization incidence of APUH in two populations did not change over the observational period and it was significantly higher in the Zagreb region. The incidence of acute duodenal ulcer hemorrhage also remained unchanged, whereas the incidence of acute gastric ulcer hemorrhage increased. The results of this study allow us to monitor epidemiological indicators of APUH and compare data with other countries. PMID:25559836

  9. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  10. Acute Kidney Injury in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Charles; Singhania, Girish; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-10-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common, morbid, and costly surgical complication. Current efforts to understand and manage AKI in surgical patients focus on prevention, mitigation of further injury when AKI has occurred, treatment of associated conditions, and facilitation of renal recovery. Lesser severity AKI is now understood to be much more common, and more morbid, than was previously thought. The ability to detect AKI within hours of onset would be helpful in protecting the kidney and in preserving renal function, and several imaging and biomarker modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:26410139

  11. Identification of the decision maker for a patient's hospital choice: who decides which hospital?

    PubMed

    Sloane, G; Tidwell, P; Horsfield, M

    1999-01-01

    If marketers wish to communicate the positive characteristics of purchasing the private hospital experience, the marketers need to be able to identify which of the participants in the purchasing process is acting in the role of decision maker. Research was undertaken of doctors in the rural setting. Potential respondents were selected from Orange to Broken Hill; from Coonabarabran to Young. Two private hospitals are known to be located within this region--one in Orange and one in Dubbo. In most cases, patients in the rural setting are having the final say as to which hospital to attend. They are filling the role of decision maker. The factors that potential patients are considering in their decision include the services provided by the hospital--specifically factors relating to accommodation, services and cost. These observations are those as interpreted by the doctors who see these patients. Based on the findings of the survey a number of recommendations have been made: (1) Any marketing communication by hospitals should target primarily patients and then doctors. (2) Further research should be undertaken to attempt to accurately determine what characteristics are considered when patients and doctors refer to hospital services. (3) Research should be undertaken to determine the identity of all parties involved in the purchasing decision process. (4) Further research should be undertaken of the general population to determine what factors relating to a hospital are considered when making the hospital purchasing decision. (5) Further in depth analysis should be conducted with the raw data. PMID:10623196

  12. Early Identification of Patients at Risk of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gajic, Ognjen; Dabbagh, Ousama; Park, Pauline K.; Adesanya, Adebola; Chang, Steven Y.; Hou, Peter; Anderson, Harry; Hoth, J. Jason; Mikkelsen, Mark E.; Gentile, Nina T.; Gong, Michelle N.; Talmor, Daniel; Bajwa, Ednan; Watkins, Timothy R.; Festic, Emir; Yilmaz, Murat; Iscimen, Remzi; Kaufman, David A.; Esper, Annette M.; Sadikot, Ruxana; Douglas, Ivor; Sevransky, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate, early identification of patients at risk for developing acute lung injury (ALI) provides the opportunity to test and implement secondary prevention strategies. Objectives: To determine the frequency and outcome of ALI development in patients at risk and validate a lung injury prediction score (LIPS). Methods: In this prospective multicenter observational cohort study, predisposing conditions and risk modifiers predictive of ALI development were identified from routine clinical data available during initial evaluation. The discrimination of the model was assessed with area under receiver operating curve (AUC). The risk of death from ALI was determined after adjustment for severity of illness and predisposing conditions. Measurements and Main Results: Twenty-two hospitals enrolled 5,584 patients at risk. ALI developed a median of 2 (interquartile range 1–4) days after initial evaluation in 377 (6.8%; 148 ALI-only, 229 adult respiratory distress syndrome) patients. The frequency of ALI varied according to predisposing conditions (from 3% in pancreatitis to 26% after smoke inhalation). LIPS discriminated patients who developed ALI from those who did not with an AUC of 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.78–0.82). When adjusted for severity of illness and predisposing conditions, development of ALI increased the risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio, 4.1; 95% confidence interval, 2.9–5.7). Conclusions: ALI occurrence varies according to predisposing conditions and carries an independently poor prognosis. Using routinely available clinical data, LIPS identifies patients at high risk for ALI early in the course of their illness. This model will alert clinicians about the risk of ALI and facilitate testing and implementation of ALI prevention strategies. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00889772). PMID:20802164

  13. Comparison of delay times to hospital presentation for physicians and nonphysicians with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ridker, P M; Manson, J E; Goldhaber, S Z; Hennekens, C H; Buring, J E

    1992-07-01

    To evaluate whether patients who recognize the symptoms of myocardial ischemia and have easy access to medical care have shortened time delays between onset of symptoms and hospital presentation, the total time interval between symptom onset and hospital arrival for 258 U.S. male physicians experiencing a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the Physicians' Health Study (PHS) was compared with that of a comparable group of 240 men enrolled in the U.S. component of the Second International Study of Infarct Survival (ISIS-2), as well as with those of previously published series of patients with AMI. For patients presenting for medical care within 24 hours of symptom onset, the median time delay from onset of symptoms to presentation for medical care was 1.8 hours in the PHS, and 4.9 hours in the U.S. component of ISIS-2 (p less than 0.001). Furthermore, 56% of participants in the PHS presented for medical care within 2 hours and 72% within 4 hours of symptom onset compared with 20% (p less than 0.001) and 44% (p less than 0.001), respectively, for ISIS-2 participants. In previously published series, the average time to presentation was comparable to that in the ISIS-2 trial, with variation depending on country of origin and on local population density. The median time to medical presentation in any previous series was not shorter than that in the PHS. Thus, physicians in the PHS had significantly shorter time delays between onset of symptoms and presentation for medical care. This difference may help explain the far lower than expected cardiovascular mortality rates among physician participants in the PHS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1615847

  14. Migration of patients between five urban teaching hospitals in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Galanter, William L; Applebaum, Andrew; Boddipalli, Viveka; Kho, Abel; Lin, Michael; Meltzer, David; Roberts, Anna; Trick, Bill; Walton, Surrey M; Lambert, Bruce L

    2013-04-01

    To quantify the extent of patient sharing and inpatient care fragmentation among patients discharged from a cohort of Chicago hospitals. Admission and discharge dates and patient ZIP codes from 5 hospitals over 2 years were matched with an encryption algorithm. Admission to more than one hospital was considered fragmented care. The association between fragmentation and socio-economic variables using ZIP-code data from the 2000 US Census was measured. Using validation from one hospital, patient matching using encrypted identifiers had a sensitivity of 99.3 % and specificity of 100 %. The cohort contained 228,151 unique patients and 334,828 admissions. Roughly 2 % of the patients received fragmented care, accounting for 5.8 % of admissions and 6.4 % of hospital days. In 3 of 5 hospitals, and overall, the length of stay of patients with fragmented care was longer than those without. Fragmentation varied by hospital and was associated with the proportion of non-Caucasian persons, the proportion of residents whose income fell in the lowest quartile, and the proportion of residents with more children being raised by mothers alone in the zip code of the patient. Patients receiving fragmented care accounted for 6.4 % of hospital days. This percentage is a low estimate for our region, since not all regional hospitals participated, but high enough to suggest value in creating Health Information Exchange. Fragmentation varied by hospital, per capita income, race and proportion of single mother homes. This secure methodology and fragmentation analysis may prove useful for future analyses. PMID:23381645

  15. Diabetes hinders community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Boavida, J M; Raposo, J F; Froes, F; Nunes, B; Ribeiro, R T; Penha-Gonçalves, C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and its impact on hospital length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Research design and methods We carried out a retrospective, nationwide register analysis of CAP in adult patients admitted to Portuguese hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Anonymous data from 157 291 adult patients with CAP were extracted from the National Hospital Discharge Database and we performed a DM-conditioned analysis stratified by age, sex and year of hospitalization. Results The 74 175 CAP episodes that matched the inclusion criteria showed a high burden of DM that tended to increase over time, from 23.7% in 2009 to 28.1% in 2012. Interestingly, patients with CAP had high DM prevalence in the context of the national DM prevalence. Episodes of CAP in patients with DM had on average 0.8 days longer hospital stay as compared to patients without DM (p<0.0001), totaling a surplus of 15 370 days of stay attributable to DM in 19 212 admissions. In-hospital mortality was also significantly higher in patients with CAP who have DM (15.2%) versus those who have DM (13.5%) (p=0.002). Conclusions Our analysis revealed that DM prevalence was significantly increased within CAP hospital admissions, reinforcing other studies’ findings that suggest that DM is a risk factor for CAP. Since patients with CAP who have DM have longer hospitalization time and higher mortality rates, these results hold informative value for patient guidance and healthcare strategies. PMID:27252873

  16. Acute care of older patients in the emergency department: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, John J; Kennelly, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Older patients in the emergency department (ED) are a vulnerable population who are at a higher risk of functional decline and hospital reattendance subsequent to an ED visit, and have a high mortality rate in the months following an ED attendance. The delivery of acute care in a busy environment to this population presents its own unique challenge. The purpose of this review is to detail the common geriatric syndromes encountered in the ED as well as the appropriate strategies and instruments, which can be utilized to support the clinical decision matrix and improve outcomes. PMID:27147890

  17. Acute myocardial infarction or acute myocarditis? Discharge registry-based study of likelihood and associated features in hospitalised patients

    PubMed Central

    Kytö, Ville; Sipilä, Jussi; Rautava, Päivi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the likelihood of and patient features associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus acute myocarditis in different population segments. Design Nationwide, multihospital observational retrospective registry study of 9.6 years in Finland. Participants All consecutive patients aged ≥18 years hospitalised with a primary diagnosis of AMI (n=89 399) or acute myocarditis (n=2131) in 22 hospitals with a coronary catheterisation laboratory. Primary outcome measures Likelihood of AMI versus acute myocarditis and associated patient features. Results Men were over-represented in patients with AMI (59.8%) and in patients with acute myocarditis (76.1%). Age distributions of AMI and acute myocarditis were opposite as a majority of patients with myocarditis were aged 18–29 years, while the number of patients with AMI increased gradually up to 80 years of age. Patients aged 18–29 years were more likely to have acute myocarditis as the cause of hospitalisation (relative risk (RR)=11.4; 95% CI 7.6 to 16.1 for myocarditis, p<0.0001), but after 30 years of age the likelihood of infarction was higher with exponentially increasing RR for AMI. In youngest patients (18–29 years), the likelihood of AMI was higher in women, but men had higher odds for AMI after 40 years of age. Overall, men had OR of 1.97 (95% CI 1.74 to 2.23, p<0.0001) for AMI versus myocarditis when compared with women. Hypercholesterolaemia, chronic coronary artery disease, diabetes and hypertension predicted AMI in multivariate analysis. Odds for myocarditis were significantly higher if the patient had an otolaryngeal infection (OR 18.13; 95% CI 8.96 to 36.67, p<0.0001). Conclusions Acute myocarditis is more common than AMI in hospitalised patients aged 18–29 years, but the risk of AMI increases exponentially thereafter. Hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes and hypertension predict AMI regardless of age and gender. PMID:26009575

  18. Monitoring the impact of the DRG payment system on nursing service context factors in Swiss acute care hospitals: Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Spirig, Rebecca; Spichiger, Elisabeth; Martin, Jacqueline S.; Frei, Irena Anna; Müller, Marianne; Kleinknecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims: With this study protocol, a research program is introduced. Its overall aim is to prepare the instruments and to conduct the first monitoring of nursing service context factors at three university and two cantonal hospitals in Switzerland prior to the introduction of the reimbursement system based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) and to further develop a theoretical model as well as a methodology for future monitoring following the introduction of DRGs. Background: DRG was introduced to all acute care hospitals in Switzerland in 2012. In other countries, DRG introduction led to rationing and subsequently to a reduction in nursing care. As result, nursing-sensitive patient outcomes were seriously jeopardised. Switzerland has the opportunity to learn from the consequences experienced by other countries when they introduced DRGs. Their experiences highlight that DRGs influence nursing service context factors such as complexity of nursing care or leadership, which in turn influence nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. For this reason, the monitoring of nursing service context factors needs to be an integral part of the introduction of DRGs. However, most acute care hospitals in Switzerland do not monitor nursing service context data. Nursing managers and hospital executive boards will be in need of this data in the future, in order to distribute resources effectively. Methods/Design: A mixed methods design in the form of a sequential explanatory strategy was chosen. During the preparation phase, starting in spring 2011, instruments were selected and prepared, and the access to patient and nursing data in the hospitals was organized. Following this, online collection of quantitative data was conducted in fall 2011. In summer 2012, qualitative data was gathered using focus group interviews, which helped to describe the processes in more detail. During 2013 and 2014, an integration process is being conducted involving complementing, comparing and contrasting

  19. Pediatric Patients' Malnutrition and Its Relation to Hospitalization Times and Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimarey, Luis M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Relates the nutritional status of 1,378 hospitalized pediatric patients to length of hospitalization and definitive hospitalization diagnosis. Findings indicated the length of hospitalization time increased markedly with malnutrition, especially for patients with diarrhea. (BJD)

  20. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Hyland, Andrew; Bianco, Eduardo; Glantz, Stanton A; Cummings, K Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Stimulated by the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, many countries in Latin America adopted comprehensive smoke-free policies. In March 2006, Uruguay became the first Latin American country to adopt 100% smoke-free national legislation, which ended smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The objective of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease 2 years before and 2 years after the policy was implemented in Uruguay. Methods Reports of hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (International Classification of Disease-10 I21) from 37 hospitals (79% of all hospital admissions in the country), representing the period 2 years before and 2 years after the adoption of a nationwide smoke-free policy in Uruguay (between 1 March 2004 and 29 February 2008), were reviewed. A time series analysis was undertaken to compare the average monthly number of events of hospital admission for AMI before and after the smoke-free law. Results A total of 7949 hospital admissions for AMI were identified during the 4-year study period. Two years after the smoke-free policy was enacted, hospital admissions for AMI fell by 22%. The same pattern and roughly the same magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions were observed for patients seen in public and private hospitals, men, women and people aged 40–65 years and older than 65 years. Conclusions The national smoke-free policy implemented in Uruguay in 2006 was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for AMI. PMID:22337557

  1. Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    This is a literature review of the frequency of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized patients with cancer and of the available evidence supporting the use of thromboprophylaxis. Patients with cancer are at particularly high risk of venous thromboembolism and account for almost 20% of patients in the population. Hospitalization is an important risk factor in patients with cancer, with rates reported between 0.6% and 7.8%. The incidence has been increasing over the past decade. Three randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses indicate that prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin, heparin, or fondaparinux significantly reduces the rate of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized medical patients who are at high risk. Patients with cancer were included in these studies, but prospective trials specifically focused on patients with cancer are not available. Evidence indicates that appropriate thromboprophylaxis is provided to a minority of hospitalized patients with cancer and that targeted educational efforts and computerized prompt systems can increase appropriate use. Guidelines developed by both oncology and thrombosis organizations support the use of thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized patients with cancer. In conclusion, most patients hospitalized with cancer are at high risk of venous thromboembolism, and thromboprophylaxis should be provided in the absence of active bleeding or a high bleeding risk. PMID:19704060

  2. The evolution of an acute care hospital unit to a DRG-exempt rehabilitation unit. A preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Parfenchuck, T A; Parziale, J R; Liberman, J R; Butcher, R P; Ahern, D K

    1990-02-01

    The Health Care Financing Administration's decision to adopt a prospective based payment system has caused many institutions to implement new policies and practices. A recent area of interest for many hospitals has been the creation of diagnosis-related group (DRG) exempt units to maximize reimbursement practices. We analyzed changes which occurred when an eight bed acute care stroke unit (SU) was converted to a DRG exempt eight bed rehabilitation unit (RU). The time period involved was 1 1/2 months before and 1 1/2 months after the transition occurred. Analysis of data from the pre- and posttransition periods revealed that: (1) length of stay increased significantly from 11.7 to 15.3 days (P less than 0.001); (2) functional independence measure (FIM) score improvement was significantly greater (P less than 0.05) for RU patients (0.84/day) than for SU patients (0.39/day); (3) disposition to home v other facilities increased significantly from 50 to 81% (P less than 0.05); (4) the overall occupancy increased from 94 to 100% and all beds were filled with rehabilitation patients; (5) the proportion of patients with Medicare as their primary insurer was comparable before (64%) and after (67%) unit conversion; (6) gross income from rehabilitation patients increased by 43%. Indirect savings via reduction of acute hospital length of stay for Medicare patients increased total income from operation of this unit. We conclude that patients on the RU stayed longer, had greater daily improvements in functional status, and were more likely to be discharged to home. This appears to be due to a more efficient use of rehabilitation beds and a concomitant overall improvement in reimbursement to the hospital.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2105736

  3. Inequalities in care in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shabnam; Simms, Alexander; Batin, Phillip; Kurian, John; Gale, Chris P

    2015-01-01

    Coronary