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Sample records for acute humoral xenograft

  1. Humor.

    PubMed

    Woodbury-Fariña, Michel A; Antongiorgi, Joalex L

    2014-12-01

    Humor has not been taken as seriously as it should be. Humor has many positive effects in the daily lives of patients and clinicians need to take advantage of these. Many indices of stress are attenuated and this serves to improve the therapeutic alliance. Freudian, rational emotive therapy, and kleinian views are presented, as well as examples of how to use playful therapy. In addition, advice on how to develop humor is given. PMID:25455066

  2. Humor, laughter, and the cerebellum: insights from patients with acute cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Andrzejewski, K; Göricke, S; Wondzinski, E; Siebler, M; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2013-12-01

    Extent of cerebellar involvement in cognition and emotion is still a topic of ongoing research. In particular, the cerebellar role in humor processing and control of laughter is not well known. A hypermetric dysregulation of affective behavior has been assumed in cerebellar damage. Thus, we aimed at investigating humor comprehension and appreciation as well as the expression of laughter in 21 patients in the acute or subacute state after stroke restricted to the cerebellum, and in the same number of matched healthy control subjects. Patients with acute and subacute cerebellar damage showed preserved comprehension and appreciation of humor using a validated humor test evaluating comprehension, funniness and aversiveness of cartoons ("3WD Humor Test"). Additionally, there was no difference when compared to healthy controls in the number and intensity of facial reactions and laughter while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, or video sketches measured by the Facial Action Coding System. However, as depression scores were significantly increased in patients with cerebellar stroke, a concealing effect of accompanying depression cannot be excluded. Current findings add to descriptions in the literature that cognitive or affective disorders in patients with lesions restricted to the cerebellum, even in the acute state after damage, are frequently mild and might only be present in more sensitive or specific tests. PMID:23661243

  3. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo. PMID:20406497

  4. Successful therapy with rituximab of refractory acute humoral renal transplant rejection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celik, A; Saglam, F; Cavdar, C; Sifil, A; Atila, K; Sarioglu, S; Bora, S; Gulay, H; Camsari, T

    2008-01-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) is generally less responsive to conventional anti-rejection treatment with consequent allograft losses. Therapeutic options include antilymphocyte antibody (ATG), intravenous immunglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, or immunoadsorption with protein A together with intensification of immunsuppression with a tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil combination. This report describes a transplant recipient who responded to rituximab therapy as treatment for steroid-, ATG-, IVIG-, and plasmapheresis-resistant AHR. PMID:18261611

  5. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic test systems that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limited amounts of primary tumor material. A popular assay is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice. The protocol includes injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice with subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated are then used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. Detailed in this unit are procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for use in basic research and translational studies. PMID:25737157

  6. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic models that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limiting amounts of primary tumor material. A frequently used model is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice and involves injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice, and subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated can then be used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. This unit describes detailed procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for potential use in basic research or translational studies. PMID:25737157

  7. Variegated clonality and rapid emergence of new molecular lesions in xenografts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are associated with drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Daniel; Liem, Natalia L M; Mossner, Maximilian; Klaumünzer, Marion; Papa, Rachael A; Nowak, Verena; Jann, Johann C; Akagi, Tadayuki; Kawamata, Norihiko; Okamoto, Ryoko; Thoennissen, Nils H; Kato, Motohiro; Sanada, Masashi; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Ogawa, Seishi; Marshall, Glenn M; Lock, Richard B; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-01-01

    The use of genome-wide copy-number analysis and massive parallel sequencing has revolutionized the understanding of the clonal architecture of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by demonstrating that this disease is composed of highly variable clonal ancestries following the rules of Darwinian selection. The current study aimed to analyze the molecular composition of childhood ALL biopsies and patient-derived xenografts with particular emphasis on mechanisms associated with acquired chemoresistance. Genomic DNA from seven primary pediatric ALL patient samples, 29 serially passaged xenografts, and six in vivo selected chemoresistant xenografts were analyzed with 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. Copy-number analysis of non-drug-selected xenografts confirmed a highly variable molecular pattern of variegated subclones. Whereas primary patient samples from initial diagnosis displayed a mean of 5.7 copy-number alterations per sample, serially passaged xenografts contained a mean of 8.2 and chemoresistant xenografts a mean of 10.5 copy-number alterations per sample, respectively. Resistance to cytarabine was explained by a new homozygous deletion of the DCK gene, whereas methotrexate resistance was associated with monoallelic deletion of FPGS and mutation of the remaining allele. This study demonstrates that selecting for chemoresistance in xenografted human ALL cells can reveal novel mechanisms associated with drug resistance. PMID:25450514

  8. In vivo acute and humoral response to three-dimensional porous soy protein scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chien, Karen B; Aguado, Brian A; Bryce, Paul J; Shah, Ramille N

    2013-11-01

    Increasing interest in using soy biomaterials for tissue engineering applications has prompted investigation into the in vivo biocompatibility of soy implants. In this study, the biocompatibility of soy protein scaffolds fabricated using freeze-drying and 3-D printing was assessed using a subcutaneous implant model in BALB/c mice. The main objectives of this study were: (1) to compare soy protein with bovine collagen, a well-characterized natural protein implant, by implanting scaffolds of the same protein weight, and (2) to observe the effects of soy scaffold microstructure and amount of protein loading, which also alters the degradation properties, on the acute and humoral immune responses towards soy. Results showed that freeze-dried soy scaffolds fully degraded after 14 days, whereas collagen scaffolds (of the same protein weight) remained intact for 56 days. Furthermore, Masson's trichrome staining showed little evidence of damage or fibrosis at the soy implant site. Scaffolds of higher soy protein content, however, were still present after 56 days. H&E staining revealed that macrophage infiltration was hindered in the denser bioplotted soy scaffolds, causing slower degradation. Analysis of soy-specific antibodies in mouse serum after implantation revealed levels of IgG1 that correlated with higher scaffold weight and protein density. However, no soy-specific IgE was detected, indicating the absence of an allergic response to the soy implants. These results demonstrate that soy protein could be an acceptable biocompatible implant for tissue regeneration, and that scaffold porosity, soy protein density and scaffold degradation rate significantly affect the acute and humoral immune response. PMID:23851173

  9. Efficacy of an Fc-modified anti-CD123 antibody (CSL362) combined with chemotherapy in xenograft models of acute myelogenous leukemia in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Erwin M.; Yee, Dean; Busfield, Samantha J.; McManus, Julie F.; Cummings, Nik; Vairo, Gino; Wei, Andrew; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Powell, Jason A.; Lopez, Angel F.; Lewis, Ian D.; McCall, Martin N.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of older patients with acute myelogenous leukemia is generally poor. The interleukin-3 receptor α-chain (CD123) is highly expressed on the surface of acute leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. CSL362 is a fully humanized, CD123-neutralizing monoclonal antibody containing a modified Fc structure, which enhances human natural killer cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Six continuous acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts established from patient explants and characterized by cell and molecular criteria, produced progressively lethal disease 42-202 days after transplantation. CSL362 alone reduced engraftment of one of four and three of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts in the bone marrow and peripheral organs, respectively. A cytarabine and daunorubicin regimen was optimized using this model to identify potentially synergistic interactions with CSL362. Cytarabine/daunorubicin improved the survival of mice engrafted with four of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts by 31–41 days. Moreover, CSL362 extended the survival of cytarabine/daunorubicin-treated mice for two of two acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts, while augmentation of natural killer cell-deficient NSG mice with adoptively transferred human natural killer cells improved survival against a single xenograft. Interestingly, this enhanced CSL362 efficacy was lost in the absence of chemotherapy. This study shows that acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts provide a platform for the evaluation of new therapeutics, simulating complex in vivo interactions, and that the in vivo efficacy of CSL362 supports continued clinical development of this drug. PMID:26130514

  10. Residual Disease in a Novel Xenograft Model of RUNX1-Mutated, Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sivagnanalingam, Umayal; Balys, Marlene; Eberhardt, Allison; Wang, Nancy; Myers, Jason R.; Ashton, John M.; Becker, Michael W.; Calvi, Laura M.; Mendler, Jason H.

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients harboring RUNX1 mutations have a dismal prognosis with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We aimed to develop an in vivo model of RUNX1-mutated, CN-AML in which the nature of residual disease in this molecular disease subset could be explored. We utilized a well-characterized patient-derived, RUNX1-mutated CN-AML line (CG-SH). Tail vein injection of CG-SH into NOD scid gamma mice led to leukemic engraftment in the bone marrow, spleen, and peripheral blood within 6 weeks. Treatment of leukemic mice with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy resulted in clearance of disease from the spleen and peripheral blood, but persistence of disease in the bone marrow as assessed by flow cytometry and secondary transplantation. Whole exome sequencing of CG-SH revealed mutations in ASXL1, CEBPA, GATA2, and SETBP1, not previously reported. We conclude that CG-SH xenografts are a robust, reproducible in vivo model of CN-AML in which to explore mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26177509

  11. Acute vascular response to cediranib treatment in human non-small-cell lung cancer xenografts with different tumour stromal architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanyan; Allen, Danny; Kersemans, Veerle; Devery, Aoife M.; Bokobza, Sivan M.; Smart, Sean; Ryan, Anderson J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Tumours can be categorised based on their stromal architecture into tumour vessel and stromal vessel phenotypes, and the phenotypes have been suggested to define tumour response to chronic treatment with a VEGFR2 antibody. However, it is unclear whether the vascular phenotypes of tumours associate with acute vascular response to VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), or whether the early changes in vascular function are associated with subsequent changes in tumour size. This study was sought to address these questions by using xenograft models of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) representing stromal vessel phenotype (Calu-3) and tumour vessel phenotype (Calu-6), respectively. Methods For dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), nude mice bearing established Calu-3 or Calu-6 xenografts were treated with a potent pan-VEGFR TKI, cediranib (6 mg/kg), at 0 h and 22 h. DCE-MRI was performed 2 h before the first dose and 2 h after the second dose of cediranib to examine acute changes in tumour vessel perfusion. Tumours were harvested for hypoxia detection by CA9 immunohistochemistry. For tumour growth study, mice carrying established Calu-3 or Calu-6 tumours were treated with cediranib once daily for 5 days. Results Twenty-four hours after cediranib administration, the perfusion of Calu-3 tumours was markedly reduced, with a significant increase in hypoxia. In contrast, neither perfusion nor hypoxia was significantly affected in Calu-6 tumours. Tumour regressions were induced in Calu-3 xenografts, but not in Calu-6 xenografts, although there was a trend towards tumour growth inhibition after 5 days of cediranib treatment. Conclusion These findings suggest that tumour stromal architecture may associate with acute tumour vascular response to VEGFR TKI, and this acute tumour vascular response may be a promising early predictive marker of response to VEGFR TKI in NSCLC. PMID:26323213

  12. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of an Induction Regimen for In Vivo Combined Testing of Novel Drugs against Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min H.; Liem, Natalia L. M.; Carol, Hernan; Boehm, Ingrid; Groepper, Daniel; Reynolds, C. Patrick; Stewart, Clinton F.; Lock, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Current regimens for induction therapy of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), or for re-induction post relapse, use a combination of vincristine (VCR), a glucocorticoid, and l-asparaginase (ASP) with or without an anthracycline. With cure rates now approximately 80%, robust pre-clinical models are necessary to prioritize active new drugs for clinical trials in relapsed/refractory patients, and the ability of these models to predict synergy/antagonism with established therapy is an essential attribute. In this study, we report optimization of an induction-type regimen by combining VCR, dexamethasone (DEX) and ASP (VXL) against ALL xenograft models established from patient biopsies in immune-deficient mice. We demonstrate that the VXL combination was synergistic in vitro against leukemia cell lines as well as in vivo against ALL xenografts. In vivo, VXL treatment caused delays in progression of individual xenografts ranging from 22 to >146 days. The median progression delay of xenografts derived from long-term surviving patients was 2-fold greater than that of xenografts derived from patients who died of their disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that systemic DEX exposure in mice increased 2-fold when administered in combination with VCR and ASP, consistent with clinical findings, which may contribute to the observed synergy between the 3 drugs. Finally, as proof-of-principle we tested the in vivo efficacy of combining VXL with either the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Bcl-w inhibitor, ABT-737, or arsenic trioxide to provide evidence of a robust in vivo platform to prioritize new drugs for clinical trials in children with relapsed/refractory ALL. PMID:22479469

  13. Histone modifications patterns in tissues and tumours from acute promyelocytic leukemia xenograft model in response to combined epigenetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Valiulienė, Giedrė; Treigytė, Gražina; Savickienė, Jūratė; Matuzevičius, Dalius; Alksnė, Milda; Jarašienė-Burinskaja, Rasa; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Navakauskas, Dalius; Navakauskienė, Rūta

    2016-04-01

    Xenograft models are suitable for in vivo study of leukemia's pathogenesis and the preclinical development of anti-leukemia agents but understanding of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms linking to adult cell functions in pathological conditions during different in vivo treatments is yet unknown. In this study, for the first time epigenetic chromatin modifications were characterized in tissues and tumours from murine xenograft model generated using the human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) NB4 cells engrafted in immunodeficient NOG mice. Xenografts were subjected to combined epigenetic treatment by histone deacetylase inhibitor Belinostat, histone methyltransferase inhibitor 3-DZNeaplanocin A and all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro model, where such combination inhibited NB4 cell growth and enhanced retinoic acid-induced differentiation to granulocytes. Xenotransplantation was assessed by peripheral blood cells counts, the analysis of cell surface markers (CD15, CD33, CD45) and the expression of certain genes (PML-RAR alpha, CSF3, G-CSFR, WT1). The combined treatment prolonged APL xenograft mice survival and prevented tumour formation. The analysis of the expression of histone marks such as acetylation of H4, trimethylation of H3K4, H3K9 and H3K27 in APL xenograft mice tumours and tissues demonstrated tissue-specific changes in the level of histone modifications and the APL prognostic mark, WT1 protein. In summary, the effects of epigenetic agents used in this study were positive for leukemia prevention and linked to a modulation of the chromatin epigenetic environment in adult tissues of malignant organism. PMID:27044813

  14. Radiosensitizing effect of misonidazole in acute and fractionated irradiation of a human osteosarcoma xenograft. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.; Brustad, T.

    1980-09-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of misonidazole (Ro-07-0582) in acute and fractionated irradiation of a human osteosarcoma grown in the athymic mutant nude mouse was studied. Tumor regrowth delay was used as a measure of response. The enhancement ratio of misonidazole was found to be 1.45 for an actue dose of 12.50 Gy and 1.25 for four fractions of 3.75 Gy, delivered over four consecutive days. It is concluded that the present osteosarcoma xenograft reoxygenated inadequately during the three day period which elapsed from the first to the fourth fraction of 3.75 Gy.

  15. A robust and rapid xenograft model to assess efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents for human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Saland, E; Boutzen, H; Castellano, R; Pouyet, L; Griessinger, E; Larrue, C; de Toni, F; Scotland, S; David, M; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Vergez, F; Barreira, Y; Collette, Y; Récher, C; Sarry, J-E

    2015-01-01

    Relevant preclinical mouse models are crucial to screen new therapeutic agents for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current in vivo models based on the use of patient samples are not easy to establish and manipulate in the laboratory. Our objective was to develop robust xenograft models of human AML using well-characterized cell lines as a more accessible and faster alternative to those incorporating the use of patient-derived AML cells. Five widely used AML cell lines representing various AML subtypes were transplanted and expanded into highly immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/LtSz-severe combined immunodeficiency IL2Rγcnull mice (for example, cell line-derived xenografts). We show here that bone marrow sublethal conditioning with busulfan or irradiation has equal efficiency for the xenotransplantation of AML cell lines. Although higher number of injected AML cells did not change tumor engraftment in bone marrow and spleen, it significantly reduced the overall survival in mice for all tested AML cell lines. On the basis of AML cell characteristics, these models also exhibited a broad range of overall mouse survival, engraftment, tissue infiltration and aggressiveness. Thus, we have established a robust, rapid and straightforward in vivo model based on engraftment behavior of AML cell lines, all vital prerequisites for testing new therapeutic agents in preclinical studies. PMID:25794133

  16. Acute effects of benzene and cyclophosphamide exposure on cellular and humoral immunity of cotton rats, Sigmodon hispidus

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, S.T.; Lochmiller, R.L.; Vestey, M.R.; Qualls, C.W. Jr.; Elangbam, C.S. )

    1991-06-01

    Many environmental pollutants are potent immunotoxicants with the capability of altering host resistance to pathogens and compromising overall immunological integrity. Because environmental contaminants typically occur as a diverse group of compounds that are difficult to individually identify, their hazardous potential is often difficult to study in the laboratory. Consequently, development of wild mammalian species as bioindicators of environmental contamination may provide an alterative approach to assessing the hazardous potential of immunotoxicants for both human and wildlife populations. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is an excellent prospect as an in situ bioindicator of environmental contamination of terrestrial ecosystems. Recently, the authors initiated studies in their laboratory to develop a sensitive method to evaluate environmental immunotoxicity hazards to wildlife and humans. The present study was designed to test the sensitivity of selected humoral and cell-mediated immune response assays in the cotton rat to acute benzene and cyclophosphamide exposure which are known immunotoxicants.

  17. Antibodies targeting human IL1RAP (IL1R3) show therapeutic effects in xenograft models of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ågerstam, Helena; Karlsson, Christine; Hansen, Nils; Sandén, Carl; Askmyr, Maria; von Palffy, Sofia; Högberg, Carl; Rissler, Marianne; Wunderlich, Mark; Juliusson, Gunnar; Richter, Johan; Sjöström, Kjell; Bhatia, Ravi; Mulloy, James C.; Järås, Marcus; Fioretos, Thoas

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a poor survival rate, and there is an urgent need for novel and more efficient therapies, ideally targeting AML stem cells that are essential for maintaining the disease. The interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP; IL1R3) is expressed on candidate leukemic stem cells in the majority of AML patients, but not on normal hematopoietic stem cells. We show here that monoclonal antibodies targeting IL1RAP have strong antileukemic effects in xenograft models of human AML. We demonstrate that effector-cell–mediated killing is essential for the observed therapeutic effects and that natural killer cells constitute a critical human effector cell type. Because IL-1 signaling is important for the growth of AML cells, we generated an IL1RAP-targeting antibody capable of blocking IL-1 signaling and show that this antibody suppresses the proliferation of primary human AML cells. Hence, IL1RAP can be efficiently targeted with an anti-IL1RAP antibody capable of both achieving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and blocking of IL-1 signaling as modes of action. Collectively, these results provide important evidence in support of IL1RAP as a target for antibody-based treatment of AML. PMID:26261316

  18. Busulfan depletes neutrophils and delays accelerated acute rejection of discordant xenografts in the guinea pig-to-rat model.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Robert B; Beck, Tino; Stehle, Ingo; Kremer, Marcus; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Complement factor C6 plays a critical role in mediating hyperacute rejection of discordant xenografts. In order to explore the mechanism of discordant xenograft rejection, we investigated kinetics and phenotypes of the cellular infiltrate in xenografts in untreated and leukocyte-depleted recipients, in relation to graft survival. Guinea pig cardiac xenografts were heterotopically transplanted to totally C6-deficient PVG (C-) rats. Grafts were removed after 0, 6, 12, and 24 h ( n = 6). Histological evaluation was performed with hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) and immunoperoxidase staining. The agents fucoidin and busulfan were applied to delay xenograft rejection further. Within 6 h, minimal perivascular edema with isolated infiltrating CD11b/c- and ED1-positive cells were found. An intense infiltration of CD11b/c- and ED1-positive cells with interstitial hemorrhage was present after 24 h, though with little CD161 and CD3 cell infiltration. Inhibition of cell adhesion by fucoidin did not prolong xenograft survival (34 +/- 15 h, n = 4, P<0.47), but the depletion of granulocytes by injection of busulfan did prolong survival of the discordant xenografts, to 62 +/- 22 h ( n = 7, P < or = 0.0039). These results demonstrate a significant effect of specific depletion of granulocytes and macrophages by busulfan therapy on guinea pig cardiac xenograft survival in PVG (C-) rats, suggesting the participation of these infiltrating cells in the xenoreactive rejection process. PMID:12545340

  19. Humoral Response in Toscana Virus Acute Neurologic Disease Investigated by Viral-Protein-Specific Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Magurano, Fabio; Nicoletti, Loredana

    1999-01-01

    The Toscana virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is the only sandfly-transmitted virus that demonstrates neurotropic activity. Clinical cases ranging from aseptic meningitis to meningoencephalitis caused by Toscana virus are yearly observed in central Italy during the summer, and several cases have been reported among tourists returning from zones of endemicity (Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Cyprus). In Toscana virus patients, immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, usually present at the onset of symptoms, can reveal elevated titers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and can persist for at least 1 year. IgG antibodies can be absent at the onset of symptoms: titers rise in convalescent sera and persist for many years. At least five proteins have been identified in Toscana virus-infected cells: nucleoprotein N, glycoproteins G1 and G2, a large protein (L) assumed to be a component of the polymerase, and two nonstructural proteins, NSm and NSs. We report results of a study on the antibody response to individual viral proteins in patients with Toscana virus-associated acute neurologic disease. Immunoblotting and semiquantitative radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) allow identification of nucleoprotein N as the major antigen responsible for both IgM and IgG responses. Antibodies to proteins other than nucleoprotein N are detected only by RIPA. Antibodies to glycoproteins are detected in about one-third of patients, and whereas their presence always predicts neutralization, some serum samples with neutralizing activity have undetectable levels of antibodies to G1-G2. Antibodies to nonstructural proteins NSm and NSs are also identified. The results obtained raise some questions about antigenic variability and relevant neutralization epitopes of Toscana virus. PMID:9874664

  20. Evaluation of the NOD/SCID xenograft model for glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids such as prednisolone and dexamethasone are critical drugs used in multi-agent chemotherapy protocols used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and response to glucocorticoids is highly predictive of outcome. The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model of ALL is a clinically relevant model in which the mice develop a systemic leukemia which retains the fundamental biological characteristics of the original disease. Here we report a study evaluating the NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model to investigate glucocorticoid-induced gene expression. Cells from a glucocorticoid-sensitive xenograft derived from a child with B-cell precursor ALL were inoculated into NOD/SCID mice. When highly engrafted the mice were randomized into groups of 4 to receive dexamethasone 15 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection or vehicle control. Leukemia cells were harvested from mice spleens at 0, 8, 24 or 48 hours thereafter, and gene expression analyzed on Illumina WG-6_V3 chips, comparing all groups to time 0 hours. Results The 8 hour dexamethasone-treated timepoint had the highest number of significantly differentially expressed genes, with fewer observed at the 24 and 48 hour timepoints, and with minimal changes seen across the time-matched controls. When compared to publicly available datasets of glucocorticoid-induced gene expression from an in vitro cell line study and from an in vivo study of patients with ALL, at the level of pathways, expression changes in the 8 hour xenograft samples showed a similar response to patients treated with glucocorticoids. Replicate analysis revealed that at the 8 hour timepoint, a dataset with high signal and differential expression, using data from 3 replicates instead of 4 resulted in excellent recovery scores of > 0.9. However at other timepoints with less signal very poor recovery scores were obtained with 3 replicates. Conclusions The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model provides a reproducible experimental system in which to

  1. Efficacy of JAK/STAT pathway inhibition in murine xenograft models of early T-cell precursor (ETP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Dolai, Sibasish; Delgado-Martin, Cristina; Vincent, Tiffaney; Robbins, Alissa; Selvanathan, Arthavan; Ryan, Theresa; Hall, Junior; Wood, Andrew C.; Tasian, Sarah K.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Wood, Brent L.; Hermiston, Michelle L.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor (ETP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a recently described subtype of T-ALL characterized by a unique immunophenotype and genomic profile, as well as a high rate of induction failure. Frequent mutations in cytokine receptor and Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathways led us to hypothesize that ETP-ALL is dependent on JAK/STAT signaling. Here we demonstrate aberrant activation of the JAK/STAT pathway in ETP-ALL blasts relative to non-ETP T-ALL. Moreover, ETP-ALL showed hyperactivation of STAT5 in response to interleukin-7, an effect that was abrogated by the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. In vivo, ruxolitinib displayed activity in 6 of 6 patient-derived murine xenograft models of ETP-ALL, with profound single-agent efficacy in 5 models. Ruxolitinib treatment decreased peripheral blast counts relative to pretreatment levels and compared with control (P < .01) in 5 of 6 ETP-ALL xenografts, with marked reduction in mean splenic blast counts (P < .01) in 6 of 6 samples. Surprisingly, both JAK/STAT pathway activation and ruxolitinib efficacy were independent of the presence of JAK/STAT pathway mutations, raising the possibility that the therapeutic potential of ruxolitinib in ETP-ALL extends beyond those cases with JAK mutations. These findings establish the preclinical in vivo efficacy of ruxolitinib in ETP-ALL, a biologically distinct subtype for which novel therapies are needed. PMID:25645356

  2. Rejection of Cardiac Xenografts Transplanted from α 1,3-Galactosyltransferase Gene-Knockout (GalT-KO) Pigs to Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Hisashi, Y.; Yamada, K.; Kuwaki, K.; Tseng, Y.-L; Dor, F. J. M. F.; Houser, S. L; Robson, S. C.; Schuurman, H.-J.; Cooper, D. K. C.; Sachs, D. H.; Colvin, R. B.; Shimizu, A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of α 1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GalT-KO) swine donors in discordant xenotransplantation has extended the survival of cardiac xenografts in baboons following transplantation. Eight baboons received heterotopic cardiac xenografts from GalT-KO swine and were treated with a chronic immunosuppressive regimen. The pathologic features of acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR), acute cellular xenograft rejection (ACXR) and chronic rejection were assessed in the grafts. No hyperacute rejection developed and one graft survived up to 6 months after transplantation. However, all GalT-KO heart grafts underwent graft failure with AHXR, ACXR and/or chronic rejection. AHXR was characterized by interstitial hemorrhage and multiple thrombi in vessels of various sizes. ACXR was characterized by TUNEL+ graft cell injury with the infiltration of T cells (including CD3 and TIA-1+ cytotoxic T cells), CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, macrophages and a small number of B and NK cells. Chronic xenograft vasculopathy, a manifestation of chronic rejection, was characterized by arterial intimal thickening with TUNEL+ dead cells, antibody and complement deposition, and/or cytotoxic T-cell infiltration. In conclusion, despite the absence of the Gal epitope, acute and chronic antibody and cell-mediated rejection developed in grafts, maintained by chronic immunosupression, presumably due to de novo responses to non-Gal antigens. PMID:19032222

  3. Acute Effects of Pathogenic Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge on Vaccine-Induced Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses to Gag in Rhesus Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Krista K.; Waterman, Paul M.; Pauza, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in macaques provides a convenient model for testing vaccine efficacy and for understanding viral pathogenesis in AIDS. We immunized macaques with recombinant, Salmonella typhimurium (expressing Gag) or soluble Gag in adjuvant to generate T-cell-dependent lymphoproliferative or serum antibody responses. Immunized animals were challenged by intrarectal inoculation with SHIV89.6PD. Virus infection was accompanied by rapid losses of lymphoproliferative responses to Gag or phytohemagglutinin. By 8 weeks, mitogen responses recovered to near normal levels but antigen-specific immunity remained at low or undetectable levels. Serum antibody levels were elevated initially by virus exposure but soon dropped well below levels achieved by immunization. Our studies show a rapid depletion of preexisting Gag-specific CD4+ T cells that prevent or limit subsequent antiviral cellular and humoral immune responses during acute SHIV infection. PMID:9971763

  4. Humor in Educational Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurtler, Leo

    Humor can be a crucial factor of learning environments and of communication. Recent investigations of humor in educational settings mostly focus on learning performance. This paper shifts the attention to the enhancement of social climate through humor. Humor can be an element to solve critical social situations. To develop humor, it is necessary…

  5. An immediate transcriptional signature associated with response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor Givinostat in T acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Pinazza, M; Borga, C; Agnusdei, V; Minuzzo, S; Fossati, G; Paganin, M; Michielotto, B; De Paoli, A; Basso, G; Amadori, A; te Kronnie, G; Indraccolo, S

    2016-01-01

    Despite some success with certain hematological malignancies and in contrast with the strong pro-apoptotic effects measured in vitro, the overall response rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) is low. With the aim to improve the understanding of how HDACis work in vivo, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the clinically approved HDACi Givinostat in a collection of nine pediatric human T-ALL engrafted systemically in NOD/SCID mice. We observed highly heterogeneous antileukemia responses to Givinostat, associated with reduction of the percentage of infiltrating blasts in target organs, induction of apoptosis and differentiation. These effects were not associated with the T-ALL cytogenetic subgroup. Transcriptome analysis disclosed an immediate transcriptional signature enriched in genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and DNA repair, which was validated by quantitative RT-PCR and was associated with in vivo response to this HDACi. Increased phospho-H2AX levels, a marker of DNA damage, were measured in T-ALL cells from Givinostat responders. These results indicate that the induction of the DNA damage response could be an early biomarker of the therapeutic effects of Givinostat in T-ALL models. This information should be considered in the design of future clinical trials with HDACis in acute leukemia. PMID:26764573

  6. An immediate transcriptional signature associated with response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor Givinostat in T acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts.

    PubMed

    Pinazza, M; Borga, C; Agnusdei, V; Minuzzo, S; Fossati, G; Paganin, M; Michielotto, B; De Paoli, A; Basso, G; Amadori, A; te Kronnie, G; Indraccolo, S

    2016-01-01

    Despite some success with certain hematological malignancies and in contrast with the strong pro-apoptotic effects measured in vitro, the overall response rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) is low. With the aim to improve the understanding of how HDACis work in vivo, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the clinically approved HDACi Givinostat in a collection of nine pediatric human T-ALL engrafted systemically in NOD/SCID mice. We observed highly heterogeneous antileukemia responses to Givinostat, associated with reduction of the percentage of infiltrating blasts in target organs, induction of apoptosis and differentiation. These effects were not associated with the T-ALL cytogenetic subgroup. Transcriptome analysis disclosed an immediate transcriptional signature enriched in genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and DNA repair, which was validated by quantitative RT-PCR and was associated with in vivo response to this HDACi. Increased phospho-H2AX levels, a marker of DNA damage, were measured in T-ALL cells from Givinostat responders. These results indicate that the induction of the DNA damage response could be an early biomarker of the therapeutic effects of Givinostat in T-ALL models. This information should be considered in the design of future clinical trials with HDACis in acute leukemia. PMID:26764573

  7. RNAi-mediated silencing of HLA A2 suppressed acute rejection against human fibroblast xenografts in the striatum of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caixia; Xu, Yunzhi; Zheng, Deyu; Sun, Xiaohong; Xu, Qunyuan; Duan, Deyi

    2016-08-15

    Major histocompatibility complex class l (MHC I) molecules play a role in determining whether transplanted cells will be accepted or rejected, and masking of MHC I on donor cells has been found useful for immunoprotection of neural xenografts. In the present study, primary human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF), HELF treated with lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA A2, MHC I in humans) (siHELF), and rat embryonic lung fibroblasts (RELF) were stereotaxically grafted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats to explore whether knockdown of HLA A2 could reduce host immune responses against xenografts. Before lentiviral infection, the cells were transduced with retroviruses harboring tyrosine hydroxylase cDNA. Knockdown of HLA A2 protein was examined by Western blotting. The immune responses (the number of CD4 and CD8 T-cells in the brain and peripheral blood), glial reaction, and survival of human fibroblasts were quantitatively evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry at 4d, 2w, and 6w post-graft. Animal behaviors were assessed by counting apomorphine-induced rotations pre- and post-grafts. It was shown that a lower level of HLA A2 was observed in siHELF grafts than in HELF grafts, and knockdown of HLA A2 decreased rat immune responses, as indicated by less remarkable increases in the number of CD8 and CD4 T-cells in the brain and the ratio of CD4:CD8 T-cells in the peripheral blood in rats grafted with siHELF. Rats grafted with siHELF exhibited a significant improvement in motor asymmetry post-transplantation and a better survival of human fibroblasts at 2w. The increasing number of activated microglia and the decreasing number of astrocytes were found in three groups of rats post-implantation. These data suggested that RNAi-mediated knockdown of HLA A2 could suppress acute rejection against xenogeneic human cell transplants in the rat brain. PMID:27397073

  8. Acute BVDV-2 infection in beef calves delays humoral responses to a non-infectious antigen challenge

    PubMed Central

    McCorkell, Robert; Horsman, Shawn R.; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Muench, Greg; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Waeckerlin, Regula; Eschbaumer, Michael; Dardari, Rkia; Chaiyakul, Mark; Gajda, Pawel; Czub, Markus; van der Meer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive effects of an intranasal challenge with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) 2a (strain 1373) were assessed through acquired and innate immune system responses to ovalbumin (OVA). Concurrent BVDV infection was hypothesized to delay and reduce the humoral response to ovalbumin (administered on days 3 and 15 post-inoculation). Infected animals followed the expected clinical course. BVDV titers, and anti-BVDV antibodies confirmed the course of infection and were not affected by the administration of OVA. Both the T-helper (CD4+) and B-cell (CD20+) compartments were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in infected animals, while the gamma-delta T-cell population (Workshop cluster 1+, WC1+) decreased slightly in numbers. Infection with BVDV delayed the increase in OVA IgG by approximately 3 d from day 12 through day 21 post-inoculation. Between days 25 and 37 post-inoculation following BVDV infection the IgM concentration in the BVDV− group decreased while the OVA IgM titer still was rising in the BVDV+ animals. Thus, active BVDV infection delays IgM and IgG responses to a novel, non-infectious antigen. PMID:26483584

  9. American Humor. [Course Syllabus].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane, David E. E.

    This syllabus describes a three-credit course entitled "American Humor," offered at the University of New Haven (Connecticut). According to the syllabus, "American Humor" will identify traits of American humor as historical phenomena with relations to national character, business attitudes, regionalism, folk humor, and health; historical…

  10. Bortezomib, C1-inhibitor and plasma exchange do not prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO pig kidney xenografts in baboons.

    PubMed

    Le Bas-Bernardet, S; Tillou, X; Branchereau, J; Dilek, N; Poirier, N; Châtelais, M; Charreau, B; Minault, D; Hervouet, J; Renaudin, K; Crossan, C; Scobie, L; Takeuchi, Y; Diswall, M; Breimer, M E; Klar, N; Daha, M R; Simioni, P; Robson, S C; Nottle, M B; Salvaris, E J; Cowan, P J; d'Apice, A J F; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K; Lagutina, I; Duchi, R; Perota, A; Lazzari, G; Galli, C; Cozzi, E; Soulillou, J-P; Vanhove, B; Blancho, G

    2015-02-01

    Galactosyl-transferase KO (GalT-KO) pigs represent a potential solution to xenograft rejection, particularly in the context of additional genetic modifications. We have performed life supporting kidney xenotransplantation into baboons utilizing GalT-KO pigs transgenic for human CD55/CD59/CD39/HT. Baboons received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids and recombinant human C1 inhibitor combined with cyclophosphamide or bortezomib with or without 2-3 plasma exchanges. One baboon received a control GalT-KO xenograft with the latter immunosuppression. All immunosuppressed baboons rejected the xenografts between days 9 and 15 with signs of acute humoral rejection, in contrast to untreated controls (n = 2) that lost their grafts on days 3 and 4. Immunofluorescence analyses showed deposition of IgM, C3, C5b-9 in rejected grafts, without C4d staining, indicating classical complement pathway blockade but alternate pathway activation. Moreover, rejected organs exhibited predominantly monocyte/macrophage infiltration with minimal lymphocyte representation. None of the recipients showed any signs of porcine endogenous retrovirus transmission but some showed evidence of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) replication within the xenografts. Our work indicates that the addition of bortezomib and plasma exchange to the immunosuppressive regimen did not significantly prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO renal xenografts. Non-Gal antibodies, the alternative complement pathway, innate mechanisms with monocyte activation and PCMV replication may have contributed to rejection. PMID:25612490

  11. Bortezomib, C1-inhibitor and Plasma Exchange Do Not Prolong the Survival of Multi-transgenic GalT-KO Pig Kidney Xenografts in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Le, Bas-Bernardet S.; Tillou, X.; Branchereau, J.; Dilek, N.; Poirier, N.; Châtelais, M.; Charreau, B.; Minault, D.; Hervouet, J.; Renaudin, K.; Crossan, C.; Scobie, L.; Takeuchi, Y.; Diswall, M.; Breimer, M.E.; Klar, N.; Daha, M.R.; Simioni, P.; Robson, S.C.; Nottle, M.B.; Salvaris, E.J.; Cowan, P.J.; d’Apice, A.J.F.; Sachs, D.H.; Yamada, K.; Lagutina, I.; Duchi, R.; Perota, A.; Lazzari, G.; Galli, C.; Cozzi, E.; Soulillou, J.-P.; B., Vanhove; Blancho, G.

    2014-01-01

    Galactosyl-transferase knock-out (GalT-KO) pigs represent a potential solution to xenograft rejection, particularly in the context of additional genetic modifications. We have performed life supporting kidney xenotransplantation into baboons utilizing GalT-KO pigs transgenic for human CD55/CD59/CD39/HT. Baboons received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids and recombinant human C1 Inhibitor combined with cyclophosphamide or bortezomib with or without 2–3 plasma exchanges. One baboon received a control GalT-KO xenograft with the latter immunosuppression. All immunosuppressed baboons rejected the xenografts between days 9 to 15 with signs of acute humoral rejection, in contrast to untreated controls (n=2) which lost their grafts on day 3 and 4. Immunofluorescence analyses showed deposition of IgM, C3, C5b-9 in rejected grafts, without C4d staining, indicating classical complement pathway blockade but alternate pathway activation. Moreover, rejected organs exhibited predominantly monocyte/macrophage infiltration with minimal lymphocyte representation. None of the recipients showed any signs of PERV transmission but some showed evidence of PCMV replication within the xenografts. Our work indicates that the addition of bortezomib and plasma exchange to the immunosuppressive regimen did not significantly prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO renal xenografts. Non-Gal antibodies, the alternative complement pathway, innate mechanisms with monocyte activation and PCMV replication may have contributed to rejection. PMID:25612490

  12. Time Profile of Viral DNA in Aqueous Humor Samples of Patients Treated for Varicella-Zoster Virus Acute Retinal Necrosis by Use of Quantitative Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Bernheim, D.; Germi, R.; Labetoulle, M.; Romanet, J. P.; Morand, P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) loads using quantitative PCR (qPCR) in patients treated for acute retinal necrosis (ARN). Six patients (52 ± 13 years old) with ARN syndrome were consecutively studied. Aqueous humor (AH) was sampled from both eyes of all patients for qPCR evaluation. The patients were treated with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreal injections of antiviral drugs. The mean follow-up time was 17.6 ± 16.4 months. Main outcome measures were the numbers of viral genome copies in the AH, assessed using real-time qPCR with hydrolysis probe technology with a threshold of detection of 200 copies/ml. Two main portions of the viral load curves were observed for each patient: a plateau phase (27.8 ± 24.9 days) and a decrease in the number of viral genome copies. The mean baseline viral load was 3.4 × 107 ± 4.45 × 107 copies/ml (6 × 106 to 1.2 × 108 copies/ml). The viral load decreased according to a logarithmic model, with a 50% reduction obtained in 3 ± 0.7 days. There was a significant viral load (>102 copies/ml) at 50 days after the onset of treatment, despite antiviral drugs. qPCR use demonstrated reproducible VZV DNA kinetics with a two-phase evolution: a plateau followed by a logarithmic decrease. These data suggest that high-dosage antiviral therapy administered for the conventional 10-day duration is insufficient for most patients. This series of patients responded with a similar decrease in viral load once treatment was initiated, and the data from these patients may be used to predict the responses of future patients. PMID:23637296

  13. Time profile of viral DNA in aqueous humor samples of patients treated for varicella-zoster virus acute retinal necrosis by use of quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Bernheim, D; Germi, R; Labetoulle, M; Romanet, J P; Morand, P; Chiquet, C

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) loads using quantitative PCR (qPCR) in patients treated for acute retinal necrosis (ARN). Six patients (52 ± 13 years old) with ARN syndrome were consecutively studied. Aqueous humor (AH) was sampled from both eyes of all patients for qPCR evaluation. The patients were treated with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreal injections of antiviral drugs. The mean follow-up time was 17.6 ± 16.4 months. Main outcome measures were the numbers of viral genome copies in the AH, assessed using real-time qPCR with hydrolysis probe technology with a threshold of detection of 200 copies/ml. Two main portions of the viral load curves were observed for each patient: a plateau phase (27.8 ± 24.9 days) and a decrease in the number of viral genome copies. The mean baseline viral load was 3.4 × 10(7) ± 4.45 × 10(7) copies/ml (6 × 10(6) to 1.2 × 10(8) copies/ml). The viral load decreased according to a logarithmic model, with a 50% reduction obtained in 3 ± 0.7 days. There was a significant viral load (>102 copies/ml) at 50 days after the onset of treatment, despite antiviral drugs. qPCR use demonstrated reproducible VZV DNA kinetics with a two-phase evolution: a plateau followed by a logarithmic decrease. These data suggest that high-dosage antiviral therapy administered for the conventional 10-day duration is insufficient for most patients. This series of patients responded with a similar decrease in viral load once treatment was initiated, and the data from these patients may be used to predict the responses of future patients. PMID:23637296

  14. Acute and long-term effect of infliximab on humoral and echocardiographic parameters in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Tomáš, L'ubomír; Lazúrová, Ivica; Pundová, Lýdia; Oetterová, Mária; Zakuciová, Mária; Petrášová, Darina; Studenčan, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, i.e., rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC). Anti-TNF-alpha strategies are successfully used in their treatment. However, their effect on heart function is still uncertain. The objectives of the study were to examine the acute and long-term effect of infliximab on the heart morphology and function in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. Thirty-one patients (21 men and 10 women) were included. Ten percent of them were diagnosed with RA, 22.5 % with AS, 22.5 % with CD, and 45 % with UC, respectively. N-terminal fragment of pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) was measured before and immediately after infliximab administration at the beginning of the study and in the sixth and 12th months. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and in the sixth and 12th months. There was a significant increase in NT-proBNP after the first infliximab infusion (88.40 ± 14.09 vs. 95.24 ± 14.28 pg/ml, p = 0.0046) and similar response was detected after each infusion in the sixth and 12th months. Plasma NT-proBNP slightly but not significantly decreased (88.40 ± 14.09 vs. 81.74 ± 23.14 pg/ml, p = 0.583, and 88.40 ± 14.09 vs. 56.83 ± 17.77 pg/ml, p = 0.0576, in the sixth and 12th months, respectively). There were no significant changes in echocardiographic structural and functional parameters of the left ventricle during follow-up. Plasma NT-proBNP mildly but significantly increases immediately after infliximab infusion. However, long-term infliximab administration does not deteriorate both cardiac morphology and function. PMID:23010850

  15. Humor. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David; Parr, Jerry; Duffy, Vincent; Strader, Bill; Stephens, Karen

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on humor in early child care: (1) "What Makes Young Children Laugh?" (David Elkind); (2) "Humor as a Tool in the Workplace" (Jerry Parr); (3) "Vincent's Vignettes" (Vincent Duffy); (4) "Family Humor" (Bill Strader); and (5) "Books to Tickle Funny Bones" (Karen Stephens). (SD)

  16. Humor, abstraction, and disbelief.

    PubMed

    Hoicka, Elena; Jutsum, Sarah; Gattis, Merideth

    2008-09-01

    We investigated humor as a context for learning about abstraction and disbelief. More specifically, we investigated how parents support humor understanding during book sharing with their toddlers. In Study 1, a corpus analysis revealed that in books aimed at 1-to 2-year-olds, humor is found more often than other forms of doing the wrong thing including mistakes, pretense, lying, false beliefs, and metaphors. In Study 2, 20 parents read a book containing humorous and non-humorous pages to their 19-to 26-month-olds. Parents used a significantly higher percentage of high abstraction extra-textual utterances (ETUs) when reading the humorous pages. In Study 3, 41 parents read either a humorous or non-humorous book to their 18-to 24-month-olds. Parents reading the humorous book made significantly more ETUs coded for a specific form of high abstraction: those encouraging disbelief of prior utterances. Sharing humorous books thus increases toddlers' exposure to high abstraction and belief-based language. PMID:21585438

  17. The Humor of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchner, Joan F.

    This paper explores the development of humor, the positive potential of young children's humor, and resources for harnessing the energy of humor. The literature on humor is dominated by two theoretical streams: psychoanalytic theory, which recognizes humor as a vehicle for expressing emotions, particularly unacceptable emotions; and cognitive…

  18. Humor and interpersonal attraction.

    PubMed

    Murstein, B I; Brust, R G

    1985-12-01

    A humor test composed of cartoons, comic strips, and jokes was administered to 30 college couples (26 single, 4 married) who rated them for humor. Subjects also stated how much they loved and liked their partner, their probability of marrying the partner, and filled out Rubin's Liking and Love Scales. The hypotheses were that similarity of rating of the humorous stimuli would be associated with loving, liking, and predisposition to marry. Hypotheses were confirmed. PMID:16367459

  19. Sense of Humor Preferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Dennis M.

    2007-01-01

    Humor is a powerful tool. It can disarm an adversary. It can leaven the purposefully self-aggrandizing nature of a job interview. Perhaps most important, it can serve as a window to personality in the same way that a resume is a window to experience. In this article, the author emphasizes the value of having a sense of humor. He emphasizes that it…

  20. Humor, Philosophy and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreall, John

    2014-01-01

    This article begins by examining the bad reputation humor traditionally had in philosophy and education. Two of the main charges against humor--that it is hostile and irresponsible--are linked to the Superiority Theory. That theory is critiqued and two other theories of laughter are presented--the Relief Theory and the Incongruity Theory. In the…

  1. Treating humoral rejection after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Jef; Vermeulen, Tom; Janssen Van Doorn, Karin; Vrints, Christiaan; Conraads, Viviane

    2011-04-01

    Whereas effective strategies are available to treat acute cellular cardiac rejection, humoral rejection, also called vascular or antibody-mediated rejection, is more difficult to manage. Antibody-mediated (non-cellular) rejections (AMR) are rare and few successfully treated cases have been described in the literature. We report on a female patient, diagnosed with humoral rejection, leading to severe ventricular dysfunction and haemodynamic compromise, two months after transplantation. The patient received a combination therapy, consisting of plasmapheresis and immunoglobulins, which resulted in complete resolution of immunohistochemical signs of AMR. In this report, we will overview AMR and discuss several treatment modalities. PMID:21591590

  2. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation. PMID:22012411

  3. The Humor in Horror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kies, Cosette

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of horror fiction for teenagers focuses on the element of humor. Topics include parodies, plots, the element of mystery, cover art, end-of-chapter cliffhangers, and formula books. An annotated list of 10 pertinent titles is included. (LRW)

  4. Humor as a nursing intervention.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A H

    1993-02-01

    This article describes the use of humor as a nursing intervention and asks if nurses can justify the integration of the use of humor into the repertoire of nursing interventions. Several uses for humor are illustrated, and humor is differentiated from laughter. The article quotes many nurse leaders' opinions about humor and identifies do's and do not's of appropriate humor; it discusses six research studies in which health care professionals used humor as a treatment protocol. The studies were in the areas of preoperative teaching, clinical evaluation, strategies to prevent hopelessness in adolescents with oncologic illness, and group cohesiveness. Results of these six studies give some evidence, although not robust, that humor is an effective intervention. Methods of determining and implementing humor as an appropriate nursing intervention are included. PMID:8457984

  5. Characterization of humoral endorphin.

    PubMed

    Weissman, B A; Azov, R; Granat, M; Gothilf, Y; Sarne, Y

    1980-01-01

    Utilizing a radioimmunoassay (RIA) with antibodies produced against leu-enkephalin, the presence of humoral endorphin in various body fluids and tissues has been shown. Pretreatment with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was needed in all cases in order to detect the immunoreactivity. However, both treated and untreated samples of humoral endorphin were active in the opiate receptor assay. Gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-2 as well as on Sephadex G-10 columns of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), amniotic fluid (AF) and blood shows that they all contain a similar material with an apparent molecular weight of 1,000-1,400 daltons. Chromatography of rat brain homogenate exhibited two peaks of immunoreactivity, one of which is probably due to enkephalins and the other to humoral endorphin. The latter fraction was found to be very stable when incubated in CSF, while its degradation in blood was slightly faster. This opioid compound inhibited the electrically stimulated contractions of the guinea pig ileum; the specificity of this action was indicated by its reversal with low concentrations of naloxone. In pregnant women, humoral endorphin levels in maternal and cord blood remains stable during pregnancy, while there is a significantly higher concentration of humoral endorphin in the amniotic fluid at mid-trimester as compared to that in term pregnancies during labor. PMID:6255488

  6. Discovery of LY2457546: a multi-targeted anti-angiogenic kinase inhibitor with a novel spectrum of activity and exquisite potency in the acute myelogenous leukemia-Flt-3-internal tandem duplication mutant human tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Timothy P; Clayton, Joshua R; Rempala, Mark E; Henry, James R; Knobeloch, John M; Mendel, David; McLean, Johnathan A; Hao, Yan; Barda, David A; Considine, Eileen L; Uhlik, Mark T; Chen, Yuefeng; Ma, Liandong; Bloem, Laura J; Akunda, Jacqueline K; McCann, Denis J; Sanchez-Felix, Manuel; Clawson, David K; Lahn, Michael M; Starling, James J

    2012-06-01

    LY2457546 is a potent and orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases involved in angiogenic and tumorigenic signalling. In biochemical and cellular assays, LY2457546 demonstrates potent activity against targets that include VEGFR2 (KDR), PDGFRβ, FLT-3, Tie-2 and members of the Eph family of receptors. With activities against both Tie2 and Eph receptors, LY2457546 possesses an activity profile that distinguishes it from multikinase inhibitors. When compared head to head with sunitinib, LY2457546 was more potent for inhibition of endothelial tube formation in an in vitro angiogenesis co-culture model with an intermittent treatment design. In vivo, LY2457546 inhibited VEGF-driven autophosphorylation of lung KDR in the mouse and rat in a dose and concentration dependent manner. LY2457546 was well tolerated and exhibited efficacy in a 13762 syngeneic rat mammary tumor model in both once and twice daily continuous dosing schedules and in mouse human tumor xenograft models of lung, colon, and prostate origin. Additionally, LY2457546 caused complete regression of well-established tumors in an acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) FLT3-ITD mutant xenograft tumor model. The observed efficacy that was displayed by LY2457546 in the AML FLT3-ITD mutant tumor model was superior to sunitinib when both were evaluated using equivalent doses normalized to in vivo inhibition of pKDR in mouse lung. LY2457546 was well tolerated in non-clinical toxicology studies conducted in rats and dogs. The majority of the toxicities observed were similar to those observed with other multi-targeted anti-angiogenic kinase inhibitors (MAKs) and included bone marrow hypocellularity, hair and skin depigmentation, cartilage dysplasia and lymphoid organ degeneration and necrosis. Thus, the unique spectrum of target activity, potent in vivo anti-tumor efficacy in a variety of rodent and human solid tumor models, exquisite potency against a clinically relevant model of AML, and non

  7. Use of Humor in Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkaus, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Provides a summary of research on the benefits and uses of subject-matter-related humor in instructional materials, and cites comments of five experts on how to use humor in the design of instruction. Thirteen references are listed. (MER)

  8. Humor in Counseling: Leader Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldin, Eugene; Bordan, Terry; Araoz, Daniel L.; Gladding, Samuel T.; Kaplan, David; Krumboltz, John; Lazarus, Arnold

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the existence of humor in counseling from the perspectives of several leaders in the field. Specifically, the last 5 authors describe some of their thoughts and experiences regarding the emergence of humor in counseling.

  9. Using Humor in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, David; Christenson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Humor can be extremely beneficial in everyday life, whether giving or receiving it. It can be used to lighten the mood, give encouragement, or make corrections. Humor in physical education is no exception. Physical educators can use humor as a teaching tool and to create an environment for students to acquire the knowledge to practice a lifetime…

  10. Friendship, Intimacy and Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2014-01-01

    A review of the literature in philosophy in the past 20 years indicates that relatively little has been written on the connection between friendship, intimacy and humor. This article is intended to begin to address the neglect of this topic among philosophers by focusing on some interesting aspects of the relationship between friendship, intimacy…

  11. On Humorous Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menair, Marion Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation I examine the patterns and uses of transgressive humor and sexual talk that male traders from Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) indulge in when at their leisure from trading. I investigate how cultural conceptualizations or ideologies are brought into the present moment through discursive interaction and how the cultural signs…

  12. Humoral immunity in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Barker, A F; Craig, S; Bardana, E J

    1987-09-01

    Bronchiectasis occurs in patients with immunodeficiency and fungal hypersensitivity disorders. To assess the prevalence of abnormal humoral immune parameters in bronchiectasis, a retrospective study was carried out on sera from 30 patients. Studies included immunoglobulin quantitation and specific antibody to fungal species. Eleven patients were found to have immunodeficiency (nine with panhypoglobulinemia and two with selective IgM deficiency). Six patients had elevations of serum IgA and four patients had elevations of serum IgE. Six patients had elevated total antibody to Aspergillus or Candida species and six had precipitin bands to one or more fungal antigens. This study indicates that immunodeficiency is prevalent and plays a causative role in some patients with bronchiectasis. Hypersensitivity reactions to Aspergillus, Candida, and other ubiquitous environmental fungi may also play an etiopathogenic role in this disease (bronchiectasis, humoral immunity, immunodeficiency). PMID:3631652

  13. Cellular and humoral immune reactions in chronic active liver disease. II. Lymphocyte subsets and viral antigens in liver biopsies of patients with acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, H F; Houthoff, H J; Huitema, S; Wolters, G; Poppema, S; Gips, C H

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics and distribution of the inflammatory infiltrate in liver biopsies of 25 patients with hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection were studied in relation to the distribution and expression of HBV antigens. Mononuclear subsets were characterized with monoclonal (OKT, OKM, Leu) antibodies to surface antigens. For the demonstration of viral antigens directly conjugated antibodies to surface (HBsAg), core (HBcAg) and 'e' (HBeAg) antigen were used. For the study of mutual relations all methods were performed on serial cut tissue sections. In chronic active hepatitis B (CAH-B, n = 12) OKT8+ lymphocytes of T cell origin were the only cell type present in areas with liver cell degeneration and T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the only immune mechanism. In chronic persistent hepatitis B (CPH-B, n = 7) the only conspicuous feature was the presence of many Leu 3+ lymphocytes of the helper/inducer population in the portal tracts. In acute hepatitis B (AHB, n = 6) OKT8+ cells of non-T origin (OKT1-,3-) and Leu 7+ cells of presumed natural killer (NK) potential predominated in the areas with liver cell necrosis, and non-T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the predominant immune mechanism. In none of these disease entities a positive spatial relation could be established between the cytotoxic cells and the demonstrable expression of HBV antigens in hepatocytes. It is concluded that differences in immunological reaction pattern may explain the different course in the three forms of HBV infection studied. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6713726

  14. The Effects of Laughter on Humor and Humor on Mood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetola, Henry W.; Reno, Raymond R.

    Two experiments were conducted examining the mood altering effects of humor and the moderating effect of laughter on both humor appreciation and mood. The mood of the subjects in the first experiment was manipulated to make them feel slightly elated or slightly depressed. They then listened to either comedy routines or an interview. The comedy…

  15. The Scoop on Good Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Gail W.

    1987-01-01

    Recommends teaching about the uses of humor in technical writing classes by using computer user manuals. Suggests that humor has a place in technical communication, particularly in computer manuals, where new users' apprehension must be reduced, heavy technical points need clarification, and warnings and cautions should be reinforced. (SKC)

  16. Some Humor in the Bible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woehlk, Heinz D.

    The Bible contains a variety of literary genres including drama, tragedy, and epic poetry, and it is an excellent basis for character study. It also contains a certain amount of humor, which should not be overlooked by students of biblical literature. Examples of intentional humor include the second version of the creation, found in the second…

  17. Humor and the Primary Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canzler, Lillian

    This study focuses on the motivational aspects of children's humor and describes the naturally occurring verbal humor of children without stimulus from adults. Kindergarten and elementary school children were observed during their lunch period at school while engaged in social interaction over 16 weeks. The study was designed to (1) record the…

  18. Effects of Classroom Humor Climate and Acceptance of Humor Messages on Adolescents' Expressions of Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Yi-Chen; Lee, Chun-Yang; Wang, Hong-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Background: To adapt to dramatic changes from physical growth, physical development and the increasing demand of significant others, humor has been found to be an effective coping strategy. However, previous studies have found that adolescents start to express their humor styles with aggressive components which causes negative consequences, such…

  19. Natural antibodies and the host immune responses to xenografts.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D V

    2000-05-01

    Natural antibodies are present in the serum of individuals in the absence of known antigenic stimulation. These antibodies are primarily IgM, polyreactive, and encoded by immunoglobulin V genes in germline configuration. Natural antibodies are produced by B-1 lymphocytes, cells that form the primary cell of the fetal and newborn B cell repertoire and may represent the basic foundation upon which the adult repertoire of B cell antibodies is based. Natural antibodies react with a variety of endogenous and exogenous antigens, including xenoantigens expressed by tissues between unrelated species. These antibodies are capable of causing the immediate rejection of grafts exchanged across species barriers. One of the central issues related to our understanding of the immunopathologic mechanisms responsible for rejection of xenografts is whether pre-formed natural antibodies and new antibodies induced following xenotransplantation are produced by the same pathways of B cell antibody production. We have established in studies conducted in rodents and humans that the initial phases of antibody production xenogeneic tissues involves the use of a restricted population of Ig germline genes to encode xenoantibody binding. As the humoral xenoantibody response matures, the same closely-related groups of Ig V genes are used to encode antibody binding and there is evidence for an isotype switch to IgG antibody production and the appearance of somatic mutations consistent with antigen-driven affinity maturation. Our findings in both rodent and human studies form the basis for our proposal that the xenograft response reflects the use of B cell natural antibody repertoires originally intended to provide protection against infection. The host humoral response is inadvertently recruited to mount antibody responses against foreign grafts because they display carbohydrate antigens that are shared by common environmental microbes. This model of xenoantibody responses is being tested in our

  20. Humor and Healing in College Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Barbara J.; Roehrig, James P.; Yang, Peggy H.

    2015-01-01

    Humor is an often neglected but potentially powerful tool in college counseling center interventions. In this article we review potential benefits and hazards of using humor in a college mental health setting along with perspectives on humor's mechanism of action and distinctions between types of humor. Therapist and client-specific…

  1. Humor. A therapeutic approach in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Bellert, J L

    1989-04-01

    Humor theory has evolved from various disciplines. Numerous professionals have published literature and research studies that examine the historical perspective of humor and the current practice of humor in health care. Historically, researchers have found humor to be an unconscious activity developed from childhood to adulthood. They describe humor as spontaneous and incongruent, involving a changing state of mind. Currently, health care professionals and patients are utilizing humor as a coping mechanism, as a communication skill, and as a tool to promote the psychological and physiological healing process. This article describes how humor theory has evolved, the use of humor in health care, and humor as an adjunct therapy in oncology. Oncology nurses can utilize humor as a part of the nursing process in the care provided to patients and families. PMID:2713839

  2. Cartoon Humor in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pease, Ruth A.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests that humor promotes group unity, relieves tension, and stimulates creative thinking. Demonstrates how using cartoons in nursing education helps students identify and examine stereotypes to improve relationships. (SK)

  3. Human Aqueous Humor Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Dismuke, W. Michael; Challa, Pratap; Navarro, Iris; Stamer, W. Daniel; Liu, Yutao

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous humor (AH) is a dynamic intraocular fluid that supports the vitality of tissues that regulate intraocular pressure. We recently discovered that extracellular nanovesicles called exosomes are a major constituent of AH. Exosomes function in extracellular communication and contain proteins and small RNA. Our goal was to characterize the physical properties of AH exosomes and their exosomal RNA (esRNA) content. We isolated exosomes from human AH collected during cataract surgery from five patients using serial ultracentrifugation. We measured the size and concentration of AH exosomes in solution using nanoparticle tracking analysis. We found a single population of vesicles having a mean size of 121±11nm in the unprocessed AH. Data show that centrifugation does not significantly affect the mean particle size (121±11nm versus 124±21nm), but does impact the final number of exosomes in solution (87% loss from the unprocessed AH; n=5). We extracted esRNA from the pooled human AH samples using miRCURY RNA isolation kit from Exiqon. The quality of extracted esRNA was evaluated using Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100 and was used to generate a sequencing library for small RNA sequencing with Illumina MiSeq sequencer. More than 10 different miRNAs were identified; abundant species included miR-486-5p, miR-204, and miR-184. We found that the majority of extracellular vesicles in the AH were in the exosome size range, suggesting that miRNAs housed within exosomes may function in communication between AH inflow and outflow tissues. PMID:25619138

  4. Neural correlates of humor detection and appreciation.

    PubMed

    Moran, Joseph M; Wig, Gagan S; Adams, Reginald B; Janata, Petr; Kelley, William M

    2004-03-01

    Humor is a uniquely human quality whose neural substrates remain enigmatic. The present report combined dynamic, real-life content and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to dissociate humor detection ("getting the joke") from humor appreciation (the affective experience of mirth). During scanning, subjects viewed full-length episodes of the television sitcoms Seinfeld or The Simpsons. Brain activity time-locked to humor detection moments revealed increases in left inferior frontal and posterior temporal cortices, whereas brain activity time-locked to moments of humor appreciation revealed increases in bilateral regions of insular cortex and the amygdala. These findings provide evidence that humor depends critically upon extant neural systems important for resolving incongruities (humor detection) and for the expression of affect (humor appreciation). PMID:15006673

  5. Using Humorous Language to Teach Literary Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Don L. F.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses diverse examples of literary devices by comparing metaphor and humor. Defines and illustrates paronomasia, paradox, oxymoron, anacoluthon, zeugma, parody, jargon, satire, conceit, anachronism, hyperbole, cacography, understatement, and doggerel. A humorous appendix contrasts errors with rhetorical devices. (NKA)

  6. The Benefits of Humor in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulloth, Joan Kay

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with 31 nursing students and 3 teachers identified several benefits from using humor in class: relieving stress, focusing attention, making learning fun, enhancing learning, and strengthening relationships. Students overwhelmingly supported the use of appropriate humor. (Contains 29 references.) (SK)

  7. A Look at Humor in Literature and Children's Responses to Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monson, Dianne L.

    Humor in literature and children's responses to humor deserve serious study. Humor in literature may focus on a character's method for coping with a disturbing situation, problems (such as riddles) that engender sudden insights when things fall into place, or ludicrous characters. Incongruity and surprise also play an important part in humor and…

  8. A Threshold Theory of the Humor Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Robert; Joker, Veronica R.

    2007-01-01

    The humor response has long been considered mysterious, and it is given relatively little attention in modern experimental psychology, in spite of the fact that numerous studies suggest that it has substantial benefits for mood and health. Existing theories of humor fail to account for some of the most basic humor phenomena. On most occasions when…

  9. Humor and Satire in the English Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donelson, Kenneth, Ed.

    1973-01-01

    According to the "Arizona English Bulletin" (AEB), not enough attention is given to humor or satire in high school English classes. AEB suggests that if the English class is a place for bringing reality into the curriculum, humor must become a part of the total English program. Featured in this issue are 25 essays on various aspects of humor and…

  10. Humorous Relations: Attentiveness, Pleasure and Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Cris

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the structures of humor and joke telling that require particular kinds of attentiveness and particular relationships between speaker and audience, or more specifically, between classmates. First, I will analyze the pedagogical and relational preconditions that are necessary for humor to work. If humor is to work well, the…

  11. Histopathologic insights into the mechanism of anti-non-Gal antibody-mediated pig cardiac xenograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Guerard W; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Tazelaar, Henry D; Ekser, Burcin; Pierson, Richard N; Robson, Simon C; Cooper, David K C; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2013-01-01

    The histopathology of cardiac xenograft rejection has evolved over the last 20 yr with the development of new modalities for limiting antibody-mediated injury, advancing regimens for immune suppression, and an ever-widening variety of new donor genetics. These new technologies have helped us progress from what was once an overwhelming anti-Gal-mediated hyperacute rejection to a more protracted anti-Gal-mediated vascular rejection to what is now a more complex manifestation of non-Gal humoral rejection and coagulation dysregulation. This review summarizes the changing histopathology of Gal- and non-Gal-mediated cardiac xenograft rejection and discusses the contributions of immune-mediated injury, species-specific immune-independent factors, transplant and therapeutic procedures, and donor genetics to the overall mechanism(s) of cardiac xenograft rejection. PMID:25098626

  12. Humor Comprehension and Humor Appreciation of Cognitively Oriented Humor: A Study of Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Amelia J.

    1985-01-01

    Investigates kindergarten children's ability to comprehend and appreciate cognitively-oriented humor. Conceptual development was measured by assessing children's responses to a liquid conservation task modeled after Piaget. Results fail to support previous theories and indicate that a majority of the children fully comprehended and were able to…

  13. Immune response and histology of humoral rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    González-Molina, Miguel; Ruiz-Esteban, Pedro; Caballero, Abelardo; Burgos, Dolores; Cabello, Mercedes; Leon, Miriam; Fuentes, Laura; Hernandez, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive immune response forms the basis of allograft rejection. Its weapons are direct cellular cytotoxicity, identified from the beginning of organ transplantation, and/or antibodies, limited to hyperacute rejection by preformed antibodies and not as an allogenic response. This resulted in allogenic response being thought for decades to have just a cellular origin. But the experimental studies by Gorer demonstrating tissue damage in allografts due to antibodies secreted by B lymphocytes activated against polymorphic molecules were disregarded. The special coexistence of binding and unbinding between antibodies and antigens of the endothelial cell membranes has been the cause of the delay in demonstrating the humoral allogenic response. The endothelium, the target tissue of antibodies, has a high turnover, and antigen-antibody binding is non-covalent. If endothelial cells are attacked by the humoral response, immunoglobulins are rapidly removed from their surface by shedding and/or internalization, as well as degrading the components of the complement system by the action of MCP, DAF and CD59. Thus, the presence of complement proteins in the membrane of endothelial cells is transient. In fact, the acute form of antibody-mediated rejection was not demonstrated until C4d complement fragment deposition was identified, which is the only component that binds covalently to endothelial cells. This review examines the relationship between humoral immune response and the types of acute and chronic histological lesion shown on biopsy of the transplanted organ. PMID:27267916

  14. The Relationship Between Humor Styles and Forgiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hampes, William

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that a factor in a victim’s forgiveness of an offender is the victim’s ability to make more positive, or at least less negative, attributions of the offender’s behavior and that perspective-taking can be a factor in facilitating that process. Self-enhancing humor has been found to be positively correlated with perspective-taking empathy and aggressive humor found to be negatively correlated with perspective-taking empathy. Therefore it was predicted that self-enhancing humor would be positively correlated with forgiveness and aggressive humor negatively correlated with forgiveness. The Humor Styles Questionnaire, the Absence of Negative and Presence of Positive subscales of the Forgiveness Scale, and the Forgiveness Likelihood Scale were administered to 112 college undergraduates. Self-enhancing humor was significantly and positively correlated with all of the forgiveness measures, aggressive humor and self-defeating humor were significantly and negatively correlated with some of the forgiveness measures and affiliative humor was not significantly correlated with any of the forgiveness measures. The results were interpreted in terms of previous findings for humor styles, perspective-taking empathy, depression, self-esteem and anxiety. Future research involving the extent to which other personality variables, such as perspective-taking empathy, mediate the relationship between self-enhancing humor and forgiveness was suggested. PMID:27547252

  15. The Relationship Between Humor Styles and Forgiveness.

    PubMed

    Hampes, William

    2016-08-01

    Research has shown that a factor in a victim's forgiveness of an offender is the victim's ability to make more positive, or at least less negative, attributions of the offender's behavior and that perspective-taking can be a factor in facilitating that process. Self-enhancing humor has been found to be positively correlated with perspective-taking empathy and aggressive humor found to be negatively correlated with perspective-taking empathy. Therefore it was predicted that self-enhancing humor would be positively correlated with forgiveness and aggressive humor negatively correlated with forgiveness. The Humor Styles Questionnaire, the Absence of Negative and Presence of Positive subscales of the Forgiveness Scale, and the Forgiveness Likelihood Scale were administered to 112 college undergraduates. Self-enhancing humor was significantly and positively correlated with all of the forgiveness measures, aggressive humor and self-defeating humor were significantly and negatively correlated with some of the forgiveness measures and affiliative humor was not significantly correlated with any of the forgiveness measures. The results were interpreted in terms of previous findings for humor styles, perspective-taking empathy, depression, self-esteem and anxiety. Future research involving the extent to which other personality variables, such as perspective-taking empathy, mediate the relationship between self-enhancing humor and forgiveness was suggested. PMID:27547252

  16. The Dark Side of Humor: DSM-5 Pathological Personality Traits and Humor Styles

    PubMed Central

    Zeigler-Hill, Virgil; McCabe, Gillian A.; Vrabel, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    Basic personality traits (e.g., extraversion) have been found to be associated with the humor styles that individuals employ. In the present study, we were interested in determining whether pathological personality traits were also associated with humor styles. We examined the associations between the pathological personality traits captured by the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5) and humor styles in a sample of college students (N = 594). Negative affectivity and detachment were negatively associated with the affiliative and self-enhancing humor styles. Antagonism was positively associated with the aggressive humor style but negatively associated with the affiliative humor style. Disinhibition was positively associated with the aggressive humor style, whereas disinhibition and psychoticism were both positively associated with the self-defeating humor style. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings and how they can expand our understanding of the connections between the darker aspects of personality and humor. PMID:27547254

  17. The Dark Side of Humor: DSM-5 Pathological Personality Traits and Humor Styles.

    PubMed

    Zeigler-Hill, Virgil; McCabe, Gillian A; Vrabel, Jennifer K

    2016-08-01

    Basic personality traits (e.g., extraversion) have been found to be associated with the humor styles that individuals employ. In the present study, we were interested in determining whether pathological personality traits were also associated with humor styles. We examined the associations between the pathological personality traits captured by the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5) and humor styles in a sample of college students (N = 594). Negative affectivity and detachment were negatively associated with the affiliative and self-enhancing humor styles. Antagonism was positively associated with the aggressive humor style but negatively associated with the affiliative humor style. Disinhibition was positively associated with the aggressive humor style, whereas disinhibition and psychoticism were both positively associated with the self-defeating humor style. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings and how they can expand our understanding of the connections between the darker aspects of personality and humor. PMID:27547254

  18. Pentraxins in humoral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Inforzato, Antonio; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Valentino, Sonia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity represents the first line of defence against pathogens and plays key roles in activation and orientation of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system comprises both a cellular and a humoral arm. Components of the humoral arm include soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) that recognise pathogens associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate the immune response in coordination with the cellular arm, therefore acting as functional ancestors of antibodies. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a prototypic soluble PRM that is produced at sites of infection and inflammation by both somatic and immune cells. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved protein has revealed a non-redundant role in resistance to selected pathogens. Moreover, PTX3 exerts important functions at the crossroad between innate immunity, inflammation and female fertility. Here we review the studies on PTX3, with emphasis on pathogen recognition and crosstalk with other components of the innate immune system. PMID:21948359

  19. Personality, Humor Styles and Happiness: Happy People Have Positive Humor Styles.

    PubMed

    Ford, Thomas E; Lappi, Shaun K; Holden, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the relationships between four personality traits, humor styles, and happiness. Replicating previous research, happiness was positively correlated with four personality traits: extraversion, locus of control, self-esteem, and optimism. Further, happiness positively related to self-enhancing and affiliative humor styles; it related negatively to self-defeating and aggressive humor styles. Thus, happy people habitually engage in positive uses of humor and avoid engaging in negative uses of humor in daily life. We also found support for our hypothesis. People high in extraversion, locus of control, self-esteem, and optimism are happier because they engage in positive humor in daily life. PMID:27547251

  20. Personality, Humor Styles and Happiness: Happy People Have Positive Humor Styles

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Thomas E.; Lappi, Shaun K.; Holden, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the relationships between four personality traits, humor styles, and happiness. Replicating previous research, happiness was positively correlated with four personality traits: extraversion, locus of control, self-esteem, and optimism. Further, happiness positively related to self-enhancing and affiliative humor styles; it related negatively to self-defeating and aggressive humor styles. Thus, happy people habitually engage in positive uses of humor and avoid engaging in negative uses of humor in daily life. We also found support for our hypothesis. People high in extraversion, locus of control, self-esteem, and optimism are happier because they engage in positive humor in daily life. PMID:27547251

  1. Nonlinear refraction in vitreous humor.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, B A; Roach, W P; Rogers, M E; Mayo, M W; Toth, C A; Cain, C P; Noojin, G D

    1993-11-01

    We extend the application of the z-scan technique to determine the nonlinear refractive index (n(2)) for human and rabbit vitreous humor, water, and physiological saline. In these measurements there were nonlinear contributions to the measured signal from the aqueous samples and the quartz cell that held the sample. Measurements were made with 60-ps pulses at 532 nm. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of the nonlinear refractive properties of biological material. PMID:19829406

  2. Heart Xenograft Survival With Chimeric Pig Donors and Modest Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Beschorner, William E.; Sudan, Debra L.; Radio, Stanley J.; Yang, Tianyu; Franco, Kenneth L.; Hill, Arthur C.; Shearon, C. Carson; Thompson, Scott C.; Dixon, Robert S.; Johnson, Noel D.; Kuszynski, Charles A.; Rubocki, Ronald J.; Lechtenberg, Kelly F.; Matamoros, Aurelio; Goertzen, Timothy C.; Fox, Ira J.; Langnas, Alan N.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To assess the use of donor pigs with cellular chimerism for prevention of acute rejection with modest immune suppression. The clinical use of pig organ xenografts is currently precluded by severe acute rejection, which resists standard immune suppression. Summary Background Data For long-term survival of pig organ xenografts, immune suppression significantly greater than used with allografts would currently be necessary, leaving the recipient immune deficient and at increased risk for infections. Induction of immune tolerance and tissue accommodation could enhance xenograft survival but would lead to complications and frequent graft failure. Induction of cellular chimerism within the donor pigs, however, could accomplish these goals before transplantation, significantly reducing the risk. Methods Marrow cells from sheep were infused into fetal pigs. Heart xenografts from chimeric or nonchimeric pigs were transplanted heterotopically into recipient sheep, simultaneous with infusion of splenocytes. Posttransplant suppression consisted of cyclosporine and tapered corticosteroids, comparable with allotransplants. Results All of the control grafts (n = 12) were rejected by acute vascular rejection in 4 to 8 days. In contrast, only one episode of vascular rejection was observed in the experimental group (n = 13). Four experimental recipients had an episode of moderate diffuse cellular rejection (grade 3) and one had moderate focal cellular rejection (grade 2). Each episode responded to pulse steroids. Seven grafts showed no significant rejection. There was little evidence of immune deficiency, infection, or toxicity. Conclusions Acute vascular rejection was prevented in a large animal model without the need for severe immune suppression. PMID:12560785

  3. Effects of humor on sentence memory.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S R

    1994-07-01

    Memory for humorous and nonhumorous versions of sentences was compared. Humorous sentences were better remembered than the nonhumorous sentences on both free- and cued-recall tests and on measures of sentence recall and word recall. These effects persisted when subjects were warned that they were about to read a humorous sentence but were attenuated in incidental learning and limited to within-subjects manipulations. In incidental learning, recall was also scored as a function of subjective ratings of humor. Subjective humor affected memory in both within- and between-subjects designs. Attention, arousal, rehearsal, retrieval, and surprise explanations were explored. Results suggest that humorous material receives both increased attention and rehearsal relative to nonhumorous material. PMID:8064254

  4. Humor and aging - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Greengross, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Humor is one of the most important human activities, one that is enjoyed daily by people in every culture and at every age. However, very little is known about how aging affects humor experiences. Research suggests that elderly people enjoy humor more than younger people, but they have increasing difficulties in understanding jokes. Several cognitive mechanisms that may help explain this trend are discussed. Also, the amount of laughter exhibited by the elderly is smaller compared to young adults. In addition, the older population seems not to enjoy aggressive types of humor as much as the younger ones, and the elderly are especially sensitive to jokes referring to old age. Because most studies are cross-sectional, we cannot ignore possible cohort effects that might influence age differences in humor production and humor appreciation. Several future directions are mentioned with the hope for further research on the subject to follow. PMID:23689078

  5. Humor: a nursing intervention for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hulse, J R

    1994-01-01

    Researchers should investigate humor's value and impact on quality of life of elders. Humorous interventions should be studied and compared in elders. The effects of endorphin release during laughter is another aspect of humor to be studied. Certainly humor is not the answer to all the discomforts encountered by older adults, but the positive effects on some cannot be disputed. Humor as a noninvasive modality and an adjunct to patient care can be of benefit not only to the patient and family, but also to the professional nurse who encounters the discomforts of the patient on a daily basis. Humor can aid in viewing the pleasures and pains of the world with new perspectives. PMID:7515018

  6. Laughing It Up: Native American Humor as Spiritual Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Garrett, J. T.; Torres-Rivera, Edil; Wilbur, Michael; Roberts-Wilbur, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Native American humor is explored through a brief discussion of the current literature regarding the use of humor in counseling and descriptions of various forms and communication styles of Native humor as spiritual tradition. Implications for multicultural awareness in the use of humor and possible use of Native humor in counseling with Native…

  7. Instructional scientific humor in the secondary classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizner, Francine

    This study is an examination of the manner in which educators employ scientific content humor and how that humor is perceived by their students. Content humor is a useful strategy in drawing the attention of students and improving their receptivity toward scientific information. It is also a useful tool in combating the growing distractions of the electronic classroom. Previous studies have found that humor has a positive effect on knowledge, memory, and understanding. However, few studies have been conducted below the undergraduate level and mainly quantitative measures of student recall have been used to measure learning. This study employed multiple data sources to determine how two secondary biology teachers used humor in order to explain scientific concepts and how their students perceived their teachers' use of scientific instructional humor. Evidence of student humor reception was collected from four students in each of the two classes. All of the scientific instructional humor used in the studied classrooms was cognitive in nature, varying among factual, procedural, conceptual, and metacognitive knowledge. Teachers tended to use dialogic forms of humor. Their scientific humor reflected everyday experiences, presented queries, poked fun at authority, and asked students to search out new perspectives and perform thought experiments. Teachers were the primary actors in performing the humorous events. The events were sometimes physical exaggerations of words or drawings, and they occurred for the purpose of establishing rapport or having students make connections between scientific concepts and prior knowledge. Student perceptions were that teachers did employ humor toward instructional objectives that helped their learning. Helping students become critical thinkers is a trademark of science teachers. Science teachers who take the risk of adopting some attributes of comedians may earn the reward of imparting behaviors on their students like critical thinking

  8. Cognitive Distortions, Humor Styles, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rnic, Katerina; Dozois, David J. A.; Martin, Rod A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive distortions are negative biases in thinking that are theorized to represent vulnerability factors for depression and dysphoria. Despite the emphasis placed on cognitive distortions in the context of cognitive behavioural theory and practice, a paucity of research has examined the mechanisms through which they impact depressive symptomatology. Both adaptive and maladaptive styles of humor represent coping strategies that may mediate the relation between cognitive distortions and depressive symptoms. The current study examined the correlations between the frequency and impact of cognitive distortions across both social and achievement-related contexts and types of humor. Cognitive distortions were associated with reduced use of adaptive Affiliative and Self-Enhancing humor styles and increased use of maladaptive Aggressive and Self-Defeating humor. Reduced use of Self-Enhancing humor mediated the relationship between most types of cognitive distortions and depressed mood, indicating that distorted negative thinking may interfere with an individual’s ability to adopt a humorous and cheerful outlook on life (i.e., use Self-Enhancing humor) as a way of regulating emotions and coping with stress, thereby resulting in elevated depressive symptoms. Similarly, Self-Defeating humor mediated the association of the social impact of cognitive distortions with depression, such that this humor style may be used as a coping strategy for dealing with distorted thinking that ultimately backfires and results in increased dysphoria. PMID:27547253

  9. Cognitive Distortions, Humor Styles, and Depression.

    PubMed

    Rnic, Katerina; Dozois, David J A; Martin, Rod A

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive distortions are negative biases in thinking that are theorized to represent vulnerability factors for depression and dysphoria. Despite the emphasis placed on cognitive distortions in the context of cognitive behavioural theory and practice, a paucity of research has examined the mechanisms through which they impact depressive symptomatology. Both adaptive and maladaptive styles of humor represent coping strategies that may mediate the relation between cognitive distortions and depressive symptoms. The current study examined the correlations between the frequency and impact of cognitive distortions across both social and achievement-related contexts and types of humor. Cognitive distortions were associated with reduced use of adaptive Affiliative and Self-Enhancing humor styles and increased use of maladaptive Aggressive and Self-Defeating humor. Reduced use of Self-Enhancing humor mediated the relationship between most types of cognitive distortions and depressed mood, indicating that distorted negative thinking may interfere with an individual's ability to adopt a humorous and cheerful outlook on life (i.e., use Self-Enhancing humor) as a way of regulating emotions and coping with stress, thereby resulting in elevated depressive symptoms. Similarly, Self-Defeating humor mediated the association of the social impact of cognitive distortions with depression, such that this humor style may be used as a coping strategy for dealing with distorted thinking that ultimately backfires and results in increased dysphoria. PMID:27547253

  10. Humor: The "Witting" Edge in Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriven, Jolene; Hefferin, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Humor contributes to teamwork, creative problem solving, mental flexibility, and risk taking in the workplace. As a classroom tool, it increases student attentiveness and retention of information. (SK)

  11. Humor, Emotional Empathy, Creativity and Cognitive Dissonance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, G. Alfred; Altermatt, Ellen R.; Forsyth, Peggy D.

    The devaluation of racial, ethnic, or religious groups, sometimes disguised as humor, is a major contributor to violence and aggression against these groups. In an effort to understand this process, five factors of humor: negative ethnic stereotype jokes, play-on-word jokes, academic/social referent cartoons, gender/establishment jokes, and gross…

  12. "That Hurts!": Humor and Sadomasochism in "Lolita."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bick, Ilsa J.

    1994-01-01

    States that humor is dependent on individual perspective, and that the subject matter of "Lolita" (1962), which concerns child abuse and molestation, is difficult to treat with humor. Argues that despite its subject, "Lolita" continues to be funny. Concludes that viewers know the subject matter is not funny, but while watching, viewers do not…

  13. Confessions from a Guy Who Teaches Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L.

    2008-01-01

    Humor is an intriguing topic that exists in the contexts of adult education and human resource development. This paper describes my experiences at developing and facilitating a graduate course on humor and adult learning. Researchers and scholarly practitioners in adult education and human resource development are encouraged to build their…

  14. The benefits of humor in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Ulloth, Joan Kay

    2002-11-01

    This study was designed to examine the perceived benefits of intentionally using humor in the nursing classroom. A multiple case study of three associate degree nursing instructors and their classes was developed with qualitative methods, which included observations, interviews, and surveys. Data were examined within and across cases for commonality or difference of experience. Strong connections were made between humor and learning. Teachers and students expressed benefits they believed were received from humor. Humor can be an effective, multipurpose teaching tool for nurse educators to convey course content, hold students' attention, relieve anxiety, establish rapport with students, and make learning fun. When combined with other teaching methods, humor can enhance student learning. PMID:12437052

  15. Humor style similarity and difference in friendship dyads.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Simon C; Fox, Claire L; Jones, Siân E

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the concurrent and prospective (fall to spring) associations between four different humor styles to assess the degree to which stable friendships are characterized by similarity, and to assess whether best friends' humor styles influence each other's later use of humor. Participants were aged 11-13 years, with 87 stable, reciprocal best friend dyads. Self-report assessments of humor styles were completed on both occasions. Results indicated that there was no initial similarity in dyads' levels of humor. However, dyads' use of humor that enhances interpersonal relationships (Affiliative humor) became positively correlated by spring. Additionally, young people's use of this humor style was positively associated with their best friend's later use of the same. No such effects were present for humor which was aggressive, denigrating toward the self, or used to enhance the self. These results have clear implications for theories of humor style development, highlighting an important role for Affiliative humor within stable friendship dyads. PMID:26580553

  16. Humor and creative life styles.

    PubMed

    Richman, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper is based upon the writings of William James in the late 19th century, and Alfred Adler and Sigmund Freud in the 20th, enriched by the contributions of later personality and role theorists. The self is defined as the unique organization of each person; a style is the self in action. Different life styles and their components are expressed in different situations. I posit that humor and positive thinking, combined with meaning and purpose, are vital components of all constructive life styles. The knowledge of life styles cuts through diagnostic labels to reveal our universal humanity. It can be fruitfully applied to patients and nonpatients alike and, I found, for the self-understanding of therapist. The clinical application of life styles is illustrated through numerous vignettes. PMID:11641883

  17. A threshold theory of the humor response.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Robert; Joker, Veronica R

    2007-01-01

    The humor response has long been considered mysterious, and it is given relatively little attention in modern experimental psychology, in spite of the fact that numerous studies suggest that it has substantial benefits for mood and health. Existing theories of humor fail to account for some of the most basic humor phenomena. On most occasions when a humor response occurs, certain verbal or visual stimuli (the "setup" stimuli, which function as an establishing operation) must precede a critical stimulus (such as a "punch line" or the final panel or critical feature of a cartoon), which then occasions a sudden "revelation" or "understanding"; this revelation is often accompanied by the humor response. We suggest that the setup stimuli increase the strength of the revelatory response to a point just below the threshold of awareness and that the critical stimulus, properly designed and timed, edges the revelatory response to a point just above threshold. We also suggest that it is this threshold phenomenon that produces most instances of the humor response. We discuss these issues in the context of some notable humor of Carl Rogers and B. F. Skinner. PMID:22478488

  18. A Threshold Theory of the Humor Response

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Robert; Joker, Veronica R

    2007-01-01

    The humor response has long been considered mysterious, and it is given relatively little attention in modern experimental psychology, in spite of the fact that numerous studies suggest that it has substantial benefits for mood and health. Existing theories of humor fail to account for some of the most basic humor phenomena. On most occasions when a humor response occurs, certain verbal or visual stimuli (the “setup” stimuli, which function as an establishing operation) must precede a critical stimulus (such as a “punch line” or the final panel or critical feature of a cartoon), which then occasions a sudden “revelation” or “understanding”; this revelation is often accompanied by the humor response. We suggest that the setup stimuli increase the strength of the revelatory response to a point just below the threshold of awareness and that the critical stimulus, properly designed and timed, edges the revelatory response to a point just above threshold. We also suggest that it is this threshold phenomenon that produces most instances of the humor response. We discuss these issues in the context of some notable humor of Carl Rogers and B. F. Skinner. PMID:22478488

  19. [The humoral immunity changes in experimental cranio-cerebral trauma, concurrent with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Merets'kyĭ, V M

    2013-05-01

    The results of studying in dynamics of the humoral immunity indices were adduced in experimental cranio-cerebral truma (CCT) in conjunction with diabetes mellitus (DM). Peculiarities of the immune answer while the period of an acute reaction on trauma and early signs of posttraumatic period have been characterized by reduction of content in the main classes of immunoglobulins IgA, IgM, IgG and enhancement of the circulating immune complexes (CIC) concentration. Experimental DM was accompanied by raising of functional activity of humoral immunity in accordance with immunoglobulins level and CIC. The specificity of changes in humoral immunity in conditions of CCT on the DM background consisted of more profound lowering of the immunoglobulins level and rapid enhancement of the CIC content. PMID:23888817

  20. Last Laughs: Gallows Humor and Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Piemonte, Nicole M

    2015-12-01

    This paper argues that "backstage" gallows humor among clinical mentors not only affects medical students' perceptions of what it means to be a doctor but is also symptomatic and indicative of a much larger problem in medicine-namely, the failure to attend fully to the complexity and profundity of the lived experiences of illness, suffering, and death. Reorienting the discourse surrounding gallows humor away from whether or in what context it is acceptable and toward the reasons why doctors feel the need to use such humor in the first place addresses this issue in a more illuminating way. PMID:26062447

  1. LOL Teacher! Using Humor to Enhance Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Shelly

    2015-01-01

    Laughing with students can help them connect on a deeper level with the teacher and the learning. This article offers the following four strategies to incorporate humor into teaching: (1) Integrate humorous bits to boost engagement; (2) Choose humorous materials; (3) Create interest with humorous web tools and apps; and (4) Teach with silly…

  2. Exploring the Relationship between Humor and Aesthetic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience." For Morreall, both humor and…

  3. Counseling through the Funny Bone: Humor in Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Meredith

    This paper examines the role that humor may play in guidance counseling. After a brief review of the literature on the physiology of laughter and the therapeutic effects of humor, the paper draws on past research to discuss the developmental stages of humor from infancy to late adolescence and adulthood, citing examples of the kinds of humor that…

  4. Humor in Evaluating and Treating Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    BERNET, WILLIAM

    1993-01-01

    Humor can provide useful information during the psychiatric evaluation of children and adolescents and can also facilitate the therapeutic process. Clinical examples demonstrate how humor is useful as a diagnostic tool; how it can be used to shape the therapeutic relationship; and the role of humor as a therapeutic technique. Humor may help the child and adolescent patient explore feelings and may help the therapist deal with resistance. In some circumstances, the humor itself can become an agent of change. Humor has been used in the treatment of depression, aggression, social ineptitude, and conduct problems. Both the benefits and the risks of using humor are discussed. PMID:22700156

  5. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  6. Humoral innate immune response and disease

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Stephanie N.; Varahan, Sriram; Yuan, Kai; Li, Xiangdong; Fleming, Sherry D.

    2012-01-01

    The humoral innate immune response consists of multiple components, including the naturally occurring antibodies (NAb), pentraxins and the complement and contact cascades. As soluble, plasma components, these innate proteins provide key elements in the prevention and control of disease. However, pathogens and cells with altered self proteins utilize multiple humoral components to evade destruction and promote pathogy. Many studies have examined the relationship between humoral immunity and autoimmune disorders. This review focuses on the interactions between the humoral components and their role in promoting the pathogenesis of bacterial and viral infections and chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Understanding the beneficial and detrimental aspects of the individual components and the interactions between proteins which regulate the innate and adaptive response will provide therapeutic targets for subsequent studies. PMID:22771788

  7. Laughter and humor therapy in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Paul N; Parsons, Trisha; Ben-Moshe, Ros; Weinberg, Melissa; Neal, Merv; Gilbert, Karen; Rawson, Helen; Ockerby, Cherene; Finlay, Paul; Hutchinson, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Laughter and humor therapy have been used in health care to achieve physiological and psychological health-related benefits. The application of these therapies to the dialysis context remains unclear. This paper reviews the evidence related to laughter and humor therapy as a medical therapy relevant to the dialysis patient population. Studies from other groups such as children, the elderly, and persons with mental health, cancer, and other chronic conditions are included to inform potential applications of laughter therapy to the dialysis population. Therapeutic interventions could range from humorous videos, stories, laughter clowns through to raucous simulated laughter and Laughter Yoga. The effect of laughter and humor on depression, anxiety, pain, immunity, fatigue, sleep quality, respiratory function and blood glucose may have applications to the dialysis context and require further research. PMID:24467450

  8. An Explanation of the Relationship between Instructor Humor and Student Learning: Instructional Humor Processing Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanzer, Melissa B.; Frymier, Ann B.; Irwin, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes the Instructional Humor Processing Theory (IHPT), a theory that incorporates elements of incongruity-resolution theory, disposition theory, and the elaboration likelihood model (ELM) of persuasion. IHPT is proposed and offered as an explanation for why some types of instructor-generated humor result in increased student…

  9. Investigating the Effect of Humor Communication Skills Training on Pro-Social and Anti-Social Humor Styles, Cognitive Learning, Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Humor Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    Humor is an important aspect of interpersonal interactions as it is linked to the development and maintenance of relationships (Merolla, 2006). The purpose of this dissertation was to test the effect of a humor communication skills training program on the ability to minimize anti-social humor (i.e., aggressive, self-defeating) and enhance…

  10. Self-Deprecating Humor Versus Other-Deprecating Humor in Health Messages

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JI YOUNG; SLATER, MICHAEL D.; TCHERNEV, JOHN

    2016-01-01

    Humor is sometimes employed in health messages. However, little is known about contingencies under which different types of humor may or may not be effective. This experiment crossed humorous vs. non-humorous and self- vs. other-deprecating messages about binge drinking, and tested how differences in personal investment in alcohol use moderates the effects of such messages on college binge drinkers. Results showed significant three-way interaction effects on subjective norms and behavioral intentions largely consistent with hypotheses. Assessment of significant differences in the interactions indicated that for binge drinkers who weren’t high in personal investment in alcohol use, other-deprecating humor tended to reduce their perceived subjective norms about the acceptability of binge drinking behavior and their behavioral intentions. The effect of the experimental manipulation on subjective norms among these binge drinkers was shown to mediate the effect on intentions to binge drink in the future. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:26020507

  11. Altered Sense of Humor in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Gordon, Elizabeth; Golden, Hannah L.; Cohen, Miriam H.; Woodward, Felix J.; Macpherson, Kirsty; Slattery, Catherine F.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Sense of humor is potentially relevant to social functioning in dementias, but has been little studied in these diseases. We designed a semi-structured informant questionnaire to assess humor behavior and preferences in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 15), semantic dementia (SD; n = 7), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 10), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD; n = 16) versus healthy age-matched individuals (n = 21). Altered (including frankly inappropriate) humor responses were significantly more frequent in bvFTD and SD (all patients) than PNFA or AD (around 40% of patients). All patient groups liked satirical and absurdist comedy significantly less than did healthy controls. This pattern was reported premorbidly for satirical comedy in bvFTD, PNFA, and AD. Liking for slapstick comedy did not differ between groups. Altered sense of humor is particularly salient in bvFTD and SD, but also frequent in AD and PNFA. Humor may be a sensitive probe of social cognitive impairment in dementia, with diagnostic, biomarker and social implications. PMID:26444779

  12. pO{sub 2} Fluctuation Pattern and Cycling Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma and Melanoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Christine; Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Galappathi, Kanthi; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Blood perfusion in tumors is spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in local fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}) and tissue regions showing cycling hypoxia. In this study, we investigated whether the pO{sub 2} fluctuation pattern and the extent of cycling hypoxia differ between tumor types showing high (e.g., cervical carcinoma xenograft) and low (e.g., melanoma xenograft) fractions of connective tissue-associated blood vessels. Methods and Materials: Two cervical carcinoma lines (CK-160 and TS-415) and two melanoma lines (A-07 and R-18) transplanted into BALB/c nu/nu mice were included in the study. Tissue pO{sub 2} was measured simultaneously in two positions in each tumor by using a two-channel OxyLite fiber-optic oxygen-sensing device. The extent of acute and chronic hypoxia was assessed by combining a radiobiological and a pimonidazole-based immunohistochemical assay of tumor hypoxia. Results: The proportion of tumor regions showing pO{sub 2} fluctuations, the pO{sub 2} fluctuation frequency in these regions, and the relative amplitude of the pO{sub 2} fluctuations were significantly higher in the melanoma xenografts than in the cervical carcinoma xenografts. Cervical carcinoma and melanoma xenografts did not differ significantly in the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells or the fraction of chronically hypoxic cells. However, the ratio between fraction of acutely hypoxic cells and fraction of chronically hypoxic cells was significantly higher in melanoma than in cervical carcinoma xenografts. Conclusions: Temporal heterogeneity in blood flow and tissue pO{sub 2} in tumors may depend on tumor histology. Connective tissue surrounding microvessels may stabilize blood flow and pO{sub 2} and, thus, protect tumor tissue from cycling hypoxia.

  13. [Positive aspects of old ages - humor of seniors].

    PubMed

    Mareš, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    This survey study has five parts. In the first part two conceptual approaches to humor are characterized. One considers "the comic" to be an umbrella concept, and humor is only one of its rather positive forms. The other comes out from the umbrella concept "humor", and distinguishes between various forms of humor including the negative ones. Three main theories of humor are presented: theory of superiority, theory of incongruity, and a relief theory. The second part introduces humor in the elderly and draws the attention to the fact that we know relatively little about humor in old age because most research has been carried out in children, adolescents or adults in productive age. The third part of the study describes the process of diagnostics of humor in the elderly. For example, within the qualitative methods, in-depth interviews with seniors or analyses of their diary entries are used. Within quantitative methods, questionnaires are used, and this study presents the survey of seven most frequent ones applied in the studies of humor in the elderly. In the context of mixed methods, understanding of humor in young and seniors, or understanding of humor in relatively healthy seniors and seniors after stroke are compared. The fourth part of the study presents the Gelkopfs model on relationship between humor, treatment and cure of patients. The fifth part of the study demonstrates the options how to use humor to improve the mental state of the elderly (by means of individual or group interventions). PMID:25994908

  14. Total lymphoid irradiation and discordant cardiac xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, E.; Dresdale, A.R.; Diehl, J.T.; Katzen, N.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Konstam, M.A.; Payne, D.D.; Cleveland, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation can prolong concordant cardiac xenografts. The effects of total lymphoid irradiation in a discordant xenograft model (guinea pig to rat) were studied with and without adjuvant pharmacologic immunosuppression. Inbred Lewis rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups. Group 1 (n = 6) served as a control group and rats received no immunosuppression. Group 2 (n = 5) received triple-drug therapy that consisted of intraperitoneal azathioprine (2 mg/kg), cyclosporine (20 mg/kg), and methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) for 1 week before transplantation. Group 3 animals (n = 5) received 15 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation in 12 divided doses over a 3-week period. Group 4 (n = 6) received both triple-drug therapy and total lymphoid irradiation as described for groups 2 and 3. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine if a correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and rejection-free interval existed. Rejection was defined as cessation of graft pulsation and was confirmed by histologic test results. Only groups 1 and 2 showed a difference in survival (group 1, 6.9 +/- 1.0 minutes; group 2, 14.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, p = 0.02). Although total lymphoid irradiation did decrease complement-dependent cytotoxicity, linear regression revealed no correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and graft survival (coefficient of correlation, 0.30). Unlike concordant cardiac xenografts, total lymphoid irradiation with or without triple-drug therapy does not prolong graft survival.

  15. Differentiation of xenografted human fetal lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Jelena; Floros, Joanna; Phelps, David S.; Wigdahl, Brian; Welsh, Patricia; Weisz, Judith; Shearer, Debra A.; Pree, Alphonse Leure du; Myers, Roland; Howett, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize xenografted human fetal lung tissue with respect to developmental stage-specific cytodifferentiation. Human fetal lung tissue (pseudoglandular stage) was grafted either beneath the renal capsule or the skin of athymic mice (NCr-nu). Tissues were analyzed from 3 to 42 days post-engraftment for morphological alterations by light and electron microscopy (EM), and for surfactant protein mRNA and protein by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry (ICC), respectively. The changes observed resemble those seen in human lung development in utero in many respects, including the differentiation of epithelium to the saccular stage. Each stage occurred over approximately one week in the graft in contrast to the eight weeks of normal in utero development. At all time points examined, all four surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D) were detected in the epithelium by ICC. Lamellar bodies were first identified by EM in 14 day xenografts. By day 21, a significant increase in lamellar body expression was observed. Cellular proliferation, as marked by PCNA ICC and elastic fiber deposition resembled those of canalicular and saccular in utero development. This model in which xenografted lung tissue in different stages of development is available may facilitate the study of human fetal lung development and the impact of various pharmacological agents on this process. PMID:17555893

  16. Humor in Context: Fire Service and Joking Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Larry; Roth, Gene

    2013-01-01

    Although theorizing about humor has occurred for several decades, scant research exists that examines humor in the broad context of human resource development. Humor exists in workplaces and it is historicized in the professional and organizational contexts of workers. This paper explores aspects of a joking culture within the specific work…

  17. Children's Literature: There's Some Sense to Its Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    1985-01-01

    Focuses on three interrelated issues: (1) developmental theories of humor (2) variables that facilitate children's responses to amusing literature, and (3) strategies for the evaluation and more effective use of humorous children's books. Provides examples of books, an overview chart of the general chronology of children's humor development, and…

  18. Are We Having Fun Yet? Humor in the English Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Argues that humor is an invaluable teaching tool in English classes. Describes how the author and her students: found humor an important means of discovering profound truths in Shakespeare's dramas; enjoyed the epic "Paradise Lost"; worked with satire in Chaucer; and used humor in students' own creative activities. (SR)

  19. Truly Funny: Humor, Irony, and Satire as Moral Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadlez, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    The occasional role of humor as a vehicle for moral criticism is investigated. I begin by distinguishing between this particular role and the other kinds of ways in which humor and amusement might be regarded through a moral lens, consider historical approaches to humor that corroborate the kind of role for it on which my investigation focuses,…

  20. The Performance of Humor in Computer-Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baym, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Argues that humor can be accomplished in computer-mediated communication and can be critical to creating social meaning online. Analyzes the humor of the USENET news group rec.arts.tv.soaps (r.a.t.s.), which discusses soap operas. Combines user surveys with message analysis to show the prevalence and importance of humor in r.a.t.s. (RS)

  1. Strategically Funny: Romantic Motives Affect Humor Style in Relationship Initiation

    PubMed Central

    DiDonato, Theresa E.; Jakubiak, Brittany K.

    2016-01-01

    Not all humor is the same, yet little is known about the appeal of specific humor styles in romantic initiation. The current experimental study addresses this gap by investigating how romantic motives (short-term or long-term) affect individuals’ anticipated use of, and response to, positive humor and negative humor. Heterosexual participants (n = 224) imagined the pursuit of either a desired short-term or long-term relationship, indicated the extent to which they would produce positive and negative humor, and reported how their own interest would change in response to the imaginary target’s use of positive or negative humor. Results revealed that individuals are strategic in their humor production as a function of relational motives. Individuals produced positive humor in both contexts but limited their use of negative humor when pursuing a long-term relationship. The target’s positive humor increased individuals’ attraction, especially women’s, and although negative humor boosted attraction, it did not boost attraction more for short-term than long-term relationships. Findings extend a trait-indicator model of humor and their implications are discussed in light of other theoretical perspectives. PMID:27547256

  2. Continuity and Change: The Cultural Context of Women's Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Alice

    As a technique of social control intimately associated with the display and control of power, humor reflects empowerment. Contemporary women have few traditions of using power, and a variety of covert factors have discouraged women's use of humor. The most significant of these is the way that the popular mind has defined humor as a male…

  3. Humor in the Classroom: Theories, Functions, and Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Patrick J.

    While humor can backfire or, worse, mask dark, underlying prejudices, research reveals positive and promising connections between humor and creativity, efficiency, and mental health. Although there remains considerable room for disagreement on the essential qualities of humor, several researchers after reviewing the literature appear to have…

  4. Use of Humorous Visuals To Enhance Computer-Based-Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snetsinger, Wendy; Grabowski, Barbara

    It was hypothesized that a visual strategy that incorporates a humorous theme and cartoons with humorous comments relevant to the content helps motivate students to focus on and retain computer-based instructional material. An experiment to assess this hypothesis was undertaken with 43 college students who received a humorous presentation on…

  5. Assessing Student Perceptions of Inappropriate and Appropriate Teacher Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Wojtaszczyk, Ann M.

    2007-01-01

    This study replicated and extended Wanzer, Frymier, Wojtaszczyk, and Smith's (2006) preliminary typology of appropriate and inappropriate teacher humor and advanced three explanations for differences in interpretations of teacher humor. Students were more likely to view teacher humor as inappropriate when it was perceived as offensive and when it…

  6. Appropriate and Inappropriate Uses of Humor By Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekelja Wanzer, Melissa; Bainbridge Frymier, Ann; Wojtaszczyk, Ann M; Smith, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The use of humor in teaching has been linked to learning in several studies, although the research has been equivocal. The various types of humor used by teachers have also been investigated but not in terms of what students view as appropriate and inappropriate uses of humor. Participants in this study were asked to generate examples of…

  7. Encyclopedia of 20th-Century American Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Nilsen, Don L. F.

    This reference encyclopedia contains information on both the historical and contemporary aspects of humor and comedy in the United States. Arranged in an A-to-Z format, the encyclopedia is a collection of article-length essays that examine humor from many perspectives, from defining terms; to providing information on humor writers, comedians, and…

  8. Humor Styles and Leadership Styles: Community College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrica, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between leadership styles (transformational, transactional, laissez-faire) and humor styles (affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, self-defeating) of community college presidents. Research has shown that humor and leadership styles are related and that humor may enhance interpersonal…

  9. Self-Deprecating Humor Versus Other-Deprecating Humor in Health Messages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Slater, Michael D; Tchernev, John

    2015-01-01

    Humor is sometimes used in health messages. However, little is known about contingencies under which different types of humor may or may not be effective. This experiment crossed humorous versus nonhumorous and self- versus other-deprecating messages about binge drinking, and tested how differences in personal investment in alcohol use moderates the effects of such messages on college binge drinkers. Results showed significant 3-way interaction effects on subjective norms and behavioral intentions largely consistent with hypotheses. Assessment of significant differences in the interactions indicated that for binge drinkers who were not high in personal investment in alcohol use, other-deprecating humor tended to reduce their perceived subjective norms about the acceptability of binge drinking behavior and their behavioral intentions. The effect of the experimental manipulation on subjective norms among these binge drinkers was shown to mediate the effect on intentions to binge drink in the future. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:26020507

  10. Proteomic analysis of human vitreous humor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The vitreous humor is a transparent, gelatinous mass whose main constituent is water. It plays an important role in providing metabolic nutrient requirements of the lens, coordinating eye growth and providing support to the retina. It is in close proximity to the retina and reflects many of the changes occurring in this tissue. The biochemical changes occurring in the vitreous could provide a better understanding about the pathophysiological processes that occur in vitreoretinopathy. In this study, we investigated the proteome of normal human vitreous humor using high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Results The vitreous humor was subjected to multiple fractionation techniques followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. We identified 1,205 proteins, 682 of which have not been described previously in the vitreous humor. Most proteins were localized to the extracellular space (24%), cytoplasm (20%) or plasma membrane (14%). Classification based on molecular function showed that 27% had catalytic activity, 10% structural activity, 10% binding activity, 4% cell and 4% transporter activity. Categorization for biological processes showed 28% participate in metabolism, 20% in cell communication and 13% in cell growth. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000957. Conclusion This large catalog of vitreous proteins should facilitate biomedical research into pathological conditions of the eye including diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment and cataract. PMID:25097467

  11. Mark Twain and American Humor [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    In this three-part lesson, students examine structure and characterization in the short story and consider the significance of humor through a study of Mark Twain's "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County." In Part I, through skits and storytelling, students first examine the structure of Twain's story and the role he creates for his…

  12. Prosodic Markers of Saliency in Humorous Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Lucy; Corduas, Marcella; Eisterhold, Jodi; Seifried, Brenna; Eggleston, Alyson; Attardo, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Much of what we think we know about the performance of humor relies on our intuitions about prosody (e.g., "it's all about timing"); however, this has never been empirically tested. Thus, the central question addressed in this article is whether speakers mark punch lines in jokes prosodically and, if so, how. To answer this question, this article…

  13. Culture through Humor in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guegan-Fisher, C.

    Humor can be a very effective tool to make students remember what they should know about the traditions and beliefs, manners and institutions of a culture. The teacher himself should outwardly be the embodiment of the culture which is taught. For example, when a teacher of French walks into the classroom the first day he should introduce himself…

  14. Using Humor to Crack the Glass Ceiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace

    1994-01-01

    Assistant vice president for academic personnel at public university took notes on incidents that caused participants to laugh during meetings of academic managers between 1988 and 1993. Recorded percentages of males and females in attendance, who conducted meeting, and who initiated laughter. Found differences in how men and women used humor to…

  15. Social Influences on Children's Humor Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosslyn, Stephen M.; Henker, Barbara A.

    Two experiments to study the development of the meaning of laughter in children are reported. A pilot study presented recorded audio tapes with both humorous and nonhumorous episodes, some with accompanying canned laughter, to 24 boys between the ages of 4 and 6 years. Observers recorded durations of laughter and smiling. Results showed that both…

  16. Humor: A Critical Analysis for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibles, Warren

    Part of the "Teaching Young People to be Critical Series," this booklet defines and analyzes humor for children in light of theories of philosophers Ludwig Wittenstein and John Dewey. Intended for individual or small group work, the objectives are threefold: reading improvement, reading enjoyment, and student involvement in making the leap from…

  17. Economics with a Sense of Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Diane

    1985-01-01

    In this humorous dialogue that can be read and acted out as a play in high school economics classes, Karl Marx, a spokesman for communism, and Adam Smith, the father of capitalism, debate (1) whether an economy should produce designer jeans and (2) who should own McDonald's restaurant. (RM)

  18. Very Good Medicine: Indigenous Humor and Laughter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mala, Cynthia Lindquist

    2016-01-01

    Humor is not only instinctive and a basic human need, but it also is very good medicine. Laughter boosts the immune system, lowers blood pressure, reduces stress hormones, and is linked to healthy functioning organs. [This article was written with Mylo Redwater Smith.

  19. Humor as Camouflage of Televised Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, W. James; Warren, Ron

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to research on schema theory and media effects by examining how violence is portrayed in comedy programs. Finds a high rate of violence (especially verbal forms) on comedy programs; and the combination of humor, minor acts of violence, and program context tend to trivialize its presence. Suggests that viewers' schema for comedy uses…

  20. Comic Relief: Engaging Students through Humor Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goebel, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    In this time of high-stakes tests and school accountability, English classrooms have been pushed to become increasingly serious places. Combining NCLB pressures with desires to use literature to do important cultural work--such as fighting ethnic, gender, and social-class discrimination--virtually bans humor from the classroom. This is unfortunate…

  1. The Public Repository of Xenografts Enables Discovery and Randomized Phase II-like Trials in Mice.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth C; Murakami, Mark A; Christodoulou, Alexandra; Christie, Amanda L; Köster, Johannes; DeSouza, Tiffany A; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Kallgren, Scott P; Liu, Huiyun; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Plana, Olivia; Montero, Joan; Stevenson, Kristen E; Rao, Prakash; Vadhi, Raga; Andreeff, Michael; Armand, Philippe; Ballen, Karen K; Barzaghi-Rinaudo, Patrizia; Cahill, Sarah; Clark, Rachael A; Cooke, Vesselina G; Davids, Matthew S; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Dorfman, David M; Eaton, Hilary; Ebert, Benjamin L; Etchin, Julia; Firestone, Brant; Fisher, David C; Freedman, Arnold S; Galinsky, Ilene A; Gao, Hui; Garcia, Jacqueline S; Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Graubert, Timothy A; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Halilovic, Ensar; Harris, Marian H; Herbert, Zachary T; Horwitz, Steven M; Inghirami, Giorgio; Intlekoffer, Andrew M; Ito, Moriko; Izraeli, Shai; Jacobsen, Eric D; Jacobson, Caron A; Jeay, Sébastien; Jeremias, Irmela; Kelliher, Michelle A; Koch, Raphael; Konopleva, Marina; Kopp, Nadja; Kornblau, Steven M; Kung, Andrew L; Kupper, Thomas S; LaBoeuf, Nicole; LaCasce, Ann S; Lees, Emma; Li, Loretta S; Look, A Thomas; Murakami, Masato; Muschen, Markus; Neuberg, Donna; Ng, Samuel Y; Odejide, Oreofe O; Orkin, Stuart H; Paquette, Rachel R; Place, Andrew E; Roderick, Justine E; Ryan, Jeremy A; Sallan, Stephen E; Shoji, Brent; Silverman, Lewis B; Soiffer, Robert J; Steensma, David P; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Stone, Richard M; Tamburini, Jerome; Thorner, Aaron R; van Hummelen, Paul; Wadleigh, Martha; Wiesmann, Marion; Weng, Andrew P; Wuerthner, Jens U; Williams, David A; Wollison, Bruce M; Lane, Andrew A; Letai, Anthony; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Ritz, Jerome; Brown, Myles; Long, Henry; Aster, Jon C; Shipp, Margaret A; Griffin, James D; Weinstock, David M

    2016-04-11

    More than 90% of drugs with preclinical activity fail in human trials, largely due to insufficient efficacy. We hypothesized that adequately powered trials of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) in mice could efficiently define therapeutic activity across heterogeneous tumors. To address this hypothesis, we established a large, publicly available repository of well-characterized leukemia and lymphoma PDXs that undergo orthotopic engraftment, called the Public Repository of Xenografts (PRoXe). PRoXe includes all de-identified information relevant to the primary specimens and the PDXs derived from them. Using this repository, we demonstrate that large studies of acute leukemia PDXs that mimic human randomized clinical trials can characterize drug efficacy and generate transcriptional, functional, and proteomic biomarkers in both treatment-naive and relapsed/refractory disease. PMID:27070704

  2. Gammaherpesvirus Co-infection with Malaria Suppresses Anti-parasitic Humoral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Caline G.; Anthony, Neil R.; O’Flaherty, Brigid M.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Priyamvada, Lalita; Engwerda, Christian R.; Speck, Samuel H.; Lamb, Tracey J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to non-cerebral severe malaria is estimated to occur within 1-2 infections in areas of endemic transmission for Plasmodium falciparum. Yet, nearly 20% of infected children die annually as a result of severe malaria. Multiple risk factors are postulated to exacerbate malarial disease, one being co-infections with other pathogens. Children living in Sub-Saharan Africa are seropositive for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) by the age of 6 months. This timing overlaps with the waning of protective maternal antibodies and susceptibility to primary Plasmodium infection. However, the impact of acute EBV infection on the generation of anti-malarial immunity is unknown. Using well established mouse models of infection, we show here that acute, but not latent murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection suppresses the anti-malarial humoral response to a secondary malaria infection. Importantly, this resulted in the transformation of a non-lethal P. yoelii XNL infection into a lethal one; an outcome that is correlated with a defect in the maintenance of germinal center B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the spleen. Furthermore, we have identified the MHV68 M2 protein as an important virus encoded protein that can: (i) suppress anti-MHV68 humoral responses during acute MHV68 infection; and (ii) plays a critical role in the observed suppression of anti-malarial humoral responses in the setting of co-infection. Notably, co-infection with an M2-null mutant MHV68 eliminates lethality of P. yoelii XNL. Collectively, our data demonstrates that an acute gammaherpesvirus infection can negatively impact the development of an anti-malarial immune response. This suggests that acute infection with EBV should be investigated as a risk factor for non-cerebral severe malaria in young children living in areas endemic for Plasmodium transmission. PMID:25996913

  3. Gammaherpesvirus Co-infection with Malaria Suppresses Anti-parasitic Humoral Immunity.

    PubMed

    Matar, Caline G; Anthony, Neil R; O'Flaherty, Brigid M; Jacobs, Nathan T; Priyamvada, Lalita; Engwerda, Christian R; Speck, Samuel H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2015-05-01

    Immunity to non-cerebral severe malaria is estimated to occur within 1-2 infections in areas of endemic transmission for Plasmodium falciparum. Yet, nearly 20% of infected children die annually as a result of severe malaria. Multiple risk factors are postulated to exacerbate malarial disease, one being co-infections with other pathogens. Children living in Sub-Saharan Africa are seropositive for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) by the age of 6 months. This timing overlaps with the waning of protective maternal antibodies and susceptibility to primary Plasmodium infection. However, the impact of acute EBV infection on the generation of anti-malarial immunity is unknown. Using well established mouse models of infection, we show here that acute, but not latent murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection suppresses the anti-malarial humoral response to a secondary malaria infection. Importantly, this resulted in the transformation of a non-lethal P. yoelii XNL infection into a lethal one; an outcome that is correlated with a defect in the maintenance of germinal center B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the spleen. Furthermore, we have identified the MHV68 M2 protein as an important virus encoded protein that can: (i) suppress anti-MHV68 humoral responses during acute MHV68 infection; and (ii) plays a critical role in the observed suppression of anti-malarial humoral responses in the setting of co-infection. Notably, co-infection with an M2-null mutant MHV68 eliminates lethality of P. yoelii XNL. Collectively, our data demonstrates that an acute gammaherpesvirus infection can negatively impact the development of an anti-malarial immune response. This suggests that acute infection with EBV should be investigated as a risk factor for non-cerebral severe malaria in young children living in areas endemic for Plasmodium transmission. PMID:25996913

  4. Benefits of humor in reduction of threat-induced anxiety.

    PubMed

    Yovetich, N A; Dale, J A; Hudak, M A

    1990-02-01

    The benefits of humor in reducing anxiety were investigated in a laboratory study, in which subjects were falsely led to believe that they would receive a shock in 12 min. Participants were 53 undergraduate students with either high or low sense of humor as measured by the Situational Humor Response Questionnaire of Martin and Lefcourt (1984). During the anticipatory period, subjects listened to either a humorous tape, a nonhumorous tape, or no tape. Dependent variables were repeated measures of self-reported anxiety, heart rate, and zygomatic facial activity. Anxiety increased over the anticipatory period, as predicted. A significant interaction between condition and time indicated that subjects from the humor condition consistently rated themselves as less anxious and reported less increase in stress as the shock approached. A three-way interaction concentrating on the final 3 min. indicated a tendency for subjects with low sense of humor to have higher heart rates in the no-tape condition than in the humorous or nonhumorous tape conditions. Analysis for zygomatic activity indicated more smiling by subjects with high sense of humor and by subjects in the humor condition. Also, the humorous tape elicited more smiling by subjects with high sense of humor. PMID:2326429

  5. Differentiating what is humorous from what is not.

    PubMed

    Warren, Caleb; McGraw, A Peter

    2016-03-01

    After 2.5 millennia of philosophical deliberation and psychological experimentation, most scholars have concluded that humor arises from incongruity. We highlight 2 limitations of incongruity theories of humor. First, incongruity is not consistently defined. The literature describes incongruity in at least 4 ways: surprise, juxtaposition, atypicality, and a violation. Second, regardless of definition, incongruity alone does not adequately differentiate humorous from nonhumorous experiences. We suggest revising incongruity theory by proposing that humor arises from a benign violation: something that threatens a person's well-being, identity, or normative belief structure but that simultaneously seems okay. Six studies, which use entertainment, consumer products, and social interaction as stimuli, reveal that the benign violation hypothesis better differentiates humorous from nonhumorous experiences than common conceptualizations of incongruity. A benign violation conceptualization of humor improves accuracy by reducing the likelihood that joyous, amazing, and tragic situations are inaccurately predicted to be humorous. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26692355

  6. Cultural differences in therapeutic humor in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny; Adamle, Kathleen; Chiang, Ling-Chun

    2009-03-01

    Humor has been recognized by nurse researchers and practitioners as a constructive therapeutic intervention and has shown positive psychological and physiological outcomes for patient care. Because cross-cultural research on humor is sparse, this preliminary study investigates how nursing faculty members approach teaching therapeutic humor in the classroom and clinical education in different countries. Through an investigation of classroom (didactic) education and clinical practicum with direct patient care, the study may elucidate the linkage between theory and practice as well as how nursing faculty members view therapeutic humor in general. Researching nursing faculty teaching practices and viewpoints of therapeutic humor may help reveal cultural differences in the use of humor in healthcare settings. This cross-cultural study included 40 nursing faculty at three nursing programs: two in the United States and one in Taiwan. A qualitative approach was used to perform content analysis on responses to the open-ended questionnaires. Research findings revealed cultural differences between faculties from the two countries. Taiwanese faculty members indicated that they teach more theory and concepts related to therapeutic humor in the classroom than do nursing faculty members from the United States. However, nursing faculty members in Taiwan reported that they observe and practice less therapeutic humor in clinical settings out of respect for the cultural value of "reverence of illness" operating within Taiwanese society. Therapeutic humor was family centered and interdependent on relationships, roles, duties, and responsibilities of family members. In contrast, the U.S. faculty members stated that they teach less theory and concepts related to therapeutic humor in the classroom but observe and practice humor more in clinical settings. United States faculty approached teaching therapeutic humor in the classroom on an informal basis because the subject was not part of

  7. Humor and older adults: what makes them laugh?

    PubMed

    Kruse, Barbara G; Prazak, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Laughter, the physical response to perceived humor, has demonstrated positive effects on physical and psychological well-being. Studies that focus on effects of humor on health and well-being of older adults are scarce. No studies were found that examine what older adults find humorous. The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore the humor stimulus in a population of older adults. One hundred thirty (130) hospital auxiliary personnel aged 50 and older were asked the question What makes you laugh? Content analysis of responses revealed nine themes in two major categories, which were (a) people or animals and (b) situations or events. Children represented the largest category of people (30%), and telling jokes represented the largest category of situations or events (51%). Humor can be used by nurses as an effective therapeutic tool when caring for older adults if appropriate sources of humor are identified and applied. PMID:16880415

  8. Does Humor Influence the Stigma of Mental Illnesses?

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Patrick W.; Powell, Karina J.; Fokuo, J. Konadu; Kosyluk, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Public stigma is a barrier for people with mental illness. Humor may have the potential to decrease stigmatizing attitudes in the context of disclosure. Participants completed measures on stigmatizing attitudes and humor style and were then randomized to one of three conditions (self-disclosure comedy sketch, the same comedy sketch with no disclosure, and a control comedy sketch). After reviewing the comedy sketch, participants repeated the attitude measures and provided perceptions of the comic. Humor styles and perceptions significantly interacted with condition to reduce stigma. Perceptions of the self-disclosed comic were associated with reduced stigma. People exhibiting affiliative humor style (i.e., they enjoy making others laugh) were shown to have significantly greater stigma changes in the disclosed condition compared to the non-disclosed and control conditions. Affiliative humor endorsers also interacted with the non-disclosed condition suggesting that mental health comedy might generally reduce stigma in people who use humor to improve relationships. PMID:24727719

  9. Does humor influence the stigma of mental illnesses?

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Patrick W; Powell, Karina J; Fokuo, J Konadu; Kosyluk, Kristin A

    2014-05-01

    Public stigma is a barrier for people with mental illness. Humor may have the potential to decrease stigmatizing attitudes in the context of disclosure. Participants completed measures on stigmatizing attitudes and humor style and were then randomized to one of three conditions (self-disclosure comedy sketch, the same comedy sketch with no disclosure, and a control comedy sketch). After reviewing the comedy sketch, the participants repeated the attitude measures and provided perceptions of the comic. Humor styles and perceptions significantly interacted with condition to reduce stigma. Perceptions of the self-disclosed comic were associated with reduced stigma. People exhibiting affiliative humor style (i.e., they enjoy making others laugh) were shown to have significantly greater stigma changes in the disclosed condition compared with the nondisclosed and control conditions. Affiliative humor endorsers also interacted with the nondisclosed condition, suggesting that mental health comedy might generally reduce stigma in people who use humor to improve relationships. PMID:24727719

  10. Don't Smile before Christmas: The Role of Humor in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallinger, Linda Moody

    1997-01-01

    Humor can be a powerful, productive tool to help teachers succeed in the classroom. Humor cultivates spirit, alleviates stress, improves communication, and diffuses conflict. Reviews types of humor (satire, cheerfulness, eccentricity, and sarcasm), discusses humor's classroom uses and benefits, and shows how school leaders can introduce humor into…

  11. Humor in Training: Laugh and the World Learns with You--Maybe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemke, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Guidelines for using humor in training are as follows: (1) use a modicum of apt, relevant humor in an informative presentation; (2) self-disparaging humor enhances the presenter's image; (3) humor is only one factor that enhances interest; (4) apt, relevant humor does not affect persuasiveness; and (5) satire has unpredictable results. (SK)

  12. Cultures of (Un)happiness: Teaching, Schooling, and Light and Dark Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The author explores humor during a time of increasingly hostile accountability measures directed toward educators. Drawing on incongruity and other theories of humor, he explores both "light" and "dark" humor and some aspects of the educational potential and power of humor. Noting how humor is related to creativity and problem management, the…

  13. The Anals of History: Unintentional Humor from Freshman Compositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Kristine

    1983-01-01

    Presents examples of unintentional humor from college freshman composition courses. Suggests that by pointing out miscommunications, teachers can persuade students to use standard English more effectively. (MM)

  14. The cellular lesion of humoral rejection: predominant recruitment of monocytes to peritubular and glomerular capillaries.

    PubMed

    Fahim, T; Böhmig, G A; Exner, M; Huttary, N; Kerschner, H; Kandutsch, S; Kerjaschki, D; Bramböck, A; Nagy-Bojarszky, K; Regele, H

    2007-02-01

    Accumulation of inflammatory cells within capillaries is a common morphologic feature of humoral renal allograft rejection and is most easily appreciated if it occurs in glomeruli. The aim of our study was to determine the amount and composition of immune cells within glomeruli and peritubular capillaries (PTC) in cellular and humoral allograft rejection. Immunofluorescent double-labeling for CD31 and CD3 or CD68 was used for phenotyping and enumerating immune cells within glomeruli and PTC. The major findings are: (1) accumulation of immune cells in PTC is far more common than it would be anticipated based on the assessment by conventional histology; (2) it is not the absolute number of immune cells accumulating within capillaries, but rather the composition of the intracapillary cell population that distinguishes humoral rejection from cellular rejection and (3) in C4d positive biopsies a predominantly monocytic cell population accumulates not only within glomeruli but also within PTC. The median value of monocyte/T-cell ratio within PTC was 2.3 in C4d positive biopsies but only 1 (p = 0.0008) in C4d negative biopsies. Given their prominent presence within capillaries and their extensive biological versatility monocytes might contribute to the capillary damage observed in acute and chronic allograft rejection. PMID:17283488

  15. Engineering Humoral Immunity as Prophylaxis or Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Cailin E.; Balazs, Alejandro B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the review In this review, we will discuss the field of engineered humoral immunity with an emphasis on recent work using viral vectors to produce antibodies in vivo. As an alternative to passive transfer of monoclonal antibody protein, a transgene encoding an antibody is delivered to cells via vector transduction, resulting in expression and secretion by the host cell. This review will summarize the evidence in support of this strategy as an alternative to traditional vaccines against infection and as novel therapeutics for a variety of diseases. Recent findings Historically, humoral immunity has been engineered through vaccination and passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies. However, recent work suggests that vectors can be used to deliver transgenes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies to nonhematopoietic tissues and can mediate long-term expression that is capable of preventing or treating infectious diseases. The production of engineered monoclonal antibodies allows for precise targeting and elimination of aberrant self-proteins that are characteristic of certain neurodegenerative disease. This approach has also been successfully used to combat cancer and addiction in several animal models. Despite the wide array of expression platforms that have been described, adeno-associated virus vectors have emerged as the frontrunner for rapid clinical translation. Summary Recent advances in vector-mediated antibody expression have demonstrated the potential for such interventions to prevent infection and treat disease. As such, it offers an alternative to immunogen-based vaccine design and a novel therapeutic intervention by enabling precise manipulation of humoral immunity. Success translating these approaches to patients may enable the development of effective prevention against previously intractable pathogens that evade immunity such as HIV, influenza, malaria or HCV and may also enable new treatment options for neurodegenerative diseases such as

  16. Using humor to communicate competitive excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Grimsley, M.

    1994-12-31

    The use of humor to communicate excellence in the nuclear industry is described, particularly as a method to relieve public anxiety. At many companies throughout our culture, it is not okay to have fun with anything work related; it violates the puritan work ethic - you know, nose to the grindstone, buckle down and get crackin, and so forth. At Wolf Creek, we`re finding that when we have fun - not only among ourselves, but around and with others as well - we are more effective with the public, more interesting to the media, and we all smile more.

  17. Humoral and Cellular Immune Response in Canine Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Popiel, J; Chełmońska-Soyta, A

    2015-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrine diseases in dogs and is generally considered to be autoimmune in nature. In human hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is destroyed by both cellular (i.e. autoreactive helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes) and humoral (i.e. autoantibodies specific for thyroglobulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine) effector mechanisms. Other suggested factors include impaired peripheral immune suppression (i.e. the malfunction of regulatory T cells) or an additional pro-inflammatory effect of T helper 17 lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunological changes in canine hypothyroidism. Twenty-eight clinically healthy dogs, 25 hypothyroid dogs without thyroglobulin antibodies and eight hypothyroid dogs with these autoantibodies were enrolled into the study. There were alterations in serum proteins in hypothyroid dogs compared with healthy controls (i.e. raised concentrations of α-globulins, β2- and γ-globulins) as well as higher concentration of acute phase proteins and circulating immune complexes. Hypothyroid animals had a lower CD4:CD8 ratio in peripheral blood compared with control dogs and diseased dogs also had higher expression of interferon γ (gene and protein expression) and CD28 (gene expression). Similar findings were found in both groups of hypothyroid dogs. Canine hypothyroidism is therefore characterized by systemic inflammation with dominance of a cellular immune response. PMID:25958183

  18. Limited immune diversity in urodela: chronic transplantation responses occur even with family-disparate xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kinefuchi, Kenjiroh; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Touma, Maki; Hosono, Masamichi

    2013-07-01

    Urodele amphibians are thought to have poorer immune responses than evolutionary more ancestral vertebrate classes, such as bony fish. We investigated skin graft rejection and transplantation immunity in Urodele amphibians, Japanese newts, and Asiatic salamanders, and compared these findings to those from transplants in several species of frogs. The skin grafts used in this study were either allogeneic or xenogeneic. The mean survival time of the first set of allografts at 20°C was approximately 60 days for chronic responses in Urodela and 20 days for acute responses in Anura. As the graft survival times of urodeles were significantly longer than those of anurans, even when urodeles were repeatedly grafted from identical donors, there appear to be substantial differences in transplantation immunity between Urodela and Anura. These slow responses in Urodela may not be accompanied by the expansion of cytotoxic T cells, as observed in fish and anuran species, which are known to have functional major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class I systems. In our study, approximately five histo-incompatible immunogenic components were found to be involved in chronic responses in newts. Similar chronic responses were also observed in xenograft rejection in newts. In contrast, xenografts were rejected in frogs due to an accelerated acute response, possibly involving natural killer cells. Our findings that some anti-allogeneic components appear to be shared with xenogeneic components indicate that the diversification of the acquired immune system is poorly developed in Urodela. PMID:23829218

  19. The evolution of humor from male aggression

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The response to seeing a man riding a unicycle was reported to be consistently related to the viewer’s sex and stage of physical development. To see if this observation was universal, observations of responses were collected from 23 male and 9 female unicyclists aged 15–69 years, with 2–40 years cycling experience across four continents. With two exceptions among men, the findings were the same as those originally reported: children showed interest and curiosity, young girls showed little interest, while adult women showed a kindly, concerned, praising response. By contrast, boys showed physical aggression, which became more verbal, merging in the later teens to the snide, aggressive, stereotyped humorous response shown by adult males, which became less frequent in elderly men. The universality of the response across different individuals, environments, and dates of observation suggests an endogenous mechanism, and the association with masculine development relates this to androgen. The theoretical consequences are discussed. It is concluded that humor develops from aggression in males and is evolutionarily related to sexual selection. PMID:22359467

  20. Pastoral Perspectives of Humor's Use in Ministry Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Results from a qualitative component of a mixed-methods research design are reported regarding the use of humor in pastoral ministry. Thirteen Southern Baptist (SB) pastors were interviewed, from a total of 37 exemplars identified in the quantitative component of the study, regarding their perspectives toward humor in ministry. Results overall…

  1. Can Humor Increase Persuasion, Or Is It All a Joke?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markiewicz, Dorothy

    This study investigated two questions: (1) Can a humorous persuasive message increase the amount of persuasion compared with a serious control message? (2) Can humor external to and contiguous with a persuasive message increase its persuasiveness? The research on the first question attempted to determine intervening variables responsible for prior…

  2. The Use of Humor when Counseling African American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vereen, Linwood G.; Butler, S. Kent; Williams, Franklyn C.; Darg, Jules A.; Downing, Trae K. E.

    2006-01-01

    According to the literature, humor is a critical tool to enhance the counseling process because it can reduce stress, build rapport, and aid in the increase of the client's self-efficacy. In recent years, the critical nature of using humor appropriately from a cultural perspective has been explored. In this article, the authors further explore the…

  3. Humor in Advertisements Enhances Product Liking by Mere Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strick, Madelijn; van Baaren, Rick B.; Holland, Rob W.; van Knippenberg, Ad

    2009-01-01

    Humor in advertising is known to enhance product liking, but this attitude change is often considered nonpredictive of product choice. Previous research relied exclusively on explicit self-report measures to assess attitudes and purchase intentions. The present research shows that unobtrusive association of a product with humor can affect…

  4. More than trivial: strategies for using humor in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Dean, Ruth Anne Kinsman; Gregory, David M

    2005-01-01

    Humor and laughter are ubiquitous in human interactions. Terminal illness, however, is often accompanied by circumstances of anxiety, fear, and sadness. Hospice/palliative care emphasizes quality of life and the importance of human relationships. In this context, humor finds its place in authentic person-to-person connectedness. This article presents findings from a clinical ethnography that investigated the phenomena of humor and laughter in an inpatient palliative care unit. As a participant observer, the lead author accompanied 6 nurses throughout their day-to-day activities, twice weekly over 12 weeks. In addition to more than 200 hours of fieldwork, informal conversations were held with patients and families and semistructured interviews were conducted with nurses (n = 11), physicians (n = 2), a social worker (n = 1), and a physiotherapist (n = 1). Humor was pervasive, varied in the setting, and occurred across a range of intensities. Both clients and team members used humor to build relationships, contend with circumstances, and express sensibilities. Humor was affected by differences in people, differing circumstances, ethnicity, gender, and degree of stress. Participants relied on intuition as well as a constellation of other factors in discerning whether or not to use humor. Techniques for assessment included identification of cues such as expression in the eyes and timing as indications of receptivity. Combined with caring and sensitivity, humor is a powerful therapeutic asset in hospice/palliative care. It must neither be taken for granted nor considered trivial. PMID:16046892

  5. Effects of Humor on Teacher Stress, Affect, and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley, Jacqueline Dena

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are at high risk for stress, negative emotion, and job dissatisfaction, which has been linked with health problems and early attrition. Humor has been found to relieve various forms of stress. However, there is a gap in the literature regarding humor effects on teacher stress and its related consequences. The purpose of this quantitative,…

  6. Laugh yourself to sleep: memory consolidation for humorous information.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Alexis M; Payne, Jessica D

    2014-05-01

    There is extensive evidence that emotional information is better remembered than neutral information across long delays, especially if the delay interval contains an opportunity for sleep. However, as prior studies have focused on memory for negative stimuli, it is unclear whether positive memories benefit from time and sleep as well. To investigate the consolidation of positive memories, the current study examined differences in memory for humorous and non-humorous cartoons. While prior evidence demonstrates that humorous information is preferentially remembered relative to non-humorous information over brief delays, it is unknown whether this benefit lasts across longer delay intervals or whether sleep is important for lasting humor memories to form. Thus, we tested memory for 27 cartoons across 12-h delay periods containing either sleep or wakefulness. Results indicate that humor's enhancing effect on recall memory is robust across a 12-h delay and that a period of sleep facilitates this effect over wakefulness when cartoons are novel to participants and ranked based on subjective emotional ratings. Further, in accordance with previous studies that reveal diminished emotional reactivity to stimuli following sleep, in a supplemental experiment, we found that sleep reduced subjective ratings of humor, arousal, and positivity of humorous cartoons. These findings provide preliminary evidence that sleep's impact on negative emotional memory consolidation and emotional reactivity can be extended to positive stimuli as well. PMID:24337230

  7. Multilingual Manipulation and Humor in "I Love Lucy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschen, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    "I Love Lucy" is considered to have been one of the most humorous television programs in the United States as early as the 1950s. This paper explores the use of language by the protagonists, Lucy and Ricky Ricardo, in order to understand the source of the program's humor. Linguistic analysis of the Ricardos' speech is applied,…

  8. Subversion or Socialization? Humor and Carnival in Morris Gleitzman's Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    Like their counterparts elsewhere, Australian children favour humorous novels; comedic writers consistently dominate the preteen and early teen fiction market in Australia. Regardless of its popularity, however, in comparison to more serious writing, humorous literature has received little critical attention. Of the studies aimed at this area,…

  9. Group Time: Taking a "Humor Break" at Group Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Ellen Booth

    2005-01-01

    January is a perfect time to insert a strong dose of humor into group time gatherings. Oftentimes, children have tired of the predictable pattern of group meetings and need some change. Humor-filled group time activities can be the best secret remedy. Not only will children become more interested in the group time meetings (and therefore listen…

  10. Humor in Children's Lives: A Guidebook for Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Amelia J., Ed.

    Designed as a resource and as a guide for professionals who work with children and their families, this book explores the cathartic effect of humor on children, and looks at humor as an infusion of energy that promotes healthy growth, development, and adjustment in children of all ages. The chapters are as follows: (1) "Introduction: A Global…

  11. Stimulus Characteristics Affect Humor Processing in Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samson, Andrea C.; Hegenloh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate whether individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) show global humor processing deficits or whether humor comprehension and appreciation depends on stimulus characteristics. Non-verbal visual puns, semantic and Theory of Mind cartoons were rated on comprehension, funniness and the punchlines were explained. AS…

  12. Did You Hear the One about...? Humor in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Used properly, humor can be a valuable educational tool. It also helps middle school students cope with many of the personal issues that arise and focus on school, and helps teachers connect with their students. From silly costumes to movie music, this article describes how some teachers and administrators incorporate humor into their daily school…

  13. Laughlines: The Role of Humor in Children's Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Linda Abby; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reports on the 1987 Drexel University/Free Library of Philadelphia Conference on Children's Literature. The edited text of the keynote address by Alvin Schwartz, "Children, Humor and Folklore," and the acceptance speech by Deborah Kogan Ray, recipient of the 1987 Drexel Citation, are included. Observations on humor from workshop sessions are…

  14. BILLBOARD EXPRESSING LOCAL HUMOR CONCERNING FLOOD DAMAGE TO WALNUT STREET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BILLBOARD EXPRESSING LOCAL HUMOR CONCERNING FLOOD DAMAGE TO WALNUT STREET BRIDGE, I-83 SOUTHBOUND, LOOKING WEST. BILLBOARD EXPRESSING LOCAL HUMOR CONCERNING FLOOD DAMAGE TO WALNUT STREET BRIDGE, I-83 SOUTHBOUND, LOOKING WEST. - Walnut Street Bridge, Spanning Susquehanna River at Walnut Street (State Route 3034), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  15. Welcome to HELL : Humor in English Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuncay, Hidayet

    2007-01-01

    Humor means understanding not only the language and words but their use, meaning, subtle nuances, the underlying culture, implications and unwritten messages. Humor does not often travel well from one culture to another, as each society has a somewhat different concept of what is funny (Dobson, 1987). In Foreign Language Learning (FLL), the…

  16. Development: Ages & Stages--The Importance of Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Carla; Miller, Susan A.; Church, Ellen Booth

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of humor and how it helps to understand children's thinking from birth to 6 years. The article presents three sections describing how a young child's sense of humor reveals much about the way he thinks. The first section is entitled "Giggles!" written by Carla Poole. Intended for babies from birth to 2, Poole…

  17. Examining Teachers' Motivation Level According to School Principals' Humor Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recepoglu, Ergun; Kilinc, Ali Cagatay; Cepni, Osman

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the motivation level of teachers according to school principals' humor styles. The humor styles survey and job motivation scale were used to gather data from 305 randomly selected teachers employed in primary schools in Karabuk. Results indicated that 141 of the teachers claimed school principal had…

  18. A Computational Model of Linguistic Humor in Puns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Justine T.; Levy, Roger; Goodman, Noah D.

    2016-01-01

    Humor plays an essential role in human interactions. Precisely what makes something funny, however, remains elusive. While research on natural language understanding has made significant advancements in recent years, there has been little direct integration of humor research with computational models of language understanding. In this paper, we…

  19. Learning about and through Humor in the Second Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Nancy D.

    2009-01-01

    Humorous communication is extremely complex in both its forms and functions (e.g. Norrick, 1993; 2003). Much of the previous work that has put forth suggestions for incorporating humor into the language classroom (e.g. Trachtenberg, 1979; Deneire, 1995; Schmitz, 2002) has not examined these complexities in the detail necessary for the target…

  20. Antibody-mediated Xenograft Injury: Mechanisms and Protective Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of porcine organs for clinical transplantation is a promising potential solution to the shortage of human organs. Preformed anti-pig antibody is the primary cause of hyperacute rejection, while elicited antibody can contribute to subsequent “delayed” xenograft rejection. This article will review recent progress to overcome antibody mediated xenograft rejection, through modification of the host immunity and use of genetically engineered pig organs. PMID:19376229

  1. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Biau, Julian; Chautard, Emmanuel; Court, Frank; Pereira, Bruno; Verrelle, Pierre; Devun, Flavien; De Koning, Leanne; Dutreix, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery. PMID:27567954

  2. Development and characterization of a human orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Shelat, Anang; Bradley, Cori; Chen, Xiang; Federico, Sara; Thiagarajan, Suresh; Shirinifard, Abbas; Bahrami, Armita; Pappo, Alberto; Qu, Chunxu; Finkelstein, David; Sablauer, Andras; Dyer, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer of the developing sympathoadrenal lineage. The tumors are known to develop from the adrenal gland or paraspinal ganglia and have molecular and cellular features of sympathetic neurons such as dense core vesicles and catecholamine production. Here we present the detailed molecular, cellular, genetic and epigenetic characterization of an orthotopic xenograft derived from a high-risk stage 4 neuroblastoma patient. Overall, the xenografted tumor retained the high risk features of the primary tumor and showed aggressive growth and metastasis in the mouse. Also, the genome was preserved with no additional copy number variations, structural variations or aneuploidy. There were 13 missense mutations identified in the xenograft that were not present in the patient’s primary tumor and there were no new nonsense mutations. None of the missense mutations acquired in the xenograft were in known cancer genes. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using the orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft to test standard of care chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapeutics. Finally, we optimized a new approach to produce primary cultures of the neuroblastoma xenografts for high-throughput drug screening which can be used to test new combinations of therapeutic agents for neuroblastoma. PMID:25863122

  3. The biology of acute transplant rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Tilney, N L; Kupiec-Weglinski, J W

    1991-01-01

    An intriguing and increasingly understood facet of immune responses is the ability of a recipient to destroy a foreign tissue or organ graft. The phenomenon of acute rejection of an allograft involves a series of complex and inter-related cellular and humoral events, culminating in graft death. Some of the current thinking surrounding this phenomenon is reviewed. PMID:1867525

  4. Science For The Public: Collaboration and Humor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargo, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The transformation of all things media and information into a dynamic environment of user access has created what seems infinite possibilities to inform the public in many different ways - as well as seemingly infinite possibilities to confuse. This talk will describe a rather non-conventional collaboration between two different creative cultures and its significance to maintaining scientific accuracy and devising strategies important to audience engagement - among them, humor. While focusing on the award-winning effort ``When Things Get Small'' created by University of California Television producer R. Wargo in collaboration with condensed matter physicist I.K. Schuller and actor Adam J. Smith, with both NSF and private support, the case study provides insight into a model and modes which can be used successfully by other scientists to engage the public in what they do.

  5. Children's Understanding of Self-Focused Humor Styles.

    PubMed

    James, Lucy Amelia; Fox, Claire Louise

    2016-08-01

    It has been proposed that four main styles of humor exist, two which are thought to be adaptive (affiliative, self-enhancing) and two which are thought to be maladaptive (aggressive, self-defeating). Whilst the existence of these four humor styles has been supported in older children, it is suggested that for younger children, self-enhancing and self-defeating humor may develop at a later point. To investigate this further, the current research involved five semi-structured paired interviews with children aged eight to eleven years to explore the use and understanding of self-enhancing and self-defeating humor in this age group. Findings indicated that use of both self-enhancing and self-defeating humor were apparent in some children, but not all. It therefore seems appropriate that attempts to investigate humor in this age group should aim to include all four styles of humor. The current research also demonstrated the value of paired interviews when carrying out this sort of research with children. PMID:27547258

  6. Children’s Understanding of Self-Focused Humor Styles

    PubMed Central

    James, Lucy Amelia; Fox, Claire Louise

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that four main styles of humor exist, two which are thought to be adaptive (affiliative, self-enhancing) and two which are thought to be maladaptive (aggressive, self-defeating). Whilst the existence of these four humor styles has been supported in older children, it is suggested that for younger children, self-enhancing and self-defeating humor may develop at a later point. To investigate this further, the current research involved five semi-structured paired interviews with children aged eight to eleven years to explore the use and understanding of self-enhancing and self-defeating humor in this age group. Findings indicated that use of both self-enhancing and self-defeating humor were apparent in some children, but not all. It therefore seems appropriate that attempts to investigate humor in this age group should aim to include all four styles of humor. The current research also demonstrated the value of paired interviews when carrying out this sort of research with children. PMID:27547258

  7. NEURAL CORRELATES OF HUMOR DETECTION AND APPRECIATION IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Michelle N.; Walter, Elizabeth; Black, Jessica M.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2012-01-01

    Humor is a vital component of human well-being. Neuroimaging studies conducted with adults indicate that humor activates specific brain regions including the temporo-occipito-parietal junction (TOPJ), involved in incongruity resolution, and mesolimbic regions, involved in reward processing. However, no study to date has used neuroimaging to examine humor in typically developing children. Here we illuminate the neural network involved in the detection and appreciation of humor in childhood. Fifteen typically developing children ages 6–12 were invited to watch and respond to video clips while neural activity was imaged with a 3T GE Discovery MR750 scanner. Prior to presentation during functional imaging, the clips were evaluated by age-matched controls and were representative of three categories: Funny, Positive (enjoyable but not funny), and Neutral (not intended to evoke any emotional response). We found TOPJ and mesolimbic activation in children’s response to humor, suggesting these regions may form a humor-essential neural network already present in childhood. Furthermore, in a novel comparison of Funny stimuli to Positive stimuli, we found that bilateral TOPJ activation may be specific to humor processing and not part of a general constellation of neural activity in response to reward. Finally, we observed greater activation in the inferior frontal gyrus and NAcc in younger participants, indicating humor activation intensity changes during development. By providing a crucial link in studying the neurodevelopment of humor processing across the lifespan, our findings contribute valuable information about the evolution of how children understand their world. PMID:22302817

  8. Exploratory Theoretical Tests of the Instructor Humor-Student Learning Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolkan, San; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors' use of humor is generally a positive influence on student outcomes. However, examinations of humor have found that specific types of messages may not impact, or may even reverse, its positive effect. Instructional humor processing theory (IHPT) has been used to explain how humor impacts student learning. The current study sought…

  9. The Use of Humor in the English as a Second Language Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selleck, Denise Faith

    This study examines the use of teacher and student humor in the English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) classroom. A summary and synthesis of previous research on theories of humor, humor and its use in society, and applications of humor revealed its importance as an object of study. An analysis of audiotaped transcripts of samples of ESL classes…

  10. A Study of Humor Initiated by Cosmopolitan and Locals in an Urban University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukens, Janet G.; Jain, Nemi C.

    This paper presents the results of an empirical study designed to test three hypotheses concerning the type of humor initiated by faculty in their interpersonal communication: (1) the organizational type of person is associated with the type of humor he initiates; (2) cosmopolitans tend to initiate abrasive humor more often than lubricant humor;…

  11. Those Who Laugh Are Defenseless: How Humor Breaks Resistance to Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strick, Madelijn; Holland, Rob W.; van Baaren, Rick B.; van Knippenberg, Ad

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments illustrate that humor in advertisements prevents the development of negative brand associations due to resistance. Previous research on humor in advertising suggested that humor can counter negative responses during ad processing, but less is known about the effect of humor on the development of negative brand associations in…

  12. Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Using Humor in Education but Were Afraid to Laugh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, William E.

    The importance of laughter and humor to enhance education, and special education in particular, is addressed. A sense of humor is an attitude, and humor together with enthusiasm helps students enjoy the learning process. Humor can make students become more alert, and can have very positive influences on affect. A funny remark, a pleasant…

  13. Molecular profiling of patient-derived breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Identification of new therapeutic agents for breast cancer (BC) requires preclinical models that reproduce the molecular characteristics of their respective clinical tumors. In this work, we analyzed the genomic and gene expression profiles of human BC xenografts and the corresponding patient tumors. Methods Eighteen BC xenografts were obtained by grafting tumor fragments from patients into Swiss nude mice. Molecular characterization of patient tumors and xenografts was performed by DNA copy number analysis and gene expression analysis using Affymetrix Microarrays. Results Comparison analysis showed that 14/18 pairs of tumors shared more than 56% of copy number alterations (CNA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis showed that 16/18 pairs segregated together, confirming the similarity between tumor pairs. Analysis of recurrent CNA changes between patient tumors and xenografts showed losses in 176 chromosomal regions and gains in 202 chromosomal regions. Gene expression profile analysis showed that less than 5% of genes had recurrent variations between patient tumors and their respective xenografts; these genes largely corresponded to human stromal compartment genes. Finally, analysis of different passages of the same tumor showed that sequential mouse-to-mouse tumor grafts did not affect genomic rearrangements or gene expression profiles, suggesting genetic stability of these models over time. Conclusions This panel of human BC xenografts maintains the overall genomic and gene expression profile of the corresponding patient tumors and remains stable throughout sequential in vivo generations. The observed genomic profile and gene expression differences appear to be due to the loss of human stromal genes. These xenografts, therefore, represent a validated model for preclinical investigation of new therapeutic agents. PMID:22247967

  14. Humoral immune response directed against LEDGF in patients with VKH.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Senju, S; Shinohara, T; Nakatsura, T; Murata, Y; Ishihara, M; Nakamura, S; Ohno, S; Negi, A; Nishimura, Y

    2001-10-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease is an autoimmune systemic disorder. In Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, inflammatory disorders occur in multiple organs containing melanocytes, including uvea (resulting in acute bilateral panuveitis), skin (resulting in vitiligo and alopecia), central nervous system (resulting in meningitis) and inner ears (resulting in hearing loss and tinnitus). These inflammatory aspects are attributed to the destruction of melanocytes through immunological mechanisms. Studies have been carried out to elucidate the exact etiology and target autoantigen in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, but much remains to be investigated. Identification of target autoantigen is important to understand the etiology of autoimmune diseases, and for development of antigen-specific immuno-modulation therapy. To identify the target autoantigens in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, we made use of an immunoscreening of a bovine uveal cDNA expression library with serum samples obtained from patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease. We identified an immunoreactive cDNA clone that encodes bovine lens epithelium derived growth factor. mRNA of human lens epithelium derived growth factor was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and it was expressed in human uvea, retina and melanocytes. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies were quantitated in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using recombinant human lens epithelium derived growth factor. The prevalence of IgG anti-lens epithelium derived growth factor autoantibodies in patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (66.7% versus 21.6%, P<0.001). On the other hand, the prevalence of the autoantibody in patients with panuveitis of other etiology, Behçet's disease and sarcoidosis, was almost same as that in healthy controls. These results suggest that the humoral immune response agonist lens epithelium derived growth factor is not a mere secondary phenomena

  15. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  16. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E. Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W.; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80–90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  17. The effect of humor on memory: constrained by the pun.

    PubMed

    Summerfelt, Hannah; Lippman, Louis; Hyman, Ira E

    2010-01-01

    In a series of experiments, we investigated the effect of pun humor on memory. In all experiments, the participants were exposed to knock-knock jokes in either the original form retaining the pun or in a modified form that removed the pun. In Experiment 1, the authors found that pun humor improved both recall and recognition memory following incidental encoding. In Experiment 2, they found evidence that rehearsal is not the cause of the humor effect on memory. In Experiments 3 and 4, the authors found that the constraints imposed by puns and incongruity may account for the humor effects observed. Puns constrain and limit the information that can fit in the final line of a joke and thus make recall easier. PMID:21086859

  18. Ascorbate in aqueous humor protects against myeloperoxidase-induced oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, J. T.; Howes, E. L.; English, D.

    1985-01-01

    Chemotactic factors can cause polymorphonuclear leukocytes to release the contents of azurophilic granules, including the enzymes beta-glucuronidase and myeloperoxidase. In the presence of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye, the supernatant from stimulated leukocytes contains beta-glucuronidase, but myeloperoxidase is not detectable. Studies with aqueous humor and partially purified human myeloperoxidase suggest that this phenomenon is not due to a failure of enzyme release. The factor responsible for the inability to detect MPO in the assay system is heat-labile, dialyzable, and reversed by ascorbate oxidase. Comparable assay inhibition is produced by ascorbic acid at a concentration present in either human or rabbit aqueous humor. The ability of aqueous humor to protect against myeloperoxidase-induced oxidation may contribute to several diverse phenomena, including the susceptibility of the eye to Candida infection and a prolonged half-life for several inflammatory mediators in the anterior chamber. PMID:2992283

  19. GLUCOCORTICOID EFFECTS ON NATURAL AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY IN MALLARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult male mallards were treated with dexamethasone (DEX) to observe the impact of glucocorticoids (GC) upon natural killer cell activity, humoral antibody response to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) , and other physiologic parameters. esults showed that DEX caused significant decrease...

  20. The Aggression-Inhibiting Influence of Nonhostile Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Robert A.; Ball, Rodney L.

    1974-01-01

    The present experiment sought to investigate the hypothesis that exposure to nonhostile humor would be highly effective in reducing the level of aggression subsequently evidenced by angry individuals. (Author/RK)

  1. A Computational Model of Linguistic Humor in Puns.

    PubMed

    Kao, Justine T; Levy, Roger; Goodman, Noah D

    2016-07-01

    Humor plays an essential role in human interactions. Precisely what makes something funny, however, remains elusive. While research on natural language understanding has made significant advancements in recent years, there has been little direct integration of humor research with computational models of language understanding. In this paper, we propose two information-theoretic measures-ambiguity and distinctiveness-derived from a simple model of sentence processing. We test these measures on a set of puns and regular sentences and show that they correlate significantly with human judgments of funniness. Moreover, within a set of puns, the distinctiveness measure distinguishes exceptionally funny puns from mediocre ones. Our work is the first, to our knowledge, to integrate a computational model of general language understanding and humor theory to quantitatively predict humor at a fine-grained level. We present it as an example of a framework for applying models of language processing to understand higher level linguistic and cognitive phenomena. PMID:26235596

  2. Establishment and Characterization of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Le; Serra, Stefano; Law, Calvin; Wei, Alice; Stockley, Tracy L; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are increasing in incidence yet the cause of these tumors remains unknown. Familial associations have shed light on the genetic basis of some of these tumors, but sporadic tumors seem to have primarily epigenetic dysregulation. The rarity of cell lines and animal models has been a barrier to studies of treatment modalities. We set out to develop a xenograft model of gastrointestinal NETs. Primary human NETs were collected at the time of surgery under sterile conditions and xenografted into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Tumor growth was measured and when tumors reached 1500 mm(3), they were excised and half was re-xenografted through multiple generations. The other half was bisected; a part was frozen and a part was fixed for morphologic and immunohistochemical characterization as well as molecular validation of fidelity of a successful xenograft. Of 106 human NETs, seven were successfully engrafted of which only one tumor was successfully propagated for eight passages. Two years later, the tumor retains its neuroendocrine features and similarity to the original primary human tumor. It has retained expression of keratin as well as chromogranin A reactivity. The establishment of a NET xenograft provides a model for further study of the biological behavior of these tumors and can be used to examine the in vivo effects of various medical and targeted radiotherapeutic agents on tumor growth. PMID:27067082

  3. A human fetal prostate xenograft model of developmental estrogenization.

    PubMed

    Saffarini, Camelia M; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V; Amin, Ali; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease in older men. Rodent models have demonstrated that an early and later-life exposure to estrogen can lead to cancerous lesions and implicated hormonal dysregulation as an avenue for developing future prostate neoplasia. This study utilizes a human fetal prostate xenograft model to study the role of estrogen in the progression of human disease. Histopathological lesions were assessed in 7-, 30-, 90-, 200-, and 400-day human prostate xenografts. Gene expression for cell cycle, tumor suppressors, and apoptosis-related genes (ie, CDKN1A, CASP9, ESR2, PTEN, and TP53) was performed for 200-day estrogen-treated xenografts. Glandular hyperplasia was observed in xenografts given both an initial and secondary exposure to estradiol in both 200- and 400-day xenografts. Persistent estrogenic effects were verified using immunohistochemical markers for cytokeratin 10, p63, and estrogen receptor α. This model provides data on the histopathological state of the human prostate following estrogenic treatment, which can be utilized in understanding the complicated pathology associated with prostatic disease and early and later-life estrogenic exposures. PMID:25633637

  4. AML cells are differentially sensitive to chemotherapy treatment in a human xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Mark; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Sexton, Christina; Shrestha, Mahesh; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Mulloy, James C

    2013-03-21

    As acute myeloid leukemia (AML) xenograft models improve, the potential for using them to evaluate novel therapeutic strategies becomes more appealing. Currently, there is little information on using standard chemotherapy regimens in AML xenografts. Here we have characterized the immunodeficient mouse response to combined Ara-C (cytarabine) and doxorubicin treatment. We observed significant toxicity associated with doxorubicin that required optimization of the route of injection as well as the maximum-tolerated dose for immunodeficient strains. Mice treated with an optimized 5-day induction protocol showed transient weight loss, short-term reduction of peripheral blood cell and platelet counts, and slight anemia. Considerable cytotoxicity was observed in the bone marrow (BM), with primitive LSK cells having a significant survival advantage relative to more mature cells, consistent with the idea of chemotherapy targeting actively growing cells. Treated leukemic mice demonstrated reduced disease burden and increased survival, demonstrating efficacy. AML cells showed significantly increased sensitivity to doxorubicin-containing therapy compared with murine BM cells. Although early treatment could result in some cures, mice with significant leukemia grafts were not cured by using induction therapy alone. Overall, the data show that this model system is useful for the evaluation of novel chemotherapies in combination with standard induction therapy. PMID:23349390

  5. Longitudinal Associations Between Humor Styles and Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Fox, Claire Louise; Hunter, Simon Christopher; Jones, Siân Emily

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed the concurrent and prospective associations between psychosocial adjustment and four humor styles, two of which are adaptive (affiliative, self-enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive, self-defeating). Participants were 1,234 adolescents (52% female) aged 11-13 years, drawn from six secondary schools in England. Self-reports of psychosocial adjustment (loneliness, depressive symptomatology, and self-esteem) and humor styles were collected at two time points (fall and summer). In cross-lagged panel analyses, self-defeating humor was associated with an increase in both depressive symptoms and loneliness, and with a decrease in self-esteem. In addition, depressive symptoms predicted an increase in the use of self-defeating humor over time, indicating that these may represent a problematic spiral of thoughts and behaviors. Self-esteem was associated with an increase in the use of affiliative humor over the school year but not vice-versa. These results inform our understanding of the ways in which humor is associated with psychosocial adjustment in adolescence. PMID:27547255

  6. Humor appreciation of captionless cartoons in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It seems that the core neural regions and cognitive processes implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) pathophysiology may overlap with those involved in humor appreciation. However, to date, there have been no studies that have explored humor appreciation in OCD. The purpose of the present work was to investigate humor appreciation in a group of patients with OCD. Methods We examined 25 patients with OCD and 25 healthy controls, matched by age, education, and gender. We administered Penn's Humor Appreciation Test (PHAT), a computerized test comprising captionless cartoons by Mordillo. Each set of stimuli consisted of two almost identical drawings, one of which was funny due to the alteration of a detail in the cartoon, whereas the other was not funny. Severity of psychopathology was evaluated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Results No significant effect for group, gender or group × gender interaction was found on the PHAT scores. In OCD patients, humor appreciation was not significantly associated with age of onset, duration of illness, and obsessions, but correlated significantly with compulsions. Conclusions Humor appreciation, based on captionless cartoons in OCD, does not seem to be deficient compared to healthy subjects but may be related to illness characteristics. PMID:22103926

  7. Longitudinal Associations Between Humor Styles and Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Claire Louise; Hunter, Simon Christopher; Jones, Siân Emily

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the concurrent and prospective associations between psychosocial adjustment and four humor styles, two of which are adaptive (affiliative, self-enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive, self-defeating). Participants were 1,234 adolescents (52% female) aged 11-13 years, drawn from six secondary schools in England. Self-reports of psychosocial adjustment (loneliness, depressive symptomatology, and self-esteem) and humor styles were collected at two time points (fall and summer). In cross-lagged panel analyses, self-defeating humor was associated with an increase in both depressive symptoms and loneliness, and with a decrease in self-esteem. In addition, depressive symptoms predicted an increase in the use of self-defeating humor over time, indicating that these may represent a problematic spiral of thoughts and behaviors. Self-esteem was associated with an increase in the use of affiliative humor over the school year but not vice-versa. These results inform our understanding of the ways in which humor is associated with psychosocial adjustment in adolescence. PMID:27547255

  8. Humor styles and personality: A meta-analysis of the relation between humor styles and the Big Five personality traits.

    PubMed

    Mendiburo-Seguel, Andrés; Páez, Darío; Martínez-Sánchez, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    This research summarizes the knowledge generated in social psychology and positive psychology about the relationship between humor styles, personality and wellbeing. Specifically, a meta-analysis was performed with the results of 15 studies on humor styles measured by the Humor Styles Questionnaire (Martin, Puhlik-Doris, Larsen, Gray & Weir, 2003) in correlation with the personality traits measured by the Big Five Personality model (measured with different scales). Following the steps presented by Rosenthal (1991) for meta-analysis in the case of correlational research, we calculated the total mean r as an indicator of effect size. Results show that affiliative humor has a strong and homogeneous relation to neuroticism and extraversion. The homogeneity and heterogeneity found between variables and possible explanations are discussed in the conclusion. PMID:25786353

  9. Eosinophils: important players in humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Berek, C

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils perform numerous tasks. They are involved in inflammatory reactions associated with innate immune defence against parasitic infections and are also involved in pathological processes in response to allergens. Recently, however, it has become clear that eosinophils also play crucial non-inflammatory roles in the generation and maintenance of adaptive immune responses. Eosinophils, being a major source of the plasma cell survival factor APRIL (activation and proliferation-induced ligand), are essential not only for the long-term survival of plasma cells in the bone marrow, but also for the maintenance of these cells in the lamina propria which underlies the gut epithelium. At steady state under non-inflammatory conditions eosinophils are resident cells of the gastrointestinal tract, although only few are present in the major organized lymphoid tissue of the gut - the Peyer's patches (PP). Surprisingly, however, lack of eosinophils abolishes efficient class-switching of B cells to immunoglobulin (Ig)A in the germinal centres of PP. Thus, eosinophils are required to generate and to maintain mucosal IgA plasma cells, and as a consequence their absence leads to a marked reduction of IgA both in serum and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). Eosinophils thus have an essential part in long-term humoral immune protection, as they are crucial for the longevity of antibody-producing plasma cells in the bone marrow and, in addition, for gut immune homeostasis. PMID:26291602

  10. Whole vitreous humor dissection for vitreodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Murali, Karthik; Kashani, Amir H; Humayun, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The authors propose an effective technique to isolate whole, intact vitreous core and cortex from post mortem enucleated porcine eyes. While previous studies have shown the results of such dissections, the detailed steps have not been described, precluding researchers outside the field from replicating their methods. Other studies harvest vitreous either through aspiration, which does not maintain the vitreous structure anatomy, or through partial dissection, which only isolates the vitreous core. The proposed method isolates the whole vitreous body, with the vitreous core and cortex intact, while maintaining vitreous anatomy and structural integrity. In this method, a full thickness scleral flap in an enucleated porcine eye is first created and through this, the choroid tissue can be separated from the sclera. The scleral flap is then expanded and the choroid is completely separated from the sclera. Finally the choroid-retina tissue is peeled off the vitreous to leave an isolated intact vitreous body. The proposed vitreous dissection technique can be used to study physical properties of the vitreous humor. In particular, this method has significance for experimental studies involving drug delivery, vitreo-retinal oxygen transport, and intraocular convection. PMID:26065393

  11. Patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Carina; Costa, Céu; Sousa, Nuno; Amado, Francisco; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-10-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTXs) are said to accurately reflect the heterogeneity of human tumors. In the case of human bladder cancer, few studies are available featuring these models. The best methodology to develop and the real value of the model remain unclear. This systematic review aims to elucidate the best methodology to establish and use PDTXs to study the characteristics and behavior of human bladder tumors. The value and potential application of these models are also addressed. A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify published studies using xenograft models directly established from human bladder cancer samples into mice. A total of 12 studies were included in the final analysis. All studies differed in design; the reported take rate varied between 11% and 80%, with the implantation via dorsal incision and with matrigel obtaining the higher take rate. Advanced stage and high-grade tumors were associated with increased take rate. Xenografts preserved the original tumor identity in the establishment phase and after serial passages. Although some studies suggest a correlation between engraftment success and clinical prognosis, evidence about the association between the response of xenografts to treatment and the clinical response of the tumor of origin is still missing. All methodological approaches resulted in the establishment of tumor xenografts with preservation of the original tumor identity but variable take rate. The time needed to establish the model and propagate xenografts to a number suitable for drug testing is the main limitation of the model, along with the success rate and lack of consistency in the early passages. Comparison between tumor response in mice and clinical outcome remains to be assessed. PMID:25742701

  12. The German Version of the Humor Styles Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties and Overlap With Other Styles of Humor

    PubMed Central

    Ruch, Willibald; Heintz, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The Humor Styles Questionnaire (HSQ; Martin et al., 2003) is one of the most frequently used questionnaires in humor research and has been adapted to several languages. The HSQ measures four humor styles (affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, and self-defeating), which should be adaptive or potentially maladaptive to psychosocial well-being. The present study analyzes the internal consistency, factorial validity, and factorial invariance of the HSQ on the basis of several German-speaking samples combined (total N = 1,101). Separate analyses were conducted for gender (male/female), age groups (16–24, 25–35, >36 years old), and countries (Germany/Switzerland). Internal consistencies were good for the overall sample and the demographic subgroups (.80–.89), with lower values obtained for the aggressive scale (.66–.73). Principal components and confirmatory factor analyses mostly supported the four-factor structure of the HSQ. Weak factorial invariance was found across gender and age groups, while strong factorial invariance was supported across countries. Two subsamples also provided self-ratings on ten styles of humorous conduct (n = 344) and of eight comic styles (n = 285). The four HSQ scales showed small to large correlations to the styles of humorous conduct (-.54 to .65) and small to medium correlations to the comic styles (-.27 to .42). The HSQ shared on average 27.5–35.0% of the variance with the styles of humorous conduct and 13.0–15.0% of the variance with the comic styles. Thus–despite similar labels–these styles of humorous conduct and comic styles differed from the HSQ humor styles. PMID:27547259

  13. Vitreous humor rheology after Nd:YAG laser photo disruption.

    PubMed

    Abdelkawi, Salwa A; Abdel-Salam, Ahmed M; Ghoniem, Dina F; Ghaly, Sally K

    2014-03-01

    This work aimed to consider the hazardous side effect of eye floaters treatment with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser on the protein and viscoelastic properties of the vitreous humor, and evaluate the protective role of vitamin C against laser photo disruption. Five groups of New Zealand rabbits were divided as follows: control group for (n = 3) without any treatment, the second group (n = 9) treated with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser energy of 5 mJ × 100 pulse delivered to the anterior, middle, and posterior vitreous, respectively (n = 3 for each). The third group (n = 9) received a daily dose of 25 mg/kg body weight vitamin C for 2 weeks, and then treated with laser as the previous group. The fourth group (n = 9) treated with 10 mJ 9 50 pulse delivered to the anterior, middle, and posterior vitreous, respectively (n = 3 rabbits each). The fifth group (n = 9) received a daily dose of 25 mg/kg body weight vitamin C for 2 weeks, and then treated with laser as the previous group. After 2 weeks of laser treatment, the protein content, refractive index (RI), and the rheological properties of vitreous humor, such as consistency, shear stress, and viscosity, were determined. The results showed that, the anterior vitreous group exposed to of 5 mJ × 100 pulse and/or supplemented with vitamin C, showed no obvious change. Furthermore, all other treated groups especially for mid-vitreous and posterior vitreous humor showed increase in the protein content, RI and the viscosity of vitreous humor. The flow index remained below unity indicating the non-Newtonian behavior of the vitreous humor. Application of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser should be restricted to the anterior vitreous humor to prevent the deleterious effect of laser on the gel state of the vitreous humor. PMID:23797611

  14. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hines, William C; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; Chu, Berbie; Stanford-Moore, Gaelen; Sampayo, Rocío; Garbe, James C; Stampfer, Martha; Borowsky, Alexander D; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER(+) adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent with "luminal B" intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44(High) subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44(Low) cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER(+) cancers. This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development. PMID:26661596

  15. Reliable Establishment of Human Sarcoma Xenografts in the Nude Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tinkey, Peggy T.; Milas, Mira

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. The ability to establish consistent human tumor xenografts in experimental animals is a crucial part of preclinical investigations.The goal of this study was to develop a method of establishing a human tumor xenograft in the leg of a nude rat for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatments of human extremity sarcoma. Methods and results. Initial attempts to produce sarcoma nodules by subcutaneous injection of a human leiomyosarcoma tumor cell suspension (SKLMS-1) resulted in tumor nodule formation in only four of 10 sites (40%).The xenograft method was modified to include younger nude rats of a different source and substrain (HSD:rnu/rnu, 5–9 weeks old), treated with 500 cGy whole-body irradiation, and the transplantation of tumor cells or small tumor fragments which had been embedded in Matrigel.These changes improved the tumor take rate per site to 52/52 (100%).Tumor nodules demonstrated rapid and progressive growth and histological features consistent with the original human sarcoma. Discussion. Successful human leiomyosarcoma establishment in these nude rats permits the investigation of sarcoma biology and treatment with surgical procedures for which a mouse model would be inadequate. In this study we identified modifications in technique which enhanced the xenografting of a leiomyosarcoma cell line in nude rats; these techniques may increase tumor take rates for other tumor types as well. PMID:18521275

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  17. Laugh and learn: humor as a teaching strategy in occupational therapy education.

    PubMed

    Southam, Marti; Schwartz, Kathleen Barker

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY Humor use in education has been studied in fields such as psychology and nursing. Research has demonstrated that effective educational humor needs to be integrated into the topic and used in moderation. Used appropriately, humor can gain attention, facilitate creative thinking and memory, motivate students to attend class, and promote learning outcomes. No studies were located in the occupational therapy literature that specifically related to humor as an aspect of teaching. The purpose of this article is to explore the merits of humor as an educational tool and to give examples of ways that occupational therapy faculty and clinical instructors can employ humor. PMID:23944666

  18. Does Humor Explain Why Relationally Aggressive Adolescents Are Popular?

    PubMed Central

    Bowker, Julie C.; Etkin, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    The association between relational aggression and popularity during early adolescence is well established. Yet, little is known about why, exactly, relationally aggressive young adolescents are able to achieve and maintain high popular status among peers. The present study investigated the mediating role of humor in the association between relational aggression and popularity during early adolescence. Also considered was whether the association between relational aggression and humor varies according to adolescents’ gender and their friends’ levels of relational aggression. Participants were 265 sixth-grade students (48% female; 41% racial/ethnic minority; Mage = 12.04 years) who completed peer nomination and friendship measures in their classrooms at two time points (Wave 1: February; Wave 2: May). The results indicated that Wave 1 relational aggression was related to Wave 1 and 2 popularity indirectly through Wave 1 humor, after accounting for the effects of Wave 1 physical aggression, ethnicity, and gender. Additional analyses showed that relational aggression and humor were related significantly only for boys and for young adolescents with highly relationally aggressive friends. The results support the need for further research on humor and aggression during early adolescence and other mechanisms by which relationally aggressive youth achieve high popular status. PMID:24136377

  19. Does humor explain why relationally aggressive adolescents are popular?

    PubMed

    Bowker, Julie C; Etkin, Rebecca G

    2014-08-01

    The association between relational aggression and popularity during early adolescence is well established. Yet, little is known about why, exactly, relationally aggressive young adolescents are able to achieve and maintain high popular status among peers. The present study investigated the mediating role of humor in the association between relational aggression and popularity during early adolescence. Also considered was whether the association between relational aggression and humor varies according to adolescents' gender and their friends' levels of relational aggression. Participants were 265 sixth-grade students (48% female; 41% racial/ethnic minority; M age = 12.04 years) who completed peer nomination and friendship measures in their classrooms at two time points (Wave 1: February; Wave 2: May). The results indicated that Wave 1 relational aggression was related to Wave 1 and 2 popularity indirectly through Wave 1 humor, after accounting for the effects of Wave 1 physical aggression, ethnicity, and gender. Additional analyses showed that relational aggression and humor were related significantly only for boys and for young adolescents with highly relationally aggressive friends. The results support the need for further research on humor and aggression during early adolescence and other mechanisms by which relationally aggressive youth achieve high popular status. PMID:24136377

  20. Tolerance to the humoral and hemodynamic effects of caffeine in man.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, D; Wade, D; Workman, R; Woosley, R L; Oates, J A

    1981-01-01

    Acute caffeine in subjects who do not normally ingest methylxanthines leads to increases in blood pressure, heart rate, plasma epinephrine, plasma norepinephrine, plasma renin activity, and urinary catecholamines. Using a double-blind design, the effects of chronic caffeine administration on these same variables were assessed. Near complete tolerance, in terms of both humoral and hemodynamic variables, developed over the first 1-4 d of caffeine. No long-term effects of caffeine on blood pressure, heart rate, plasma renin activity, plasma catecholamines, or urinary catecholamines could be demonstrated. Discontinuation of caffeine ingestion after 7 d of administration did not result in a detectable withdrawal phenomenon relating to any of the variables assessed. PMID:7009653

  1. A Sensitive IHC Method for Monitoring Autophagy-Specific Markers in Human Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    He, Helen; Yang, Yu; Xiang, Zhongmin; Yu, Lunyin; Chouitar, Jouhara; Yu, Jie; D'Amore, Natalie Roy; Li, Ping; Li, Zhi; Bowman, Douglas; Theisen, Matthew; Brownell, James E.; Tirrell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Use of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to detect autophagy biomarkers in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) xenograft tissue. Materials and Methods. Autophagy marker regulation was studied in xenograft tissues using Amp HQ IHC and standard IHC methods. Results. The data demonstrate the feasibility of using high sensitivity TSA IHC assays to measure low abundant autophagy markers in FFPE xenograft tissue. PMID:27247826

  2. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune tubulointerstitial nephritis in Brown-Norway rats by (15S)-15-methyl prostaglandin E1. Analysis of the effect of prostaglandin E1 on the induction of the humoral immune response and the elicitation of humorally mediated inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Ulich, T. R.; Ni, R. X.

    1986-01-01

    Brown-Norway (BN) rats develop tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) after immunization with bovine tubular basement membrane (TBM) and adjuvants. Daily subcutaneous injections (either on Days 0-7 or Days 0-14) of (15S)-15-methyl prostaglandin E1 (M-PGE1) at a dose of 1 mg/kg/day markedly inhibited or completely abrogated the development of both the acute polymorphonuclear (Day 10) and the subsequent mononuclear (Day 14) inflammatory phases of BN rat TIN. Circulating anti-TBM antibody in Days 0-7 M-PGE1-treated rats was moderately diminished on Day 8 after immunization but not on Day 14. Circulating anti-TBM antibody in Days 0-14 M-PGE1-treated rats was only slightly diminished on Day 14. In experiments to test the effect of M-PGE1 on the elicitation phase of humorally mediated inflammation, M-PGE1 inhibited the acute inflammatory response observed 6 hours after intradermal injection of particulate TBM into TBM-sensitized BN rats. The inflammation in these skin tests was demonstrated by passive transfer experiments to be humorally mediated. The inhibition of acute humorally mediated intradermal inflammation was not attributable to neutropenia, because M-PGE1 caused a significant neutrophilia as demonstrated by peripheral blood smears. Although the inhibition of TIN in Days 0-14 M-PGE1-treated rats may have been due, in part, to dysfunction of the elicitation phase of humorally mediated inflammation, the inhibition of TIN in Days 0-7 M-PGE1-treated rats was more likely secondary to the diminished induction of either humoral or cellular immunity. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3740216

  3. Leptospiral proteins recognized during the humoral immune response to leptospirosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, H; Croda, J; Flannery, B; Mazel, M; Matsunaga, J; Galvão Reis, M; Levett, P N; Ko, A I; Haake, D A

    2001-08-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis caused by pathogenic spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. An understanding of leptospiral protein expression regulation is needed to develop new immunoprotective and serodiagnostic strategies. We used the humoral immune response during human leptospirosis as a reporter of protein antigens expressed during infection. Qualitative and quantitative immunoblot analysis was performed using sera from 105 patients from Brazil and Barbados. Sera from patients with other diseases and healthy individuals were evaluated as controls. Seven proteins, p76, p62, p48, p45, p41, p37, and p32, were identified as targets of the humoral response during natural infection. In both acute and convalescent phases of illness, antibodies to lipopolysaccharide were predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) while antibodies to proteins were exclusively IgG. Anti-p32 reactivity had the greatest sensitivity and specificity: positive reactions were observed in 37 and 84% of acute- and convalescent-phase sera, respectively, while only 5% of community control individuals demonstrated positive reactions. Six immunodominant antigens were expressed by all pathogenic leptospiral strains tested; only p37 was inconsistently expressed. Two-dimensional immunoblots identified four of the seven infection-associated antigens as being previously characterized proteins: LipL32 (the major outer membrane lipoprotein), LipL41 (a surface-exposed outer membrane lipoprotein), and heat shock proteins GroEL and DnaK. Fractionation studies demonstrated LipL32 and LipL41 reactivity in the outer membrane fraction and GroEL and DnaK in the cytoplasmic fraction, while p37 appeared to be a soluble periplasmic protein. Most of the other immunodominant proteins, including p48 and p45, were localized to the inner membrane. These findings indicate that leptospiral proteins recognized during natural infection are potentially useful for serodiagnosis and may serve as targets for vaccine

  4. Leptospiral Proteins Recognized during the Humoral Immune Response to Leptospirosis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Hygia; Croda, Júlio; Flannery, Brendan; Mazel, Mary; Matsunaga, James; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Levett, Paul N.; Ko, Albert I.; Haake, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis caused by pathogenic spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. An understanding of leptospiral protein expression regulation is needed to develop new immunoprotective and serodiagnostic strategies. We used the humoral immune response during human leptospirosis as a reporter of protein antigens expressed during infection. Qualitative and quantitative immunoblot analysis was performed using sera from 105 patients from Brazil and Barbados. Sera from patients with other diseases and healthy individuals were evaluated as controls. Seven proteins, p76, p62, p48, p45, p41, p37, and p32, were identified as targets of the humoral response during natural infection. In both acute and convalescent phases of illness, antibodies to lipopolysaccharide were predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) while antibodies to proteins were exclusively IgG. Anti-p32 reactivity had the greatest sensitivity and specificity: positive reactions were observed in 37 and 84% of acute- and convalescent-phase sera, respectively, while only 5% of community control individuals demonstrated positive reactions. Six immunodominant antigens were expressed by all pathogenic leptospiral strains tested; only p37 was inconsistently expressed. Two-dimensional immunoblots identified four of the seven infection-associated antigens as being previously characterized proteins: LipL32 (the major outer membrane lipoprotein), LipL41 (a surface-exposed outer membrane lipoprotein), and heat shock proteins GroEL and DnaK. Fractionation studies demonstrated LipL32 and LipL41 reactivity in the outer membrane fraction and GroEL and DnaK in the cytoplasmic fraction, while p37 appeared to be a soluble periplasmic protein. Most of the other immunodominant proteins, including p48 and p45, were localized to the inner membrane. These findings indicate that leptospiral proteins recognized during natural infection are potentially useful for serodiagnosis and may serve as targets for vaccine

  5. Humor theories and the physiological benefits of laughter.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Julia; Eisenbraun, Amy Janel

    2009-01-01

    There are 3 main theories used to explain the functions of humor: (1) the relief theory, (2) the incongruity theory, and (3) the superiority theory. While these theories focus on the specific role that humor plays for people in situations such as dealing with misfortune, making sense of rule violations, and bonding with others, we propose that underlying each of these theories are the physiological benefits of laughter. We draw on findings from empirical studies on laughter to demonstrate that these physiological benefits occur regardless of the theory that is used to explain the humor function. Findings from these studies have important implications for nurse practitioners working in hospice settings, long-term care facilities, nursing homes, and hospitals. PMID:19901609

  6. The Use of Humor in Serious Mental Illness: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gelkopf, Marc

    2011-01-01

    There is now a relatively good understanding of the broad range of direct and indirect effects of humor and laughter on perceptions, attitudes, judgments and emotions, which can potentially benefit the physical and psychological state. This article presents a review and discussion of the use of humor and laughter in treating people with serious mental illness, distinguishing between clinical papers on individual and group psychotherapy, and empirical research reports describing humor and laughter interventions. In spite of the exponential growth of the field over the last 30 years, I conclude that empirical studies are still lacking, the studies that do exist have major methodological shortcomings, and the field is in dire need of further investigation. PMID:19687190

  7. Human aqueous humor proteome in cataract, glaucoma, and pseudoexfoliation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kliuchnikova, Anna A; Samokhina, Nadezhda I; Ilina, Irina Y; Karpov, Dmitry S; Pyatnitskiy, Mikhail A; Kuznetsova, Ksenia G; Toropygin, Ilya Y; Kochergin, Sergey A; Alekseev, Igor B; Zgoda, Victor G; Archakov, Alexander I; Moshkovskii, Sergei A

    2016-07-01

    Twenty-nine human aqueous humor samples from patients with eye diseases such as cataract and glaucoma with and without pseudoexfoliation syndrome were characterized by LC-high resolution MS analysis. In total, 269 protein groups were identified with 1% false discovery rate including 32 groups that were not reported previously for this biological fluid. Since the samples were analyzed individually, but not pooled, 36 proteins were identified in all samples, comprising the constitutive proteome of the fluid. The most dominant molecular function of aqueous humor proteins as determined by GO analysis is endopeptidase inhibitor activity. Label-free protein quantification showed no significant difference between glaucoma and cataract aqueous humor proteomes. At the same time, we found decrease in the level of apolipoprotein D as a marker of the pseudoexfoliation syndrome. The data are available from ProteomeXchange repository (PXD002623). PMID:27193151

  8. Glucose determination in human aqueous humor with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L.; Pelletier, Christine C.; Borchert, Mark

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that spectroscopic analysis of the aqueous humor of the eye could be used to indirectly predict blood glucose levels in diabetics noninvasively. We have been investigating this potential using Raman spectroscopy in combination with partial least squares (PLS) analysis. We have determined that glucose at clinically relevant concentrations can be accurately predicted in human aqueous humor in vitro using a PLS model based on artificial aqueous humor. We have further determined that with proper instrument design, the light energy necessary to achieve clinically acceptable prediction of glucose does not damage the retinas of rabbits and can be delivered at powers below internationally acceptable safety limits. Herein we summarize our current results and address our strategies to improve instrument design. 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  9. A novel xenograft model to study the role of TSLP-induced CRLF2 signals in normal and malignant human B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Francis, Olivia L; Milford, Terry-Ann M; Martinez, Shannalee R; Baez, Ineavely; Coats, Jacqueline S; Mayagoitia, Karina; Concepcion, Katherine R; Ginelli, Elizabeth; Beldiman, Cornelia; Benitez, Abigail; Weldon, Abby J; Arogyaswamy, Keshav; Shiraz, Parveen; Fisher, Ross; Morris, Christopher L; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Filippov, Valeri; Van Handel, Ben; Ge, Zheng; Song, Chunhua; Dovat, Sinisa; Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Payne, Kimberly J

    2016-04-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) stimulates in-vitro proliferation of human fetal B-cell precursors. However, its in-vivo role during normal human B lymphopoiesis is unknown. Genetic alterations that cause overexpression of its receptor component, cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2), lead to high-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia implicating this signaling pathway in leukemogenesis. We show that mouse thymic stromal lymphopoietin does not stimulate the downstream pathways (JAK/STAT5 and PI3K/AKT/mTOR) activated by the human cytokine in primary high-risk leukemia with overexpression of the receptor component. Thus, the utility of classic patient-derived xenografts for in-vivo studies of this pathway is limited. We engineered xenograft mice to produce human thymic stromal lymphopoietin (+T mice) by injection with stromal cells transduced to express the cytokine. Control (-T) mice were produced using stroma transduced with control vector. Normal levels of human thymic stromal lymphopoietin were achieved in sera of +T mice, but were undetectable in -T mice. Patient-derived xenografts generated from +T as compared to -T mice showed a 3-6-fold increase in normal human B-cell precursors that was maintained through later stages of B-cell development. Gene expression profiles in high-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia expanded in +T mice indicate increased mTOR pathway activation and are more similar to the original patient sample than those from -T mice. +T/-T xenografts provide a novel pre-clinical model for understanding this pathway in B lymphopoiesis and identifying treatments for high-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with overexpression of cytokine-like factor receptor 2. PMID:26611474

  10. [Neuropsychology of humor: an introduction Part 1. Psychological data].

    PubMed

    Derouesné, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Humor is, from a psychological point of view, a complex process involving cognitive, affective, interspersonal and social elements in a interpersonal context. Its cognitive core is based on the perception of incongruity between two related inconsistent or contradictory mental representations. The total or partial resolution of incongruity in a playful frame is associated with a specific positive emotion, which characteristics and intensity are determined by the structure of the humoristic stimulus more than its content, and the personal and social contexts. Main theories of humor are reviewed as well as its development, its cognitive and affective correlates, and the influence of genre, age and personality. PMID:27005341

  11. Age effects on B cells and humoral immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2010-01-01

    Both humoral and cellular immune responses are impaired in aged individuals, leading to decreased vaccine responses. Although T cell defects occur, defects in B cells play a significant role in age-related humoral immune changes. The ability to undergo class switch recombination (CSR), the enzyme for CSR, AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase) and the transcription factor E47 are all decreased in aged stimulated B cells. We here present an overview of age-related changes in human B cell markers and functions, and also discuss some controversies in the field of B cell aging. PMID:20728581

  12. Humor in print health advertisements: enhanced attention, privileged recognition, and persuasiveness of preventive messages.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Nathalie; Brigaud, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the effect of humor in one particular type of print advertisement: the preventive health ads for three topics (alcohol, tobacco, obesity). Previous research using commercial ads demonstrated that individuals' attention is spontaneously attracted by humor, leading to a memory advantage for humorous information over nonhumorous information. Two experiments investigated whether the positive effect of humor can occur with preventive health ads. In Experiment 1, participants observed humorous and nonhumorous health ads while their viewing times were recorded. In Experiment 2, to compare humorous and nonhumorous ads, the memory of health messages was assessed through a recognition task and a convincing score was collected. The results confirmed that, compared to nonhumorous health ads, those using humor received prolonged attention, were judged more convincing, and their messages were better recognized. Overall, these findings suggest that humor can be of use in preventive health communication. PMID:24160572

  13. Using Humor in Treatment of Substance Use Disorders: Worthy of Further Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Canha, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the literature, humor has demonstrated positive effects on memory and learning, as well as physiological and psychological well being. Research has described improvements in communication and trust through the use of humor in the nurse-patient relationship. The utilization of humor with certain populations, including those with anxiety disorders, cancer patients and mood disorders has also been widely described in the literature but little research has been conducted with humor use in patients’ recovery from substance use disorders. This population might benefit from the thoughtful applications of humor to promote laughter and mirth as well as learning recovery principles. A review of the humor theories, theoretical processes and humor styles are discussed for their use in individuals with substance use disorders, in particularly for early recovery engagement in 12 step programs and other recover support social networks. The application of humor in efforts to support recovery with substance use disorder patients is worth investigating further. PMID:27347254

  14. Using Humor in Treatment of Substance Use Disorders: Worthy of Further Investigation.

    PubMed

    Canha, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the literature, humor has demonstrated positive effects on memory and learning, as well as physiological and psychological well being. Research has described improvements in communication and trust through the use of humor in the nurse-patient relationship. The utilization of humor with certain populations, including those with anxiety disorders, cancer patients and mood disorders has also been widely described in the literature but little research has been conducted with humor use in patients' recovery from substance use disorders. This population might benefit from the thoughtful applications of humor to promote laughter and mirth as well as learning recovery principles. A review of the humor theories, theoretical processes and humor styles are discussed for their use in individuals with substance use disorders, in particularly for early recovery engagement in 12 step programs and other recover support social networks. The application of humor in efforts to support recovery with substance use disorder patients is worth investigating further. PMID:27347254

  15. Helping At-Risk College Students Help Themselves through Humor: A Reading and Writing Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Lois E.

    1994-01-01

    Outlines the many benefits of humor. Describes a reading and writing strategy to help at-risk college students reduce stress, appreciate the humor in many areas of college life, and use reading and writing about humorous college situations as a tool for developing critical thinking. Describes an application of the strategy. (SR)

  16. The Association between Humor and Depression in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients and High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freiheit, Stacy R.; Overholser, James C.; Lehnert, Kim L.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined relationship between a sense of humor and symptoms of depression among adolescents. Findings on measures of humor and depression for 140 adolescents revealed that a sense of humor can be reliably measured and may be inversely related to symptoms of depression. (LBT)

  17. Humor in Pedagogy: How Ha-Ha Can Lead to Aha!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, R. L.

    2006-01-01

    Several studies have examined the pedagogical implications and cautions concerning the use of humor in teaching. Humor has been associated with a host of positive physiological and psychological effects. Researchers have identified that educators who use humor in their instruction are more positively rated by their peers and their students; others…

  18. The Relationship between Instructor Humor Orientation and Students' Report on Second Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziyaeemehr, Ali; Kumar, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Humor is an integral component of any language and therefore has an impact on the way languages are acquired/learned. Numerous studies have investigated the role of instructor humor in teaching/learning processes; however, there is little empirical research on the relationship between instructor humor and learning of a second language. This paper…

  19. Those who laugh are defenseless: how humor breaks resistance to influence.

    PubMed

    Strick, Madelijn; Holland, Rob W; van Baaren, Rick B; van Knippenberg, Ad

    2012-06-01

    Three experiments illustrate that humor in advertisements prevents the development of negative brand associations due to resistance. Previous research on humor in advertising suggested that humor can counter negative responses during ad processing, but less is known about the effect of humor on the development of negative brand associations in memory. Brand associations are important because there is often a time delay between ad exposure and brand decisions. We separately manipulated two typical aspects of humor processing, that is, distraction and positive affect, and examined their effects on the development of respectively negative and positive brand associations. All experiments were conducted with university students as participants. The results showed that resistance causes negative brand associations (Experiments 1 and 2), and humor prevents the development of these negative brand associations more than nondistracting positive stimuli and neutral stimuli (Experiment 2 and 3). The prevention of negative brand associations was caused by the distractive properties of humor. Irrespective of resistance, the positive affect engendered by humor enhanced positive brand associations. Experiment 3 showed that distraction and positive affect in humor uniquely contribute to brand preference. Together, these results illustrate that the effect of humor on resistance follows a two-step process: humor forestalls the development of negative brand associations because of its distractive properties (cognitive mechanism), and engenders positive brand associations because of its positive emotional outcomes (affective mechanism). These effects of humor on brand associations jointly promote brand preference. PMID:22564085

  20. Was That Levity or Livor Mortis? Crime Scene Investigators' Perspectives on Humor and Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivona, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Humor is common and purposeful in most work settings. Although researchers have examined humor and joking behavior in various work settings, minimal research has been done on humor applications in the field of crime scene investigation. The crime scene investigator encounters death, trauma, and tragedy in a more intimate manner than any other…

  1. Learning to Laugh at Ourselves: Humor, Self-Transcendence, and the Cultivation of Moral Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2010-01-01

    In this essay Mordechai Gordon begins to address the neglect of humor among philosophers of education by focusing on some interesting connections between humor, self-transcendence, and the development of moral virtues. More specifically, he explores the kind of humor that makes fun of oneself and how it can affect educational encounters. Gordon…

  2. The Use of Humor as a Teaching Strategy in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukehart, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine the use of humor as a teaching strategy among a sample of nurse educators employed by community colleges and universities in Northern and Central California nursing programs. The study also identified the types of humor used, how humor is used in the classroom, and nurse educators' perceptions of…

  3. Use and Non-Use of Humor in Academic ESL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziyaeemehr, Ali; Kumar, Vijay; Abdullah, Mohd S. Faiz

    2011-01-01

    A substantial body of research emphasizes the importance of humor in teaching/learning processes; however, research on the reasons for non-use of humor in academic contexts has enjoyed scant attention. Addressing this gap, this study examines the reasons for instructors' humor avoidance taking into account student perceived benefits of using humor…

  4. Humor in Literature about Children with Disability: What Are We Seeing in Literature?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrail, Ewa; Rieger, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    This article explores instances of humor in literature as it relates to children with disabilities and offers ways to help children and adolescents build an authentic understanding of disability and disability humor. The prevalent message in the books reviewed is that children with disability not only appreciate humor but also can produce various…

  5. Establishment and characterization of five new human renal tumor xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Beniers, A. J.; Peelen, W. P.; Schaafsma, H. E.; Beck, J. L.; Ramaekers, F. C.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Ten different human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) primary tumors were xenografted into BALB/c nu/nu mice. Five of the tumors (NU-10, NU-12, NU-20, NU-22, and NU-28) gave rise to serially transplantable tumors that were further characterized. Histology, DNA index, immunohistochemical characteristics, growth rate, and clonogenic potential were followed from primary tumor to the 5th to 15th transplant passage. Only one of the tumors (NU-20) showed remarkable instability for all tested parameters in the first five transplant passages. Histology of the other tumors was essentially the same to the histology of the primary tumors, although differences between human and host-derived vessels were apparent. DNA index values in general showed a trend toward an aneuploid character of the xenografts. Immunohistochemical analyses showed a loss of intensity of staining but a concomitant rise in the fraction of positively staining cells with antibodies against cytokeratins, vimentin, tumor-associated antigens, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigens. Human leukocyte antigen class II antigen expression showed a loss of intensity as well as a decrease in the fraction of positive cells. Tumor doubling time was lowest in transplant passage number 0, and stable growth was noticed in transplant passages 1 through 4. Clonogenic potential of four of the lines was higher for the xenografts than for the primary tumors. The authors conclude that, on xenografting, histologic characteristics of the primary tumor are essentially conserved. Progression in the first transplant passages, however, results in tumors with a more aggressive character. Images Figure 1 PMID:1739137

  6. Moral sensibilities and moral standing: Caplan on xenograft "donors".

    PubMed

    Nelson, James Lindemann

    1993-07-01

    [I]nterest in animals as a source of organs and tissues for human beings remains strong. New developments in immunosuppression technology promise to lower the technical barriers to a routine use of nonhumans as organ donors, and the image of colonies of animals kept at the ready for supplying the growing human need for new organs seems a much more plausible scenario now than it did when broached by transplantation specialists in the Sixties. As Arthur Caplan has powerfully argued, the prospects that other sources of organs may resolve the supply problem are grim.... In the face of these "pro-xenograft" pressures, it becomes all the more signficant to assess arguments against the practice that rest on considerations of the moral status of the nonhumans from whom the organs are taken. To be sure, xenograft faces other moral difficulties -- for example, concerns about the quality of informed consent obtained for recipients, worries about the possibility that xenografting will serve as a vector by which new and possibly virulent viruses become established in humans, and problems about whether such spending is equitable in the light of other unresolved human needs. Yet whether we morally wrong animals in taking their organs and their lives remains a decidedly central issue here, one that cannot be finessed away by developing better informed consent procedures, better anti-viral strategies, or by situating transplantation medicine in a just health care system. PMID:11651606

  7. Humor in Father-Daughter Immigration Narratives of Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This article draws from an ethnography on Mexican immigrant fathers and their children to examine humor in immigration narratives as acts of resistance. The analysis focuses on the devices employed by a father and daughter during their everyday talk and co-narration of an incident with police officers. Findings illustrate how the form and content…

  8. Humoral response to rabies vaccines in pet dogs.

    PubMed

    Singh, V K; Tiwari, K N; Mohan, Bhardwaj; Mala, Chabbra; Rana, U V S; Ichhpujani, R L

    2007-06-01

    Humoral immune response was studied in dogs vaccinated with different tissue culture vaccines commonly used for immunization of dogs in India. The results revealed that after single dose of vaccination only 56% dogs developed protective titer (> or = 1:8). The response of the three vaccines used in the study was not similar, highlighting the need to maintain post marketing surveillance. PMID:18338690

  9. Mexican Proverbs: The Philosophy, Wisdom and Humor of a People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballesteros, Octavio A.

    Careful reading of proverbs can aid an individual to develop self-awareness by providing insights into what one cultural group considers desirable human behavior. Respect for the elderly can be taught to the young through the study of proverbs. Through their proverbs, the Mexicans reveal their friendliness, love of animals, sense of humor, and…

  10. Humorous Language Play in a Thai EFL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Ross

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between creativity, play, and language learning has been of increasing interest over the past decade, but the role of humour itself in SLL remains significantly under-explored. The present study examines humorous language play initiated by a bilingual EFL teacher and taken up by his post-beginner students in a Thai university…

  11. Does CMC Promote Language Play? Exploring Humor in Two Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandergriff, Ilona; Fuchs, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    In view of the growing body of research on humor and language play in computer-mediated communication (CMC) which--more than any other medium--has been associated with goofing off, joking, and other nonserious communication, this paper compares spontaneous foreign language play (L2 play) in text-only synchronous computer-mediated versus…

  12. Laugh and Learn: Using Humor to Teach Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggieri, Colleen A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how one high school English teacher used humor when teaching Shakespearean tragedy. Describes how this improved students' attitudes and appreciation of the tragedies, helped them appreciate literature devices in the plays, and helped them review prior to their exam. (SR)

  13. Temperament and Communicative Competence as Predictors of Young Children's Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, David K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Explores the relations between temperament, communicative competence, and humor expression among four- and five-year-old nursery school children. Shows that ratings of communicative competence and various dimensions of temperament account for a significant proportion of the variance in the reported frequency of children's laughter and verbal and…

  14. Using Humorous Sitcom Clips in Teaching Federal Income Taxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, H. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This article shares the motivation, process, and outcomes of using humorous scenes from television comedies to teach the real world of tax practice. The article advances the literature by reviewing the use of video clips in a previously unexplored discipline, discussing the process of identifying and selecting appropriate clips, and introducing…

  15. Humor Preference as a Function of Preoedipal Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juni, Samuel

    1982-01-01

    Psychoanalytic theory predicts that humor preference is a derivative of unresolved childhood conflicts. Analyzed students' (N=104) Rorschach protocols to yield measures of preoedipal fixation. Students ranked jokes from most to least funny. Results showed that the ranking of jokes was a function of the fixation measures for women only. (Author/RC)

  16. Brock Cole: The Good, the Bad, and the Humorously Ironic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Wendy J.

    1999-01-01

    Looks at three books for young adults by Brock Cole: "The Goats" (1987), "Celine" (1989), and "The Facts Speak for Themselves" (1997). Discusses common elements in these stories: young people who rise to the occasion; adults who often do not; characters readers can empathize with; an honest treatment of sexuality; and a wonderful use of humor. (SR)

  17. Humor and the Emeritus Professor: An Interview with Gene Roth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivona, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a compilation of several conversations with Dr. Gene Roth, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at Northern Illinois University. Dr. Roth is past President of the Academy of Human Resource Development, and although he is well known for his efforts in bringing humor into the field of HRD, he is not the same Gene Roth that played…

  18. Humor as a Presentational Device in Broadcast Public Service Announcements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, D. J.

    On a daily basis, American television and radio audiences are subjected to a stream of broadcast Public Service Announcements (PSAs), each promoting "some kind of social or economic action deemed beneficial" (Stridsberg, 1977). Often, these announcements employ humor as a presentational device to help stimulate the behavioral change needed to…

  19. Oxidative Stress Levels in Aqueous Humor from High Myopic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Bi; Kim, Ha Kyoung; Hyon, Joon Young; Wee, Won Ryang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare oxidative stress status in the aqueous humor of highly myopic eyes and control eyes. Methods Aqueous humor samples were collected from 15 highly myopic eyes (high myopia group) and 23 cataractous eyes (control group) during cataract surgery. Central corneal thickness, corneal endothelial cell density, hexagonality of corneal endothelial cells, and cell area of corneal endothelial cells were measured using specular microscopy. Axial length was measured using ultrasound biometry. 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and malondialdehyde levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results 8-OHdG level was lower in the aqueous humor of myopic patients than in that of control group (p = 0.014) and was positively correlated with central corneal thickness and negatively correlated with axial length (r = 0.511, p = 0.02; r = -0.382, p < 0.001). There was no correlation between 8-OHdG level and corneal endothelial cell density, hexagonality, or cell area. Malondialdehyde level did not show any correlation with any parameters evaluated. Conclusions 8-OHdG might be a sensitive biomarker for evaluating oxidative stress status in the eye. Oxidative stress level was lower in the aqueous humor of highly myopic eyes compared to that in control eyes, which indicates lower metabolic activity in these eyes. PMID:27247516

  20. Tracking Humoral Responses Using Self Assembling Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Anderson, Karen S.; Raphael, Jacob v.; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Sibani, Sahar; Montor, Wagner R.; Pacek, Marcin; Wong, Jessica; Eljanne, Mariam; Sanda, Martin G.; Hu, Yanhui; Logvinenko, Tanya; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    The humoral immune response is a highly specific and adaptive sensor for changes in the body's protein milieu, which responds to novel structures of both foreign and self antigens. Although immunoglobulins represent a major component of human serum and are vital to survival, little is known about the response specificity and determinants that govern the human immunome. Historically, antigen-specific humoral immunity has been investigated using individually-produced and purified target proteins, a labor-intensive process that has limited the number of antigens that have been studied. Here, we present the development of methods for applying self-assembling protein microarrays and a related method for producing 96-well formatted macroarrays for monitoring the humoral response at the proteome scale. Using plasmids encoding full-length cDNAs for over 850 human proteins and 1700 pathogen proteins, we demonstrate that these microarrays are highly sensitive, specific, reproducible, and can simultaneously measure immunity to thousands of proteins without a priori protein purification. Using this approach, we demonstrate the detection of humoral immunity to known and novel self-antigens, cancer antigens, autoimmune antigens, as well as pathogen-derived antigens. This represents a powerful and versatile tool for monitoring the immunome in health and disease. PMID:21136799

  1. Laughing matters: Infant humor in the context of parental affect.

    PubMed

    Mireault, Gina C; Crockenberg, Susan C; Sparrow, John E; Cousineau, Kassandra; Pettinato, Christine; Woodard, Kelly

    2015-08-01

    Smiling and laughing appear very early during the first year of life, but little is known about how infants come to appraise a stimulus as humorous. This short-term longitudinal study explored infant humor perception from 5 to 7 months of age as a function of parental affect during an absurd event. Using a within-participants design, parents alternated smiling/laughing with emotional neutrality while acting absurdly toward their infants. Group comparisons showed that infants (N = 37) at all ages smiled at the event regardless of parental affect but did so significantly longer at 5 and 6 months, and more often and sooner at 7 months, when parents provided humor cues. Similarly, sequential analyses revealed that after gazing at the event, 7-month-olds were more likely to smile at it only when parents provided humor cues and were comparatively more likely to look away when parents were neutral. Thus, starting at 5 months of age, parental affect influenced infants' affect toward an absurd event, an effect that was magnified at 7 months. These results are discussed in the context of emotional contagion, regulation, and the emergence of social referencing. PMID:25897958

  2. Chimeric 2C10R4 anti-CD40 antibody therapy is critical for long-term survival of GTKO.hCD46.hTBM pig-to-primate cardiac xenograft.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, Muhammad M; Singh, Avneesh K; Corcoran, Philip C; Thomas, Marvin L; Clark, Tannia; Lewis, Billeta G; Hoyt, Robert F; Eckhaus, Michael; Pierson, Richard N; Belli, Aaron J; Wolf, Eckhard; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Phelps, Carol; Reimann, Keith A; Ayares, David; Horvath, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Preventing xenograft rejection is one of the greatest challenges of transplantation medicine. Here, we describe a reproducible, long-term survival of cardiac xenografts from alpha 1-3 galactosyltransferase gene knockout pigs, which express human complement regulatory protein CD46 and human thrombomodulin (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM), that were transplanted into baboons. Our immunomodulatory drug regimen includes induction with anti-thymocyte globulin and αCD20 antibody, followed by maintenance with mycophenolate mofetil and an intensively dosed αCD40 (2C10R4) antibody. Median (298 days) and longest (945 days) graft survival in five consecutive recipients using this regimen is significantly prolonged over our recently established survival benchmarks (180 and 500 days, respectively). Remarkably, the reduction of αCD40 antibody dose on day 100 or after 1 year resulted in recrudescence of anti-pig antibody and graft failure. In conclusion, genetic modifications (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM) combined with the treatment regimen tested here consistently prevent humoral rejection and systemic coagulation pathway dysregulation, sustaining long-term cardiac xenograft survival beyond 900 days. PMID:27045379

  3. Chimeric 2C10R4 anti-CD40 antibody therapy is critical for long-term survival of GTKO.hCD46.hTBM pig-to-primate cardiac xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, Muhammad M.; Singh, Avneesh K.; Corcoran, Philip C.; Thomas III, Marvin L.; Clark, Tannia; Lewis, Billeta G.; Hoyt, Robert F.; Eckhaus, Michael; Pierson III, Richard N.; Belli, Aaron J.; Wolf, Eckhard; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Phelps, Carol; Reimann, Keith A.; Ayares, David; Horvath, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Preventing xenograft rejection is one of the greatest challenges of transplantation medicine. Here, we describe a reproducible, long-term survival of cardiac xenografts from alpha 1-3 galactosyltransferase gene knockout pigs, which express human complement regulatory protein CD46 and human thrombomodulin (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM), that were transplanted into baboons. Our immunomodulatory drug regimen includes induction with anti-thymocyte globulin and αCD20 antibody, followed by maintenance with mycophenolate mofetil and an intensively dosed αCD40 (2C10R4) antibody. Median (298 days) and longest (945 days) graft survival in five consecutive recipients using this regimen is significantly prolonged over our recently established survival benchmarks (180 and 500 days, respectively). Remarkably, the reduction of αCD40 antibody dose on day 100 or after 1 year resulted in recrudescence of anti-pig antibody and graft failure. In conclusion, genetic modifications (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM) combined with the treatment regimen tested here consistently prevent humoral rejection and systemic coagulation pathway dysregulation, sustaining long-term cardiac xenograft survival beyond 900 days. PMID:27045379

  4. Humor styles and loneliness: a study among Hong Kong and Hangzhou undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiao Dong; Wong, Ashley Yuen Man; Hiranandani, Neelam Arjan

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the relationship between humor styles and loneliness among a sample of Hong Kong and Mainland Chinese. A total of 159 Hong Kong undergraduates and 178 Hangzhou undergraduates were recruited to complete a survey composed of the Humor Styles Questionnaire and the Emotional and Social Loneliness Scales. Multiple regression analyses showed that self-defeating humor explained significant variance in both social and emotional loneliness for Hong Kong students, but only in social loneliness for Hangzhou students. Hong Kong students scored significantly higher on aggressive humor and self-defeating humor, and scored significantly lower on affiliative humor and self-enhancing humor than did their counterparts in Hangzhou. This could be attributed to the greater influence of Confucianism in Mainland China than in Hong Kong. PMID:25153950

  5. Silence as the Root of American Indian Humor: Further Meditations on the Comic Vision of Anishinaabe Culture and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Lawrence W.

    2007-01-01

    The literature on humor generally focuses on the nature of incongruities as the root of humor. In this article, the author takes the examination of humor one step further by meditating on the mental frame involved with humor. He is interested in what cultural experiences would predispose the individuals within a given culture to have a sense of…

  6. [The effect of humor in the workplace on mental/physical health and self-evaluation of job performance].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Junichi; Fuji, Kei

    2016-04-01

    In this study we aimed to examine the contents of humor in the Japanese workplace and to understand the effects of humor on mental/physical health and self-evaluation of job performance. Japanese workers (N = 436) responded to questionnaires addressing workplace humor, feelings about workplace, workplace communication, mental/physical health, and perceived job performance. An exploratory factor analysis indicated that there are five types of workplace humor: norm-violating humor, experience-sharing humor workplace-enjoying humor, people-recalling humor, and outside-mocking humor. A covariance structural analysis showed that norm-violating humor and workplace-enjoying humor decreased mental and physical health by promoting both negative feelings in the workplace and self-disclosure about the negative side of work. Results also revealed that experience-sharing humor, people-recalling humor, and outside-mocking humor had a positive effect on the self-evaluation of job performance as well as mental and physical health, by promoting both positive feelings and mutual communication in the workplace. Results suggest that humor in the workplace has various influences on workers depending on the type of workplace humor. PMID:27180510

  7. Explorations of the Functions of Humor and Other Types of Fun among Families of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Alicja

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative study of six families of children with disabilities and their perspectives on humor. The findings revealed that the families had an understanding of humor that went beyond the generalized humor construct. They embraced both the concept of humor and "other types of fun." Furthermore, the families' attempts at…

  8. Decoding humor experiences from brain activity of people viewing comedy movies.

    PubMed

    Sawahata, Yasuhito; Komine, Kazuteru; Morita, Toshiya; Hiruma, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Humans naturally have a sense of humor. Experiencing humor not only encourages social interactions, but also produces positive physiological effects on the human body, such as lowering blood pressure. Recent neuro-imaging studies have shown evidence for distinct mental state changes at work in people experiencing humor. However, the temporal characteristics of these changes remain elusive. In this paper, we objectively measured humor-related mental states from single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data obtained while subjects viewed comedy TV programs. Measured fMRI data were labeled on the basis of the lag before or after the viewer's perception of humor (humor onset) determined by the viewer-reported humor experiences during the fMRI scans. We trained multiple binary classifiers, or decoders, to distinguish between fMRI data obtained at each lag from ones obtained during a neutral state in which subjects were not experiencing humor. As a result, in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right temporal area, the decoders showed significant classification accuracies even at two seconds ahead of the humor onsets. Furthermore, given a time series of fMRI data obtained during movie viewing, we found that the decoders with significant performance were also able to predict the upcoming humor events on a volume-by-volume basis. Taking into account the hemodynamic delay, our results suggest that the upcoming humor events are encoded in specific brain areas up to about five seconds before the awareness of experiencing humor. Our results provide evidence that there exists a mental state lasting for a few seconds before actual humor perception, as if a viewer is expecting the future humorous events. PMID:24324656

  9. Decoding Humor Experiences from Brain Activity of People Viewing Comedy Movies

    PubMed Central

    Sawahata, Yasuhito; Komine, Kazuteru; Morita, Toshiya; Hiruma, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Humans naturally have a sense of humor. Experiencing humor not only encourages social interactions, but also produces positive physiological effects on the human body, such as lowering blood pressure. Recent neuro-imaging studies have shown evidence for distinct mental state changes at work in people experiencing humor. However, the temporal characteristics of these changes remain elusive. In this paper, we objectively measured humor-related mental states from single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data obtained while subjects viewed comedy TV programs. Measured fMRI data were labeled on the basis of the lag before or after the viewer’s perception of humor (humor onset) determined by the viewer-reported humor experiences during the fMRI scans. We trained multiple binary classifiers, or decoders, to distinguish between fMRI data obtained at each lag from ones obtained during a neutral state in which subjects were not experiencing humor. As a result, in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right temporal area, the decoders showed significant classification accuracies even at two seconds ahead of the humor onsets. Furthermore, given a time series of fMRI data obtained during movie viewing, we found that the decoders with significant performance were also able to predict the upcoming humor events on a volume-by-volume basis. Taking into account the hemodynamic delay, our results suggest that the upcoming humor events are encoded in specific brain areas up to about five seconds before the awareness of experiencing humor. Our results provide evidence that there exists a mental state lasting for a few seconds before actual humor perception, as if a viewer is expecting the future humorous events. PMID:24324656

  10. Is Laughing at the Expense of Victims and Offenders a Red Flag? Humor and Secondary Traumatic Stress.

    PubMed

    Craun, Sarah W; Bourke, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Those who work with human trauma often use humor to handle job stressors. Research has demonstrated that lighthearted humor is related to lower secondary traumatic stress scores, while gallows humor has the inverse relationship. This work explores how three types of humor relate to secondary traumatic stress: (a) humor at the expense of victims, (b) humor at the expense of offenders, and (c) humor containing sexual innuendo. Internet crimes against children taskforce personnel completed questionnaires about secondary traumatic stress and coping techniques. Humor at the expense of victims was rarely used, but when it was, it was indicative of higher secondary traumatic stress. There were no relationships between secondary traumatic stress and the use of humor at the expense of offenders or humor containing sexual innuendo. PMID:26301442

  11. Analysis of the Lipidome of Xenografts Using MALDI-IMS and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Lage, Sergio; Abad-García, Beatriz; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Terés, Silvia; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martín, M. Laura; Escribá, Pablo V.; Fernández, José A.

    2014-07-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice are a very popular model to study the development of cancer and to test new drug candidates. Among the parameters analyzed are the variations in the lipid composition, as they are good indicators of changes in the cellular metabolism. Here, we present a study on the distribution of lipids in xenografts of NCI-H1975 human lung cancer cells, using MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF. The identification of lipids directly from the tissue by MALDI was aided by the comparison with identification using ESI ionization in lipid extracts from the same xenografts. Lipids belonging to PCs, PIs, SMs, DAG, TAG, PS, PA, and PG classes were identified and their distribution over the xenograft was determined. Three areas were identified in the xenograft, corresponding to cells in different metabolic stages and to a layer of adipose tissue that covers the xenograft.

  12. Mother, melancholia, and humor in Erik H. Erikson's earliest writings.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2008-09-01

    Erik H. Erikson wrote three articles when he was in his late-twenties and an up-and-coming member of the psychoanalytic community in Vienna. At the time he wrote these articles, he was in a training psychoanalysis with Anna Freud, teaching at the Heitzing School in Vienna, and learning the Montessori method of teaching. These articles focus on the loss of primary narcissism and the development of the superego (or punitive conscience) in early childhood, especially through the child's conflict with maternal authority. They support the idea that melancholia, with its internalized rage against the mother, is the inevitable outcome of the loss of primary narcissism. I note, however, that the third of these articles makes a case for the restorative role of humor, especially when Freud's view that humor is a function of the superego is taken into account. PMID:19105029

  13. Effects of Prostaglandin Analogues on Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Nelson S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most prevalent risk factor for glaucoma. All treatments, whether surgical or pharmaceutical, are aimed at lowering IOP. Prostaglandin analogues are a first line therapy for glaucoma due to their ability to reduce IOP, once-daily dosing, efficacy, and minimal side-effect profile. Whereas prostaglandin analogues have been known to alter aqueous humor outflow through the unconventional (uveoscleral) pathway, more recent evidence suggests their action also occurs through the conventional (trabecular) pathway. Understanding how prostaglandin analogues successfully lower IOP is important, as this information may lead to the discovery of new molecular targets for future therapeutic intervention. This review explores the current understanding of prostaglandin analogue biology as it pertains to IOP reduction and improved aqueous humor outflow facility. PMID:24359106

  14. Lateralization in appreciation of humor: sex differences vs stimulus effects.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, J

    1997-10-01

    The finding that women rate funnier humorous items with left-ear input, while men give higher ratings with right-ear input has been cited as evidence for a biological basis for sex differences in appreciation of humor. However, in 1991 Gallivan did not find this effect and suggested that the earlier finding could have been due to the use of 'male-oriented' stimuli. In this study, 72 subjects rated the funniness of 32 'female oriented' comedy excerpts, presented monaurally. Women gave higher ratings with right-ear input but men's ratings were not affected by ear of presentation. These findings represent another failure to replicate the earlier-reported hemispheric effect and support the conclusion that it may have been due to the stimuli used. PMID:9347538

  15. Aqueous humor cytokine profiling in patients with wet AMD

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Ding, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yu; Li, Jiaqing; Tang, Miao; Yuan, Miner; Hu, Andina; Zhan, Zongyi; Li, Zijing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the chemokine expression profiles in the aqueous humor of wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) patients and to correlate their levels with clinical findings. Methods Undiluted aqueous humor samples (100–200 μl) were obtained from 16 wet AMD eyes and 12 control eyes. Forty chemokines were measured using a multiplex method. A 6×6 mm area of the macular region centered on the fovea was examined using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results The detection rates were 50% or more for 15 chemokines. Compared with the control group, the aqueous humor in wet AMD patients showed a significantly higher expression of CXCL10 (p=0.004), CCL14 (p=0.002), CXCL16 (p=0.013), CXCL7 (p=0.033), and CCL22 (p=0.037), while growth-related oncogene (GRO) was significantly decreased in the wet AMD patients (p=0.001). When compared with treatment-naïve patients, the recurrent group had significant upregulation of CXCL10 (p=0.012) and CCL22 (p=0.002). CXCL16 was positively correlated with lesion size, and CCL22 was higher in patients whose OCT images showed intraretinal fluid (IRF) or hyperreflective foci (HF). Conclusions Elevated levels of inflammation-related chemokines, including CXCL10, CCL14, CXCL16, CXCL7, and CCL22, in the aqueous humor of AMD patients may suggest a pathogenic role for inflammation. CXCL10 and CCL22 were more elevated in eyes with recurrent wet AMD than in treatment-naïve eyes. CXCL16 was positively correlated with lesion size. The increase in CCL22 was correlated with the presence of IRF or HF. These data may be of interest in the search for biomarkers associated with wet AMD and may potentially indicate different treatment strategies. PMID:27122966

  16. HUMOR STYLES, CREATIVE PERSONALITY TRAITS, AND CREATIVE THINKING IN A HONG KONG SAMPLE.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiao Dong; Hui, Anna Na

    2015-12-01

    Humor is found to be an essential element of creative thinking in Western culture. In Eastern culture, however, the relationship between creativity and humor is ambivalent. This study examined the relationship among humor styles, creative personality traits, and creative thinking abilities. A sample of 118 Chinese undergraduates in Hong Kong was recruited to complete the Humor Styles Questionnaire, the three Creative Personality subscales of the Chinese Personality Assessment Inventory-2 (CPAI-2), and the Verbal Test of the Wallach-Kogan Creativity Tests. Results show that humor styles are uncorrelated with creative thinking abilities of flexibility, fluency, and originality, but affiliative humor and aggressive humor are correlated with creative personality traits of novelty and diversity. A hierarchical multiple regression shows that both humor styles and creative personality traits of novelty and diversity account for non-significant variance on creative thinking abilities. These findings largely support a hypothesized non-association between humor styles and creative measures. They also pose a sharp contrast to findings obtained in the West, in which humor styles are typically correlated with both creative thinking abilities and creative personality traits. PMID:26595303

  17. The effect of humor on aggression catharsis in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Ziv, A

    1987-07-01

    Two studies were designed to measure the cathartic effects of humor on aggressive responses. In the first study, two versions (easy and difficult) of Raven's intelligence test were administered to two groups of high school students. Only the easy version could be solved in the alloted time. Rosenzweig's (1951) Picture Frustration test was then administered and the students' aggressive responses were scored. Results showed that those who did not solve the problems had significantly higher scores on aggressivity than did the others. The second study, using four different groups, was planned according to a modified Solomon design. Two of the four groups of students completed the difficult part of the Raven test, and then two video-tapes were presented: a humorous one to two groups and a neutral one to the others. Finally, the Rosenzweig Picture Frustration test was administered to all four groups. An analysis of variance computed on the aggressivity scores showed one significant difference: frustrated students who viewed the humorous videotape had lower scores than those viewing the neutral one. PMID:3625568

  18. Stop laughing! Humor perception with and without expressive suppression.

    PubMed

    Korb, Sebastian; Grandjean, Didier; Samson, Andrea C; Delplanque, Sylvain; Scherer, Klaus R

    2012-01-01

    The neurophysiological study of emotion regulation focused on the strategy of reappraisal-i.e., the cognitive reinterpretation of a stimulus. Reappraisal reduces emotional expression, the experience of both negative and positive feelings, and the amplitude of an event-related potential (ERP)-the late positive potential (LPP). In contrast, the strategy of expressive suppression (ES), being the inhibition of emotional expression, has been reported to reduce subjective feelings of positive, but not negative emotion, and has not yet been investigated with ERPs. We focused on the LPP to assess the correlates of ES in the context of humor perception. Twenty-two female participants rated sequences of humorous (H) and non-humorous (NH) pictures, while their zygomaticus muscle was recorded. A spontaneous (SP) condition, in which participants attended naturally to the pictures, resulted in higher ratings of funniness, increased smiling, and increased LPP amplitude for H compared to NH stimuli. An ES condition, in which participants suppressed their facial reactions, resulted in reduced smiling, without affecting subjective ratings. LPP amplitude did not differ between H and NH stimuli during ES, suggesting equal allocation of processing resources to both stimuli. These results suggest that, similarly to reappraisal, ES modifies the way the brain processes positive emotional stimuli. PMID:22369232

  19. Bimatoprost Effects on Aqueous Humor Dynamics in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, David F.; Krauss, Achim H.-P.; Nilsson, Siv F. E.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of bimatoprost on aqueous humor dynamics were quantified in monkey eyes. Uveoscleral outflow was measured by the anterior chamber perfusion method, using FITC-dextran. Total outflow facility was determined by the two-level constant pressure method. Aqueous flow was measured with a scanning ocular fluorophotometer. Uveoscleral outflow was 0.96 ± 0.19 μL min−1 in vehicle-treated eyes and 1.37 ± 0.27 μL min−1 (n = 6; P < .05) in eyes that received bimatoprost 0.01% b.i.d. × 5 days. Bimatoprost had no effect on total outflow facility, which was 0.42 ± 0.05 μL min−1 at baseline and 0.42 ± 0.04 μL min−1 after bimatoprost treatment. Bimatoprost had no significant effect on aqueous humor flow. This study demonstrates that bimatoprost increases uveoscleral outflow but not total outflow facility or aqueous humor flow, indicating that it lowers intraocular pressure in ocular normotensive monkeys by a mechanism that exclusively involves uveoscleral outflow. PMID:20508775

  20. Studies of the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets.

    PubMed

    Hamahashi, K; Sato, M; Yamato, M; Kokubo, M; Mitani, G; Ito, S; Nagai, T; Ebihara, G; Kutsuna, T; Okano, T; Mochida, J

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to repair and regenerate articular cartilage with layered chondrocyte sheets, produced using temperature-responsive culture dishes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets. Articular chondrocytes and synovial cells were harvested during total knee arthroplasty. After co-culture, the samples were divided into three groups: a monolayer, 7 day culture sheet group (group M); a triple-layered, 7 day culture sheet group (group L); and a monolayer culture group with a cell count identical to that of group L (group C). The secretion of collagen type 1 (COL1), collagen type 2 (COL2), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13), transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Layered chondrocyte sheets produced the most humoral factors. PGE2 expression declined over time in group C but was significantly higher in groups M and L. TGFβ expression was low in group C but was significantly higher in groups M and L (p<0.05). Our results suggest that the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets may contribute to cartilaginous tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:23165985

  1. Q fever in pregnant goats: humoral and cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Both humoral and cellular immunity are important in the host defence against intracellular bacteria. Little is known about the immune response to C. burnetii infections in domestic ruminants even though these species are the major source of Q fever in humans. To investigate the goat’s immune response we inoculated groups of pregnant goats via inhalation with a Dutch outbreak isolate of C. burnetii. All animals were successfully infected. Phase 1 and Phase 2 IgM- and IgG-specific antibodies were measured. Cellular immune responses were investigated by interferon-gamma, enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot test (IFN-γ Elispot), lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and systemic cytokines. After two weeks post inoculation (wpi), a strong anti-C. burnetii Phase 2 IgM and IgG antibody response was observed while the increase in IgM anti-Phase 1 antibodies was less pronounced. IgG anti-Phase 1 antibodies started to rise at 6 wpi. Cellular immune responses were observed after parturition. Our results demonstrated humoral and cellular immune responses to C. burnetii infection in pregnant goats. Cell-mediated immune responses did not differ enough to distinguish between Coxiella-infected and non-infected pregnant animals, whereas a strong-phase specific antibody response is detected after 2 wpi. This humoral immune response may be useful in the early detection of C. burnetii-infected pregnant goats. PMID:23915213

  2. SEX DIFFERENCES DURING HUMOR APPRECIATION IN CHILD SIBLING-PAIRS

    PubMed Central

    Vrticka, Pascal; Neely, Michelle; Walter, Elizabeth; Black, Jessica M.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental origin of sex differences in adult brain function is poorly understood. Elucidating neural mechanisms underlying comparable cognitive functionality in both children and adults is required to address this gap. Humor appreciation represents a particularly relevant target for such developmental research because explanatory theories apply across the life span and underlying neurocircuitry shows sex differences in adults. As a positive mood state, humor is also of interest due to sex differences in rates of depression, a disorder afflicting twice as many women as men. In this study, we employed fMRI to investigate brain responses to funny versus positive (and neutral) video clips in 22 children ages 6 to 13 years, including 8 sibling pairs. Our data revealed increased activity to funny clips in bilateral temporo-occipital cortex, midbrain, and amygdala in girls. Conversely, we found heightened activation to positive clips in bilateral inferior parietal lobule, fusiform gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, amygdala, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex in boys. Many of these effects persisted when looking at sibling-pairs only. We interpret such findings as reflecting the presence of early sex divergence in reward saliency / expectation and stimulus relevance attribution. These findings are discussed in the context of evolutionary and developmental theories of humor function. PMID:23672302

  3. Monitoring of aqueous humor metabolites using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicksted, James P.; Erckens, Roel J.; Motamedi, Massoud; March, Wayne F.

    1994-05-01

    Laser Raman scattering has been used to monitor glucose and lactate metabolites within aqueous humor specimens obtained from nine human eyes during cataract surgery. Nine postmortem rabbit eyes were also investigated. Raman measurements were obtained using a single grating Raman spectrometer with a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD. A 514.5 nm line from an argon laser was used to illuminate capillaries containing several microliters of aqueous humor. A water background was subtracted from each of the aqueous humor Raman spectra. This experimental system was calibrated so that each metabolite in water could be measured down to 0.1 weight percent. Raman peaks indicative of the stretching vibrations of methylene and methyl groups associated with glucose and lactate, respectively, were observed in the human specimens. A second stretching mode characteristic of lactate between the carbon atom and either the carboxylic acid group or carboxylate ion group was also observed providing a distinguishing feature between the glucose and lactate Raman peaks. Similar structure was observed from the rabbit specimens, but these samples have recently been found to have been contaminated during euthanasia.

  4. Three Decades Investigating Humor and Laughter: An Interview With Professor Rod Martin.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rod; Kuiper, Nicholas A

    2016-08-01

    Since the start of the 21st century, the investigation of various psychological aspects of humor and laughter has become an increasingly prominent topic of research. This growth can be attributed, in no small part, to the pioneering and creative work on humor and laughter conducted by Professor Rod Martin. Dr. Martin's research interests in humor and laughter began in the early 1980s and continued throughout his 32 year long career as a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Western Ontario. During this time, Dr. Martin published numerous scholarly articles, chapters, and books on psychological aspects of humor and laughter. Professor Martin has just retired in July 2016, and in the present interview he recounts a number of research highlights of his illustrious career. Dr. Martin's earliest influential work, conducted while he was still in graduate school, stemmed from an individual difference perspective that focused on the beneficial effects of sense of humor on psychological well-being. This research focus remained evident in many of Professor Martin's subsequent investigations, but became increasingly refined as he developed several measures of different components of sense of humor, including both adaptive and maladaptive humor styles. In this interview, Dr. Martin describes the conceptualization, development and use of the Humor Styles Questionnaire, along with suggestions for future research and development. In doing so, he also discusses the three main components of humor (i.e., cognitive, emotional and interpersonal), as well as the distinctions and similarities between humor and laughter. Further highlights of this interview include Professor Martin's comments on such diverse issues as the genetic versus environmental loadings for sense of humor, the multifaceted nature of the construct of humor, and the possible limitations of teaching individuals to use humor in a beneficial manner to cope with stress and enhance their social and

  5. Three Decades Investigating Humor and Laughter: An Interview With Professor Rod Martin

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rod; Kuiper, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the start of the 21st century, the investigation of various psychological aspects of humor and laughter has become an increasingly prominent topic of research. This growth can be attributed, in no small part, to the pioneering and creative work on humor and laughter conducted by Professor Rod Martin. Dr. Martin’s research interests in humor and laughter began in the early 1980s and continued throughout his 32 year long career as a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Western Ontario. During this time, Dr. Martin published numerous scholarly articles, chapters, and books on psychological aspects of humor and laughter. Professor Martin has just retired in July 2016, and in the present interview he recounts a number of research highlights of his illustrious career. Dr. Martin’s earliest influential work, conducted while he was still in graduate school, stemmed from an individual difference perspective that focused on the beneficial effects of sense of humor on psychological well-being. This research focus remained evident in many of Professor Martin’s subsequent investigations, but became increasingly refined as he developed several measures of different components of sense of humor, including both adaptive and maladaptive humor styles. In this interview, Dr. Martin describes the conceptualization, development and use of the Humor Styles Questionnaire, along with suggestions for future research and development. In doing so, he also discusses the three main components of humor (i.e., cognitive, emotional and interpersonal), as well as the distinctions and similarities between humor and laughter. Further highlights of this interview include Professor Martin’s comments on such diverse issues as the genetic versus environmental loadings for sense of humor, the multifaceted nature of the construct of humor, and the possible limitations of teaching individuals to use humor in a beneficial manner to cope with stress and enhance their social and

  6. Reproducibility of Differential Proteomic Technologies in CPTAC Fractionated Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) employed a pair of reference xenograft proteomes for initial platform validation and ongoing quality control of its data collection for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tumors. These two xenografts, representing basal and luminal-B human breast cancer, were fractionated and analyzed on six mass spectrometers in a total of 46 replicates divided between iTRAQ and label-free technologies, spanning a total of 1095 LC–MS/MS experiments. These data represent a unique opportunity to evaluate the stability of proteomic differentiation by mass spectrometry over many months of time for individual instruments or across instruments running dissimilar workflows. We evaluated iTRAQ reporter ions, label-free spectral counts, and label-free extracted ion chromatograms as strategies for data interpretation (source code is available from http://homepages.uc.edu/~wang2x7/Research.htm). From these assessments, we found that differential genes from a single replicate were confirmed by other replicates on the same instrument from 61 to 93% of the time. When comparing across different instruments and quantitative technologies, using multiple replicates, differential genes were reproduced by other data sets from 67 to 99% of the time. Projecting gene differences to biological pathways and networks increased the degree of similarity. These overlaps send an encouraging message about the maturity of technologies for proteomic differentiation. PMID:26653538

  7. Antitumor effects of a monoclonal antibody to human CCR9 in leukemia cell xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Sonia; Vela, Maria; Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Carramolino, Laura; Gutiérrez, Julio; Gómez, Lucio; Lozano, María; Salvador, Beatriz; García-Gallo, Mónica; Martínez-A, Carlos; Kremer, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Tumor expression of certain chemokine receptors is associated with resistance to apoptosis, migration, invasiveness and metastasis. Because CCR9 chemokine receptor expression is very restricted in healthy tissue, whereas it is present in tumors of distinct origins including leukemias, melanomas, prostate and ovary carcinomas, it can be considered a suitable candidate for target-directed therapy. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 91R, a mouse anti-human CCR9 IgG2b monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope within the CCR9 N-terminal domain. This antibody inhibits the growth of subcutaneous xenografts from human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells in immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice. Tumor size in 91R-treated mice was reduced by 85% compared with isotype-matched antibody-treated controls. Tumor reduction in 91R-treated mice was concomitant with an increase in the apoptotic cell fraction and tumor necrotic areas, as well as a decrease in the fraction of proliferating cells and in tumor vascularization. In the presence of complement or murine natural killer cells, 91R promoted in vitro lysis of MOLT-4 leukemia cells, indicating that this antibody might eliminate tumor cells via complement- and cell-dependent cytotoxicity. The results show the potential of the 91R monoclonal antibody as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CCR9-expressing tumors. PMID:24870448

  8. Development and characterization of xenograft model systems for adenoid cystic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Baras, Alexander S.; Mancuso, Stefani; Fan, Hao; Davidson, Robert; Dirks, Dawn; Golden, Wendy; Frierson, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC) is one of the most common malignancies to arise in human salivary glands, and also arises in glandular tissue of other organ systems. To address the paucity of experimental model systems for this tumor type, we have undertaken a program of transplanting tissue samples of human ACC into immunodeficient nu/nu mice to create xenograft model systems. In 17 of 23 attempts (74%) xenograft tumors were successfully grown. In all cases, the histologic appearance of the donating tumor was recapitulated in the subsequent xenograft. Characterization of a subset of xenograft models by immunohistochemical biomarkers and by RNA transcript microarray analysis showed good fidelity in the recapitulation of gene expression patterns in the xenograft tumors compared to the human donor tumors. Since ACC is known to frequently contain a t(6;9) translocation that fuses the MYB and NFIB genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of twelve ACC xenograft models was performed that assayed MYB locus break-apart and MYB-NFIB locus fusion. 11/12 (92%) xenograft models revealed MYB locus rearrangement and 10/12 (83%) xenograft models showed evidence of fusion of the MYB and NFIB loci. The two related xenograft models (derived from primary and metastatic tumors, respectively, of the same human subject) were karyotyped, showing a t(1;6) translocation, suggesting MYB translocation to a novel fusion partner gene. Overall, our results indicate that ACC is amenable to xenografting and that ACC xenograft models recapitulate the molecular and morphologic characteristics of human tumors, suggesting utility as valid experimental and preclinical model systems for this disease. PMID:21709671

  9. Effect of nanovaccine chemistry on humoral immune response kinetics and maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haughney, Shannon L.; Ross, Kathleen A.; Boggiatto, Paola M.; Wannemuehler, Michael J.; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2014-10-01

    Acute respiratory infections represent a significant portion of global morbidity and mortality annually. There is a critical need for efficacious vaccines against respiratory pathogens. To vaccinate against respiratory disease, pulmonary delivery is an attractive route because it mimics the route of natural infection and can confer both mucosal and systemic immunity. We have previously demonstrated that a single dose, intranasal vaccine based on polyanhydride nanoparticles elicited a protective immune response against Yersinia pestis for at least 40 weeks after immunization with F1-V. Herein, we investigate the effect of nanoparticle chemistry and its attributes on the kinetics and maturation of the antigen-specific serum antibody response. We demonstrate that manipulation of polyanhydride nanoparticle chemistry facilitated differential kinetics of development of antibody titers, avidity, and epitope specificity. The results provide new insights into the underlying role(s) of nanoparticle chemistry in providing long-lived humoral immunity and aid in the rational design of nanovaccine formulations to induce long-lasting and mature antibody responses.Acute respiratory infections represent a significant portion of global morbidity and mortality annually. There is a critical need for efficacious vaccines against respiratory pathogens. To vaccinate against respiratory disease, pulmonary delivery is an attractive route because it mimics the route of natural infection and can confer both mucosal and systemic immunity. We have previously demonstrated that a single dose, intranasal vaccine based on polyanhydride nanoparticles elicited a protective immune response against Yersinia pestis for at least 40 weeks after immunization with F1-V. Herein, we investigate the effect of nanoparticle chemistry and its attributes on the kinetics and maturation of the antigen-specific serum antibody response. We demonstrate that manipulation of polyanhydride nanoparticle chemistry

  10. Different attitudes toward humor between Chinese and American students: evidence from the Implicit Association Test.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Yue, Xiao Dong; Lu, Su

    2011-08-01

    Although cross-cultural research indicates that Chinese people demonstrate less humor than do Americans, little research addresses the reasons. This cross-cultural difference may be largely due to different implicit attitudes toward humor held by Chinese and Americans, deeply rooted in the two cultural traditions. Both self-report evaluation and the Implicit Association Test (IAT) were used to compare Chinese and American attitudes toward humor. Although 60 Chinese undergraduate students showed no significant difference from 33 American exchange students in explicit attitudes toward humor, the former associated humor more frequently with unpleasant adjectives and seriousness with pleasant adjectives on the IAT; the opposite pattern was found for the American group. This indicated a negative implicit attitude toward humor among the Chinese students. PMID:22049652

  11. Frontal brain asymmetry and transient cardiovascular responses to the perception of humor.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Schulter, Günter; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Samson, Andrea C; Freudenthaler, H Harald; Lackner, Helmut K

    2013-04-01

    The study examined the relationship of individual differences in prefrontal brain asymmetry, measured by the EEG in resting conditions, to the individual's responsivity in the context of humor (n=42). Several weeks after the EEG recording, immediate cardiovascular responses to the perception of humor and behavioral indicators of humor processing were obtained in an experimental paradigm involving non-verbal cartoons. Relatively greater resting activity in the left than right prefrontal cortex, particularly at the ventrolateral positions, was associated with faster detection of humor, a more pronounced cardiac response to the perception of humor (heart rate and cardiac output), and more accessible internal positive affective states (indicated by faster reports of amusement levels). The study confirms and extends findings of the relevance of prefrontal brain asymmetry to affective responsivity, contributing evidence in the domain of positive affect and humor, and demonstrating relationships to the immediate cardiovascular response pattern to an emotional event. PMID:23274171

  12. "Make'em Laugh and They Will Learn": A Closer Look at the Relationship between Perceptions of Instructors' Humor Orientation and Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja

    The use of humor in the classroom has been investigated using a variety of humor operationalizations and methodologies with mixed results. The present study examined the role of teacher humor orientation (HO) rather than specific humorous behaviors. The relationship between teacher humor orientation and learning was the focus of this study.…

  13. Professors Are from Mars[R], Students Are from Snickers[R]: How To Write and Deliver Humor in the Classroom and in Professional Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    This book is a guide to humor that can break down the communication barriers between professors and students, who can be so different that they can seem to come from different planets. The chapters are: (1) "Why Use Humor?"; (2) "Anatomy of Humor"; (3) "Types and Forms of Humor"; (4) "Sources of Humorous Material"; (5) "Delivering Humor…

  14. Prevention of pancreatic islet xenograft rejection by dietary vitamin E.

    PubMed Central

    Vajkoczy, P.; Lehr, H. A.; Hübner, C.; Arfors, K. E.; Menger, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    In pancreatic islet transplantation, the adhesion of activated leukocytes to endothelial cells and the loss of microvascular integrity represent the critical microcirculatory events, which promote loss of graft function due to rejection. With the view that oxygen radicals may contribute to graft rejection, we studied the effect of the antioxidant vitamin E on microvascular rejection of islet grafts. Islets were transplanted syngeneically and xenogeneically (rat) into dorsal skin-fold chambers of hamsters, which received a non-vitamin-E-supplemented laboratory chow. Treated animals with xenografts were fed with a diet supplemented with vitamin E in a low (150 mg/kg) and high (8000 mg/kg) concentration. Intravital fluorescence microscopy demonstrated complete vascularization of syngeneic grafts at day 10 after transplantation, intact islet microcirculation at day 20 with a functional capillary density of 653 +/- 6 cm-1, and only few leukocytes adherent to the endothelial lining of the islets' microvasculature (88 +/- 23 mm-2). Xenogeneic islets showed initial signs of rejection at day 6, including adhesion of leukocytes to the microvascular endothelium (610 +/- 110 mm-2) and loss of endothelial integrity. After 20 days, functional capillary density was significantly lower (173 +/- 68 cm-1) when compared with syngeneic grafts, indicating failure of graft acceptance. Supplementation of the diet with low and high concentrations of vitamin E resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) reduction of xenograft leukocyte-endothelium interaction (146 +/- 29 mm-2 and 109 +/- 42 mm-2) at day 6 after transplantation and and adequate development of functional capillary density at day 20 (478 +/- 36 cm-1 and 539 +/- 86 cm-1; P < 0.05), indicating prevention of microvascular rejection. We conclude that dietary supplementation of the lipophilic antioxidant vitamin E attenuates leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, preserves microvascular integrity, and thus inhibits microvascular

  15. Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala; Hu, Chaoxin; Maitra, Anirban; Pomper, Martin G

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Axl is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. •Axl overexpression confers invasive phenotype. •Axl imaging would be useful for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. •Axl expression imaging is demonstrated in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts. •Graded levels of Axl expression imaging is feasible. -- Abstract: The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is overexpressed in and leads to patient morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Axl–Gas6 interactions are critical for tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of imaging graded levels of Axl expression in tumors using a radiolabeled antibody. We radiolabeled anti-human Axl (Axl mAb) and control IgG1 antibodies with {sup 125}I with high specific radioactivity and radiochemical purity, resulting in an immunoreactive fraction suitable for in vivo studies. Radiolabeled antibodies were investigated in severe combined immunodeficient mice harboring subcutaneous CFPAC (Axl{sup high}) and Panc1 (Axl{sup low}) pancreatic cancer xenografts by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging. Based on these results, the specificity of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb was also validated in mice harboring orthotopic Panc1 or CFPAC tumors and in mice harboring subcutaneous 22Rv1 (Axl{sup low}) or DU145 (Axl{sup high}) prostate tumors by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging studies at 72 h post-injection of the antibody. Both imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated specific and persistent accumulation of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb in Axl{sup high} (CFPAC and DU145) expression tumors compared to the Axl{sup low} (Panc1 and 22Rv1) expression tumors. Axl expression in these tumors was further confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. No difference in the uptake of radioactivity was observed between the control [{sup 125}I]IgG1 antibody in the Axl{sup high} and Axl{sup low} expression tumors. These data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging Axl expression in pancreatic

  16. Humor as a reward mechanism: event-related potentials in the healthy and diseased brain.

    PubMed

    Mensen, Armand; Poryazova, Rositsa; Schwartz, Sophie; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Humor processing involves distinct processing stages including incongruity detection, emotional response, and engagement of mesolimbic reward regions. Dysfunctional reward processing and clinical symptoms in response to humor have been previously described in both hypocretin deficient narcolepsy-cataplexy (NC) and in idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). For NC patients, humor is the strongest trigger for cataplexy, a transient loss of muscle tone, whereas dopamine-deficient PD-patients show blunted emotional responses to humor. To better understand the role of reward system and the various contributions of hypocretinergic and dopaminergic mechanisms to different stages of humor processing we examined the electrophysiological response to humorous and neutral pictures when given as reward feedback in PD, NC and healthy controls. Humor compared to neutral feedback demonstrated modulation of early ERP amplitudes likely corresponding to visual processing stages, with no group differences. At 270 ms post-feedback, conditions showed topographical and amplitudinal differences for frontal and left posterior electrodes, in that humor feedback was absent in PD patients but increased in NC patients. We suggest that this effect relates to a relatively early affective response, reminiscent of increased amygdala response reported in NC patients. Later ERP differences, corresponding to the late positive potential, revealed a lack of sustained activation in PD, likely due to altered dopamine regulation in reward structures in these patients. This research provides new insights into the temporal dynamics and underlying mechanisms of humor detection and appreciation in health and disease. PMID:24489683

  17. The use of humor in forensic mental health staff-patient interactions.

    PubMed

    Gildberg, Frederik A; Bradley, Stephen K; Paaske, Kristian J; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Humor utilized in the practice of forensic mental health nursing might seem somehow inappropriate, given the serious circumstances surrounding most forensic mental health patients. However, some recent research has pointed to the use of humor as an important component in staff interactions with forensic mental health patients. This study reviews the existing international forensic mental health research literature on humor to investigate (a) what characterizes forensic mental health staff-patient use of humor and (b) what significance humor holds within the forensic mental health setting. The search was conducted in June 2013. Scopus, CINAHL, PubMed, and PsychINFO were searched using keywords relevant to the study. Articles were categorized using a literature matrix and analyzed using thematic analysis. Twelve research articles were reviewed and included in the analysis. Three themes were identified: (a) "humor as staff skill," showing that staff found humor to be important as an interpersonal ability; (b) "humor as a relational tool" with the purpose of establishing and maintaining staff-patient interactions; and (c) "the impact of humor on patients," describing impacts on conflicts, dimensions of health, and motivation. The results of the analysis are however limited because of the dearth of published articles on the subject. PMID:24847873

  18. Sex differences in preferences for humor: a replication, modification, and extension.

    PubMed

    Hone, Liana S E; Hurwitz, William; Lieberman, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary-minded scientists have proposed that humor is a sexually selected trait in men that signals mate quality. Indeed, women tend to prefer men who make them laugh and men tend to prefer women who laugh at their jokes. However, it is unclear how robust this pattern is. Here we report a replication of one of the first studies (Bressler, Martin, and Balshine, 2006) to examine the sex differences in preferences for humor receptivity versus humor production. We replicate Bressler et al.'s (2006) findings that men prefer women who are receptive to their humor whereas women prefer men who produce humor. These findings held even after we modified Bressler et al.'s questionnaire for better conceptual validity. Furthermore, using a separate measure designed to assess trade-offs, we found that men viewed humor receptivity as a necessity and humor production as a luxury when they were asked to create an ideal long-term partner. For women, it was just the opposite. These results bolster the claim that sexual selection has shaped sex differences regarding preferences for a prospective mate's sense of humor and that what one means by "sense of humor" can vary. PMID:25670631

  19. Does humor in radio advertising affect recognition of novel product brand names?

    PubMed

    Berg, E M; Lippman, L G

    2001-04-01

    The authors proposed that item selection during shopping is based on brand name recognition rather than recall. College students rated advertisements and news stories of a simulated radio program for level of amusement (orienting activity) before participating in a surprise recognition test. Humor level of the advertisements was varied systematically, and content was controlled. According to signal detection analysis, humor did not affect the strength of recognition memory for brand names (nonsense units). However, brand names and product types were significantly more likely to be associated when appearing in humorous advertisements than in nonhumorous advertisements. The results are compared with prior findings concerning humor and recall. PMID:11506048

  20. [Detection of leptospira by culture of vitreous humor and detection of antibodies against leptospira in vitreous humor and serum of 225 horses with equine recurrent uveitis].

    PubMed

    Dorrego-Keiter, Elisa; Tóth, József; Dikker, Lieke; Sielhorst, Jutta; Schusser, Gerald Fritz

    2016-01-01

    In the ongoing discussion regarding the aetiopathogenesis of equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) it was the aim of the present study to elucidate the relationship of leptospira infection and ERU. In a population of 225 horses leptospira were examined in vitreous humor by culture and leptospira antibody were detected in vitreous humor and serum samples. Preoperative serum samples were collected from 221/225 ERU patients of different age, gender and breed. Undiluted vitreous humor was aseptically taken from 198/225 patients that underwent pars plana vitrectomy at the beginning of surgery and from 27/225 patients' eyeball after enucleation: Serum and vitreous humor were tested for specific leptospiral antibodies by microscopic agglutination test (MAT). Furthermore, vitreous humor was examined by culture. 20 patients which were euthanized due to a live-threatening disease other than ERU served as a control group. A total of 127/221 (57.5%) horses had serum antibodies (≥ 1:100). Most frequently antibodies against L. interrogans serovar Grippotyphosa were detected (79/127), followed by L. interrogans serovar lcterohaemorrhagiae (34/127) and L. interrogans serovar Bratislava (29/127). Only 79/225 horses (35.1%) had leptospiral antibodies in vitreous humor, in which L. interrogans serovar Grippotyphosa (67/79) was identified most frequently followed by L. interrogans serovar Pomona (18/79) and L. interrogans serovar lcterohaemorrhagiae (8/79) which was identified as single or multiple reaction. Isolation of leptospira from vitreous humor was positive in 34/212 horses (16%). 10/20 control horses had a positive antibody titer against leptospira in serum and 2/20 horses in vitreous humor, whereas there was no leptospira detected in culture. The result of 84% negative cultures from vitreous humor of 212 ERU patients is decisive for the diagnosis and therapy of ERU. PMID:27344913

  1. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Puchelle, E; Peault, B

    2000-01-01

    Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa. PMID:11667974

  2. Integrated Transcriptomic and Glycomic Profiling of Glioma Stem Cell Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wildburger, Norelle C; Zhou, Shiyue; Zacharias, Lauren G; Kroes, Roger A; Moskal, Joseph R; Schmidt, Mary; Mirzaei, Parvin; Gumin, Joy; Lang, Frederick F; Mechref, Yehia; Nilsson, Carol L

    2015-09-01

    Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs) have the innate ability to migrate or home toward and engraft in tumors such as glioblastoma (GBM). Because of this unique property of BM-hMSCs, we have explored their use for cell-mediated therapeutic delivery for the advancement of GBM treatment. Extravasation, the process by which blood-borne cells—such as BM-hMSCs—enter the tissue, is a highly complex process but is heavily dependent upon glycosylation for glycan-glycan and glycan-protein adhesion between the cell and endothelium. However, in a translationally significant preclinical glioma stem cell xenograft (GSCX) model of GBM, BM-hMSCs demonstrate unequal tropism toward these tumors. We hypothesized that there may be differences in the glycan compositions between the GSCXs that elicit homing ("attractors") and those that do not ("non-attractors") that facilitate or impede the engraftment of BM-hMSCs in the tumor. In this study, glycotranscriptomic analysis revealed significant heterogeneity within the attractor phenotype and the enrichment of high mannose type N-glycan biosynthesis in the non-attractor phenotype. Orthogonal validation with topical PNGase F deglycosylation on the tumor regions of xenograft tissue, followed by nLC-ESI-MS, confirmed the presence of increased high mannose type N-glycans in the non-attractors. Additional evidence provided by our glycomic study revealed the prevalence of terminal sialic acid-containing N-glycans in non-attractors and terminal galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine N-glycans in attractors. Our results provide the first evidence for differential glycomic profiles in attractor and non-attractor GSCXs and extend the scope of molecular determinates in BM-hMSC homing to glioma. PMID:26185906

  3. Virus infection-associated bone marrow B cell depletion and impairment of humoral immunity to heterologous infection mediated by TNF-alpha/LTalpha.

    PubMed

    Borrow, Persephone; Hou, Sam; Gloster, Simone; Ashton, Miranda; Hyland, Lisa

    2005-02-01

    We previously showed that influenza virus infection of mice induces a depletion of bone marrow B lineage cells due to apoptosis of early B cells mediated by a mechanism involving TNF-alpha/LTalpha. Here we demonstrate that this effect is also observed with acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection and resulted in a deficiency of both splenic transitional B cells and mature follicular B cells. To determine whether there was an associated impairment of humoral immunity, we infected mice with LCMV and 10 days later at the peak of the B cell depletion, inoculated them with influenza virus. We found that influenza virus-specific antibody titers were dramatically reduced in mice recovering from LCMV infection compared to those in mice infected with influenza virus alone. Further, we showed that there was no reduction of the influenza virus-specific antibody response in LCMV-infected TNF-alpha/LTalpha-deficient mice, suggesting that TNF-alpha/LTalpha-mediated effects on bone marrow and/or peripheral lymphocytes were responsible for the observed impairment in humoral immunity. These results show that the TNF-alpha/LTalpha production induced following infection with diverse viruses has detrimental effects on early B cells in the bone marrow, and may be among the factors that lead to the severely compromised humoral immunity observed to subsequent heterologous infections. PMID:15657949

  4. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  5. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  6. Development of Electrochemiluminescent Serology Assays to Measure the Humoral Response to Antigens of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Maifeld, Sarah V.; Ro, Bodrey; Mok, Hoyin; Chu, Marla; Yu, Li; Yamagata, Ryan; Leonardson, Tansy; Chio, Vera; Parhy, Bandita; Park, Samuel; Carlson, Marcia; Machhi, Shushil; Ulbrandt, Nancy; Falsey, Ann R.; Walsh, Edward E.; Wang, C. Kathy; Esser, Mark T.; Zuo, Fengrong

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and precise serology assays are needed to measure the humoral response to antigens of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) following natural infection or vaccination. We developed and evaluated a collection of electrochemiluminescent (ECL) serology assays using four RSV antigens (F, N, Ga and Gb). To assess the merits of ECL technology, the four ECL serology assays were evaluated using a well-characterized “gold standard” panel of acute and convalescent serum samples from fifty-nine RSV-positive and thirty RSV-negative elderly subjects (≥65 years old). The combined results from the four ECL assays demonstrated good concordance to the “gold standard” diagnosis, reaching 95% diagnostic sensitivity and 100% diagnostic specificity. Additionally, a combination of ECL assays provided higher diagnostic sensitivity than a commercially available diagnostic ELISA or cell-based microneutralization assay. In summary, these data demonstrate the advantages of using ECL-based serology assays and highlight their use as a sensitive diagnostic approach to detect recent RSV infection in an elderly population. PMID:27070145

  7. Protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection after nasopharyngeal colonization requires both humoral and cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R; Cohen, J M; Jose, R J; de Vogel, C; Baxendale, H; Brown, J S

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia and infective exacerbations of chronic lung disease, yet there are few data on how adaptive immunity can specifically prevent S. pneumoniae lung infection. We have used a murine model of nasopharyngeal colonization by the serotype 19F S. pneumoniae strain EF3030 followed by lung infection to investigate whether colonization protects against subsequent lung infection and the mechanisms involved. EF3030 colonization induced systemic and local immunoglobulin G against a limited number of S. pneumoniae protein antigens rather than capsular polysaccharide. During lung infection, previously colonized mice had increased early cytokine responses and neutrophil recruitment and reduced bacterial colony-forming units in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with control mice. Colonization-induced protection was lost when experiments were repeated in B-cell- or neutrophil-deficient mice. Furthermore, the improved interleukin (IL)-17 response to infection in previously colonized mice was abolished by depletion of CD4+ cells, and prior colonization did not protect against lung infection in mice depleted of CD4+ cells or IL17. Together these data show that naturally acquired protective immunity to S. pneumoniae lung infection requires both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, providing a template for the design of improved vaccines that can specifically prevent pneumonia or acute bronchitis. PMID:25354319

  8. Hydrolysis of thymic humoral factor gamma 2 by neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11).

    PubMed Central

    Indig, F E; Pecht, M; Trainin, N; Burstein, Y; Blumberg, S

    1991-01-01

    A search for the natural substrates for neutral endopeptidase (NEP; EC 3.4.24.11) in the immune system led to investigation of the enzyme's action on thymic humoral factor gamma 2 (THF). The ectoenzyme rapidly and efficiently hydrolyses the Lys6-Phe7 bond of the octapeptide. The site of cleavage was confirmed by h.p.l.c. analysis, amino acid analysis and sequence determination of the products. Phosphoramidon (3.6 microM), a potent inhibitor of the enzyme, prevents this cleavage even during prolonged incubation. The high efficiency of hydrolysis of THF by NEP is similar to that reported for [Leu5]enkephalin, and the dipeptide Phe-Leu is the C-terminal product in the hydrolysis of both peptides. The presence of NEP, reportedly identified as the common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia antigen (CALLA), in bone-marrow cells and other cells of the immune system raises the possibility that it may play a role in modulating the activity of peptides such as THF. PMID:1898375

  9. Cellular and humoral immunity in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dhib-Jalbut, S S; Abdelnoor, A M; Haddad, F S

    1981-01-01

    Cellular and humoral immunity was studied in 26 patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Results were compared with those of 14 normal controls and 11 patients suffering from other neurological disorders. It was shown that cellular and humoral immune responses are adequate in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The persistently elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA indicated a persistent infection, and their progressive rise in later stages correlated with the progressive nature of the illness. IgG progressively increased with the clinical stage in the cerebrospinal fluid unaccompanied by a corresponding rise in the measles antibody titer. This suggests that antigenic determinants other than those tested play a role in the production of IgG in the cerebrospinal fluid. The progressive increase in the ratio of cerebrospinal fluid to serum IgG with the advance of the disease suggests synthesis of IgG locally in the central nervous system. Elevated measles antibody titer in serum and cerebrospinal fluid is a consistent aid in the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. It is more specific in cerebrospinal fluid than in serum. Its level did not vary significantly with the clinical stages or duration of illness. Depressed serum complement activity has been detected in some subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients in whom serum levels of the third and fourth components of the complement were normal. PMID:6973545

  10. Effect of centchroman on cellular and humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Licto; Asad, Mohammad; Hrishikeshavan, Heremaglur Jagannath; Chandrakala, Gowda Kallenahalli

    2007-01-01

    Centchroman (Ormeloxifene) is a nonsteroidal selective estrogen receptor modulator that is used as once a week oral contraceptive agent. The effect of centchroman on the immune system was evaluated by using different experimental models such as carbon clearance test, cyclophosphamide induced neutropenia, neutrophil adhesion test, effect on serum immunoglobulins, mice lethality test and indirect haemagglutination test. The first three models namely carbon clearance test, cyclophosphamide induced neutropenia and neutrophil adhesion test were used to study cell mediated immunity while the latter three models were used to see the effect on humoral immunity. Centchroman was administered orally at a dose of 5 mg/kg and levamisole (2.5 mg/kg/ p.o) was used as standard drug. Centchroman significantly increased the levels of serum immunoglobulins and also prevented the mortality induced by bovine Pasteurella multocida in mice. It also increased significantly the circulating antibody litre in indirect haemagglunation test. However, it did not show any significant effect on phagocytic index in carbon clearance assay and nor did influence the adhesion of neutrophils in the neutrophil adhesion test. Centchroman was also not effective in preventing the cyclophosphamde induced neutropenia. Hence, it was concluded that centchroman increases humoral immunity with no significant effect on cell mediated immunity. PMID:18476393

  11. Oculo-peritoneal shunt: draining aqueous humor to the peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Junyent, Ana; Maldonado-Bas, Arturo; Gonzalez, Andrea; Pueyrredón, Francisco; Maldonado-Junyent, María; Maldonado-Junyent, Arturo; Rodriguez, Diego; Bulacio, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, there were estimated to be approximately 60.5 million people with glaucoma. This number is expected to increase to 79.6 million by 2020. In 2010, there were 8.4 million people with bilateral blindness caused by glaucoma, and this number is expected in increase to 11.2 million by 2020. Filtering implants are special devices that have been developed to reduce intraocular pressure in patients with refractory glaucoma. The success rate of these implants is relatively low, and they continue to fail over time. To avoid failure caused by the formation of scar tissue around the implants, attempts have been made to drain the aqueous humor to various sites, including the venous system, lacrimal sac, sinuses, and conjunctival fornix. Recently, a system to shunt aqueous humor from the anterior chamber to the peritoneum has been developed. The surgical technique involved in this system is a modification of the technique currently used by neurosurgeons for the treatment of hydrocephalus. We present the first case operated using this technique. PMID:25945537

  12. Serum immunoglobulin levels and humoral immune competence in coalworkers

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.D.; Boyd, J.E.; Collins, H.P.; Davis, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels were measured in 788 coalworkers and 121 nonmining controls for comparison with the radiological category of pneumoconiosis after taking into account age and smoking habit. In addition a simple assessment of humoral immune competence was made by estimating the titre of serum antibody against the common gut commensal Escherichia coli. Smoking was found to depress serum IgA and IgM while levels of IgG and IgA increased slightly with age. Men with radiological signs of coalworkers pneumoconiosis (CWP) had significantly raised levels of IgA and IgG with increasing pneumoconiosis category. Even coalworkers with less than category 1 simple pneumoconiosis had raised levels of IgA, suggesting that increased production of this immunoglobulin occurs before radiologically identifiable pathological changes have occurred in the lung tissue. No association between reduced humoral immune competence and radiological category of pneumoconiosis was found. Whether high Ig levels in men exposed to coal dust are merely a passive response to dusted lung tissue or whether they indicate that an immunological process is important in the development of pneumoconiotic lesions remains uncertain.

  13. Searching for biomarkers: humoral response profiling with luciferase immunoprecipitation systems.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Ching, Kathryn H; Bren, Kathleen E; Iadarola, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    B-cell-mediated humoral responses are triggered in many human diseases, including autoimmune diseases, cancer, and neurologic and infectious diseases. However, the full exploitation of the information contained within a patient's antibody repertoire for diagnosis, monitoring and even disease prediction has been limited due to the poor diagnostic performance of many immunoassay formats. We have developed luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) that harnesses light-emitting proteins to generate high-definition antibody profiles that are optimal for both diagnostics and biomarker discovery. Here, we describe the results and implications from a range of LIPS-antibody profiling studies performed in our laboratory. These include highly sensitive diagnostics for domestic and global pathogens, insights into infection-related diseases, discovery of new biomarkers for human diseases, subcategorization of symptoms and identification of pathogenic autoantibodies against self-proteins. These investigations highlight the types of humoral response profiles associated with different diseases, provide new information related to disease pathogenesis and offer a framework for incorporating LIPS antibody profiling into global health initiatives and disease monitoring. PMID:21679112

  14. Changes in humoral immunologic parameters after exposure to volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Olenchock, S A; Mull, J C; Mentnech, M S; Lewis, D M; Bernstein, R S

    1983-03-01

    Occupational exposure to volcanic ash from Mount St. Helens continues during the salvaging of trees in the high dust blow-down area of Washington. We studied the effects of volcanic ash exposure on the level of humoral immune factors IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, and ANA (antinuclear antibody) in a group of volcanic ash-exposed loggers shortly after the major eruption and one year later. Comparisons with similar levels in nonexposed, similarly employed, matched loggers were made. C3 and C4 levels were significantly lower at both time periods in the exposed loggers when compared to the reference group. No differences between groups were observed at either time period for the immunoglobulin levels or ANA. The exposed loggers did show a marked decrease (not seen in the reference group) in serum IgG levels after 1 yr of exposure to the volcanic ash. They likewise showed a significant mean increase in IgA, while the reference group had a mean increase in IgM after 1 yr. These data suggest that exposure to volcanic ash may affect humoral immunologic parameters. PMID:6601725

  15. The adenylate cyclase receptor complex and aqueous humor formation.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, J.; Sears, M.

    1984-01-01

    The secretory tissue of the eye, the ciliary processes, contains an enzyme receptor complex, composed of membrane proteins, the catalytic moiety of the enzyme adenylate cyclase, a guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein (or N protein), and other features. The enzyme can be activated by well-known neurohumoral or humoral agents, catecholamines, glycoprotein hormones produced by the hypothalamic pituitary axis, and other related compounds, including placental gonadotropin, organic fluorides, and forskolin, a diterpene. These compounds cause the ciliary epithelia to produce cyclic AMP at an accelerated rate. Cyclic AMP, as a second messenger, causes, either directly or indirectly, a decrease in the net rate of aqueous humor inflow that may be modulated by cofactors. Clinical syndromes fit the experimental data so that an integrated explanation can be given for the reduced intraocular pressure witnessed under certain central nervous system and adrenergic influences. The molecular biology of this concept provides important leads for future investigations that bear directly both upon the regulation of intraocular pressure and upon glaucoma. Images FIG. 11 PMID:6093393

  16. Humor Styles and Their Relationship to Well-Being among the Gifted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick; Ronner, Sieuwke; Nauta, Arnolda

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which a sample of 202 gifted individuals (members of Mensa) engaged in four humor styles and the extent to which these humor styles were related to their well-being. These results were compared to a comparative population sample (n = 265). Results showed that gifted individuals most often used positive…

  17. A Review of Humor in Educational Settings: Four Decades of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banas, John A.; Dunbar, Norah; Rodriguez, Dariela; Liu, Shr-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of this project is to provide a summary of extant research regarding humor in the classroom, with an emphasis on identifying and explaining inconsistencies in research findings and offering new directions for future studies in this area. First, the definitions, functions, and main theories of humor are reviewed. Next, the paper…

  18. Entextualized Humor in the Formation of Scientist Identities among U.S. Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucholtz, Mary; Skapoulli, Elena; Barnwell, Brendan; Lee, Jung-Eun Janie

    2011-01-01

    Studies of the socialization of novices into scientific cultures typically emphasize official knowledge-making activities. However, scientific socialization is also accomplished informally through humor. As entextualized humor, formulaic jokes enable U.S. undergraduate students in science to claim scientist identities both through a displayed…

  19. "Last Professor Standing!": Powerpoint Enables All Faculty to Use Humor in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2014-01-01

    There are two major global educational trends that have changed the form and execution of humor in the classroom and in professional conferences: (1) the burgeoning instructional technology, especially PowerPoint, which can provide a vehicle for several forms of low risk humor anyone can present; and (2) the diversity of classroom demographics,…

  20. Moderating Influence of Gender on the Relationship between Humor and Peer Acceptance in Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Lawrence W.

    The hypothesis was tested that humor facilitates social attraction. Students in three fourth-grade classrooms responded to two different peer rating surveys, one measuring interpersonal perceptions of humorousness and the other measuring classroom social distance. Differences between same- and cross-gender ratings were examined. Statistical…

  1. Laughter: The Navajo Way. Humorous Stories of the People (in Navajo and English) Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Alan; Dennison, Gene

    This book has been prepared for the use of teachers, ethnologists, linguists, Indian studies scholars, language students and those who have an interest in the languages and cultures of the earlier inhabitants of this continent. The stories reflect the Navajo love for and genius with words and humor. Most of the humor represented is of three basic…

  2. Comprehension of Humor in Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities, Reading Disabilities, and without Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Glass, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The normal development of humor in children has been well documented with a predictable course that is tied to social, cognitive, and linguistic development in children. This study explored humor comprehension in children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD). Children with NVLD were compared with children with reading disabilities and a…

  3. Comprehension of humor in children with nonverbal learning disabilities, reading disabilities, and without learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Glass, Kimberly

    2008-12-01

    The normal development of humor in children has been well documented with a predictable course that is tied to social, cognitive, and linguistic development in children. This study explored humor comprehension in children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD). Children with NVLD were compared with children with reading disabilities and a comparison group of children with no learning disabilities to assess their comprehension of humor. The humor test was composed of a joke and cartoon section. No group differences in humor comprehension were found when the NVLD group was defined as having visual-spatial and visual reasoning deficits. However, when the NVLD group was divided into children with and without social perceptual difficulties as defined by a direct measure of social comprehension, significant group differences were found in the levels of humor comprehension. These results support the association of humor comprehension with social perception and lend tentative support to the hypothesis that children with NVLD may not be a homogenous group. Future study directions include further exploration into the nature of the association between humor comprehension and social perception as well as closer examination of the heterogeneity of NVLD. PMID:18726696

  4. He Who Laughs First: The Importance of Humor to Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krogh, Suzanne

    1985-01-01

    Reviews current theories of humor development, discusses the interaction of humor with other developmental areas (including cognitive development, personality development, creativity, and moral development), and suggests ways in which research can be applied in the early childhood classroom. (Author/DST)

  5. To Laugh is to Know: A Discussion of the Cognitive Element in Children's Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Libby

    The development of children's humor is described, focusing on the cognitive aspect of what is funny and how this relates to children's intellectual growth. Cognitive elements that facilitate children's humor are identified as: (1) the ability to grasp incongruities, (2) the presence of an intellectual challenge, (3) timing, (4) novelty, and (5) a…

  6. Humor Ability Reveals Intelligence, Predicts Mating Success, and Is Higher in Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greengross, Gil; Miller, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    A good sense of humor is sexually attractive, perhaps because it reveals intelligence, creativity, and other "good genes" or "good parent" traits. If so, intelligence should predict humor production ability, which in turn should predict mating success. In this study, 400 university students (200 men and 200 women) completed measures of abstract…

  7. Direct current stimulation of the left temporoparietal junction modulates dynamic humor appreciation.

    PubMed

    Slaby, Isabella; Holmes, Amanda; Moran, Joseph M; Eddy, Marianna D; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2015-11-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of transcranial direct current stimulation targeting the left temporoparietal junction (TPJ) on humor appreciation during a dynamic video rating task. In a within-participants design, we targeted the left TPJ with anodal, cathodal, or no transcranial direct current stimulation, centered at electrode site C3 using a 4×1 targeted stimulation montage. During stimulation, participants dynamically rated a series of six stand-up comedy videos for perceived humor. We measured event-related (time-locked to crowd laughter) modulation of humor ratings as a function of stimulation condition. Results showed decreases in rated humor during anodal (vs. cathodal or none) stimulation; this pattern was evident for the majority of videos and was only partially predicted by individual differences in humor style. We discuss the possibility that upregulation of neural circuits involved in the theory of mind and empathizing with others may reduce appreciation of aggressive humor. In conclusion, the present data show that neuromodulation of the TPJ can alter the mental processes underlying humor appreciation, suggesting critical involvement of this cortical region in detecting, comprehending, and appreciating humor. PMID:26351965

  8. The Use of Humor in a CBI Science Lesson To Enhance Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snetsinger, Wendy; Grabowski, Barbara

    This research experiment studied the effect of humor versus non-humor on learning and retention of a computer-based instructional (CBI) lesson on tick identification. The experiment also surveyed the subjects' enjoyment of the lesson material, their personal experiences with ticks, and their concerns about ticks and tick-borne diseases.…

  9. Antigenic Targets of the Bovine Humoral Response to PDD-associated Spirochetes Change with Subsequent Exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD), also known as hairy heel wart, is a major cause of lameness of cows in the U.S. dairy industry. Cattle are known to mount a humoral response to spirochetes isolated from PDD lesions. This study was undertaken to evaluate the progression of the bovine humoral i...

  10. The Potency of Humor and Instructional Self-Efficacy on Art Teacher Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans-Palmer, Teri

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative study was sparked by a keen interest in art teachers who practice humor in challenging school environments. Stressors unique to art education can cause teachers to lose heart in such a way that their ability to perform is compromised. To teach effectively, teachers must maintain resilience to cope with stress. Pedagogical humor,…

  11. Humor in High School and the Role of Teacher Leaders in School Public Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosiczky, Bonnie; Mullen, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    How can public schools improve public relations strategies, particularly in communications between teachers and students? The purposes of this study were to investigate teacher leaders' perceptions of the use of humor in the high school classroom and discover how humor might bridge instruction to student learning and strengthen…

  12. Humor and laughter in persons with cognitive impairment and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Liptak, Amy; Tate, Judith; Flatt, Jason; Oakley, Mary Ann; Lingler, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe humor and laughter in persons with cognitive impairment (PWCI) and caregivers who were recalling a shared experience in a focus group. Design Twenty participants attended an Art Engagement Activity at the Andy Warhol Art Museum, which included a guided tour and an art project. All PWCI had medically diagnosed cognitive disorders and all caregiver participants did not. Four focus groups were conducted and transcripts of audio-recorded sessions were transferred to a qualitative software program. Methods Words, phrases and episodes of humor and laughter were used to construct codes, which were refined during group analysis using constant comparison. Findings Humor and laughter were present in all four focus groups. Emerging themes of humor included silliness, sarcasm and commenting about hardships of dementia. Laughter was identified in segments with and without humor. Some PWCI were unable to follow social cues. Conclusions Humor and laughter played a role in creating a safe social environment. PWCI were able to engage in humor during social interactions, yet some had difficulty recognizing social cues. Further study may reveal roles of humor and laughter in adaptation to cognitive decline and holistic interventions for improved quality of life. PMID:23926217

  13. Relationships between Humor Styles and Family Functioning in Parents of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Alicja; McGrail, J. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The humor styles and family functioning of parents of children with disabilities are understudied subjects. This study seeks to shed quantitative light on these areas. Seventy-two parents of children with disabilities completed the "Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales" (FACES IV) and the "Humor Styles…

  14. Spanish Teachers' Sense of Humor and Student Performance on the National Spanish Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that second/foreign language teachers' sense of humor is directly related to many outcomes for teachers and their students. This research investigates the relationship between the perceived sense of humor of in-service Spanish teachers' (n?=?102) and their students' (n?=?5,419) score on the National Spanish Exams…

  15. Mirth and Murder: Crime Scene Investigation as a Work Context for Examining Humor Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L.; Vivona, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Within work settings, humor is used by workers for a wide variety of purposes. This study examines humor applications of a specific type of worker in a unique work context: crime scene investigation. Crime scene investigators examine death and its details. Members of crime scene units observe death much more frequently than other police officers…

  16. The Role of Humor in Learning Physics: a Study of Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Maria

    2016-02-01

    We all know that they do it, but what do students laugh about when learning science together? Although research has shown that students do use humor when they learn science, the role of humor in science education has received little attention. In this study, undergraduate students' laughter during collaborative work in physics has been investigated. In order to do this, a framework inspired by conversation analysis has been used. Empirical data was drawn from two video-recorded sessions in which first-year engineering students solved physics problems together. The analysis revealed that the students' use of humor was almost exclusively related to physics. Five themes identified summarize the role of humor in the group discussions: Something is obvious, Something is difficult, Something said might be wrong, Something is absurd, and Something said is not within informal norms. This study shows that humor may contribute not only to a good working atmosphere and thereby to the students' learning but also how humor interrelates with both disciplinary culture of physics and its epistemology. The students do not only create and re-create humor that facilitates their social interactions, but through humor they constitute local norms of science and engage with the disciplinary discourse.

  17. A Review of Humor for Computer Games: Play, Laugh and More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormann, Claire; Biddle, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Computer games are now becoming ways to communicate, teach, and influence attitudes and behavior. In this article, we address the role of humor in computer games, especially in support of serious purposes. We begin with a review of the main theories of humor, including superiority, incongruity, and relief. These theories and their…

  18. Exposure to Sexist Humor and Rape Proclivity: The Moderator Effect of Aversiveness Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero-Sanchez, Monica; Duran, Mercedes; Carretero-Dios, Hugo; Megias, Jesus L.; Moya, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of exposure to sexist humor about women on men's self-reported rape proclivity. Earlier studies have shown that exposure to this type of humor increases rape proclivity and that funniness responses to jokes are a key element to consider. However, the role of aversiveness responses has not been…

  19. The heart of the matter: the effects of humor on well-being during recovery from cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Nicholas L; Yoshimura, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the uses of humor among cardiovascular patients to test the associations between humor use, satisfaction with companion relationships, and health during recovery. Self-report data were collected from members of two national support groups for patients recovering from cardiovascular disease. As expected, general humorousness associated with social and psychological well-being. Several specific functions of humor in cardiovascular recovery were identified and linked with health perceptions. Antidote humor increased social and psychological health perceptions, whereas conversation regulation humor and distancing humor were negatively related to perceived social and psychological health. Relationship satisfaction mediated most effects. The findings offer new insight into the variability of humor effects, particularly following cardiovascular treatment. PMID:23829386

  20. Humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    WONG-CHEW, ROSA MARÍA; FRÍAS, MARGARITA NAVA; GARCÍA-LEÓN, MIGUEL LEONARDO; ARRIAGA-PIZANO, LOURDES; SANSON, AURORA MEDINA; LOPEZ-MACÍAS, CONSTANTINO; ISIBASI, ARMANDO; SANTOS-PRECIADO, JOSÉ IGNACIO

    2012-01-01

    The immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer is controversial. The objective of this study was to characterize the cellular and humoral immune responses to an influenza vaccine in children with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy. In this study, children with cancer, who were not previously immunized, received an influenza vaccine via intramuscular injection. Blood samples were obtained prior to and at 4 weeks after immunization. Antibodies were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Cell-mediated immunity was measured by specific lymphoproliferation with 3H-thymidine incorporation and by measuring cell frequencies following staining with monoclonal antibodies (CD8, CD4, CD19, CD45RA and CD27) using flow cytometry following incubation with the influenza antigen for 5 days. Geometric mean titers (GMT), mean counts per minute (cpm), cell frequencies prior to and following vaccination and percentage patient responses were compared using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric U and Chi-square tests; where p<0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant result. A total of 56 children were included. Their mean age was 6.64±3.61 years. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was diagnosed in 75, solid tumors in 23 and lymphoma in 2% of the children. Subjects with titers ≥40 hemagglutination units (HU) increased from 43% prior to vaccination to 73% following vaccination (p=0.01), whereas the GMT increased from 31.35 [95% confidence interval (CI), 29–111] to 143.45 HU (95% CI, 284–640) following vaccination (p<0.001). An increase in CD45RA expression in CD8+ T cells was observed following vaccination (p=0.01). An increase in CD27 expression was observed in the CD4/8-negative cell population stimulated with the influenza antigen following vaccination (p<0.05). No serious adverse effects were observed. An increase in the seropositivity rate and GMT values following influenza vaccination were also observed. Influenza

  1. Virtuous laughter: we should teach medical learners the art of humor.

    PubMed

    Oczkowski, Simon

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the stress and burnout suffered by critical care workers. Physicians have a responsibility to teach learners the skills required not only to treat patients, but to cope with the demands of a stressful profession. Humor has been neglected as a strategy to help learners develop into virtuous and resilient physicians. Humor can be used to reduce stress, address fears, and to create effective health care teams. However, there are forms of humor which can be hurtful or discriminatory. In order to maximize the benefits of humor and to reduce its harms, we need to teach and model the effective and virtuous use of humor in the intensive care unit. PMID:25959366

  2. Humor Therapy: Relieving Chronic Pain and Enhancing Happiness for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Mimi M. Y.; Lo, Anna P. K.; Cheng, Tracy L. Y.; Chan, Eva K. K.; Chan, Annie H. Y.; Chung, Helena S. W.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the effectiveness of a humor therapy program in relieving chronic pain, enhancing happiness and life satisfaction, and reducing loneliness among older persons with chronic pain. It was a quasiexperimental pretest-posttest controlled design. Older persons in a nursing home were invited to join an 8-week humor therapy program (experimental group), while those in another nursing home were treated as a control group and were not offered the program. There were 36 older people in the experimental group and 34 in the control group. Upon completion of the humor therapy program, there were significant decreases in pain and perception of loneliness, and significant increases in happiness and life satisfaction for the experimental group, but not for the control group. The use of humor therapy appears to be an effective nonpharmacological intervention. Nurses and other healthcare professionals could incorporate humor in caring for their patients. PMID:21151506

  3. Tomato paste alters NF-κB and cancer-related mRNA expression in prostate cancer cells, xenografts, and xenograft microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Bastani, Nasser E; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2015-01-01

    Tomatoes may protect against prostate cancer development, possibly through targeting signaling pathways such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We investigated whether tomato paste could modulate NF-κB activity and cancer-related gene expression in human derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and PC3 xenografts. PC3-cells were stably transduced with an NF-κB-luciferase construct, and treated with tomato extracts or vehicle control. Nude mice bearing PC3 xenografts were fed a Western-like diet with or without 10% tomato paste for 6.5 wk. The tomato diet significantly inhibited TNFα stimulated NF-κB activity in cultured PC3 cells, and modulated the expression of genes associated with inflammation, apoptosis, and cancer progression. Accumulation of lycopene occurred in liver, xenografts, and serum of mice fed tomato diet. Tomato paste in the diet did not affect tumor size in mice; however, there was a trend toward inhibition of NF-κB activity in the xenografts. The effect of tomato on gene expression was most prominent in the xenograft microenvironment, where among others NFKB2, STAT3, and STAT6 showed higher expression levels after tomato treatment. Our findings support biological activity of tomatoes in cancer-related inflammation. PMID:25664890

  4. Evaluation of 89Zr-pertuzumab in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to HER2 and is used in combination with another HER2–specific monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, for the treatment of HER2+ metastatic breast cancer. Pertuzumab binds to an HER2 binding site distinct from that of trastuzumab, and its affinity is enhanced when trastuzumab is present. We aim to exploit this enhanced affinity of pertuzumab for its HER2 binding epitope and adapt this antibody as a PET imaging agent by radiolabeling with 89Zr to increase the sensitivity of HER2 detection in vivo. Here, we investigate the biodistribution of 89Zr-pertuzumab in HER2–expressing BT-474 and HER2–nonexpressing MDA-MB-231 xenografts to quantitatively assess HER2 expression in vivo. In vitro cell binding studies were performed resulting in retained immunoreactivity and specificity for HER2–expressing cells. In vivo evaluation of 89Zr-pertuzumab was conducted in severely combined immunodeficient mice, subcutaneously inoculated with BT-474 and MDA-MB-231 cells. 89Zr-pertuzumab was systemically administered and imaged at 7 days postinjection (p.i.) followed by terminal biodistribution studies. Higher tumor uptake was observed in BT-474 compared to MDA-MB-231 xenografts with 47.5 ± 32.9 and 9.5 ± 1.7% ID/g, respectively at 7 days p.i (P = 0.0009) and blocking studies with excess unlabeled pertuzumab showed a 5-fold decrease in BT-474 tumor uptake (P = 0.0006), confirming the in vivo specificity of this radiotracer. Importantly, we observed that the tumor accumulation of 89Zr-pertuzumab was increased in the presence of unlabeled trastuzumab, at 173 ± 74.5% ID/g (P = 0.01). Biodistribution studies correlate with PET imaging quantification using max SUV (r = 0.98, P = 0.01). Collectively, these results illustrate that 89Zr-pertuzumab as a PET imaging agent may be beneficial for the quantitative and noninvasive assessment of HER2 expression in vivo especially for patients undergoing trastuzumab therapy. PMID:25058168

  5. Ursodeoxycholic acid induces apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Xu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Huang, Ya; Han, Guo-Qing; Liang, Tie-Jun; Wei, Li-Li; Qin, Cheng-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: BALB/c nude mice were randomized into four groups 24 h before subcutaneous injection of hepatocarcinoma BEL7402 cells suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) into the right flank. The control group (n = 10) was fed a standard diet while treatment groups (n = 10 each) were fed a standard daily diet supplemented with different concentrations of UDCA (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg per day) for 21 d. Tumor growth was measured once each week, and tumor volume (V) was calculated with the following equation: V = (L × W2) × 0.52, where L is the length and W is the width of the xenograft. After 21 d, mice were killed under ether anesthesia, and tumors were excised and weighed. Apoptosis was evaluated through detection of DNA fragmentation with gel electrophoresis and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the expression of apoptosis-related proteins BAX, BCL2, APAF1, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3. RESULTS: UDCA suppressed tumor growth relative to controls. The mean tumor volumes were the following: control, 1090 ± 89 mm3; 30 mg/kg per day, 612 ± 46 mm3; 50 mg/kg per day, 563 ± 38 mm3; and 70 mg/kg per day, 221 ± 26 mm3. Decreased tumor volumes reached statistical significance relative to control xenografts (30 mg/kg per day, P < 0.05; 50 mg/kg per day, P < 0.05; 70 mg/kg per day, P < 0.01). Increasing concentrations of UDCA led to increased DNA fragmentation observed on gel electrophoresis and in the TUNEL assay (control, 1.6% ± 0.3%; 30 mg/kg per day, 2.9% ± 0.5%; 50 mg/kg per day, 3.15% ± 0.7%, and 70 mg/kg per day, 4.86% ± 0.9%). Western blot analysis revealed increased expression of BAX, APAF1, cleaved-caspase-9 and cleaved-caspase-3 proteins, which induce apoptosis, but decreased expression of BCL2

  6. Pathobiochemical mechanisms during the acute phase response.

    PubMed

    Kleesiek, K; Greiling, H

    1984-01-01

    The acute phase response is characterised by the following sequence of principle phenomena: (1) an early local inflammatory reaction, (2) formation of inflammatory humoral factors inducing a systemic reaction, (3) stimulation of glycoprotein synthesis predominantly in the hepatocytes, and (4) an increase in the plasma concentration of acute phase proteins, when the rate of biosynthesis exceeds the degradation rate. Inflammatory mediators (lysosomal enzymes, oxygen derived radicals, prostaglandins) are mainly released during phagocytosis by granulocytes and macrophages. The signal reaching the hepatocytes is not yet clearly identified. A leukocyte endogenous mediator (LEM) released by macrophages is described. There is evidence that prostaglandins and probably proteinase alpha 2-macroglobulin complexes are also involved. The hepatic acute phase protein synthesis is modulated by hormones (insulin, cortisol, somatotropin). The biochemical events in the hepatocyte include an increase in protein synthesis and the regulatory control of the glycosylation of polypeptide precursors. The secreted glycoproteins serve variously as inhibitors or mediators of the inflammatory processes. PMID:6208159

  7. Don't Tease Me, I'm Working: Examining Humor in a Midwestern Organization Using Ethnography of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojha, Ajay K.; Holmes, Tammy L.

    2010-01-01

    Within organizations, the communicative phenomenon of humor is commonplace. Humorous talk is just as important and frequent to regular discourse that takes place between organizational members. In this inquiry we examine humor as a particular way of communicating between members of a small Midwestern United States organization. Specifically, we…

  8. Fine-tuning patient-derived xenograft models for precision medicine approaches in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Olivia L; Milford, Terry-Ann M; Beldiman, Cornelia; Payne, Kimberly J

    2016-03-01

    Many leukemias are characterized by well-known mutations that drive oncogenesis. Mice engineered with these mutations provide a foundation for understanding leukemogenesis and identifying therapies. However, data from whole genome studies provide evidence that malignancies are characterized by multiple genetic alterations that vary between patients, as well as inherited genetic variation that can also contribute to oncogenesis. Improved outcomes will require precision medicine approaches-targeted therapies tailored to malignancies in each patient. Preclinical models that reflect the range of mutations and the genetic background present in patient populations are required to develop and test the combinations of therapies that will be used to provide precision medicine therapeutic strategies. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) produced by transplanting leukemia cells from patients into immune deficient mice provide preclinical models where disease mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy can be studied in vivo in context of the genetic variability present in patient tumors. PDX models are possible because many elements in the bone marrow microenvironment show cross-species activity between mice and humans. However, several cytokines likely to impact leukemia cells are species-specific with limited activity on transplanted human leukemia cells. In this review we discuss the importance of PDX models for developing precision medicine approaches to leukemia treatment. We illustrate how PDX models can be optimized to overcome a lack of cross-species cytokine activity by reviewing a recent strategy developed for use with a high-risk form of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that is characterized by overexpression of CRLF2, a receptor component for the cytokine, TSLP. PMID:26912005

  9. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J.; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdcscid and Il2rgnull alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation. PMID:24912157

  10. It's in the way that you use it: attachment and the dyadic nature of humor during conflict negotiation in romantic couples.

    PubMed

    Winterheld, Heike A; Simpson, Jeffry A; Oriña, M Minda

    2013-04-01

    In a behavioral observation study with dating couples, we examined (a) how attachment orientations predict humor use and (b) how people respond to their partners' use of humor. Couples were videotaped while trying to resolve a relationship conflict. Each discussion was rated on several theoretically relevant dimensions. Highly avoidant individuals used more aggressive humor and less affiliative humor during their discussions, whereas highly anxious individuals used more self-defeating humor. Individuals also tailored their humor use to partners who were highly anxious and distressed. Aggressive humor was received more negatively by partners who sought more care. Affiliative humor was favorably received, especially when partners were more distressed, whereas self-defeating humor elicited negative responses from highly distressed partners. Both highly anxious and avoidant individuals reacted unfavorably when they were the recipients of the humor styles they used most often. The implications of these results for our understanding of relationships and humor are discussed. PMID:23456558

  11. Quercetin Aglycone Is Bioavailable in Murine Pancreas and Pancreatic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifeng; Angst, Eliane; Park, Jenny L.; Moro, Aune; Dawson, David W.; Reber, Howard A.; Eibl, Guido; Hines, O. Joe; Go, Vay-Liang W.; Lu, Qing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Quercetin is a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic and other cancers. This study was to examine the distribution of quercetin in plasma, lung, liver, pancreas and pancreatic cancer xenografts in a murine in vivo model and the uptake of quercetin in pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells in cellular in vitro model. Mice were randomly allocated to control diet, 0.2 and 1% quercetin diet groups utilizing the AIN93G-based diet (n=12 per group) for 6 weeks. In addition, 6 mice from each group were injected weekly with chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine (120 mg/kg mouse, i.p.). MiaPaCa cells were collected from culture medium after cells were exposed to 30 µM of quercetin for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hrs. Levels of quercetin and 3-O’-methyl-quercetin in mice tissues and MiaPaCa-2 cells were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography following enzymatic hydrolysis and then extraction. Our study showed that quercetin is accumulated in pancreatic cancer cells, and is absorbed in the circulating system, tumors and tissues of pancreas, liver and lung in vivo. A higher proportion of total quercetin found in tumors and pancreas are aglycones. Gemcitabine co-treatment with quercetin reduced absorption of quercetin in mice circulatory system and liver. Results from the study provide important information on the interpretation of chemo-therapeutic efficacy of quercetin. PMID:20499918

  12. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models in Gynecological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Clare L.; Mackay, Helen J; Haluska, Paul

    2014-01-01

    OVERVIEW In the era of targeted therapies, patients with gynecological malignancies have not yet been major beneficiaries of this new class of agents. This may reflect the fact that the main tumor types, ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers, are a highly heterogeneous group of cancers, with variable response to standard chemotherapies. This is also likely due to poor model development in which to study the diversity of these cancers. Cancer-derived cell lines fail to adequately recapitulate molecular hallmarks of specific cancer subsets and complex microenvironments, which may be critical for sensitivity to targeted therapies. Patient derived xenografts (PDX), using fresh human tumor without prior in vitro culture, combined with whole genome expression, gene copy number and sequencing analyses, could dramatically aid novel therapy development in gynecological malignancies. Gynecological tumors can be engrafted in immunodeficient mice with a high rate of success and within a reasonable time frame. The resulting PDX accurately recapitulate the patient’s tumour in histological, molecular and in vivo treatment response characteristics. Orthotopic PDX develop complications relevant for the clinic, such as ascites and bowel obstruction, providing opportunities for understanding the biology of these clinical problems. Thus, PDX have great promise for delivering improved understanding of gynecological malignancies, serve as better models for designing novel therapies and clinical trials and could underpin individualized, directed therapy for patients from whom PDX models have been established. PMID:24857111

  13. Metastatic phenotype in CWR22 prostate cancer xenograft following castration

    PubMed Central

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Affronti, Hayley C.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan M.; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    Background CWR22 is a human xenograft model of primary prostate cancer (PCa) that is often utilized to study castration recurrent (CR) PCa. CWR22 recapitulates clinical response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), in that tumors regress in response to castration, but can recur after a period of time. Methods Two cohorts of mice, totaling 117 mice were implanted with CWR22, allowed to develop tumors, castrated by pellet removal and followed for a period of 32 and 50 weeks. Mice presenting with tumors >2.0 cm3 at the primary site, moribund appearance, or palpable masses other than the primary tumor were sacrificed prior to the endpoint of the study. Tumor tissue, serum, and abnormal lesions were collected upon necropsy and analyzed by IHC, H&E, and PCR for presence of metastatic lesions arising from CWR22. Results Herein, we report that CWR22 progresses after castration from a primary, hormonal therapy‐naïve tumor to metastatic disease in 20% of castrated nude mice. Histological examination of CWR22 primary tumors revealed distinct pathologies that correlated with metastatic outcome after castration. Conclusion This is the first report and characterization of spontaneous metastasis in the CWR22 model, thus, CWR22 is a bona‐fide model of clinical PCa representing the full progression from androgen‐sensitive, primary PCa to metastatic CR‐PCa. Prostate 76:359–368, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26642837

  14. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Martinez, Gary V.; Cornnell, Heather H.; Hart, Charles P.; Baker, Amanda F.; Gillies, Robert

    2016-01-01

    TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC). The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans) within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3) following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials. PMID:27227903

  15. Localization of human tumour xenografts after i.v. administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moshakis, V; McIlhinney, R A; Raghavan, D; Neville, A M

    1981-07-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (LICR-LON/HT13) has been developed to a cell-surface antigen carried on a human germ-cell tumour xenograft (HX39). After radioiodination, the antibody localized in vivo preferentially in xenografted tumours as opposed to normal mouse tissue, whereas tumor uptake did not occur with normal mouse IgG or nonspecific monoclonal IgG. This selective localization could be abolished by simultaneous injection of an excess of the unlabelled LICR-LON/HT13. The kinetics of and factors influencing localization have been examined. Tumour weight was important in that the smaller the tumour the better the localization. LICR-LON/HT13 was found to localize also in other xenografted germ-cell tumours, but not in non-germ-cell tumour xenografts. Thus monoclonal antibodies are capable of selective in vivo localization of human tumours in an animal model, and their clinical value should now be assessed. PMID:6789857

  16. Establishing Prostate Cancer Patient Derived Xenografts: Lessons Learned From Older Studies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Pamela J; Russell, Peter; Rudduck, Christina; Tse, Brian W-C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Raghavan, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the progression of prostate cancer to androgen-independence/castrate resistance and development of preclinical testing models are important for developing new prostate cancer therapies. This report describes studies performed 30 years ago, which demonstrate utility and shortfalls of xenografting to preclinical modeling. Methods We subcutaneously implanted male nude mice with small prostate cancer fragments from transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) from 29 patients. Successful xenografts were passaged into new host mice. They were characterized using histology, immunohistochemistry for marker expression, flow cytometry for ploidy status, and in some cases by electron microscopy and response to testosterone. Two xenografts were karyotyped by G-banding. Results Tissues from 3/29 donors (10%) gave rise to xenografts that were successfully serially passaged in vivo. Two, (UCRU-PR-1, which subsequently was replaced by a mouse fibrosarcoma, and UCRU-PR-2, which combined epithelial and neuroendocrine features) have been described. UCRU-PR-4 line was a poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinoma derived from a patient who had undergone estrogen therapy and bilateral castration after his cancer relapsed. Histologically, this comprised diffusely infiltrating small acinar cell carcinoma with more solid aggregates of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The xenografted line showed histology consistent with a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and stained positively for prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and the cytokeratin cocktail, CAM5.2, with weak staining for prostate specific antigen (PSA). The line failed to grow in female nude mice. Castration of three male nude mice after xenograft establishment resulted in cessation of growth in one, growth regression in another and transient growth in another, suggesting that some cells had retained androgen sensitivity. The karyotype (from passage 1) was 43

  17. Science for the Public Through Collaboration and Humor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargo, Richard

    2013-03-01

    The transformation of all things media and information into a dynamic environment of user access has created what seems infinite possibilities to inform the public in many different ways - as well as seemingly infinite possibilities to confuse. This talk will describe a rather non-conventional collaboration between two different creative cultures and its significance to maintaining scientific accuracy and devising strategies important to audience engagement - among them humor. While focusing on the award-winning effort ``When Things Get Small'' created by University of California Television producer R. Wargo in collaboration with condensed matter physicist I.K. Schuller and actor Adam J. Smith, with both NSF and private support, the case study provides insight into a model and modes which can be used successfully by other scientists to engage the public in what they do.

  18. Psychological stress may induce increased humoral and decreased cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Paik, I H; Toh, K Y; Lee, C; Kim, J J; Lee, S J

    2000-01-01

    Stress alters immune function and affects different immune cell populations in different ways. The authors examined whether psychological stress has different effects on the production of macrophage, T-helper 1(Th1) cell, and T-helper 2(Th2) cell-derived cytokines. Forty-two college students were recruited and their blood was sampled on the day they were to take a stressful academic examination and again 4 weeks after the examination. The stress from the academic examination significantly increased IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-10 and decreased IFN-gamma production. These findings suggest that examination stress may increase Th2 cell-mediated humoral immunity and macrophage activities and may decrease Th1 cell-mediated cellular immunity. PMID:11209594

  19. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    PubMed Central

    von Mensdorff-Pouilly, Silvia; Moreno, Maria; Verheijen, René H. M.

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer. PMID:24212946

  20. Humoral and cellular factors of maternal immunity in swine.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Henri; Berri, Mustapha; Gerdts, Volker; Meurens, François

    2009-03-01

    Immunoglobulins cannot cross the placenta in pregnant sows. Neonatal pigs are therefore agammaglobulinemic at birth and, although immunocompetent, they cannot mount rapid immune responses at systemic and mucosal sites. Their survival depends directly on the acquisition of maternal immunity via colostrum and milk. Protection by maternal immunity is mediated by a number of factors, including specific systemic humoral immunity, involving mostly maternal IgG transferred from blood to colostrum and typically absorbed within the first 36 h of life. Passive mucosal immunity involves local humoral immunity, including the production of secretory IgA (sIgA), which is transferred principally via milk until weaning. The mammary gland (MG) produces sIgA, which is, then secreted into the milk via the poly-Ig receptor (pIgR) of epithelial cells. These antibodies are produced in response to intestinal and respiratory antigens, including pathogens and commensal organisms. Protection is also mediated by cellular immunity, which is transferred via maternal cells present in mammary secretions. The mechanisms underlying the various immunological links between MG and the mucosal surfaces involve hormonally regulated addressins and chemokines specific to these compartments. The enhancement of colostrogenic immunity depends on the stimulation of systemic immunity, whereas the enhancement of lactogenic immunity depends on appropriate stimulation at induction sites, an increase in cell trafficking from the gut and upper respiratory tract to the MG and, possibly, enhanced immunoglobulin production at the effector site and secretion in milk. In addition, mammary secretions provide factors other than immunoglobulins that protect the neonate and regulate the development of mucosal immunity--a key element of postnatal adaptation to environmental antigens. PMID:18761034

  1. Brain hemodynamic activity during viewing and re-viewing of comedy movies explained by experienced humor.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Pajula, Juha; Tohka, Jussi; Lee, Hsin-Ju; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Humor is crucial in human social interactions. To study the underlying neural processes, three comedy clips were shown twice to 20 volunteers during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Inter-subject similarities in humor ratings, obtained immediately after fMRI, explained inter-subject correlation of hemodynamic activity in right frontal pole and in a number of other brain regions. General linear model analysis also indicated activity in right frontal pole, as well as in additional cortical areas and subcortically in striatum, explained by humorousness. The association of the right frontal pole with experienced humorousness is a novel finding, which might be related to humor unfolding over longer time scales in the movie clips. Specifically, frontal pole has been shown to exhibit longer temporal receptive windows than, e.g., sensory areas, which might have enabled processing of humor in the clips based on holding information and reinterpreting that in light of new information several (even tens of) seconds later. As another novel finding, medial and lateral prefrontal areas, frontal pole, posterior-inferior temporal areas, posterior parietal areas, posterior cingulate, striatal structures and amygdala showed reduced activity upon re-viewing of the clips, suggesting involvement in processing of humor related to novelty of the comedic events. PMID:27323928

  2. Infant humor perception from 3- to 6-months and attachment at one year.

    PubMed

    Mireault, Gina; Sparrow, John; Poutre, Merlin; Perdue, Brittany; Macke, Laura

    2012-12-01

    Infancy is a critical time for the development of secure attachment, which is facilitated by emotionally synchronous interactions with parents. Humor development, which includes shared laughter and joint attention to an event, emerges concurrently with attachment, but little is known regarding the relationship, if any, between humor development and attachment in the first year. Thirty 3-month-old infants were videoed at home each month until they were 6-months old while their parents attempted to amuse them. Frequency of infants' smiles and laughs served as a measure of "state humor", and the smiling/laughing subscale of the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised served as a measure of "trait humor". State and trait humor were not correlated. Lower trait humor as 6 months predicted higher attachment security on the Attachment Q-sort at 12-months (r=.46), suggesting that less good-humored infants elicit greater parental engagement, which works to the benefit of attachment, or vice versa. Future studies should examine the importance of smiling and laughter as they relate to other developmental phenomena in the first year. PMID:22982281

  3. Ocular pharmacokinetics of latamoxef and cefaclor in humans. Penetration into aqueous humor.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, T; Tsukiai, S; Arai, S; Miyake, K; Kimura, M; Fukuchi, H

    1989-01-01

    Penetrations of latamoxef (LMOX) and cefaclor (CCL) into the aqueous humor after intravenous or oral administration were investigated in patients admitted with cataract. Concentrations of antibiotics in plasma and aqueous humor were determined periodically by microbiological assay. LMOX disappeared from plasma in a monoexponential manner with a half-life of 2.7 h after intravenous administration at a dose of 1000 mg. The maximum concentration of LMOX in aqueous humor (4.7 micrograms/ml) was observed 2 h after administration. When CCL was administered orally at a dose of 500 mg, the maximum concentration of CCL in aqueous humor was 0.53 microgram/ml 2 h after administration, whereas the maximum plasma concentration of 8.4 micrograms/ml was observed at 1 h. Pharmacokinetic analysis (simultaneous simulation) of plasma and aqueous humor concentration-time courses was done by using the best-fitting compartment model examined (modified two-compartment model). Prediction of the concentration of antibiotics in aqueous humor from the plasma concentration profile was also examined using the same compartment model in a separate experiment. The predicted concentration in aqueous humor was proved to fit reasonably with the measured concentration. PMID:2724050

  4. Ocular pharmacokinetics of latamoxef and cefaclor in rabbits. Penetration into aqueous humor.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, T; Tsukiai, S; Arai, S; Miyake, K; Kimura, M; Fukuchi, H

    1988-10-01

    Penetrations of latamoxef (LMOX) and cefaclor (CCL) into the aqueous humor after intravenous or oral administration were investigated in rabbits. Concentrations of antibiotics in plasma and aqueous humor after administration were determined periodically by microbiological assay. LMOX disappeared from plasma in a monoexponential manner with a half-life of 43 min after intravenous administration at a dose of 50 mg/kg. The maximum concentration of LMOX in aqueous humor (6.4 micrograms/ml) was observed 1 h after administration. When CCL was administered orally at a dose of 50 mg/kg, the maximum concentration of CCL in aqueous humor was 1.00 microgram/ml 1.5 h after administration, whereas the maximum plasma concentration of 19.2 micrograms/ml was observed at 30 min. Pharmacokinetic analysis (simultaneous simulation) of plasma and aqueous humor concentration-time courses was made using the best fitted compartment model examined (modified two-compartment model). Prediction of the concentration of antibiotics in aqueous humor from the plasma concentration profile was also examined using the same compartment model in a separate experiment. The predicted concentration in aqueous humor was proved to coincide reasonably well with the measured concentration. PMID:3221302

  5. Brain hemodynamic activity during viewing and re-viewing of comedy movies explained by experienced humor

    PubMed Central

    Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Pajula, Juha; Tohka, Jussi; Lee, Hsin-Ju; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Humor is crucial in human social interactions. To study the underlying neural processes, three comedy clips were shown twice to 20 volunteers during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Inter-subject similarities in humor ratings, obtained immediately after fMRI, explained inter-subject correlation of hemodynamic activity in right frontal pole and in a number of other brain regions. General linear model analysis also indicated activity in right frontal pole, as well as in additional cortical areas and subcortically in striatum, explained by humorousness. The association of the right frontal pole with experienced humorousness is a novel finding, which might be related to humor unfolding over longer time scales in the movie clips. Specifically, frontal pole has been shown to exhibit longer temporal receptive windows than, e.g., sensory areas, which might have enabled processing of humor in the clips based on holding information and reinterpreting that in light of new information several (even tens of) seconds later. As another novel finding, medial and lateral prefrontal areas, frontal pole, posterior-inferior temporal areas, posterior parietal areas, posterior cingulate, striatal structures and amygdala showed reduced activity upon re-viewing of the clips, suggesting involvement in processing of humor related to novelty of the comedic events. PMID:27323928

  6. Effects of different storage protocols on cat testis tissue potential for xenografting and recovery of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mota, Paula C; Ehmcke, Jens; Westernströer, Birgit; Gassei, Kathrin; Ramalho-Santos, João; Schlatt, Stefan

    2012-01-15

    The loss of genetic diversity due to premature death of valuable individuals is a significant problem in animal conservation programs, including endangered felids. Testis tissue xenografting has emerged as a system to obtain spermatozoa from dead immature animals, however protocols to store this tissue before xenografting are still lacking. This study focused on testis tissue cryopreservation and storage from the domestic cat (Felis catus) classified as "pre-pubertal" and "pubertal" according to spermatogenesis development. Grafts from testis tissue cryopreserved with DMSO 1.4M, recovered after 10 weeks xenografting, presented seminiferous tubules with no germ cells. On the contrary, testis tissue from pre-pubertal animals preserved in ice-cold medium for 2 to 5 days presented no loss of viability or spermatogenic potential, while the number of grafts of pubertal cat testis tissue with germ cells after 10 weeks of xenografting decreased with increasing storage time. Nevertheless, even grafts from pre-pubertal cat testis tissue presented lower anti-DDX4 and anti-BOULE staining (proteins necessary for the meiosis completion), when compared with adult cat testis. Finally, a strong correlation found between testis weight and xenograft outcome may help choose good candidates for xenografting. PMID:21958640

  7. Mutational Landscapes of Sequential Prostate Metastases and Matched Patient Derived Xenografts during Enzalutamide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Manish; Wang, Liguo; Xie, Fang; Sicotte, Hugues; Yin, Ping; Dehm, Scott M.; Hart, Steven N.; Vedell, Peter T.; Barman, Poulami; Qin, Rui; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Carlson, Rachel E.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Eiken, Patrick W.; McMenomy, Brendan P.; Wieben, Eric D.; Jha, Gautam; Jimenez, Rafael E.; Weinshilboum, Richard; Wang, Liewei

    2015-01-01

    Developing patient derived models from individual tumors that capture the biological heterogeneity and mutation landscape in advanced prostate cancer is challenging, but essential for understanding tumor progression and delivery of personalized therapy in metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer stage. To demonstrate the feasibility of developing patient derived xenograft models in this stage, we present a case study wherein xenografts were derived from cancer metastases in a patient progressing on androgen deprivation therapy and prior to initiating pre-chemotherapy enzalutamide treatment. Tissue biopsies from a metastatic rib lesion were obtained for sequencing before and after initiating enzalutamide treatment over a twelve-week period and also implanted subcutaneously as well as under the renal capsule in immuno-deficient mice. The genome and transcriptome landscapes of xenografts and the original patient tumor tissues were compared by performing whole exome and transcriptome sequencing of the metastatic tumor tissues and the xenografts at both time points. After comparing the somatic mutations, copy number variations, gene fusions and gene expression we found that the patient’s genomic and transcriptomic alterations were preserved in the patient derived xenografts with high fidelity. These xenograft models provide an opportunity for predicting efficacy of existing and potentially novel drugs that is based on individual metastatic tumor expression signature and molecular pharmacology for delivery of precision medicine. PMID:26695660

  8. Xenograft survival in two species combinations using total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1987-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has profound immunosuppressive actions and has been applied successfully to allotransplantation but not xenotransplantation. Cyclosporine (CsA) has not generally permitted successful xenotransplantation of organs but has not been used in combination with TLI. TLI and CsA were given alone and in combination to rats that were recipients of hamster or rabbit cardiac xenografts. Combined TLI and CsA prolonged survival of hamster-to-rat cardiac xenografts from three days in untreated controls to greater than 100 days in most recipients. TLI alone significantly prolonged rabbit to rat xenograft survival with doubling of survival time. However, combined treatment did not significantly prolong rabbit-to-rat cardiac xenograft survival compared with TLI alone. The hamster and rat are phylogenetically closely related. Transplants from hamsters to rat are concordant xenografts since the time course of unmodified rejection is similar to first-set rejection of allografts. Although the rabbit-to-rat transplant is also between concordant species (average survival of untreated controls: 3.2 days) the rabbit and rat are more distantly related. These results suggest that TLI is an effective immunosuppressant when applied to cardiac xenotransplants in these animal models; that the choice of species critically affects xenograft survival when TLI and/or CsA are used for immunosuppression; and that the closely related species combination tested has markedly prolonged (greater than 100 days) survival using combined TLI and CsA.

  9. Using Psychophysiological Measures to Examine the Temporal Profile of Verbal Humor Elicitation.

    PubMed

    Fiacconi, Chris M; Owen, Adrian M

    2015-01-01

    Despite its pervasiveness in popular culture, there remains much to be learned about the psychological and physiological processes that underlie our experience of humor. In the present study, we examined the temporal profile of verbal humor elicitation using psychophysiological measures of heart rate (HR) and facial electromyography (EMG). Consistent with recent prior research on cardiovascular changes to perceived humor, we found that HR acceleration was greater for jokes relative to non-jokes, and was positively related to the level of perceived humor elicited by these jokes. In addition, activity recorded from the zygomaticus major muscle that controls smiling was found to be greater for jokes relative to non-jokes. To link these physiological changes to the psychological processes that govern humor comprehension, we took the initial inflection point of the zygomatic EMG response as a marker for the onset of humor comprehension, and used this marker to probe the pattern of cardiovascular activity at this time-point. We estimated the onset of the humor response to occur during the initial HR deceleration phase, and found that jokes relative to non-jokes elicited a decreased HR response at this time-point. This result questions the previously forwarded notion that the psychological "moment of insight" that signals the start of the humor response is always associated with heightened cardiovascular activity. This discrepancy is discussed in relation to possible differences in the cognitive processes required to comprehend different forms of humor. At a broader level, our results also demonstrate the advantages of combining different psychophysiological measures to examine psychological phenomena, and illustrate how one such measure can constrain the interpretation of others. PMID:26332843

  10. Using Psychophysiological Measures to Examine the Temporal Profile of Verbal Humor Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Fiacconi, Chris M.; Owen, Adrian M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite its pervasiveness in popular culture, there remains much to be learned about the psychological and physiological processes that underlie our experience of humor. In the present study, we examined the temporal profile of verbal humor elicitation using psychophysiological measures of heart rate (HR) and facial electromyography (EMG). Consistent with recent prior research on cardiovascular changes to perceived humor, we found that HR acceleration was greater for jokes relative to non-jokes, and was positively related to the level of perceived humor elicited by these jokes. In addition, activity recorded from the zygomaticus major muscle that controls smiling was found to be greater for jokes relative to non-jokes. To link these physiological changes to the psychological processes that govern humor comprehension, we took the initial inflection point of the zygomatic EMG response as a marker for the onset of humor comprehension, and used this marker to probe the pattern of cardiovascular activity at this time-point. We estimated the onset of the humor response to occur during the initial HR deceleration phase, and found that jokes relative to non-jokes elicited a decreased HR response at this time-point. This result questions the previously forwarded notion that the psychological “moment of insight” that signals the start of the humor response is always associated with heightened cardiovascular activity. This discrepancy is discussed in relation to possible differences in the cognitive processes required to comprehend different forms of humor. At a broader level, our results also demonstrate the advantages of combining different psychophysiological measures to examine psychological phenomena, and illustrate how one such measure can constrain the interpretation of others. PMID:26332843

  11. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity. PMID:21796701

  12. Gene expression in human ovarian tissue after xenografting.

    PubMed

    Van Langendonckt, A; Romeu, L; Ambroise, J; Amorim, C; Bearzatto, B; Gala, J L; Donnez, J; Dolmans, M M

    2014-06-01

    Cryobanking and transplantation of ovarian tissue is a promising approach to restore fertility in cancer patients. However, ischemic stress following avascular ovarian cortex grafting is known to induce stromal tissue fibrosis and alterations in follicular development. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of freeze-thawing and grafting procedures on gene expression in human ovarian tissue. Frozen-thawed ovarian tissue from 14 patients was xenografted for 7 days to nude mice and one ungrafted fragment was used as a control. Immediately after recovery, grafts were processed for RNA extraction and histological analysis. Their expression profile was screened by whole-genome oligonucleotide array (n = 4) and validated by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain analysis (n = 10). After data filtering, the Limma package was used to build a linear regression model for each gene and to compute its fold change between tissues on Days 0 and 7. After adjusting the P-value by the Sidak method, 84 of the transcripts were significantly altered after 7 days of grafting, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -14 and angiogenic factors such as placental growth factor and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4). Major biological processes were related to tissue remodeling, including secretory processes, cellular adhesion and response to chemical and hormonal stimuli. Angiopoietin signaling, the interleukin-8 pathway and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation were shown to be differentially regulated. On Day 7, overexpression was confirmed by PCR for interleukin-8, transforming growth factor-beta 1, matrix metalloproteinase-14 and CXCR4, compared with ungrafted controls. In conclusion, new as well as known genes involved in tissue restructuring and angiogenesis were identified and found to play a key role during the first days after human ovarian tissue transplantation. This will facilitate the development of strategies to optimize grafting techniques. PMID

  13. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  14. How does psychopathy relate to humor and laughter? Dispositions toward ridicule and being laughed at, the sense of humor, and psychopathic personality traits.

    PubMed

    Proyer, René T; Flisch, Rahel; Tschupp, Stefanie; Platt, Tracey; Ruch, Willibald

    2012-01-01

    This scoping study examines the relation of the sense of humor and three dispositions toward ridicule and being laughed at to psychopathic personality traits. Based on self-reports from 233 adults, psychopathic personality traits were robustly related to enjoying laughing at others, which most strongly related to a manipulative/impulsive lifestyle and callousness. Higher psychopathic traits correlated with bad mood and it existed independently from the ability of laughing at oneself. While overall psychopathic personality traits existed independently from the sense of humor, the facet of superficial charm yielded a robust positive relation. Higher joy in being laughed at also correlated with higher expressions in superficial charm and grandiosity while fearing to be laughed at went along with higher expressions in a manipulative life-style. Thus, the psychopathic personality trait could be well described in its relation to humor and laughter. Implications of the findings are highlighted and discussed with respect to the current literature. PMID:22559907

  15. Dissecting Polyclonal Vaccine-Induced Humoral Immunity against HIV Using Systems Serology.

    PubMed

    Chung, Amy W; Kumar, Manu P; Arnold, Kelly B; Yu, Wen Han; Schoen, Matthew K; Dunphy, Laura J; Suscovich, Todd J; Frahm, Nicole; Linde, Caitlyn; Mahan, Alison E; Hoffner, Michelle; Streeck, Hendrik; Ackerman, Margaret E; McElrath, M Juliana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Pau, Maria G; Baden, Lindsey R; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Barouch, Dan H; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alter, Galit

    2015-11-01

    While antibody titers and neutralization are considered the gold standard for the selection of successful vaccines, these parameters are often inadequate predictors of protective immunity. As antibodies mediate an array of extra-neutralizing Fc functions, when neutralization fails to predict protection, investigating Fc-mediated activity may help identify immunological correlates and mechanism(s) of humoral protection. Here, we used an integrative approach termed Systems Serology to analyze relationships among humoral responses elicited in four HIV vaccine trials. Each vaccine regimen induced a unique humoral "Fc fingerprint." Moreover, analysis of case:control data from the first moderately protective HIV vaccine trial, RV144, pointed to mechanistic insights into immune complex composition that may underlie protective immunity to HIV. Thus, multi-dimensional relational comparisons of vaccine humoral fingerprints offer a unique approach for the evaluation and design of novel vaccines against pathogens for which correlates of protection remain elusive. PMID:26544943

  16. Laugh Away the Fat? Therapeutic Humor in the Control of Stress-induced Emotional Eating.

    PubMed

    Bast, Elizabeth S; Berry, Elliot M

    2014-01-01

    This review explores the potential overlap between the fields of nutrition and therapeutic humor, together with the role of humor as a possible tool for aiding those in whom emotions, particularly negative ones, trigger eating as a means to improve mood. We review emotional eating, obesity, and the hypothesized mechanisms of emotional eating. We then review the field of therapeutic humor and its ability to de-stress individuals, possibly through endorphin and opioid systems, both of which are also involved in eating behavior. Finally, we present a novel hypothesis that people may be trained to use humor as a "food substitute" at best, or to blunt hunger stimuli, to achieve similar advantages, without the side effect of weight gain. PMID:24498514

  17. Stability of ethanol in postmortem blood and vitreous humor in long-term refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Theresa; Hearn, W Lee

    2003-10-01

    Ethanol concentrations in postmortem blood and vitreous humor samples collected at the Miami-Dade Medical Examiner Department over 5-6 years ago were reexamined to assess whether vitreous humor is a more reliable specimen for the analysis of ethanol in samples stored long term. The average change in 50-mL polypropylene tubes containing blood was 0.06 gm/dL (35% loss). On the other hand, vitreous humor samples collected in 10-mL gray-top Vacutainer tubes yielded an average change of 0.01 gm/dL (6.1% loss). This study demonstrates that vitreous humor may be a reliable matrix for ethanol analysis following prolonged refrigerated storage of the samples. PMID:14607009

  18. Laugh Away the Fat? Therapeutic Humor in the Control of Stress-induced Emotional Eating

    PubMed Central

    Bast, Elizabeth S.; Berry, Elliot M.

    2014-01-01

    This review explores the potential overlap between the fields of nutrition and therapeutic humor, together with the role of humor as a possible tool for aiding those in whom emotions, particularly negative ones, trigger eating as a means to improve mood. We review emotional eating, obesity, and the hypothesized mechanisms of emotional eating. We then review the field of therapeutic humor and its ability to de-stress individuals, possibly through endorphin and opioid systems, both of which are also involved in eating behavior. Finally, we present a novel hypothesis that people may be trained to use humor as a “food substitute” at best, or to blunt hunger stimuli, to achieve similar advantages, without the side effect of weight gain. PMID:24498514

  19. Humor: a research and practice tool for nurse scholar-supervisors, practitioners, and educators.

    PubMed

    Yura-Petro, H

    1991-06-01

    The nurse scholar, whether a supervisor, an educator, or a practitioner, has a lifetime of research opportunities as well as personal experiences related to the human need for humor. We need to develop the means to assess the individual's and group's response to humor. Nurse scholars, particularly the nurse supervisor, can make a significant contribution in the search to harness some of the energy we use in laughing and direct it toward helping us heal our human conditions. PMID:10110633

  20. How fun are your meetings? Investigating the relationship between humor patterns in team interactions and team performance.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Allen, Joseph A

    2014-11-01

    Research on humor in organizations has rarely considered the social context in which humor occurs. One such social setting that most of us experience on a daily basis concerns the team context. Building on recent theorizing about the humor-performance link in teams, this study seeks to increase our understanding of the function and effects of humor in team interaction settings. We examined behavioral patterns of humor and laughter in real teams by videotaping and coding humor and laughter during 54 regular organizational team meetings. Performance ratings were obtained immediately following the team meetings as well as at a later time point from the teams' supervisors. At the behavioral unit level within the team interaction process, lag sequential analysis identified humor and laughter patterns occurring above chance (e.g., a joke followed by laughter, followed by another joke). Moreover, humor patterns triggered positive socioemotional communication, procedural structure, and new solutions. At the team level, humor patterns (but not humor or laughter alone) positively related to team performance, both immediately and 2 years later. Team-level job insecurity climate was identified as a boundary condition: In low job insecurity climate conditions, humor patterns were positively related to performance, whereas in high job insecurity climate conditions, humor patterns did not relate to team performance. The role of job insecurity as a boundary condition persisted at both time points. These findings underscore the importance of studying team interactions for understanding the role of humor in organizations and considering team-level boundary conditions over time. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25314363

  1. Kinetics of humoral responsiveness in severe thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, F T; Bachvaroff, R J

    1976-01-01

    Severe thermal injury has the capacity to increase the rate of generation of antibody-forming cells in mice. The intensity of stimulation appears to be proportional to the extent of injury. The effect has been observed in animals burned within 1 hr before or after sensitization with test antigen(s), and persists up to 14 days after injury. Thereafter, the stimulatory effect wanes, and disappears by the 21st day after burning. Responses to T-cell (thymus derived lymphocytes) dependent antigens (sheep erythrocytes; sheep erythrocytes coupled to TNP) and to antigens not requiring T and B-cell (bone marrow derived lymphocytes) cooperation (DNP-Ficoll) appear to be equally affected by thermal injury. The mechanisms underlying this form of enhanced antibody response are not clear. The data, however, support the possibility that the burn wound may release factor(s) capable of enhancing humoral responsiveness in the injured animal. Such factor(s) do not appear to be endotoxins. PMID:945719

  2. Humoral and cellular autoimmune responses in stiff person syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Tobias; Londei, Marco; Hawa, Mohammed; Leslie, R David G

    2003-09-01

    Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is a chronic autoimmune disease associated with humoral and cellular immune responses to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65. Another chronic autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), is also associated with autoimmune responses to this antigen, but T1D patients develop SPS only extremely rarely and only a third of SPS patients develop T1D (mostly mild manifestations in adulthood). In a previous study, we described important differences between T1D and SPS in the autoimmune response to GAD 65: (1) T cells of SPS patients recognize epitopes in the middle of GAD 65 (amino residues 81-171 and 313-403), whereas patients with T1D preferentially recognize another middle (161-243) and a C-terminal region (473-555); and (2) GAD antibodies (Abs) were nearly exclusively of the Th1-associated IgG1 type in T1D, whereas SPS patients had both Th1- and Th2-associated IgG4 and IgE GAD Abs. These differences were not simply related to different HLA alleles. Fine epitope mapping revealed further distinct T cell epitopes in both diseases despite similar HLA background. Therefore, a single autoantigen can elicit different immune responses causing distinct chronic autoimmune diseases possibly related to a Th1 or Th2 bias of the disease. PMID:14592879

  3. Age-dependent humoral responses of children to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Fairchok, M P; Rouse, J H; Morris, S L

    1995-01-01

    In the United States, disseminated infection with environmental mycobacteria, including the Mycobacterium avium complex, is the most common opportunistic bacterial infection seen in AIDS patients. However, the source and relative degree of exposure to environmental mycobacteria during childhood are unknown. To examine the age-related exposure to mycobacteria, we obtained serum samples from 150 children ranging in age from 6 months to 18 years. Each sample was tested against both M. avium (serovar 1) sonic extracts and mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All serum samples were also subjected to immunoblot analysis with the sonic extract antigen. These studies established that elevated ELISA values (P < 0.0001) and increased immunoblot reactivity (P < 0.0001) against mycobacterial antigens were both associated with increasing age. The seroreactivity differences were most striking when comparing the age groups of children below the age of 6 with the older age groups. Our results suggest that the development of humoral immune responses to mycobacterial antigens in children correlates with increasing age and that there may be an environmental factor predisposing to mycobacterial exposure which is related to advancing age. PMID:7583921

  4. [History of scrofula: from humoral dyscrasia to consumption].

    PubMed

    Duarte G, Ignacio; Chuaqui F, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The term “scrofula” was used for a long time to designate a chronic swelling of cervical lymph nodes. This paper outlines the prevalent ideas on the nature, pathogenesis and the treatment of this disorder, from classical Greek medicine up to the 18th century. A Hippocratic treatise regarded scrofula as produced by an accumulation of phlegm, with a consequent imbalance or dyscrasia of the body humors. It was believed that it could heal spontaneously; but it could also soften, open through the skin and have an obstinate course. The treatment consisted mainly on local applications, incision to evacuate the soft content, or extirpation of the abnormal mass. In France and England, crowds of scrofulous patients were touched by the kings who were supposed to have a hereditary miraculous power to cure the disease. A Medieval text mentioned that scrofula could also affect other parts of the body. In the 17th century, scrofula was reputed as a frequent condition and was attributed to blood acrimony which coagulated in spongy organs. It was associated to phthisis or consumption due to the lethal outcome in some patients and to a cheese-like appearance of the pulmonary and the scrofulous lesions. PMID:27401383

  5. Kinetics of humoral responsiveness in severe thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, F T; Bachvaroff, R J

    1976-07-01

    Severe thermal injury has the capacity to increase the rate of generation of antibody-forming cells in mice. The intensity of stimulation appears to be proportional to the extent of injury. The effect has been observed in animals burned within 1 hr before or after sensitization with test antigen(s), and persists up to 14 days after injury. Thereafter, the stimulatory effect wanes, and disappears by the 21st day after burning. Responses to T-cell (thymus derived lymphocytes) dependent antigens (sheep erythrocytes; sheep erythrocytes coupled to TNP) and to antigens not requiring T and B-cell (bone marrow derived lymphocytes) cooperation (DNP-Ficoll) appear to be equally affected by thermal injury. The mechanisms underlying this form of enhanced antibody response are not clear. The data, however, support the possibility that the burn wound may release factor(s) capable of enhancing humoral responsiveness in the injured animal. Such factor(s) do not appear to be endotoxins. PMID:945719

  6. Development of dog mammary tumor xenograft in immunosuppressed Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Rajmani, R S; Singh, Prafull Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Kumar, G Ravi; Sahoo, Aditya P; Santra, Lakshman; Saxena, Shikha; Singh, Lakshya Veer; Chaturvedi, Uttara; Saxena, Lovleen; Desai, G S; Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Jadon, N S; Tiwari, Ashok K

    2014-10-01

    Development and study of dog mammary tumour xenograft in immunosuppressed Swiss Albino Mice adds a new dimension in cancer research as dog tumors have many similarities with human tumors regarding progression, histopathology, molecular mechanism, immune response and therapy. Failure of the immune system to recognize and eliminate cancer cells leads to cancer progression and the fight between immune cells and cancer cells has a great role in understanding the mechanism of cancer progression and elimination. Rejection and acceptance of tumour xenograft depends on efficiency of CD4+, CD8+ and NK cell populations. In the present investigation, dog mammary tumor xenograft in cyclosporine-A and gamma-irradiated, immunosuppressed Swiss Albino mice was developed and the immune cell status of graft accepted and rejected mice was assessed. It was observed that all the major immune cells (CD4+, CD8+ and NK cells) play an equal role in tumour rejection. PMID:25345242

  7. Establishment and characterization of a canine xenograft model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, L; Peña, L; González Gil, A; Cáceres, S; Díez, L; Illera, J C

    2013-12-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) and human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) are the most aggressive form of mammary/breast cancer. Both species naturally develop it, sharing epidemiological, clinical and histological characteristics. Thus, IMC has been suggested as a model to study the human disease. We have developed the first IMC xenograft model in SCID mice. Xenografts reproduced the histological features from the primary tumor, were highly aggressive and showed dermal tumor emboli, distinctive hallmarks of IMC/IBC. This model was hormone receptors positive and HER2 negative. Our findings showed that estrogens and androgens are locally produced in tissues. Factors related to tumor vascularization showed positive expression and xenografts with the highest expression of all analyzed vascular factors had the highest rate of tumor proliferation. The role of steroid hormones and the angio/lymphangiogenic properties found in this model, provide additional knowledge for future interventions in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the disease. PMID:23972378

  8. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  9. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  10. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  11. Humor and College Adjustment: The Predictive Nature of Humor, Academic Achievement, Authoritative Parenting Styles on the Initial Adjustment of Male and Female First-Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, Gregory P.; Andrews, David W.

    2003-01-01

    A self-report questionnaire on academic achievement, birth order, and family structure; the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire; the Parental Authority Questionnaire; and the Coping Humor Scale were administered to 257 first-year college students. Researchers examined the relationships among (a) authoritative parenting style, (b) family…

  12. Germ cell differentiation in cryopreserved, immature, Indian spotted mouse deer (Moschiola indica) testes xenografted onto mice.

    PubMed

    Pothana, Lavanya; Makala, Himesh; Devi, Lalitha; Varma, Vivek Phani; Goel, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    Death of immature animals is one of the reasons for the loss of genetic diversity of rare and endangered species. Because sperm cannot be collected from immature males, cryobanking of testicular tissue combined with testis xenografting is a potential option for conservation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the establishment of spermatogenesis in cryopreserved immature testicular tissues from Indian spotted mouse deer (Moschiola indica) after ectopic xenografting onto immunodeficient nude mice. Results showed that testis tissues that were frozen in cryomedia containing either 10% DMSO with 80% fetal bovine serum (D10S80) or 20% DMSO with 20% fetal bovine serum (D20S20) had significantly more (P < 0.01) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeled positive interstitial cells when compared with fresh testis tissues (46.3 ± 3.4 and 51.9 ± 4.0 vs. 22.8 ± 2.0). Xenografted testicular tissues showed degenerated seminiferous tubules 24 weeks after grafting in testes that had been cryopreserved in D20S20; alternatively, pachytene spermatocytes were the most advanced germ cells in testes that were cryopreserved in D10S80. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining confirmed the proliferative status of spermatocytes, and the increases in tubular and lumen diameters indicated testicular maturation in xenografts. However, persistent anti-Müllerian hormone staining in Sertoli cells of xenografts revealed incomplete testicular maturation. This study reports that cryopreserved testis tissue that had been xenografted from endangered animals onto mice resulted in the establishment of spermatogenesis with initiation of meiosis. These findings are encouraging for cryobanking of testicular tissues from immature endangered animals to conserve their germplasm. PMID:25467768

  13. Establishment and characterization of novel xenograft models of human biliary tract carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Emura, Fabian; Kamma, Hiroshi; Ghosh, Mila; Koike, Naoto; Kawamoto, Toru; Saijo, Kaoru; Ohno, Tadao; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Todoroki, Takeshi

    2003-11-01

    In order to develop new therapeutic regimens for biliary tract cancers, which carry dismal prognoses, the establishment of a human biliary tract cancer xenograft model is essential. Herein, we report the successful establishment and characterization of two xenograft models of human biliary tract cancers. An adenosquamous gallbladder cancer cell line (TGBC-44) and a bile duct adenocarcinoma cell line (TGBC-47) were obtained from fresh surgical specimens in our department and subcutaneously inoculated into nude mice. The overall tumor take rate was 100% and solid tumors grew measurable after 5 and 7 days for TGBC-44 and TGBC-47, respectively. Tumor doubling time was 3.9+/-1.1 and 4.1+/-0.5 days in the exponential growth phase in TGBC-44 and TGBC-47 xenografts, respectively. Isozyme test and karyotype analysis confirmed the human origin. Histopathology analysis revealed that the TGBC-44 xenograft retained both the squamous and the adenocarcinoma components, and the TGBC-47 xenograft exhibited poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma as in the corresponding original tumors. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting studies revealed positive and similar expression of platelet derived endothelial growth factor/thymidine phosphorylase (PDGF/TP), thymidylate synthase (TS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in both original tumors and xenograft models. No macroscopic metastases were found at the time of sacrifice. We have successfully established two models of human biliary tract cancer, gallbladder and bile duct cancer. Models retained the morphological and biochemical characteristics of the original tumor and demonstrated constant biological behavior in all transplanted mice. These models could be useful tools for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against biliary tract cancers. PMID:14532968

  14. Maturation of the developing human fetal prostate in a rodent xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Spade, Daniel J.; Huse, Susan M.; Kostadinov, Stefan; Hall, Susan J.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer in men. The etiology of prostate cancer is unknown, although both animal and epidemiologic data suggest that early life exposures to various toxicants, may impact DNA methylation status during development, playing an important role. Methods We have developed a xenograft model to characterize the growth and differentiation of human fetal prostate implants (gestational age 12-24 weeks) that can provide new data on the potential role of early life stressors on prostate cancer. The expression of key immunohistochemical markers responsible for prostate maturation was evaluated, including p63, cytokeratin 18, α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, caldesmon, Ki-67, prostate specific antigen, estrogen receptor-α, and androgen receptor. Xenografts were separated into epithelial and stromal compartments using laser capture microdissection (LCM), and the DNA methylation status was assessed in >480,000 CpG sites throughout the genome. Results Xenografts demonstrated growth and maturation throughout the 200 days of post-implantation evaluation. DNA methylation profiles of laser capture micro-dissected tissue demonstrated tissue-specific markers clustered by their location in either the epithelium or stroma of human prostate tissue. Differential methylated promoter region CpG-associated gene analysis revealed significantly more stromal than epithelial DNA methylation in the 30 and 90-day xenografts. Functional classification analysis identified CpG-related gene clusters in methylated epithelial and stromal human xenografts. Conclusion This study of human fetal prostate tissue establishes a xenograft model that demonstrates dynamic growth and maturation, allowing for future mechanistic studies of the developmental origins of later life proliferative prostate disease. PMID:24038131

  15. Multimodality Imaging Methods for Assessing Retinoblastoma Orthotopic Xenograft Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Corson, Timothy W.; Samuels, Brian C.; Wenzel, Andrea A.; Geary, Anna J.; Riley, Amanda A.; McCarthy, Brian P.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Bailey, Barbara J.; Rogers, Pamela I.; Pollok, Karen E.; Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Territo, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of the pediatric ocular tumor retinoblastoma are paving the way for development of targeted therapies. Robust model systems such as orthotopic xenografts are necessary for testing such therapeutics. One system involves bioluminescence imaging of luciferase-expressing human retinoblastoma cells injected into the vitreous of newborn rat eyes. Although used for several drug studies, the spatial and temporal development of tumors in this model has not been documented. Here, we present a new model to allow analysis of average luciferin flux () through the tumor, a more biologically relevant parameter than peak bioluminescence as traditionally measured. Moreover, we monitored the spatial development of xenografts in the living eye. We engineered Y79 retinoblastoma cells to express a lentivirally-delivered enhanced green fluorescent protein-luciferase fusion protein. In intravitreal xenografts, we assayed bioluminescence and computed , as well as documented tumor growth by intraocular optical coherence tomography (OCT), brightfield, and fluorescence imaging. In vivo bioluminescence, ex vivo tumor size, and ex vivo fluorescent signal were all highly correlated in orthotopic xenografts. By OCT, xenografts were dense and highly vascularized, with well-defined edges. Small tumors preferentially sat atop the optic nerve head; this morphology was confirmed on histological examination. In vivo, in xenografts showed a plateau effect as tumors became bounded by the dimensions of the eye. The combination of modeling and in vivo intraocular imaging allows both quantitative and high-resolution, non-invasive spatial analysis of this retinoblastoma model. This technique will be applied to other cell lines and experimental therapeutic trials in the future. PMID:24901248

  16. Multimodality imaging methods for assessing retinoblastoma orthotopic xenograft growth and development.

    PubMed

    Corson, Timothy W; Samuels, Brian C; Wenzel, Andrea A; Geary, Anna J; Riley, Amanda A; McCarthy, Brian P; Hanenberg, Helmut; Bailey, Barbara J; Rogers, Pamela I; Pollok, Karen E; Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Territo, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of the pediatric ocular tumor retinoblastoma are paving the way for development of targeted therapies. Robust model systems such as orthotopic xenografts are necessary for testing such therapeutics. One system involves bioluminescence imaging of luciferase-expressing human retinoblastoma cells injected into the vitreous of newborn rat eyes. Although used for several drug studies, the spatial and temporal development of tumors in this model has not been documented. Here, we present a new model to allow analysis of average luciferin flux ([Formula: see text]) through the tumor, a more biologically relevant parameter than peak bioluminescence as traditionally measured. Moreover, we monitored the spatial development of xenografts in the living eye. We engineered Y79 retinoblastoma cells to express a lentivirally-delivered enhanced green fluorescent protein-luciferase fusion protein. In intravitreal xenografts, we assayed bioluminescence and computed [Formula: see text], as well as documented tumor growth by intraocular optical coherence tomography (OCT), brightfield, and fluorescence imaging. In vivo bioluminescence, ex vivo tumor size, and ex vivo fluorescent signal were all highly correlated in orthotopic xenografts. By OCT, xenografts were dense and highly vascularized, with well-defined edges. Small tumors preferentially sat atop the optic nerve head; this morphology was confirmed on histological examination. In vivo, [Formula: see text] in xenografts showed a plateau effect as tumors became bounded by the dimensions of the eye. The combination of [Formula: see text] modeling and in vivo intraocular imaging allows both quantitative and high-resolution, non-invasive spatial analysis of this retinoblastoma model. This technique will be applied to other cell lines and experimental therapeutic trials in the future. PMID:24901248

  17. Chemosensitivity of human head and neck cancer xenografts in the clonogenic assay and in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Boerrigter, G. H.; Heinerman, E. C.; Braakhuis, B. J.; Snow, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    The potential use of human head and neck (H & N) tumours, growing in athymic nude mice, for preclinical assessment of cytostatic drug sensitivity in a soft agar cloning system was examined. Of 20 H & N tumour xenografts, obtained from 6 different xenograft lines, 17 demonstrated sufficient colony growth to evaluate in vitro drug sensitivity. Moreover, all xenografts provided enough cells to test 8 cytostatic drugs at 3 concentrations each. A dose-dependent inhibition of colony growth was obtained with all drugs tested, except methotrexate. Tumours were considered sensitive when the drug concentration required to inhibit colony formation by 50%, was less than 1/10 of the peak plasma concentration in patients. All H & N tumour lines were resistant to cisplatin, doxorubicin, hydroxyurea, mafosfamide (an in vitro active analogue of cyclophosphamide) and methotrexate. Bleomycin was active in 1/6 and 5-fluorouracil in 6/6 of the H & N tumour lines tested. In 32 cases the in vitro data of the H & N tumour lines and a chemosensitive rat rhabdomyosarcoma were compared directly with in vivo results obtained in nude mice. The clonogenic assay correctly predicted sensitivity in 4/6 (66.7%) and resistance in 21/26 (80.8%) of the cases. A lack of correlation was noted for methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide. In vitro culture of human H & N xenografts may provide a means for a rapid and large scale screening to identify new drugs active against H & N malignancies. In addition the clonogenic assay may help to select drugs for subsequent testing in the nude mouse xenograft model. The lack of correlation for some drugs in the present study indicates that there are some limitations in the use of xenograft tumour material for in vitro testing of new drugs. PMID:3730256

  18. Anti-tumor effect of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MICHISHITA, Masaki; OHTSUKA, Aya; NAKAHIRA, Rei; TAJIMA, Tsuyoshi; NAKAGAWA, Takayuki; SASAKI, Nobuo; ARAI, Toshiro; TAKAHASHI, Kimimasa

    2015-01-01

    Feline mammary carcinomas are characterized by rapid progression and metastases. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of tumor angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a single drug therapy of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma expressing VEGF protein. Bevacizumab treatment suppressed tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis and enhancing apoptosis; however, it did not affect the tumor proliferation index. Thus, bevacizumab had anti-tumor effects on a xenograft model, and this may be useful for the treatment of feline mammary carcinoma. PMID:26616000

  19. Polymeric penetration enhancers promote humoral immune responses to mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katja; Mann, Jamie F S; Rogers, Paul; Shattock, Robin J

    2014-06-10

    Protective mucosal immune responses are thought best induced by trans-mucosal vaccination, providing greater potential to generate potent local immune responses than conventional parenteral vaccination. However, poor trans-mucosal permeability of large macromolecular antigens limits bioavailability to local inductive immune cells. This study explores the utility of polymeric penetration enhancers to promote trans-mucosal bioavailability of insulin, as a biomarker of mucosal absorption, and two vaccine candidates: recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (CN54gp140) and tetanus toxoid (TT). Responses to vaccinating antigens were assessed by measurement of serum and the vaginal humoral responses. Polyethyleneimine (PEI), Dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD) and Chitosan enhanced the bioavailability of insulin following intranasal (IN), sublingual (SL), intravaginal (I.Vag) and intrarectal (IR) administration. The same penetration enhancers also increased antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses to the model vaccine antigens in serum and vaginal secretions following IN and SL application. Co-delivery of both antigens with PEI or Chitosan showed the highest increase in systemic IgG and IgA responses following IN or SL administration. However the highest IgA titres in vaginal secretions were achieved after IN immunisations with PEI and Chitosan. None of the penetration enhancers were able to increase antibody responses to gp140 after I.Vag immunisations, while in contrast PEI and Chitosan were able to induce TT-specific systemic IgG levels following I.Vag administration. In summary, we present supporting data that suggest appropriate co-formulation of vaccine antigens with excipients known to influence mucosal barrier functions can increase the bioavailability of mucosally applied antigens promoting the induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses. PMID:24657807

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Vitreous Humor in Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Michael; Dacheva, Ivanka; Nobl, Matthias; Siwy, Justyna; Schanstra, Joost P.; Mullen, William; Koch, Frank H. J.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Kretz, Florian T. A.; Auffarth, Gerd U.; Koss, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the protein profile of human vitreous of untreated patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods Sixty-eight vitreous humor (VH) samples (44 from patients with treatment naïve RVO, 24 controls with idiopathic floaters) were analyzed in this clinical-experimental study using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometer and tandem mass spectrometry. To define potential candidate protein markers of RVO, proteomic analysis was performed on RVO patients (n = 30) and compared with controls (n = 16). To determine validity of potential biomarker candidates in RVO, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was performed by using proteome data of independent RVO (n = 14) and control samples (n = 8). Results Ninety-four different proteins (736 tryptic peptides) could be identified. Sixteen proteins were found to be significant when comparing RVO and control samples (P = 1.43E-05 to 4.48E-02). Five proteins (Clusterin, Complement C3, Ig lambda-like polypeptide 5 (IGLL5), Opticin and Vitronectin), remained significant after using correction for multiple testing. These five proteins were also detected significant when comparing subgroups of RVO (central RVO, hemi-central RVO, branch RVO) to controls. Using independent samples ROC-Area under the curve was determined proving the validity of the results: Clusterin 0.884, Complement C3 0.955, IGLL5 1.000, Opticin 0.741, Vitronectin 0.786. In addition, validation through ELISA measurements was performed. Conclusion The results of the study reveal that the proteomic composition of VH differed significantly between the patients with RVO and the controls. The proteins identified may serve as potential biomarkers for pathogenesis induced by RVO. PMID:27362861

  1. Humoral Immunity Links Candida albicans Infection and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fradin, Chantal; Salleron, Julia; Damiens, Sébastien; Moragues, Maria Dolores; Souplet, Vianney; Jouault, Thierry; Robert, Raymond; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Sendid, Boualem; Colombel, Jean Fréderic; Poulain, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The protein Hwp1, expressed on the pathogenic phase of Candida albicans, presents sequence analogy with the gluten protein gliadin and is also a substrate for transglutaminase. This had led to the suggestion that C. albicans infection (CI) may be a triggering factor for Celiac disease (CeD) onset. We investigated cross-immune reactivity between CeD and CI. Methods Serum IgG levels against recombinant Hwp1 and serological markers of CeD were measured in 87 CeD patients, 41 CI patients, and 98 healthy controls (HC). IgA and IgG were also measured in 20 individuals from each of these groups using microchips sensitized with 38 peptides designed from the N-terminal of Hwp1. Results CI and CeD patients had higher levels of anti-Hwp1 (p=0.0005 and p=0.004) and anti-gliadin (p=0.002 and p=0.0009) antibodies than HC but there was no significant difference between CeD and CI patients. CeD and CI patients had higher levels of anti-transglutaminase IgA than HC (p=0.0001 and p=0.0039). During CI, the increase in anti-Hwp1 paralleled the increase in anti-gliadin antibodies. Microchip analysis showed that CeD patients were more reactive against some Hwp1 peptides than CI patients, and that some deamidated peptides were more reactive than their native analogs. Binding of IgG from CeD patients to Hwp1 peptides was inhibited by γIII gliadin peptides. Conclusions Humoral cross-reactivity between Hwp1 and gliadin was observed during CeD and CI. Increased reactivity to Hwp1 deamidated peptide suggests that transglutaminase is involved in this interplay. These results support the hypothesis that CI may trigger CeD onset in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:25793717

  2. Humoral response against glial derived antigens in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Papuć, Ewa; Kurzepa, Jacek; Kurys-Denis, Ewa; Grabarska, Aneta; Krupski, Witold; Rejdak, Konrad

    2014-04-30

    To check whether glial cells have the ability to elicit adaptive immune response in Parkinson's disease and whether a change in this immune response can be observed over time. There is an increasing evidence that glial cells are involved in the neurodegenerative process in PD, in addition to neuronal structures. Measurement of autoantibodies against proteins of oligodendrocytes may serve as an indirect method to assess the level of glial cells activation or degeneration under in vivo conditions. Serum samples from 26 PD patients were collected twice, at baseline and after mean of 13 months. In addition, serum samples from 13 healthy controls matched for age and gender were assessed at one time point. IgG and IgM autoantibodies against myelin-oligodendrocyticglycoprotein (MOG), myelin basic protein (MBP), myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and proteolipoprotein (PLP) were measured in all investigated subjects by a commercially available ELISA system (Mediagnost, Germany). In a group of PD significant decrease of IgG titers was observed for anti-MAG autoantibodies over the investigated time period (p<0.05). For IgM antibodies, we observed statistically significant decrease in anti-MAG autoantibodies in the follow-up period (p<0.05) and increase in anti-MBP and anti-PLP autoantibodies (p<0.05). All antibody titers differed significantly between healthy control subjects and PD patients. Our study provides the evidence for the presence of humoral response against some glial derived antigens in PD. The increasing levels of anti MBP IgG and IgM might point to the value of this marker for monitoring disease progression. PMID:24594199

  3. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  4. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  5. Protection against hyperacute xenograft rejection of transgenic rat hearts expressing human decay accelerating factor (DAF) transplanted into primates.

    PubMed Central

    Charreau, B.; Ménoret, S.; Tesson, L.; Azimzadeh, A.; Audet, M.; Wolf, P.; Marquet, R.; Verbakel, C.; Ijzermans, J.; Cowan, P.; Pearse, M.; d'Apice, A.; Soulillou, J. P.; Anegon, I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Production of transgenic pigs for multiple transgenes is part of a potential strategy to prevent immunological events involved in xenograft rejection. Use of a genetically engineerable rodent as a donor in primates could allow testing in vivo of the effects of different transgenes on controlling xenograft rejection. As a first step in the development of a donor containing multiple transgenes, transgenic rats for human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) were used as heart donors to test their resistance against complement (C)-mediated rejection by non-human primates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Transgenic rats were generated by using a construct containing the human DAF cDNA under the transcriptional control of the endothelial cell (EC)-specific human ICAM-2 promoter. DAF expression was evaluated by immunohistology and by FACS analysis of purified ECs. Resistance of transgenic hearts against C-mediated damage was evaluated by ex vivo perfusion with human serum and by transplantation into cynomolgus monkeys. RESULTS: Immunohistological analysis of DAF expression in several organs from two transgenic lines showed uniform expression on the endothelium of all blood vessels. ECs purified from transgenic hearts showed 50% DAF expression compared to human ECs and >70% reduction of C-dependent cell lysis compared to control rat ECs. Hemizygous transgenic hearts perfused with human serum showed normal function for >60 min vs. 11. 2 +/- 1.7 min in controls. Hemi- or homozygous transgenic hearts transplanted into cynomolgus monkeys showed longer survival (15.2 +/- 7 min and >4.5 hr, respectively) than controls (5.5 +/- 1.4 min). In contrast to hyperacutely rejected control hearts, rejected homozygous DAF hearts showed signs of acute vascular rejection (AVR) characterized by edema, hemorrhage, and an intense PMN infiltration. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that endothelial-specific DAF expression increased heart transplant survival in a rat-to-primate model of

  6. Estimation of time since death by vitreous humor hypoxanthine, potassium, and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Rognum, T O; Holmen, S; Musse, M A; Dahlberg, P S; Stray-Pedersen, A; Saugstad, O D; Opdal, S H

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of vitreous humor potassium (K(+)) has since the 1960s been recognized as an adjunct for estimation of time since death. In 1991 we introduced hypoxanthine (Hx) as a new marker. Furthermore we demonstrated that time since death estimation was more accurate when ambient temperature was included in the calculations, both for K(+) and for Hx. In this paper we present a refined method. The subjects consist of 132 cases with known time of death and ambient temperature. One sample from each subject was used in the calculations. Vitreous humor Hx levels were available in all subjects, while K(+) was measured in 106 of the subjects, due to insufficient volume of vitreous humor. Linear regression analysis was applied to model the correlation between vitreous humor Hx and K(+), taking the interactions with temperature into consideration. The diagrams published in 1991, which also included ambient temperature, estimated median time since death with range between the 10th and 90th percentile, whereas the linear regression analysis presented in this paper estimates mean time since death with a corresponding 95% interval of confidence. We conclude that time since death may be estimated with relatively high precision applying vitreous humor Hx and K(+) concentrations combined with ambient temperature. PMID:26994446

  7. Functional heterogeneity of genetically defined subclones in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klco, Jeffery M.; Spencer, David H.; Miller, Christopher A.; Griffith, Malachi; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan T.; Fulton, Robert S.; Eades, William C.; Link, Daniel C.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Walter, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dipersio, John F.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The relationships between clonal architecture and functional heterogeneity in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples are not yet clear. We used targeted sequencing to track AML subclones identified by whole genome sequencing using a variety of experimental approaches. We found that virtually all AML subclones trafficked from the marrow to the peripheral blood, but some were enriched in specific cell populations. Subclones showed variable engraftment potential in immunodeficient mice. Xenografts were predominantly comprised of a single genetically-defined subclone, but there was no predictable relationship between the engrafting subclone and the evolutionary hierarchy of the leukemia. These data demonstrate the importance of integrating genetic and functional data in studies of primary cancer samples, both in xenograft models and in patients. PMID:24613412

  8. Optimized Protocol To Analyze Changes in the Lipidome of Xenografts after Treatment with 2-Hydroxyoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; Martin, M Laura; López, Daniel H; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A

    2016-01-01

    Xenografts are a popular model for the study of the action of new antitumor drugs. However, xenografts are highly heterogeneous structures, and therefore it is sometimes difficult to evaluate the effects of the compounds on tumor metabolism. In this context, imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) may yield the required information, due to its inherent characteristics of sensitivity and spatial resolution. To the best of our knowledge, there is still no clear analysis protocol to properly evaluate the changes between samples due to the treatment. Here we present a protocol for the evaluation of the effect of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2-OHOA), an antitumor compound, on xenografts lipidome based on IMS. Direct treated/control comparison did not show conclusive results. As we will demonstrate, a more sophisticated protocol was required to evaluate these changes including the following: (1) identification of different areas in the xenograft, (2) classification of these areas (necrotic/viable) to compare similar types of tissues, (3) suppression of the effect of the variation of adduct formation between samples, and (4) normalization of the variables using the standard deviation to eliminate the excessive impact of the stronger peaks in the statistical analysis. In this way, the 36 lipid species that experienced the largest changes between treated and control were identified. Furthermore, incorporation of 2-hydroxyoleic acid to a sphinganine base was also confirmed by MS/MS. Comparison of the changes observed here with previous results obtained with different techniques demonstrates the validity of the protocol. PMID:26607740

  9. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations sensitize to chemotherapy in patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, I; Borgida, A; Cao, P; Cheung, M; Pintilie, M; Bianco, T; Holter, S; Ibrahimov, E; Kumareswaran, R; Bristow, R G; Tsao, M-S; Gallinger, S; Hedley, D W

    2015-01-01

    Background: Germline mutations of the BRCA tumour suppressors have been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Clinical evidence suggests that these patients may be more sensitive to treatment with cisplatin. As the frequency of germline BRCA mutations is low, definitive experimental data to support the clinical observations are still missing. Methods: We tested gemcitabine and cisplatin sensitivity of four BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutant and three BRCA1 and BRCA2 wild-type (WT) patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts. Results: We observed treatment sensitivity to gemcitabine and cisplatin in the BRCA WT and mutant models. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutant xenografts were significantly more sensitive to cisplatin although these models also showed sensitivity to gemcitabine. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 WT models showed sensitivity to gemcitabine but not cisplatin. Treatment sensitivity in the xenograft models closely resembled treatment response in the corresponding patients. Discussion: We have characterised a panel of xenografts derived from pancreatic cancer patients carrying germline BRCA mutations, and shown that their genetic features resemble the patient donor. Our results support further clinical testing of treatment regimens combining gemcitabine and platinum drugs in this patient population, as well as preclinical research aiming to identify mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in BRCA mutant pancreatic cancers. PMID:26180923

  10. Human xenograft models as useful tools to assess the potential of novel therapeutics in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Weerden, W M; Bangma, C; de Wit, R

    2008-01-01

    With docetaxel as effective chemotherapy for hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC), the number of new treatment combinations for HRPC is expanding demanding a fast-track screening system. This review elaborates on the use of xenograft models to select the most promising combination therapies for entering into phase II clinical trials. PMID:19088719

  11. The inhibitory efficacy of methylseleninic acid against colon cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. We tested the hypoththesis that oral dosing methylseleninic acid (MSeA), a methylselenol precursor, inhibits the growth of colon cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice fed a Se adequate diet. In this...

  12. Antitumor effect of Kanglaite® injection in human pancreatic cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kanglaite® injection (KLT), with a main ingredient of Coix seed oil (a traditional Chinese medicine), has been widely used for cancer treatment in China. KLT has an inhibitory effect on many kinds of tumors and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling promotes cell survival, proliferation, and progression in cancer cells. Therefore, targeting this pathway may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for human cancers. Methods Here, we examined the effects of KLT on the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice, and assessed its therapeutic potential. Growth and apoptosis of tumor xenografts were examined, and the expression levels of genes and proteins involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were measured by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Results Our results revealed that KLT dramatically inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer xenografts and induced apoptosis simultaneously. Furthermore, it downregulated the expression of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR. Conclusions These results suggest that KLT can suppress growth and induce apoptosis of pancreatic cancer xenografts. Moreover, KLT can downregulate the expression of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR to modulate the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:25005526

  13. Andrographolide radiosensitizes human ovarian cancer SKOV3 xenografts due to an enhanced apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Xingsheng

    2015-11-01

    Andrographolide (AND), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to have radiosensitivity in several types of cancer. Whether AND can radiosensitize ovarian cancer remains unknown. The present study investigated the radiosensitizing effects of AND in human ovarian SKOV3 xenografts and examined the molecular mechanisms of AND-mediated radiosensitization. Nude mice bearing human ovarian SKOV3 were treated with AND to investigate the effects of drug administration on tumor growth, radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and autophagy. Subsequent Western blot analysis and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining (autophagy analysis) were used to determine the role of AND. Finally, the pathway of apoptosis was characterized by caspase-3 activity assay as well as TUNEL analysis. AND potently sensitized SKOV3 xenografts to radiation. Moreover, apoptosis and autophagy in radiation combined with drug-treated xenografts increased significantly compared with the simple drug or single radiation treatment. This result was associated with an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and p-p53 expression after exposure to combination treatment. Meanwhile, the level of Beclin 1 and Atg5 and the conversion from LC3-I to LC3-II, three important proteins involved in autophagy, were increased. AND acts as a strong radiosensitizer in human ovarian SKOV3 xenografts in vivo by increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and promoting the activation of caspase-3, leading to enhanced apoptosis as well as autophagy. PMID:26014516

  14. Limited ability of humoral immune responses in control of viremia during infection with SIVsmmD215 strain

    SciTech Connect

    Ribiero, Ruy M

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the impact of humoral immunity on SIV replication, 11 rhesus macaques (RMs) were inoculated with the neutralization-sensitive strain SIVsmmD215. Seven RMs were treated every three weeks, with 50 mglkg of an anti-CD20 antibody (Rituxan, gift from Genentech) starting from day -7 p.i., as follows: four RMs were treated for two months, and three were treated for five months. The remaining four RMs were used as controls. Three RMs were completely depleted of CD20 cells. Four RMs only partially depleted CD20 cells in the LNs and intestine. The efficacy of tissue CD20 depletion predicted the ablation of antibody production, with SIVsmm seroconversion being delayed in the animals with complete tissue CD20 depletion, and neutralizing antibody production being significantly delayed and at low levels in all CD20-depleted RMs. There was no significant difference in acute or chronic VLs between CD20-depleted RMs and control monkeys, with a tendency for lower set-point VLs in CD20-depleted RMs. At 6 weeks p.i., cellular immune responses were significantly stronger in CD20 depleted RMs than in controls. After two years p.i., there was no significant difference in survival between CD20-depleted and control RMs. We concluded that CD20 depletion plays no significant role in the control of SIV replication or disease progression in SIVsmmD215-infected RMs.

  15. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode.

    PubMed

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L; Norata, Giuseppe D; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  16. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode

    PubMed Central

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S.; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L.; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  17. Dataset of aqueous humor cytokine profile in HIV patients with Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Jayant Venkatramani; Agrawal, Rupesh; Yeo, Tun Kuan; Gunasekeran, Dinesh V; Balne, Praveen Kumar; Lee, Bernett; Au, Veonice Bijin; Connolly, John; Teoh, Stephen C B

    2016-09-01

    The data shows the aqueous humor cytokine profiling results acquired in a small cohort of 17 HIV patients clinically diagnosed with Cytomegalovirus retinitis using the FlexMAP 3D (Luminex®) platform using the Milliplex Human Cytokine® kit. Aqueous humor samples were collected from these patients at different time points (pre-treatment and at 4-weekly intervals through the 12-week course of intravitreal ganciclovir treatment) and 41 cytokine levels were analyzed at each time point. CMV DNA viral load was assessed in 8 patients at different time points throughout the course of ganciclovir treatment. The data described herein is related to the research article entitled "Aqueous humor immune factors and cytomegalovirus (CMV) levels in CMV retinitis through treatment - The CRIGSS study" (Iyer et al., 2016) [1]. Cytokine levels against the different time points which indicate the response to the given treatment and against the CMV viral load were analyzed. PMID:27547803

  18. Entertainment-education in the context of humor: effects on safer sex intentions and risk perceptions.

    PubMed

    Moyer-Gusé, Emily; Mahood, Chad; Brookes, Sarah

    2011-12-01

    Past research has examined the effects of entertainment narratives on story-related behaviors, but most has focused primarily on dramatic genres rather than comedy. The present study examines how the presence or absence of pregnancy-related humor influences viewers' counterarguing, perceived severity, and intentions to engage in unprotected sexual behavior. Results were consistent with expectations in that related humor reduced counterarguing while also trivializing the severity of the consequences of sexual behavior. When the pregnancy storyline was presented in its original humorous context, viewers reported greater intentions to engage in unprotected sex than when pregnancy was presented in a more serious tone. Model testing clarified this finding by revealing the underlying mechanisms. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:21707390

  19. Serial changes of humor comprehension for four-frame comic Manga: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Mariko; Yaoi, Ken; Minamoto, Takehiro; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Serial changes of humor comprehension evoked by a well organized four-frame comic Manga were investigated by fMRI in each step of humor comprehension. The neural substrates underlying the amusing effects in response to funny and mixed order manga were compared. In accordance with the time course of the four frames, fMRI activations changed serially. Beginning with the second frame (development scene), activation of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) was observed, followed by activations in the temporal and frontal areas during viewing of the third frame (turn scene). For the fourth frame (punch line), strong increased activations were confirmed in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and cerebellum. Interestingly, distinguishable activation differences in the cerebellum between funny and non-funny conditions were also found for the fourth frame. These findings suggest that humor comprehension evokes activation that initiates in the TPJ and expands to the MPFC and cerebellum at the convergence level. PMID:25059843

  20. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  1. Orthotopic xenografts of human melanoma and colonic and ovarian carcinoma in sheep to evaluate radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. H.; Rose, A. H.; Glancy, R. J.; Penhale, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Extrapolation to humans from experimental radioimmunotherapy in nude mouse xenograft models is confounded by large relative tumour size and small volume of distribution in mice allowing tumour uptake of radiolabelled antibodies unattainable in patients. Our large animal model of human tumours in cyclosporin-immunosuppressed sheep demonstrated tumour uptake of targeted radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies comparable with uptakes reported in clinical trials. Sheep immunosuppression with daily intravenous cyclosporin augmented by oral ketoconazole maintained trough blood levels of cyclosporin within the range 1000-1500 ng ml(-1). Human tumour cells were transplanted orthotopically by inoculation of 10(7) cells: SKMEL melanoma subcutaneously; LS174T and HT29 colon carcinoma into bowel, peritoneum and liver; and JAM ovarian carcinoma into ovary and peritoneum. Tumour xenografts grew at all sites within 3 weeks of inoculation, preserving characteristic morphology without evidence of necrosis or host rejection. Lymphatic metastasis was demonstrated in regional nodes draining xenografts of melanoma and ovarian carcinoma. Colonic LS1 74T xenografts produced mucin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The anti-CEA IgG1 monoclonal antibody A5B7 was radiolabelled with iodine-131 and administered intravenously to sheep. Peak uptake at 5 days in orthotopic human tumour transplants in gut was 0.027% DI g(-1) (percentage of injected dose per gram) and 0.034% DI g(-1) in hepatic metastases with tumour to blood ratios of 2-2.5. Non-specific tumour uptake in melanoma was 0.003% DI g(-1). Uptake of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in human tumours in our large animal model is comparable with that observed in patients and may be more realistic than nude mice xenografts for prediction of clinical efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9716032

  2. Xenograft assessment of predictive biomarkers for standard head and neck cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew P; Swick, Adam D; Smith, Molly A; Blitzer, Grace C; Yang, Robert Z; Saha, Sandeep; Harari, Paul M; Lambert, Paul F; Liu, Cheng Z; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a challenging cancer to treat with overall 5-year survival on the order of 50-60%. Therefore, predictive biomarkers for this disease would be valuable to provide more effective and individualized therapeutic approaches for these patients. While prognostic biomarkers such as p16 expression correlate with outcome; to date, no predictive biomarkers have been clinically validated for HNSCC. We generated xenografts in immunocompromised mice from six established HNSCC cell lines and evaluated response to cisplatin, cetuximab, and radiation. Tissue microarrays were constructed from pre- and posttreatment tumor samples derived from each xenograft experiment. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a semiautomated imaging and analysis platform to determine the relative expression of five potential predictive biomarkers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phospho-EGFR, phospho-Akt, phospho-ERK, and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1). Biomarker levels were compared between xenografts that were sensitive versus resistant to a specific therapy utilizing a two-sample t-test with equal standard deviations. Indeed the xenografts displayed heterogeneous responses to each treatment, and we linked a number of baseline biomarker levels to response. This included low ERCC1 being associated with cisplatin sensitivity, low phospho-Akt correlated with cetuximab sensitivity, and high total EGFR was related to radiation resistance. Overall, we developed a systematic approach to identifying predictive biomarkers and demonstrated several connections between biomarker levels and treatment response. Despite these promising initial results, this work requires additional preclinical validation, likely involving the use of patient-derived xenografts, prior to moving into the clinical realm for confirmation among patients with HNSCC. PMID:25619980

  3. Xenograft assessment of predictive biomarkers for standard head and neck cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Andrew P; Swick, Adam D; Smith, Molly A; Blitzer, Grace C; Yang, Robert Z; Saha, Sandeep; Harari, Paul M; Lambert, Paul F; Liu, Cheng Z; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a challenging cancer to treat with overall 5-year survival on the order of 50–60%. Therefore, predictive biomarkers for this disease would be valuable to provide more effective and individualized therapeutic approaches for these patients. While prognostic biomarkers such as p16 expression correlate with outcome; to date, no predictive biomarkers have been clinically validated for HNSCC. We generated xenografts in immunocompromised mice from six established HNSCC cell lines and evaluated response to cisplatin, cetuximab, and radiation. Tissue microarrays were constructed from pre- and posttreatment tumor samples derived from each xenograft experiment. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a semiautomated imaging and analysis platform to determine the relative expression of five potential predictive biomarkers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phospho-EGFR, phospho-Akt, phospho-ERK, and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1). Biomarker levels were compared between xenografts that were sensitive versus resistant to a specific therapy utilizing a two-sample t-test with equal standard deviations. Indeed the xenografts displayed heterogeneous responses to each treatment, and we linked a number of baseline biomarker levels to response. This included low ERCC1 being associated with cisplatin sensitivity, low phospho-Akt correlated with cetuximab sensitivity, and high total EGFR was related to radiation resistance. Overall, we developed a systematic approach to identifying predictive biomarkers and demonstrated several connections between biomarker levels and treatment response. Despite these promising initial results, this work requires additional preclinical validation, likely involving the use of patient-derived xenografts, prior to moving into the clinical realm for confirmation among patients with HNSCC. PMID:25619980

  4. Modeling of response to endocrine therapy in a panel of human luminal breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Cottu, P; Marangoni, E; Assayag, F; de Cremoux, P; Vincent-Salomon, A; Guyader, Ch; de Plater, L; Elbaz, C; Karboul, N; Fontaine, J J; Chateau-Joubert, S; Boudou-Rouquette, P; Alran, S; Dangles-Marie, V; Gentien, D; Poupon, M-F; Decaudin, D

    2012-06-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major complication of luminal breast cancer and studies of the biological features of hormonal resistance are limited by the lack of adequate preclinical models. The aim of this study is to establish and characterize a panel of primary human luminal breast carcinoma xenografts, and to evaluate their response to endocrine therapies. Four hundred and twenty-three tumor fragments obtained directly from patients have been grafted in the interscapular fatpad of Swiss nude mice. After stable engraftment with estradiol supplementation, xenografted tumors have been validated by conventional pathology and immunohistochemistry examination, and additional molecular studies. In vivo tumor growth and response to different endocrine treatments were evaluated. We have engrafted 423 tumors including 314 ER+ tumors, and 8 new luminal breast cancer xenografts have been obtained (2.5%). Tumor take was much lower for luminal tumors than for non-luminal tumors (2.5 vs. 24.7%, P < 0.0001), and was associated with two independent criteria, i.e., ER status (P < 0.0001) and a high grade tumor (P = 0.05). Histological and immunohistochemical analyses performed on patient's tumors and xenografts showed striking similarities in the tumor morphology as well as in the expression level of ER, PR, and HER2. Response to hormone therapy, evaluated in 6 luminal models, showed different sensitivities, thus exhibiting heterogeneity similar to what is observed in the clinic. We have established a panel of primary human luminal breast cancer xenografts, recapitulating the biological and clinical behaviors of patient tumors, and therefore suitable for further preclinical experiments. PMID:22002565

  5. Anti-tumor efficacy of paclitaxel against human lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yamori, T; Sato, S; Chikazawa, H; Kadota, T

    1997-12-01

    We examined paclitaxel for anti-tumor activity against human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice and compared its efficacy with that of cisplatin, currently a key drug for lung cancer chemotherapy. Five non-small cell lung cancers (A549, NCI-H23, NCI-H226, NCI-H460 and NCI-H522) and 2 small cell lung cancers (DMS114 and DMS273) were chosen for this study, since these cell lines have been well characterized as regards in vitro and in vivo drug sensitivity. These cells were exposed to graded concentrations of paclitaxel (0.1 to 1000 nM) for 48 h. The 50% growth-inhibitory concentrations (GI50) for the cell lines ranged from 4 to 24 nM, which are much lower than the achievable peak plasma concentration of paclitaxel. In the in vivo study, 4 cell lines (A549, NCI-H23, NCI-H460, DMS-273) were grown as subcutaneous tumors xenografts in nude mice. Paclitaxel was given intravenously as consecutive daily injections for 5 days at the doses of 24 and 12 mg/kg/day. Against every xenograft, paclitaxel produced a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition compared to the saline control. Paclitaxel at 24 mg/kg/day was more effective than cisplatin at 3 mg/kg/day with the same dosing schedule as above, although the toxicity of paclitaxel was similar to or rather lower than that of cisplatin, in terms of body weight loss. In addition, paclitaxel showed potent activity against 2 other lung cancer xenografts (NCI-H226 and DMS114). Therefore, paclitaxel showed more effective, wider-spectrum anti-tumor activity than cisplatin in this panel of 6 lung cancer xenografts. These findings support the potential utility of paclitaxel in the treatment of human lung cancer. PMID:9473739

  6. Orthotopic Human Choroidal Melanoma Xenografts in Nude Rats with Aggressive and Nonaggressive PAS Staining Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Rod D.; Abbas, Asad

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Choroidal melanoma is the most common primary ocular cancer among the adult population. Patient survival has been linked to the periodic acid-Schiff base (PAS)–positive vascular patterns in the tumors. The presence of PAS-positive loops or cross-linking parallel channels is a marker of an aggressive tumor. The purpose of this study was to develop new xenograft models of human choroidal melanoma that predictably demonstrate the PAS staining patterns associated with nonaggressive and aggressive tumors in humans. METHODS Three human choroidal melanoma cell lines (C918, M619, and OCM-1) were used. C918 and M619 are considered aggressive, based on their ability to form PAS-positive channels in vitro. The nonaggressive OCM-1 cells do not form these channels. C918, M619, and OCM-1 spheroids were grown and implanted in the suprachoroidal space of 20, 17, and 16 WAG/RijHs-rnu nude rats, respectively. Tumors were grown for 1 to >4 weeks, and histology was performed to evaluate tumor growth and determine PAS labeling patterns. RESULTS Growth of C918, M619, and OCM-1 xenografts were histologically verified in 20/20, 15/17, and 16/16 rats, respectively. PAS staining revealed loops and cross-linking parallel channels, typical of aggressive tumors in patients, in 90% of C918 and 100% of M619 xenografts. Only 4 of 16 OCM-1 xenografts showed PAS-positive loops. The rest showed no PAS staining or only perivascular staining, indicative of nonaggressive tumors. CONCLUSIONS It is possible to grow human choroidal melanoma orthotopic xenografts in nude rats that reproduce the PAS staining patterns associated with aggressive and nonaggressive choroidal melanomas in patients. PMID:16384938

  7. Review Of Applied Mathematical Models For Describing The Behaviour Of Aqueous Humor In Eye Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierka, M.; Jurczak, P.

    2015-12-01

    In the paper, currently used methods for modeling the flow of the aqueous humor through eye structures are presented. Then a computational model based on rheological models of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids is proposed. The proposed model may be used for modeling the flow of the aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is modeled as an array of rectilinear parallel capillary tubes. The flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids is considered. As a results of discussion mathematical equations of permeability of porous media and velocity of fluid flow through porous media have been received.

  8. [The humoral immunity indices of patients with malignant skin melanoma using the viral immunomodulator rigvir].

    PubMed

    Glinkina, L S; Heisele, O G; Garklava, R R; Muceniece, A J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a viral immunomodulator rigvir on humoral immunity was studied in patients with skin malignant melanoma. Peripheral blood levels of B-lymphocytes, IgA, G and M and circulating immune complexes were assayed and immunoglobulin/B-cell ratio (Ig/B) calculated. Preoperative treatment with rigvir brought the indexes of humoral immunity to normal. Response of melanoma patients to rigvir treatment was different from that seen in healthy subjects and was determined by the course of disease. PMID:1300751

  9. Acute Sensitivity of Ph-like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia to the SMAC-Mimetic Birinapant.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Jennifer; Robbins, Alissa; Evans, Kathryn; Beck, Dominik; Kurmasheva, Raushan T; Billups, Catherine A; Carol, Hernan; Heatley, Sue; Sutton, Rosemary; Marshall, Glenn M; White, Deborah; Pimanda, John; Houghton, Peter J; Smith, Malcolm A; Lock, Richard B

    2016-08-01

    Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a genetically defined high-risk ALL subtype with a generally poor prognosis. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of birinapant, a small-molecule mimetic of the apoptotic regulator SMAC, against a diverse set of ALL subtypes. Birinapant exhibited potent and selective cytotoxicity against B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL) cells that were cultured ex vivo or in vivo as patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX). Cytotoxicity was consistently most acute in Ph-like BCP-ALL. Unbiased gene expression analysis of BCP-ALL PDX specimens identified a 68-gene signature associated with birinapant sensitivity, including an enrichment for genes involved in inflammatory response, hematopoiesis, and cell death pathways. All Ph-like PDXs analyzed clustered within this 68-gene classifier. Mechanistically, birinapant sensitivity was associated with expression of TNF receptor TNFR1 and was abrogated by interfering with the TNFα/TNFR1 interaction. In combination therapy, birinapant enhanced the in vivo efficacy of an induction-type regimen of vincristine, dexamethasone, and L-asparaginase against Ph-like ALL xenografts, offering a preclinical rationale to further evaluate this SMAC mimetic for BCP-ALL treatment. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4579-91. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27302164

  10. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  11. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  12. Caution, the Use of Humor May Lead to Confusion: Evaluation of a Video Podcast of the Midwest Teen Sex Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, Shelly; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Spies, Erica L.; Losch, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Web sites about sexual health lack the interactivity, humor, and "viral" nature required to attract young adults. The Midwest Teen Sex Show (www.midwestteensexshow.com) is an interactive, humor-based Web site that provides sexual health information to young adults. One episode from the Web site was shown to six focus groups of young women, ages…

  13. The Use of Humor and Storytelling with African American Men: Innovative Therapeutic Strategies for Success in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vereen, Linwood G.; Hill, Nicole R.; Butler, S. Kent

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of culturally appropriate humor as a tool for change within the parameters of counseling has grown within the literature. In comparison, the art of storytelling has had little attention within the literature as a tool for strategic change. This article outlines a framework for the use of humor and storytelling as…

  14. Laughing in the Face of Fear (of Disease Detection): Using Humor to Promote Cancer Self-Examination Behavior.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Robin L

    2016-07-01

    This research examines the possible benefit of using humor to reduce anxiety associated with performing cancer self-examination behaviors. In Study 1, 187 undergraduates read a humorous public service announcement (PSA) script promoting either breast or testicular self-exams. Results suggest that perception of humor reduced anxiety about self-exams, which, in turn, related to more positive self-exam attitudes. Simultaneously, humor perception associated with greater message processing motivation, which, in turn, associated with more supportive self-exam attitudes. Self-exam attitudes also positively associated with self-exam intentions. These results were largely replicated in Study 2. Further, self-exam intentions predicted self-exam behavior 1 week later. However, consistent with past research, the humorous and serious messages did not generate differences in subsequent self-exam behavior, though the intention-behavior relationship was stronger and significant for those exposed to the humorous versus the serious messages. In light of these findings, and given that humor has the advantage of attracting and holding attention in real message environments, the use of carefully constructed humor appeals may be a viable message strategy to promote health detection behaviors. PMID:26652312

  15. Tenascin C protects aorta from acute dissection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Taizo; Shiraishi, Kozoh; Furusho, Aya; Ito, Sohei; Hirakata, Saki; Nishida, Norifumi; Yoshimura, Koichi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Takanobu; Ueno, Takafumi; Hamano, Kimikazu; Hiroe, Michiaki; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Aoki, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is caused by the disruption of intimomedial layer of the aortic walls, which is immediately life-threatening. Although recent studies indicate the importance of proinflammatory response in pathogenesis of AAD, the mechanism to keep the destructive inflammatory response in check is unknown. Here, we report that induction of tenascin-C (TNC) is a stress-evoked protective mechanism against the acute hemodynamic and humoral stress in aorta. Periaortic application of CaCl2 caused stiffening of abdominal aorta, which augmented the hemodynamic stress and TNC induction in suprarenal aorta by angiotensin II infusion. Deletion of Tnc gene rendered mice susceptible to AAD development upon the aortic stress, which was accompanied by impaired TGFβ signaling, insufficient induction of extracellular matrix proteins and exaggerated proinflammatory response. Thus, TNC works as a stress-evoked molecular damper to maintain the aortic integrity under the acute stress.

  16. Positive psychological measure: constructing and evaluating the reliability and validity of a Chinese Humor Scale applicable to professional nursing.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Hsiao, Yu-Ling; Liu, Shwu-Jiuan; Chang, Chueh

    2005-09-01

    The nursing profession has generally accepted humor as beneficial to health care. As nursing has always emphasized holistic care and the importance of individual needs, the profession values the ability of humor to positively affect all aspects of a patient's well being. The purposes of this study were to develop a "Chinese Humor Scale (CHS)" for the nursing profession and then test its reliability and validity. The 405 individuals selected for participation in this study included nursing on-the-job students from a medical university and professional nurses practicing at four hospitals in north Taiwan. Researchers developed a list of 57 key humor measures which were filled out and returned by study participants. An evaluation of results using Cronbach's alpha coefficients demonstrated good consistency (alpha=.93) for the developed CHS. Intercorrelations amongst the four sub-scales were generally quite low, indicating each sub-scale measures dimensions relatively distinct from one another (r=.24 approximately .48, both p's<.001). The CHS was tested using item analysis. The scale was constructed in accordance with exploratory factor analysis (EFA) (K.M.O.=.92). Thirty CHS items, categorized under the four indices of "humorous creativity", "tendency to laugh", "perceptivity to humor", and "humorous attitude", were found to explain 55.42% of total variances. The CHS was found to provide good validity using a content validity index (CVI) developed by five experts. The results of this study provide encouraging evidence for the construct validity and reliability of the proposed humor scale and support its application by nursing educators and clinicians to further test and assess concepts related to humor. Further research is needed to explore more fully the implications of humor in nursing. PMID:16237632

  17. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  18. Xenografts of five human leiomyosarcomas: radiation response after 60cobalt- and d(14)+Be neutron single doses.

    PubMed

    Budach, V; Stuschke, M; Budach, W; Streffer, C; Sack, H

    1990-01-01

    Five permanently established xenograft lines of human soft tissue sarcomas were irradiated with single doses of 5.8 MeV d(14)+Be neutrons and of 60Co rays, respectively, at several dose levels to generate dose response relationships. The tumors were clamped ten minutes prior to and during irradiation to induce uniform hypoxia. All tumours were previously characterized by means of histomorphology, tumour doubling times (DT's), DNA-index and enzyme pattern of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD). According to these criteria, three out of five leiomyosarcomas were identical referring to the biopsy of origin, whereas two had changed in successive passages. For the different tumour lines, specific growth delays ranged from 0 to 8.7 after 5.3 Gy neutrons and from 0 to 11.4 after 16 Gy60Co, respectively. In terms of radiosensitivity for different single doses and irradiation qualities, a highly significant overall correlation (rs = 0.82 +/- 0.06) was found for the ranking of the tumours with respect to the growth delay and specific growth delay endpoints. No correlation was found between tumour doubling times and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). In general, calculated RBE-values decreased with increasing effect level. For the five tumour lines, RBE-values ranged from 1.6 to 12.7 and 2.0 to 4.4 at specific growth delays of 0.5 and 2.0, respectively, under acutely hypoxic conditions. These results indicate a potential advantage for neutrons in a subgroup of human soft tissue sarcomas compared with sparsely ionising irradiation. PMID:2105535

  19. HUMORAL ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO INDIVIDUAL VIRAL PROTEINS AFTER MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to identify viral proteins that played an important role in the humoral immune response to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Viral proteins were separated from a purified virus preparation on polyacrylamide gels, were blotted onto nitrocellulose strips,...

  20. Pickles Will Kill You: Use Humor to Teach Critical Reading Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmer, Jean E.

    In developing critical reading, humor may contribute to three broad categories of skills: discerning the author's purpose, inferencing, and evaluating content. Passages from children's books such as "Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" or "The Great Brain" can help to illustrate the need for teachers and students to thoughtfully infer and evaluate…

  1. The Potential of Humor as a Trigger for Emotional Engagement in Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoad, Colin; Deed, Craig; Lugg, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the relevance of humor to student engagement in outdoor education. A sociocultural framework is applied to this examination, based on a view of learning as constructed, cognitive, embodied, and affective. A set of affordances of outdoor education as a contextually situated learning activity is identified along with related…

  2. Stress Management Strategies for Students: The Immediate Effects of Yoga, Humor, and Reading on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzolo, Denise; Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Stiskal, Doreen; Simpkins, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Health science programs can be demanding and difficult for many students, leading to high levels of stress. High levels of stress can have a negative effect on students and subsequently the practicing clinician. Research suggests that yoga, humor, and reading are simple, effective methods to help reduce stress. To date no research…

  3. From Kate Sanborn to Feminist Psychology: The Social Context of Women's Humor, 1885-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Alice

    1986-01-01

    Examines the work of Kate Sanborn (1839-1917), who edited an anthology of women's humor and crusaded for 20 years to alter the stereotype of women's humorlessness. It is suggested that her work adds to our knowledge of feminist history, as well as presaging current theoretical developments in the psychology of women. (Author/ABB)

  4. "Ma Sha Allah!" Creating Community through Humor Practices in a Diverse Arabic Language Flagship Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Sara Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Lave and Wenger's (1991) and Wenger's (1998) "communities of practice" (CoP) framework, this study explores the shared repertoire of humor practices in the creation of community within the context of a culturally diverse and multilevel adult Arabic language classroom consisting of two native speakers, five heritage language learners…

  5. Reactions to Humorous Sexual Stimuli as a Function of Sexual Activeness and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prerost, Frank J.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed male (N=60) and female (N=60) responses to pictorial humorous sexual material in relationship to degree of sexual expression and personal satisfaction with sexual behavior. Results showed persons with active and satisfying sexual expression enjoyed sexually explicit cartoons and showed less preference for aggressive themes. (LLL)

  6. [Humoral nonspecific immunity in patients with post-burn cicatrical strictures of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Mumladze, R B; Babaian, S S; Bobkov, Iu I; Chernyshev, V S; Taratuta, O V

    1983-03-01

    The authors have studied the significance of factors of the humoral non-specific defense (HND) in 37 patients with cicatricial constrictions of the oesophagus and stomach. The data obtained were used for choosing the optimum terms for gastrostoma and oesophagoplasty. In 14 patients treatment with lysozyme was performed due to decreased indices of HND. PMID:6857955

  7. Male Readership Differences in Liquor Magazine Ads Employing Nonsensical and Sexual Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Leonard N.; And Others

    A study examined the attention getting value of nonsensical and sexual humor used in liquor advertisements to determine if one was more effective than the other in attracting male magazine readers. Thirty-two Starch-scored liquor ads taken from 1976 and 1977 issues of "Time,""Newsweek," and "Sports Illustrated" were analyzed by three male readers.…

  8. "Cops" and the Comic Frame: Humor and Meaning-Making in Reality-Based Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiser-Getz, Glenn C.

    1995-01-01

    Examines college students' responses to the program "Cops" to better understand how viewers construct meaning and pleasure from the televisual texts of reality-based programming. Finds that humor guides the viewers' interpretations of the text and is a major source of pleasure, but the audience's search for the comic both deviates from and…

  9. Comparison of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine in Weaned Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare humoral and cellular immune responses to inactivated swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccine. Methods: Fifty 3-week-old weaned pigs from a herd free of SIV and PRRSV were randomly divided into the non-vaccinated control group and vaccinated group containing 25 pigs each....

  10. Comparison of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine in Weaned Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humoral and cellular immune responses to inactivated swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccine were evaluated and compared. Fifty 3-week-old weaned pigs from a herd free of SIV and PRRSV were randomly divided into the non-vaccinated control group and vaccinated group containing 25 pigs each. Pigs were va...

  11. "Grammar Nazis Never Sleep": Facebook Humor and the Management of Standard Written Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Tamah; Švelch, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses Language Management Theory (Nekvapil and Sherman, "Language management in contact situations. Perspectives from three continents". Peter Lang, Frankfurt/Main, 2009) to investigate Facebook pages as a site and instrument of behavior-toward-language, focusing specifically on the use of humor. The language in question is…

  12. Resilient Youths Use Humor to Enhance Socioemotional Functioning during a "Day in the Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, E. Leslie; Fox, Janice D.; Anderson, Michelle S.; Cameron, Catherine Ann

    2010-01-01

    In order to extend previous early years humor research into early adolescence, the authors adapted an innovative ecological research method such that at-risk adolescents could be filmed during an entire waking day in their life. Community youth advocates nominated one 15-year-old female and one 14-year-old male as doing well despite adverse…

  13. As Far As Words Go: Activities for Understanding Ambiguous Language and Humor, Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Cecile Cyrul

    2009-01-01

    Understanding ambiguous words, phrases, and sentences is an important part of reading well, communicating skillfully, and enjoying humor based on word play. With this seven-unit activity book--filled with creative, ready-to-use activities based on jokes and puns--students will learn how to decipher the language ambiguities they encounter inside…

  14. IMMUNOLOGIC EFFECTS OF NICKEL: I. SUPPRESSION OF CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of nickel chloride on the cellular and humoral immune responses of mice were studied. A single intramuscular injection of nickel chloride (18.3 mg/kg) caused a significant involution of the thymus within 2 days following treatment. Significant reductions in the in vit...

  15. Humor, Self-Attitude, Emotions, and Cognitions in Group Art Therapy with War Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopytin, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of the therapeutic effects of group art therapy in a psychotherapy unit of a Russian hospital for war veterans. The researchers randomly assigned 112 veterans being treated for stress-related disorders to an experimental group (art therapy) and a control group. The emphasis was on the use of humor in the…

  16. Children's Appreciation of Humor: A Test of the Cognitive-Congruency Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, Paul E.

    According to the cognitive-congruency principle, humor appreciation peaks when the cognitive demands of the stimulus are congruent with the cognitive level of the child. This study tested the principle with jokes based on concepts associated with concrete operational thinking, conservation of mass and weight. This method provides a satisfactory…

  17. Humor Reduces Anxiety and Disgust in Anticipation of an Educational Dissection in Teacher Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph; Wüst-Ackermann, Peter; Demirhan, Eda

    2016-01-01

    Dissections of human organs and animals are an important part of medical and science education but students usually express negative emotions towards dissections. Some studies show a negative influence of disgust and anxiety on motivation, interest and achievement. Therefore, reducing anxiety and disgust should be an important aim. As humor can…

  18. An Acquired Taste: Children's Perceptions of Humor and Teasing in Verbal Irony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pexman, Penny M.; Glenwright, Melanie; Krol, Andrea; James, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    Around 5 or 6 years of age, children begin to recognize that speakers who make ironic remarks do not believe what they literally say, but children of the same age do not show appreciation for the humor function of irony (Dews et al., 1996; Harris & Pexman, 2003). We investigated 7- to 10-year-old children's interpretations of verbal irony and…

  19. Using humor to teach responsible sexual health decision making and condom comfort.

    PubMed

    Fennell, R

    1993-07-01

    Using a lively classroom activity and a sense of humor is helpful in conveying a serious message about responsible sexual behavior to college students. The activity described takes only 1 hour, requires simple and easily obtainable equipment, and generates animated discussions. Students learn to feel more comfortable about using condoms after demonstrations of the strength and flexibility of these increasingly available items. PMID:8376678

  20. The Common Elements of Sex and Aggression as Reflected in Humor Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prerost, Frank J.; Brewer, Robert E.

    Freudian theory and subsequent research indicates a connection between sexual and aggressive motivation. The present study investigated preferences among nonsexual, sexual, and aggressive humor as a function of induced aggressive mood. One-hundred and twenty male and 120 female university students participated in one of four 2x2 factorial designs…

  1. A Deadpan Look at Humor in Curriculum Theory (Or, The Serious vs. the Solemn).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallance, Elizabeth

    Educational researchers can provide unusual perspectives to their research if they include humor and irony. Looking at topics from the reverse (the critical attitude, the aesthetic perspective) allows researchers to see patterns, details, and meanings which are normally hidden from view. This aesthetic perspective enables artists, critics, and…

  2. Gender and Higher Education: A Critical Spin in the Study of Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Flavia; Dana, Daniel; Roth, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Feminist pedagogy as a research construct can be classified into gender and liberatory subgroups. Gender models frequently focus on learning. Liberatory models underline the social structures and power relations which constitute systems of oppression. Humor in practice may be used as a social corrective, or it may be used to extend power distances…

  3. On Using Humor to Market Higher Education: At Whose Expense Is the Clowning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines the deliberately humorous approaches undertaken in two recent higher education marketing endeavors: The American Council on Education's "Solutions for Our Future" campaign and Stanford's "Hail, Stanford, Hail" initiative. Three television commercials from each project are described and discussed in light of a view of comedy…

  4. Humor Scholarship and TESOL: Applying Findings and Establishing a Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Nancy D.

    2011-01-01

    Research in the areas of second language (L2) pragmatics and of conversational humor has increased in recent decades, resulting in a strong base of knowledge from which applied linguists can draw information for teaching purposes and undertake future research. Yet, whereas empirical findings in L2 pragmatics are beginning to find their way into…

  5. Stripping the boss: the powerful role of humor in the Egyptian Revolution 2011.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Mohamed M; Frerichs, Sabine

    2013-12-01

    The Egyptian Revolution 2011 has shaken the Arab world and stirred up Middle-East politics. Moreover, it caused a rush in political science and the neighboring disciplines, which had not predicted an event like this and now have troubles explaining it. While many things can be learned from the popular uprising, and from the limitations of previous scholarship, our focus will be on a moral resource, which has occasionally been noticed, but not sufficiently explored: the role of humor in keeping up the spirit of the Revolution. For 18 days, protestors persevered at Liberation Square in Central Cairo, the epicenter of resistance; at times a few dozens, at times hundreds of thousands. What they did was to fight the terror of the regime, which reached absurd peaks during those days, with humor-successfully. We offer a social-functionalist account of the uprising, which includes behavioral as well as cultural levels of analysis, and illuminates how humorous means helped to achieve deadly serious goals. By reconstructing how Egyptians laughed themselves into democracy, we outline a social psychology of resistance, which uses humor both as a sword and a shield. PMID:23801370

  6. Humor and Film in the Geography Classroom: Learning from Michael Moore's "TV Nation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, Derek H.; Popke, E. Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    How can teachers use humor and film to convert geography classrooms into public spaces for thinking and talking about the world in a critical way? One useful resource for raising student consciousness and critical discussion is "TV Nation"-a satirical television newsmagazine show created, produced, and hosted by rebel-filmmaker Michael Moore in…

  7. Creating, Evaluating, and Improving Humorous Cartoons Related to Design Principles for Gifted Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Schneider, Jean S.

    2009-01-01

    Humor through cartoons is an interesting way to engage students in learning course content. The purpose of this study was to document the process of graduate student-made cartoons that portrayed content about principles of designing gifted education programs. Seventeen graduate students enrolled in an introductory gifted education course…

  8. Age-Related Differences in Judgments of Inappropriate Behavior are Related to Humor Style Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jennifer Tehan; Lohani, Monika; Isaacowitz, Derek M.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying social gaffes is important for maintaining relationships. Older adults are less able than young to discriminate between socially appropriate and inappropriate behavior in video clips. One open question is how these social appropriateness ratings relate to potential age differences in the perception of what is actually funny or not. In the present study, young, middle-aged, and older adults were equally able to discriminate between appropriate and inappropriate social behavior in a diverse set of clips relevant to both age groups. However, young and middle-aged adults rated the gaffe clips as funnier than control clips and young adults smiled more during the inappropriate clips than the control clips. Older adults did not show this pattern, suggesting that they did not find the inappropriate clips funny. Additionally, young adults endorsed a more aggressive humor style than middle-aged and older adults and aggressive humor style endorsement mediated age differences in social appropriateness ratings. Results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms such as cohort differences in humor and developmental prioritization of certain humor styles, as well as the importance of investigating age differences in both abilities and preferences. PMID:25244473

  9. Post-War Humor in the Upper-Division German Literature Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Eva-Maria

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several units from a course on German Humor offered at Washington University in St. Louis in the Spring of 2003 and 2006. The course was constructed according to the principles of the task-based classroom outlined by James Lee and employed at Georgetown University. The emphasis in each of the four units, which address East…

  10. Techniques for Using Humor and Fun in the Language Arts Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minchew, Sue S.; Hopper, Peggy F.

    2008-01-01

    The authors, former middle and high school English teachers, review the rationale for using humor and fun in the classroom and provide detailed descriptions for teaching practices and activities that confer enjoyment and learning for language arts students. Although fun activities, these methods foster vocabulary development, grammar instruction,…

  11. From Implicit to Explicit Representation in Children's Response to Pictorial Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puche-Navarro, Rebeca

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments examined pictorial humor as an unusual but legitimate way to approach the study of children's representational activity and the transition from implicit to explicit knowledge. In both experiments, the participants were 3- and 4-year-old children. Experiment 1 studied the understanding of two pictorial jokes using two conditions,…

  12. Measurement of Physiologic Glucose Levels Using Raman Spectroscopy in a Rabbit Aqueous Humor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, J.; Storrie-Lombardi, M.; Borchert, M.

    1998-01-01

    We have elecited a reliable glucose signature in mammalian physiological ranges using near infrared Raman laser excitation at 785 nm and multivariate analysis. In a recent series of experiments we measured glucose levels in an artificial aqueous humor in the range from 0.5 to 13X normal values.

  13. The Application of Humorous Song in EFL Classrooms and Its Effects on Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiee, Marzieh; Kassaian, Zohre; Dastjerdi, Hossein Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Language learners need to feel secure and to be free of stress so they can focus on language tasks (Ellis, 1994). A language teacher should use different tools to encourage students and make them involved in learning process. Humor and song are effective tools, as they develop creativity and make the class environment an appropriate setting for…

  14. How Comedians Learn to Use Humor to Raise Awareness and Consciousness about Social and Political Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Nancy Ann

    2011-01-01

    During these unprecedented complicated times, there is an equally unprecedented need for an informed citizenry. Many of us watch democracy get played out on the 24-hour news networks. Still others bear witness to it in the social commentaries embedded in the entertainment provided by late night comedians like Jon Stewart. Humor provides a largely…

  15. Humorous Cartoons Made by Preservice Teachers for Teaching Science Concepts to Elementary Students: Process and Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Sallis, Derek A.; Donaldson, J. Ana

    2008-01-01

    Elementary school science is an often-neglected subject in the current literacy-focused political atmosphere. However, reading informational trade books about science in literacy class can help children increase their science knowledge. Incorporating humor through content-related cartoons is an effective way to engage students in deeper…

  16. Chronic stress, leukocyte subpopulations, and humoral response to latent viruses

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, W.; Weisse, C.S.; Reynolds, C.P.; Bowles, C.A.; Baum, A. )

    1989-01-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to affect immune system status and function, but most studies of this relationship have focused on acute stress and/or laboratory situations. The present study compared total numbers of leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (determined by flow cytometry) and antibody titers to latent and nonlatent viruses among a group of chronically stressed individuals living near the damaged Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant with those of a demographically comparable control group. Urinary catecholamine and cortisol levels were also examined. Residents of the TMI area exhibited greater numbers of neutrophils, which were positively correlated with epinephrine levels. The TMI group also exhibited fewer B lymphocytes, T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Antibody titers to herpes simplex were significantly different across groups as well, whereas titers to nonlatent rubella virus as well as IgG and IgM levels were comparable.

  17. Chronic stress, leukocyte subpopulations, and humoral response to latent viruses.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, W; Weisse, C S; Reynolds, C P; Bowles, C A; Baum, A

    1989-01-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to affect immune system status and function, but most studies of this relationship have focused on acute stress and/or laboratory situations. The present study compared total numbers of leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (determined by flow cytometry) and antibody titers to latent and nonlatent viruses among a group of chronically stressed individuals living near the damaged Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant with those of a demographically comparable control group. Urinary catecholamine and cortisol levels were also examined. Residents of the TMI area exhibited greater numbers of neutrophils, which were positively correlated with epinephrine levels. The TMI group also exhibited fewer B lymphocytes, T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Antibody titers to herpes simplex were significantly different across groups as well, whereas titers to nonlatent rubella virus as well as IgG and IgM levels were comparable. PMID:2555149

  18. Xenografting of testicular tissue pieces: twelve years of an in vivo spermatogenesis system

    PubMed Central

    Arregui, Lucía; Dobrinski, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a dynamic and complex process that involves endocrine and testicular factors. During xenotransplantation of testicular tissue fragments into immunodecifient mice a functional communication between host brain and donor testis is established. This interaction allows for the progression of spermatogenesis and recovery of fertilization-competent spermatozoa from a broad range of mammalian species. In the last years, significant progress has been achieved in testis tissue xenografting that improves our knowledge about factors determining the success of grafting. The goal of this review is to provide up to date information about the role of factors such as donor age, donor species, testis tissue preservation or type of recipient mouse on the efficiency of this technique. Applications are described and compared with other techniques with similar purposes. Recent work demonstrates that testicular tissue xenografting is used as a model to study gonadotoxicity of drugs and to obtain sperm from valuable young males. PMID:25150043

  19. Raman spectroscopy identifies radiation response in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Samantha J.; Isabelle, Martin; Devorkin, Lindsay; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Lum, Julian J.; Jirasek, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    External beam radiation therapy is a standard form of treatment for numerous cancers. Despite this, there are no approved methods to account for patient specific radiation sensitivity. In this report, Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used to identify radiation-induced biochemical changes in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. Chemometric analysis revealed unique radiation-related Raman signatures that were specific to nucleic acid, lipid, protein and carbohydrate spectral features. Among these changes was a dramatic shift in the accumulation of glycogen spectral bands for doses of 5 or 15 Gy when compared to unirradiated tumours. When spatial mapping was applied in this analysis there was considerable variability as we found substantial intra- and inter-tumour heterogeneity in the distribution of glycogen and other RS spectral features. Collectively, these data provide unique insight into the biochemical response of tumours, irradiated in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of RS for detecting distinct radiobiological responses in human tumour xenografts.

  20. In vivo radiolocalization of antiosteogenic sarcoma monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Sakahara, H.; Hosoi, S.; Yamamuro, T.; Higashi, S.; Mikawa, H.; Endo, K.; Toyama, S.

    1984-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies Ost6 and Ost7 (mouse Immunoglobulin G1) to human osteogenic sarcoma were isolated from ascitic fluid and labeled with radioiodine. After injection into athymic nu/nu mice with s.c. xenografts of human osteogenic sarcoma, the uptake of radioactivity in tumors, visceral organs, and blood was determined. Five days after injection, Ost6 and Ost7 showed preferential accumulation in tumors (tumor:blood ratio, 4.3). Furthermore, with testicular and bladder tumors, both unreactive with Ost7, there was no localization of radiolabeled Ost7 in xenograft growths. When Ost7 was labeled with /sup 131/I, its accumulation into human osteogenic sarcoma could be clearly visualized by whole-body gamma-scintigraphy without computer-assisted data processing.

  1. Tumor Repression of VCaP Xenografts by a Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide

    PubMed Central

    Hargrove, Amanda E.; Martinez, Thomas F.; Hare, Alissa A.; Kurmis, Alexis A.; Phillips, John W.; Sud, Sudha; Pienta, Kenneth J; Dervan, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides are high affinity DNA-binding small molecules that can inhibit protein-DNA interactions. In VCaP cells, a human prostate cancer cell line overexpressing both AR and the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion, an androgen response element (ARE)-targeted Py-Im polyamide significantly downregulates AR driven gene expression. Polyamide exposure to VCaP cells reduced proliferation without causing DNA damage. Py-Im polyamide treatment also reduced tumor growth in a VCaP mouse xenograft model. In addition to the effects on AR regulated transcription, RNA-seq analysis revealed inhibition of topoisomerase-DNA binding as a potential mechanism that contributes to the antitumor effects of polyamides in cell culture and in xenografts. These studies support the therapeutic potential of Py-Im polyamides to target multiple aspects of transcriptional regulation in prostate cancers without genotoxic stress. PMID:26571387

  2. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Nicole E.; Rastelli, Antonella L.; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases. PMID:26378060

  3. Anti-CD45 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy using Bismuth-213: High Rates of Complete Remission and Long-Term Survival in a Mouse Myeloid Leukemia Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Back, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Park, Steven I; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozoco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K; Green, Damian J; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Press, Oliver W

    2011-07-21

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. α-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path-length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to β-emitting radionuclides for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5 ± 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. α imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a β-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 μCi of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for >100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an α-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of AML.

  4. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Lamming, Dudley W; Cummings, Nicole E; Rastelli, Antonella L; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-10-13

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases. PMID:26378060

  5. Ketogenic Diets Enhance Oxidative Stress and Radio-Chemo-Therapy Responses in Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bryan G.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Brandt, Kristin E.; Lindholm, Kaleigh E.; Button, Anna M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Smith, Brian J.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Fath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ketogenic diets (KDs) are high in fat and low in carbohydrates as well as protein which forces cells to rely on lipid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration rather than glycolysis for energy metabolism. Cancer cells (relative to normal cells) are believed to exist in a state of chronic oxidative stress mediated by mitochondrial metabolism. The current study tests the hypothesis that KDs enhance radio-chemo-therapy responses in lung cancer xenografts by enhancing oxidative stress. Experimental Design Mice bearing NCI-H292 and A549 lung cancer xenografts were fed a KD (KetoCal® 4:1 fats: proteins+carbohydrates) and treated with either conventionally fractionated (1.8-2 Gy) or hypofractionated (6 Gy) radiation as well as conventionally fractionated radiation combined with carboplatin. Mice weights and tumor size were monitored. Tumors were assessed for immuno-reactive 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-(4HNE) modified proteins as a marker of oxidative stress as well as PCNA and γH2AX as indices of proliferation and DNA damage, respectively. Results The KD combined with radiation resulted in slower tumor growth in both NCI-H292 and A549 xenografts (p<0.05), relative to radiation alone. The KD also slowed tumor growth when combined with carboplatin and radiation, relative to control. Tumors from animals fed a KD in combination with radiation demonstrated increases in oxidative damage mediated by lipid peroxidation as determined by 4HNE-modified proteins as well as decreased proliferation as assessed by decreased immunoreactive PCNA. Conclusions These results show that a KD enhances radio-chemo-therapy responses in lung cancer xenografts by a mechanism that may involve increased oxidative stress. PMID:23743570

  6. Noninvasive Radiofrequency Field Destruction of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Xenografts Treated with Targeted Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S.; Zhu, Cihui; Massey, Katheryn L.; Thompson, C. Shea; Kaluarachchi, Warna D.; Hamir, Amir N.; Curley, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers with few effective treatments. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are potentially therapeutic because of the safety demonstrated thus far and their physio-chemical characteristics. We utilized the astounding heating rates of AuNPs in nonionizing radiofrequency (RF) radiation to investigate human pancreatic xenograft destruction in a murine model. Experimental Design Weekly, Panc-1 and Capan-1 human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in immunocompromised mice were exposed to an RF field 36 hours after treatment (intraperitoneal) with cetuximab or PAM4 antibody conjugated AuNPs, respectively. Tumor sizes were measured weekly while necrosis and cleaved caspase-3 were investigated with H&E staining and immunofluorescence, respectively. In addition, AuNP internalization and cytotoxicity were investigated in vitro with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. Results Panc-1 cells demonstrated increased apoptosis with decreased viability after treatment with cetuximab conjugated AuNPs and RF field exposure (p = 0.00005). Differences in xenograft volumes were observed within 2 weeks of initiating therapy. Cetuximab-conjugated and PAM4-conjugated AuNPs demonstrated RF field-induced destruction of Panc-1 and Capan-1 pancreatic carcinoma xenografts after six weeks of weekly treatment (p = 0.004 and p = 0.035, respectively). There was no evidence of injury to murine organs. Cleaved caspase-3 and necrosis were both increased in treated tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates a potentially novel cancer therapy by non-invasively inducing intracellular hyperthermia with targeted AuNPs in an RF field. While the therapy is dependent on the specificity of the targeting antibody, normal tissues were without toxicity despite systemic therapy and whole body RF field exposure. PMID:21138869

  7. Pim Kinases Promote Migration and Metastatic Growth of Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Santio, Niina M.; Eerola, Sini K.; Paatero, Ilkka; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Anizon, Fabrice; Moreau, Pascale; Tuomela, Johanna; Härkönen, Pirkko; Koskinen, Päivi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and methods Pim family proteins are oncogenic kinases implicated in several types of cancer and involved in regulation of cell proliferation, survival as well as motility. Here we have investigated the ability of Pim kinases to promote metastatic growth of prostate cancer cells in two xenograft models for human prostate cancer. We have also evaluated the efficacy of Pim-selective inhibitors to antagonize these effects. Results We show here that tumorigenic growth of both subcutaneously and orthotopically inoculated prostate cancer xenografts is enhanced by stable overexpression of either Pim-1 or Pim-3. Moreover, Pim-overexpressing orthotopic prostate tumors are highly invasive and able to migrate not only to the nearby prostate-draining lymph nodes, but also into the lungs to form metastases. When the xenografted mice are daily treated with the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, both the volumes as well as the metastatic capacity of the tumors are drastically decreased. Interestingly, the Pim-promoted metastatic growth of the orthotopic xenografts is associated with enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, forced Pim expression also increases phosphorylation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, which may enable the tumor cells to migrate towards tissues such as the lungs that express the CXCL12 chemokine ligand. Conclusions Our results indicate that Pim overexpression enhances the invasive properties of prostate cancer cells in vivo. These effects can be reduced by the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, which can reach tumor tissues without serious side effects. Thus, Pim-targeting therapies with DHPCC-9-like compounds may help to prevent progression of local prostate carcinomas to fatally metastatic malignancies. PMID:26075720

  8. Stereomicroscopic fluorescence imaging of head and neck cancer xenografts targeting CD147

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J. Robert; Gleysteen, John P.; Barañano, Christopher F.; Bremser, Jennifer R.; Zhang, Wenyue; Zinn, Kurt R.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that systemically administered fluorescently labeled anti-CD147 antibody can detect head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in vivo. Experimental design In vivo immunodeficient murine model. Results Peak tumor fluorescence was visualized by near infrared stereomicroscopy in SCC-1 tumors at 24 hours after systemic injection of anti-CD147:Cy5.5 bioconjugate. SCC-1 xenografts demonstrated significantly higher fluorescent intensity after administration of CD147:Cy5.5 (48 au, p < 0.0001) compared to IgG1k:Cy5.5 isotype control antibody (9 au). FaDu tumors overexpressing CD147 (FaDu/E) demonstrated higher fluorescence (53 au) compared to control vector transfected cells (FaDu, 33 au, p < 0.0001) which was higher than CD147 knockdown cells (FaDu/siE, 5 au, p < 0.0001). Methods To determine if fluorescently labeled anti-CD147 antibody was specific for tumors in vivo, anti-CD147 and non-specific IgG1k antibody were labeled with a near infrared fluorophore (Cy5.5) and administered systemically to immunodeficient mice bearing SCC-1 xenografts. Imaging was performed over a 72 hour period using brightfield and fluorescent (685–735 nm) stereomicroscopy. To determine if fluorescence varied with receptor expression, SCID mice were xenografted with cell lines expressing variable amounts of CD147: FaDu (control vector transfected), FaDu/siE (siRNA CD147 knockdown) or FaDu/E (CD147 overexpressing) cells. Conclusions This data suggests fluorescently labeled anti-CD147 may have clinical utility in detection of HNSCC. PMID:18431087

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a novel porcine xenograft: the initial Italian experience

    PubMed Central

    ZAFFAGNINI, STEFANO; GRASSI, ALBERTO; MUCCIOLI, GIULIO MARIA MARCHEGGIANI; DI SARSINA, TOMMASO ROBERTI; RAGGI, FEDERICO; BENZI, ANDREA; MARCACCI, MAURILIO

    2015-01-01

    At the current state of the art in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, multiple techniques have been presented but none has given clearly defined and improved results. One of the main issues concerns the choice of graft. The concept of using xenograft tissue, defined as a graft tissue from one species and destined for implantation in an unlike species, was introduced in order to try to overcome the mechanical and biological concerns associated with synthetic materials and the safety and quality concerns and availability problems of allograft tissue. Xenograft tissue carries the risk of producing an immunological reaction. In order to try to overcome or attenuate the immune response against porcine xenograft tissue, the Z-Process® (Aperion Biologics Inc, San Antonio, Texas, USA) has been developed and used to produce the Z-Lig® family of devices for ACL reconstruction procedures. Z-Lig® is a tendon graft with or without bone blocks, sourced from animal tissue in a manner consistent with what has normally been sourced from human tissue, and processed to overcome anti-Gal-mediated rejection and to attenuate other immunological recognition in humans. All this while ensuring sterility, viral inactivation and preservation of mechanical proprieties appropriate for an ACL reconstruction device. The Z-Lig® device has been tested in skeletally mature monkeys and given interesting and promising results from the preclinical performance and safety profile point of view. On this basis, it was possible to proceed with the first clinical trial involving humans, which gave similar encouraging results. The Z-Lig® device has also been implanted in Italy at the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute in Bologna, as a part of international multicenter prospective randomized blinded controlled study aimed at comparing xenograft with allograft tissue. PMID:26605257

  10. Biological Analysis of Human CML Stem Cells; Xenograft Model of Chronic Phase Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sheela A

    2016-01-01

    Xenograft mouse models have been instrumental in expanding our knowledge of hematopoiesis and can provide a functional description of stem cells that possess engrafting potential. Here we describe methodology outlining one way of analyzing human malignant cells that are able to engraft immune compromised mice. Using models such as these will allow researchers to gain valuable insight into the primitive leukemic subtypes that evade current therapy regimes and are critical to understand, in order to eradicate malignancy. PMID:27581148

  11. Repeatedly administered antidepressant drugs modulate humoral and cellular immune response in mice through action on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Kozlowski, Michael; Bryniarski, Pawel; Strobel, Spencer; Bryk, Agata; Myszka, Michal; Tyszka, Anna; Kuszmiersz, Piotr; Nowakowski, Jaroslaw; Filipczak-Bryniarska, Iwona

    2016-08-01

    Depression is associated with an altered immune response, which could be normalized by antidepressant drugs. However, little is known about the influence of antidepressants on the peripheral immune response and function of macrophages in individuals not suffering from depression. Our studies were aimed at determining the influence of antidepressant drugs on the humoral and cellular immune response in mice. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with imipramine, fluoxetine, venlafaxine, or moclobemide and contact immunized with trinitrophenyl hapten followed by elicitation and measurement of contact sensitivity by ear swelling response. Peritoneal macrophages from drug-treated mice were either pulsed with sheep erythrocytes or conjugated with trinitrophenyl and transferred into naive recipients to induce humoral or contact sensitivity response, respectively. Secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates, nitric oxide, and cytokines by macrophages from drug-treated mice was assessed, respectively, in chemiluminometry, Griess-based colorimetry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the expression of macrophage surface markers was analyzed cytometrically. Treatment of mice with fluoxetine, venlafaxine, and moclobemide results in suppression of humoral and cell-mediated immunity with a reduction of the release of macrophage proinflammatory mediators and the expression of antigen-presentation markers. In contrast, treatment with imipramine enhanced the humoral immune response and macrophage secretory activity but slightly suppressed active contact sensitivity. Our studies demonstrated that systemically delivered antidepressant drugs modulate the peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, mostly through their action on macrophages. Imipramine was rather proinflammatory, whereas other tested drugs expressed immunosuppressive potential. Current observations may be applied to new therapeutic strategies dedicated to various disorders associated with excessive

  12. Neural Correlates of Sex/Gender Differences in Humor Processing for Different Joke Types.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Humor operates through a variety of techniques, which first generate surprise and then amusement and laughter once the unexpected incongruity is resolved. As different types of jokes use different techniques, the corresponding humor processes also differ. The present study builds on the framework of the 'tri-component theory of humor,' which details the mechanisms involved in cognition (comprehension), affect (appreciation), and laughter (expression). This study seeks to identify differences among joke types and between sexes/genders in the neural mechanisms underlying humor processing. Three types of verbal jokes, bridging-inference jokes (BJs), exaggeration jokes (EJs), and ambiguity jokes (AJs), were used as stimuli. The findings revealed differences in brain activity for an interaction between sex/gender and joke type. For BJs, women displayed greater activation in the temporoparietal-mesocortical-motor network than men, demonstrating the importance of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) presumably for 'theory of mind' processing, the orbitofrontal cortex for motivational functions and reward coding, and the supplementary motor area for laughter. Women also showed greater activation than men in the frontal-mesolimbic network associated with EJs, including the anterior (frontopolar) prefrontal cortex (aPFC, BA 10) for executive control processes, and the amygdala and midbrain for reward anticipation and salience processes. Conversely, AJs elicited greater activation in men than women in the frontal-paralimbic network, including the dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC) and parahippocampal gyrus. All joke types elicited greater activation in the aPFC of women than of men, whereas men showed greater activation than women in the dPFC. To confirm the findings related to sex/gender differences, random group analysis and within group variance analysis were also performed. These findings help further establish the mechanisms underlying the processing of different joke types

  13. Neural Correlates of Sex/Gender Differences in Humor Processing for Different Joke Types

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Humor operates through a variety of techniques, which first generate surprise and then amusement and laughter once the unexpected incongruity is resolved. As different types of jokes use different techniques, the corresponding humor processes also differ. The present study builds on the framework of the ‘tri-component theory of humor,’ which details the mechanisms involved in cognition (comprehension), affect (appreciation), and laughter (expression). This study seeks to identify differences among joke types and between sexes/genders in the neural mechanisms underlying humor processing. Three types of verbal jokes, bridging-inference jokes (BJs), exaggeration jokes (EJs), and ambiguity jokes (AJs), were used as stimuli. The findings revealed differences in brain activity for an interaction between sex/gender and joke type. For BJs, women displayed greater activation in the temporoparietal–mesocortical-motor network than men, demonstrating the importance of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) presumably for ‘theory of mind’ processing, the orbitofrontal cortex for motivational functions and reward coding, and the supplementary motor area for laughter. Women also showed greater activation than men in the frontal-mesolimbic network associated with EJs, including the anterior (frontopolar) prefrontal cortex (aPFC, BA 10) for executive control processes, and the amygdala and midbrain for reward anticipation and salience processes. Conversely, AJs elicited greater activation in men than women in the frontal-paralimbic network, including the dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC) and parahippocampal gyrus. All joke types elicited greater activation in the aPFC of women than of men, whereas men showed greater activation than women in the dPFC. To confirm the findings related to sex/gender differences, random group analysis and within group variance analysis were also performed. These findings help further establish the mechanisms underlying the processing of different

  14. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  15. Antitumor activity of gambogic acid on NCI-H1993 xenografts via MET signaling pathway downregulation

    PubMed Central

    LI, DONGLEI; YANG, HUIWEI; LI, RUNPU; WANG, YANLI; WANG, WEIJUN; LI, DONGJIE; MA, SHAOLIN; ZHANG, XUYU

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anti-tumor mechanisms of gambogic acid (GA) on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo. Non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H1993 cells, which harbor a MET gene amplification, were subcutaneously injected into athymic nude mice. The mice were randomly assigned to treatment with 10, 20 or 30 mg/kg GA for 3 weeks. At the end of the efficacy study, all the mice were sacrificed and the tumor tissues were subjected to western blot analysis and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. GA inhibited NCI-H1993 xenograft tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of phosphorylated (p)-MET and its downstream signaling molecules p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 were significantly inhibited by GA. IHC analysis of Ki-67 expression demonstrated that GA treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. GA exerted antitumor effects on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo by direct regulation of the MET signaling pathway. Theses antitumor effects were primarily a result of its anti-proliferation function. PMID:26722245

  16. Berberine inhibits human tongue squamous carcinoma cancer tumor growth in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-09-01

    Our primary studies showed that berberine induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. But there is no report to show berberine inhibited SCC-4 cancer cells in vivo on a murine xenograft animal model. SCC-4 tumor cells were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, berberine (10mg/kg of body weight) and doxorubicin (4mg/kg of body weight). The tested agents were injected once per four days intraperitoneally (i.p.), with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cells inoculation. Treatment with 4mg/kg of doxorubicin or with 10mg/kg of berberine resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 10mg/kg berberine was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Our findings indicated that berbeirne inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model. Therefore, berberine may represent a tongue cancer preventive agent and can be used in clinic. PMID:19303753

  17. Slow Freezing, but Not Vitrification Supports Complete Spermatogenesis in Cryopreserved, Neonatal Sheep Testicular Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Pukazhenthi, Budhan S.; Nagashima, Jennifer; Travis, Alexander J.; Costa, Guilherme M.; Escobar, Enrique N.; França, Luiz R.; Wildt, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to spur growth of early stage gametic cells recovered from neonates could lead to significant advances in rescuing the genomes of rare genotypes or endangered species that die unexpectedly. The purpose of this study was to determine, for the first time, the ability of two substantially different cryopreservation approaches, slow freezing versus vitrification, to preserve testicular tissue of the neonatal sheep and subsequently allow initiation of spermatogenesis post-xenografting. Testis tissue from four lambs (3-5 wk old) was processed and then untreated or subjected to slow freezing or vitrification. Tissue pieces (fresh, n = 214; slow freezing, then thawing, n = 196; vitrification, then warming, n = 139) were placed subcutaneously under the dorsal skin of SCID mice and then grafts recovered and evaluated 17 wk later. Grafts from fresh and slow frozen tissue contained the most advanced stages of spermatogenesis, including normal tubule architecture with elongating spermatids in ~1% (fresh) and ~10% (slow frozen) of tubules. Fewer than 2% of seminiferous tubules advanced to the primary spermatocyte stage in xenografts derived from vitrified tissue. Results demonstrate that slow freezing of neonatal lamb testes was far superior to vitrification in preserving cellular integrity and function after xenografting, including allowing ~10% of tubules to retain the capacity to resume spermatogenesis and yield mature spermatozoa. Although a first for any ruminant species, findings also illustrate the importance of preemptive studies that examine cryo-sensitivity of testicular tissue before attempting this type of male fertility preservation on a large scale. PMID:25923660

  18. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Expresses Vasculogenic Mimicry: Demonstration in Patients and Experimental Manipulation in Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lezcano, Cecilia; Kleffel, Sonja; Lee, Nayoung; Larson, Allison R.; Zhan, Qian; DoRosario, Andrew; Wang, Linda C.; Schatton, Tobias; Murphy, George F.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly virulent cutaneous neoplasm that, like melanoma, is a frequent cause of patient morbidity and mortality. The cellular mechanisms responsible for the aggressive behavior of MCC remain unknown. Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is a phenomenon associated with cancer virulence, including in melanoma, whereby anastomosing laminin networks form in association with tumor cells that express certain endothelial genes. To determine whether VM is a factor in MCC, we employed a relevant xenograft model using two independent human MCC lines. Experimentally induced tumors were remarkably similar histologically to patient MCC, and both contained laminin networks associated with vascular endothelial-cadherin (CD144) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) as well as Nodal expression typical of VM in melanoma. Moreover, two established chemotherapeutic agents utilized for human MCC, etoposide and carboplatin, induced necrosis in xenografts upon systemic administration while enriching for laminin networks in apparently resistant viable tumor regions that persisted. These findings for the first time establish VM-like laminin networks as a biomarker in MCC, demonstrate the experimental utility of the MCC xenograft model, and suggest that VM-rich regions of MCC may be refractory to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25111691

  19. Biodistribution of TAT-LHRH conjugated chitosan/DNA nanoparticles in the mice bearing hepatoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lanxia; Wang, Hai; Liu, Qi; Duan, Mingli; Dong, Xia; Zhu, Dunwan; Zhu, Yingjun; Leng, Xigang

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most prevalent malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. More effective cures for HCC patients are urgently needed, of which gene therapy is among those with the most potential. We previously developed a novel gene carrier by conjugating low molecular weight chitosan with TAT (transactivator of transcription) peptide and LHRH (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) analog, with the resultant TAT-LHRH-chitosan conjugate (TLC) demonstrating high selectivity for hepatoma cells in vitro. However, it remains unclear whether TLC can deliver the genes to the target organs and tissues in vivo, which is one of the critical features determining their medical application potential. The current study further investigated the in vivo distribution of TLC/DNA nanoparticles (TLCDNPs) in the nude mice with subcutaneous hepatoma xenografts. It was found that TLCDNPs delayed the renal clearance of DNA and prolonged its circulation time as compared with CS/DNA complexes (CDNPs) and naked DNA, but failed to demonstrate enhanced accumulation of DNA in the hepatoma xenografts. The mechanisms regarding the failure of TLCDNPs' tumor targeting in the mice bearing subcutaneous hepatoma xenografts remain unclear and need to be further addressed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2394-2400, 2016. PMID:27153405

  20. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts. PMID:26732545