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  1. Analysis of Hypoxic and Hypercapnic Ventilatory Response in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ling; Sharifi, Husham; Rico, Tom; Andlauer, Olivier; Aran, Adi; Bloomrosen, Efrat; Faraco, Juliette; Fang, Han; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A previous study has suggested that the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) allele DQB1*06:02 affects hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) but not hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) in an Asian population. The current study evaluated the relationship in Caucasians and Asians. In addition we assessed whether gender or polymorphisms in genes participating in the control of breathing affect HVR and HCVR. Methods A re-breathing system was used to measure HVR and HCVR in 551 young adults (56.8% Caucasians, 30% Asians). HLA-DQB1*06:02 and tagged polymorphisms and coding variants in genes participating in breathing (PHOX2B, GPR4 and TASK2/KCNK5) were analyzed. The associations between HVR/HCVR and HLA-DQB1*06:02, genetic polymorphisms, and gender were evaluated using ANOVA or frequentist association testing with SNPTEST. Results HVR and gender are strongly correlated. HCVR and gender are not. Mean HVR in women was 0.276±0.168 (liter/minute/%SpO2) compared to 0.429±0.266 (liter/minute/%SpO2) in men, p<0.001 (55.4% higher HVR in men). Women had lower baseline minute ventilation (8.08±2.36 l/m vs. 10.00±3.43l/m, p<0.001), higher SpO2 (98.0±1.3% vs. 96.6±1.7%, p<0.001), and lower EtCO2 (4.65±0.68% vs. 4.82±1.02%, p = 0.025). One hundred and two (18.5%) of the participants had HLA-DQB1*06:02. No association was seen between HLA-DQB1*06:02 and HVR or HCVR. Genetic analysis revealed point wise, uncorrected significant associations between two TASK2/KCNK5 variants (rs2815118 and rs150380866) and HCVR. Conclusions This is the largest study to date reporting the relationship between gender and HVR/ HCVR and the first study assessing the association between genetic polymorphisms in humans and HVR/HCVR. The data suggest that gender has a large effect on hypoxic breathing response. PMID:28045995

  2. Ventilatory function assessment in safety pharmacology: Optimization of rodent studies using normocapnic or hypercapnic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goineau, Sonia; Rompion, Sonia; Guillaume, Philippe; Picard, Sandra

    2010-09-15

    Although the whole body plethysmography for unrestrained animals is the most widely used method to assess the respiratory risk of new drugs in safety pharmacology, non-appropriate experimental conditions may mask deleterious side effects of some substances. If stimulant or bronchodilatory effects can be easily evidenced in rodents under standard experimental conditions, i.e. normal air breathing and diurnal phase, drug-induced respiratory depression remains more difficult to detect. This study was aimed at comparing the responsiveness of Wistar rats, Duncan Hartley guinea-pigs or BALB/c mice to the respiratory properties of theophylline (50 or 100 mg/kg p.o.) or morphine (30 mg/kg i.p.) under varying conditions (100% air versus 5% CO{sub 2}-enriched air, light versus dark day phase), in order to select the most appropriate experimental conditions to each species for safety airway investigations. Our results showed that under normocapnia the ventilatory depressant effects of morphine can be easily evidenced in mice, slightly observed in guinea-pigs and not detected in rats in any day phase. Slight hypercapnic conditions enhanced the responsiveness of rats to morphine but not that of guinea-pigs and importantly they did not blunt the airway responsiveness of rats to the stimulation and bronchodilation evoked by theophylline, the most widely used reference agent in safety pharmacology studies. In conclusion, hypercapnic conditions associated with the non-invasive whole body plethysmography should be considered for optimizing the assessment of both the ventilatory depressant potential of morphine-like substances or the respiratory stimulant effects of new drugs in the rat, the most extensively used species in rodent safety and toxicological investigations.

  3. Ventilatory function assessment in safety pharmacology: optimization of rodent studies using normocapnic or hypercapnic conditions.

    PubMed

    Goineau, Sonia; Rompion, Sonia; Guillaume, Philippe; Picard, Sandra

    2010-09-15

    Although the whole body plethysmography for unrestrained animals is the most widely used method to assess the respiratory risk of new drugs in safety pharmacology, non-appropriate experimental conditions may mask deleterious side effects of some substances. If stimulant or bronchodilatory effects can be easily evidenced in rodents under standard experimental conditions, i.e. normal air breathing and diurnal phase, drug-induced respiratory depression remains more difficult to detect. This study was aimed at comparing the responsiveness of Wistar rats, Duncan Hartley guinea-pigs or BALB/c mice to the respiratory properties of theophylline (50 or 100 mg/kg p.o.) or morphine (30 mg/kg i.p.) under varying conditions (100% air versus 5% CO2-enriched air, light versus dark day phase), in order to select the most appropriate experimental conditions to each species for safety airway investigations. Our results showed that under normocapnia the ventilatory depressant effects of morphine can be easily evidenced in mice, slightly observed in guinea-pigs and not detected in rats in any day phase. Slight hypercapnic conditions enhanced the responsiveness of rats to morphine but not that of guinea-pigs and importantly they did not blunt the airway responsiveness of rats to the stimulation and bronchodilation evoked by theophylline, the most widely used reference agent in safety pharmacology studies. In conclusion, hypercapnic conditions associated with the non-invasive whole body plethysmography should be considered for optimizing the assessment of both the ventilatory depressant potential of morphine-like substances or the respiratory stimulant effects of new drugs in the rat, the most extensively used species in rodent safety and toxicological investigations.

  4. Effect of 3-day dry immersion on ventilatory response to hypercapnic hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander; Dyachenko, Alexander; Shulagin, Yury; Ermolaev, Evgeny

    Previously conducted researches revealed changes in the regulation of breathing during spaceflight. Increase in the duration of voluntary breath holding was obtained in 6-month flights of the International Space Station (Baranov et al., 2009). A reduction of ventilatory response (VR) to hypoxic stimulus and the lack of changes in VR to hypercapnic stimulus was found during the 16-day flight of the "Neurolab", compared with the vertical position of the body on the Earth (Prisk et al., 2000). However, the dynamics and mechanisms of gravity-dependent changes in VR remain uncertain in simulated weightlessness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of three-day dry immersion (DI) on VR of respiratory system to CO _{2}. Eleven healthy volunteers aged from 19 to 26 years participated in the study. Each subject performed four rebreathing hypercapnic-hypoxic tests. The first test (background research) revealed the initial state of respiratory control and was performed a few days to DI in a sitting position. The second test was conducted in the supine position, after 1-2 hours immersion in a bath. The third test was made in the supine position on the third day of stay in DI. Fourth test was held in a sitting position 8 hours after leaving the bath. A developed hardware and software setup was used to measure the VR. During all rebreathing tests P _{CO2} in setup increased from 0 mmHg to 60 mmHg, while P _{O2} decreased from 140 mmHg to 60 mmHg. An average duration of the tests was 13 minutes. A slope of the linear approximation of relationships between the minute ventilation and tidal volume versus P _{CO2} was considered as sensitivity of respiratory system and an interception with the axis P _{CO2} was considered as the point of apnea. Statistical significance of changes was analyzed with paired Wilcoxon signed rank test. A significant (P<0.05) increase in sensitivity of ventilation to CO _{2} was observed in both stages 2 and 3 in the bath in comparison with stage 4

  5. Hypercapnic ventilatory response in humans before, during, and after 23 days of low level CO2 exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, A. R.; Prisk, G. K.; Schollmann, C.; Hoffmann, U.

    1998-01-01

    Alterations in ventilation and the chemoreceptor response to CO2 during 23 d of 1.2% inspired CO2 were studied in four male subjects. Resting ventilation (VE), tidal volume (VT), respiratory frequency (fR), inspired and end tidal O2 and CO2 and the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) measured by CO2 rebreathing were measured once before entering the chamber, on days 2, 5, 11, and 22 of CO2 exposure, and one day after. Resting VE slightly increased (5%) on day 2 of exposure and significantly increased (22%) by day 5 followed by a progressive decrease to pre-chamber levels by day 22 and on the first day of recovery. Tidal volume and fR were not statistically different. During the exposure PetCO2 was significantly elevated with day 2 having the largest increase (19.6%). PetCO2 returned to normal within 24 h post exposure. The HCVR was characterized by the slope (SHCVR), intercept at zero ventilation (B), and the ventilation at a PCO2 = 60 mmHg (VE60). The SHCVR decreased (14%) on day 2, but was not significant; the SHCVR on the other exposure days were also not different. The SHCVR on the first recovery day significantly increased (37%). The HCVR B was shifted to the right on day 2 by 5.2 mmHg, then progressively returned to the pre-exposure position. On recovery the B significantly shifted 6.9 mmHg to the right of pre-exposure B. The VE60 decreased by approximately 32% and 16% on day 2 and 5, respectively, then returned within pre-exposure range for the remainder of the exposure and during recovery. During the early phase and one day after the exposure the HCVR was right shifted. One day after exposure chemoreceptor sensitivity to elevated CO2 was increased but, the B was right shifted resulting in a reduced HCVR below PCO2 of 60 mmHg and a greater HCVR above 60 mmHg.

  6. Ventilatory responses of healthy subjects to intravenous combinations of morphine and oxycodone under imposed hypercapnic and hypoxaemic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, L A; Kam, P C; Williams, D B; Wright, A W E; Smith, M T; Mather, L E

    2005-01-01

    Aims Previous isobolographic analysis revealed that coadministration of morphine and oxycodone produces synergistic antinociception in laboratory rodents. As both opioids can produce ventilatory depression, this study was designed to determine whether their ventilatory effects were synergistic when coadministered to healthy human subjects. Methods A placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study was performed in 12 male volunteers. Ventilatory responses to hypoxaemia and hypercapnia were determined from 1-h intravenous infusions of saline (‘placebo’), 15 mg morphine sulphate (M), 15 mg oxycodone hydrochloride (O), and their combination in the dose ratios of 1 : 2, 1 : 1, 2 : 1. Drug and metabolite concentrations in serial peripheral venous blood samples were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography–MS/MS. Results ‘Placebo’ treatment was without significant ventilatory effects. There were no systematic differences between active drug treatments on either the slopes or intercepts of the hypoxaemic and hypercapnia ventilation responses. During drug treatment, the mean minute ventilation at PetCO2 = 55 mmHg (VE55) decreased to 74% of the subjects’ before treatment values (95% confidence interval 62, 87), 68% (57, 80), 69% (59, 79), 68% (63, 73), and 61% (52, 69) for M15, M10/O5, M7.5/O7.5, M5/O10 and O15, respectively. Recovery was more prolonged with increasing oxycodone doses, corresponding to its greater potency and lower clearance compared with morphine. Conclusions Although adverse ventilatory effects of these drugs were found as expected, no unexpected or disproportionate effects of any of the morphine and oxycodone treatments were found that might impede their use in combination for pain management. PMID:15842550

  7. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD.

  8. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD. PMID:18268918

  9. Permissive hypercapnia--role in protective lung ventilatory strategies.

    PubMed

    Laffey, John G; O'Croinin, Donall; McLoughlin, Paul; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2004-03-01

    "Permissive hypercapnia" is an inherent element of accepted protective lung ventilation. However, there are no clinical data evaluating the efficacy of hypercapnia per se, independent of ventilator strategy. In the absence of such data, it is necessary to determine whether the potential exists for an active role for hypercapnia, distinct from the demonstrated benefits of reduced lung stretch. In this review, we consider four key issues. First, we consider the evidence that protective lung ventilatory strategies improve survival and we explore current paradigms regarding the mechanisms underlying these effects. Second, we examine whether hypercapnic acidosis may have effects that are additive to the effects of protective ventilation. Third, we consider whether direct elevation of CO(2), in the absence of protective ventilation, is beneficial or deleterious. Fourth, we address the current evidence regarding the buffering of hypercapnic acidosis in ARDS. These perspectives reveal that the potential exists for hypercapnia to exert beneficial effects in the clinical context. Direct administration of CO(2) is protective in multiple models of acute lung and systemic injury. Nevertheless, several specific concerns remain regarding the safety of hypercapnia. At present, protective ventilatory strategies that involve hypercapnia are clinically acceptable, provided the clinician is primarily targeting reduced tidal stretch. There are insufficient clinical data to suggest that hypercapnia per se should be independently induced, nor do outcome data exist to support the practice of buffering hypercapnic acidosis. Rapidly advancing basic scientific investigations should better delineate the advantages, disadvantages, and optimal use of hypercapnia in ARDS.

  10. Hypercapnic encephalopathy syndrome: a new frontier for non-invasive ventilation?

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele

    2011-08-01

    According to the classical international guidelines, non-invasive ventilation is contraindicated in hypercapnic encephalopathy syndrome (HES) due to the poor compliance to ventilatory treatment of confused/agitated patients and the risk of aspirative pneumonia related to lack of airways protection. As a matter of fact, conventional mechanical ventilation has been recommended as "golden standard" in these patients. However, up to now there are not controlled data that have demonstrated in HES the advantage of conventional mechanical ventilation vs non-invasive ventilation. In fact, patients with altered mental status have been systematically excluded from the randomised and controlled trials performed with non-invasive ventilation in hypercapnic acute respiratory failure. Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that an initial cautious NPPV trial in selected HES patients may be attempt as long as there are no other contraindications and the technique is provided by experienced caregivers in a closely monitored setting where ETI is always readily available. The purpose of this review is to report the physiologic rationale, the clinical feasibility and the still open questions about the careful use of non-invasive ventilation in HES as first-line ventilatory strategy in place of conventional mechanical ventilation via endotracheal intubation.

  11. Effect of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in elderly patients with hypercapnic acute-on-chronic respiratory failure and a do-not-intubate order.

    PubMed

    Scarpazza, Paolo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; di Franco, Giuseppe; Raschi, Stefania; Usai, Pierfranco; Bernareggi, Monica; Bonacina, Cristiano; Melacini, Chiara; Vanni, Silvia; Bencini, Serena; Pravettoni, Chiara; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Guffanti, Enrico; Casali, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) is effective in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). It proved to reduce the need of endotracheal intubation (ETI), the incidence of ETI-associated pneumonia, and mortality compared to nonventilated patients. A particular aspect concerns the outcome of NIMV in patients referring to an emergency room (ER) for ARF, and with a do-not-intubate (DNI) status due to advanced age or critical conditions. The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of NIMV in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI status. An overall number of 62 subjects (30 males, 32 females, mean age 81 +/- 4.8 years, range 79-91 years) referred to our semi-intensive respiratory department were enrolled in the study. The underlying diseases were severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 50/62 subjects, restrictive thoracic disorders in 7/62 subjects, and multiorgan failure in 5/62 subjects. Fifty-four/62 patients were successfully treated with NIMV while 2/62 did not respond to NIMV and were therefore submitted to ETI (one survived). Among NIMV-treated patients, death occurred in 6 patients after a mean of 9.9 days; the overall rate of NIMV failure was 12.9%. Negative prognostic factors for NIMV response proved to be: an older age, a low Glasgow Coma Score, a high APACHE score at admission, a high PaCO2 after 12 hours and a low pH both after 1 and 12 hours of NIMV. We conclude that elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF with a DNI status can be successfully treated by NIMV.

  12. Effect of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in elderly patients with hypercapnic acute-on-chronic respiratory failure and a do-not-intubate order

    PubMed Central

    Scarpazza, Paolo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; di Franco, Giuseppe; Raschi, Stefania; Usai, Pierfranco; Bernareggi, Monica; Bonacina, Cristiano; Melacini, Chiara; Vanni, Silvia; Bencini, Serena; Pravettoni, Chiara; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Galeazzo, Gian; Riario-Sforza; Guffanti, Enrico; Casali, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) is effective in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). It proved to reduce the need of endotracheal intubation (ETI), the incidence of ETI-associated pneumonia, and mortality compared to nonventilated patients. A particular aspect concerns the outcome of NIMV in patients referring to an emergency room (ER) for ARF, and with a do-not-intubate (DNI) status due to advanced age or critical conditions. The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of NIMV in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI status. An overall number of 62 subjects (30 males, 32 females, mean age 81 ± 4.8 years, range 79–91 years) referred to our semi-intensive respiratory department were enrolled in the study. The underlying diseases were severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 50/62 subjects, restrictive thoracic disorders in 7/62 subjects, and multiorgan failure in 5/62 subjects. Fifty-four/62 patients were successfully treated with NIMV while 2/62 did not respond to NIMV and were therefore submitted to ETI (one survived). Among NIMV-treated patients, death occurred in 6 patients after a mean of 9.9 days; the overall rate of NIMV failure was 12.9%. Negative prognostic factors for NIMV response proved to be: an older age, a low Glasgow Coma Score, a high APACHE score at admission, a high PaCO2 after 12 hours and a low pH both after 1 and 12 hours of NIMV. We conclude that elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF with a DNI status can be successfully treated by NIMV. PMID:19281095

  13. Partial Ventilatory Support Modalities in Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Sarah M.; Meade, Maureen; Rose, Louise; Burns, Karen; Mehta, Sangeeta; Doyle, Robert; Henzler, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of partial ventilatory support modes that allow spontaneous breathing in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is unclear. The objective of this scoping review was to assess the effects of partial ventilatory support on mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and both hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) lengths of stay (LOS) for patients with ALI and ARDS; the secondary objective was to describe physiologic effects on hemodynamics, respiratory system and other organ function. Methods MEDLINE (1966–2009), Cochrane, and EmBase (1980–2009) databases were searched using common ventilator modes as keywords and reference lists from retrieved manuscripts hand searched for additional studies. Two researchers independently reviewed and graded the studies using a modified Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine grading system. Studies in adult ALI/ARDS patients were included for primary objectives and pre-clinical studies for supporting evidence. Results Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified, in addition to six prospective cohort studies, one retrospective cohort study, one case control study, 41 clinical physiologic studies and 28 pre-clinical studies. No study was powered to assess mortality, one RCT showed shorter ICU length of stay, and the other demonstrated more ventilator free days. Beneficial effects of preserved spontaneous breathing were mainly physiological effects demonstrated as improvement of gas exchange, hemodynamics and non-pulmonary organ perfusion and function. Conclusions The use of partial ventilatory support modalities is often feasible in patients with ALI/ARDS, and may be associated with short-term physiological benefits without appreciable impact on clinically important outcomes. PMID:22916094

  14. Impaired ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in mice lacking the immediate early gene fos B.

    PubMed

    Malik, Mohammad T; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kline, David D; Adhikary, Gautam; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2005-01-15

    Earlier studies on cell culture models suggested that immediate early genes (IEGs) play an important role in cellular adaptations to hypoxia. Whether IEGs are also necessary for hypoxic adaptations in intact animals is not known. In the present study we examined the potential importance of fos B, an IEG in ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia. Experiments were performed on wild type and mutant mice lacking the fos B gene. Ventilation was monitored by whole body plethysmography in awake animals. Baseline ventilation under normoxia, and ventilatory response to acute hypoxia and hypercapnia were comparable between wild type and mutant mice. Hypobaric hypoxia (0.4 atm; 3 days) resulted in a significant elevation of baseline ventilation in wild type but not in mutant mice. Wild type mice exposed to hypobaric hypoxia manifested an enhanced hypoxic ventilatory response compared to pre-hypobaric hypoxia. In contrast, hypobaric hypoxia had no effect on the hypoxic ventilatory response in mutant mice. Hypercapnic ventilatory responses, however, were unaffected by hypobaric hypoxia in both groups of mice. These results suggest that the fos B, an immediate early gene, plays an important role in ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in mice.

  15. Acute effects of jaw clenching using a customized mouthguard on anaerobic ability and ventilatory flows.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jose; Buscà, Bernat; Solana-Tramunt, Mònica; Miró, Adrià

    2015-12-01

    The latest findings on the ergogenic effects of a dentistry-design, bite-aligning mouthpiece require additional research to assess its impact on anaerobic ability and ventilatory parameters. This paper was aimed at determining the ergogenic acute effects of wearing a custom-made mouthpiece on oral airflow dynamics, 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test performance parameters. Twenty-eight healthy and physically-active male subjects (age: 24.50 ± 3.32, height: 181.34 ± 7.4, weight: 78.14 ± 8.21), were voluntarily studied. The subjects were first briefed on the test protocols, and then performed the 30s Wingate test and Spirometer test. The experimental trials were performed in a random counterbalanced order. We evaluate maximum expiratory volume (VEmax L min(-1)), mean power (W kg(-1)), peak power (W kg(-1)), time to peak (s), rate to fatigue (Ws(-1)) and lactate production (mMol L(-1)), rate of perceived exertion (RPE). There were significant differences between mouthguard and no-mouthguard conditions in mean power (W kg(-1)), peak power (W kg(-1)), time to peak (s), and rate to fatigue (Ws(-1)) for the 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test. Significantly lower lactate production (mMol L(-1)) was observed, in mouthguard condition but no significant differences were found in RPE. In airflow dynamics, the VEmax L min(-1) was significantly higher when comparing the mouthguard and the no mouthguard conditions in both forced and unforced conditions. In conclusion, wearing a customized mouthguard improves anaerobic ability and increases forced expiratory volume. This study will help practitioners improve athlete's performance in anaerobic activities where high intensity action might provoke jaw-clenching, contributing in reductions of lactate and fatigue, and improving ventilatory parameters.

  16. Chronic overexpression of cerebral Epo improves the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia during the postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Caravagna, Céline; Gasser, Edith M Schneider; Ballot, Orlane; Joseph, Vincent; Soliz, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Clinicians observed that the treatment of premature human newborns for anemia with erythropoietin (Epo) also improved their respiratory autonomy. This observation is in line with our previous in vitro studies showing that acute and chronic Epo stimulation enhances fictive breathing of brainstem-spinal cord preparations of postnatal day 3-4 mice during hypoxia. Furthermore, we recently reported that the antagonization of the cerebral Epo (by using the soluble Epo receptor; sEpoR) significantly reduced the basal ventilation and the hypoxic ventilatory response of 10 days old mice. In this study, we used transgenic (Tg21) mice to investigate the effect of the chronic cerebral Epo overexpression on the modulation of the normoxic and hypoxic ventilatory drive during the post-natal development. Ventilation was evaluated by whole body plethysmography at postnatal ages 3 (P3), 7 (P7), 15 (P15) and 21 (P21). In addition Epo quantification was performed by RIA and mRNA EpoR was evaluated by qRT-PCR. Our results showed that compared to control animals the chronic Epo overexpression stimulates the hypoxic (but not the normoxic) ventilation assessed as VE/VO2 at the ages of P3 and P21. More interestingly, we observed that at P7 and P15 the chronic Epo stimulation of ventilation was attenuated by the down regulation of the Epo receptor in brainstem areas. We conclude that Epo, by stimulating ventilation in brainstem areas crucially helps tolerating physiological (e.g., high altitude) and/or pathological (e.g., respiratory disorders, prematurity, etc.) oxygen deprivation at postnatal ages.

  17. Behavioral, Ventilatory and Thermoregulatory Responses to Hypercapnia and Hypoxia in the Wistar Audiogenic Rat (WAR) Strain

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Humberto; Oliveira, José Antonio; Glass, Mogens Lesner; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the behavioral, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses elicited by acute exposure to both hypercapnic and hypoxic environments in Wistar audiogenic rats (WARs). The WAR strain represents a genetic animal model of epilepsy. Methods Behavioral analyses were performed using neuroethological methods, and flowcharts were constructed to illustrate behavioral findings. The body plethysmography method was used to obtain pulmonary ventilation (VE) measurements, and body temperature (Tb) measurements were taken via temperature sensors implanted in the abdominal cavities of the animals. Results No significant difference was observed between the WAR and Wistar control group with respect to the thermoregulatory response elicited by exposure to both acute hypercapnia and acute hypoxia (p>0.05). However, we found that the VE of WARs was attenuated relative to that of Wistar control animals during exposure to both hypercapnic (WAR: 133 ± 11% vs. Wistar: 243 ± 23%, p<0.01) and hypoxic conditions (WAR: 138 ± 8% vs. Wistar: 177 ± 8%; p<0.01). In addition, we noted that this ventilatory attenuation was followed by alterations in the behavioral responses of these animals. Conclusions Our results indicate that WARs, a genetic model of epilepsy, have important alterations in their ability to compensate for changes in levels of various arterial blood gasses. WARs present an attenuated ventilatory response to an increased PaCO2 or decreased PaO2, coupled to behavioral changes, which make them a suitable model to further study respiratory risks associated to epilepsy. PMID:27149672

  18. Enhanced non-eupneic breathing following hypoxic, hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic gas challenges in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Getsy, Paulina M; Davis, Jesse; Coffee, Gregory A; May, Walter J; Palmer, Lisa A; Strohl, Kingman P; Lewis, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    C57BL6 mice display non-eupneic breathing and spontaneous apneas during wakefulness and sleep as well as markedly disordered breathing following cessation of a hypoxic challenge. We examined whether (1) C57BL6 mice display marked non-eupneic breathing following hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic challenges, and (2) compared the post-hypoxia changes in non-eupneic breathing of C57BL6 mice to those of B6AF1 (57BL6 dam × A/J sire) and Swiss-Webster mice, which display different ventilatory responses than C57BL6 mice. C57BL6 mice displayed marked increases in respiratory frequency and non-eupneic breathing upon return to room-air after hypoxic (10% O2, 90% N2), hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2 and 74% N2) and hypoxic-hypercapnic (10% O2, 5% CO2 and 85% N2) challenges. B6AF1 mice displayed less tachypnea and reduced non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia, whereas Swiss-Webster mice displayed robust tachypnea with minimal increases in non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that non-eupneic breathing increases after physiologically-relevant hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge in C57BL6 mice and suggest that further studies with these and B6AF1 and Swiss-Webster mice will help define the genetics of non-eupneic breathing.

  19. Enhanced non-eupneic breathing following hypoxic, hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic gas challenges in conscious mice

    PubMed Central

    Getsy, Paulina M.; Davis, Jesse; Coffee, Gregory A.; May, Walter J.; Palmer, Lisa A.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    C57BL6 mice display non-eupneic breathing and spontaneous apneas during wakefulness and sleep as well as markedly disordered breathing following cessation of a hypoxic challenge. We examined whether (1) C57BL6 mice display marked non-eupneic breathing following hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic challenges, and (2) compared the post-hypoxia changes in non-eupneic breathing of C57BL6 mice to those of B6AF1 (57BL6 dam × A/J sire) and Swiss-Webster mice, which display different ventilatory responses than C57BL6 mice. C57BL6 mice displayed marked increases in respiratory frequency and non-eupneic breathing upon return to room-air after hypoxic (10% O2, 90% N2), hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2, 74% N2) and hypoxic-hypercapnic (10% O2, 5% CO2, 85% N2) challenges. B6AF1 mice displayed less tachypnea and reduced non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia, whereas Swiss-Webster mice displayed robust tachypnea with minimal increases in non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that non-eupneic breathing increases after physiologically-relevant hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge in C57BL6 mice and suggest that further studies with these and B6AF1 and Swiss-Webster mice will help define the genetics of non-eupneic breathing. PMID:25242462

  20. Cerebrovascular and ventilatory responses to acute isocapnic hypoxia in healthy aging and lung disease: effect of vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sara E; Waltz, Xavier; Kissel, Christine K; Szabo, Lian; Walker, Brandie L; Leigh, Richard; Anderson, Todd J; Poulin, Marc J

    2015-08-15

    Acute hypoxia increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation (V̇e). It is unknown if these responses are impacted with normal aging, or in patients with enhanced oxidative stress, such as (COPD). The purpose of the study was to 1) investigate the effects of aging and COPD on the cerebrovascular and ventilatory responses to acute hypoxia, and 2) to assess the effect of vitamin C on these responses during hypoxia. In 12 Younger, 14 Older, and 12 COPD, we measured peak cerebral blood flow velocity (V̄p; index of CBF), and V̇e during two 5-min periods of acute isocapnic hypoxia, under conditions of 1) saline-sham; and 2) intravenous vitamin C. Antioxidants [vitamin C, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and catalase], oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced protein oxidation product], and nitric oxide metabolism end products (NOx) were measured in plasma. Following the administration of vitamin C, vitamin C, SOD, catalase, and MDA increased, while NOx decreased. V̄p and V̇e sensitivity to hypoxia was reduced in Older by ∼60% (P < 0.02). COPD patients exhibited similar V̄p and V̇e responses to Older (P > 0.05). Vitamin C did not have an effect on the hypoxic V̇e response but selectively decreased the V̄p sensitivity in Younger only. These findings suggest a reduced integrative reflex (i.e., cerebrovascular and ventilatory) during acute hypoxemia in healthy older adults. Vitamin C does not appear to have a large influence on the cerebrovascular or ventilatory responses during acute hypoxia.

  1. Acute ventilatory responses to hypoxia during voluntary and electrically induced leg exercise in man.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J J; Robbins, P A

    1994-05-15

    1. The acute ventilatory response to a brief period of hypoxia (AHVR) was measured in six subjects (a) at rest, (b) during electrically induced leg exercise (EEL), (c) during voluntary leg exercise at an external work rate matched to electrical exercise (EV1) and (d) during voluntary leg exercise at an internal work rate (i.e. metabolic rate) matched to electrical exercise (EV2). The end-tidal PO2 during hypoxia was 50 mmHg and the end-tidal PCO2 was held constant at 1-2 mmHg above resting values throughout each of these four protocols. 2. EEL was produced by surface electrode stimulation of the quadriceps muscles so as to cause the legs to extend at the knee and lift a set of weights via a pulley system. During EV1, each subject lifted the same weight through the same height and at the same frequency as during his EEL protocol. During EV2, the weight, the height through which it was lifted and the frequency of voluntary contractions were altered to produce a similar O2 consumption and CO2 production as during EEL. 3. In each subject, end-tidal PCO2 values showed no change between the four protocols, and in three subjects in whom they were measured, arterial PCO2 values were also similar between the protocols. Venous lactate levels did not increase after EEL or EV2. 4. The AHVR during EEL (14.1 +/- 1.42 l min-1; mean +/- S.E.M) was significantly increased (Student's paired t test) compared with rest (7.55 +/- 1.10 l min-1; P < 0.003).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Does amifostine reduce metabolic rate? Effect of the drug on gas exchange and acute ventilatory hypoxic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Jaideep J; Allen, Caroline; Little, Evelyn; Formenti, Federico; Harris, Adrian L; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-04-16

    Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange) over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg) of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. There was no change in metabolic rate with amifostine as measured by oxygen uptake (p = 0.113). However in carbon dioxide output and respiratory quotient, we detected a small decline over time in control and drug protocols, consistent with a gradual change from carbohydrate to fat metabolism over the course of the relatively long study protocol. A novel result was that amifostine (1000 mg) increased the mean ± SD acute hypoxic ventilatory response from 12.4 ± 5.1 L/min to 20.3 ± 11.9 L/min (p = 0.045). In conclusion, any cellular protective effects of amifostine are unlikely due to metabolic effects. The stimulatory effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses may be due to increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor, either peripherally in the carotid body, or centrally in the brain.

  3. Lung Transcriptomics during Protective Ventilatory Support in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Valladares, Francisco; Klassert, Tilman E; Valladares, Basilio; Slevogt, Hortense; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Villar, Jesus; Flores, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory process of the lung. The only proven life-saving support is mechanical ventilation (MV) using low tidal volumes (LVT) plus moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, it is currently unknown how they exert the protective effects. To identify the molecular mechanisms modulated by protective MV, this study reports transcriptomic analyses based on microarray and microRNA sequencing in lung tissues from a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24 hours post-CLP, septic animals were randomized to three ventilatory strategies: spontaneous breathing, LVT (6 ml/kg) plus 10 cmH2O PEEP and high tidal volume (HVT, 20 ml/kg) plus 2 cmH2O PEEP. Healthy, non-septic, non-ventilated animals served as controls. After 4 hours of ventilation, lung samples were obtained for histological examination and gene expression analysis using microarray and microRNA sequencing. Validations were assessed using parallel analyses on existing publicly available genome-wide association study findings and transcriptomic human data. The catalogue of deregulated processes differed among experimental groups. The 'response to microorganisms' was the most prominent biological process in septic, non-ventilated and in HVT animals. Unexpectedly, the 'neuron projection morphogenesis' process was one of the most significantly deregulated in LVT. Further support for the key role of the latter process was obtained by microRNA studies, as four species targeting many of its genes (Mir-27a, Mir-103, Mir-17-5p and Mir-130a) were found deregulated. Additional analyses revealed 'VEGF signaling' as a central underlying response mechanism to all the septic groups (spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated). Based on this data, we conclude that a co-deregulation of 'VEGF signaling' along with 'neuron projection morphogenesis

  4. Early use of noninvasive techniques for clearing respiratory secretions during noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinrong; Cui, Zhaobo; Liu, Shuhong; Gao, Xiuling; Gao, Pan; Shi, Yi; Guo, Shufen; Li, Peipei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) might be superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPDs). Inefficient clearance of respiratory secretions provokes NPPV failure in patients with hypercapnic encephalopathy (HE). This study compared CMV and NPPV combined with a noninvasive strategy for clearing secretions in HE and AECOPD patients. The present study is a prospective cohort study of AECOPD and HE patients enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 in a critical care unit of a major university teaching hospital in China. A total of 74 patients received NPPV and 90 patients received CMV. Inclusion criteria included the following: physician-diagnosed AECOPD, spontaneous airway clearance of excessive secretions, arterial blood gas analysis requiring intensive care, moderate-to-severe dyspnea, and a Kelly–Matthay scale score of 3 to 5. Exclusion criteria included the following: preexisting psychiatric/neurological disorders unrelated to HE, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, upper airway obstruction, acute coronary syndromes, preadmission tracheostomy or endotracheal intubation, and urgent endotracheal intubation for cardiovascular, psychomotor agitation, or severe hemodynamic conditions. Intensive care unit participants were managed by NPPV. Participants received standard treatment consisting of controlled oxygen therapy during NPPV-free periods; antibiotics, intravenous doxofylline, corticosteroids (e.g., salbutamol and ambroxol), and subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin; and therapy for comorbidities if necessary. Nasogastric tubes were inserted only in participants who developed gastric distension. No pharmacological sedation was administered. The primary and secondary outcome measures included comparative complication rates, durations of ventilation and hospitalization, number of invasive devices/patient, and in-hospital and 1-year mortality

  5. Ventilatory response to acute hypoxia in transgenic mice over-expressing erythropoietin: effect of acclimation to 3-week hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Cárdenas-Alayza, Rosa; Macarlupú, José Luis; Monge-C, Carlos; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2007-09-30

    We used transgenic mice constitutively over-expressing erythropoietin ("tg6" mice) and wild-type (wt) mice to investigate whether the high hematocrit (hct), consequence of Epo over-expression affected: (1) the normoxic ventilation (V (E)) and the acute hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and decline (HVD), (2) the increase in ventilation observed after chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (430mmHg for 21 days), (3) the respiratory "blunting", and (4) the erythrocythemic response induced by chronic hypoxia exposure. V (E) was found to be similar in tg6 and wt mice in normoxia (FIO2=0.21). Post-acclimation V (E) was significantly elevated in every time point in wt mice at FIO2=0.10 when compared to pre-acclimation values. In contrast, tg6 mice exhibited a non-significant increase in V (E) throughout acute hypoxia exposure. Changes in V (E) are associated with adjustments in tidal volume (V(T)). HVR and HVD were independent of EE in tg6 and wt mice before chornic hypoxia exposure. HVR was significantly greater in wt than in tg6 mice after chronic hypoxia. After acclimation, HVD decreased in tg6 mice. Chronic hypoxia exposure caused hct to increase significantly in wt mice, while only a marginal increase occurred in the tg6 group. Although pre-existent EE does not appear to have an effect on HVR, the observation of alterations on V(T) suggests that it may contribute to time-dependent changes in ventilation and in the acute HVR during exposure to chronic hypoxia. In addition, our results suggest that EE may lead to an early "blunting" of the ventilatory response.

  6. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation with average volume assured pressure support (AVAPS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) in patients with acute respiratory failure has been traditionally determined based on clinical assessment and changes in blood gases, with NIV support pressures manually adjusted by an operator. Bilevel positive airway pressure-spontaneous/timed (BiPAP S/T) with average volume assured pressure support (AVAPS) uses a fixed tidal volume that automatically adjusts to a patient’s needs. Our study assessed the use of BiPAP S/T with AVAPS in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hypercapnic encephalopathy as compared to BiPAP S/T alone, upon immediate arrival in the Emergency-ICU. Methods We carried out a prospective interventional match-controlled study in Guayaquil, Ecuador. A total of 22 patients were analyzed. Eleven with COPD exacerbations and hypercapnic encephalopathy with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) <10 and a pH of 7.25-7.35 were assigned to receive NIV via BiPAP S/T with AVAPS. Eleven patients were selected as paired controls for the initial group by physicians who were unfamiliar with our study, and these patients were administered BiPAP S/T. Arterial blood gases, GCS, vital signs, and ventilatory parameters were then measured and compared between the two groups. Results We observed statistically significant differences in favor of the BiPAP S/T + AVAPS group in GCS (P = .00001), pCO2 (P = .03) and maximum inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) (P = .005), among others. However, no significant differences in terms of length of stay or days on NIV were observed. Conclusions BiPAP S/T with AVAPS facilitates rapid recovery of consciousness when compared to traditional BiPAP S/T in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials application ref is ISRCTN05135218 PMID:23497021

  7. Minocycline blocks glial cell activation and ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer Ann; Arbogast, Tara Elizabeth; Moya, Esteban A; Fu, Zhenxing; Powell, Frank L

    2017-01-18

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) is the time-dependent increase in ventilation, which persists upon return to normoxia, and involves plasticity in both central nervous system respiratory centers and peripheral chemoreceptors. We investigated the role of glial cells in VAH in male Sprague Dawley rats using minocycline, an antibiotic that inhibits microglia activation and has anti-inflammatory properties, and barometric pressure plethysmography to measure ventilation. Rats received either minocycline (45mg/kg, i.p. daily) or saline beginning one day before and during 7 days of chronic hypoxia (CH, PIO2 = 70 Torr). Minocycline had no effect on normoxic control rats or the hypercapnic ventilatory response in CH rats, but minocycline significantly (p < 0.001) decreased ventilation during acute hypoxia in CH rats. However, minocycline administration during only the last 3 days of CH did not reverse VAH. Microglia and astrocyte activation in the nucleus tractus solitarius was quantified from 30 minutes to 7 days of CH. Microglia showed an active morphology (shorter and fewer branches) after 1 hour of hypoxia and returned to the control state (longer filaments and extensive branching) after 4 hours of CH. Astrocytes increased GFAP antibody immunofluorescent intensity, indicating activation, at both 4 and 24 hours of CH. Minocycline had no effect on glia in normoxia, but significantly decreased microglia activation at 1 hour of CH and astrocyte activation at 24 hours of CH. These results support a role for glial cells providing an early signal for the induction but not maintenance of neural plasticity underlying ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.

  8. Acute effects of an arginine-based supplement on neuromuscular, ventilatory, and metabolic fatigue thresholds during cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Zak, Roksana B; Camic, Clayton L; Hill, Ethan C; Monaghan, Molly M; Kovacs, Attila J; Wright, Glenn A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of an acute dose of an arginine-based supplement on the physical working capacity at the fatigue threshold (PWCFT), lactate threshold (LT), ventilatory threshold (VT), and peak oxygen uptake during incremental cycle ergometry. This study used a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, within-subjects crossover design. Nineteen untrained men (mean age ± SD = 22.0 ± 1.7 years) were randomly assigned to ingest either the supplement (3.0 g of arginine, 300 mg of grape seed extract, and 300 mg of polyethylene glycol) or placebo (microcrystalline cellulose) and performed an incremental test on a cycle ergometer for determination of PWCFT, LT, VT, and peak oxygen uptake. Following a 1-week period, the subjects returned to the laboratory and ingested the opposite substance (either supplement or placebo) prior to completing another incremental test to be reassessed for PWCFT, LT, VT, and peak oxygen uptake. The paired-samples t tests indicated there were significant (P < 0.05) mean differences between the arginine and placebo conditions for the PWCFT (192 ± 42 vs. 168 ± 53 W, respectively) and VT (2546 ± 313 vs. 2452 ± 342 mL·min(-1)), but not the LT (135 ± 26 vs. 138 ± 22 W), absolute peak oxygen uptake (3663 ± 445 vs. 3645 ± 438 mL·min(-1)), or relative peak oxygen uptake (46.5 ± 6.0 vs. 46.2 ± 5.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)). These findings suggested that the arginine-based supplement may be used on an acute basis for delaying the onset of neuromuscular fatigue (i.e., PWCFT) and improving the VT in untrained individuals.

  9. Variable Inhibition by Falling CO2 of Hypoxic Ventilatory Response in Man,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-21

    approximately 7-liter closed breathing circuit initially containing 35% 02 with no C02 was used. Transducers and the computer used were the same as those...hypoxia and small values, a blunted response. The hypercapnic ventilatory response was measured using a modified rebreathing technique (9). An...responses were closely correlated (Figure 1). This was true when the hypoxic ventilatory response was expressed either as the slope VE/ Sa02 (Figure 1

  10. Ventilatory response of goats to transient changes in CO2 and O2 during acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Smith, C A; Kellogg, R H

    1975-07-01

    The authors assessed the relative sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreceptors of 4 goats to a transient decrease in inspired CO2 using a 2-breath test. This test provides a steady-state background of hypoxia and hypercapnia and then, for 2 breaths, an equally hypoxic gas mixture containing no CO2. Another type of 2-breath test, providing 2 breaths of a hyperoxic gas mixture against a background of hypoxia, was used to establish the time course of a response known to come from peripheral chemoreceptors. Seven human subjects were studied in a similar fashion to establish the validity of the procedure. Except for 2 responses, the author's human data agree with those reported previously by others. All 4 goats resembled man in responding to removal of hypoxia with a significant decrease in ventilation, but 3 of the 4 goats, unlike man, showed no significant decrease in ventilation when CO2 was removed. The authors conclude that the peripheral chemoreceptors of goats are commonly insensitive to transient changes in inspired CO2 during acute hypoxia.

  11. Acute hypercapnic hyperoxia stimulates reactive species production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices but does not induce oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2 chemoreceptive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated by hyperoxia via a free radical mechanism. Hyperoxia has been shown to increase superoxide and nitric oxide in the cSC, but it remains unknown how changes in Pco2 during hyperoxia affect the production of O2-dependent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) downstream that can lead to increased levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress, cellular excitability, and, potentially, dysfunction. We used real-time fluorescence microscopy in rat brain slices to determine how hyperoxia and hypercapnic acidosis (HA) modulate one another in the production of key RONS, as well as colorimetric assays to measure levels of oxidized and nitrated lipids and proteins. We also examined the effects of CO2 narcosis and hypoxia before euthanasia and brain slice harvesting, as these neurons are CO2 sensitive and hypothesized to employ CO2/H(+) mechanisms that exacerbate RONS production and potentially oxidative stress. Our findings show that hyperoxia ± HA increases the production of peroxynitrite and its derivatives, whereas increases in Fenton chemistry are most prominent during hyperoxia + HA. Using CO2 narcosis before euthanasia modulates cellular sensitivity to HA postmortem and enhances the magnitude of the peroxynitrite pathway, but blunts the activity of Fenton chemistry. Overall, hyperoxia and HA do not result in increased production of markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress as expected. We postulate this is due to antioxidant and proteosomal removal of damaged lipids and proteins to maintain cell viability and avoid death during protracted hyperoxia.

  12. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Valentini, Ilaria; Carbonara, Paolo; Marchetti, Antonio; Nava, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU) with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functional parameters were recorded including the cause of acute respiratory failure, SAPS II score, Charlson comorbidity index, and further comorbidities not listed in the Charlson index. NIV success was defined as clinical improvement leading to discharge to regular ward, while exitus or need for endotracheal intubation was considered failure. Results. NIV outcome was successful in 134 patients while 42 underwent failure. Univariate analysis showed significantly higher SAP II score, Charlson index, prevalence of pneumonia, and lower serum albumin level in the failure group. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant predictive value for pneumonia and albumin. Conclusions. The most important determinants of NIV outcome in COPD patients are the presence of pneumonia and the level of serum albumin as an indicator of the patient nutritional status. PMID:24563868

  13. Sleep-related breathing disorders in acute respiratory failure assisted by non-invasive ventilatory treatment: utility of portable polysomnographic system.

    PubMed

    Resta, O; Guido, P; Foschino Barbaro, M P; Picca, V; Talamo, S; Lamorgese, V

    2000-02-01

    PAP, Respironics Inc.) airway positive pressure in timed or spontaneous/timed modes. Two patients required intubation and mechanical ventilatory treatment. In one patient with hypothyroidism was sufficient to institute hormonal therapy. Our study shows that acute respiratory failure due to SRBD is not exceptional in an Intermediate Intensive Care Unit and that if clinical suspicion is strong, portable polysomnography may yield diagnostic confirmation and help in establishing appropriate treatment and in avoiding the invasive ventilatory treatment.

  14. Correlates of obesity-related chronic ventilatory failure

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Ari R; Hart, Nicholas; Stradling, John R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Only a third of obese patients develop chronic ventilatory failure. This cross-sectional study assessed multiple factors potentially associated with chronic ventilatory failure. Materials/patients and methods Participants had a body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2, with or without chronic ventilatory failure (awake arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide >6 kPa or base excess (BE) ≥2 mmols/L). Factors investigated were grouped into domains: (1) obesity measures, (2) pulmonary function, (3) respiratory and non-respiratory muscle strength, (4) sleep study derivatives, (5) hypoxic and hypercapnic responses, and (6) some hormonal, nutritional and inflammatory measures. Results 71 obese participants (52% male) were studied over 27 months, 52 (SD 9) years and BMI 47 (range 32–74) kg/m2. The best univariate correlates of BE from each domain were: (1) dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurement of visceral fat (r=+0.50, p=0.001); (2) supine forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r=−0.40, p=0.001); (3) sniff maximum pressure (r=−0.28, p=0.02); (4) mean overnight arterial oxygen saturation (r=−0.50, p<0.001); (5) ventilatory response to 15% O2 breathing (r=−0.28, p=0.02); and (6) vitamin D (r=−0.30, p=0.01). In multivariate analysis, only visceral fat and ventilatory response to hypoxia remained significant. Conclusions We have confirmed that in the obese, BMI is a poor correlate of chronic ventilatory failure, and the best independent correlates are visceral fat and hypoxic ventilatory response. Trial registration number NCT01380418. PMID:26918192

  15. Ventilatory failure, ventilator support, and ventilator weaning.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Martin J; Laghi, Franco; Jubran, Amal

    2012-10-01

    The development of acute ventilatory failure represents an inability of the respiratory control system to maintain a level of respiratory motor output to cope with the metabolic demands of the body. The level of respiratory motor output is also the main determinant of the degree of respiratory distress experienced by such patients. As ventilatory failure progresses and patient distress increases, mechanical ventilation is instituted to help the respiratory muscles cope with the heightened workload. While a patient is connected to a ventilator, a physician's ability to align the rhythm of the machine with the rhythm of the patient's respiratory centers becomes the primary determinant of the level of rest accorded to the respiratory muscles. Problems of alignment are manifested as failure to trigger, double triggering, an inflationary gas-flow that fails to match inspiratory demands, and an inflation phase that persists after a patient's respiratory centers have switched to expiration. With recovery from disorders that precipitated the initial bout of acute ventilatory failure, attempts are made to discontinue the ventilator (weaning). About 20% of weaning attempts fail, ultimately, because the respiratory controller is unable to sustain ventilation and this failure is signaled by development of rapid shallow breathing. Substantial advances in the medical management of acute ventilatory failure that requires ventilator assistance are most likely to result from research yielding novel insights into the operation of the respiratory control system.

  16. Ventilatory and chemoreceptor responses to hypercapnia in neonatal rats chronically exposed to moderate hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Bavis, Ryan W; Li, Ke-Yong; DeAngelis, Kathryn J; March, Ryan J; Wallace, Josefine A; Logan, Sarah; Putnam, Robert W

    2017-03-01

    Rats reared in hyperoxia hypoventilate in normoxia and exhibit progressive blunting of the hypoxic ventilatory response, changes which are at least partially attributed to abnormal carotid body development. Since the carotid body also responds to changes in arterial CO2/pH, we tested the hypothesis that developmental hyperoxia would attenuate the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) of neonatal rats by blunting peripheral and/or central chemoreceptor responses to hypercapnic challenges. Rats were reared in 21% O2 (Control) or 60% O2 (Hyperoxia) until studied at 4, 6-7, or 13-14days of age. Hyperoxia rats had significantly reduced single-unit carotid chemoafferent responses to 15% CO2 at all ages; CO2 sensitivity recovered within 7days after return to room air. Hypercapnic responses of CO2-sensitive neurons of the caudal nucleus tractus solitarius (cNTS) were unaffected by chronic hyperoxia, but there was evidence for a small decrease in neuronal excitability. There was also evidence for augmented excitatory synaptic input to cNTS neurons within brainstem slices. Steady-state ventilatory responses to 4% and 8% CO2 were unaffected by developmental hyperoxia in all three age groups, but ventilation increased more slowly during the normocapnia-to-hypercapnia transition in 4-day-old Hyperoxia rats. We conclude that developmental hyperoxia impairs carotid body chemosensitivity to hypercapnia, and this may compromise protective ventilatory reflexes during dynamic respiratory challenges in newborn rats. Impaired carotid body function has less of an impact on the HCVR in older rats, potentially reflecting compensatory plasticity within the CNS.

  17. Ventilatory Control in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Van Dyke, J.; Nashold, L.; Satriotomo, I.; Suzuki, M.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease. ALS selectively causes degeneration in upper and lower (spinal) motor neurons, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis and death by ventilatory failure. Although ventilatory failure is generally the cause of death in ALS, little is known concerning the impact of this disorder on respiratory motor neurons, the consequences of respiratory motor neuron cell death, or the ability of the respiratory control system to “fight back” via mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity. Here we review known effects of ALS on breathing, including possible effects on rhythm generation, respiratory motor neurons, and their target organs: the respiratory muscles. We consider evidence for spontaneous compensatory plasticity, preserving breathing well into disease progression despite dramatic loss of spinal respiratory motor neurons. Finally, we review current and potential therapeutic approaches directed toward preserving the capacity to breathe in ALS patients. PMID:23692930

  18. Cost of ventilation and effect of digestive state on the ventilatory response of the tegu lizard.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Nini; Wang, Tobias

    2004-07-12

    We performed simultaneous measurements of ventilation, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production in the South American lizard, Tupinambis merianae, equipped with a mask and maintained at 25 degrees C. Ventilation of resting animals was stimulated by progressive exposure to hypercapnia (2, 4 and 6%) or hypoxia (15, 10, 8 and 6%) in inspired gas mixture. This was carried out in both fasting and digesting animals. The ventilatory response to hypercapnia and hypoxia were affected by digestive state, with a more vigorous ventilatory response in digesting animals compared to fasting animals. Hypoxia doubled total ventilation while hypercapnia led to a four-fold increase in total ventilation both accomplished through an increase in tidal volume. Oxygen uptake remained constant during all hypercapnic exposures while there was an increase during hypoxia. Cost of ventilation was estimated to be 17% during hypoxia but less than 1% during hypercapnia. Our data indicate that ventilation can be greatly elevated at a small energetic cost.

  19. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Dzal, Yvonne A.; Milsom, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O2 for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O2 min−1 kg−1, and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min−1 kg−1, respectively; p < 0.05), whereas body temperature was unchanged and animals remained awake and active. Subcutaneous injection of the general adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline (AMP; 100 mg kg−1, in saline), but not control saline injections, prevented the HVR but had no effect on the HMR. As a result, AMP-treated naked mole rats exhibited extreme hyperventilation in hypoxia. These animals were also less tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR. PMID:25520355

  20. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Dzal, Yvonne A; Milsom, William K

    2015-02-07

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O₂ for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O₂ min(-1) kg(-1), and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min(-1) kg(-1), respectively; p < 0.05), whereas body temperature was unchanged and animals remained awake and active. Subcutaneous injection of the general adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline (AMP; 100 mg kg(-1), in saline), but not control saline injections, prevented the HVR but had no effect on the HMR. As a result, AMP-treated naked mole rats exhibited extreme hyperventilation in hypoxia. These animals were also less tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR.

  1. Brain stem NO modulates ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in mice.

    PubMed

    El Hasnaoui-Saadani, R; Alayza, R Cardenas; Launay, T; Pichon, A; Quidu, P; Beaudry, M; Léon-Velarde, F; Richalet, J P; Duvallet, A; Favret, F

    2007-11-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia. We measured the ventilation in acclimatized Bl6/CBA mice breathing 21% and 8% oxygen, used a nNOS inhibitor, and assessed the expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor and nNOS (mRNA and protein). Two groups of Bl6/CBA mice (n = 60) were exposed during 2 wk either to hypoxia [barometric pressure (PB) = 420 mmHg] or normoxia (PB = 760 mmHg). At the end of exposure the medulla was removed to measure the concentration of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, the expression of NMDA-NR1 receptor, and nNOS by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. We also measured the ventilatory response [fraction of inspired O(2) (Fi(O(2))) = 0.21 and 0.08] before and after S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline treatment (SMTC, nNOS inhibitor, 10 mg/kg ip). Chronic hypoxia caused an increase in ventilation that was reduced after SMTC treatment mainly through a decrease in tidal volume (Vt) in normoxia and in acute hypoxia. However, the difference observed in the magnitude of acute hypoxic ventilatory response [minute ventilation (Ve) 8% - Ve 21%] in acclimatized mice was not different. Acclimatization to hypoxia induced a rise in NMDA receptor as well as in nNOS and NO production. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that activation of nNOS is involved in the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in mice but not in the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) while the increased expression of NMDA receptor expression in the medulla of chronically hypoxic mice plays a role in acute HVR. These results are therefore consistent with central nervous system plasticity, partially involved in ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia through nNOS.

  2. Selective antagonism of opioid-induced ventilatory depression by an ampakine molecule in humans without loss of opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Oertel, B G; Felden, L; Tran, P V; Bradshaw, M H; Angst, M S; Schmidt, H; Johnson, S; Greer, J J; Geisslinger, G; Varney, M A; Lötsch, J

    2010-02-01

    Ventilatory depression is a significant risk associated with the use of opioids. We assessed whether opioid-induced ventilatory depression can be selectively antagonized by an ampakine without reduction of analgesia. In 16 healthy men, after a single oral dose of 1,500 mg of the ampakine CX717, a target concentration of 100 ng/ml alfentanil decreased the respiratory frequency by only 2.9 +/- 33.4% as compared with 25.6 +/- 27.9% during placebo coadministration (P < 0.01).Blood oxygenation and the ventilatory response to hypercapnic challenge also showed significantly smaller decreases with CX717 than with placebo. In contrast, CX717 did not affect alfentanil-induced analgesia in either electrical or heat-based experimental models of pain. Both ventilatory depression and analgesia were reversed with 1.6 mg of naloxone. These results support the use of ampakines as selective antidotes in humans to counter opioid-induced ventilatory depression without affecting opioid-mediated analgesia.

  3. Psychophysical Differences in Ventilatory Awareness and Breathlessness between Athletes and Sedentary Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Faull, Olivia K.; Cox, Pete J.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Breathlessness is a complex set of symptoms that are comprised of both sensory and affective (emotional) dimensions. While ventilation is now understood to be a potential limiter to performance in highly-trained individuals, the contribution of breathlessness-anxiety in those nearing maximal ventilation during intense exercise has not yet been considered as a limiter to performance. Methods: In this study, we compared the physiology and psychology of breathlessness in 20 endurance athletes with 20 untrained age- and sex-matched sedentary controls. Subjects completed baseline spirometry and anxiety questionnaires, an incremental exercise test to exhaustion and a steady-state hypercapnic ventilatory response test, with concurrent measures of breathlessness intensity and breathlessness-anxiety. Results: Compared with sedentary subjects, athletes reported equivalent breathlessness intensity but greater breathlessness-anxiety at maximal exercise (athletes vs. sedentary (mean ± SD): breathlessness intensity (0–100%) 80.7 (22.7) vs. 72.5 (17.2), p = 0.21; breathlessness-anxiety (0–100%), 45.3 (36.3) vs. 22.3 (20.0), p = 0.02). Athletes operated at higher proportions of their maximal ventilatory capacity (MVV) (athletes vs. sedentary (mean ventilation ± SD; % MVV): 101.6 (27.2) vs. 73.7 (30.1), p = 0.003). In the athletes there was a positive linear correlation between ventilation and breathlessness score during the hypercapnic challenge that was not observed in the sedentary controls. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that whilst operating at high proportions of maximal ventilation, breathlessness-anxiety becomes increasingly prominent in athletes. Our results suggest that ventilatory perception pathways may be a target for improved athletic performance in some individuals. PMID:27378940

  4. The successful treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure with oral modafinil

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Helen; Quirke, Ginny; Farmer, Sally; Adeyemo, Sumbo; Varney, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Hypercapnic respiratory failure is common in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is usually treated by nasal ventilation. Not all patients requiring such ventilation can tolerate it, with anxiety and phobia influencing their reaction, along with treatment failure. We report the case histories of six patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were at risk of death due to refusal of nasal ventilation or its failure despite ongoing treatment. We report their improvement with oral modafinil 200 mg tablets used as a respiratory stimulant, which led to discharge, improved arterial blood gases, and offset further admissions with hypercapnic respiratory failure. This drug is licensed for narcolepsy and is said to stimulate the respiratory system via the central nervous system. Its use in respiratory failure is an unlicensed indication, and there are no case reports or studies of such use in the literature. Its respiratory stimulant effects appear better than those with protriptyline, which was a drug previously used until its production was discontinued. Our findings suggest that a study of modafinil in hypercapnic respiratory failure would be warranted, especially for patients with treatment failure or intolerance to nasal ventilation. This may offer a way of shortening hospital stay, improving outcome and quality of life, and reducing death and readmissions. PMID:24812505

  5. The successful treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure with oral modafinil.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Helen; Quirke, Ginny; Farmer, Sally; Adeyemo, Sumbo; Varney, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Hypercapnic respiratory failure is common in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is usually treated by nasal ventilation. Not all patients requiring such ventilation can tolerate it, with anxiety and phobia influencing their reaction, along with treatment failure. We report the case histories of six patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were at risk of death due to refusal of nasal ventilation or its failure despite ongoing treatment. We report their improvement with oral modafinil 200 mg tablets used as a respiratory stimulant, which led to discharge, improved arterial blood gases, and offset further admissions with hypercapnic respiratory failure. This drug is licensed for narcolepsy and is said to stimulate the respiratory system via the central nervous system. Its use in respiratory failure is an unlicensed indication, and there are no case reports or studies of such use in the literature. Its respiratory stimulant effects appear better than those with protriptyline, which was a drug previously used until its production was discontinued. Our findings suggest that a study of modafinil in hypercapnic respiratory failure would be warranted, especially for patients with treatment failure or intolerance to nasal ventilation. This may offer a way of shortening hospital stay, improving outcome and quality of life, and reducing death and readmissions.

  6. [Acute respiratory failure as the sol inaugural sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Chaouch, N; Meraï, S; Cheikh Rouhou, S; Ben Romdhane, K; Ben Mrad, S; Besbes, M; Tritar, F

    2007-10-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformation is an occipitocervical malformation where the cerebellar amygdales descend below the occipital foramen. Acute respiratory failure is an exceptional inaugural sign. We report two cases disclosed by alveolar hypoventilation associated with type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The two patients age 51 and 52 years had an uneventful past history and presented with hypercapnic encephalopathy with acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Respiratory function tests, helicoidal thoracic computed tomographic angiography, electromyogram, cardiac echography, and thyroid and immunological tests were normal. Blood gases and polysomnography were in favor of central hypoventilation without sleep apnea. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The course was complicated by recurrent respiratory failure in both patients. Surgical decompression performed for the first patient provided no improvement. This patient died two months after surgery subsequent to aspiration pneumonia. The second patient was treated with continuous positive pressure noninvasive ventilatory assistance and had a good outcome at 25 months. These two cases illustrate the absence of any neurological sign, acute respiratory failure being the only sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation.

  7. Classic conditioning of the ventilatory responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Nsegbe, E; Vardon, G; Perruchet, P; Gallego, J

    1997-10-01

    Recent authors have stressed the role of conditioning in the control of breathing, but experimental evidence of this role is still sparse and contradictory. To establish that classic conditioning of the ventilatory responses can occur in rats, we performed a controlled experiment in which a 1-min tone [conditioned stimulus (CS)] was paired with a hypercapnic stimulus [8.5% CO2, unconditioned stimulus (US)]. The experimental group (n = 9) received five paired CS-US presentations, followed by one CS alone to test conditioning. This sequence was repeated six times. The control group (n = 7) received the same number of CS and US, but each US was delivered 3 min after the CS. We observed that after the CS alone, breath duration was significantly longer in the experimental than in the control group and mean ventilation was significantly lower, thus showing inhibitory conditioning. This conditioning may have resulted from the association between the CS and the inhibitory and aversive effects of CO2. The present results confirmed the high sensitivity of the respiratory controller to conditioning processes.

  8. The Effects of Lung Protective Ventilation or Hypercapnic Acidosis on Gas Exchange and Lung Injury in Surfactant Deficient Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hummler, Helmut D.; Banke, Katharina; Wolfson, Marla R.; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Ebsen, Michael; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Fuchs, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background Permissive hypercapnia has been shown to reduce lung injury in subjects with surfactant deficiency. Experimental studies suggest that hypercapnic acidosis by itself rather than decreased tidal volume may be a key protective factor. Objectives To study the differential effects of a lung protective ventilatory strategy or hypercapnic acidosis on gas exchange, hemodynamics and lung injury in an animal model of surfactant deficiency. Methods 30 anesthetized, surfactant-depleted rabbits were mechanically ventilated (FiO2 = 0.8, PEEP = 7cmH2O) and randomized into three groups: Normoventilation-Normocapnia (NN)-group: tidal volume (Vt) = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 40 mmHg; Normoventilation-Hypercapnia (NH)-group: Vt = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg by increasing FiCO2; and a Hypoventilation-Hypercapnia (HH)-group: Vt = 4.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg. Plasma lactate and interleukin (IL)-8 were measured every 2 h. Animals were sacrificed after 6 h to perform bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), to measure lung wet-to-dry weight, lung tissue IL-8, and to obtain lung histology. Results PaO2 was significantly higher in the HH-group compared to the NN-group (p<0.05), with values of the NH-group between the HH- and NN-groups. Other markers of lung injury (wet-dry-weight, BAL-Protein, histology-score, plasma-IL-8 and lung tissue IL-8) resulted in significantly lower values for the HH-group compared to the NN-group and trends for the NH-group towards lower values compared to the NN-group. Lactate was significantly lower in both hypercapnia groups compared to the NN-group. Conclusion Whereas hypercapnic acidosis may have some beneficial effects, a significant effect on lung injury and systemic inflammatory response is dependent upon a lower tidal volume rather than resultant arterial CO2 tensions and pH alone. PMID:26840779

  9. Effects of Early Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration on E-Selectin, Hemodynamic Stability, and Ventilatory Function in Patients with Septic-Shock-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of 72-hour early-initiated continuous venovenous hemofiltration (ECVVH) treatment in patients with septic-shock-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (not acute kidney injury, AKI) with regard to serum E-selectin and measurements of lung function and hemodynamic stability. Methods. This prospective nonblinded single institutional randomized study involved 51 patients who were randomly assigned to receive or not receive ECVVH, an ECVVH group (n = 24) and a non-ECVVH group (n = 27). Besides standard therapies, patients in ECVVH group underwent CVVH for 72 h. Results. At 0 and 24 h after initiation of treatment, arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), and E-selectin level were not significantly different between groups (all P > 0.05). Compared to non-ECVVH group, PaO2/FiO2 is significantly higher and EVLWI and E-selectin level are significantly lower in ECVVH group (all P < 0.05) at 48 h and 72 h after initiation of treatment. The lengths of mechanical ventilation and stay in intensive care unit (ICU) were shorter in ECVVH group (all P < 0.05), but there was no difference in 28-day mortality between two groups. Conclusions. In patients with septic-shock-induced ARDS (not AKI), treatment with ECVVH in addition to standard therapies improves endothelial function, lung function, and hemodynamic stability and reduces the lengths of mechanical ventilation and stay in ICU. PMID:28044135

  10. Depressed Hypoxic and Hypercapnic Ventilatory Responses at Early Stage of Lethal Avian Influenza A Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Zemmie; Harrod, Kevin S.; Xu, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    H5N1 virus infection results in ~60% mortality in patients primarily due to respiratory failure, but the underlying causes of mortality are unclear. The goal of this study is to reveal respiratory disorders occurring at the early stage of infection that may be responsible for subsequent respiratory failure and death. BALB/c mice were intranasally infected with one of two H5N1 virus strains: HK483 (lethal) or HK486 (non-lethal) virus. Pulmonary ventilation and the responses to hypoxia (HVR; 7% O2 for 3 min) and hypercapnia (HCVR; 7% CO2 for 5 min) were measured daily at 2 days prior and 1, 2, and 3 days postinfection (dpi) and compared to mortality typically by 8 dpi. At 1, 2, and 3 dpi, immunoreactivities (IR) of substance P (SP-IR) in the nodose ganglion or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-IR) in the carotid body coupled with the nucleoprotein of influenza A (NP-IR) was examined in some mice, while arterial blood was collected in others. Our results showed that at 2 and 3 dpi: 1) both viral infections failed to alter body temperature and weight, V˙CO2, or induce viremia while producing similarly high lung viral titers; 2) HK483, but not HK486, virus induced tachypnea and depressed HVR and HCVR without changes in arterial blood pH and gases; and 3) only HK483 virus led to NP-IR in vagal SP-IR neurons, but not in the carotid body, and increased density of vagal SP-IR neurons. In addition, all HK483, rather than HK486, mice died at 6 to 8 dpi and the earlier death was correlated with more severe depression of HVR and HCVR. Our data suggest that tachypnea and depressed HVR/HCVR occur at the early stage of lethal H5N1 viral infection associated with viral replication and increased SP-IR density in vagal neurons, which may contribute to the respiratory failure and death. PMID:26808681

  11. [Thermoregulatory activity of the intercostal muscles under a hypercapnic load].

    PubMed

    Burachevskaia, L E

    1983-02-01

    In experiments on anesthetized cats, the reactions elicited by CO2 inhalation were studied in single motor units of the intercostal muscles activated during shivering. The excitation of the bulbar respiratory center during shivering was found to modify the activity of the respiratory and tonic motor units. Most of the respiratory motor units in a hypercapnic state increased the mean firing rate by 1.5/sec. The tonic motor units both diminished the mean firing rate and changed the pattern of activity: they began to produce bursts of spikes synchronous with the respiratory rhythm. The problems of supraspinal regulation of activity of the intercostal muscles motoneuron pool are discussed.

  12. Lack of correlation between the ventilatory response to CO2 and lung function impairment in myotonic dystrophy patients: evidence for a dysregulation at central level.

    PubMed

    Poussel, Mathias; Thil, Catherine; Kaminsky, Pierre; Mercy, Magalie; Gomez, Emmanuel; Chaouat, Ari; Chabot, François; Chenuel, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy Type 1 (DM1) is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults. Respiratory failure is common but clinical findings support a dysregulation of the control of breathing at central level, furthermore contributing to alveolar hypoventilation independently of the severity of respiratory weakness. We therefore intended to study the relationship between the ventilatory response to CO2 and the impairment of lung function in DM1 patients. Sixty-nine DM1 patients were prospectively investigated (43.5 ± 12.7 years). Systematic pulmonary lung function evaluation including spirometry, plethysmography, measurements of respiratory muscle strength, arterial blood gas analysis and ventilatory response to CO2 were performed. Thirty-one DM1 patients (45%) presented a ventilatory restriction, 38 (55%) were hypoxaemic and 15 (22%) were hypercapnic. Total lung capacity decline was correlated to hypoxaemia (p = 0.0008) and hypercapnia (p = 0.0013), but not to a decrease in ventilatory response to CO2 (p = 0.194). Ventilatory response to CO2 was reduced to 0.85 ± 0.67 L/min/mmHg and not correlated to respiratory muscle weakness. Ventilatory response to CO2 was neither different among restricted/non-restricted patients (p = 0.2395) nor among normoxaemic/hypoxaemic subjects (p = 0.6380). The reduced ventilatory response to CO2 in DM1 patients appeared independent of lung function impairment and respiratory muscle weakness, suggesting a central cause of CO2 insensitivity.

  13. Ventilatory Chemosensory Drive Is Blunted in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueira, Matias; Baby, Santhosh M.; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the DMD gene resulting in an absence of dystrophin in neurons and muscle. Respiratory failure is the most common cause of mortality and previous studies have largely concentrated on diaphragmatic muscle necrosis and respiratory failure component. Here, we investigated the integrity of respiratory control mechanisms in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Whole body plethysmograph in parallel with phrenic nerve activity recordings revealed a lower respiratory rate and minute ventilation during normoxia and a blunting of the hypoxic ventilatory reflex in response to mild levels of hypoxia together with a poor performance on a hypoxic stress test in mdx mice. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed low PaO2 and pH and high PaCO2 in mdx mice. To investigate chemosensory respiratory drive, we analyzed the carotid body by molecular and functional means. Dystrophin mRNA and protein was expressed in normal mice carotid bodies however, they are absent in mdx mice. Functional analysis revealed abnormalities in Dejours test and the early component of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex in mdx mice. Together, these results demonstrate a malfunction in the peripheral chemosensory drive that would be predicted to contribute to the respiratory failure in mdx mice. These data suggest that investigating and monitoring peripheral chemosensory drive function may be useful for improving the management of DMD patients with respiratory failure. PMID:23922741

  14. Reduced suppression of CO2-induced ventilatory stimulation by endomorphins relative to morphine.

    PubMed

    Czapla, Marc A; Zadina, James E

    2005-10-19

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics, but a major limitation for their therapeutic usefulness is their induction of respiratory depression. Endomorphin-1 (EM1), in contrast to several other mu opioids, exhibits a threshold for respiratory depression that is well above its threshold for analgesia. Its effect on sensitivity to CO(2), however, remains unknown. Minute ventilation (V(E)) in 2, 4, and 6% CO(2) was measured before and after systemic administration of EM1, endomorphin-2 (EM2), DAMGO, and morphine in the conscious rat. EM1 and EM2 attenuated the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) only in high doses, while DAMGO and morphine diminished the HCVR in much lower doses. The ventilatory effects of high doses of all 4 agonists were blocked by the mu-opioid antagonist naloxone (0.4 mg/kg i.v.), but not by the peripherally restricted mu-opioid antagonist, methyl-naloxone (0.4 mg/kg i.v.). It was concluded that the endomorphins attenuated the HCVR only in large doses, well beyond the analgesic threshold, and did so through a centrally mediated mu-opioid mechanism.

  15. Pathophysiology of human ventilatory control.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jerome A; Smith, Curtis A

    2014-08-01

    We review the substantial recent progress made in understanding the underlying mechanisms controlling breathing and the applicability of these findings to selected human diseases. Emphasis is placed on the sites of central respiratory rhythm and pattern generation as well as newly described functions of the carotid chemoreceptors, the integrative nature of the central chemoreceptors, and the interaction between peripheral and central chemoreception. Recent findings that support critical contributions from cortical central command and muscle afferent feedback to exercise hyperpnoea are also reviewed. These basic principles, and the evidence supporting chemoreceptor and ventilatory control system plasticity during and following constant and intermittent hypoxaemia and stagnant hypoxia, are applied to: 1) the pathogenesis, consequences and treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea; and 2) exercise hyperpnoea and its control and limitations with ageing, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure.

  16. Pathophysiology of human ventilatory control

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, JA; Smith, CA

    2015-01-01

    We review the substantial progress recently made in understanding the underlying mechanisms controlling breathing and the applicability of these findings to selected human diseases. Emphasis is placed on the sites of central respiratory rhythm and pattern generation as well as newly described functions of the carotid chemoreceptors and the integrative nature of the central chemoreceptors and the interaction between peripheral and central chemoreception. Recent findings supporting critical contributions from cortical central command and muscle afferent feedback to exercise hyperpnea are also reviewed. These basic principles and the evidence supporting chemoreceptor and ventilatory control system plasticity during and following constant and intermittent hypoxemia and stagnant hypoxia are applied: a) to the pathogenesis, consequences and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea; and b) to exercise hyperpnea and its control and limitations with aging, COPD and CHF. PMID:24925922

  17. Breathing while altricial: the ontogeny of ventilatory chemosensitivity in red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) nestlings.

    PubMed

    Dzialowski, Edward M; Sirsat, Tushar S; Sirsat, Sarah K G; Price, Edwin R

    2016-12-01

    Altricial bird species, like red-winged blackbirds, hatch at an immature state of functional maturity with limited aerobic capacity and no endothermic capacity. Over the next 10-12 days in the nest, red-winged blackbirds develop increased metabolic capacity before fledging. Although ontogeny of respiration has been described in precocial birds, ontogeny of ventilatory chemosensitivity is unknown in altricial species. Here we examined developmental changes in chemosensitivity of tidal volume (Vt), breathing frequency (ƒ), minute ventilation (V̇e), and whole animal oxygen consumption (V̇o2) from hatching to just before fledging in red-winged blackbirds on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 posthatching (dph) in response to hypercapnia (2 and 4% CO2) and hypoxia (15 and 10% O2). Under control conditions, there was a developmental increase in V̇e with age due to increased Vt Hypercapnic and hypoxic chemosensitivities were present as early as 1 dph. In response to hypoxia, 1, 3, and 9 dph nestlings increased V̇e at 10% O2, by increasing ƒ with some change in Vt in younger animals. In contrast to early neonatal altricial mammals, the hypoxic response of nestling red-winged blackbirds was not biphasic. In response to hypercapnia, 3 dph nestlings increased V̇e by increasing both ƒ and Vt From 5 dph on, the hypercapnic increase in V̇e was accounted for by increased Vt and not ƒ. Chemosensitivity to O2 and CO2 matures early in nestling red-winged blackbirds, well before the ability to increase V̇o2 in response to cooling, and thus does not represent a limitation to the development of endothermy.

  18. Time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Porteus, Cosima; Hedrick, Michael S; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias; Milsom, William K

    2011-04-01

    Over a decade has passed since Powell et al. (Respir Physiol 112:123-134, 1998) described and defined the time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in adult mammals. These time domains, however, have yet to receive much attention in other vertebrate groups. The initial, acute HVR of fish, amphibians and reptiles serves to minimize the imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. If the hypoxia is sustained, a suite of secondary adjustments occur giving rise to a more long-term balance (acclimatization) that allows the behaviors of normal life. These secondary responses can change over time as a function of the nature of the stimulus (the pattern and intensity of the hypoxic exposure). To add to the complexity of this process, hypoxia can also lead to metabolic suppression (the hypoxic metabolic response) and the magnitude of this is also time dependent. Unlike the original review of Powell et al. (Respir Physiol 112:123-134, 1998) that only considered the HVR in adult animals, we also consider relevant developmental time points where information is available. Finally, in amphibians and reptiles with incompletely divided hearts the magnitude of the ventilatory response will be modulated by hypoxia-induced changes in intra-cardiac shunting that also improve the match between O(2) supply and demand, and these too change in a time-dependent fashion. While the current literature on this topic is reviewed here, it is noted that this area has received little attention. We attempt to redefine time domains in a more 'holistic' fashion that better accommodates research on ectotherms. If we are to distinguish between the genetic, developmental and environmental influences underlying the various ventilatory responses to hypoxia, however, we must design future experiments with time domains in mind.

  19. [Management of acute exacerbations of COPD].

    PubMed

    Rabbat, A; Guetta, A; Lorut, C; Lefebvre, A; Roche, N; Huchon, G

    2010-10-01

    Exacerbations of COPD are common and cause a considerable burden to the patient and the healthcare system. To optimize the hospital care of patients with exacerbations of COPD, clinicians should be aware of some key points: management of exacerbations is broadly based on clinical features and severity. Initial clinical evaluation is crucial to define those patients requiring hospital admission and those who could be managed as outpatients. In hospitalized patients, the appropriate level of care should be determined by the initial severity and response to initial medical treatment. Medical treatment should follow recent recommendations, including rest, titrated oxygen therapy, inhaled or nebulized short-acting bronchodilators (Beta2-agonists and anticholinergic agents), DVT prevention with LMWH, steroids in most severely ill patients, unless there are contraindications and antibiotics in the case of a clear bacterial infectious aetiology. Severe exacerbations may lead to acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Unless contraindicated, non-invasive ventilation (NIV) should be the first line ventilatory support for these patients. NIV should be commenced early, before severe acidosis ensues, to avoid the need for endotracheal intubation and to reduce mortality and treatment failures. Several randomised controlled clinical trials support the use of NIV in the management of acute exacerbations of COPD, demonstrating a decreased need for mechanical ventilation and an improved survival. In most severe cases, NIV should be provided in ICU. Although it has been shown that for less severe patients (with pH values>7.30), NIV can be administered safely and effectively on general medical wards, a lead respiratory consultant and trained nurses are mandatory. Mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube should be considered when patients have contraindications to the use of NIV or fail to improve on NIV. The duration of mechanical ventilation should be shortened as much as

  20. Measurement of ventilatory threshold by respiratory frequency.

    PubMed

    Nabetani, Teru; Ueda, Takeshi; Teramoto, Keisuke

    2002-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether respiratory frequency can be used as a valid parameter for estimating ventilatory threshold and for examining differences in exercise modes such as a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. 24 men and 12 women performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer and on a treadmill. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, pulmonary ventilation, ventilatory frequency, and heart rate were measured continuously every 30 sec. during the test. Three different and independent reviewers detected the ventilatory threshold point and break point of respiratory rate, which were then compared. Analysis indicated that (1) ventilatory threshold was well correlated with break point of respiratory rate for both cycle (r=.88, p<.001) and treadmill exercise (r=.96, p<.001). However, on the average, ventilatory threshold was only 71% (cycle) or 88% (treadmill) of break point of respiratory rate. (2) The regression equation for treadmill exercise was more accurate than that for cycling, but the detected data samples were smaller. The break point of respiratory rate was more easily detected for the cycle ergometer test 33 of 36 subjects) than for the treadmill test (only 15 of 36). The cycle ergometer test identified the break point of respiratory rate more easily than did the treadmill test. (3) There was an association between physical fitness and whether the break point of respiratory rate was detectable, and the more fit the subject (above average), the more likely the break point was to be undetected. Our study demonstrates that the break point of respiratory rate is closely associated with ventilatory threshold and that the cycle ergometer test is more conducive than the treadmill test to the detectability of break point of respiratory rate.

  1. Effects of intracerebroventricular administered fluoxetine on cardio-ventilatory functions in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kermorgant, Marc; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Tyler, Charles R; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2014-09-01

    Fluoxetine (FLX) is a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor present in the aquatic environment which is known to bioconcentrate in the brains of exposed fish. FLX acts as a disruptor of various neuroendocrine functions in the brain, but nothing is known about the possible consequence of FLX exposure on the cardio-ventilatory system in fish. Here we undertook to investigate the central actions of FLX on ventilatory and cardiovascular function in unanesthetized rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of FLX (dosed between 5 and 25 μg) resulted in a significantly elevated total ventilation (VTOT), with a maximum hyperventilation of +176% (at a dose of 25μg) compared with vehicle injected controls. This increase was due to an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP: +126%) with minor effects on ventilatory frequency. The highest dose of FLX (25 μg) produced a significant increase in mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (PDA: +20%) without effects on heart rate (ƒH). In comparison, intra-arterial injections of FLX (500-2,500 μg) had no effect on ventilation but the highest doses increased both PDA and ƒH. The ICV and IA cardio-ventilatory effects of FLX were very similar to those previously observed following injections of 5-HT, indicating that FLX probably acts via stimulating endogenous 5-HT activity through inhibition of 5-HT transporter(s). Our results demonstrate for the first time in fish that FLX administered within the brain exerts potent stimulatory effects on ventilation and blood pressure increase. The doses of FLX given to fish in our study are higher than the brain concentrations of FLX in fish that result from acute exposure to FLX through the water. Nonetheless, our results indicate possible disrupting action of long term exposure to FLX discharged into the environment on central target sites sensitive to 5-HT involved in cardio-ventilatory control.

  2. Effects of buspirone on posthypoxic ventilatory behavior in the C57BL/6J and A/J mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Motoo; Dostal, Jesse; Kimura, Hiroshi; Strohl, Kingman P

    2008-08-01

    Buspirone, a partial agonist of the serotonergic 5-HT1A receptor, improves breathing irregularities in humans with Rett syndrome or brain stem injury. The purpose of this study was to examine whether buspirone alters posthypoxic ventilatory behavior in C57BL/6J (B6) and A/J mouse strains. Measurements of ventilatory behavior were collected from unanesthetized adult male mice (n=6 for each strain) using the plethysmographic method. Mice were given intraperitoneal injections of vehicle or several doses of buspirone and exposed to 2 min of hypoxia (10% O2) followed by rapid reoxygenation (100% O2). Twenty minutes later, mice were tested for hypercapnic response (8% CO(2)-92% O2). On a separate day, mice were injected with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist 4-iodo-N-{2-[4-(methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl] ethyl}-N-2-pyridinylbenzamide (p-MPPI) before the injection of buspirone, and measurements were repeated. In separate studies, arterial blood-gas analysis was performed for each strain (n=12 in B6 and 10 in A/J) with buspirone or vehicle. In both strains, buspirone stimulated ventilation at rest. In the B6 mice, the hypoxic response was unchanged, but the response to hypercapnia was reduced with buspirone (5 mg/kg; P<0.05). With reoxygenation, vehicle-treated B6 exhibited periodic breathing and greater variation in ventilation compared with A/J (P<0.01). In B6 animals, >or=3 mg/kg of buspirone reduced variation and prevented the occurrence of posthypoxic periodic breathing. Both effects were reversed by p-MPPI. Treatment effect of buspirone was not explained by a difference in resting arterial blood gases. We conclude that buspirone improves posthypoxic ventilatory irregularities in the B6 mouse through its agonist effects on the 5-HT1A receptor.

  3. Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Blunts the Expression of Ventilatory Long Term Facilitation in Sleeping Rats.

    PubMed

    Edge, Deirdre; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a central feature of human sleep-disordered breathing, causes respiratory instability in sleeping rats (Edge D, Bradford A, O'halloran KD. Adv Exp Med Biol 758:359-363, 2012). Long term facilitation (LTF) of respiratory motor outputs following exposure to episodic, but not sustained, hypoxia has been described. We hypothesized that CIH would enhance ventilatory LTF during sleep. We examined the effects of 3 and 7 days of CIH exposure on the expression of ventilatory LTF in sleeping rats. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to 20 cycles of normoxia and hypoxia (5 % O(2) at nadir; SaO(2) ~ 80 %) per hour, 8 h per day for 3 or 7 consecutive days (CIH, N = 7 per group). Corresponding sham groups (N = 7 per group) were subjected to alternating cycles of air under identical experimental conditions in parallel. Following gas exposures, breathing during sleep was assessed in unrestrained, unanaesthetized animals using the technique of whole-body plethysmography. Rats were exposed to room air (baseline) and then to an acute IH (AIH) protocol consisting of alternating periods of normoxia (7 min) and hypoxia (FiO(2) 0.1, 5 min) for 10 cycles. Breathing was monitored during the AIH exposure and for 1 h in normoxia following AIH exposure. Baseline ventilation was elevated after 3 but not 7 days of CIH exposure. The hypoxic ventilatory response was equivalent in sham and CIH animals after 3 days but ventilatory responses to repeated hypoxic challenges were significantly blunted following 7 days of CIH. Minute ventilation was significantly elevated following AIH exposure compared to baseline in sham but not in CIH exposed animals. LTF, determined as the % increase in minute ventilation from baseline following AIH exposure, was significantly blunted in CIH exposed rats. In summary, CIH leads to impaired ventilatory responsiveness to AIH. Moreover, CIH blunts ventilatory LTF. The physiological

  4. Cardiovascular and Ventilatory Consequences of Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Tamara M; Giraud, George D; Togioka, Brandon M; Jones, Daniel B; Cigarroa, Joaquin E

    2017-02-14

    Although laparoscopic surgery accounts for >2 million surgical procedures every year, the current preoperative risk scores and guidelines do not adequately assess the risks of laparoscopy. In general, laparoscopic procedures have a lower risk of morbidity and mortality compared with operations requiring a midline laparotomy. During laparoscopic surgery, carbon dioxide insufflation may produce significant hemodynamic and ventilatory consequences such as increased intraabdominal pressure and hypercarbia. Hemodynamic insults secondary to increased intraabdominal pressure include increased afterload and preload and decreased cardiac output, whereas ventilatory consequences include increased airway pressures, hypercarbia, and decreased pulmonary compliance. Hemodynamic effects are accentuated in patients with cardiovascular disease such as congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, and congenital heart disease. Prevention of cardiovascular complications may be accomplished through a sound understanding of the hemodynamic and physiological consequences of laparoscopic surgery as well as a defined operative plan generated by a multidisciplinary team involving the preoperative consultant, anesthesiologist, and surgeon.

  5. Ventilatory efficiency during exercise in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-Guo; Hansen, James E; Garatachea, Nuria; Storer, Thomas W; Wasserman, Karlman

    2002-12-01

    When evaluating dyspnea in patients with heart or lung disease it is useful to measure the quantity of ventilation needed to eliminate metabolically produced CO2 (i.e., the ventilatory efficiency). Mathematically, the relationship between ventilation (VE) and CO2 output is determined by the arterial CO2 pressure and the physiologic dead space-tidal volume ratio. We decided to determine how age, sex, size, fitness, and the type of ergometer influenced ventilatory efficiency in normal subjects. Three methods were compared for expressing this relationship: (1) the VE versus CO2 output slope below the ventilatory compensation point, commonly used by cardiologists for estimating the severity of heart failure; (2) the VE/CO2 output ratio at the anaerobic threshold, commonly used by pulmonologists; and (3) the lowest VE/CO2 output ratio during exercise, the latter parameter not previously reported. We studied 474 healthy adults, between 17 and 78 years of age during incremental cycle and treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise tests at three test sites, correcting the total VE for the equipment dead space. The lowest VE/CO2 output ratio was insignificantly different from the ratio at the anaerobic threshold, less variable than that for the slope relationship, and unaffected by the site, ergometer, and gas exchange measurement systems. The regression equation for the lowest VE/CO2 output ratio was 27.94 + 0.108 x age + (0.97 = F, 0.0 = M) - 0.0376 x height, where age is in years and height is in centimeters. We conclude that the lowest VE/CO2 output ratio is the preferred noninvasive method to estimate ventilatory inefficiency.

  6. Exercise Ventilatory Limitation: The Role Of Expiratory Flow Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Babb, Tony G.

    2012-01-01

    Ventilatory limitation to exercise remains an important unresolved clinical issue; as a result, many individuals misinterpret the effects of expiratory flow limitation as an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Expiratory flow limitation is not all-or-none; approaching maximal expiratory flow can have important effects not only on ventilatory capacity but also on breathing mechanics, ventilatory control, and possibly exertional dyspnea and exercise intolerance. PMID:23038244

  7. Is ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia a phenomenon that arises through mechanisms that have an intrinsic role in the regulation of ventilation at sea level?

    PubMed

    Robbins, P A

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to set out the hypothesis that arterial PO2 may play a significant role in the regulation of breathing at sea level. The following points are made: 1) Although CO2 is clearly the dominant feedback signal in the acute setting, there is evidence, particularly clinical observation, that the ventilatory response to CO2 may adapt. 2) Although the ventilatory response to an acute variation in alveolar PO2 around sea-level values is feeble, studies at altitude have shown that over longer-time periods alveolar PO2 is a more powerful regulator of ventilation. 3) Recent evidence suggests that mechanisms associated with ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia are active at sea-level values for PO2, and indeed affect the acute ventilatory response to hypoxia. 4) While most evidence suggests that the peripheral and central chemoreflexes are independent and additive in their contributions to ventilation, experiments over longer durations suggest that peripheral chemoreceptor afferents may play an important role in regulating central chemoreflex sensitivity to CO2. This is potentially an important mechanism by which oxygen can alter the acute chemoreflex responses to CO2. In conclusion, the mechanisms underlying ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia may have an important role in regulating the respiratory system at sea level.

  8. The effects of long-term noninvasive ventilation in hypercapnic COPD patients: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, L; Vos, W; Dieriks, B; Daems, D; Verhulst, S; Vinchurkar, S; Ides, K; De Backer, J; Germonpre, P; De Backer, W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a well-established treatment for acute-on- chronic respiratory failure in hypercapnic COPD patients. Less is known about the effects of a long-term treatment with NIV in hypercapnic COPD patients and about the factors that may predict response in terms of improved oxygenation and lowered CO2 retention. Methods In this study, we randomized 15 patients to a routine pharmacological treatment (n = 5, age 66 [standard deviation ± 6] years, FEV1 30.5 [±5.1] %pred, PaO2 65 [±6] mmHg, PaCO2 52.4 [±6.0] mmHg) or to a routine treatment and NIV (using the Synchrony BiPAP device [Respironics, Inc, Murrsville, PA]) (n = 10, age 65 [±7] years, FEV1 29.5 [±9.0] %pred, PaO2 59 [±13] mmHg, PaCO2 55.4 [±7.7] mmHg) for 6 months. We looked at arterial blood gasses, lung function parameters and performed a low-dose computed tomography of the thorax, which was later used for segmentation (providing lobe and airway volumes, iVlobe and iVaw) and post-processing with computer methods (providing airway resistance, iRaw) giving overall a functional image of the separate airways and lobes. Results In both groups there was a nonsignificant change in FEV1 (NIV group 29.5 [9.0] to 38.5 [14.6] %pred, control group 30.5 [5.1] to 36.8 [8.7] mmHg). PaCO2 dropped significantly only in the NIV group (NIV: 55.4 [7.7] → 44.5 [4.70], P = 0.0076; control: 52.4 [6.0] → 47.6 [8.2], NS). Patients actively treated with NIV developed a more inhomogeneous redistribution of mass flow than control patients. Subsequent analysis indicated that in NIV-treated patients that improve their blood gases, mass flow was also redistributed towards areas with higher vessel density and less emphysema, indicating that flow was redistributed towards areas with better perfusion. There was a highly significant correlation between the % increase in mass flow towards lobes with a blood vessel density of >9% and the increase in PaO2. Improved ventilation–perfusion match and

  9. Validation of the hypercapnic calibrated fMRI method using DOT-fMRI fusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Evans, Karleyton C.; Selb, Juliette; Huppert, Theodore J.; Boas, David A.; Gagnon, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Calibrated functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a widely used method to investigate brain function in terms of physiological quantities such as the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). The first and one of the most common methods of fMRI calibration is hypercapnic calibration. This is achieved via simultaneous measures of blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) and the arterial spin labeling (ASL) signals during a functional task that evokes regional changes in CMRO2. A subsequent acquisition is then required during which the subject inhales carbon dioxide for short periods of time. A calibration constant, typically labeled M, is then estimated from the hypercapnic data and is subsequently used together with the BOLD-ASL recordings to compute evoked changes in CMRO2 during the functional task. The computation of M assumes a constant CMRO2 during the CO2 inhalation, an assumption that has been questioned since the origin of calibrated fMRI. In this study we used Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) together with BOLD and ASL – an alternative calibration method that does not require any gas manipulation and therefore no constant CMRO2 assumption - to cross-validate the estimation of M obtained from a traditional hypercapnic calibration. We found a high correlation between the M values (R=0.87, p<0.01) estimated using these two approaches. The findings serve to validate the hypercapnic fMRI calibration technique and suggest that the inter-subject variability routinely obtained for M is reproducible with an alternative method and might therefore reflect inter-subject physiological variability. PMID:25196509

  10. Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis: a protective or harmful strategy for critically ill newborn foals?

    PubMed

    Vengust, Modest

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews both the beneficial and adverse effects of permissive hypercapnic respiratory acidosis in critically ill newborn foals. It has been shown that partial carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2) above the traditional safe range (hypercapnia), has beneficial effects on the physiology of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous system in neonates. In human neonatal critical care medicine permissive hypercapnic acidosis is generally well-tolerated by patients and is more beneficial to their wellbeing than normal carbon dioxide (CO2) pressure or normocapnia. Even though adverse effects of hypercapnia have been reported, especially in patients with central nervous system pathology and/or chronic infection, critical care clinicians often artificially increase PCO2 to take advantage of its positive effects on compromised neonate tissues. This is referred to as therapeutic hypercapnia. Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis is common in critically ill newborn foals and has traditionally been considered as not beneficial. A search of online scientific databases was conducted to survey the literature on the effects of hypercapnia in neonates, with emphasis on newborn foals. The dynamic status of safety levels of PCO2 and data on the effectiveness of different carbon dioxide levels are not available for newborn foals and should be scientifically determined. Presently, permissive hypercapnia should be implemented or tolerated cautiously in compromised newborn foals and its use should be based on relevant data from adult horses and other species.

  11. Intermittent hypercapnia induces long-lasting ventilatory plasticity to enhance CO2 responsiveness to overcome dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Bryan Patrick

    The ability of the brain to detect (central CO2 chemosensitivity) and respond to (central CO2 chemoresponsiveness) changes in tissue CO2/pH, is a homeostatic process essential for mammalian life. Dysfunction of the serotonin (5-HT) mechanisms compromises ventilatory CO 2 chemosensitivity/responsiveness and may enhance vulnerability to pathologies such as the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The laboratory of Dr. Michael Harris has shown medullary raphe contributions to central chemosensitivity involving both 5-HT- and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated mechanisms. I tested the hypothesis that postnatal exposure to mild intermittent hypercapnia (IHc) induces respiratory plasticity, due in part to strengthening of bicuculline- and saclofen-sensitive mechanisms (GABAA and GABAB receptor antagonists respectively). Rats were exposed to IHc-pretreatment (8 cycles of 5 % CO2) for 5 days beginning at postnatal day 12 (P12). I subsequently assessed CO2 responsiveness using an in situ perfused brainstem preparation. Hypercapnic responses were determined with and without pharmacological manipulation. In addition, IHc-pretreatment effectiveness was tested for its ability to overcome dysfunction in the CO2 responsiveness induced by a dietary tryptophan restriction. This dysfunctional CO2 responsiveness has been suggested to arise from a chronic, partial 5-HT reduction imparted by the dietary restriction. Results show IHc-pretreatment induced plasticity sufficient for CO2 responsiveness despite removal of otherwise critical ketanserin-sensitive mechanisms. CO2 responsiveness following IHc-pretreatment was absent if ketanserin was combined with bicuculline and saclofen, indicating that the plasticity was dependent upon bicuculline- and saclofen-sensitive mechanisms. IHc--induced plasticity was also capable of overcoming the ventilatory defects associated with maternal dietary restriction. Duration of IHc-induced plasticity was also investigated and found to last far into

  12. Ventilatory Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baille, Guillaume; De Jesus, Anna Maria; Perez, Thierry; Devos, David; Dujardin, Kathy; Charley, Christelle Monaca; Defebvre, Luc; Moreau, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to some other neurodegenerative diseases, little is known about ventilatory dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD). To assess the spectrum of ventilation disorders in PD, we searched for and reviewed studies of dyspnea, lung volumes, respiratory muscle function, sleep breathing disorders and the response to hypoxemia in PD. Among the studies, we identified some limitations: (i) small study populations (mainly composed of patients with advanced PD), (ii) the absence of long-term follow-up and (iii) the absence of functional evaluations under “off-drug” conditions. Although there are many reports of abnormal spirometry data in PD (mainly related to impairment of the inspiratory muscles), little is known about hypoventilation in PD. We conclude that ventilatory dysfunction in PD has been poorly studied and little is known about its frequency and clinical relevance. Hence, there is a need to characterize the different phenotypes of ventilation disorders in PD, study their relationships with disease progression and assess their prognostic value. PMID:27314755

  13. Mass Law Predicts Hyperbolic Hypoxic Ventilatory Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severinghaus, John W.

    The hyperbolic hypoxic ventilatory response vs PaO2, HVRp, is interpreted as relecting a mass hyperbolic relationship of cytochrome PcO2 to cytochrome potential Ec, offset 32 torr by the constant diffusion gradient between arterial blood and cytochrome in CB at its constant metabolic rate dot VO_2 . Ec is taken to be a linear function of redox reduction and CB ventilatory drive. As Ec rises in hypoxia, the absolute potentials of each step in the citric acid cycle rises equally while the potential drop across each step remains constant because flux rate remains constant. A hypothetic HVRs ( dot VE vs SaO2) response curve computed from these assumptions is strikingly non linear. A hypothetic HVRp calculated from an assumed linear HVRs cannot be fit to the observed hyperbolic increase of ventilation in response to isocapnic hypoxia at PO2 less than 40 torr. The incompatibility of these results suggest that in future studies HVRs will not be found to be linear, especially below 80% SaO2 and HVRp will fail to be accurately hyperbolic.

  14. Domiciliary ventilatory support: an analysis of outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, E H; Loh, L; Branthwaite, M A

    1988-01-01

    Prolonged ventilatory support has been used to treat 51 patients with respiratory failure secondary to skeletal (22) or neuromuscular (29) disease. Symptomatic relief was achieved in five patients with rapidly progressive neurological disease who died within 27 months. The remaining 46 patients, aged 11-69 years at presentation, have been followed for more than two and a half years. All but 10 were treated with negative pressure ventilation from the outset, intermittent positive pressure ventilation being used initially in the others and continued at home in three. Nocturnal negative pressure ventilation has been used at home by 39 patients. A permanent tracheostomy has been maintained in 14, to facilitate positive pressure ventilation in three and to circumvent upper airway obstruction during sleep in 11. Sustained improvement in symptoms and arterial blood gas tensions has been maintained, independence and the capacity for gainful employment have been regained in those of an appropriate age, and the incidence of subsequent hospital admissions has been low. Neither the mode of presentation nor the aetiology of the restrictive ventilatory defect influenced outcome in patients with stable or only slowly progressive primary disease. PMID:3127911

  15. Early life sensory ability-ventilatory responses of thornback ray embryos (Raja clavata) to predator-type electric fields.

    PubMed

    Ball, Rachel Emma; Oliver, Matthew Kenneth; Gill, Andrew Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Predator avoidance is fundamental for survival and it can be particularly challenging for prey animals if physical movement away from a predatory threat is restricted. Many sharks and rays begin life within an egg capsule that is attached to the sea bed. The vulnerability of this sedentary life stage is exacerbated in skates (Rajidae) as the compulsory ventilatory activity of embryos makes them conspicuous to potential predators. Embryos can reduce this risk by mediating ventilatory activity if they detect the presence of a predator using an acute electrosense. To determine how early in embryonic life predator elicited behavioral responses can occur, the reactions of three different age groups (1/3 developed, 2/3 developed, and near hatching) of embryonic thornback rays Raja clavata were tested using predator-type electric field stimuli. Egg capsules were exposed to continuous or intermittent stimuli in order to assess varying predator-type encounter scenarios on the ventilatory behavior of different developmental stages. All embryos reacted with a "freeze response" following initial electric field (E-field) exposure, ceasing ventilatory behavior in response to predator presence, demonstrating electroreceptive functionality for the first time at the earliest possible stage in ontogeny. This ability coincided with the onset of egg ventilatory behavior and may represent an effective means to enhance survival. A continuous application of stimuli over time revealed that embryos can adapt their behavior and resume normal activity, whereas when presented intermittently, the E-field resulted in a significant reduction in overall ventilatory activity across all ages. Recovery from stimuli was significantly quicker in older embryos, potentially indicative of the trade-off between avoiding predation and adequate respiration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 721-729, 2016.

  16. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Powell, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. PMID:27347896

  17. [Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist: a revolution of mechanical ventilation?].

    PubMed

    Piquilloud, Lise; Jolliet, Philippe; Tassaux, Didier

    2010-12-15

    Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist or NAVA is a new assisted ventilatory mode which, in comparison with pressure support, leads to improved patient-ventilator synchrony and a more variable ventilatory pattern. It also improves arterial oxygenation. With NAVA, the electrical activity of the diaphragm is recorded through a nasogastric tube equipped with electrodes. This electrical activity is then used to pilot the ventilator. With NAVA, the patient's respiratory pattern controls the ventilator's timing of triggering and cycling as well as the magnitude of pressurization, which is proportional to inspiratory demand. The effect of NAVA on patient outcome remains to be determined through well-designed prospective studies.

  18. Hypercapnic ventilation during exercise: effects of exercise methods and inhalation techniques.

    PubMed

    Kelley, M A; Owens, G R; Fishman, A P

    1982-10-01

    The effect of exercise on the ventilatory response to inhaled CO2 is uncertain because previous studies using different techniques have come to different conclusions. We undertook to resolve this problem by using multiple techniques and confining our study to a uniform level of mild exercise (VO2 = 10 ml/kg min). One group of subjects exercised on a treadmill and was tested with both rebreathing and steady-state CO2 methods. A second group exercised on a bicycle while using the rebreathing method. We found that the ventilatory response to CO2 was unchanged by mild exercise, regardless of the method used for CO2 inhalation or the technique used for exercise. These results indicate that under controlled conditions mild exercise does not produce any change in ventilatory sensitivity to CO2.

  19. Naked mole rats exhibit metabolic but not ventilatory plasticity following chronic sustained hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Danielle; Dzal, Yvonne A; Seow, Allison; Milsom, William K; Pamenter, Matthew E

    2016-03-30

    Naked mole rats are among the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified and live in chronic hypoxia throughout their lives. The physiological mechanisms underlying this tolerance, however, are poorly understood. Most vertebrates hyperventilate in acute hypoxia and exhibit an enhanced hyperventilation following acclimatization to chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH). Conversely, naked mole rats do not hyperventilate in acute hypoxia and their response to CSH has not been examined. In this study, we explored mechanisms of plasticity in the control of the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic metabolic response (HMR) of freely behaving naked mole rats following 8-10 days of chronic sustained normoxia (CSN) or CSH. Specifically, we investigated the role of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in mediating these responses. Our study yielded three important findings. First, naked mole rats did not exhibit ventilatory plasticity following CSH, which is unique among adult animals studied to date. Second, GABA receptor (GABAR) antagonism altered breathing patterns in CSN and CSH animals and modulated the acute HVR in CSN animals. Third, naked mole rats exhibited GABAR-dependent metabolic plasticity following long-term hypoxia, such that the basal metabolic rate was approximately 25% higher in normoxic CSH animals than CSN animals, and GABAR antagonists modulated this increase.

  20. The von Hippel-Lindau Chuvash mutation in mice causes carotid-body hyperplasia and enhanced ventilatory sensitivity to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Slingo, Mary E; Turner, Philip J; Christian, Helen C; Buckler, Keith J; Robbins, Peter A

    2014-04-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors coordinates diverse cellular and systemic responses to hypoxia. Chuvash polycythemia (CP) is an autosomal recessive disorder in humans in which there is impaired oxygen-dependent degradation of HIF, resulting in long-term systemic elevation of HIF levels at normal oxygen tensions. CP patients demonstrate the characteristic features of ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia, namely, an elevated baseline ventilation and enhanced acute hypoxic ventilatory response (AHVR). We investigated the ventilatory and carotid-body phenotype of a mouse model of CP, using whole-body plethysmography, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. In keeping with studies in humans, CP mice had elevated ventilation in euoxia and a significantly exaggerated AHVR when exposed to 10% oxygen, with or without the addition of 3% carbon dioxide. Carotid-body immunohistochemistry demonstrated marked hyperplasia of the oxygen-sensing type I cells, and the cells themselves appeared enlarged with more prominent nuclei. This hypertrophy was confirmed by electron microscopy, which also revealed that the type I cells contained an increased number of mitochondria, enlarged dense-cored vesicles, and markedly expanded rough endoplasmic reticulum. The morphological and ultrastructural changes seen in the CP mouse carotid body are strikingly similar to those observed in animals exposed to chronic hypoxia. Our study demonstrates that the HIF pathway plays a major role, not only in regulating both euoxic ventilatory control and the sensitivity of the response to hypoxia, but also in determining the morphology of the carotid body.

  1. Quantifying the ventilatory control contribution to sleep apnoea using polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Philip I; Edwards, Bradley A; Nemati, Shamim; Butler, James P; Owens, Robert L; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew; Sands, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    Elevated loop gain, consequent to hypersensitive ventilatory control, is a primary nonanatomical cause of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) but it is not possible to quantify this in the clinic. Here we provide a novel method to estimate loop gain in OSA patients using routine clinical polysomnography alone. We use the concept that spontaneous ventilatory fluctuations due to apnoeas/hypopnoeas (disturbance) result in opposing changes in ventilatory drive (response) as determined by loop gain (response/disturbance). Fitting a simple ventilatory control model (including chemical and arousal contributions to ventilatory drive) to the ventilatory pattern of OSA reveals the underlying loop gain. Following mathematical-model validation, we critically tested our method in patients with OSA by comparison with a standard (continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) drop method), and by assessing its ability to detect the known reduction in loop gain with oxygen and acetazolamide. Our method quantified loop gain from baseline polysomnography (correlation versus CPAP-estimated loop gain: n=28; r=0.63, p<0.001), detected the known reduction in loop gain with oxygen (n=11; mean±sem change in loop gain (ΔLG) -0.23±0.08, p=0.02) and acetazolamide (n=11; ΔLG -0.20±0.06, p=0.005), and predicted the OSA response to loop gain-lowering therapy. We validated a means to quantify the ventilatory control contribution to OSA pathogenesis using clinical polysomnography, enabling identification of likely responders to therapies targeting ventilatory control.

  2. Widespread sites of brain stem ventilatory chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Coates, E L; Li, A; Nattie, E E

    1993-07-01

    We produced local tissue acidosis in various brain stem regions with 1-nl injections of acetazolamide (AZ) to locate the sites of central chemoreception. To determine whether the local acidosis resulted in a stimulation of breathing, we performed the experiment in chloralose-urethan anesthetized vagotomized carotid-denervated (cats) paralyzed servo-ventilated cats and rats and measured phrenic nerve activity (PNA) as the response index. Measurements of extracellular brain tissue pH by glass microelectrodes showed that AZ injections induced a change in pH at the injection center equivalent to that produced by an increase in end-tidal PCO2 of approximately 36 Torr and that the change in brain pH was limited to a tissue volume with a radius of < 350 microns. We found AZ injections sites that caused a significant increase in PNA to be located 1) within 800 microns of the ventrolateral medullary surface at locations within traditional rostral and caudal chemosensitive areas and the intermediate area, 2) within the vicinity of the nucleus tractus solitarii, and 3) within the vicinity of the locus coeruleus. Single AZ injections produced increases in PNA that were < or = 69% of the maximum value observed with an increase in end-tidal PCO2. We conclude that central chemoreceptors are distributed at many locations within the brain stem, all within 1.5 mm of the surface, and that stimulation of a small fraction of all central chemoreceptors can result in a large ventilatory response.

  3. Laryngeal endocrine cells: topographic distribution and adaptation to chronic hypercapnic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Kusakabe, T; Hayashida, Y; Yoshida, T; Matsuda, H; Atoji, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2000-10-01

    The morphology, topographic distribution, effects of denervation, and exposure to hypercapnic hypoxia of endocrine cells were examined in rat larynx. The endocrine cells, which were immunoreactive for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), were observed within the epithelial layer of the laryngeal cavity and in the laryngeal gland, while solitary endocrine cells with apical and/or basal cytoplasmic processes appeared near the glottis. After denervation of the left cervical vagosympathetic trunk and the superior laryngeal nerve, the number of mucosal endocrine cells in the denervated side was not significantly different from that in the intact side. After exposure to hypercapnic hypoxia for 3 months, the number of endocrine cells with PGP 9.5 and CGRP was markedly increased. In conclusion, the secretion of laryngeal endocrine cells may be stimulated by CO2 rather than O2. Furthermore, the endocrine cells and the sensory and autonomic nervous system may regulate each other by an axon reflex mechanism. Endocrine cells appear to play a very important role in the local regulation of the laryngeal mucosa.

  4. Rh protein expression in branchial neuroepithelial cells, and the role of ammonia in ventilatory control in fish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Michele Nawata, C; De Boeck, Gudrun; Wood, Chris M

    2015-08-01

    Bill Milsom has made seminal contributions to our understanding of ventilatory control in a wide range of vertebrates. Teleosts are particularly interesting, because they produce a 3rd, potentially toxic respiratory gas (ammonia) in large amounts. Fish are well known to hyperventilate under high environmental ammonia (HEA), but only recently has the potential role of ammonia in normal ventilatory control been investigated. It is now clear that ammonia can act directly as a ventilatory stimulant in trout, independent of its effects on acid-base balance. Even in ureotelic dogfish sharks, acute elevations in ammonia cause increases in ventilation. Peripherally, the detection of elevated ammonia resides in gill arches I and II in trout, and in vitro, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) from these arches are sensitive to ammonia, responding with elevations in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i). Centrally, hyperventilatory responses to ammonia correlate more closely with concentrations of ammonia in the brain than in plasma or CSF. After chronic HEA exposure, ventilatory responsiveness to ammonia is lost, associated with both an attenuation of the [Ca(2+)]i response in NECs, and the absence of elevation in brain ammonia concentration. Chronic exposure to HEA also causes increases in the mRNA expression of several Rh proteins (ammonia-conductive channels) in both brain and gills. "Single cell" PCR techniques have been used to isolate the individual responses of NECs versus other gill cell types. We suggest several circumstances (post-feeding, post-exercise) where the role of ammonia as a ventilatory stimulant may have adaptive benefits for O2 uptake in fish.

  5. Acute effects of external negative pressure ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C B; Harris, N D; Howard, P

    1991-01-01

    This study compares the acute physiological effects of external negative pressure ventilation (ENPV) in normal subjects and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The equipment consisted of an airtight jacket (Pneumosuit) and vacuum pump. Minute ventilation (Ve) was recorded using a light-emitting turbine transducer. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were calculated every 30 s. Measurements were made at rest and during ENPV with pressures of -20 cmH2O and -40 cmH2O. The ventilator rate was fixed at 16.min-1. In 10 normal subjects, Ve increased from 8.6 to 22.9 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01) accompanied by an increase in VCO2 from 0.25 to 0.39 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01). In 10 normocapnic COPD patients (arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) less than 6.0 kPa) Ve increased from 11.5 to 17.1 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01) whilst in 10 hypercapnic patients (PaCO2 greater than 6.0 kPa) Ve increased from 9.7 to 12.4 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01). A change in VCO2 was not detected in the COPD patients, and VO2 did not change in any group. Arterial blood samples were obtained in eight hypercapnic patients. Baseline mean physiological deadspace ventilation (VD) was calculated to be 4.9 l.min-1 (56% of Ve) whilst Ve was 8.8 l.min-1 in this subgroup. During ENPV, arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) increased from 6.8 to 8.2 kPa (p less than 0.01) whilst PaCO2 decreased from 6.8 to 5.8 kPa (p less than 0.01) suggesting that despite the large physiological deadspace, a significant increase in alveolar ventilation had occurred. In advanced COPD, thoracic compliance falls and limits the ventilatory response to ENPV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Vocal Cord Paralysis and Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in a Patient with Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pıhtılı, Aylin; Bingol, Züleyha; Durmuş, Hacer; Parman, Yeşim; Kıyan, Esen

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a patient case with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) who presented with vocal cord paralysis (VCP). A 60-year-old man with FAP (Gly89Gln) presented with hoarseness and snoring for the previous two years. A chest X-ray demonstrated cardiomegaly and bilateral diaphragmatic elevation. The findings of a restrictive pattern on spirometry and daytime hypercapnia were consistent with respiratory muscle weakness related to neuropathy [forced expiratory volume (FEV1): 38%, forced vital capacity (FVC): 39%, FEV1/FVC: 77, partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2): 80 mmHg, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO2): 52 mmHg]. An ear-nose-throat examination showed VCP. Polysomnography revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). FAP may cause OSA by VCP and hypercapnic respiratory failure by respiratory muscle weakness. Therefore, an ear-nose-throat examination, spirometry, arterial blood gases analysis and polysomnography are important for these patients.

  7. Brain neuropeptides in central ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation in trout

    PubMed Central

    Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Conlon, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Many neuropeptides and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are present within the brain area involved in ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation but only a few mammalian studies have focused on the integrative physiological actions of neuropeptides on these vital cardio-respiratory regulations. Because both the central neuroanatomical substrates that govern motor ventilatory and cardiovascular output and the primary sequence of regulatory peptides and their receptors have been mostly conserved through evolution, we have developed a trout model to study the central action of native neuropeptides on cardio-ventilatory regulation. In the present review, we summarize the most recent results obtained using this non-mammalian model with a focus on PACAP, VIP, tachykinins, CRF, urotensin-1, CGRP, angiotensin-related peptides, urotensin-II, NPY, and PYY. We propose hypotheses regarding the physiological relevance of the results obtained. PMID:23115556

  8. Ventilatory phenotypes among four strains of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Matthew R; Forster, Hubert V; Papanek, Paula E; Dwinell, Melinda R; Hogan, Genevieve E

    2002-09-01

    Our purpose in this study was to identify different ventilatory phenotypes among four different strains of rats. We examined 114 rats from three in-house, inbred strains and one outbred strain: Brown Norway (BN; n = 26), Dahl salt-sensitive (n = 24), Fawn-hooded Hypertensive (FHH: n = 27), and outbred Sprague-Dawley rats (SD; n = 37). We measured eupneic (room air) breathing and the ventilatory responses to hypoxia (12% O(2)-88% N(2)), hypercapnia (7% CO(2)), and two levels of submaximal exercise. Primary strain differences were between BN and the other strains. BN rats had a relatively attenuated ventilatory response to CO(2) (P < 0.001), an accentuated ventilatory response to exercise (P < 0.05), and an accentuated ventilatory roll-off during hypoxia (P < 0.05). Ventilation during hypoxia was lower than other strains, but hyperventilation during hypoxia was equal to the other strains (P > 0.05), indicating that the metabolic rate during hypoxia decreased more in BN rats than in other strains. Another strain difference was in the frequency and timing components of augmented breaths, where FHH rats frequently differed from the other strains, and the BN rats had the longest expiratory time of the augmented breaths (probably secondary to the blunted CO(2) sensitivity). These strain differences not only provide insight into physiological mechanisms but also indicate traits (such as CO(2) sensitivity) that are genetically regulated. Finally, the data establish a foundation for physiological genomic studies aimed at elucidating the genetics of these ventilatory control mechanisms.

  9. Ventilatory function in workers exposed to tea and wood dust.

    PubMed

    Al Zuhair, Y S; Whitaker, C J; Cinkotai, F F

    1981-11-01

    Changes in ventilatory capacity during the work shift were studied in workers exposed to tea dust in tea-packing plants, wood dust in two furniture factories, and virtually no dust in an inoperational power station. The FEV1 and FVC in workers exposed to dust were found to decline during the work shift by a small but significant volume. The MMFR, Vmax 50% and Vmax 75% were to variable to display any trend. No dose-response relationship could be discerned between the fall in workers' ventilatory capacity and the concentrations of airborne dust or microbes to which they were exposed. Bronchodilators could reverse the fall in FEV1.

  10. Central ventilatory and cardiovascular actions of serotonin in trout.

    PubMed

    Kermorgant, Marc; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the central actions of 5-HT on ventilatory and cardiovascular variables in the unanesthetized trout. Compared to vehicle, intracerebroventricular injection (ICV) of 5-HT elevated the total ventilation. This elevation was due to its stimulatory action on ventilatory amplitude. Moreover, 5-HT produced a dose-dependent increase in mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (PDA) without change in heart rate (fH). Methysergide, a 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, reduced the hyperventilatory and hypertensive actions of 5-HT. 8-OH-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, increased PDA while α-methyl-5-HT, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist, elevated all ventilatory variables and increased PDA without changing fH. Intra-arterial injection of 5-HT was without effect on ventilation, but 5-HT initially produced hypotension followed by hypertension. These changes were accompanied by tachycardia. It remains to be determined whether endogenous 5-HT within the brain of trout may act as a potent neuroregulator causing stimulatory effects on cardio-ventilatory functions. In the periphery, 5-HT may act as local modulator involved in vasoregulatory mechanisms.

  11. Change in pulmonary mechanics and the effect on breathing pattern of high flow oxygen therapy in stable hypercapnic COPD.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Lara; Fasano, Luca; Corcione, Nadia; Comellini, Vittoria; Musti, Muriel Assunta; Brandao, Maria; Bottone, Damiano; Calderini, Edoardo; Navalesi, Paolo; Nava, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    : We studied the effects of high flow oxygen therapy (HFOT) versus non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on inspiratory effort, as assessed by measuring transdiaphragmatic pressure, breathing pattern and gas exchange. Fourteen patients with hypercapnic COPD underwent five 30-min trials: HFOT at two flow rates, both with open and closed mouth, and NIV, applied in random order. After each trial standard oxygen therapy was reinstituted for 10 min. Compared with baseline, HFOT and NIV significantly improved breathing pattern, although to different extents, and reduced inspiratory effort; however, arterial carbon dioxide oxygen tension decreased but not significantly. These results indicate a possible role for HFOT in the long-term management of patients with stable hypercapnic COPD.

  12. Ibuprofen Blunts Ventilatory Acclimatization to Sustained Hypoxia in Humans.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Kemal Erdem; Villongco, Michael; Ho, Baran; Ellis, Erika; Zarndt, Rachel; Antonova, Julie; Hopkins, Susan R; Powell, Frank L

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia is a time-dependent increase in ventilation and the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) that involves neural plasticity in both carotid body chemoreceptors and brainstem respiratory centers. The mechanisms of such plasticity are not completely understood but recent animal studies show it can be blocked by administering ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, during chronic hypoxia. We tested the hypothesis that ibuprofen would also block the increase in HVR with chronic hypoxia in humans in 15 healthy men and women using a double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial. The isocapnic HVR was measured with standard methods in subjects treated with ibuprofen (400 mg every 8 hrs) or placebo for 48 hours at sea level and 48 hours at high altitude (3,800 m). Subjects returned to sea level for at least 30 days prior to repeating the protocol with the opposite treatment. Ibuprofen significantly decreased the HVR after acclimatization to high altitude compared to placebo but it did not affect ventilation or arterial O2 saturation breathing ambient air at high altitude. Hence, compensatory responses prevent hypoventilation with decreased isocapnic ventilatory O2-sensitivity from ibuprofen at this altitude. The effect of ibuprofen to decrease the HVR in humans provides the first experimental evidence that a signaling mechanism described for ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in animal models also occurs in people. This establishes a foundation for the future experiments to test the potential role of different mechanisms for neural plasticity and ventilatory acclimatization in humans with chronic hypoxemia from lung disease.

  13. Mixed Acid-Base Disorders, Hydroelectrolyte Imbalance and Lactate Production in Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure: The Role of Noninvasive Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Terzano, Claudio; Di Stefano, Fabio; Conti, Vittoria; Di Nicola, Marta; Paone, Gregorino; Petroianni, Angelo; Ricci, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypercapnic Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) exacerbation in patients with comorbidities and multidrug therapy is complicated by mixed acid-base, hydro-electrolyte and lactate disorders. Aim of this study was to determine the relationships of these disorders with the requirement for and duration of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) when treating hypercapnic respiratory failure. Methods Sixty-seven consecutive patients who were hospitalized for hypercapnic COPD exacerbation had their clinical condition, respiratory function, blood chemistry, arterial blood gases, blood lactate and volemic state assessed. Heart and respiratory rates, pH, PaO2 and PaCO2 and blood lactate were checked at the 1st, 2nd, 6th and 24th hours after starting NIV. Results Nine patients were transferred to the intensive care unit. NIV was performed in 11/17 (64.7%) mixed respiratory acidosis–metabolic alkalosis, 10/36 (27.8%) respiratory acidosis and 3/5 (60%) mixed respiratory-metabolic acidosis patients (p = 0.026), with durations of 45.1±9.8, 36.2±8.9 and 53.3±4.1 hours, respectively (p = 0.016). The duration of ventilation was associated with higher blood lactate (p<0.001), lower pH (p = 0.016), lower serum sodium (p = 0.014) and lower chloride (p = 0.038). Hyponatremia without hypervolemic hypochloremia occurred in 11 respiratory acidosis patients. Hypovolemic hyponatremia with hypochloremia and hypokalemia occurred in 10 mixed respiratory acidosis–metabolic alkalosis patients, and euvolemic hypochloremia occurred in the other 7 patients with this mixed acid-base disorder. Conclusions Mixed acid-base and lactate disorders during hypercapnic COPD exacerbations predict the need for and longer duration of NIV. The combination of mixed acid-base disorders and hydro-electrolyte disturbances should be further investigated. PMID:22539963

  14. Effects of chronic normobaric hypoxic and hypercapnic exposure in rats: Prevention of experimental chronic mountain sickness by hypercapnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, B.; Bonkovsky, H. L.; Ou, Lo-Chang

    1987-09-01

    A syndrome of experimental chronic mountain sickness can be produced in the Hilltop strain of Sprague-Dawley rats by chronic hypobaric hypoxic exposure. This syndrome is characterized by polycythemia, plasma hemoglobinemia, pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy with eventual failure and death. It has generally been assumed that these changes are caused by chronic hypoxemia, not by hypobaric exposure per se. We have now confirmed this directly by showing that chronic normobaric hypoxic exposure (10.5% O2) produces similar hematologic and hemodynamic changes. Further, the addition of hypercapnic exposure to the hypoxic exposure blunted or prevented the effects of the hypoxic exposure probably by stimulating respiration, thus increasing the rate of oxygen delivery to the cells. Changes in the rate-controlling enzymes of hepatic heme metabolism, 5-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase, and in cytochrome(s) P-450, the major hepatic hemoprotein(s), were also measured in hypoxic and hypercapnic rats. Hypoxia decreased 5-aminolevulinate synthase and increased cytochrome(s) P-450, probably by increasing the size of a “regulatory” heme pool within hepatocytes. These changes were also prevented by the addition of hypercapnic to hypoxic exposure.

  15. Improved fMRI calibration: precisely controlled hyperoxic versus hypercapnic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mark, Clarisse I; Fisher, Joseph A; Pike, G Bruce

    2011-01-15

    The calibration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the estimation of neuronal activation-induced changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) has been achieved through hypercapnic-induced iso-metabolic increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Hypercapnia (HC) has been traditionally implemented through alterations in the fixed inspired fractional concentrations of carbon dioxide (F(I)CO(2)) without otherwise controlling end-tidal partial pressures of carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) or oxygen (P(ET)O(2)). There are several shortcomings to the use of this manual HC method that may be improved by using precise targeting of P(ET)CO(2) while maintaining iso-oxia. Similarly, precise control of blood gases can be used to induce isocapnic hyperoxia (HO) to reduce venous deoxyhaemoglobin (dHb) and thus increase BOLD signals, without appreciably altering CMRO(2) or CBF. The aim of our study was to use precise end-tidal targeting to compare the calibration of BOLD signals under an isocapnic hyperoxic protocol (HOP) (rises in P(ET)O(2) to 140, 240 and 340 mm Hg from baseline) to that of an iso-oxic hypercapnic protocol (HCP) (rises in P(ET)CO(2) of 3, 5, 7 and 9 mm Hg from baseline). Nine healthy volunteers were imaged at 3T while monitoring end-tidal gas concentrations and simultaneously measuring BOLD and CBF signals, via arterial spin labeling (ASL), during graded HCP and HOP, alternating with normocapnic states in a blocked experimental design. The variability of the calibration constant obtained under HOP (M(HOP)) was 0.3-0.5 that of the HCP one (M(HCP)). In addition, M-variances with precise gas targeting (M(HCP) and M(HOP)) were less than those reported in studies using traditional F(I)CO(2) and F(I)O(2) methods (M(HC) and M(HO), respectively). We conclude that precise controlled gas delivery markedly improves BOLD-calibration for fMRI studies of oxygen metabolism with both the HCP and the more precise HOP-alternative.

  16. Periodic cardiovascular and ventilatory activity during midazolam sedation.

    PubMed

    Galletly, D C; Williams, T B; Robinson, B J

    1996-04-01

    We have examined the effects of sedation with midazolam 0.1 mg kg-1 and reversal with flumazenil 0.5 mg on beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) variability (HRV), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), finger photoplethysmograph amplitude (PLA) and impedence pneumography in eight volunteers. With the onset of sedation there was a small decrease in SAP and increase in HR (ns). Spectral analysis of the HR time series showed reductions in the proportion of power in the high (> 0.15 Hz) frequency "ventilatory" band consistent with midazolam causing vagolysis. During sedation, low frequency (< 0.05 Hz) oscillations of PLA, HR, SAP and ventilation were observed. These were thought to be secondary to activity of coupled cardiorespiratory neurones within the brain stem and the ventilatory periodicity appeared similar to that observed during the early stages of sleep. The diminished high frequency and increased low frequency oscillations induced by midazolam sedation were reversed by administration of flumazenil.

  17. Ventilatory control in infants, children, and adults with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bates, Melissa L; Pillers, De-Ann M; Palta, Mari; Farrell, Emily T; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2013-11-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), or chronic lung disease of prematurity, occurs in ~30% of preterm infants (15,000 per year) and is associated with a clinical history of mechanical ventilation and/or high inspired oxygen at birth. Here, we describe changes in ventilatory control that exist in patients with BPD, including alterations in chemoreceptor function, respiratory muscle function, and suprapontine control. Because dysfunction in ventilatory control frequently revealed when O2 supply and CO2 elimination are challenged, we provide this information in the context of four important metabolic stressors: stresses: exercise, sleep, hypoxia, and lung disease, with a primary focus on studies of human infants, children, and adults. As a secondary goal, we also identify three key areas of future research and describe the benefits and challenges of longitudinal human studies using well-defined patient cohorts.

  18. S-nitrosothiols signal the ventilatory response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lipton, A J; Johnson, M A; Macdonald, T; Lieberman, M W; Gozal, D; Gaston, B

    2001-09-13

    Increased ventilation in response to hypoxia has been appreciated for over a century, but the biochemistry underlying this response remains poorly understood. Here we define a pathway in which increased minute ventilation (&Vdot;E ) is signalled by deoxyhaemoglobin-derived S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). Specifically, we demonstrate that S-nitrosocysteinyl glycine (CGSNO) and S-nitroso-l-cysteine (l-CSNO)-but not S-nitroso-d-cysteine (d-CSNO)-reproduce the ventilatory effects of hypoxia at the level of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). We show that plasma from deoxygenated, but not from oxygenated, blood produces the ventilatory effect of both SNOs and hypoxia. Further, this activity is mediated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and GSNO activation by gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) is required. The normal response to hypoxia is impaired in a knockout mouse lacking gamma-GT. These observations suggest that S-nitrosothiol biochemistry is of central importance to the regulation of breathing.

  19. Ventilatory responses to dynamic exercise elicited by intramuscular sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Gallagher, K. M.; Norton, K. H.; Querry, R. G.; Welch-O'Connor, R. M.; Raven, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Eight subjects, aged 27.0+/-1.6 yr, performed incremental workload cycling to investigate the contribution of skeletal muscle mechano- and metaboreceptors to ventilatory control during dynamic exercise. METHODS: Each subject performed four bouts of exercise: exercise with no intervention (CON); exercise with bilateral thigh cuffs inflated to 90 mm Hg (CUFF); exercise with application of lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) to 45 torr (PP); and exercise with 90 mm Hg thigh cuff inflation and 45 torr LBPP (CUFF+PP). Ventilatory responses and pulmonary gas exchange variables were collected breath-by-breath with concomitant measurement of leg intramuscular pressure. RESULTS: Ventilation (VE) was significantly elevated from CON during PP and CUFF+PP at workloads corresponding to > or = 60% CON peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and during CUFF at workloads > or = 80% CON VO2peak, P < 0.05. The VO2 at which ventilatory threshold occurred was significantly reduced from CON (2.17+/-0.28 L x min(-1)) to 1.60+/-0.19 L x min(-1), 1.45+/-0.15 L x min(-1), and 1.15+/-0.11 L x min(-1) during CUFF, PP, and CUFF+PP, respectively. The slope of the linear regression describing the VE/CO2 output relationship was increased from CON by approximately 22% during CUFF, 40% during PP, and 41% during CUFF+PP. CONCLUSIONS: As intramuscular pressure was significantly elevated immediately upon application of LBPP during PP and CUFF+PP without a concomitant increase in VE, it seems unlikely that LBPP-induced increases in VE can be attributed to activation of the mechanoreflex. These findings suggest that LBPP-induced reductions in perfusion pressure and decreases in venous outflow resulting from inflation of bilateral thigh cuffs may generate a metabolite sensitive intramuscular ventilatory stimulus.

  20. Expiratory abdominal muscle activity during ventilatory chemostimulation in piglets.

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; O'Day, T L; Brozanski, B S; Guthrie, R D

    1990-04-01

    We examined abdominal muscle minute electromyographic (EMG) activity (peak moving time average EMG x respiratory rate) during eupnea, hyperoxic hypercapnia (8% CO2-40% O2-balance N2), and hypoxia (13% O2) in 12 anesthetized (0.5% halothane) newborn piglets. In addition, we assessed the role of vagal afferent pathways in the abdominal muscles' response to ventilatory chemostimulation by examining abdominal EMG activity (EMGab) before and after bilateral cervical vagotomy in five animals. Phasic expiratory EMGab was observed in 11 of 12 piglets during eupnea. Hypercapnia was associated with a sustained augmentation of minute EMGab (444 +/- 208% control). In contrast, hypoxia consistently augmented (1 min, 193 +/- 33% control) then diminished (5 min, 126 +/- 39% control) minute EMGab. Vagotomy resulted in a decline in peak moving time average EMGab by approximately one-half (48 +/- 18% control); the abdominal muscles' response to ventilatory chemostimulation, however, was qualitatively unchanged. We conclude that 1) expiration during eupnea in anesthetized newborn piglets is associated with phasic EMGab; 2) both hypercapnia and hypoxia augment minute EMGab; however, only hypercapnia is associated with sustained augmentation; and 3) although vagal afferents have a role in modulating the base-line level of EMGab, other extravagal mechanisms appear to determine the pattern of EMGab in response to ventilatory chemostimulation.

  1. Ventilatory, hemodynamic, sympathetic nervous system, and vascular reactivity changes after recurrent nocturnal sustained hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Geoffrey S; Tamisier, Renaud; Curley, Matthew; Weiss, J Woodrow

    2008-08-01

    Recurrent and intermittent nocturnal hypoxia is characteristic of several diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, obesity-hypoventilation syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea. The contribution of hypoxia to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these disease states is unclear, however. To investigate the impact of recurrent nocturnal hypoxia on hemodynamics, sympathetic activity, and vascular tone we evaluated 10 normal volunteers before and after 14 nights of nocturnal sustained hypoxia (mean oxygen saturation 84.2%, 9 h/night). Over the exposure, subjects exhibited ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia as evidenced by an increase in resting ventilation (arterial Pco(2) 41.8 +/- 1.5 vs. 37.5 +/- 1.3 mmHg, mean +/- SD; P < 0.05) and in the isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory response (slope 0.49 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.32 +/- 0.2 l/min per 1% fall in saturation; P < 0.05). Subjects exhibited a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (86.7 +/- 6.1 vs. 90.5 +/- 7.6 mmHg; P < 0.001), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (20.8 +/- 2.8 vs. 28.2 +/- 3.3 bursts/min; P < 0.01), and forearm vascular resistance (39.6 +/- 3.5 vs. 47.5 +/- 4.8 mmHg.ml(-1).100 g tissue.min; P < 0.05). Forearm blood flow during acute isocapnic hypoxia was increased after exposure but during selective brachial intra-arterial vascular infusion of the alpha-blocker phentolamine it was unchanged after exposure. Finally, there was a decrease in reactive hyperemia to 15 min of forearm ischemia after the hypoxic exposure. Recurrent nocturnal hypoxia thus increases sympathetic activity and alters peripheral vascular tone. These changes may contribute to the increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk associated with clinical diseases that are associated with chronic recurrent hypoxia.

  2. Identification of Drosophila Zfh2 as a mediator of hypercapnic immune regulation by a genome-wide RNAi screen

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jae; Hu, Jennifer A.; Krupinski, Thomas; Casalino-Matsuda, S. Marina; Sporn, Peter H. S.; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Beitel, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnia, elevated partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in blood and tissue, develops in many patients with chronic severe obstructive pulmonary disease and other advanced lung disorders. Patients with advanced disease frequently develop bacterial lung infections, and hypercapnia is a risk factor for mortality in such individuals. We previously demonstrated that hypercapnia suppresses induction of NF-κB-regulated innate immune response genes required for host defense in human, mouse and Drosophila cells, and increases mortality from bacterial infections in both mice and Drosophila. However, the molecular mediator(s) of hypercapnic immune suppression are undefined. Here, we report a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila S2* cells stimulated with bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN). The screen identified 16 genes with human orthologs whose knockdown reduced hypercapnic suppression of the gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide (AMPs) Diptericin (Dipt), but did not increase Dipt mRNA levels in air. In vivo tests of one of the strongest screen hits, Zfh2 (mammalian orthologs ZFHX3/ATBF1 and ZFHX4), demonstrate that reducing zfh2 function using a mutation or RNAi improves survival of flies exposed to elevated CO2 and infected with S. aureus. Tissue-specific knockdown of zfh2 in the fat body, the major immune and metabolic organ of the fly, mitigates hypercapnia-induced reductions in Dipt and other AMPs and improves resistance of CO2-exposed flies to infection. Zfh2 mutations also partially rescue hypercapnia-induced delays in egg hatching, suggesting that Zfh2's role in mediating responses to hypercapnia extends beyond the immune system. Together, these results identify Zfh2 as the first in vivo mediator of hypercapnic immune suppression. PMID:26643480

  3. Measurement of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF): An optimized BOLD signal model for use with hypercapnic and hyperoxic calibration.

    PubMed

    Merola, Alberto; Murphy, Kevin; Stone, Alan J; Germuska, Michael A; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Blockley, Nicholas P; Buxton, Richard B; Wise, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    Several techniques have been proposed to estimate relative changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) by exploiting combined BOLD fMRI and cerebral blood flow data in conjunction with hypercapnic or hyperoxic respiratory challenges. More recently, methods based on respiratory challenges that include both hypercapnia and hyperoxia have been developed to assess absolute CMRO2, an important parameter for understanding brain energetics. In this paper, we empirically optimize a previously presented "original calibration model" relating BOLD and blood flow signals specifically for the estimation of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and absolute CMRO2. To do so, we have created a set of synthetic BOLD signals using a detailed BOLD signal model to reproduce experiments incorporating hypercapnic and hyperoxic respiratory challenges at 3T. A wide range of physiological conditions was simulated by varying input parameter values (baseline cerebral blood volume (CBV0), baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF0), baseline oxygen extraction fraction (OEF0) and hematocrit (Hct)). From the optimization of the calibration model for estimation of OEF and practical considerations of hypercapnic and hyperoxic respiratory challenges, a new "simplified calibration model" is established which reduces the complexity of the original calibration model by substituting the standard parameters α and β with a single parameter θ. The optimal value of θ is determined (θ=0.06) across a range of experimental respiratory challenges. The simplified calibration model gives estimates of OEF0 and absolute CMRO2 closer to the true values used to simulate the experimental data compared to those estimated using the original model incorporating literature values of α and β. Finally, an error propagation analysis demonstrates the susceptibility of the original and simplified calibration models to measurement errors and potential violations in the underlying assumptions of isometabolism

  4. Upper airway CO2 receptors in tegu lizards: localization and ventilatory sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Coates, E L; Ballam, G O

    1987-01-01

    1. Tidal volume, end-tidal CO2, and ventilatory frequency in Tupinambis nigropunctatus were measured in response to CO2 (1-4%) delivered to either the mouth or nares. Additionally, the sensitivity of the ventilatory response to nasal CO2 was evaluated at CO2 concentrations less than 1%. The ventilatory parameters were also measured in response to CO2 (1-4%) delivered to the nares after the olfactory peduncle was transected. 2. It was found that (0.4-4%) nasal CO2 depressed ventilatory frequency by 9% to 83% respectively, while tidal volume was not significantly altered. CO2 (1-4%) delivered to the mouth produced no apparent changes in any of the ventilatory parameters. Following transection of the olfactory peduncle, nasal CO2 was ineffective in producing any change in ventilatory frequency or depth. 3. These findings indicate that CO2-sensitive receptors are located in either the nasal or vomeronasal membranes of tegu lizards and that the olfactory peduncle must be intact for these receptors to affect ventilatory changes in response to elevated CO2 concentrations. The receptors are capable of mediating a ventilatory response to CO2 concentrations lower than those found in either expired air or in confined spaces such as occupied burrows. 4. The discrepancies in the ventilatory responses of lizards and snakes to inspired CO2 reported in past experiments may be partially explained by the presence of nasal or vomeronasal CO2-sensitive receptors.

  5. STUDY OF RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS AND VENTILATORY CAPACITIES AMONG ROPE WORKERS

    PubMed Central

    Munt, D. F.; Gauvain, Suzette; Walford, Joan; Schilling, R. S. F.

    1965-01-01

    In a rope works handling manila, sisal, and St. Helena hemps, the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and the change in forced expiratory volume (F.E.V.1·0) during the work shift were studied in a group of 41 women and 41 men who represented 93% of the population at risk. Dust concentrations, measured with a modified Hexhlet, ranged from 0·11 to 4·51 mg./m.3 for total dust and 0·02 to 1·46 mg./m.3 for fine dust. The highest concentrations were found in the preparing rooms, in which the workers, all of whom were women, showed on the average a fall in ventilatory capacity during the shift. The workers in the rope walk, all of whom were men, showed a rise in ventilatory capacity during the shift. The difference between the men and women was statistically significant (p < 0·05). No worker gave a characteristic history of byssinosis, although nine women complained of chest tightness associated with their work. Undue breathlessness on exertion and persistent cough and phlegm were also more common among the women, but they were on the average 18 years older than the men. When the ventilatory capacities and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms of women rope workers were compared with those of a group of women employed elsewhere in the dockyard, the only significant difference was that the rope workers had more chest tightness associated with their work (p < 0·02). Exposure of volunteers to St. Helena hemp, which is apparently the most likely of the hard hemps to give rise to respiratory symptoms, caused only a slight fall in ventilatory capacity and a small rise in airways resistance. A sample of St. Helena hemp assayed on guinea-pig ileum had only a relatively small degree of contractor activity. The evidence suggests that the dusts of hard hemps do not cause byssinosis under the conditions in this factory. However, the irritant nature of the dust indicates the need to prevent total dust levels exceeding about 2 mg./m.3. Images

  6. Impaired ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in female mice overexpressing erythropoietin: unexpected deleterious effect of estradiol in carotid bodies.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Pfistner, Christine; Doan, Van Diep; Vogel, Johannes; Soliz, Jorge

    2010-12-01

    Apart from enhancing the production of red blood cells, erythropoietin (Epo) alters the ventilatory response when oxygen supply is reduced. We recently demonstrated that Epo's beneficial effect on the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia is sex dependent, with female mice being better able to cope with reduced oxygenation. In the present work, we hypothesized that ventilatory acclimatization to chronic hypoxia (VAH) in transgenic female mice (Tg6) harboring high levels of Epo in the brain and blood will also be improved compared with wild-type (WT) animals. Surprisingly, VAH was blunted in Tg6 female mice. To define whether this phenomenon had a central (brain stem respiratory centers) and/or peripheral (carotid bodies) origin, a bilateral transection of carotid sinus nerve (chemodenervation) was performed. This procedure allowed the analysis of the central response in the absence of carotid body information. Interestingly, chemodenervation restored the VAH in Tg6 mice, suggesting that carotid bodies were responsible for the blunted response. Coherently with this observation, the sensitivity to oxygen alteration in arterial blood (Dejour test) after chronic hypoxia was lower in transgenic carotid bodies compared with the WT control. As blunted VAH occurred in female but not male transgenic mice, the involvement of sex female steroids was obvious. Indeed, measurement of sexual female hormones revealed that the estradiol serum level was 4 times higher in transgenic mice Tg6 than in WT animals. While ovariectomy decreased VAH in WT females, this treatment restored VAH in Tg6 female mice. In line with this observation, injections of estradiol in ovariectomized Tg6 females dramatically reduced the VAH. We concluded that during chronic hypoxia, estradiol in carotid bodies suppresses the Epo-mediated elevation of ventilation. Considering the increased application of recombinant Epo for a variety of disorders, our data imply the need to take the patient's hormonal status

  7. Human diaphragm efficiency estimated as power output relative to activation increases with hypercapnic hyperpnea.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Kevin E; Singh, Bhajan

    2009-11-01

    Hyperpnea with exercise or hypercapnia causes phasic contraction of abdominal muscles, potentially lengthening the diaphragm at end expiration and unloading it during inspiration. Muscle efficiency in vitro varies with load, fiber length, and precontraction stretch. To examine whether these properties of muscle contractility determine diaphragm efficiency (Eff(di)) in vivo, we measured Eff(di) in six healthy adults breathing air and during progressive hypercapnia at three levels of end-tidal Pco(2) with mean values of 48 (SD 2), 55 (SD 2), and 61 (SD 1) Torr. Eff(di) was estimated as the ratio of diaphragm power (Wdi) [the product of mean inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure, diaphragm volume change (DeltaVdi) measured fluoroscopically, and 1/inspiratory duration (Ti(-1))] to activation [root mean square values of inspiratory diaphragm electromyogram (RMS(di)) measured from esophageal electrodes]. At maximum hypercapnea relative to breathing air, 1) gastric pressure and diaphragm length at end expiration (Pg(ee) and Ldi(ee), respectively) increased 1.4 (SD 0.2) and 1.13 (SD 0.08) times, (P < 0.01 for both); 2) inspiratory change (Delta) in Pg decreased from 4.5 (SD 2.2) to -7.7 (SD 3.8) cmH(2)O (P < 0.001); 3) DeltaVdi.Ti(-1), Wdi, RMS(di), and Eff(di) increased 2.7 (SD 0.6), 4.9 (SD 1.8), 2.6 (SD 0.9), and 1.8 (SD 0.3) times, respectively (P < 0.01 for all); and 4) net and inspiratory Wdi were not different (P = 0.4). Eff(di) was predicted from Ldi(ee) (P < 0.001), Pg(ee) (P < 0.001), DeltaPg.Ti(-1) (P = 0.03), and DeltaPg (P = 0.04) (r(2) = 0.52) (multivariate regression analysis). We conclude that, with hypercapnic hyperpnea, 1) approximately 47% of the maximum increase of Wdi was attributable to increased Eff(di); 2) Eff(di) increased due to preinspiratory lengthening and inspiratory unloading of the diaphragm, consistent with muscle behavior in vitro; 3) passive recoil of the diaphragm did not contribute to inspiratory Wdi or Eff(di); and 4) phasic

  8. HIF-1 and ventilatory acclimatization to chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Frank L.; Fu, Zhenxing

    2008-01-01

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) is a time-dependent increase in ventilation and ventilatory O2-sensitivity that involves plasticity in carotid body chemoreceptors and CNS respiratory centers. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) controls the expression of several genes that increase physiological O2 supply. Studies using transgenic mice show HIF-1α expression in the carotid bodies and CNS with chronic sustained and intermittent hypoxia is important for VAH. Other O2-sensitive transcription factors such as HIF-2α may be important for VAH by reducing metabolic O2 demands also. Specific gene targets of HIF-1α shown to be involved in VAH include erythropoietin, endothelin-1, neuronal nitric oxide synthase and tyrosine hydroxylase. Other HIF-1α targets that may be involved in VAH include vascular endothelial growth factor, heme oxygenase 1 and cytoglobin. Interactions between these multiple pathways and feedback control of HIF-1α expression from some of the targets support a complex and powerful role for HIF-1α in neural plasticity of physiological control circuits with chronic hypoxia. PMID:18708172

  9. HIF-1 and ventilatory acclimatization to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Powell, Frank L; Fu, Zhenxing

    2008-12-10

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) is a time-dependent increase in ventilation and ventilatory O2-sensitivity that involves plasticity in carotid body chemoreceptors and CNS respiratory centers. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) controls the expression of several genes that increase physiological O2 supply. Studies using transgenic mice show HIF-1alpha expression in the carotid bodies and CNS with chronic sustained and intermittent hypoxia is important for VAH. Other O2-sensitive transcription factors such as HIF-2alpha may be important for VAH by reducing metabolic O2 demands also. Specific gene targets of HIF-1alpha shown to be involved in VAH include erythropoietin, endothelin-1, neuronal nitric oxide synthase and tyrosine hydroxylase. Other HIF-1alpha targets that may be involved in VAH include vascular endothelial growth factor, heme oxygenase 1 and cytoglobin. Interactions between these multiple pathways and feedback control of HIF-1alpha expression from some of the targets support a complex and powerful role for HIF-1alpha in neural plasticity of physiological control circuits with chronic hypoxia.

  10. Origin of the unique ventilatory apparatus of turtles.

    PubMed

    Lyson, Tyler R; Schachner, Emma R; Botha-Brink, Jennifer; Scheyer, Torsten M; Lambertz, Markus; Bever, G S; Rubidge, Bruce S; de Queiroz, Kevin

    2014-11-07

    The turtle body plan differs markedly from that of other vertebrates and serves as a model system for studying structural and developmental evolution. Incorporation of the ribs into the turtle shell negates the costal movements that effect lung ventilation in other air-breathing amniotes. Instead, turtles have a unique abdominal-muscle-based ventilatory apparatus whose evolutionary origins have remained mysterious. Here we show through broadly comparative anatomical and histological analyses that an early member of the turtle stem lineage has several turtle-specific ventilation characters: rigid ribcage, inferred loss of intercostal muscles and osteological correlates of the primary expiratory muscle. Our results suggest that the ventilation mechanism of turtles evolved through a division of labour between the ribs and muscles of the trunk in which the abdominal muscles took on the primary ventilatory function, whereas the broadened ribs became the primary means of stabilizing the trunk. These changes occurred approximately 50 million years before the evolution of the fully ossified shell.

  11. Ventilatory support in critically ill hematology patients with respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hematology patients admitted to the ICU frequently experience respiratory failure and require mechanical ventilation. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) may decrease the risk of intubation, but NIMV failure poses its own risks. Methods To establish the impact of ventilatory management and NIMV failure on outcome, data from a prospective, multicenter, observational study were analyzed. All hematology patients admitted to one of the 34 participating ICUs in a 17-month period were followed up. Data on demographics, diagnosis, severity, organ failure, and supportive therapies were recorded. A logistic regression analysis was done to evaluate the risk factors associated with death and NIVM failure. Results Of 450 patients, 300 required ventilatory support. A diagnosis of congestive heart failure and the initial use of NIMV significantly improved survival, whereas APACHE II score, allogeneic transplantation, and NIMV failure increased the risk of death. The risk factors associated with NIMV success were age, congestive heart failure, and bacteremia. Patients with NIMV failure experienced a more severe respiratory impairment than did those electively intubated. Conclusions NIMV improves the outcome of hematology patients with respiratory insufficiency, but NIMV failure may have the opposite effect. A careful selection of patients with rapidly reversible causes of respiratory failure may increase NIMV success. PMID:22827955

  12. High pressure versus high intensity noninvasive ventilation in stable hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick B; Brignall, Kate; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I; Davidson, A Craig; Hart, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Background High-intensity (high-pressure and high backup rate) noninvasive ventilation has recently been advocated for the management of stable hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relative contributions of high inspiratory pressure and high backup rate to ventilator adherence and physiological outcome have not been investigated. Methods Patients with stable hypercapnic COPD (daytime PaCO2 > 6 kPa) and nocturnal hypoventilation were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to high-pressure and high backup rate (high-intensity) and high-pressure and low backup rate (high-pressure) for a 6-week period. At the end of the first treatment period, patients were switched to the alternative treatment. The primary outcome measure was mean nightly ventilator usage. Results Twelve patients were recruited, with seven completing the 12-week trial protocol. The mean patient age was 71 ± 8 years, with a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) of 50% ± 13% and FEV1 of 32% ± 12%. The baseline PaCO2 and PaO2 were 8.6 ± 1.7 kPa and 7.3 ± 1.4 kPa, respectively. There was no significant difference demonstrated in mean nightly ventilator usage between the high-intensity and high-pressure groups (difference of 4 minutes; 95% confidence interval −45 to 53; P = 0.9). Furthermore, there were no differences in any of the secondary endpoints, with the exception of the respiratory domain of the Severe Respiratory Insufficiency questionnaire, which was lower in the high-intensity arm than in the high-pressure arm (57 ± 11 versus 69 ± 16; P < 0.05). Conclusion There was no additional benefit, in terms of night-time ventilator adherence or any of the other measured parameters, demonstrated by addition of a high backup rate to high-pressure noninvasive ventilation. These data suggest that it is the high-pressure component of the high-intensity noninvasive ventilation approach that plays the important therapeutic role in

  13. Chronic nicotine and ethanol exposure both disrupt central ventilatory responses to hypoxia in bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barbara E; Brundage, Cord M; McLane, Lisa H

    2013-07-01

    The central hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) comprises a reduction in ventilatory activity that follows a peripherally mediated ventilatory augmentation. Chronic early developmental exposure to nicotine or ethanol are both known to impair the peripherally mediated HVR, and nicotine impairs the central HVR, but the effect of ethanol on the central HVR has not been investigated. Additionally, chronic nicotine and ethanol exposure are known to impair ventilatory responses to hypercapnia in bullfrog tadpoles but HVRs have not been tested. Here early and late metamorphic tadpoles were exposed to either 30 μg/L nicotine or 0.15-0.05 g/dL ethanol for 10 wk. Tadpole brainstems were then isolated and the neurocorrelates of ventilation were monitored in vitro over 180 min of hypoxia (PO2=5.05±1.04 kPa). Both nicotine and ethanol exposure disrupted central HVRs. Nicotine impairments were dependent on development. Central HVRs were impaired only in early metamorphic nicotine-exposed tadpoles. Both early and late metamorphic ethanol-exposed tadpoles failed to exhibit central HVRs. Thus, central HVRs are impaired following both nicotine and ethanol exposure. Such failure to decrease ventilatory activity during hypoxia indicates that central hypoxic ventilatory depression is an active suppression of neural activity in response to hypoxia rather than a metabolic consequence of O2 limitation, and that exposure to ethanol (across development) or nicotine (during early development) disrupts mechanisms that normally induce active ventilatory depression.

  14. Protein kinase C modulates ventilatory patterning in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Bandla, H P; Simakajornboon, N; Graff, G R; Gozal, D

    1999-03-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) mediates important components of signal transduction pathways underlying neuronal excitability and modulates respiratory timing mechanisms in adult rats. To determine ventilatory effects of systemic PKC inhibition during development, whole-body plethysmographic recordings were conducted in 2-3-d (n = 11), 5-6-d (n = 19), 10-12-d (n = 14), and 20-21-d-old (n = 14) rat pups after treatment with vehicle and Ro 32-0432 (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Ro 32-0432 decreased minute ventilation (V E) by 51.0 +/- 5.5% (mean +/- SEM) in youngest pups (p < 0.01) but only 19.1 +/- 6.8% in 20-21-d-old pups (p < 0.01). V E decreases were always due to frequency reductions with tidal volume (VT) remaining unaffected. Respiratory rate decreases primarily resulted from marked expiratory time (TE) prolongations being more pronounced in 2-3-d-old (115.5 +/- 28.9%) compared with 20-21-d old (36.6 +/- 10.9%; p < 0.002 analysis of variance [ANOVA] ). Expression of the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, gamma, delta, iota, and mu was further examined in brainstem and cortex by immunoblotting and revealed different patterns with postnatal age and location. We conclude that endogenous PKC inhibition elicits age-dependent ventilatory reductions which primarily affect timing mechanisms rather than changes in volume drive. This effect on ventilation abates with increasing postnatal age suggesting that the neural substrate mediating overall respiratory output may be more critically dependent on PKC activity in the immature animal.

  15. Ventilatory responses to carbon dioxide at low and high levels of oxygen are elevated after episodic hypoxia in men compared with women.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Chris; Badr, M Safwan; Mateika, Jason H

    2004-11-01

    We hypothesized that the acute ventilatory response to carbon dioxide in the presence of low and high levels of oxygen would increase to a greater extent in men compared with women after exposure to episodic hypoxia. Eleven healthy men and women of similar race, age, and body mass index completed a series of rebreathing trials before and after exposure to eight 4-min episodes of hypoxia. During the rebreathing trials, subjects initially hyperventilated to reduce the end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PetCO2) below 25 Torr. Subjects then rebreathed from a bag containing a normocapnic (42 Torr), low (50 Torr), or high oxygen gas mixture (150 Torr). During the trials, PetCO2 increased while the selected level of oxygen was maintained. The point at which minute ventilation began to rise in a linear fashion as PetCO2 increased was considered to be the carbon dioxide set point. The ventilatory response below and above this point was determined. The results showed that the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide above the set point was increased in men compared with women before exposure to episodic hypoxia, independent of the oxygen level that was maintained during the rebreathing trials (50 Torr: men, 5.19 +/- 0.82 vs. women, 4.70 +/- 0.77 l x min(-1) x Torr(-1); 150 Torr: men, 4.33 +/- 1.15 vs. women, 3.21 +/- 0.58 l x min(-1) x Torr(-1)). Moreover, relative to baseline measures, the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide in the presence of low and high oxygen levels increased to a greater extent in men compared with women after exposure to episodic hypoxia (50 Torr: men, 9.52 +/- 1.40 vs. women, 5.97 +/- 0.71 l x min(-1) x Torr(-1); 150 Torr: men, 5.73 +/- 0.81 vs. women, 3.83 +/- 0.56 l x min(-1) x Torr(-1)). Thus we conclude that enhancement of the acute ventilatory response to carbon dioxide after episodic hypoxia is sex dependent.

  16. Glutamate receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in rat

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Carr, J Austin; Go, Ariel; Fu, Zhenxing; Reid, Stephen G; Powell, Frank L

    2014-01-01

    When exposed to a hypoxic environment the body's first response is a reflex increase in ventilation, termed the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). With chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH), such as during acclimatization to high altitude, an additional time-dependent increase in ventilation occurs, which increases the HVR. This secondary increase persists after exposure to CSH and involves plasticity within the circuits in the central nervous system that control breathing. Currently these mechanisms of HVR plasticity are unknown and we hypothesized that they involve glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), where afferent endings from arterial chemoreceptors terminate. To test this, we treated rats held in normoxia (CON) or 10% O2 (CSH) for 7 days and measured ventilation in conscious, unrestrained animals before and after microinjecting glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists into the NTS. In normoxia, AMPA increased ventilation 25% and 50% in CON and CSH, respectively, while NMDA doubled ventilation in both groups (P < 0.05). Specific AMPA and NMDA receptor antagonists (NBQX and MK801, respectively) abolished these effects. MK801 significantly decreased the HVR in CON rats, and completely blocked the acute HVR in CSH rats but had no effect on ventilation in normoxia. NBQX decreased ventilation whenever it was increased relative to normoxic controls; i.e. acute hypoxia in CON and CSH, and normoxia in CSH. These results support our hypothesis that glutamate receptors in the NTS contribute to plasticity in the HVR with CSH. The mechanism underlying this synaptic plasticity is probably glutamate receptor modification, as in CSH rats the expression of phosphorylated NR1 and GluR1 proteins in the NTS increased 35% and 70%, respectively, relative to that in CON rats. PMID:24492841

  17. Glutamate receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in rat.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Carr, J Austin; Go, Ariel; Fu, Zhenxing; Reid, Stephen G; Powell, Frank L

    2014-04-15

    When exposed to a hypoxic environment the body's first response is a reflex increase in ventilation, termed the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). With chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH), such as during acclimatization to high altitude, an additional time-dependent increase in ventilation occurs, which increases the HVR. This secondary increase persists after exposure to CSH and involves plasticity within the circuits in the central nervous system that control breathing. Currently these mechanisms of HVR plasticity are unknown and we hypothesized that they involve glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), where afferent endings from arterial chemoreceptors terminate. To test this, we treated rats held in normoxia (CON) or 10% O2 (CSH) for 7 days and measured ventilation in conscious, unrestrained animals before and after microinjecting glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists into the NTS. In normoxia, AMPA increased ventilation 25% and 50% in CON and CSH, respectively, while NMDA doubled ventilation in both groups (P < 0.05). Specific AMPA and NMDA receptor antagonists (NBQX and MK801, respectively) abolished these effects. MK801 significantly decreased the HVR in CON rats, and completely blocked the acute HVR in CSH rats but had no effect on ventilation in normoxia. NBQX decreased ventilation whenever it was increased relative to normoxic controls; i.e. acute hypoxia in CON and CSH, and normoxia in CSH. These results support our hypothesis that glutamate receptors in the NTS contribute to plasticity in the HVR with CSH. The mechanism underlying this synaptic plasticity is probably glutamate receptor modification, as in CSH rats the expression of phosphorylated NR1 and GluR1 proteins in the NTS increased 35% and 70%, respectively, relative to that in CON rats.

  18. Ventilatory Threshold, Running Economy and Distance Running Performance of Trained Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Scott K.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to identify physiological factors that account for success in distance running, researchers evaluated relationships among ventilatory threshold, running economy, and distance running performance. Subjects were trained male runners with similar maximal aerobic power. (Authors/PP)

  19. Clinical outcomes of patients requiring ventilatory support in Brazilian intensive care units: a multicenter, prospective, cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Contemporary information on mechanical ventilation (MV) use in emerging countries is limited. Moreover, most epidemiological studies on ventilatory support were carried out before significant developments, such as lung protective ventilation or broader application of non-invasive ventilation (NIV). We aimed to evaluate the clinical characteristics, outcomes and risk factors for hospital mortality and failure of NIV in patients requiring ventilatory support in Brazilian intensive care units (ICU). Methods In a multicenter, prospective, cohort study, a total of 773 adult patients admitted to 45 ICUs over a two-month period requiring invasive ventilation or NIV for more than 24 hours were evaluated. Causes of ventilatory support, prior chronic health status and physiological data were assessed. Multivariate analysis was used to identifiy variables associated with hospital mortality and NIV failure. Results Invasive MV and NIV were used as initial ventilatory support in 622 (80%) and 151 (20%) patients. Failure with subsequent intubation occurred in 54% of NIV patients. The main reasons for ventilatory support were pneumonia (27%), neurologic disorders (19%) and non-pulmonary sepsis (12%). ICU and hospital mortality rates were 34% and 42%. Using the Berlin definition, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was diagnosed in 31% of the patients with a hospital mortality of 52%. In the multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio (OR), 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.03), comorbidities (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.28 to 3.17), associated organ failures (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.20), moderate (OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.10 to 3.35) to severe ARDS (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 4.41), cumulative fluid balance over the first 72 h of ICU (OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.39 to 4.28), higher lactate (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.50), invasive MV (OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.32 to 5.39) and NIV failure (OR, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.74 to 8.99) were independently associated with hospital mortality

  20. Increased ventilatory response to carbon dioxide in COPD patients following vitamin C administration

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Sara E.; Kissel, Christine K.; Szabo, Lian; Walker, Brandie L.; Leigh, Richard; Anderson, Todd J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have decreased ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses to hypercapnia. Antioxidants increase the ventilatory response to hypercapnia in healthy humans. Cerebral blood flow is an important determinant of carbon dioxide/hydrogen ion concentration at the central chemoreceptors and may be affected by antioxidants. It is unknown whether antioxidants can improve the ventilatory and cerebral blood flow response in individuals in whom these are diminished. Thus, we aimed to determine the effect of vitamin C administration on the ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses to hypercapnia during healthy ageing and in COPD. Using transcranial Doppler ultrasound, we measured the ventilatory and cerebral blood flow responses to hyperoxic hypercapnia before and after an intravenous vitamin C infusion in healthy young (Younger) and older (Older) subjects and in moderate COPD. Vitamin C increased the ventilatory response in COPD patients (mean (95% CI) 1.1 (0.9–1.1) versus 1.5 (1.1–2.0) L·min−1·mmHg−1, p<0.05) but not in Younger (2.5 (1.9–3.1) versus 2.4 (1.9–2.9) L·min−1·mmHg−1, p>0.05) or Older (1.3 (1.0–1.7) versus 1.3 (1.0–1.7) L·min−1·mmHg−1, p>0.05) healthy subjects. Vitamin C did not affect the cerebral blood flow response in the young or older healthy subjects or COPD subjects (p>0.05). Vitamin C increases the ventilatory but not cerebrovascular response to hyperoxic hypercapnia in patients with moderate COPD. PMID:27730137

  1. Intertidal pool fish Girella laevifrons (Kyphosidae) shown strong physiological homeostasis but shy personality: The cost of living in hypercapnic habitats.

    PubMed

    Benítez, S; Duarte, C; Opitz, T; Lagos, N A; Pulgar, J M; Vargas, C A; Lardies, M A

    2017-02-16

    Tide pools habitats are naturally exposed to a high degree of environmental variability. The consequences of living in these extreme habitats are not well established. In particular, little it is known about of the effects of hypercanic seawater (i.e. high pCO2 levels) on marine vertebrates such as intertidal pool fish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increased pCO2 on the physiology and behavior in juveniles of the intertidal pool fish Girella laevifrons. Two nominal pCO2 concentrations (400 and 1600μatm) were used. We found that exposure to hypercapnic conditions did not affect oxygen consumption and absorption efficiency. However, the lateralization and boldness behavior was significantly disrupted in high pCO2 conditions. In general, a predator-risk cost of boldness is assumed, thus the increased occurrence of shy personality in juvenile fishes may result in a change in the balance of this biological interaction, with significant ecological consequences.

  2. Indication of BOLD-specific venous flow-volume changes from precisely controlled hyperoxic vs. hypercapnic calibration.

    PubMed

    Mark, Clarisse I; Pike, G Bruce

    2012-04-01

    Deriving cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals involves a flow-volume parameter (α), reflecting total cerebral blood volume changes, and a calibration constant (M). Traditionally, the former is assumed a fixed value and the latter is measured under alterations in fixed inspired fractional concentrations of carbon dioxide. We recently reported on reductions in M-variability via precise control of end-tidal pressures of both hypercapnic (HC) and hyperoxic (HO) gases. In light of these findings, our aim was to apply the improved calibration alternatives to neuronal activation, making use of their distinct vasoactive natures to evaluate the α-value. Nine healthy volunteers were imaged at 3 T while simultaneously measuring BOLD and arterial spin-labeling signals during controlled, graded, HC, and HO, followed by visual (VC) and sensorimotor cortices (SMC) activation. On the basis of low M- and CMRO(2)-variability, the comparison of these calibration alternatives accurately highlighted a reduced venous flow-volume relationship (α=0.16±0.02, with α(VC)=0.12±0.04, and α(SMC)=0.20±0.02), as appropriate for BOLD modeling.

  3. Chronic hypercapnic incubation increases relative organ growth and reduces blood pressure of embryonic American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Crossley, Dane A

    2015-04-01

    Reptilian nests can experience natural hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions. We incubated alligator eggs at a female-only producing temperature (30°C) in three conditions: 21% O2/0.04% CO2, 21% O2/3.5% CO2 and 21% O2/7% CO2. Alligator embryos chronically incubated in high CO2 were markedly hypotensive (blood pressure reduced by 46%) and had relatively (mass-specific) enlarged hearts (dry mass increased by 20%), lungs (dry mass increased by 17%), and kidneys (dry mass increased by 14%). This study is the first to chronically incubate reptilian eggs in hypercapnia and suggests that high CO2 alters the cardiovascular phenotype of alligator embryos (low blood pressure, relatively enlarged hearts), as well as the relative size of the organs primarily responsible for acid base balance, lungs and kidneys. The lungs and kidneys are largely non-functional during embryonic development, and the embryonic phenotype of increased relative mass may be a predictive-adaptation to metabolic or respiratory acidosis, such as during exercise or high respiratory CO2. This study demonstrates that phenotypic plasticity of alligator embryos incubated in high CO2 may result in either preferential organ growth, or maintenance of organ growth with reduced somatic growth.

  4. Breathing pattern and ventilatory control in chronic tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Spungen, Ann M; Bauman, William A; Lesser, Marvin; McCool, F Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Blunted ventilatory responses to carbon dioxide indicate that respiratory control is impaired when ventilation is stimulated in individuals with tetraplegia; however, respiratory control during resting breathing has not been extensively studied in this population. Our objective was to evaluate respiratory control and sigh frequency during resting breathing in persons with tetraplegia. A prospective, two-group comparative study was performed. Breathing pattern was assessed in ten outpatients with chronic tetraplegia and eight age- and gender-matched able-bodied controls. Subjects were noninvasively monitored for 1 h, while seated and at rest. Tidal volume (V(T)) was calculated from the sum of the anteroposterior displacements of the rib cage and abdomen and the axial displacement of the chest wall. Inspiratory time (T(I)), V(T), and the ratio of V(T) to inspiratory time (V(T)/T(I)) were calculated breath by breath. A sigh was defined as any breath greater than two or more times an individual's mean V(T). Minute ventilation, V(T)/T(I), and sigh frequency were reduced in tetraplegia compared with controls (5.24 +/- 1.15 vs. 7.16 +/- 1.29 L/min, P < 0.005; 208 +/- 45 vs. 284 +/- 47 ml/s, P < 0.005; and 11 +/- 7 vs. 42 +/- 19 sighs/h, P < 0.0005, respectively). V(T)/T(I) was associated with sigh frequency in both groups (tetraplegia: R = 0.88; P = 0.001 and control: R = 0.70; P < 0.05). We concluded that reductions in minute ventilation, V(T)/T(I), and sigh frequency suggest that respiratory drive is diminished during resting breathing in subjects with tetraplegia. These findings extend prior observations of disordered respiratory control during breathing stimulated by CO(2) in tetraplegia to resting breathing.

  5. Cardio-ventilatory coupling in young healthy resting subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Thomas E.; Jacono, Frank J.; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Yeganeh, Amir; Fishman, Mikkel; Wilson, Christopher G.; Strohl, Kingman P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, cardio-ventilatory coupling (CVC) refers to the statistical relationship between the onset of either inspiration (I) or expiration (E) and the timing of heartbeats (R-waves) before and after these respiratory events. CVC was assessed in healthy, young (<45 yr), resting, supine subjects (n = 19). Four intervals were analyzed: time from I-onset to both the prior R-wave (R-to-I) and the following R-wave (I-to-R), as well as time from E-onset to both the prior R-wave (R-to-E) and following R-wave (E-to-R). The degree of coupling was quantified in terms of transformed relative Shannon entropy (tRSE), and χ2 tests based on histograms of interval times from 200 breaths. Subjects were studied twice, from 5 to 27 days apart, and the test-retest reliability of CVC measures was computed. Several factors pointed to the relative importance of the R-to-I interval compared with other intervals. Coupling was significantly stronger for the R-to-I interval, coupling reliability was largest for the R-to-I interval, and only tRSE for the R-to-I interval was correlated with height, weight, and body surface area. The high test-retest reliability for CVC in the R-to-I interval provides support for the hypothesis that CVC strength is a subject trait. Across subjects, a peak ∼138 ms prior to I-onset was characteristic of CVC in the R-to-I interval, although individual subjects also had earlier peaks (longer R-to-I intervals). CVC for the R-to-I interval was unrelated to two separate measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), suggesting that these two forms of coupling (CVC and RSA) are independent. PMID:22267392

  6. Ventilatory demand and dynamic hyperinflation induced during ADL-based tests in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Karoliny; Gulart, Aline A.; Munari, Anelise B.; Karloh, Manuela; Mayer, Anamaria F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Airflow limitation frequently leads to the interruption of activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). These patients commonly show absence of ventilatory reserve, reduced inspiratory reserve volume, and dynamic hyperinflation (DH). Objective To investigate ventilatory response and DH induced by three ADL-based protocols in COPD patients and compare them to healthy subjects. Method Cross-sectional study. COPD group: 23 patients (65±6 years, FEV1 37.2±15.4%pred); control group: 14 healthy subjects (64±4 years) matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Both groups performed all three tests: Glittre-ADL test; an activity test that involved moving objects on a shelf (TSHELF); and a modified shelf protocol isolating activity with upper limbs (TSHELF-M). Ventilatory response and inspiratory capacity were evaluated. Results Baseline ventilatory variables were similar between groups (p>0.05). The ventilatory demand increased and the inspiratory capacity decreased significantly at the end of the tests in the COPD group. Ventilatory demand and DH were higher (p<0.05) in the TSHELF than in the TSHELF–M in the COPD group (p<0.05). There were no differences in DH between the three tests in the control group (p>0.05) and ventilatory demand increased at the end of the tests (p<0.05) but to a lower extent than the COPD group. Conclusion The TSHELF induces similar ventilatory responses to the Glittre-ADL test in COPD patients with higher ventilatory demand and DH. In contrast, the ventilatory response was attenuated in the TSHELF-M, suggesting that squatting and bending down during the Glittre-ADL test could trigger significant ventilatory overload. PMID:27333482

  7. Tetraplegia is associated with enhanced peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity and ventilatory long-term facilitation.

    PubMed

    Sankari, Abdulghani; Bascom, Amy T; Riehani, Anas; Badr, M Safwan

    2015-11-15

    Cardiorespiratory plasticity induced by acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) may contribute to recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesized that patients with cervical SCI would demonstrate higher minute ventilation (V̇e) following AIH compared with subjects with thoracic SCI and able-bodied subjects who served as controls. Twenty-four volunteers (8 with cervical SCI, 8 with thoracic SCI, and 8 able-bodied) underwent an AIH protocol during wakefulness. Each subject experienced 15 episodes of isocapnic hypoxia using mixed gases of 100% nitrogen (N2), 8% O2, and 40% CO2 to achieve oxygen saturation ≤90% followed by room air (RA). Measurements were obtained before, during, and 40 min after AIH to obtain ventilation and heart rate variability data [R-R interval (RRI) and low-frequency/high-frequency power (LF/HF)]. AIH results were compared with those of sham studies conducted in RA during the same time period. Individuals with cervical SCI had higher V̇e after AIH compared with able-bodied controls (117.9 ± 23.2% vs. 97.9 ± 11.2%, P < 0.05). RRI decreased during hypoxia in all individuals (those with cervical SCI, from 1,009.3 ± 65.0 ms to 750.2 ± 65.0 ms; those with thoracic SCI, from 945.2 ± 65.0 ms to 674.9 ± 65.0 ms; and those who were able-bodied, from 949 ± 75.0 to 682.2 ± 69.5 ms; P < 0.05). LH/HF increased during recovery in individuals with thoracic SCI and those who were able-bodied (0.54 ± 0.22 vs. 1.34 ± 0.22 and 0.67 ± 0.23 vs. 1.82 ± 0.23, respectively; P < 0.05) but remained unchanged in the group with cervical SCI. Our conclusion is that patients with cervical SCI demonstrate ventilatory long-term facilitation following AIH compared with able-bodied controls. Heart rate responses to hypoxia are acutely present in patients with cervical SCI but are absent during posthypoxic recovery.

  8. Oxygen diffusion limitation triggers ventilatory movements during spiracle closure when insects breathe discontinuously.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ping; Sender, Roi; Gefen, Eran

    2014-07-01

    During discontinuous gas exchange cycles in insects, spiracular opening follows a typical prolonged period of spiracle closure. Gas exchange with the environment occurs mostly during the period of full spiracular opening. In this study we tested the hypothesis that recently reported ventilatory movements during the spiracle closure period serve to mix the tracheal system gaseous contents, and support diffusive exchanges with the tissues. Using heliox (21% O2, 79% He), we found that by increasing oxygen diffusivity in the gas phase, ventilatory movements of Schistocerca gregaria were significantly delayed compared with normoxic conditions. Exposure to hyperoxic conditions (40% O2, 60% N2) resulted in a similar delay in forced ventilation. Together, these results indicate that limits to oxygen diffusion to the tissues during spiracle closure trigger ventilatory movements, which in turn support tissue demands. These findings contribute to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of respiratory gas exchange between insect tissues and the environment.

  9. Drug effects on ventilatory control and upper airway physiology related to sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Wang, David; Eckert, Danny J; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2013-09-15

    Understanding the inter-relationship between pharmacological agents, ventilatory control, upper airway physiology and their consequent effects on sleep-disordered breathing may provide new directions for targeted drug therapy. Where available, this review focuses on human studies that contain both drug effects on sleep-disordered breathing and measures of ventilatory control or upper airway physiology. Many of the existing studies are limited in sample size or comprehensive methodology. At times, the presence of paradoxical findings highlights the complexity of drug therapy for OSA. The existing studies also highlight the importance of considering inter-individual pharmacokinetics and underlying causes of sleep apnea in interpreting drug effects on sleep-disordered breathing. Practical ways to assess an individual's ventilatory control and how it interacts with upper airway physiology is required for future targeted pharmacotherapy in sleep apnea.

  10. [Fat mass and fat free mass on ventilatory function in adults].

    PubMed

    Feng, Kui; Chen, Li; Zu, Shu-Yu; Han, Shao-Mei; Zhu, Guang-Jin

    2010-04-25

    This study is designed to probe for the effects of fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM) on ventilatory function in adults. 1 307 healthy adults (372 males and 935 females) were selected from some localities of Heilongjiang province through random sampling by means of questionnaire and physical examination and measured for height, weight, waist to hip ratio (WHR), FM, FFM and ventilatory function. The data were analyzed by means of Pearson correlation analysis, independent-samples t test and multi-factors regression analysis. Regardless of sex, an independent positive correlation was found (P<0.001) between age and fat mass index (FMI). Regardless of sex, fat free mass index (FFMI) was found to be positively associated with forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory flow at 25% of forced vital capacity (FEF25%) (P<0.01), and FMI was significantly and negatively related to FVC, FEV1, FEF75% (P<0.05). In males FMI was significantly and negatively related to maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) (P<0.05). Regardless of sex, the effect of FFMI on FVC was higher than that of FMI. For the males, the effect of FFMI on FVC was smaller than that of FMI, while the opposite was found in the females. Regardless of sex, FEF75% tended to decrease with increasing FMI, while FFMI was found to have no effects on FEF75%. MMEF tended to decrease with increasing FMI in the males, but no marked change was found in the females. The above results suggest that FM and FFM are independent factors influencing ventilatory function in adults. FM is negatively correlated with ventilatory function, but as a reflection of muscle mass, FFM is positively correlated with ventilatory function in adults. There is quantitative difference between the effects of FFM and FM on ventilatory function.

  11. Chemosensitivity, Cardiovascular Risk, and the Ventilatory Response to Exercise in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Stickland, Michael K.; Fuhr, Desi P.; Edgell, Heather; Byers, Brad W.; Bhutani, Mohit; Wong, Eric Y. L.; Steinback, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    COPD is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk and a potentiated ventilatory response to exercise. Enhanced carotid chemoreceptor (CC) activity/sensitivity is present in other clinical conditions, has been shown to contribute to sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow, and is predictive of mortality. CC activity/sensitivity, and the resulting functional significance, has not been well examined in COPD. We hypothesized that CC activity/sensitivity would be elevated in COPD, and related to increased pulse wave velocity (a marker of CV risk) and the ventilatory response to exercise. Methods: 30 COPD patients and 10 healthy age-matched controls were examined. Participants performed baseline cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function testing. CC activity was later evaluated by the drop in ventilation with breathing 100% O2, and CC sensitivity was then assessed by the ventilatory response to hypoxia (ΔVE/ΔSpO2). Peripheral arterial stiffness was subsequently evaluated by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) using applanation tonometry while the subjects were breathing room air, and then following chemoreceptor inhibition by breathing 100% O2 for 2 minutes. Results: CC activity, CC sensitivity, PWV and the ventilatory response to exercise were all increased in COPD relative to controls. CC sensitivity was related to PWV; however, neither CC activity nor CC sensitivity was related to the ventilatory response to exercise in COPD. CC inhibition by breathing 100% O2 normalized PWV in COPD, while no effect was observed in controls. Conclusion: CC activity and sensitivity are elevated in COPD, and appear related to cardiovascular risk; however, CC activity/sensitivity does not contribute to the potentiated ventilatory response to exercise. PMID:27355356

  12. Validity of the Modified Conconi Test for Determining Ventilatory Threshold During On-Water Rowing

    PubMed Central

    Cabo, Jorge Villamil; Martinez-Camblor, Pablo; del Valle, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to design a field test based on the Conconi protocol to determine the ventilatory threshold of rowers and to test its reliability and validity. A group of sixteen oarsmen completed a modified Conconi test for on-water rowing. The reliability of the detection of the heart rate threshold was evaluated using heart rate breaking point in the Conconi test and retest. Heart rate threshold was detected in 88.8% of cases in the test-retest. The validity of the modified Conconi test was evaluated by comparing the heart rate threshold data acquired with that obtained in a ventilatory threshold test (VT2). No significant differences were found for the values of different intensity parameters i.e. heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), stroke rate (SR) and speed (S) between the heart rate threshold and the ventilatory threshold, (170.9 ± 6.8 vs. 169.3 ± 6.4 beats·min-1; 42.0 ± 8.6 vs. 43.5 ± 8.3 ml·kg-1·min-1; 25.8 ± 3.3 vs. 27.0 ± 3.2 strokes·min-1 and 14.4 ± 0.8 vs. 14.6 ± 0.8 km·h-1). The differences in averages obtained in the Conconi test-retest were small with a low standard error of the mean. The reliability data between the Conconi test-retest showed low coefficients of variations (CV) and high intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). The total errors for the Conconi test-retest are low for the measured variables (1.31 HR, 0.87 VO2, 0.65 SR, and 0.1 S). The Bland- Altman’s method for analysis validity showed a strong concordance according to the analyzed variables. We conclude that the modified Conconi test for on-water rowing is a valid and reliable method for the determination of the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). Key points The Modified Conconi test for on-water rowing is a simple and non-invasive method for the determination of anaerobic threshold for on-water rowing. The modified Conconi protocol for rowing was also shown to be a valid protocol for the calculation of the second ventilatory threshold using

  13. Liquid extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal: use of THAM (tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane) coupled to hemofiltration to control hypercapnic acidosis in a porcine model of protective mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Pablo; Lillo, Felipe; Soto, Dagoberto; Escobar, Leslie; Simon, Felipe; Hernández, Karina; Alegría, Leyla; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to facilitate protective mechanical ventilation is the use of extracorporeal CO2 removal techniques. Several strategies based on membrane gas exchangers have been developed. However, these techniques are still poorly available. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of THAM infusion coupled to hemofiltration for the management of hypercapnic acidosis. A severe respiratory acidosis was induced in seven anesthetized pigs. Five of them were treated with THAM 8-mmol·kg(-1)·h(-1) coupled to hemofiltration (THAM+HF group) at 100 mL·kg(-1)·h(-1). After 18-hours of treatment the THAM infusion was stopped but hemofiltration was kept on until 24-hours. The 2 other animals were treated with THAM but without hemofiltration. After 1-hour of treatment in THAM+HF, PaCO2 rapidly decreased from a median of 89.0 (IQR) (80.0, 98.0) to 71.3 (65.8, 82.0) mmHg (P<0.05), while pH increased from 7.12 (7.01, 7.15) to 7.29 (7.27, 7.30) (P<0.05). Thereafter PaCO2 remained stable between 60-70 mmHg, while pH increased above 7.4. After stopping THAM at 18 hours of treatment a profound rebound effect was observed with severe hypercapnic acidosis. The most important side effect we observed was hyperosmolality, which reached a maximum of 330 (328, 332) mOsm·kg H2O(-1) at T18. The animals treated only with THAM developed severe hypercapnia, despite the fact that pH returned to normal values, and died after 12 hours. Control-group had an uneven evolution until the end of the experiment. A combined treatment with THAM coupled to hemofiltration may be an effective treatment to control severe hypercapnic acidosis.

  14. Gene transcripts encoding hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) exhibit tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent responses to hypoxia and hypercapnic hypoxia in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Kristin M; Follett, Chandler R; Burnett, Louis E; Lema, Sean C

    2012-09-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that under low environmental oxygen regulates the expression of suites of genes involved in metabolism, angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, immune function, and growth. Here, we isolated and sequenced partial cDNAs encoding hif-α and arnt/hif-β from the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, an estuarine species that frequently encounters concurrent hypoxia (low O(2)) and hypercapnia (elevated CO(2)). We then examined the effects of acute exposure (1h) to hypoxia (H) and hypercapnic hypoxia (HH) on relative transcript abundance for hif-α and arnt/hif-β in different tissues (glycolytic muscle, oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas, gill, and gonads) using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our results indicate that hif-α and arnt/hif-β mRNAs were constitutively present under well-aerated normoxia (N) conditions in all tissues examined. Further, H and HH exposure resulted in both tissue-specific and muscle fiber type-specific effects on relative hif-α transcript abundance. In the gill and glycolytic muscle, relative hif-α mRNA levels were significantly lower under H and HH, compared to N, while no change (or a slight increase) was detected in oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas and gonadal tissues. H and HH did not affect relative transcript abundance for arnt/hif-β in any tissue or muscle fiber type. Thus, in crustaceans the HIF response to H and HH appears to involve changes in hif transcript abundance, with variation in hif-α and arnt/hif-β transcriptional dynamics occurring in both a tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent manner.

  15. A new approach for the determination of ventilatory and lactate thresholds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, B; Kuipers, H; Snyder, A C; Keizer, H A; Jeukendrup, A; Hesselink, M

    1992-10-01

    In order to determine the ventilatory threshold (VT) and the lactate threshold (LT) in a reliable way, a new method is proposed and compared with conventional methods. The new method consists of calculating the point that yields the maximal distance from a curve representing ventilatory and metabolic variables as a function of oxygen uptake (VO2) to the line formed by the two end points of the curve (Dmax method). Male cyclists (n = 8) performed two incremental exercise tests a week apart. Ventilatory/metabolic variables were measured and blood was sampled for later lactate measurement during each workload and immediately after exercise. No statistical differences were observed in the threshold values (expressed as absolute oxygen uptake; VO2) determined by the Dmax method and the conventional linear regression method (according to O2 equivalent; EqO2) and venous blood at the onset of blood lactate (OBLA), while VT assessed with the conventional linear method (according to the slope of CO2 output; Vslope) yielded significantly lower threshold values. Similar results were obtained from the reproducibility test. Thus, the Dmax method appears to be an objective and reliable method for threshold determination, which can be applied to various ventilatory or metabolic variables yet yield similar results. The results also showed that breathing frequency can be used to determine VT.

  16. Respiratory muscle endurance is limited by lower ventilatory efficiency in post-myocardial infarction patients

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Laura M. T.; Karsten, Marlus; Neves, Victor R.; Beltrame, Thomas; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Catai, Aparecida M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reduced respiratory muscle endurance (RME) contributes to increased dyspnea upon exertion in patients with cardiovascular disease. Objective The objective was to characterize ventilatory and metabolic responses during RME tests in post-myocardial infarction patients without respiratory muscle weakness. Method Twenty-nine subjects were allocated into three groups: recent myocardial infarction group (RG, n=9), less-recent myocardial infarction group (LRG, n=10), and control group (CG, n=10). They underwent two RME tests (incremental and constant pressure) with ventilatory and metabolic analyses. One-way ANOVA and repeated measures one-way ANOVA, both with Tukey post-hoc, were used between groups and within subjects, respectively. Results Patients from the RG and LRG presented lower metabolic equivalent and ventilatory efficiency than the CG on the second (50± 06, 50± 5 vs. 42± 4) and third part (50± 11, 51± 10 vs. 43± 3) of the constant pressure RME test and lower metabolic equivalent during the incremental pressure RME test. Additionally, at the peak of the incremental RME test, RG patients had lower oxygen uptake than the CG. Conclusions Post-myocardial infarction patients present lower ventilatory efficiency during respiratory muscle endurance tests, which appears to explain their inferior performance in these tests even in the presence of lower pressure overload and lower metabolic equivalent. PMID:24675907

  17. Do regression-based computer algorithms for determining the ventilatory threshold agree?

    PubMed

    Ekkekakis, Panteleimon; Lind, Erik; Hall, Eric E; Petruzzello, Steven J

    2008-07-01

    The determination of the ventilatory threshold has been a persistent problem in research and clinical practice. Several computerized methods have been developed to overcome the subjectivity of visual methods but it remains unclear whether different computerized methods yield similar results. The purpose of this study was to compare nine regression-based computerized methods for the determination of the ventilatory threshold. Two samples of young and healthy volunteers (n = 30 each) participated in incremental treadmill protocols to volitional fatigue. The ventilatory data were averaged in 20-s segments and analysed with a computer program. Significant variance among methods was found in both samples (Sample 1: F = 11.50; Sample 2: F = 11.70, P < 0.001 for both). The estimates of the ventilatory threshold ranged from 2.47 litres.min(-1) (71% VO2max) to 3.13 litres.min(-1) (90% VO2max) in Sample 1 and from 2.37 litres.min(-1) (67% VO2max) to 3.03 litres.min(-1) (83% VO2max) in Sample 2. The substantial differences between methods challenge the practice of relying on any single computerized method. A standardized protocol, likely based on a combination of methods, might be necessary to increase the methodological consistency in both research and clinical practice.

  18. Ventilatory inhomogeneity determined from multiple-breath washouts during sustained microgravity on Spacelab SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Paiva, Manuel; West, John B.

    1995-01-01

    We used multiple-breath N2 washouts (MBNW) to study the homogeneity of ventilation in four normal humans (mean age 42.5 yr) before, during, and after 9 days of exposure to microgravity on Spacelab Life Sciences-1. Subjects performed 20-breath MBNW at tidal volumes of approximately 700 ml and 12-breath MBNW at tidal volumes of approximately 1,250 ml. Six indexes of ventilatory inhomogeneity were derived from data from (1) distribution of specific ventilation (SV) from mixed-expired and (2) end-tidal N2, (3) change of slope of N2 washout (semilog plot) with time, (4) change of slope of normalized phase III of successive breaths, (5) anatomic lead dead space, and (6) Bohr dead space. Significant ventilatory inhomogeneity was seen in the standing position at normal gravity (1 G). When we compared standing 1 G with microgravity, the distributions of SV became slightly narrower, but the difference was not significant. Also, there were no significant changes in the change of slope of the N2 washout, change of normalized phase III slopes, or the anatomic and Bohr dead spaces. By contrast, transition from the standing to supine position in 1 G resulted in significantly broader distributions of SV and significantly greater changes in the changes in slope of the N2 washouts, indicating more ventilatory inhomogeneity in that posture. Thus these techniques can detect relatively small changes in ventilatory inhomogeneity. We conclude that the primary determinants of ventilatory inhomogeneity during tidal breathing in the upright posture are not gravitational in origin.

  19. Long-term modulation of the exercise ventilatory response in goats.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, P A; Mitchell, G S

    1993-01-01

    1. To test the hypothesis that repeated associations of exercise and increased respiratory dead space elicit mechanisms that augment future ventilatory responses to exercise alone, experiments were conducted on normal adult goats familiarized with experimental procedures. 2. Measurements of ventilation, arterial blood gases and CO2 production were made at rest, during mild steady-state exercise (4 km h-1; 5% grade) and with increased dead space at rest in seven goats before and after training. In Series I experiments, training consisted of fourteen to twenty exercise trials explicitly paired with increased dead space (0.8 l) over 2 days. Increased dead space predominantly represents a CO2 chemoreceptor stimulus with only mild hypoxic stimulation. Post-training measurements were made 1-6 h and 1 week after training was completed. 3. The same goats repeated a slightly modified protocol several months later (Series II; 6 trials per day for 4 days) to determine if responses were both repeatable and reversible, and to investigate training effects on dynamic ventilatory responses at the onset of exercise. 4. In Series I experiments, resting minute ventilation and breathing frequency were elevated 1-6 h post-training compared to baseline (44 and 74% respectively), whereas resting tidal volume decreased (14%). One week post-training, resting values had returned to baseline. Series II training had no significant effects on resting measurements. 5. Relative to baseline, arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Pa,CO2) values decreased significantly more from rest to exercise 1-6 h post-training in both Series I (2.7 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.9 mmHg) and Series II (3.4 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.6 mmHg). The exercise ventilatory response increased 25-28% 1-6 h post-training (both series), largely due to a greater exercise frequency response, but returned to baseline 1 week post-training. Training had no effect on ventilatory responses to CO2 at rest, suggesting that decreases in CO2

  20. [Positive end-expiratory pressure : adjustment in acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Dembinski, R

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of patients suffering from acute lung injury is a challenge for the treating physician. In recent years ventilation of patients with acute hypoxic lung injury has changed fundamentally. Besides the use of low tidal volumes, the most beneficial setting of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been in the focus of researchers. The findings allow adaption of treatment to milder forms of acute lung injury and severe forms. Additionally computed tomography techniques to assess the pulmonary situation and recruitment potential as well as bed-side techniques to adjust PEEP on the ward have been modified and improved. This review gives an outline of recent developments in PEEP adjustment for patients suffering from acute hypoxic and hypercapnic lung injury and explains the fundamental pathophysiology necessary as a basis for correct treatment.

  1. Influence of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Ventilatory Efficiency and Cycling Performance in Normoxia and Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Naranjo Orellana, José; Santalla, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on ventilatory efficiency, in normoxia and hypoxia, and to investigate the relationship between ventilatory efficiency and cycling performance. Sixteen sport students (23.05 ± 4.7 years; 175.11 ± 7.1 cm; 67.0 ± 19.4 kg; 46.4 ± 8.7 ml·kg−1·min−1) were randomly assigned to an inspiratory muscle training group (IMTG) and a control group (CG). The IMTG performed two training sessions/day [30 inspiratory breaths, 50% peak inspiratory pressure (Pimax), 5 days/week, 6-weeks]. Before and after the training period subjects carried out an incremental exercise test to exhaustion with gas analysis, lung function testing, and a cycling time trial test in hypoxia and normoxia. Simulated hypoxia (FiO2 = 16.45%), significantly altered the ventilatory efficiency response in all subjects (p < 0.05). Pimax increased significantly in the IMTG whereas no changes occurred in the CG (time × group, p < 0.05). Within group analyses showed that the IMTG improved ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope; EqCO2VT2) in hypoxia (p < 0.05) and cycling time trial performance [WTTmax (W); WTTmean (W); PTF(W)] (p < 0.05) in hypoxia and normoxia. Significant correlations were not found in hypoxia nor normoxia found between ventilatory efficiency parameters (VE/VCO2 slope; LEqCO2; EqCO2VT2) and time trial performance. On the contrary the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) was highly correlated with cycling time trial performance (r = 0.89; r = 0.82; p < 0.001) under both conditions. Even though no interaction effect was found, the within group analysis may suggest that IMT reduces the negative effects of hypoxia on ventilatory efficiency. In addition, the data suggest that OUES plays an important role in submaximal cycling performance. PMID:28337149

  2. Re-engineering ventilatory support to decrease days and improve resource utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Kirton, O C; DeHaven, C B; Hudson-Civetta, J; Morgan, J P; Windsor, J; Civetta, J M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to describe the development of a cost-effective ventilatory strategy using a portable microprocessor-controlled respiratory monitor (Bicore CP-100; Allied Healthcare Products, Riverside, CA.) SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Until recently, clinicians have had to accept the uncertainties of clinical judgment, which unfortunately, often biased the patient to a prolonged ventilatory course to avoid extubation failures, necessitating reintubation. METHODS:Over a 4-year period, the authors attempted to re-engineer the process of ventilatory support based on measured work of breathing (WOB), including physiologic (WOBPhys), imposed (WOBImp) and total (WOBTot). RESULTS:The authors made 90 determinations of WOB in 31 patients. The coefficient of determination (i2) of WOBTot, with the breathing frequency was 0.35, with tidal volume was 0.10, and with the rapid shallow breathing index (f/V(tau)) was 0.23; therefore, the authors discarded them as reliable inferences. Of 27 patients ventilated for > 2 days with satisfactory blood gases, but with breathing frequency > 30 breaths/minute, 6 had WOBTot < 0.8 J/L and were extubated successfully. In 21 patients, WOBTot was elevated to 1.6 +/- 0.83 J/L, WOBImp was 1.1 +/- 0.64 J/L, approximately twice the WOBPhys (0.5 +/- 0.26 J/L), a normal value. Extubation was successful in 20 of those 21 patients. This approach was extended to the spontaneous breathing pre-extubation trial. In addition, the ventilator was adjusted so that the patient sustained a WOBTot of 0.6 to 1 J/L during the ventilatory support. This evolution was tracked for 18 months in a series of 838 trauma intensive care unit patients. Average duration of ventilation decreased from 8.2 to 4.2 days (49%; p < 0.01). This translated into approximately 2400 decreased ventilator days per year. CONCLUSION: Objective measurement to guide the adequacy of ventilatory support and interpret apparent clinical weaning failures decreased total

  3. Liquid extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal: use of THAM (tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane) coupled to hemofiltration to control hypercapnic acidosis in a porcine model of protective mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Pablo; Lillo, Felipe; Soto, Dagoberto; Escobar, Leslie; Simon, Felipe; Hernández, Karina; Alegría, Leyla; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to facilitate protective mechanical ventilation is the use of extracorporeal CO2 removal techniques. Several strategies based on membrane gas exchangers have been developed. However, these techniques are still poorly available. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of THAM infusion coupled to hemofiltration for the management of hypercapnic acidosis. A severe respiratory acidosis was induced in seven anesthetized pigs. Five of them were treated with THAM 8-mmol·kg-1·h-1 coupled to hemofiltration (THAM+HF group) at 100 mL·kg-1·h-1. After 18-hours of treatment the THAM infusion was stopped but hemofiltration was kept on until 24-hours. The 2 other animals were treated with THAM but without hemofiltration. After 1-hour of treatment in THAM+HF, PaCO2 rapidly decreased from a median of 89.0 (IQR) (80.0, 98.0) to 71.3 (65.8, 82.0) mmHg (P<0.05), while pH increased from 7.12 (7.01, 7.15) to 7.29 (7.27, 7.30) (P<0.05). Thereafter PaCO2 remained stable between 60-70 mmHg, while pH increased above 7.4. After stopping THAM at 18 hours of treatment a profound rebound effect was observed with severe hypercapnic acidosis. The most important side effect we observed was hyperosmolality, which reached a maximum of 330 (328, 332) mOsm·kg H2O-1 at T18. The animals treated only with THAM developed severe hypercapnia, despite the fact that pH returned to normal values, and died after 12 hours. Control-group had an uneven evolution until the end of the experiment. A combined treatment with THAM coupled to hemofiltration may be an effective treatment to control severe hypercapnic acidosis. PMID:27648139

  4. Respiratory Chemosensitivity and Resistive Load Sensation Influences on Ventilatory Control during Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    provide an inspiratory resistance of 5 cm H2OL*s1 (experimental condition, R,) (Figure 1). The two peak V0 2 tesis were conducted on separate test days... Linea reresonaalsi.lotd5 o UJ w 0.75 . tU 0 rA 07 - -JI 1 g. . 0 Ro, r-0.32 0.25 OR0. r-0.282 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 HYPERCAPNIC RESPONSIVENESS (A’VE APACO2-1...enisiaoyfow drn idetido h sum0 ia staysaeeeciea ucin of sujets0M.34 Linea rersinaayi0lte o odR sldln)adR (dote line).o.6 V33 ,A, 1.00 S.0.75 U ORD. r- 0 .13

  5. Ventilatory and metabolic responses of burrowing owls, Athene cunicularia, to moderate and extreme hypoxia: analysis of the hypoxic ventilatory threshold vs. hemoglobin oxygen affinity relationship in birds.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Delbert L; Boggs, Dona F; Kilgore, Trevor J; Colby, Conrad; Williams, Burl R; Bavis, Ryan W

    2008-06-01

    We measured ventilation, oxygen consumption and blood gases in burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) breathing moderate and extreme hypoxic gas mixtures to determine their hypoxic ventilatory threshold (HVT) and to assess if they, like other birds and mammals, exhibit a relationship between HVT and hemoglobin O2 affinity (P(50)) of their blood. An earlier report of an attenuated ventilatory responsiveness of this species to hypoxia was enigmatic given the low O2 affinity (high P(50)) of burrowing owl hemoglobin. In the current study, burrowing owls breathing 11% and 9% O2 showed a significantly elevated total ventilation. The arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) at which ventilation is elevated above normoxic values in burrowing owls was 58 mm Hg. This threshold value conforms well to expectations based on the high P(50) of their hemoglobin and the HVT vs. P(50) relationship for birds developed in this study. Correcting for phylogenetic relatedness in the multi-species analysis had no effect on the HVT vs. P(50) relationship. Also, because burrowing owls in this study did not show a hypometabolic response at any level of hypoxia (even at 9% O2); HVT described in terms of percent change in oxygen convection requirement is identical to that based on ventilation alone.

  6. Adrenergic Blockade Does not Change Ventilatory Response to CO2 in Awake Resting Goats,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-03

    rev.erse side if necessary and Identify by block number) O ventilatory control, phentolamine , propranolol -J Li.. 20. ABSTRACT (Cat"n.ou e --t,-".ft... phentolamine or propranolol, there was no difference (compared to control studies) in the mean slope, x-inter- cept, or ventilation at end-tidal PC02 (PETC02...against PETCY2 there was also no change in these measurements after propranolol After phentolamine , there was a slight decrease in the slope and x

  7. GABA representation in hypoxia sensing: a ventilatory study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, I; Tikhomirova, L; Tarasova, N; Safonov, V; Bialkowska, M; Pokorski, M

    2011-01-01

    Phenibut, a nonspecific GABA derivative, is clinically used as an anxiolytic and tranquilizer in psychosomatic conditions. A GABA-ergic inhibitory pathway is engaged in respiratory control at both central and peripheral levels. However, the potential of phenibut to affect the O2-related chemoreflexes has not yet been studied. In this study we seek to determine the ventilatory responses to changes in inspired O2 content in anesthetized, spontaneously-breathing rats. Steady-state 5-min responses to 10% O2 in N2 and 100% O2 were taken in each animal before and 1 h after phenibut administration in a dose 450 mg/kg, i.p. Minute ventilation and its frequency and tidal components were obtained from the respiratory flow signal. We found that after a period of irregular extension of the respiratory cycle, phenibut stabilized resting ventilation at a lower level [20.0±3.3 (SD) vs 31.1±5.2 ml/min before phenibut; P<0.01]. The ventilatory depressant effect of phenibut was not reflected in the hypoxic response. In relative terms, this response was actually accentuated after phenibut; the peak hypoxic ventilation increased by 164% from baseline vs the 100% increase before phenibut. Regarding hyperoxia, its inhibitory effect on breathing was more expressed after phenibut. In conclusion, the GABA-mimetic phenibut did not curtail hypoxic ventilatory responsiveness, despite the presence of GABA-ergic pathways in both central and peripheral, carotid body mechanisms mediating the hypoxic chemoreflex. Thus, GABA-mediated synaptic inhibition may be elaborated in a way to sustain the primarily defensive ventilatory chemoreflex.

  8. Ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon result from central muscarinic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Houze, Pascal; Pronzola, Laetita; Kayouka, Maya; Villa, Antoine; Debray, Marcel; Baud, Frederic J.

    2008-12-01

    Paraoxon induces respiratory toxicity. Atropine completely reversed parathion- and paraoxon-induced respiratory toxicity. The aim of this study was to assess the peripheral or central origin of ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given paraoxon 0.215 mg/kg subcutaneously and treated with either atropine (10 mg/kg sc) or ascending doses of methylatropine of 5.42 (equimolar to that of atropine), 54.2, and 542 mg/kg administered subcutaneously 30 min after paraoxon. Ventilation at rest was assessed using whole-body plethysmography and rat temperature using infra-red telemetry. Results are expressed as mean {+-} SE. Statistical analysis used two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements. Paraoxon induced a significant decrease in temperature 30 min after injection lasting the 90 min of the study period. This effect was partially corrected by atropine, but not by methylatropine whatever the dose. Paraoxon induced a decrease in respiratory rate resulting from an increase in expiratory time associated with an increase in tidal volume. Atropine completely reversed the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon while the equimolar dose of methylatropine had no significant effects. The 54.2 and 542 mg/kg doses of methylatropine had no significant effects. Atropine crosses the blood-brain barrier and reverses peripheral and central muscarinic effects. In contrast, methylatropine does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Atropine completely reversed the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon, while methylatropine had no significant effects at doses up to 100-fold the equimolar dose of atropine. We conclude that the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon are mediated by disrupted muscarinic signaling in the central nervous system.

  9. Action of tilidine hydrochloride and morphine hydrochloride on ventilatory control in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Maranetra, N; Pain, M C

    1976-03-20

    The action of tilidine hydrochloride and morphine hydrochloride on the ventilatory response to inhaled carbon dioxide has been assessed in 10 normal volunteers. In doses of 50 mg and 100 mg given intravenously, tilidine hydrochloride induced less respiratory depression than 10 mg of morphine given intravenously. Side effects were not different or troublesome with either drug. Depending on its relative pain-relieving property, tilidine hydrochloride may have advantages over morphine as an analgesic.

  10. SHORT- AND LONG-TERM MODULATION OF THE EXERCISE VENTILATORY RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Babb, Tony G; Wood, Helen E; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2011-01-01

    The importance of adaptive control strategies (modulation and plasticity) in the control of breathing during exercise has become recognized only in recent years. In this review we discuss new evidence for modulation of the exercise ventilatory response in humans, specifically, short-and long-term modulation. Short-term modulation is proposed to be an important regulatory mechanism that helps maintain blood gas homeostasis during exercise. PMID:20164813

  11. Ventilatory compensation of the alkaline tide during digestion in the snake Boa constrictor.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Denis V; De Toledo, Luis Felipe; Abe, Augusto S; Wang, Tobias

    2004-03-01

    The increased metabolic rate during digestion is associated with changes in arterial acid-base parameters that are caused by gastric acid secretion (the 'alkaline tide'). Net transfer of HCl to the stomach lumen causes an increase in plasma HCO3- levels, but arterial pH does not change because of a ventilatory compensation that counters the metabolic alkalosis. It seems, therefore, that ventilation is controlled to preserve pH and not PCO2 during the postprandial period. To investigate this possibility, we determined arterial acid-base parameters and the metabolic response to digestion in the snake Boa constrictor, where gastric acid secretion was inhibited pharmacologically by oral administration of omeprazole. The increase in oxygen consumption of omeprazole-treated snakes after ingestion of 30% of their own body mass was quantitatively similar to the response in untreated snakes, although the peak of the metabolic response occurred later (36 h versus 24 h). Untreated control animals exhibited a large increase in arterial plasma HCO3- concentration of approximately 12 mmol l(-1), but arterial pH only increased by 0.12 pH units because of a simultaneous increase in arterial PCO2 by about 10 mmHg. Omeprazole virtually abolished the changes in arterial pH and plasma HCO3- concentration during digestion and there was no increase in arterial PCO2. The increased arterial PCO2 during digestion is not caused, therefore, by the increased metabolism during digestion or a lower ventilatory responsiveness to ventilatory stimuli during a presumably relaxed state in digestion. Furthermore, the constant arterial PCO2, in the absence of an alkaline tide, of omeprazole-treated snakes strongly suggests that pH rather than PCO2 normally affects chemoreceptor activity and ventilatory drive.

  12. Management of Ventilatory Insufficiency in Neuromuscular Patients Using Mechanical Ventilator Supported by the Korean Government.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong-Woong; Choi, Won Ah; Cho, Han Eol; Lee, Jang Woo; Park, Jung Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Since 2001, financial support has been provided for all patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) who require ventilatory support due to the paralysis of respiratory muscles in Korea. The purpose of this study was to identify ventilator usage status and appropriateness in these patients. We included 992 subjects with rare and incurable NMD registered for ventilator rental fee support. From 21 February 2011 to 17 January 2013, ventilator usage information, regular follow-up observation, and symptoms of chronic hypoventilation were surveyed by phone. Home visits were conducted for patients judged by an expert medical team to require medical examination. Abnormal ventilatory status was assessed by respiratory evaluation. Chronic respiratory insufficiency symptoms were reported by 169 of 992 subjects (17%), while 565 subjects (57%) did not receive regular respiratory evaluation. Ventilatory status was abnormal in 102 of 343 home-visit subjects (29.7%). Although 556 subjects (56%) reported 24-hour ventilator use, only 458 (46%) had an oxygen saturation monitoring device, and 305 (31%) performed an airstacking exercise. A management system that integrates ventilator usage monitoring, counselling and advice, and home visits for patients who receive ventilator support could improve the efficiency of the ventilator support project.

  13. Effect of upper airway CO2 pattern on ventilatory frequency in tegu lizards.

    PubMed

    Ballam, G O; Coates, E L

    1989-07-01

    Nasal CO2-sensitive receptors are reported to depress ventilatory frequency in several reptilian species in response to constant low levels of inspired CO2. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of phasic patterns of CO2 in the upper airways on ventilation. Awake lizards (Tupinambis nigropunctatus) breathed through an endotracheal tube from an isolated gas source. A second gas mixture was forced at constant flow into the external nares. A concentration of 4% CO2 was intermittently pulsed through the nares in a square-wave pattern with a frequency of 60, 12, 6, 4.2, 1.8, and 0.6 cycles/min. Concentrations of 2, 3, 4, and 6% CO2 were also pulsed through the nares at 12 cycles/min and compared with sustained levels of 1, 1.5, 2, and 3%. Additionally, 0 or 3% CO2 was forced through the upper airways with a servo system designed to mimic normal ventilatory flow and gas concentrations. No changes in breathing pattern were noted during any of the pulsing protocols, although a significant breathing frequency depression was present with sustained levels of CO2 of comparable mean concentrations. We conclude that ventilatory control is selectively responsive to sustained levels of environmental CO2 but not to phasic changes in upper airway CO2 concentration.

  14. [Positional paper of the German working group "cardiopulmonary exercise testing" to ventilatory and metabolic (lactate) thresholds].

    PubMed

    Westhoff, M; Rühle, K H; Greiwing, A; Schomaker, R; Eschenbacher, H; Siepmann, M; Lehnigk, B

    2013-02-01

    Thresholds in cardiopulmonary exercise testing are necessary for the evaluation of motivation and cooperation in exercise, for training programs, in transplant medicine, preoperative evaluation and medical assessments. There is a hardly comprehensible number of terminologies concerning these thresholds and their definitions. This hampers the comparison of protocols and studies and leads to incertainties in terminologies and interpretations of cardiopulmonary exercise tests. Based on literature a definition of thresholds was undertaken. Thresholds should be regarded from a conceptional and an operational (methodological) point of view. The conceptional model means, that there are two ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2) and two metabolic thresholds (lactate threshold [LT] 1 and 2 ). These thresholds are pathophysiologically based. Both threshold concepts determinate the beginning and the end of the aerobic-anaerobic transition. The lactate thresholds determine the metabolic changes, whereas the ventilator thresholds 1 and 2 represent the ventilatory response to the metabolic changes. VT1 represents the subsequent increase of ventilation and CO2-output relative to oxygen uptake as a consequence of an increase of lactate and a necessary lactate buffering. VT2 is characterized by an exceeding of lactate-steady-state, resulting in excess lactate, metabolic acidosis and overproportional rise of ventilation. The operational concept describes the method, which is used for determination of the different lactate and ventilatory thresholds. In a further step this can be completed by indicating the exercise protocol which was applied.

  15. Ventilatory thresholds during wheelchair exercise in individuals with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Coutts, K D; McKenzie, D C

    1995-07-01

    The ventilatory thresholds of 30 male wheelchair athletes were determined from their respiratory and metabolic responses to a continuously progressive exercise protocol to peak oxygen uptake on a wheelchair ergometer. The peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), ventilatory threshold in 1 min-1 (VTL), and ventilatory threshold expressed as a percentage of peak VO2 (VT%) were measured for all subjects. Statistical analyses of selected subsamples were used to note sport and functional ability level differences in these variables. Analysis of peak VO2 by functional classification (old International Stoke Mandeville Games Federation system; classes 1A-5, plus an amputee class) indicated that paraplegic (classes 2-5) and the amputee class athletes (2.48 1 min-1) were higher than tetraplegic (classes 1A-1C) athletes (0.95 1 min-1). The paraplegic and amputee classes were combined for a comparison of peak VO2 by sport which showed that track athletes (2.80 1 min-1) were higher than basketball players (2.41 1 min-1) who were higher than athletes from other sports (1.88 1 min-1). The VTL analyses demonstrated differences similar to the peak VO2 analyses. The VT% analyses, however, showed no sport differences, but the tetraplegic athletes had higher VT% values (87%) than the paraplegic plus amputee group (69%).

  16. Different ventilatory responses to progressive maximal exercise test performed with either the arms or legs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Renata R T; Pedrosa, Sabrina; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare respiratory responses, focusing on the time-domain variability of ventilatory components during progressive cardiopulmonary exercise tests performed on cycle or arm ergometers. METHODS: The cardiopulmonary exercise tests were conducted on twelve healthy volunteers on either a cycle ergometer or an arm ergometer following a ramp protocol. The time-domain variabilities (the standard deviations and root mean squares of the successive differences) of the minute ventilation, tidal volume and respiratory rate were calculated and normalized to the number of breaths. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the timing of breathing throughout the exercise when the cycle and arm ergometer measurements were compared. However, the arm exercise time-domain variabilities for the minute ventilation, tidal volume and respiratory rate were significantly greater than the equivalent values obtained during leg exercise. CONCLUSION: Although the type of exercise does not influence the timing of breathing when dynamic arm and leg exercises are compared, it does influence time-domain ventilatory variability of young, healthy individuals. The mechanisms that influence ventilatory variability during exercise remain to be studied. PMID:21876964

  17. Management of Ventilatory Insufficiency in Neuromuscular Patients Using Mechanical Ventilator Supported by the Korean Government

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since 2001, financial support has been provided for all patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) who require ventilatory support due to the paralysis of respiratory muscles in Korea. The purpose of this study was to identify ventilator usage status and appropriateness in these patients. We included 992 subjects with rare and incurable NMD registered for ventilator rental fee support. From 21 February 2011 to 17 January 2013, ventilator usage information, regular follow-up observation, and symptoms of chronic hypoventilation were surveyed by phone. Home visits were conducted for patients judged by an expert medical team to require medical examination. Abnormal ventilatory status was assessed by respiratory evaluation. Chronic respiratory insufficiency symptoms were reported by 169 of 992 subjects (17%), while 565 subjects (57%) did not receive regular respiratory evaluation. Ventilatory status was abnormal in 102 of 343 home-visit subjects (29.7%). Although 556 subjects (56%) reported 24-hour ventilator use, only 458 (46%) had an oxygen saturation monitoring device, and 305 (31%) performed an airstacking exercise. A management system that integrates ventilator usage monitoring, counselling and advice, and home visits for patients who receive ventilator support could improve the efficiency of the ventilator support project. PMID:27247509

  18. Influence of vagal afferents on diphasic ventilatory response to hypoxia in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Delacourt, C; Canet, E; Praud, J P; Bureau, M A

    1995-01-01

    The effect of vagal afferents on the ventilatory response to hypoxia was studied in eleven awake newborn lambs. Tests were repeated before and after vagotomy in the same lambs in two conditions: with intact upper airways and after intubation. During hypoxia, a diphasic pattern of ventilatory response was observed in both vagotomized and intact lambs. However, face mask-breathing vagotomized lambs had a blunted increase in ventilation (VI) to hypoxia as compared with intact lambs (P = 0.0001) and they showed an expiratory braking during all hypoxic time. Furthermore, the normal increase in frequency (f) to hypoxia was abolished after vagotomy. After intubation, expiratory braking disappeared and, consequently, magnitude of the VI response to hypoxia was similar in intact and vagotomized lambs. These changes were due to improved tidal volume response in vagotomized intubated lambs (P < 0.002) with no significant change in f response. We concluded that, in awake newborn lambs, vagal afferents are essential for maintaining the pattern and the magnitude of the ventilatory response to hypoxia, the latter by controlling the motor output to the larynx.

  19. Modified ventilatory response characteristics to exercise in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Kai; Metzger, Jule; Scholz, Tobias; Tetzlaff, Kay; Sorichter, Stephan; Walterspacher, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Specific adjustments to repeated extreme apnea are not fully known and understood. While a blunted ventilatory chemosensitivity to CO2 is described for elite breath-hold divers (BHDs) at rest, it is unclear whether specific adaptations affect their response to dynamic exercise. Eight elite BHDs with a previously validated decrease in CO2 chemosensitivity, 8 scuba divers (SCDs), and 8 matched control subjects were included in a study where markers of ventilatory response, Fowler's dead space, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), and blood lactate concentrations during cycle exercise were measured. Maximal power output did not differ between the groups, but lactate threshold (θL) appeared at a significantly lowered respiratory compensation point (RCP) and at a higher VO2 for the BHDs. End-tidal (petCO2) and estimated arterial pCO2 (paCO2) were significantly higher in BHDs at θL, the RCP, and maximum exhaustion. BHDs showed a significantly (P < .01) slower breathing pattern in relation to a given tidal volume at a specific work rate. In summary, BHDs presented signs of a metabolic shift from aerobic to anaerobic energy supply, decreased chemosensitivity during exercise, and a distinct ventilatory-response pattern during cycle exercise that differs from SCDs and controls.

  20. The reproducibility of VO2max, ventilatory, and lactate thresholds in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Foster, V L; Hume, G J; Dickinson, A L; Chatfield, S J; Byrnes, W C

    1986-08-01

    The reproducibility of VO2max, ventilatory, and lactate thresholds in elderly women. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 18, No. 4, pp. 425-430, 1986. This investigation examined the reproducibility of maximal (VO2max) and submaximal measures of fitness for elderly women. Eight subjects [age (yr): mean = 80.6 +/- 3.7; range = 73-86] volunteered to repeat three continuous, incremental maximal effort treadmill tests. Blood lactate determinations were made for each increment from blood samples taken from an indwelling venous catheter located in the back of the hand. Average VO2max values (ml X min-1 X kg X l-1) were 13.21 + 1.95 for test 1, 13.44 +/- 1.83 for test 2, and 13.62 + 2.95 for test 3. In all but one subject, a threshold was not definable by either ventilatory or lactate measurements. Maximal lactate values were low, with the average values for tests 1, 2, and 3 being 1.89, 1.46, and 1.86 mmol X l-1, respectively. The data demonstrates that VO2max is reproducible for older women and can, therefore, be used for fitness assessment and exercise prescription. The use of ventilatory or lactate thresholds as submaximal measures of fitness or as minimal intensities for exercise prescription was determined not to be applicable for women in the eighth and ninth decades of life.

  1. Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) and Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) Index in Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients with Chronic Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Dimoulis, Andreas; Pastaka, Chaido; Tsolaki, Vasiliki; Tsilioni, Irini; Pournaras, Spyridon; Liakos, Nikolaos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos

    2015-08-01

    The effects of Non-invasive Ventilation (NIV) on Insulin Resistance (IR) in stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients have not been fully explored. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of NIV on IR and adiponectin levels during one year application of NIV in stable COPD patients with Chronic Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure. Twenty-five (25) stable COPD patients with Chronic Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure and with no self-reported comorbidities completed the study. NIV was administered in the spontaneous/timed mode via a full face mask using a bi-level positive airway pressure system. Spirometry, blood pressure, arterial blood gases, dyspnea, daytime sleepiness, serum fasting glucose and insulin levels were assessed. IR was assessed with the calculation of the Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) index. Adiponectin was measured with radioimmunoassay. Study participants were re-evaluated on the first, third, sixth, ninth and twelfth month after the initial evaluation. There was a significant improvement in FEV1 values from the first month (34.1 ± 11.6% vs 37 ± 12.3%, p = 0.05). There was a significant decrease in IR by the ninth month of NIV use (3.4 ± 2.3 vs 2.2 ± 1.4, p < 0.0001), while adiponectin levels significantly improved from the first month of NIV use. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that baseline HOMA index was associated with paCO2 (β = 0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.001), while baseline adiponectin levels were associated with FVC (β = 0.05 ± 0.02, p = 0.035) and the concentration of serum bicarbonate (HCO3-) (-β = 0.18 ± 0.06, p = 0.002). Insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism as well as adiponectin levels improved along with the improvements in respiratory failure.

  2. Transition from acute to chronic hypercapnia in patients with periodic breathing: predictions from a computer model.

    PubMed

    Norman, Robert G; Goldring, Roberta M; Clain, Jeremy M; Oppenheimer, Beno W; Charney, Alan N; Rapoport, David M; Berger, Kenneth I

    2006-05-01

    Acute hypercapnia may develop during periodic breathing from an imbalance between abnormal ventilatory patterns during apnea and/or hypopnea and compensatory ventilatory response in the interevent periods. However, transition of this acute hypercapnia into chronic sustained hypercapnia during wakefulness remains unexplained. We hypothesized that respiratory-renal interactions would play a critical role in this transition. Because this transition cannot be readily addressed clinically, we modified a previously published model of whole-body CO2 kinetics by adding respiratory control and renal bicarbonate kinetics. We enforced a pattern of 8 h of periodic breathing (sleep) and 16 h of regular ventilation (wakefulness) repeated for 20 days. Interventions included varying the initial awake respiratory CO2 response and varying the rate of renal bicarbonate excretion within the physiological range. The results showed that acute hypercapnia during periodic breathing could transition into chronic sustained hypercapnia during wakefulness. Although acute hypercapnia could be attributed to periodic breathing alone, transition from acute to chronic hypercapnia required either slowing of renal bicarbonate kinetics, reduction of ventilatory CO2 responsiveness, or both. Thus the model showed that the interaction between the time constant for bicarbonate excretion and respiratory control results in both failure of bicarbonate concentration to fully normalize before the next period of sleep and persistence of hypercapnia through blunting of ventilatory drive. These respiratory-renal interactions create a cumulative effect over subsequent periods of sleep that eventually results in a self-perpetuating state of chronic hypercapnia.

  3. Emphysema on Thoracic CT and Exercise Ventilatory Inefficiency in Mild-to-Moderate COPD.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joshua H; Zelt, Joel T; Hirai, Daniel M; Diniz, Camilla V; Zaza, Aida; O'Donnell, Denis E; Neder, J Alberto

    2017-04-01

    There is growing evidence that emphysema on thoracic computed tomography (CT) is associated with poor exercise tolerance in COPD patients with only mild-to-moderate airflow obstruction. We hypothesized that an excessive ventilatory response to exercise (ventilatory inefficiency) would underlie these abnormalities. In a prospective study, 19 patients (FEV1 = 82 ± 13%, 12 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage 1) and 26 controls underwent an incremental exercise test. Ventilatory inefficiency was assessed by the ventilation ([Formula: see text]E)/CO2 output ([Formula: see text]CO2) nadir. Pulmonary blood flow (PBF) in a submaximal test was calculated by inert gas rebreathing. Emphysema was quantified as % of attenuation areas below 950 HU. Patients typically presented with centrilobular emphysema (76.8 ± 10.1% of total emphysema) in the upper lobes (upper/total lung ratio = 0.82 ± 0.04). They had lower peak oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2), higher [Formula: see text]E/[Formula: see text]CO2 nadir, and greater dyspnea scores than controls (p < 0.05). Lower peak [Formula: see text]O2 and worse dyspnea were found in patients with higher [Formula: see text]E/[Formula: see text]CO2 nadirs (≥30). Patients had blunted increases in PBF from rest to iso-[Formula: see text]O2 exercise (p < 0.05). Higher [Formula: see text]E/[Formula: see text]CO2 nadir in COPD was associated with emphysema severity (r = 0.63) which, in turn, was related to reduced lung diffusing capacity (r = -0.72) and blunted changes in PBF from rest to exercise (r = -0.69) (p < 0.01). Ventilation "wasted" in emphysematous areas is associated with impaired exercise ventilatory efficiency in mild-to-moderate COPD. Exercise ventilatory inefficiency links structure (emphysema) and function (DLCO) to a key clinical outcome (poor exercise tolerance) in COPD patients with only modest spirometric abnormalities.

  4. Ventilatory Responses at Peak Exercise in Endurance-Trained Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alterations in respiratory mechanics predispose healthy obese individuals to low lung volume breathing, which places them at risk of developing expiratory flow limitation (EFL). The high ventilatory demand in endurance-trained obese adults further increases their risk of developing EFL and increases their work of breathing. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and magnitude of EFL in fit obese (FO) adults via measurements of breathing mechanics and ventilatory dynamics during exercise. Methods: Ten (seven women and three men) FO (mean ± SD, 38 ± 5 years, 38% ± 5% body fat) and 10 (seven women and three men) control obese (CO) (38 ± 5 years, 39% ± 5% body fat) subjects underwent hydrostatic weighing, pulmonary function testing, cycle exercise testing, and the determination of the oxygen cost of breathing during eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea. Results: There were no differences in functional residual capacity (43% ± 6% vs 40% ± 9% total lung capacity [TLC]), residual volume (21% ± 4% vs 21% ± 4% TLC), or FVC (111% ± 13% vs 104% ± 15% predicted) between FO and CO subjects, respectively. FO subjects had higher FEV1 (111% ± 13% vs 99% ± 11% predicted), TLC (106% ± 14% vs 94% ± 7% predicted), peak expiratory flow (123% ± 14% vs 106% ± 13% predicted), and maximal voluntary ventilation (128% ± 15% vs 106% ± 13% predicted) than did CO subjects. Peak oxygen uptake (129% ± 16% vs 86% ± 15% predicted), minute ventilation (128 ± 35 L/min vs 92 ± 25 L/min), and work rate (229 ± 54 W vs 166 ± 55 W) were higher in FO subjects. Mean inspiratory (4.65 ± 1.09 L/s vs 3.06 ± 1.21 L/s) and expiratory (4.15 ± 0.95 L/s vs 2.98 ± 0.76L/s) flows were greater in FO subjects, which yielded a greater breathing frequency (51 ± 8 breaths/min vs 41 ± 10 breaths/min) at peak exercise in FO subjects. Mechanical ventilatory constraints in FO subjects were similar to those in CO subjects despite the greater ventilatory demand in FO

  5. Ventilatory response to hypercapnia and hypoxia after extensive lesion of medullary serotonergic neurons in newborn conscious piglets.

    PubMed

    Penatti, E M; Berniker, A V; Kereshi, B; Cafaro, C; Kelly, M L; Niblock, M M; Gao, H G; Kinney, H C; Li, A; Nattie, E E

    2006-10-01

    Acute inhibition of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons in the medullary raphé (MR) using a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist had an age-dependent impact on the "CO(2) response" of piglets (33). Our present study explored the effect of chronic 5-HT neuron lesions in the MR and extra-raphé on the ventilatory response to hypercapnia and hypoxia in piglets, with possible implications on the role of 5-HT in the sudden infant death syndrome. We established four experimental groups. Group 1 (n = 11) did not undergo any treatment. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were injected with either vehicle or the neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine in the cisterna magna during the first week of life (group 2, n = 9; group 4, n = 11) or second week of life (group 3, n = 10). Ventilation was recorded in response to 5% CO(2) (all groups) and 12% O(2) (group 2) during wakefulness and sleep up to postnatal day 25. Surprisingly, the piglets did not reveal changes in their CO(2) sensitivity during early postnatal development. Overall, considerable lesions of 5-HT neurons (up to 65% decrease) in the MR and extra-raphé had no impact on the CO(2) response, regardless of injection time. Postlesion raphé plasticity could explain why we observed no effect. 5,7-Dihydroxytryptamine-treated males, however, did present a lower CO(2) response during sleep. Hypoxia significantly altered the frequency during sleep in lesioned piglets. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the role of plasticity, sex, and 5-HT abnormalities in sudden infant death syndrome.

  6. Effect of amino acid infusion on the ventilatory response to hypoxia in protein-deprived neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Soliz, A; Suguihara, C; Huang, J; Hehre, D; Bancalari, E

    1994-03-01

    Several amino acids (AA) act as neurotransmitters and mediate the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide and hypoxia in adult human beings and animals. To evaluate the influence of AA on the neonatal ventilatory response to hypoxia, 29 newborn piglets less than 5 d old were randomly assigned to a control diet or protein-free diet for 7-10 d. Minute ventilation, arterial blood pressure, oxygen consumption, and arterial blood gases were measured in sedated, spontaneous breathing piglets while they breathed room air and at 1, 5 and 10 min of hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen concentration--0.10) before and after 4 h of AA (Trophamine, 3 g/kg, i.v.) or 10% dextrose infusion. The administration of AA solution in protein-deprived piglets resulted in a significant increase in minute ventilation after 10 min of hypoxia (26 +/- 19%) in comparison with their ventilatory response before AA infusion (10 +/- 12%; p < 0.02). Similar increase in the ventilatory response to hypoxia was observed in the control diet group after AA infusion (23 +/- 17% versus 11 +/- 11%; p < 0.05). Changes in arterial blood pressure, oxygen consumption, and arterial blood gases during hypoxia were similar before and after AA infusion. The ventilatory response to hypoxia in both protein-free and control diet animals were similar before and after the 10% dextrose infusion. These results stress the importance of nutritional factors in the neonatal control of breathing.

  7. Altered breathing mechanics and ventilatory response during exercise in children born extremely preterm

    PubMed Central

    DeHaan, K; Fuhr, D; Hariharan, S; Kamstra, B; Hendson, L; Adatia, I; Majaesic, C; Lovering, A T; Thompson, R B; Nicholas, D; Thebaud, B; Stickland, M K

    2016-01-01

    Background Extreme preterm birth confers risk of long-term impairments in lung function and exercise capacity. There are limited data on the factors contributing to exercise limitation following extreme preterm birth. This study examined respiratory mechanics and ventilatory response during exercise in a large cohort of children born extremely preterm (EP). Methods This cohort study included children 8–12 years of age who were born EP (≤28 weeks gestation) between 1997 and 2004 and treated in a large regionalised neonatal intensive care unit in western Canada. EP children were divided into no/mild bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) (ie, supplementary oxygen or ventilation ceased before 36 weeks gestational age; n=53) and moderate/severe BPD (ie, continued supplementary oxygen or ventilation at 36 weeks gestational age; n=50). Age-matched control children (n=65) were born at full term. All children attempted lung function and cardiopulmonary exercise testing measurements. Results Compared with control children, EP children had lower airway flows and diffusion capacity but preserved total lung capacity. Children with moderate/severe BPD had evidence of gas trapping relative to other groups. The mean difference in exercise capacity (as measured by oxygen uptake (VO2)% predicted) in children with moderate/severe BPD was −18±5% and −14±5.0% below children with no/mild BPD and control children, respectively. Children with moderate/severe BPD demonstrated a potentiated ventilatory response and greater prevalence of expiratory flow limitation during exercise compared with other groups. Resting lung function did not correlate with exercise capacity. Conclusions Expiratory flow limitation and an exaggerated ventilatory response contribute to respiratory limitation to exercise in children born EP with moderate/severe BPD. PMID:27259338

  8. Ventilatory function of healthy, urban, non smoking, Pakistani young adults aged 18-24 years.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, M A; Raza, S N; Malik, M A

    1999-08-01

    Age may have a different contribution to normal lung function values in those aged less than 25 years, as compared to older individuals. We report regression equations predicting ventilatory parameters in this age group, as none have been reported from Pakistan. The study was conducted on students of King Edward Medical College Lahore, Pakistan. Participants had never smoked and reported no respiratory symptoms. In addition to anthropometric data, forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory flow at 50% of FVC (FEF50) were measured. Equations predicting normal values of these parameters were derived using SPSS (Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.) P < or = 0.05 was treated as statistically significant. Of the students, 519 took part in the study. All four parameters correlated significantly (P < 0.001) and positively with height. FEF50 had a negative correlation with age in both sexes (P < 0.05). The correlation of other parameters with age was variable and not statistically significant. On multiple regression, height featured as an independent predictor in equations for all parameters. The contribution of age as an independent predictor of ventilatory function was, once again, variable. Independent variables were retained in the raw form as their transformation did not improve the goodness of fit of the derived equations. Only height and age emerged as independent predictors of ventilatory function. Values derived from the equations presented in this study were less than those for height and age matched white Caucasians. Such differences were greater than the 'Asian correction factors'.

  9. Exploratory study into the effect of abdominal mass loading on airways resistance and ventilatory failure

    PubMed Central

    Dattani, Raj S; Swerner, Casey B; Stradling, John R; Manuel, Ari RG

    2016-01-01

    Objective We hypothesised that the airway resistance during tidal breathing would correlate with a particular pattern of increasing obesity, particularly when supine, and would differ between participants with and without ventilatory failure. Methods In our cross-sectional cohort study, 72 morbidly obese patients (40 males, 32 females, mean body mass index (BMI) 47.2) had measurements of both airways resistance (by impulse oscillometry (IOS)) and adiposity (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)). Results All measures of airways resistance increased in the supine position: total airways resistance (R5) +37% (p<0.0005); large airways resistance (R20) +29% (p<0.0005); and small airways resistance (R5–R20) +52% (p<0.0005). BMI was correlated with seated R5, seated R5–R20, supine R5 and supine R5–R20 (r=0.33 p<0.006, r=0.32 p<0.004, r=0.30 p<0.02 and r=0.36 p<0.04, respectively). Visceral adipose tissue mass was correlated with supine R5–20 (r=0.46 p<0.05). Supine measures of total airways resistance (R5) and large airways resistance (R20) differed between those with and without ventilatory failure, as did mean weight and BMI. Conclusions Our study identifies a potentially detrimental effect of the supine posture on tidal breathing airways resistance in obese patients. This change is correlated most with visceral adipose tissue mass and the small airways. We were able to demonstrate that supine increases in airways resistance during tidal breathing, within obese patients, are different between those with and without ventilatory failure. Trial registration number NCT01380418; pre-results. PMID:27335651

  10. Kinetics of the ventilatory and metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in humans following prior exercise-induced metabolic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Susan A; Whipp, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    As the time constant of the phase 2 (ø2) ventilatory response (tauV'(E)) to moderate exercise (< lactate threshold, thetaL) is reduced by exogenous procedures that augment peripheral (carotid) chemosensitivity (hypoxia; chronic metabolic acidaemia), we examined whether an acute endogenous metabolic acidaemia had a similar effect. Six subjects completed two tests (A, B), each comprising two 6-min bouts separated by a 6-min "0" W recovery: A:- 90% thetaL, 90% thetaL; B:- supra-thetaL (50% between thetaL and peak V'O2), 90% thetaL. For Protocol A, the bout 2 sub-thetaL tauV'E was similar to bout 1. However, for Protocol B, where the initial supra-thetaL metabolic acidaemia was still evident at the end of the subsequent sub-thetaL bout, the sub-thetaL tauV'E was shorter; tauV'E/tauV'O2 and tauV'E/tauV'CO2 were reduced; and the transient end-tidal PO2undershoot was less marked. We conclude that an acute, endogenous metabolic acidaemia speeds ø2 V'(E) kinetics in moderate exercise, consistent with carotid chemoreception contributing to the tightness of arterial pH-CO2 regulation and the magnitude of the transient arterial hypoxaemia.

  11. Ventilatory Response to CO2 Rebreathing After Adrenergic Blockade in Goats,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-25

    NOTES E E T NA APR 1 1983 Ventilatory control, phentolamine , propranololSE 20, A~grlACrr.t’.t.e ,e..m dmNneeaay E idtify by blockn n~be...vent~ltr epnet yeoi C02 rebreathing in awake goats. Five goats were studied before and after intravenous administration of phentolamine (3.8 mg bolus...ventilation at end-tidal PCO = 70 torr for the CO2 response curves after the goats had received either phentolamine or propranolol. When mean inspira

  12. Validity and Reliability of Ventilatory and Blood Lactate Thresholds in Well-Trained Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Pallarés, Jesús G.; Morán-Navarro, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan Fernando; Fernández-Elías, Valentín Emilio; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine, i) the reliability of blood lactate and ventilatory-based thresholds, ii) the lactate threshold that corresponds with each ventilatory threshold (VT1 and VT2) and with maximal lactate steady state test (MLSS) as a proxy of cycling performance. Methods Fourteen aerobically-trained male cyclists (V˙O2max 62.1±4.6 ml·kg-1·min-1) performed two graded exercise tests (50 W warm-up followed by 25 W·min-1) to exhaustion. Blood lactate, V˙O2 and V˙CO2 data were collected at every stage. Workloads at VT1 (rise in V˙E/V˙O2;) and VT2 (rise in V˙E/V˙CO2) were compared with workloads at lactate thresholds. Several continuous tests were needed to detect the MLSS workload. Agreement and differences among tests were assessed with ANOVA, ICC and Bland-Altman. Reliability of each test was evaluated using ICC, CV and Bland-Altman plots. Results Workloads at lactate threshold (LT) and LT+2.0 mMol·L-1 matched the ones for VT1 and VT2, respectively (p = 0.147 and 0.539; r = 0.72 and 0.80; Bias = -13.6 and 2.8, respectively). Furthermore, workload at LT+0.5 mMol·L-1 coincided with MLSS workload (p = 0.449; r = 0.78; Bias = -4.5). Lactate threshold tests had high reliability (CV = 3.4–3.7%; r = 0.85–0.89; Bias = -2.1–3.0) except for DMAX method (CV = 10.3%; r = 0.57; Bias = 15.4). Ventilatory thresholds show high reliability (CV = 1.6%–3.5%; r = 0.90–0.96; Bias = -1.8–2.9) except for RER = 1 and V-Slope (CV = 5.0–6.4%; r = 0.79; Bias = -5.6–12.4). Conclusions Lactate threshold tests can be a valid and reliable alternative to ventilatory thresholds to identify the workloads at the transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. PMID:27657502

  13. Effect of CO₂ on the ventilatory sensitivity to rising body temperature during exercise.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiji; Honda, Yasushi; Miyakawa, Natsuki; Fujii, Naoto; Ichinose, Masashi; Koga, Shunsaku; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2011-05-01

    We examined the degree to which ventilatory sensitivity to rising body temperature (the slope of the regression line relating ventilation and body temperature) is altered by restoration of arterial PCO(2) to the eucapnic level during prolonged exercise in the heat. Thirteen subjects exercised for ~60 min on a cycle ergometer at 50% of peak O(2) uptake with and without inhalation of CO(2)-enriched air. Subjects began breathing CO(2)-enriched air at the point that end-tidal Pco(2) started to decline. Esophageal temperature (T(es)), minute ventilation (V(E)), tidal volume (V(T)), respiratory frequency (f(R)), respiratory gases, middle cerebral artery blood velocity, and arterial blood pressure were recorded continuously. When V(E), V(T), f(R), and ventilatory equivalents for O(2) uptake (V(E)/VO(2)) and CO(2) output (V(E)/VCO(2)) were plotted against changes in T(es) from the start of the CO(2)-enriched air inhalation (ΔT(es)), the slopes of the regression lines relating V(E), V(T), V(E)/VO(2), and V(E)/VCO(2) to ΔT(es) (ventilatory sensitivity to rising body temperature) were significantly greater when subjects breathed CO(2)-enriched air than when they breathed room air (V(E): 19.8 ± 10.3 vs. 8.9 ± 6.7 l·min(-1)·°C(-1), V(T): 18 ± 120 vs. -81 ± 92 ml/°C; V(E)/VO(2): 7.4 ± 5.5 vs. 2.6 ± 2.3 units/°C, and V(E)/VCO(2): 7.6 ± 6.6 vs. 3.4 ± 2.8 units/°C). The increase in Ve was accompanied by increases in V(T) and f(R). These results suggest that restoration of arterial PCO(2) to nearly eucapnic levels increases ventilatory sensitivity to rising body temperature by around threefold.

  14. Endoscopic lung volume reduction effectively treats acute respiratory failure secondary to bullous emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Paul; Garrett, Jeffrey E; Rankin, Nigel; Anderson, Graeme

    2010-10-01

    Emphysema often affects the lungs in a heterogeneous fashion, and collapse or removal of severely hyperinflated portions of lung can improve overall lung function and symptoms. The role of lung volume reduction (LVR) surgery in selected patients is well established, but that of non-surgical LVR is still being defined. In particular, use of endobronchial LVR is still under development. This case report describes a 48-year-old non-smoker with severe bullous emphysema complicated by acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, who was successfully treated by endobronchial valve placement while intubated in an intensive care unit.

  15. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Deficiency Blocks the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Thus Precipitates Hypoventilation and Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Amira D.; Lewis, Sophronia; Juričić, Lara; Udoh, Utibe-Abasi; Hartmann, Sandy; Jansen, Maurits A.; Ogunbayo, Oluseye A.; Puggioni, Paolo; Holmes, Andrew P.; Kumar, Prem; Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Dutia, Mayank B.; Marshall, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Modulation of breathing by hypoxia accommodates variations in oxygen demand and supply during, for example, sleep and ascent to altitude, but the precise molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon remain controversial. Among the genes influenced by natural selection in high-altitude populations is one for the adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase (AMPK) α1-catalytic subunit, which governs cell-autonomous adaptations during metabolic stress. Objectives: We investigated whether AMPK-α1 and/or AMPK-α2 are required for the hypoxic ventilatory response and the mechanism of ventilatory dysfunctions arising from AMPK deficiency. Methods: We used plethysmography, electrophysiology, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and immediate early gene (c-fos) expression to assess the hypoxic ventilatory response of mice with conditional deletion of the AMPK-α1 and/or AMPK-α2 genes in catecholaminergic cells, which compose the hypoxia-responsive respiratory network from carotid body to brainstem. Measurements and Main Results: AMPK-α1 and AMPK-α2 deletion virtually abolished the hypoxic ventilatory response, and ventilatory depression during hypoxia was exacerbated under anesthesia. Rather than hyperventilating, mice lacking AMPK-α1 and AMPK-α2 exhibited hypoventilation and apnea during hypoxia, with the primary precipitant being loss of AMPK-α1 expression. However, the carotid bodies of AMPK-knockout mice remained exquisitely sensitive to hypoxia, contrary to the view that the hypoxic ventilatory response is determined solely by increased carotid body afferent input to the brainstem. Regardless, functional magnetic resonance imaging and c-fos expression revealed reduced activation by hypoxia of well-defined dorsal and ventral brainstem nuclei. Conclusions: AMPK is required to coordinate the activation by hypoxia of brainstem respiratory networks, and deficiencies in AMPK expression precipitate hypoventilation and apnea, even when carotid body

  16. Pulmonary function test findings in patients with acute inhalation injury caused by smoke bombs

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Zhang, Xin-Gang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Han-Bin; Chen, Yi-Bing; Zhao, Da-Hui; Shi, Wen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the effects of smoke bomb-induced acute inhalation injury on pulmonary function at different stages of lung injury. Methods We performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in 15 patients with acute inhalation injury from days 3 to 180 after smoke inhalation. We measured the trace element zinc in whole blood on days 4 and 17, and correlations of zinc levels with PFTs were performed. Results In the acute stage of lung injury (day 3), 3 of 11 patients with mild symptoms had normal pulmonary function and 8 patients with restrictive ventilatory dysfunction and reduced diffusing capacity. Some patients also had mild obstructive ventilatory dysfunction (5 patients) and a decline in small airway function (6 patients). For patients with severe symptoms, PFT results showed moderate to severe restrictive ventilatory dysfunction and reduced diffusing capacity. PaCO2 was significantly higher (P=0.047) in patients with reduced small airway function compared with those with normal small airway function. Whole blood zinc levels in the convalescence stage (day 17) were significantly lower than those in the acute stage (day 4). Zinc in the acute stage was negatively correlated with DLCO/VA on days 3, 10, and 46 (r=−0.633, −0.676, and −0.675 respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions Smoke inhalation injury mainly causes restrictive ventilatory dysfunction and reduced diffusing capacity, and causes mild obstructive ventilatory dysfunction and small airway function decline in some patients. Zinc is negatively correlated with DLCO/VA. Zinc levels may be able to predict prognosis and indicate the degree of lung injury. PMID:28066595

  17. The midpoint between ventilatory thresholds approaches maximal lactate steady state intensity in amateur cyclists.

    PubMed

    Peinado, A B; Filho, Dm Pessôa; Díaz, V; Benito, P J; Álvarez-Sánchez, M; Zapico, A G; Calderón, F J

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to determine whether the midpoint between ventilatory thresholds (MPVT) corresponds to maximal lactate steady state (MLSS). Twelve amateur cyclists (21.0 ± 2.6 years old; 72.2 ± 9.0 kg; 179.8 ± 7.5 cm) performed an incremental test (25 W·min(-1)) until exhaustion and several constant load tests of 30 minutes to determine MLSS, on different occasions. Using MLSS determination as the reference method, the agreement with five other parameters (MPVT; first and second ventilatory thresholds: VT1 and VT2; respiratory exchange ratio equal to 1: RER = 1.00; and Maximum) was analysed by the Bland-Altman method. The difference between workload at MLSS and VT1, VT2, RER=1.00 and Maximum was 31.1 ± 20.0, -86.0 ± 18.3, -63.6 ± 26.3 and -192.3 ± 48.6 W, respectively. MLSS was underestimated from VT1 and overestimated from VT2, RER = 1.00 and Maximum. The smallest difference (-27.5 ± 15.1 W) between workload at MLSS and MPVT was in better agreement than other analysed parameters of intensity in cycling. The main finding is that MPVT approached the workload at MLSS in amateur cyclists, and can be used to estimate maximal steady state.

  18. Excess ventilation and ventilatory constraints during exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Teopompi, Elisabetta; Tzani, Panagiota; Aiello, Marina; Gioia, Maria Rosaria; Marangio, Emilio; Chetta, Alfredo

    2014-06-15

    We assessed the relationship between minute ventilation/carbon dioxide output (VE/VCO2) and ventilatory constraints during an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Slope and intercept of the VE/VCO2 linear relationship, the ratios of inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity (IC/TLC) and of tidal volume (VT) over vital capacity (VTpeak/VC) and IC (VTpeak/IC) and over forced expiratory volume at 1st second (VTpeak/FEV1) at peak of exercise were measured in 52 COPD patients during a CPET. The difference peak-rest in end-tidal pressure of CO2 (PETCO2) was also measured. VE/VCO2 intercept showed a negative correlation with IC/TLC peak (p<0.01) and a positive one with VTpeak/FEV1 (p<0.01) and with PETCO2 peak-rest (p<0.01). VE/VCO2 slope was negatively related to VTpeak/VC, VTpeak/IC and VTpeak/FEV1 (all correlations p<0.05) and to PETCO2 peak-rest (p<0.01). In COPD, VE/VCO2 slope and intercept provide complementary information on the ventilatory limitation to exercise, as assessed by changes in the end-expiratory lung volume and in tidal volume excursion.

  19. Acclimatable cardiac and ventilatory responses to copper in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Bini, Giada; Chelazzi, Guido

    2006-11-01

    Mortality and physiological tests following exposure to waterborne copper were performed in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii from a central Italian population. Mortality tests gave an estimated 96 h LC50 value (with 95% confidence limits) of 162 (132-211) mg L(-1) waterborne copper II. Variations in cardiac and ventilatory rates were simultaneously monitored using a non-invasive plethysmographic technique. In experiments with different sub-lethal copper concentrations (control, 0.5, 1 and 10 mg L(-1)) performed at different times (3, 6, 96 h), copper exposure elicited a reduction in both heart and scaphognatite rates. Following exposure to 10 mg L(-1) copper for 96 h, the heart and scaphognatite rates decreased to about 35% of the initial values. The reduction was fully reversible, since crayfish exposed to 0.5, 1 and 10 mg Cu L(-1) for 96 h resumed control rates after a 3-h residence in clean water. In crayfish pre-exposed (96 h) to sub-lethal copper concentrations (0.1 and 1 mg L(-1)) and then held in control water (3 h), the reduction of heart and scaphognatite rates after exposure to 10 mg Cu L(-1) were significantly lower than in specimens pre-exposed to control water. Therefore, copper induces a concentration and time dependent reduction of both cardiac and ventilatory activity in P. clarkii; these responses can be reduced or fully abolished by pre-exposure to sub-lethal levels of the metal.

  20. Ventilatory weaning practices in intensive care units in the city of Cali

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Vilma; Calvo, Lucía; Ramírez, María Fernanda; Arias, Marcela; Villota, Mario; Wilches-Luna, Esther Cecilia; Soto, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Early weaning from mechanical ventilation is one of the primary goals in managing critically ill patients. There are various techniques and measurement parameters for such weaning. The objective of this study was to describe the practices of ventilatory weaning in adult intensive care units in the city of Cali. Methods A survey of 32 questions (some multiple choice) evaluating weaning practices was distributed to physiotherapists and respiratory therapists working in intensive care units, to be answered anonymously. Results The most common strategy for the parameter set was the combination of continuous positive airway pressure with pressure support (78%), with a large variability in pressure levels, the most common range being 6 to 8cmH2O. The most common weaning parameters were as follows: tidal volume (92.6%), respiratory rate (93.3%) and oxygen saturation (90.4%). The most common waiting time for registration of the parameters was >15 minutes (40%). The measurements were preferably obtained from the ventilator display. Conclusion The methods and measurement parameters of ventilatory weaning vary greatly. The most commonly used method was continuous positive airway pressure with more pressure support and the most commonly used weaning parameters were the measured tidal volume and respiratory rate. PMID:25028947

  1. Fluoxetine augments ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in Brown Norway but not Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Matthew R.; Echert, Ashley E.; Puissant, Madeleine M.; Mouradian, Gary C.

    2013-01-01

    The Brown Norway (BN; BN/NHsdMcwi) rat exhibits a deficit in ventilatory CO2 sensitivity and a modest serotonin (5-HT) deficiency. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine would augment CO2 sensitivity in BN but not Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Ventilation during room air or 7 % CO2 exposure was measured before, during and after 3 weeks of daily injections of saline or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day) in adult male BN and SD rats. Fluoxetine had minimal effects on room air breathing in BN and SD rats (p>0.05), although tidal volume (VT) was reduced in BN rats (p<0.05). There were also minimal effects of fluoxetine on CO2 sensitivity in SD rats, but fluoxetine increased minute ventilation, breathing frequency and VT during hypercapnia in BN rats (p<0.05). The augmented CO2 response was reversible upon withdrawal of fluoxetine. Brain levels of biogenic amines were largely unaffected, but 5-HIAA and the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT were reduced (p<0.05) consistent with selective and effective 5-HT reuptake inhibition. Thus, fluoxetine increases ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in BN but not SD rats, further suggesting altered 5-HT system function may contribute to the inherently low CO2 sensitivity in the BN rat. PMID:23454023

  2. Fluoxetine augments ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in Brown Norway but not Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Matthew R; Echert, Ashley E; Puissant, Madeleine M; Mouradian, Gary C

    2013-04-01

    The Brown Norway (BN; BN/NHsdMcwi) rat exhibits a deficit in ventilatory CO2 sensitivity and a modest serotonin (5-HT) deficiency. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine would augment CO2 sensitivity in BN but not Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Ventilation during room air or 7% CO2 exposure was measured before, during and after 3 weeks of daily injections of saline or fluoxetine (10mg/(kgday)) in adult male BN and SD rats. Fluoxetine had minimal effects on room air breathing in BN and SD rats (p>0.05), although tidal volume (VT) was reduced in BN rats (p<0.05). There were also minimal effects of fluoxetine on CO2 sensitivity in SD rats, but fluoxetine increased minute ventilation, breathing frequency and VT during hypercapnia in BN rats (p<0.05). The augmented CO2 response was reversible upon withdrawal of fluoxetine. Brain levels of biogenic amines were largely unaffected, but 5-HIAA and the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT were reduced (p<0.05) consistent with selective and effective 5-HT reuptake inhibition. Thus, fluoxetine increases ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in BN but not SD rats, further suggesting altered 5-HT system function may contribute to the inherently low CO2 sensitivity in the BN rat.

  3. T3 supplementation affects ventilatory timing & glucose levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus model.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Stephen S; Weltman, Nathen Y; Gerdes, A Martin; Schlenker, Evelyn H

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can affect ventilation, metabolism, and fasting blood glucose levels. Hypothyroidism may be a comorbidity of T2DM. In this study T2DM was induced in 20 female Sprague Dawley rats using Streptozotocin (STZ) and Nicotinamide (N). One of experimental STZ/N groups (N=10 per group) was treated with a low dose of triiodothyronine (T3). Blood glucose levels, metabolism and ventilation (in air and in response to hypoxia) were measured in the 3 groups. STZ/N-treated rats increased fasting blood glucose compared to control rats eight days and 2 months post-STZ/N injections indicating stable induction of T2DM state. Treatments had no effects on ventilation, metabolism or body weight. After one month of T3 supplementation, there were no physiological indications of hyperthyroidism, but T3 supplementation altered ventilatory timing and decreased blood glucose levels compared to STZ/N rats. These results suggest that low levels of T3 supplementation could offer modest effects on blood glucose and ventilatory timing in this T2M model.

  4. Inductive plethysmography potential as a surrogate for ventilatory measurements during rest and moderate physical exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cabiddu, Ramona; Pantoni, Camila B. F.; Mendes, Renata G.; Trimer, Renata; Catai, Aparecida M.; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Portable respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) systems have been validated for ventilatory assessment during resting conditions and during incremental treadmill exercise. However, in clinical settings and during field-based exercise, intensity is usually constant and submaximal. A demonstration of the ability of RIP to detect respiratory measurements accurately during constant intensity conditions would promote and validate the routine use of portable RIP devices as an alternative to ergospirometry (ES), the current gold standard technique for ventilatory measures. Objective: To investigate the agreement between respiratory variables recorded by a portable RIP device and by ES during rest and constant intensity exercise. Method: Tidal volume (VT), respiratory rate (RR) and minute ventilation (VE) were concurrently acquired by portable RIP and ES in seven healthy male volunteers during standing rest position and constant intensity treadmill exercise. Results: Significant agreement was found between RIP and ES acquisitions during the standing rest position and constant intensity treadmill exercise for RR and during the standing rest position for VE. Conclusion: Our results suggest that portable RIP devices might represent a suitable alternative to ES during rest and during constant submaximal exercise. PMID:26982454

  5. Ventilatory and circulatory responses to hyperthermia in the mute swan (Cygnus olor).

    PubMed

    Bech, C; Johansen, K

    1980-10-01

    Ventilatory parameters of mute swans were measured at thermoneutral conditions and during heat stress. Deep body temperature increased from 39.5 to 41.1 degrees C. Breathing frequency increased 29 times, compared to the thermoneutral condition. Tidal volume decreased to 18% of the pre-panting value, and the total ventilatory volume increased by 5.4 times. End-tidal PCO2 and PO2 values decreased and increased, respectively. The swans developed a slight respiratory alkalosis; arterial PCO2 decreased from an average of 27.1 to 25.7 mmHG and arterial pH increased from 7.501 to 7.559. Cardiac output, heart rate and stroke volume were 106%, 154%, and 70%, respectively, of the values at thermoneutrality. Mean arterial blood pressure and total peripheral resistance were slightly reduced. It is concluded that the increased ventilation during panting mainly constitutes dead space ventilation resulting from the great reduction in tidal volume. Parabronchial ventilation remains nearly unchanged, resulting in only a slight hypocapnic alkalosis.

  6. The midpoint between ventilatory thresholds approaches maximal lactate steady state intensity in amateur cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Filho, DM Pessôa; Díaz, V; Benito, PJ; Álvarez-Sánchez, M; Zapico, AG; Calderón, FJ

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to determine whether the midpoint between ventilatory thresholds (MPVT) corresponds to maximal lactate steady state (MLSS). Twelve amateur cyclists (21.0 ± 2.6 years old; 72.2 ± 9.0 kg; 179.8 ± 7.5 cm) performed an incremental test (25 W·min-1) until exhaustion and several constant load tests of 30 minutes to determine MLSS, on different occasions. Using MLSS determination as the reference method, the agreement with five other parameters (MPVT; first and second ventilatory thresholds: VT1 and VT2; respiratory exchange ratio equal to 1: RER = 1.00; and Maximum) was analysed by the Bland-Altman method. The difference between workload at MLSS and VT1, VT2, RER=1.00 and Maximum was 31.1 ± 20.0, -86.0 ± 18.3, -63.6 ± 26.3 and -192.3 ± 48.6 W, respectively. MLSS was underestimated from VT1 and overestimated from VT2, RER = 1.00 and Maximum. The smallest difference (-27.5 ± 15.1 W) between workload at MLSS and MPVT was in better agreement than other analysed parameters of intensity in cycling. The main finding is that MPVT approached the workload at MLSS in amateur cyclists, and can be used to estimate maximal steady state. PMID:28090142

  7. Stress-induced thermotolerance of ventilatory motor pattern generation in the locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Newman, Amy E M; Foerster, Melody; Shoemaker, Kelly L; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2003-11-01

    Ventilation is a crucial motor activity that provides organisms with an adequate circulation of respiratory gases. For animals that exist in harsh environments, an important goal is to protect ventilation under extreme conditions. Heat shock, anoxia, and cold shock are environmental stresses that have previously been shown to trigger protective responses. We used the locust to examine stress-induced thermotolerance by monitoring the ability of the central nervous system to generate ventilatory motor patterns during a subsequent heat exposure. Preparations from pre-stressed animals had an increased incidence of motor pattern recovery following heat-induced failure, however, prior stress did not alter the characteristics of the ventilatory motor pattern. During constant heat exposure at sub-lethal temperatures, we observed a protective effect of heat shock pre-treatment. Serotonin application had similar effects on motor patterns when compared to prior heat shock. These studies are consistent with previous studies that indicate prior exposure to extreme temperatures and hypoxia can protect neural operation against high temperature stress. They further suggest that the protective mechanism is a time-dependent process best revealed during prolonged exposure to extreme temperatures and is mediated by a neuromodulator such as serotonin.

  8. Respiratory muscle activity and patient–ventilator asynchrony during different settings of noninvasive ventilation in stable hypercapnic COPD: does high inspiratory pressure lead to respiratory muscle unloading?

    PubMed Central

    Duiverman, Marieke L; Huberts, Anouk S; van Eykern, Leo A; Bladder, Gerrie; Wijkstra, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction High-intensity noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has been shown to improve outcomes in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. However, there is insufficient knowledge about whether with this more controlled ventilatory mode optimal respiratory muscle unloading is provided without an increase in patient–ventilator asynchrony (PVA). Patients and methods Ten chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients on home mechanical ventilation were included. Four different ventilatory settings were investigated in each patient in random order, each for 15 min, varying the inspiratory positive airway pressure and backup breathing frequency. With surface electromyography (EMG), activities of the intercostal muscles, diaphragm, and scalene muscles were determined. Furthermore, pressure tracings were derived simultaneously in order to assess PVA. Results Compared to spontaneous breathing, the most pronounced decrease in EMG activity was achieved with the high-pressure settings. Adding a high breathing frequency did reduce EMG activity per breath, while the decrease in EMG activity over 1 min was comparable with the high-pressure, low-frequency setting. With high backup breathing frequencies less breaths were pressure supported (25% vs 97%). PVAs occurred more frequently with the low-frequency settings (P=0.017). Conclusion High-intensity NIV might provide optimal unloading of respiratory muscles, without undue increases in PVA. PMID:28138234

  9. EFFECTS OF INDUCED RESPIRATORY CHANGES ON CARDIAC, VENTILATORY, AND THERMOREGULATORY PARAMETERS IN HEALTHY SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF INDUCED RESPIRATORY CHANGES ON CARDIAC, VENTILATORY, AND THERMOREGULATORY PARAMETERS IN HEALTHY SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS. LB Wichers1, WH Rowan2, DL Costa2, MJ Campen3 and WP Watkinson2 1UNC SPH, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, USA; 3LRRI, A...

  10. Effect of Same-day Sequential Exposure to Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone on Cardiac and Ventilatory Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the cardiac and ventilatory effects of sequential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and then ozone. The data show that mice exposed to both gases have increased arrhythmia and breathing changes not observed in the other groups. Although the mechanisms underlying ai...

  11. Low-dose morphine elicits ventilatory excitant and depressant responses in conscious rats: Role of peripheral μ-opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Fraser; May, Walter J.; Gruber, Ryan B.; Young, Alex P.; Palmer, Lisa A.; Gaston, Benjamin; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The systemic administration of morphine affects ventilation via a mixture of central and peripheral actions. The aims of this study were to characterize the ventilatory responses elicited by a low dose of morphine in conscious rats; to determine whether tolerance develops to these responses; and to determine the potential roles of peripheral μ-opioid receptors (μ-ORs) in these responses. Ventilatory parameters were monitored via unrestrained whole-body plethysmography. Conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats received an intravenous injection of vehicle or the peripherally-restricted μ-OR antagonist, naloxone methiodide (NLXmi), and then three successive injections of morphine (1 mg/kg) given 30 min apart. The first injection of morphine in vehicle-treated rats elicited an array of ventilatory excitant (i.e., increases in frequency of breathing, minute volume, respiratory drive, peak inspiratory and expiratory flows, accompanied by decreases in inspiratory time and end inspiratory pause) and inhibitory (i.e., a decrease in tidal volume and an increase in expiratory time) responses. Subsequent injections of morphine elicited progressively and substantially smaller responses. The pattern of ventilatory responses elicited by the first injection of morphine was substantially affected by pretreatment with NLXmi whereas NLXmi minimally affected the development of tolerance to these responses. Low-dose morphine elicits an array of ventilatory excitant and depressant effects in conscious rats that are subject to the development of tolerance. Many of these initial actions of morphine appear to involve activation of peripheral μ-ORs whereas the development of tolerance to these responses does not. PMID:24900948

  12. Role of the peripheral chemoreflex in the early stages of ventilatory acclimatization to altitude.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Peter A

    2007-09-30

    This review of ventilatory acclimatization to altitude/hypoxia (VAH) emphasizes the widely differing timescales that VAH is considered to encompass. The review concludes: (1) that early (24-48h) VAH is unlikely to arise as a reaction to the respiratory alkalosis that is normally associated with exposure to hypoxia; (2) that changes in peripheral chemoreflex function may be sufficiently rapid to explain early VAH; (3) that alterations in gene expression induced by hypoxia through the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signalling pathway may underlie a major component of VAH; and (4) that compensatory adjustments to acid-base balance in response to the initial respiratory alkalosis may have more significance for the slower changes observed later in VAH.

  13. Higher ventilatory responses during and after passive walking-like leg movement in older individuals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Minute ventilation (V·E) during walking has been shown to be higher in older individuals than in young individuals, but the mechanisms underlying the higher ventilatory response is unclear. Central command and peripheral neural reflex are important neural control mechanisms underlying ventilatory response during exercise. Passive leg movement has been used to exclude the influence of central command due to the lack of voluntary activation of muscles. The aim of the present study was to compare the ventilatory response during and after passive walking-like leg movement (PWM) in young and older individuals. Methods Eight young subjects (20 ± 2 years) and seven older subjects (70 ± 1 years) participated in this study. Subjects spent 7 minutes in a quiet standing (QS) position. Thereafter, they performed 14-minute rhythmic PWM at 1 Hz and this was followed by 7 minutes of QS. Results V·E values during pre-PWM QS were calculated as 1-minute averages using data obtained between 5 and 6 minutes. V·E values at pre-PWM QS in the young and older groups were 8.4 ± 2.1 and 7.5 ± 1.2 l/minute, respectively. V·E values increased significantly at the first minute of PWM to 11.4 ± 2.2 and 10.4 ± 2.5 l/minute in the young and older groups, respectively (P <0.001). In the young group, V·E at the last minute of PWM (9.2 ± 2.0 l/minute) was not significantly different from that at pre-PWM QS due to a decline in V·E, whereas V·E at the last minute of PWM in the older group (9.4 ± 2.2 l/minute) was still significantly higher (P <0.01). On the other hand, V·E at the first minute of post-PWM QS (7.2 ± 1.8 l/minute) was significantly lower than that during pre-PWM QS in the young group (P <0.05) but not in the older group. Conclusions Ventilatory response during and after PWM is higher in older individuals than in young individuals. This may be associated with a mechanism(s) other than central command. Our findings

  14. Central and peripheral cardiovascular, ventilatory, and motor effects of trout urotensin-II in the trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Leprince, Jérôme; Conlon, J Michael; Vaudry, Hubert

    2008-05-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) was originally considered to be exclusively the product of the caudal neurosecretory system (CNSS) of teleost fish, but it has now been demonstrated that U-II is widely expressed in peripheral tissues and nervous structures of species from lampreys to mammals. However, very little is known regarding the physiological effects of this peptide in its species of origin. In the present review, we summarize the most significant results relating to the cardiovascular, ventilatory, and motor effects of centrally and peripherally administered synthetic trout U-II in our experimental animal model, the unanesthetized trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In addition, we compare the actions of U-II with those of other neurohormonal peptides, particularly with the actions of urotensin-I, a 41-amino acid residue peptide paralogous to corticotropin-releasing hormone that is co-localized with U-II within neurons of the CNSS.

  15. Heat and moisture exchanger: importance of humidification in anaesthesia and ventilatory breathing system.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Vandana

    2008-08-01

    Adequate humidification is vital to maintain homeostasis of the airway. Heat and moisture exchangers conserve some of the exhaled water, heat and return them to inspired gases. Many heat and moisture exchangers also perfom bacterial/viral filtration and prevent inhalation of small particles. Heat and moisture exchangers are also called condenser humidifier, artificial nose, etc. Most of them are disposable devices with exchanging medium enclosed in a plastic housing. For adult and paediatric age group different dead space types are available. Heat and moisture exchangers are helpful during anaesthesia and ventilatory breathing system. To reduce the damage of the upper respiratory tract through cooling and dehydration inspiratory air can be heated and humidified, thus preventing the serious complications.

  16. The effect of inspiratory muscle fatigue on breathing pattern and ventilatory response to CO2.

    PubMed Central

    Mador, M J; Tobin, M J

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of inducing inspiratory muscle fatigue on the subsequent breathing pattern were examined during resting unstimulated breathing and during CO2 rebreathing. In addition, we examined whether induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue alters CO2 responsiveness. 2. Global inspiratory muscle fatigue and diaphragmatic fatigue were achieved by having subjects breathe against an inspiratory resistive load while generating a predetermined fraction of either their maximal mouth pressure or maximal transdiaphragmatic pressure until they were unable to generate the target pressure. 3. Induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue had no effect on the subsequent breathing pattern during either unstimulated breathing or during CO2 rebreathing. 4. Following induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue, the slope of the ventilatory response to CO2 was significantly decreased from 18.8 +/- 3.3 during control to 13.8 +/- 2.1 l min-1 (% end-tidal CO2 concentration)-1 with fatigue (P < 0.02). PMID:1484352

  17. Chaotic dynamics of cardioventilatory coupling in humans: effects of ventilatory modes.

    PubMed

    Mangin, Laurence; Clerici, Christine; Similowski, Thomas; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2009-04-01

    Cardioventilatory coupling (CVC), a transient temporal alignment between the heartbeat and inspiratory activity, has been studied in animals and humans mainly during anesthesia. The origin of the coupling remains uncertain, whether or not ventilation is a main determinant in the CVC process and whether the coupling exhibits chaotic behavior. In this frame, we studied sedative-free, mechanically ventilated patients experiencing rapid sequential changes in breathing control during ventilator weaning during a switch from a machine-controlled assistance mode [assist-controlled ventilation (ACV)] to a patient-driven mode [inspiratory pressure support (IPS) and unsupported spontaneous breathing (USB)]. Time series were computed as R to start inspiration (RI) and R to the start of expiration (RE). Chaos was characterized with the noise titration method (noise limit), largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and correlation dimension (CD). All the RI and RE time series exhibit chaotic behavior. Specific coupling patterns were displayed in each ventilatory mode, and these patterns exhibited different linear and chaotic dynamics. When switching from ACV to IPS, partial inspiratory loading decreases the noise limit value, the LLE, and the correlation dimension of the RI and RE time series in parallel, whereas decreasing intrathoracic pressure from IPS to USB has the opposite effect. Coupling with expiration exhibits higher complexity than coupling with inspiration during mechanical ventilation either during ACV or IPS, probably due to active expiration. Only 33% of the cardiac time series (RR interval) exhibit complexity either during ACV, IPS, or USB making the contribution of the cardiac signal to the chaotic feature of the coupling minimal. We conclude that 1) CVC in unsedated humans exhibits a complex dynamic that can be chaotic, and 2) ventilatory mode has major effects on the linear and chaotic features of the coupling. Taken together these findings reinforce the role of

  18. Dynamic Characteristics of Ventilatory and Gas Exchange during Sinusoidal Walking in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Iihoshi, Masaaki; Nazunin, Juhelee Tuba; Abe, Daijiro; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Our present study investigated whether the ventilatory and gas exchange responses show different dynamics in response to sinusoidal change in cycle work rate or walking speed even if the metabolic demand was equivalent in both types of exercise. Locomotive parameters (stride length and step frequency), breath-by-breath ventilation (V̇E) and gas exchange (CO2 output (V̇CO2) and O2 uptake (V̇O2)) responses were measured in 10 healthy young participants. The speed of the treadmill was sinusoidally changed between 3 km·h-1 and 6 km·h-1 with various periods (from 10 to 1 min). The amplitude of locomotive parameters against sinusoidal variation showed a constant gain with a small phase shift, being independent of the oscillation periods. In marked contrast, when the periods of the speed oscillations were shortened, the amplitude of V̇E decreased sharply whereas the phase shift of V̇E increased. In comparing walking and cycling at the equivalent metabolic demand, the amplitude of V̇E during sinusoidal walking (SW) was significantly greater than that during sinusoidal cycling (SC), and the phase shift became smaller. The steeper slope of linear regression for the V̇E amplitude ratio to V̇CO2 amplitude ratio was observed during SW than SC. These findings suggested that the greater amplitude and smaller phase shift of ventilatory dynamics were not equivalent between SW and SC even if the metabolic demand was equivalent between both exercises. Such phenomenon would be derived from central command in proportion to locomotor muscle recruitment (feedforward) and muscle afferent feedback. PMID:28076413

  19. Effects of body position on the ventilatory response following an impulse exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Haouzi, Philippe; Chenuel, Bruno; Chalon, Bernard

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify some of the mechanisms that could be involved in blunted ventilatory response (VE) to exercise in the supine (S) position. The contribution of the recruitment of different muscle groups, the activity of the cardiac mechanoreceptors, the level of arterial baroreceptor stimulation, and the hemodynamic effects of gravity on the exercising muscles was analyzed during upright (U) and S exercise. Delayed rise in VE and pulmonary gas exchange following an impulselike change in work rate (supramaximal leg cycling at 240 W for 12 s) was measured in seven healthy subjects and six heart transplant patients both in U and S positions. This approach allows study of the relationship between the rise in VE and O2 uptake (VO2) without the confounding effects of contractions of different muscle groups. These responses were compared with those triggered by an impulselike change in work rate produced by the arms, which were positioned at the same level as the heart in S and U positions to separate effects of gravity on postexercising muscles from those on the rest of the body. Despite superimposable VO2 and CO2 output responses, the delayed VE response after leg exercise was significantly lower in the S posture than in the U position for each control subject and cardiac-transplant patient (-2.58 +/- 0.44 l and -3.52 +/- 1.11 l/min, respectively). In contrast, when impulse exercise was performed with the arms, reduction of ventilatory response in the S posture reached, at best, one-third of the deficit after leg exercise and was always associated with a reduction in VO2 of a similar magnitude. We concluded that reduction in VE response to exercise in the S position is independent of the types (groups) of muscles recruited and is not critically dependent on afferent signals originating from the heart but seems to rely on some of the effects of gravity on postexercising muscles.

  20. Influence of developmental nicotine exposure on the ventilatory and metabolic response to hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Ferng, Jonathan; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2015-12-01

    To determine whether developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) alters the ventilatory and metabolic response to hyperthermia in neonatal rats (postnatal age 2-4 days), pregnant dams were exposed to nicotine (6 mg kg(-1) of nicotine tartrate daily) or saline with an osmotic mini-pump implanted subdermally on day 5 of gestation. Rat pups (a total of 72 controls and 72 DNE pups) were studied under thermoneutral conditions (chamber temperature 33°C) and during moderate thermal stress (37.5°C). In all pups, core temperature was similar to chamber temperature, with no treatment effects. The rates of pulmonary ventilation (V̇(I)), O2 consumption (V̇(O2)) and CO2 production (V̇(CO2)) did not change with hyperthermia in either control or DNE pups. However, V̇(I) was lower in DNE pups at both chamber temperatures, whereas the duration of spontaneous apnoeas was longer in DNE pups than in controls at 33°C. The V̇(I)/V̇(O2) ratio increased at 37.5°C in control pups, although it did not change in DNE pups. To simulate severe thermal stress, additional pups were studied at 33°C and 43°C. V̇(I) increased with heating in control pups but not in DNE pups. As heat stress continued, gasping was evoked in both groups, with no effect of DNE on the gasping pattern. Over a 20 min recovery period at 33°C, V̇(I) returned to baseline in control pups but remained depressed in DNE pups. In addition to altering baseline V̇(I) and apnoea duration, DNE is associated with subtle but significant alterations in the ventilatory response to hyperthermia in neonatal rats.

  1. Ventilatory defect in coal workers with simple pneumoconiosis: early detection of functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lin, L C; Yang, S C; Lu, K W

    2001-05-01

    Airway obstruction is a prominent feature in coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). However, many patients with CWP have even demonstrated a normal forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ventilatory defect by spirometry and search for parameters, other than FVC and FEV1, suitable for early detection of pulmonary impairment in CWP. A sample of 227 coal miners was selected from the medical clinics of two teaching hospitals. Maximal expiratory flow volume measurement and determination of functional residual capacity (FRC) and residual volume (RV) were carried out with an automated plethysmograph. The prevalence of airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC < 70%) in this sample of miners was 52.9% (120/227). There was a progression of functional impairment with the transition from category 0 to categories 2 and 3, no matter what the miners smoking habits. All of the 107 non-obstructed miners had a normal FVC and FEV1. However, the mean values for FEF25-75% (mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of FVC) and Vmax50 (maximal expiratory flow rate at 50% FVC) were abnormally low, and RV was already elevated, in those non-obstructed subjects with category 1 simple pneumoconiosis. A borderline abnormally elevated FRC in the miners with radiological category 3 of CWP was also noted. We conclude that the Vmax50, FEF25-75%, and RV appeared to be the discriminative indices for detecting early ventilatory defect in non-obstructed patients with simple CWP. Further studies is still needed to clarify the cause of small airway dysfunction.

  2. Inhalation of the nerve gas sarin impairs ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jianguo; Xu, Fadi; Campen, Matthew J; Zhang, Cancan; Pena-Philippides, Juan C; Sopori, Mohan L

    2008-11-01

    Sarin, a highly toxic nerve gas, is believed to cause bronchoconstriction and even death primarily through respiratory failure; however, the mechanism underlying the respiratory failure is not fully understood. The goals of this study were to ascertain whether sarin affects baseline ventilation (VE) and VE chemoreflexes as well as airway resistance and, if so, whether these changes are reversible. Four groups of F344 rats were exposed to vehicle (VEH) or sarin at 2.5, 3.5, and 4.0 mg h m(-3) (SL, SM, and SH, respectively). VE and VE responses to hypercapnia (7% CO2) or hypoxia (10% O2) were measured by plethysmography at 2 h and 1, 2, and 5 days after VEH or sarin exposure. Total pulmonary resistance (RL) also was measured in anesthetized VEH- and SH-exposed animals 2 h after exposure. Our results showed that within 2 h after exposure 11% of the SM- and 52% of the SH- exposed groups died. Although the SM and SH significantly decreased hypercapnic and hypoxic VE to similar levels (64 and 69%), SH induced greater respiratory impairment, characterized by lower baseline VE (30%; P<0.05), and total loss of the respiratory frequency response to hypercapnia and hypoxia. VE impairment recovered within 1-2 days after sarin exposure; interestingly, SH did not significantly affect baseline RL. Moreover, sarin induced body tremors that were unrelated to the changes in the VE responses. Thus, LC50 sarin causes a reversible impairment of VE that is not dependent on the sarin-induced body tremors and not associated with changes in RL.

  3. Inhalation of the nerve gas sarin impairs ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Jianguo; Xu Fadi Campen, Matthew J.; Zhang Cancan; Pena-Philippides, Juan C.; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2008-11-01

    Sarin, a highly toxic nerve gas, is believed to cause bronchoconstriction and even death primarily through respiratory failure; however, the mechanism underlying the respiratory failure is not fully understood. The goals of this study were to ascertain whether sarin affects baseline ventilation (V{sub E}) and V{sub E} chemoreflexes as well as airway resistance and, if so, whether these changes are reversible. Four groups of F344 rats were exposed to vehicle (VEH) or sarin at 2.5, 3.5, and 4.0 mg h m{sup -3} (SL, SM, and SH, respectively). V{sub E} and V{sub E} responses to hypercapnia (7% CO{sub 2}) or hypoxia (10% O{sub 2}) were measured by plethysmography at 2 h and 1, 2, and 5 days after VEH or sarin exposure. Total pulmonary resistance (R{sub L}) also was measured in anesthetized VEH- and SH-exposed animals 2 h after exposure. Our results showed that within 2 h after exposure 11% of the SM- and 52% of the SH- exposed groups died. Although the SM and SH significantly decreased hypercapnic and hypoxic V{sub E} to similar levels (64 and 69%), SH induced greater respiratory impairment, characterized by lower baseline V{sub E} (30%; P < 0.05), and total loss of the respiratory frequency response to hypercapnia and hypoxia. V{sub E} impairment recovered within 1-2 days after sarin exposure; interestingly, SH did not significantly affect baseline R{sub L}. Moreover, sarin induced body tremors that were unrelated to the changes in the V{sub E} responses. Thus, LC{sub 50} sarin causes a reversible impairment of V{sub E} that is not dependent on the sarin-induced body tremors and not associated with changes in R{sub L}.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB in the piglet brainstem after post-natal nicotine and intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Samantha; Machaalani, Rita; Waters, Karen A

    2008-09-26

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB play a significant role in the regulation of cell growth, survival and death during central nervous system development. The expression of BDNF and TrkB is affected by noxious insults. Two insults during the early post-natal period that are of interest to our laboratory are exposure to nicotine and to intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia (IHH). Piglet models were used to mimic the conditions associated with the risk factors for the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) including post-natal cigarette smoke exposure (nicotine model) and prone sleeping where the infant is subjected to re-breathing of expired gases (IHH model). We aimed to determine the effects of nicotine and IHH, alone or in combination, on pro- and rhBDNF and TrkB expression in the developing piglet brainstem. Four piglet groups were studied, with equal gender ratios in each: control (n=14), nicotine (n=14), IHH (n=10) and nic+IHH (n=14). Applying immunohistochemistry, and studying six nuclei of the caudal medulla, we found that compared to controls, TrkB was the only protein significantly decreased after nicotine and nic+IHH exposure regardless of gender. For pro-BDNF and rhBDNF however, observed changes were more evident in males than females exposed to nicotine and nic+IHH. The implications of these findings are that a prior nicotine exposure makes the developing brainstem susceptible to greater changes in the neurotrophic effects of BDNF and its receptor TrkB in the face of a hypoxic insult, and that the effects are greater in males than females.

  5. AltitudeOmics: impaired pulmonary gas exchange efficiency and blunted ventilatory acclimatization in humans with patent foramen ovale after 16 days at 5,260 m.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jonathan E; Laurie, Steven S; Kern, Julia P; Beasley, Kara M; Goodman, Randall D; Kayser, Bengt; Subudhi, Andrew W; Roach, Robert C; Lovering, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    A patent foramen ovale (PFO), present in ∼40% of the general population, is a potential source of right-to-left shunt that can impair pulmonary gas exchange efficiency [i.e., increase the alveolar-to-arterial Po2 difference (A-aDO2)]. Prior studies investigating human acclimatization to high-altitude with A-aDO2 as a key parameter have not investigated differences between subjects with (PFO+) or without a PFO (PFO-). We hypothesized that in PFO+ subjects A-aDO2 would not improve (i.e., decrease) after acclimatization to high altitude compared with PFO- subjects. Twenty-one (11 PFO+) healthy sea-level residents were studied at rest and during cycle ergometer exercise at the highest iso-workload achieved at sea level (SL), after acute transport to 5,260 m (ALT1), and again at 5,260 m after 16 days of high-altitude acclimatization (ALT16). In contrast to PFO- subjects, PFO+ subjects had 1) no improvement in A-aDO2 at rest and during exercise at ALT16 compared with ALT1, 2) no significant increase in resting alveolar ventilation, or alveolar Po2, at ALT16 compared with ALT1, and consequently had 3) an increased arterial Pco2 and decreased arterial Po2 and arterial O2 saturation at rest at ALT16. Furthermore, PFO+ subjects had an increased incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) at ALT1 concomitant with significantly lower peripheral O2 saturation (SpO2). These data suggest that PFO+ subjects have increased susceptibility to AMS when not taking prophylactic treatments, that right-to-left shunt through a PFO impairs pulmonary gas exchange efficiency even after acclimatization to high altitude, and that PFO+ subjects have blunted ventilatory acclimatization after 16 days at altitude compared with PFO- subjects.

  6. Relation of ventilatory impairment and of chronic mucus hypersecretion to mortality from obstructive lung disease and from all causes.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, P; Nyboe, J; Appleyard, M; Jensen, G; Schnohr, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation of ventilatory impairment and chronic mucus hypersecretion to death from all causes and death from obstructive lung disease (chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma) was studied in 13,756 men and women randomly selected from the general population of the City of Copenhagen. During the 10 year follow up 2288 subjects died. In 164 subjects obstructive lung disease was considered to be an underlying or a contributory cause of death (obstructive lung disease related death); in 73 subjects it was considered to be the underlying cause of death (obstructive lung disease death). Forced expiratory volume in one second, expressed as a percentage of the predicted value (FEV1% pred), and the presence of chronic phlegm were used to characterise ventilatory function and chronic mucus hypersecretion respectively. For mortality analysis the proportional hazards regression model of Cox was used; it included age, sex, pack years, inhalation habit, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and the presence or absence of asthma, heart disease, and diabetes mellitus as confounding factors. By comparison with subjects with an FEV1 of 80% pred or more, subjects with an FEV1 below 40% pred had increased risk of dying from all causes (relative risk (RR) = 5.0 for women, 2.7 for men), a higher risk of obstructive lung disease related death (RR = 57 for women, 34 for men), and a higher risk of obstructive lung disease death (RR = 101 for women, 77 for men). Chronic mucus hypersecretion was associated with only a slightly higher risk of death from all causes (RR = 1.1 for women, 1.3 for men). The association between chronic mucus hypersecretion and obstructive lung disease death varied with the level of ventilatory function, being weak in subjects with normal ventilatory function (for an FEV1 of 80% pred the RR was 1.2), but more pronounced in subjects with reduced ventilatory function (for an FEV1 of 40% pred the RR was 4.2). A similar though statistically non-significant trend was

  7. Soluble erythropoietin receptor is present in the mouse brain and is required for the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jorge; Gassmann, Max; Joseph, Vincent

    2007-08-15

    While erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR) have been widely investigated in brain, the expression and function of the soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR) remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that sEpoR, a negative regulator of Epo's binding to the EpoR, is present in the mouse brain and is down-regulated by 62% after exposure to normobaric chronic hypoxia (10% O2 for 3 days). Furthermore, while normoxic minute ventilation increased by 58% in control mice following hypoxic acclimatization, sEpoR infusion in brain during the hypoxic challenge efficiently reduced brain Epo concentration and abolished the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH). These observations imply that hypoxic downregulation of sEpoR is required for adequate ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia, thereby underlying the function of Epo as a key factor regulating oxygen delivery not only by its classical activity on red blood cell production, but also by regulating ventilation.

  8. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2.

  9. Ventilatory and cardiovascular actions of centrally administered trout tachykinins in the unanesthetized trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Conlon, J Michael

    2007-09-01

    The brains of teleost fish contain members of the tachykinin family that are the products of orthologous genes expressed in mammalian nervous tissues, but little is known regarding the physiological effects of these peptides in their species of origin. The present study compares the central actions of trout neuropeptide gamma (NPgamma), substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) (5-250 pmol) on ventilatory and cardiovascular parameters in the unanesthetized rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of NPgamma evoked a dose-dependent elevation of the ventilation rate (f(V)) but a reduction of the ventilation amplitude (V(AMP)) that was caused by a reduction of the magnitude of the adduction phase of the ventilatory signal. The net effect of NPgamma was to produce an hypoventilatory response since the total ventilation (V(TOT)) was significantly reduced. The minimum effective dose for a significant effect of NPgamma on f(V) and V(AMP) was 50 pmol. SP evoked a significant elevation of f(V), a concomitant depression of V(AMP), and a resultant decrease in V(TOT) but only at the highest dose (250 pmol). NKA was without action on f(V) but significantly decreased V(AMP) at only the highest dose tested. In this case also, the net effect of NKA was to reduce V(TOT). When injected centrally, none of the three peptides, at any dose tested, produced changes in heart rate or mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)). Intra-arterial injection of the three tachykinins (250 pmol) produced a significant (P<0.05) increase in P(DA), but only SP and NKA induced concomitant bradycardia. None of the three peptides produced any change in f(V) or V(AMP). In conclusion, our results demonstrate that centrally injected tachykinins, particularly NPgamma, produce a strong hypoventilatory response in a teleost fish and so suggest that endogenous tachykinins may be differentially implicated in neuroregulatory control of ventilation.

  10. Serotonin receptor subtypes required for ventilatory long-term facilitation and its enhancement after chronic intermittent hypoxia in awake rats.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michelle; Zhang, Yi; White, David P; Ling, Liming

    2004-02-01

    Respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF), a serotonin-dependent, persistent augmentation of respiratory activity after episodic hypoxia, is enhanced by pretreatment of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH; 5 min 11-12% O2-5 min air, 12 h/night for 7 nights). The present study examined the effects of methysergide (serotonin 5-HT1,2,5,6,7 receptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2 antagonist), or clozapine (5-HT2,6,7 antagonist) on both ventilatory LTF and the CIH effect on ventilatory LTF in conscious male adult rats to determine which specific receptor subtype(s) is involved. In untreated rats (i.e., animals not exposed to CIH), LTF, induced by five episodes of 5-min poikilocapnic hypoxia (10% O2) separated by 5-min normoxic intervals, was measured twice by plethysmography. Thus the measurement was conducted 1-2 days before (as control) and approximately 1 h after systemic injection of methysergide (1 mg/kg ip), ketanserin (1 mg/kg), or clozapine (1.5 mg/kg). Resting ventilation, metabolic rate, and hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were unchanged, but LTF ( approximately 18% above baseline) was eliminated by each drug. In CIH-treated rats, LTF was also measured twice, before and approximately 8 h after CIH. Vehicle, methysergide, ketanserin, or clozapine was injected approximately 1 h before the second measurement. Neither resting ventilation nor metabolic rate was changed after CIH and/or any drug. HVR was unchanged after methysergide and ketanserin but reduced in four of seven clozapine rats. The CIH-enhanced LTF ( approximately 28%) was abolished by methysergide and clozapine but only attenuated by ketanserin (to approximately 10%). Collectively, these data suggest that ventilatory LTF requires 5-HT2 receptors and that the CIH effect on LTF requires non-5-HT2 serotonin receptors, probably 5-HT6 and/or 5-HT7 subtype(s).

  11. Central effects of native urotensin II on motor activity, ventilatory movements, and heart rate in the trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Lancien, Frédéric; Leprince, Jérôme; Mimassi, Nagi; Mabin, Dominique; Vaudry, Hubert; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2004-10-15

    Urotensin II (UII) has been originally isolated from fish urophysis. However, in fish as in mammals, UII is also produced in brain neurons. Although UII binding sites are widely distributed in the fish central nervous system (CNS), little is known regarding its central activities. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of synthetic trout UII on the duration of motor activity (ACT; evidenced by bursts of activity on the trace of the ventilatory signal), ventilatory frequency (VF), ventilatory amplitude (VA), and heart rate (HR) in unanesthesized trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. ICV injection of very low doses of UII (1 and 5 pmol) produced a dose-dependent increase of ACT without affecting VF, VA, or HR. At a higher dose (50 pmol), UII stimulated ACT as well as VF, VA, and HR. ICV injection of trout angiotensin II (5 pmol) did not affect ACT, VF, and VA, but provoked a robust increase in HR. These data provide the first evidence that central administration of UII stimulates motor activity in a nonmammalian vertebrate.

  12. Heart rate response during a simulated Olympic boxing match is predominantly above ventilatory threshold 2: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Peixinho-Pena, Luiz Fernando; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; de Freitas Guina Fachina, Rafael Júlio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Andrade, Marília Dos Santos; da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe heart rate (HR) responses during a simulated Olympic boxing match and examine physiological parameters of boxing athletes. Ten highly trained Olympic boxing athletes (six men and four women) performed a maximal graded exercise test on a motorized treadmill to determine maximal oxygen uptake (52.2 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) ± 7.2 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) and ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2. Ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2 were used to classify the intensity of exercise based on respective HR during a boxing match. In addition, oxygen uptake (V̇O2) was estimated during the match based on the HR response and the HR-V̇O2 relationship obtained from a maximal graded exercise test for each participant. On a separate day, participants performed a boxing match lasting three rounds, 2 minutes each, with a 1-minute recovery period between each round, during which HR was measured. In this context, HR and V̇O2 were above ventilatory threshold 2 during 219.8 seconds ± 67.4 seconds. There was an increase in HR and V̇O2 as a function of round (round 3 < round 2 < round 1, P < 0.0001). These findings may direct individual training programs for boxing practitioners and other athletes.

  13. Heart rate response during a simulated Olympic boxing match is predominantly above ventilatory threshold 2: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Peixinho-Pena, Luiz Fernando; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; de Freitas Guina Fachina, Rafael Júlio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Andrade, Marília dos Santos; da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe heart rate (HR) responses during a simulated Olympic boxing match and examine physiological parameters of boxing athletes. Ten highly trained Olympic boxing athletes (six men and four women) performed a maximal graded exercise test on a motorized treadmill to determine maximal oxygen uptake (52.2 mL · kg−1 · min−1 ± 7.2 mL · kg−1 · min−1) and ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2. Ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2 were used to classify the intensity of exercise based on respective HR during a boxing match. In addition, oxygen uptake (V̇O2) was estimated during the match based on the HR response and the HR-V̇O2 relationship obtained from a maximal graded exercise test for each participant. On a separate day, participants performed a boxing match lasting three rounds, 2 minutes each, with a 1-minute recovery period between each round, during which HR was measured. In this context, HR and V̇O2 were above ventilatory threshold 2 during 219.8 seconds ± 67.4 seconds. There was an increase in HR and V̇O2 as a function of round (round 3 < round 2 < round 1, P < 0.0001). These findings may direct individual training programs for boxing practitioners and other athletes. PMID:24379723

  14. Role of glutamate and serotonin on the hypoxic ventilatory response in high-altitude-adapted plateau Pika.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhenzhong; Voituron, Nicolas; Wuren, Tana; Jeton, Florine; Jin, Guoen; Marchant, Dominique; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Ge, Ri-Li; Pichon, Aurélien P

    2015-07-01

    The highland "plateau Pika" is considered to be adapted to chronic hypoxia. We hypothesized that glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, and serotonin are involved in hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in Pikas. We tested the effects of NMDA (memantine) and non-NMDA receptors (DNQX) antagonists, NO synthase inhibitor (L-NAME), and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine) on ventilation and HVR in Pikas. Ventilatory parameters were measured before and after drug (or vehicle) injections in conscious Pikas at their natural living altitude (PIO2 86 mmHg) and after a hypoxic challenge (PIO2 57 mmHg, 3 min) to assess the influence of peripheral chemoreceptor on HVR. Minute ventilation (VI) and tidal volume (Vt) increased during hypoxic challenge after vehicle injection, whereas the Ti/Ttot ratio remained unchanged. The increase in VI and Vt observed with vehicle at PIO2-57, when compared with PIO2-86, was inhibited after memantine and fluoxetine injection, whereas the DNQX injection increased HVR. At PIO2-57, L-NAME induced an increase in the Ti/Ttot ratio when compared with vehicle. Therefore, the glutamate through NMDA-R/AMPA receptor bindings and serotonin pathway are implicated at the peripheral chemoreceptor level in HVR in Pikas. However, NO influences the ventilatory pattern of Pikas at their habitual living altitude.

  15. Metabolic and ventilatory acclimatization to cold stress in house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    PubMed

    Arens, Jeremy R; Cooper, Sheldon J

    2005-01-01

    Passerines that overwinter in temperate climates undergo seasonal acclimatization that is characterized by metabolic adjustments that may include increased basal metabolic rate (BMR) and cold-induced summit metabolism (M(sum)) in winter relative to summer. Metabolic changes must be supported by equivalent changes in oxygen transport. While much is known about the morphology of the avian respiratory system, little is known about respiratory function under extreme cold stress. We examined seasonal variation in BMR, M(sum), and ventilation in seasonally acclimatized house sparrows from Wisconsin. BMR and M(sum) increased significantly in winter compared with summer. In winter, BMR increased 64%, and M(sum) increased 29% over summer values. The 64% increase in winter BMR is the highest recorded for birds. Metabolic expansibility (M(sum)/BMR) was 9.0 in summer and 6.9 in winter birds. The metabolic expansibility of 9.0 in summer is the highest yet recorded for birds. Ventilatory accommodation under helox cold stress was due to changes in breathing frequency (f), tidal volume, and oxygen extraction efficiency in both seasons. However, the only significant difference between summer and winter ventilation measures in helox cold stress was f. Mean f in helox cold stress for winter birds was 1.23 times summer values.

  16. The ventilatory, cardiac and behavioural responses of resting cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis L.) to sudden visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    King, Alison J; Adamo, Shelley A

    2006-03-01

    When startled, some animals reduce ventilation rate and heart rate, and become motionless. The function of this response, if any, remains unknown. We used non-invasive ultrasound imaging to monitor the ventilatory, cardiac and postural responses of cuttlefish exposed to sudden visual stimuli. Simultaneously, we recorded cuttlefish behaviour using an overhead video camera. Upon presentation of the sudden visual stimulus (rapidly approaching bird cut-out), cuttlefish rapidly changed the colour and the texture of their skin, taking on characteristics of the Deimatic Display. Cuttlefish also became motionless (behavioural freezing), hyperinflated their mantles, and decreased their ventilation rate and heart rate. We found no evidence of a relationship between the intensity of the Deimatic Display and the intensity of any other measured parameter. Ventilation rate decreased during behavioural freezing. Hyperinflation of the mantle was most intense in preparation for and during behavioural freezing. Heart rate decreases occurred during mantle hyperinflation and were greatest in animals showing the most hyperinflation. Decreased heart rate may not be adaptive per se. Instead, it might be a product of the unusual arrangement of the cuttlefish peripheral vasculature, which could be compressed during mantle hyperinflation. By filling the mantle with water (hyperinflation), this response to sudden stimuli may help cuttlefish prepare for possible flight by jet propulsion, which often follows the Deimatic Display.

  17. A field study of the ventilatory response to ambient temperature and pressure in sport diving.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, F L

    1995-01-01

    This study reports on the relationship between minute ventilation (VE) and environmental variables of temperature (T) and pressure (P) during open water diving. The author conducted a total of 38 dives involving either a light (20 dives) or a moderate (18 dives) level of physical activity. Within each of these groups, P and T taken together accounted for about two thirds of the variance in the VE data. A very significant increase in VE was observed as T decreased (1 < T(degrees C) < 22), and the magnitude of this increase at a given pressure level was similar in the 'light' and the 'moderate' data sets. A second order observation, particularly notable at lower temperature, was the decrease in VE with increasing pressure under conditions of light work. Empirical functions of the from VE = A+B/P n[1 + exp(T - 8)/10], where A, B, and n are adjustable variables, could accommodate both data sets over the whole range of T and P. These results are the first obtained under actual diving conditions to provide evidence for interactions between P, T, and VE. Understanding the physiological mechanisms by which these interactions occur would assist in appreciation of the limitations imposed on scuba divers by the environmental conditions as they affect their ventilatory responses. PMID:8800853

  18. Prediction VO2max during cycle ergometry based on submaximal ventilatory indicators.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rodolfo Alkmim Moreira; Vale, Rodrigo Gomes de Souza; Simão, Roberto; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Reis, Victor Machado; Novaes, Jefferson da Silva; Miranda, Humberto; Rhea, Matthew R; Medeiros, Aldo da Cunha

    2009-09-01

    There are several equations to predict maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) from ergometric test variables on different ergometers. However, a similar equation using ventilatory thresholds of ergospirometry in a submaximal test on a cycle ergometer is unavailable. The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of VO2max prediction models based on indicators of submaximal effort. Accordingly, 4,640 healthy, nonathlete women ages 20 years and older volunteered to be tested on a cycle ergometer using a maximum incremental protocol. The subjects were randomly assigned to 2 groups: group A (estimation) and group B (validation). From the independent variables of weight in kilograms, the second workload threshold (WT2), and heart rate of the second threshold (HRT2), it was possible to build a multiple linear regression model to predict maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max = 40.302 - 0.497 [Weight] - 0.001 [HRT2] + 0.239 [WT2] in mL O2/kg/min(-1); r = 0.995 and standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 0.68 mL O2/kg/min(-1)). The cross-validation method was used in group B with group A serving as the basis for building the model and the validation dataset. The results showed that, in healthy nonathlete women, it is possible to predict VO2max with a minimum of error (SEE = 1.00%) from submaximal indicators obtained in an incremental test.

  19. A new ventilatory threshold equation for aerobically trained men and women.

    PubMed

    Malek, Moh H; Coburn, Jared W

    2009-04-01

    The purposes of the present study were to (i) modify previously published ventilatory threshold (VT) equations using the constant error (CE) values for aerobically trained individuals from a recent study; (ii) cross-validate the modified equations to determine their accuracy for estimating VT in aerobically trained individuals; (iii) derive a new non-exercise based equation for estimating VT in aerobically trained individuals if the modified equations are found to be inaccurate; and (iv) cross-validate the new VT equation using the Predicted REsidual Sum of Squares (PRESS) statistic and an independent sample of aerobically trained individuals. Two hundred and eight (n = 208) aerobically trained men and women (mean +/- SD: age = 38.8 +/- 10.4 year) performed a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer to determine the observed VT. The predicted VT values from seven published equations were compared with the observed VT by examining the CE, standard error of estimate, validity coefficient (r), and total error (TE). Cross-validation of the modified equations resulted in high %TE values. Therefore, a new VT equation was derived. Cross-validation of this equation on an independent sample of 72 subjects resulted in a low %TE value. The new model is recommended over previous models for estimating VT in aerobically trained individuals.

  20. Morphology and ventilatory function of gills in the carpet shark family Parascylliidae (Elasmobranchii, Orectolobiformes).

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomoaki; Shiba, Yojiro; Shibagaki, Kazuhiro; Nakaya, Kazuhiro

    2013-06-01

    We examined gill morphology and ventilatory function in the carpet shark family Parascylliidae using 14 preserved specimens of Parascyllium ferrugineum, P. variolatum, P. collare and Cirrhoscyllium japonicum, and two live specimens of P. ferrugineum and P. variolatum. Morphological examinations revealed eight morphological characteristics related to the fifth gill, based on comparisons with other elasmobranchs, viz. large fifth gill slit without gill filaments, anatomical modifications in the fourth ceratobranchial cartilage and coraco-branchialis muscle, and the hypaxialis muscle associated with the fifth gill arch. Ventilation examinations using dyed seawater and prey items showed different water flows through the gill slits for respiration and prey-capture actions. For respiration, water sucked into the mouth was expelled equally through the first to fourth gill slits via a "double-pump" action, there being no involvement of the fifth gill slit. In prey-capture, however, water sucked into the mouth was discharged only via the widely opened fifth gill slit. This form of water flow is similar to that in other benthic suction-feeding sharks (e.g., Chiloscyllium plagiosum), except for the active water discharge by wide expansion and contraction of the fifth parabranchial cavity. The latter is dependent upon the morphological modifications of the fourth and fifth gill arches, derived phylogenetically as a mechanistic suction specialization in Parascylliidae.

  1. Effects of a prior short simulated training session on the subsequent occurrence of ventilatory thresholds.

    PubMed

    Guilhem, Gaël; Dorel, Sylvain; Hug, Francois

    2009-03-01

    The concept of ventilatory thresholds (VTs) has been shown to be particularly useful to prescribe exercise intensities, yet, to date no study has examined the effects of previous submaximal exercise (i.e. a simulated training session) on the subsequent occurrence of VTs. We designed the present study to test the hypothesis that a previous short simulated training session induces an earlier VTs occurrence. Thirteen trained subjects perfomed two classical incremental tests on a cycle ergometer. The two tests were separated by a time period of 2-5 days, and the second test was preceded by a 34-min simulated training session. The first and second VTs (VT(1) and VT(2), respectively) were detected and expressed in their corresponding values of time, V O(2), and power output. The simulated training session did not modify VT(1) occurrence. In contrast, VT(2) was influenced by the simulated training session, showing a significant earlier occurence when VT(2) was expressed in time [-42 (-72; -13)s] and in power output [-15 (-25; -5)W]. Maximal power tolerated (MPT) was also significantly reduced by the previous exercise [-17 (-27; -7)W]. As a consequence, training intensities based on power output (associated with VT(2) or in %MPT) would be overestimated (i.e. higher metabolic state) after a short period of training session. Thus, doubt is cast on the pertinence of using the power output (or running speed by extension) for prescription of exercise during prolonged training sessions.

  2. [Noninvasive ventilation: efficacy of a new ventilatory mode in patients with obesity-hypoventilation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Couillard, A; Pepin, J-L; Rabec, C; Cuvelier, A; Portmann, A; Muir, J-F

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation is recommended to correct the nocturnal hypoventilation and relieve the symptoms of patients with the obesity-hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). The benefits of fixed pressure ventilation (S/T technology) are recognized but limited on account of the variability of nocturnal ventilatory requirements. The new technique AVAPS-AE (automatic EPAP) allows adjustment of the pressure according to the volume currently targeted. Its efficacy has not yet been evaluated. Our objectives are to evaluate firstly, whether AVAPS-AE optimizes the benefits of S/T technology on sleep architecture and quality, secondly, whether these benefits are associated with an improvement in gas exchange, symptoms, exercise tolerance, level of physical activity and quality of life of patients with OHS. In this multicenter trial, 60 newly diagnosed patients with OHS will be randomized to the control (S/T) and trial (AVAPS-AE) groups. A standardized titration procedure will be followed for the calibration of the ventilators. Functional evaluations (polysomnography, blood gases, impedance measurements and walking tests), questionnaires (physical activity, quality of life, quality of sleep and daytime somnolence) visual scales (fatigue, headaches) and a recording of activity will be undertaken after two months of ventilation.

  3. Hypoxic ventilatory sensitivity in men is not reduced by prolonged hyperoxia (Predictive Studies V and VI).

    PubMed

    Gelfand, R; Lambertsen, C J; Clark, J M; Hopkin, E

    1998-01-01

    Potential adverse effects on the O2-sensing function of the carotid body when its cells are exposed to toxic O2 pressures were assessed during investigations of human organ tolerance to prolonged continuous and intermittent hyperoxia (Predictive Studies V and VI). Isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory responses (HVR) were determined at 1.0 ATA before and after severe hyperoxic exposures: 1) continuous O2 breathing at 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 ATA for 17.7, 9.0, and 5.7 h and 2) intermittent O2 breathing at 2.0 ATA (30 min O2-30 min normoxia) for 14.3 O2 h within 30-h total time. Postexposure curvature of HVR hyperbolas was not reduced compared with preexposure controls. The hyperbolas were temporarily elevated to higher ventilations than controls due to increments in respiratory frequency that were proportional to O2 exposure time, not O2 pressure. In humans, prolonged hyperoxia does not attenuate the hypoxia-sensing function of the peripheral chemoreceptors, even after exposures that approach limits of human pulmonary and central nervous system O2 tolerance. Current applications of hyperoxia in hyperbaric O2 therapy and in subsea- and aerospace-related operations are guided by and are well within these exposure limits.

  4. Postoperative ventilatory and circulatory effects of extended rewarming during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Joachimsson, P O; Nyström, S O; Tydén, H

    1989-01-01

    Postoperative effects of extended rewarming (ECR) after hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were studied. All (n = 28) patients were rewarmed to a nasopharyngeal temperature exceeding 38 degrees C before terminating CPB. In 12 patients (control group) the rectal temperature (Tre) was 33.8 +/- 1.7 degrees C (mean +/- sd) at termination of CPB. In sixteen patients (ECR group) rewarming during CPB was continued to a Tre of 36.8 +/- 0.5 degrees C. Postoperative body temperatures, heat content, shivering, oxygen uptake, CO2 production and haemodynamic variables were measured. ECR reduced the heat gain required to complete core rewarming to 665 +/- 260 kJ, compared with 1037 +/- 374 kJ in the control group (p less than 0.01). The incidence of shivering was reduced (p less than 0.05) as well as shivering intensity and duration. In seven non-shivering ECR group patients this coincided with significantly reduced metabolic and ventilatory demands but these improvements were not valid for the group as a whole. The required ventilation temporarily during postoperative rewarming in both groups increased to 250 per cent of the basal need. Extending CPB rewarming (to at least 36 degrees C Tre) was inefficient when used as the sole measure to reduce the untoward effects of residual hypothermia during recovery after cardiac surgery with hypothermic CPB.

  5. Preliminary investigation into the ventilatory effects of midazolam in isoflurane-anaesthetised goats.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, George F; Bester, Lynette

    2012-05-30

    The ventilatory effects of intravenous midazolam (MDZ) were evaluated in isoflurane- anaesthetised goats. Eight female goats aged 2-3 years were fasted from food and water for 12 h. Anaesthesia was then induced using a face mask with isoflurane in oxygen, whilst the trachea was intubated with a cuffed tracheal tube and anaesthesia maintained with isoflurane at 1.5% end-tidal concentration. Ventilation was spontaneous. The goats were treated with either a saline placebo (PLC) or MDZ intravenously at 0.2 mg/kg. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used for the analysis of data. Significance was taken at the 0.05 level. Differences between treatments were not statistically significant (p > 0.05) for tidal volume, ventilation rate, tidal volume/kg (VT/kg) and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure. Within treatments, VT and VT/kg differed 5 min after MDZ administration; this was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The occurrence of apnoea in the MDZ-treated goats was statistically significant (p = 0.04) compared with the PLC treated goats. Intravenous MDZ at 0.2 mg/kg administered to isoflurane-anaesthetised goats may result in transient apnoea and a mild decrease in VT and VT/kg.

  6. Double product break point estimates ventilatory threshold in individuals with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Victor de Sousa, Caio; Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Aguiar, Samuel da Silva; Boullosa, Daniel Alexandre; Rosa, Thiago dos Santos; Baldissera, Vilmar; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To verify the identification of the anaerobic threshold through the double product breakpoint (DPBP) method for individuals with type 2 diabetes. [Subjects and Methods] Nine individuals with T2D (7 females; age=63.2 ± 8.9 y) and 10 non-diabetic (ND) (7 females; age=58.3 ± 7.8 y) performed an incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and expired gas were measured at the end of each stage. The ventilatory threshold (VT) and DPBP were considered as the exercise intensities above which an over proportional increases in VE and DP were observed in relation to increasing workload. [Results] No differences were observed between the workloads, HR and VO2 corresponding to the AT identified respectively by VT and DPBP. For the T2D, strong correlations between VT and DBPB workloads (r=0.853), HR (r=0.714), and VO2 (r=0.863) were found. These relationships were similar to those found for the control group (r=0.923; r=0.881; and r=0.863, respectively). [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DPBP enables for the prediction of AT and correlated well the VT in both the T2D and ND participants. PMID:27390414

  7. Hypoxic ventilatory sensitivity in men is not reduced by prolonged hyperoxia (Predictive Studies V and VI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelfand, R.; Lambertsen, C. J.; Clark, J. M.; Hopkin, E.

    1998-01-01

    Potential adverse effects on the O2-sensing function of the carotid body when its cells are exposed to toxic O2 pressures were assessed during investigations of human organ tolerance to prolonged continuous and intermittent hyperoxia (Predictive Studies V and VI). Isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory responses (HVR) were determined at 1.0 ATA before and after severe hyperoxic exposures: 1) continuous O2 breathing at 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 ATA for 17.7, 9.0, and 5.7 h and 2) intermittent O2 breathing at 2.0 ATA (30 min O2-30 min normoxia) for 14.3 O2 h within 30-h total time. Postexposure curvature of HVR hyperbolas was not reduced compared with preexposure controls. The hyperbolas were temporarily elevated to higher ventilations than controls due to increments in respiratory frequency that were proportional to O2 exposure time, not O2 pressure. In humans, prolonged hyperoxia does not attenuate the hypoxia-sensing function of the peripheral chemoreceptors, even after exposures that approach limits of human pulmonary and central nervous system O2 tolerance. Current applications of hyperoxia in hyperbaric O2 therapy and in subsea- and aerospace-related operations are guided by and are well within these exposure limits.

  8. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Haji, Altaf Gauhar; Sharma, Shekhar; Vijaykumar, DK; Paul, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury. PMID:18957111

  9. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  10. Efficacy of high-flow oxygen by nasal cannula with active humidification in a patient with acute respiratory failure of neuromuscular origin.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Lobato, Salvador; Folgado, Miguel Angel; Chapa, Angel; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of choice for patients with respiratory failure of neuromuscular origin, especially in patients with hypercapnic respiratory acidosis, is noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Endotracheal intubation and invasive ventilation are indicated for patients with severe respiratory compromise or failure of NIV. In recent years, high-flow oxygen therapy and active humidification devices have been introduced, and emerging evidence suggests that high-flow oxygen may be effective in various clinical settings, such as acute respiratory failure, after cardiac surgery, during sedation and analgesia, in acute heart failure, in hypoxemic respiratory distress, in do-not-intubate patients, in patients with chronic cough and copious secretions, pulmonary fibrosis, or cancer, in critical areas and the emergency department. We report on a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who arrived at the emergency department with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. She did not tolerate NIV and refused intubation, but was treated successfully with heated, humidified oxygen via high-flow nasal cannula. Arterial blood analysis after an hour on high-flow nasal cannula showed improved pH, P(aCO2), and awareness. The respiratory acidosis was corrected, and she was discharged after 5 days of hospitalization. Her response to high-flow nasal cannula was similar to that expected with NIV. We discuss the mechanisms of action of heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy.

  11. Metabolic, ventilatory, and hygric physiology of the gracile mouse opossum (Gracilinanus agilis).

    PubMed

    Cooper, C E; Withers, P C; Cruz-Neto, A P

    2009-01-01

    We present the first complete study of basic laboratory-measured physiological variables (metabolism, thermoregulation, evaporative water loss, and ventilation) for a South American marsupial, the gracile mouse opossum (Gracilinanus agilis). Body temperature (T(b)) was thermolabile below thermoneutrality (T(b) = 33.5 degrees C), but a substantial gradient between T(b) and ambient temperature (T(a)) was sustained even at T(a) = 12 degrees C (T(b) = 30.6 degrees C). Basal metabolic rate of 1.00 mL O2 g(-1) h(-1) at T(a) = 30 degrees C conformed to the general allometric relationship for marsupials, as did wet thermal conductance (5.7 mL O2 g(-1) h(-1) degrees C(-1)). Respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute volume at thermoneutrality matched metabolic demand such that O2 extraction was 12.4%, and ventilation increased in proportion to metabolic rate at low T(a). Ventilatory accommodation of increased metabolic rate at low T(a) was by an increase in respiratory rate rather than by tidal volume or O2 extraction. Evaporative water loss at the lower limit of thermoneutrality conformed to that of other marsupials. Relative water economy was negative at thermoneutrality but positive below T(a) = 12 degrees C. Interestingly, the Neotropical gracile mouse opossums have a more positive water economy at low T(a) than an Australian arid-zone marsupial, perhaps reflecting seasonal variation in water availability for the mouse opossum. Torpor occurred at low T(a), with spontaneous arousal when T(b) > 20 degrees C. Torpor resulted in absolute energy and water savings but lower relative water economy. We found no evidence that gracile mouse opossums differ physiologically from other marsupials, despite their Neotropical distribution, sympatry with placental mammals, and long period of separation from Australian marsupials.

  12. Habituation of the metabolic and ventilatory responses to cold-water immersion in humans.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Michael J; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Barwood, Martin J; Eglin, Clare M; Mekjavic, Igor B; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was undertaken to answer long-standing questions concerning the nature of metabolic habituation in repeatedly cooled humans. It was hypothesised that repeated skin and deep-body cooling would produce such a habituation that would be specific to the magnitude of the cooling experienced, and that skin cooling alone would dampen the cold-shock but not the metabolic response to cold-water immersion. Twenty-one male participants were divided into three groups, each of which completed two experimental immersions in 12°C water, lasting until either rectal temperature fell to 35°C or 90min had elapsed. Between these two immersions, the control group avoided cold exposures, whilst two experimental groups completed five additional immersions (12°C). One experimental group repeatedly immersed for 45min in average, resulting in deep-body (1.18°C) and skin temperature reductions. The immersions in the second experimental group were designed to result only in skin temperature reductions, and lasted only 5min. Only the deep-body cooling group displayed a significantly blunted metabolic response during the second experimental immersion until rectal temperature decreased by 1.18°C, but no habituation was observed when they were cooled further. The skin cooling group showed a significant habituation in the ventilatory response during the initial 5min of the second experimental immersion, but no alteration in the metabolic response. It is concluded that repeated falls of skin and deep-body temperature can habituate the metabolic response, which shows tissue temperature specificity. However, skin temperature cooling only will lower the cold-shock response, but appears not to elicit an alteration in the metabolic response.

  13. Circulatory and Ventilatory Power: Characterization in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Castello-Simões, Viviane; Minatel, Vinicius; Karsten, Marlus; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Perseguini, Natália Maria; Milan, Juliana Cristina; Arena, Ross; Neves, Laura Maria Tomazi; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Catai, Aparecida Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulatory power (CP) and ventilatory power (VP) are indices that have been used for the clinical evaluation of patients with heart failure; however, no study has evaluated these indices in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) without heart failure. Objective To characterize both indices in patients with CAD compared with healthy controls. Methods Eighty-seven men [CAD group = 42 subjects and healthy control group (CG) = 45 subjects] aged 40–65 years were included. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed on a treadmill and the following parameters were measured: 1) peak oxygen consumption (VO2), 2) peak heart rate (HR), 3) peak blood pressure (BP), 4) peak rate-pressure product (peak systolic HR x peak BP), 5) peak oxygen pulse (peak VO2/peak HR), 6) oxygen uptake efficiency (OUES), 7) carbon dioxide production efficiency (minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope), 8) CP (peak VO2 x peak systolic BP) and 9) VP (peak systolic BP/carbon dioxide production efficiency). Results The CAD group had significantly lower values for peak VO2 (p < 0.001), peak HR (p < 0.001), peak systolic BP (p < 0.001), peak rate-pressure product (p < 0.001), peak oxygen pulse (p = 0.008), OUES (p < 0.001), CP (p < 0.001), and VP (p < 0.001) and significantly higher values for peak diastolic BP (p = 0.004) and carbon dioxide production efficiency (p < 0.001) compared with CG. Stepwise regression analysis showed that CP was influenced by group (R2 = 0.44, p < 0.001) and VP was influenced by both group and number of vessels with stenosis after treatment (interaction effects: R2 = 0.46, p < 0.001). Conclusion The indices CP and VP were lower in men with CAD than healthy controls. PMID:26131703

  14. The Importance of the Muscle and Ventilatory Blood Pumps During Exercise in Patients Without a Subpulmonary Ventricle (Fontan Operation)

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Keri M.; Garcia, Jorge A.; Babb, Tony G.; Fixler, David E.; Ayers, Colby R.; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of the muscle and ventilatory pumps to stroke volume in patients without a subpulmonic ventricle. Background In patients with Fontan circulation, it is unclear how venous return is augmented to increase stroke volume and cardiac output during exercise. Methods Cardiac output (acetylene rebreathing), heart rate (electrocardiography), oxygen uptake (Douglas bag technique), and ventilation were measured in 9 patients age 15.8 ± 6 years at 6.1 ± 1.8 years after Fontan operation and 8 matched controls. Data were obtained at rest, after 3 min of steady-state exercise (Ex) on a cycle ergometer at 50% of individual working capacity, during unloaded cycling at 0 W (muscle pump alone), during unloaded cycling with isocapnic hyperpnea (muscle and ventilatory pump), during Ex plus an inspiratory load of 12.8 ± 1.5 cm water, and during Ex plus an expiratory load of 12.8 ± 1.6 cm water. Results In Fontan patients, the largest increases in stroke volume and stroke volume index were during zero-resistance cycling. An additional increase with submaximal exercise occurred in controls only. During Ex plus expiratory load, stroke volume indexes were reduced to baseline, non-exercise levels in Fontan patients, without significant changes in controls. Conclusions With Fontan circulation increases in cardiac output and stroke volume during Ex were due to the muscle pump, with a small additional contribution by the ventilatory pump. An increase in intrathoracic pressure played a deleterious role in Fontan circulation by decreasing systemic venous return and stroke volume. PMID:23083785

  15. Source of human ventilatory chaos: lessons from switching controlled mechanical ventilation to inspiratory pressure support in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Mangin, Laurence; Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Straus, Christian; Derenne, Jean-Philippe; Zelter, Marc; Clerici, Christine; Similowski, Thomas

    2008-04-30

    Ventilatory flow measured at the airway opening in humans exhibits a complex dynamics that has the features of chaos. Currently available data point to a neural origin of this feature, but the role of respiratory mechanics has not been specifically assessed. In this aim, we studied 17 critically ill mechanically ventilated patients during a switch form an entirely machine-controlled assistance mode (assist-controlled ventilation ACV) to a patient-driven mode (inspiratory pressure support IPS). Breath-by-breath respiratory variability was assessed with the coefficient of variation of tidal volume, total cycle time, inspiratory time, expiratory time, mean inspiratory flow, duty cycle. The detection of chaos was performed with the noise titration technique. When present, chaos was characterized with numerical indexes (correlation dimension, irregularity; largest Lyapunov exponent, sensitivity to initial conditions). Expectedly, the coefficients of variations of the respiratory variables were higher during IPS than during ACV. During ACV, noise titration failed to detect nonlinearities in 12 patients who did not exhibit signs of spontaneous respiratory activity. This indicates that the mechanical properties of the respiratory system were not sufficient to produce ventilatory chaos in the presence of a nonlinear command (ventilator clock). A positive noise limit was found in the remaining 5 cases, but these patients exhibited signs of active expiratory control (highly variable expiratory time, respiratory frequency higher than the set frequency). A positive noise limit was also observed in 16/17 patients during IPS (p<0.001). These observations suggest that ventilatory chaos predominantly has a neural origin (intrinsic to the respiratory central pattern generators, resulting from their perturbation by respiratory afferents, or both), with little contribution of respiratory mechanics, if any.

  16. Relationship between the talk test and ventilatory thresholds in well-trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Marroyo, Jose A; Villa, José G; García-López, Juan; Foster, Carl

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to extend the range of populations where the Talk Test (TT) might be used as a marker of physiologic thresholds. Eighteen highly trained cyclists underwent 2 incremental tests. One test included measurement of respiratory gas exchange to determine the ventilatory (VT) and respiratory compensation thresholds (RCTs). On a separate day, a TT was performed using the same exercise protocol. During TT, subjects read a standard paragraph at the end of each stage. The first stage at which the cyclists could not talk comfortably and could definitely not talk were referred to as the equivocal (EQ) and the negative stages (NEG), respectively. There were no significant differences in workload, heart rate, lactate, and rating of perceived exertion between VT (3.7 ± 0.4 W kg, 150 ± 10 b min, 1.6 ± 0.3 mm L, and 4.1 ± 1.4, respectively) vs. EQ (3.6 ± 0.4 W kg, 148 ± 12 b min, 1.3 ± 0.5 mm L, and 3.8 ± 1.2, respectively) and RCT (5.3 ± 0.4 W kg, 177 ± 7 b min, 4.0 ± 0.9 mm L, and 7.2 ± 1.0, respectively) vs. NEG (5.3 ± 0.5 W kg, 176 ± 10 b min, 4.2 ± 1.3 mm L, and 6.8 ± 1.5, respectively). We found significant relationships (p < 0.01) between VT and EQ and RCT and NEG for workload (r = 0.86 and 0.94, respectively), heart rate (r = 0.79 and 0.92, respectively), and rating of perceived exertion (r = 0.79 and 0.88, respectively). In conclusion, the present study showed that the EQ and NEG stages of TT can be used as a simple and practical surrogate of the VT and RCT in highly trained cyclists.

  17. Respiratory symptoms and ventilatory functions among quarry workers in Edo state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isara, Alphonsus Rukevwe; Adam, Vincent Yakubu; Aigbokhaode, Adesuwa Queen; Alenoghena, Innocent Osi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Workers in the quarry industries are exposed to hazards resulting from the inhalation of air borne particulates. The study determined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and assessed ventilatory functions among quarry workers in Edo state, Nigeria. Methods Quarry workers (site workers and office workers) were interviewed using structured questionnaire. FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC and PEFR were measured using a KoKo Legend spirometer. Results A total of 113 quarry workers (76 exposure and 37 controls) were studied. The exposure group had significantly higher occurrence of chest tightness (35.5%) compared with 16.2% of the controls (p < 0.05). The occurrence of cough (23.7% versus 13.5%), sputum (21.1% versus 16.2%), and dyspnoea (7.9% versus 5.4%), were higher in exposure groups while wheeze (10.8% versus 10.5%) and nasal congestion (27.0% and 25.0%) were higher in the control groups. The mean (SD) FEV1, and FVC were significantly lower among the exposure compared with the control group; 2.77L (0.73) versus 3.14L (0.78), p < 0.05, and 3.48L (0.84) versus 3.89L (0.92), p < 0.05. In both groups, smokers had significantly lower mean (SD) FEV1, FVC and PEFR compared with non-smokers; 2.91L (0.77) versus 3.39L (0.69), p = 0.01, 3.61L (0.91) versus 4.26L (0.74), p < 0.05 and 6.56L (2.43) versus 7.98L (1.67), p < 0.05. Conclusion Chronic exposure to quarry dust is associated with respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function indices among quarry workers. The enforcement of the use of PPEs and periodic evaluation the lung function status of quarry workers is advocated. PMID:27347301

  18. The Effects of a Duathlon Simulation on Ventilatory Threshold and Running Economy

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Nathaniel T.; Wideman, Laurie; Shields, Edgar W.; Battaglini, Claudio L.

    2016-01-01

    Multisport events continue to grow in popularity among recreational, amateur, and professional athletes around the world. This study aimed to determine the compounding effects of the initial run and cycling legs of an International Triathlon Union (ITU) Duathlon simulation on maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), ventilatory threshold (VT) and running economy (RE) within a thermoneutral, laboratory controlled setting. Seven highly trained multisport athletes completed three trials; Trial-1 consisted of a speed only VO2max treadmill protocol (SOVO2max) to determine VO2max, VT, and RE during a single-bout run; Trial-2 consisted of a 10 km run at 98% of VT followed by an incremental VO2max test on the cycle ergometer; Trial-3 consisted of a 10 km run and 30 km cycling bout at 98% of VT followed by a speed only treadmill test to determine the compounding effects of the initial legs of a duathlon on VO2max, VT, and RE. A repeated measures ANOVA was performed to determine differences between variables across trials. No difference in VO2max, VT (%VO2max), maximal HR, or maximal RPE was observed across trials. Oxygen consumption at VT was significantly lower during Trial-3 compared to Trial-1 (p = 0.01). This decrease was coupled with a significant reduction in running speed at VT (p = 0.015). A significant interaction between trial and running speed indicate that RE was significantly altered during Trial-3 compared to Trial-1 (p < 0.001). The first two legs of a laboratory based duathlon simulation negatively impact VT and RE. Our findings may provide a useful method to evaluate multisport athletes since a single-bout incremental treadmill test fails to reveal important alterations in physiological thresholds. Key points Decrease in relative oxygen uptake at VT (ml·kg-1·min-1) during the final leg of a duathlon simulation, compared to a single-bout maximal run. We observed a decrease in running speed at VT during the final leg of a duathlon simulation; resulting in an

  19. Neonatal stress affects the aging trajectory of female rats on the endocrine, temperature, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Sébastien; Gulemetova, Roumiana; Baldy, Cécile; Joseph, Vincent; Kinkead, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Human and animal studies on sleep-disordered breathing and respiratory regulation show that the effects of sex hormones are heterogeneous. Because neonatal stress results in sex-specific disruption of the respiratory control in adult rats, we postulate that it might affect respiratory control modulation induced by ovarian steroids in female rats. The hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) of adult female rats exposed to neonatal maternal separation (NMS) is ∼30% smaller than controls (24), but consequences of NMS on respiratory control in aging female rats are unknown. To address this issue, whole body plethysmography was used to evaluate the impact of NMS on the HVR (12% O2, 20 min) of middle-aged (MA; ∼57 wk old) female rats. Pups subjected to NMS were placed in an incubator 3 h/day for 10 consecutive days (P3 to P12). Controls were undisturbed. To determine whether the effects were related to sexual hormone decline or aging per se, experiments were repeated on bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) young (∼12 wk old) adult female rats. OVX and MA both reduced the HVR significantly in control rats but had little effect on the HVR of NMS females. OVX (but not aging) reduced the anapyrexic response in both control and NMS animals. These results show that hormonal decline decreases the HVR of control animals, while leaving that of NMS female animals unaffected. This suggests that neonatal stress alters the interaction between sex hormone regulation and the development of body temperature, hormonal, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia.

  20. Mechanical ventilation with heated humidifiers: measurements of condensed water mass within the breathing circuit according to ventilatory settings.

    PubMed

    Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Cappelli, S; Silvestri, S

    2013-07-01

    Heated wire humidifiers (HWHs) are widely used to heat and humidify gases during mechanical ventilation. The control strategy implemented on commercial HWHs, based on maintaining constant gas temperature at the chamber outlet, shows weaknesses: humidifying performances depend on environmental temperature and ventilatory settings, and often condensation occurs. Herein, we analyzed in vitro HWH performances focusing on the condensation amount according to ventilatory settings. We used a physical model to define the parameters which mainly influence the HWH performances. In order to investigate the influence of minute volume (MV) and frequency rate (fr) on condensation, the other influencing parameters were kept constant during experiments, and we introduced a novel approach to estimate the condensation. The method, based on measuring the condensed vapor mass (Δm), provided more objective information than the visual-based scale used in previous studies. Thanks to both the control of other influencing factors and the accurate Δm measures, the investigation showed the Δm increase with MV and fr. Substantial condensation after 7 h of ventilation and the influence of MV and fr on Δm (i.e., Δm = 3 g at MV = 1.5 L min(-1) and fr = 8 bpm and Δm = 9.4 g at MV = 8 L min(-1) and fr = 20 bpm) confirm the weaknesses of `single-point temperature' control strategies.

  1. Volatile Anaesthetic Depression of the Carotid Body Chemoreflex-Mediated Ventilatory Response to Hypoxia: Directions for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    In assessing whether volatile anaesthetics directly depress the carotid body response to hypoxia it is necessary to combine in meta-analysis studies of when it is “functionally isolated” (e.g., recordings are made from its afferent nerve). Key articles were retrieved (full papers in English) and subjected to quantitative analysis to yield an aggregate estimate of effect. Results from articles that did not use such methodology were assessed separately from this quantitative approach, to see what could be learned also from a nonquantitative overview. Just 7 articles met the inclusion criteria for hypoxia and just 6 articles for hypercapnia. Within these articles, the anaesthetic (mean dose 0.75, standard deviation (SD) 0.40 minimum alveolar concentration, MAC) statistically significantly depressed carotid body hypoxic response by 24% (P = 0.041), but a similar dose (mean 0.81 (0.42) MAC) did not affect the hypercapnic response. The articles not included in the quantitative analysis (31 articles), assessed qualitatively, also indicated that anaesthetics depress carotid body function. This conclusion helps direct future research on the anaesthetic effects on putative cellular/molecular processes that underlie the transduction of hypoxia in the carotid body. PMID:24808974

  2. [Ventilation in acute respiratory distress. Lung-protective strategies].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Rossaint, R; Dembinski, R

    2012-11-01

    Ventilation of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with protective ventilator settings is the standard in patient care. Besides the reduction of tidal volumes, the adjustment of a case-related positive end-expiratory pressure and preservation of spontaneous breathing activity at least 48 h after onset is part of this strategy. Bedside techniques have been developed to adapt ventilatory settings to the individual patient and the different stages of ARDS. This article reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and ventilator-induced lung injury and presents current evidence-based strategies for ventilator settings in ARDS.

  3. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Olivas-Medina, Dahyr Alberto; Pacheco-Tena, Cesar Francisco; Duque-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure. PMID:26273486

  4. VO2max and ventilatory threshold of trained cyclists are not affected by 28-day L-arginine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Kyle L; Greer, Felicia; Morales, Jacobo

    2011-03-01

    The ergogenic effect of L-arginine on an endurance-trained population is not well studied. The few studies that have investigated L-arginine on this population have not been conducted in a laboratory setting or measured aerobic variables. The purpose of the current study is to determine if 28 days of L-arginine supplementation in trained male cyclists affects VO2max and ventilatory threshold (VT). Eighteen (18) endurance-trained male cyclists (mean ± SD, age: 36.3 ± 7.9 years; height: 182.4 ± 4.6 cm; and body mass: 79.5 ± 4.7 kg) performed a graded exercise test (GXT; 50 W + 25 W·min) before and after 28 days of supplementation with L-arginine (ARG; 2 × 6 g·d) or placebo (PLA; cornstarch). The GXT was conducted on the subject's own bicycle using the RacerMate CompuTrainer (Seattle, WA, USA). VO2 was continuously recorded using the ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 metabolic cart (Salt Lake City, UT, USA) and VT was established by plotting the ventilatory equivalent for O2 (VE/VO2) and the ventilatory equivalent for CO2 (VE/VCO2) and identifying the point at which VE/VO2 increases with no substantial changes in VE/VCO2. L-arginine supplementation had no effect from initial VO2max (PL, 58.7 ± 7.1 ml·kg·min; ARG, 63.5 ± 7.3 ml·kg·min) to postsupplement VO2max (PL, 58.9 ± 6.0 ml·kg·min; ARG, 63.2 ± 7.2 ml·kg·min). Also, no effect was seen from initial VT (PL, 75.7 ± 4.6% VO2max; ARG, 76.0 ± 5.3% VO2max) to postsupplement VT (PL, 74.3 ± 8.1% VO2max; ARG, 74.2 ± 6.4% VO2max). These results indicate that L-arginine does not impact VO2max or VT in trained male cyclists.

  5. Oxygenation Threshold Derived from Near-Infrared Spectroscopy: Reliability and Its Relationship with the First Ventilatory Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Richard T.; Blokland, Ilse J.; Achterberg, Chantal; Visser, Jurrian M.; den Uil, Anne R.; Hofmijster, Mathijs J.; Levels, Koen; Noordhof, Dionne A.; de Haan, Arnold; de Koning, Jos J.; van der Laarse, Willem J.; de Ruiter, Cornelis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of oxygenation reflect O2 delivery and utilization in exercising muscle and may improve detection of a critical exercise threshold. Purpose First, to detect an oxygenation breakpoint (Δ[O2HbMb-HHbMb]-BP) and compare this breakpoint to ventilatory thresholds during a maximal incremental test across sexes and training status. Second, to assess reproducibility of NIRS signals and exercise thresholds and investigate confounding effects of adipose tissue thickness on NIRS measurements. Methods Forty subjects (10 trained male cyclists, 10 trained female cyclists, 11 endurance trained males and 9 recreationally trained males) performed maximal incremental cycling exercise to determine Δ[O2HbMb-HHbMb]-BP and ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2). Muscle haemoglobin and myoglobin O2 oxygenation ([HHbMb], [O2HbMb], SmO2) was determined in m. vastus lateralis. Δ[O2HbMb-HHbMb]-BP was determined by double linear regression. Trained cyclists performed the maximal incremental test twice to assess reproducibility. Adipose tissue thickness (ATT) was determined by skinfold measurements. Results Δ[O2HbMb-HHbMb]-BP was not different from VT1, but only moderately related (r = 0.58–0.63, p<0.001). VT1 was different across sexes and training status, whereas Δ[O2HbMb-HHbMb]-BP differed only across sexes. Reproducibility was high for SmO2 (ICC = 0.69–0.97), Δ[O2HbMb-HHbMb]-BP (ICC = 0.80–0.88) and ventilatory thresholds (ICC = 0.96–0.99). SmO2 at peak exercise and at occlusion were strongly related to adipose tissue thickness (r2 = 0.81, p<0.001; r2 = 0.79, p<0.001). Moreover, ATT was related to asymmetric changes in Δ[HHbMb] and Δ[O2HbMb] during incremental exercise (r = -0.64, p<0.001) and during occlusion (r = -0.50, p<0.05). Conclusion Although the oxygenation threshold is reproducible and potentially a suitable exercise threshold, VT1 discriminates better across sexes and training status during maximal stepwise

  6. Maximal oxygen uptake, ventilatory thresholds and mechanical power during cycling in tropical climate in Guadeloupean elite cyclists.

    PubMed

    Hue, O; Antoine-Jonville, S; Galy, O; Blonc, S

    2010-11-01

    The Tropical climate imposes a high level of physiological stress, which could modify the target heart rate in training load prescription, as the recommendations are often determined by maximal oxygen uptake testing in temperature-neutral laboratories. To test this hypothesis, 7 high-level cyclists performed two randomised maximal tests in neutral (19.2±0.9°C; 51.7±1.3% RH) and Tropical environment (25.8±1.1°C; 63.7±2.3% RH). Neither maximal oxygen uptake nor ventilatory threshold was influenced by the environmental conditions. However, ventilation (p<0.005) and the respiratory equivalent in O(2) (p<0.05) were significantly higher in the Tropical environment, whereas maximal power output and the time to attain maximal oxygen uptake were significantly lower (p<0.05 for both). Moreover, the ventilatory cost of cycling (expressed in LW(-1)) was significantly greater in the Tropical condition (0.40±0.03LW(-1) vs. 0.32±0.05LW(-1), in Tropical vs. Neutral; condition effect: p<0.005; condition × time: p<0.001). Rectal temperature was influenced by neither the environmental conditions nor exercise (36.7±0.1 and 37.0±0.1°C vs. 36.8±0.1 and 37.1±0.2°C, in Tropical vs. Neutral, before and after exercise) but was influenced by condition × time (p<0.05). The heart rate (HR) values usually used for training prescription were not significantly different (154±5bpm vs. 156±4bpm and 172±4bpm vs. 167±4bpm in Tropical vs. Neutral climate, for the first and second thresholds, respectively). We concluded that the usual parameters measured during maximal exercise to establish training programs are not impaired in moderate Tropical environment. Nevertheless, the thermal stress attested by the increased ventilatory cost of cycling could have prevented the cyclists from performing a true maximal test in Tropical conditions.

  7. Effects of hypercapnia and inspiratory flow-resistive loading on respiratory activity in chronic airways obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Altose, M D; McCauley, W C; Kelsen, S G; Cherniack, N S

    1977-01-01

    The respiratory responses to hypercapnia alone and to hypercapnia and flow-resistive loading during inspiration were studied in normal individuals and in eucapnic and hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction. Responses were assessed in terms of minute ventilation and occlusion pressure (mouth pressure during airway occlusion 100 ms after the onset of inspiration). Ventilatory responses to CO2 (deltaV/deltaPCO2) were distinctly subnormal in both groups of patients with airways obstruction. The two groups of patients, however, showed different occlusion pressure responses to CO2 (deltaP100/deltaPCO2): deltaP100/deltaPCO2 was normal in the eucapnic patients but subnormal in the hypercapnic patients. Flow-resistive loading during inspiration reduced deltaV/deltaPCO2 both in normal subjects and in patients with airways obstruction. The occlusion pressure response to CO2 increased in normal subjects during flow-resistive loading but remained unchanged in both groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. These results indicate that while chemosensitivity as determined by deltaP100/deltaPCO2 is impaired only in hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction, an acute increase in flow resistance elicits a subnormal increase in respiratory efferent activity in both eucapnic and hypercapnic patients. PMID:838862

  8. AltitudeOmics: enhanced cerebrovascular reactivity and ventilatory response to CO2 with high-altitude acclimatization and reexposure.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Subudhi, Andrew W; Evero, Oghenero; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Lovering, Andrew T; Roach, Robert C

    2014-04-01

    The present study is the first to examine the effect of high-altitude acclimatization and reexposure on the responses of cerebral blood flow and ventilation to CO2. We also compared the steady-state estimates of these parameters during acclimatization with the modified rebreathing method. We assessed changes in steady-state responses of middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv), cerebrovascular conductance index (CVCi), and ventilation (V(E)) to varied levels of CO2 in 21 lowlanders (9 women; 21 ± 1 years of age) at sea level (SL), during initial exposure to 5,260 m (ALT1), after 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16), and upon reexposure to altitude following either 7 (POST7) or 21 days (POST21) at low altitude (1,525 m). In the nonacclimatized state (ALT1), MCAv and V(E) responses to CO2 were elevated compared with those at SL (by 79 ± 75% and 14.8 ± 12.3 l/min, respectively; P = 0.004 and P = 0.011). Acclimatization at ALT16 further elevated both MCAv and Ve responses to CO2 compared with ALT1 (by 89 ± 70% and 48.3 ± 32.0 l/min, respectively; P < 0.001). The acclimatization gained for V(E) responses to CO2 at ALT16 was retained by 38% upon reexposure to altitude at POST7 (P = 0.004 vs. ALT1), whereas no retention was observed for the MCAv responses (P > 0.05). We found good agreement between steady-state and modified rebreathing estimates of MCAv and V(E) responses to CO2 across all three time points (P < 0.001, pooled data). Regardless of the method of assessment, altitude acclimatization elevates both the cerebrovascular and ventilatory responsiveness to CO2. Our data further demonstrate that this enhanced ventilatory CO2 response is partly retained after 7 days at low altitude.

  9. Association of ADAM33 gene polymorphism and arginase activity with susceptibility to ventilatory impairment in wood dust-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Saad-Hussein, A; Thabet, E H; Taha, M M; Shahy, E M; Mahdy-Abdallah, H

    2016-09-01

    ADAM33 represents an important gene of susceptibility for lung function impairment. This work aimed to evaluate the association between genetic polymorphism of ADAM33 at four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T1, T2, S1, and Q1) and arginase activity with respiratory functions impairment in wood workers. The study was done to compare ventilatory functions and arginase activity of 82 wood workers and 81 controls. Genotyping was determined by using the polymerase chain restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) of the workers were significantly reduced compared with the controls. T1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was associated with obvious decline in the FEV1, FVC, and PEF in wood workers, while T2 SNP was associated with decline in FEV1 and PEF. A significant increase in arginase activity was found in T2 and S1 SNPs of the exposed workers. Increase in duration of exposure was correlated with the decline in ventilatory functions. This inverse correlation was significant for pulmonary function indices in AA and GG genotypes of T1 and T2, respectively. Moreover, significance was detected for FVC and FEV1 in AA and GA genotypes of S1 and Q1. A positive correlation between arginase activity and duration of exposure was found to be significant in GG genotype of S1 SNP. An association between ADAM33 gene polymorphism and impaired lung functions was detected in wood dust-exposed workers. Arginase activity may play an associated important role in increasing this impairment in wood workers.

  10. Bronchodilator effect on ventilatory, pulmonary gas exchange, and heart rate kinetics during high-intensity exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Palange, Paolo; Ora, Josuel; Martolini, Dario; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2009-12-01

    Respiratory mechanical abnormalities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may impair cardiodynamic responses and convective oxygen delivery during exercise, resulting in slower ventilatory, pulmonary gas exchange (PGE), and heart rate (HR) kinetics compared with normal. We reasoned that bronchodilators and the attendant reduction of operating lung volumes should accelerate ventilatory, PGE, and HR kinetics in the transition from rest to high-intensity exercise. Twelve clinically stable COPD patients undertook constant-work rate cycle testing at 75% of each individual's maximum work capacity after receiving either combined nebulized bronchodilators (BD) or placebo (PL), randomly. Mean response time (MRT) and amplitude of slow component for oxygen uptake (V'O(2)), carbon dioxide production (V'CO(2)), ventilation (V'(E)), and HR together with operating dynamic end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) were measured. Resting and exercise EELV decreased significantly by 0.38 L after BD compared with PL. After BD, V'O(2), V'CO(2), V'(E), and HR MRT accelerated (p < 0.05) by an average of 12, 22, 27, and 22 s, respectively (i.e., 15, 18, 22 and 27%, respectively). The slow component for V'O(2) declined by an average of 55 ml/min compared with PL. Speeded MRT for V'O(2) correlated with indices of reduced lung hyperinflation, such as resting EELV (r = -0.64, p = 0.025) and EELV at isotime (r = -0.77, p = 0.0032). The results confirm an important interaction between abnormal dynamic respiratory mechanics and indices of cardio-circulatory function in the rest-to-exercise transition in COPD patients.

  11. Relationships between eupnoeic pattern of breathing and ventilatory control in man: I. Response to airways occlusion during active lung inflation.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Y; Prefaut, C; Delpierre, S; Mosse, P; Grimaud, C

    1976-12-01

    The apnoeic response following interruption of the air flow at different levels of the inspiratory capacity (deltaVL) was studied in conscious children and adults. Changes in mouth pressure were used to measured the duration of the apnoe. The total duration of the interrupted breath (T1) was compared to mean value of the ventilatory period of the five preceding breaths (T0). A monoexponential regression could be fitted to the relationship between T1/T0 ratio and change in lung volume (deltaVL) measured at the onset of interruption: T1/T0=k-exp (S-deltaVL), S begin the sensitivity of the response to lung inflation. When T1/T0=1, the intrathoracic lung volume was called threshold volume (VTh.L.). The parameters S and VTh.L. were used for characterization of the individual importance of the Breuer-Hering inspiratory-inhibitory reflex (B.H. reflex). The high reproducibility of the T1/T0 vs. deltaVL relationship in many subjects showed the light influence of voluntary control on apnoea's duration. In each subject, S and VTh.L. were compared with ventilatory variables measured during eupnoea. A fast pattern of breathing (i.e. small inspired volume and short inspiratory duration) was associated with high value of S and low VTh.L. Moreover VTh.L. was near the tidal volume range in subjects where the B.H. reflex was the more potent. Thus, vagal afferents relating to this reflex could modulate the eupnoeic pattern of some subjects.

  12. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  13. Prayer Sign as a Marker of Increased Ventilatory Hours, Length of Intensive Care Unit and Hospital Stay in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kundra, Tanveer Singh; Kaur, Parminder; Manjunatha, N

    2017-01-01

    Context: Various predictors have been used to predict diabetic patients who are likely to have increased ventilatory hours and an increased length of stay (LOS) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) as well as in the hospital after undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, for example, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). The authors propose a simple bed-side test, i.e., the prayer sign to predict increased ventilatory hours and increased length of ICU and hospital stay. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess whether any association exists between a positive prayer sign and increased ventilatory hours, length of ICU and hospital stay after CABG surgery in diabetic patients. Settings and Design: This prospective observational study was conducted in a 650-bedded tertiary cardiac center. Subjects and Methods: A total of 501 diabetic patients were recruited in the study over a period of 1 year. Group P consisted of 121 patients with prayer sign positive, whereas Group N consisted of 380 patients with prayer sign negative. HbA1c levels, ventilatory hours, LOS in the postoperative ICU and hospital were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare the data. Results: The mean HbA1c levels in Group P were 8.01 ± 2.28% as compared to 6.52 ± 2.46% in Group N (P < 0.0001). The mean ventilatory hours in Group P were 9.52 ± 6.46 h, and in Group N were 7.42 ± 8.01 h (P = 0.013). Whereas, the mean length of ICU stay and hospital stay in Group P was 156.42 ± 32.66 h (6.51 ± 1.36 days) and 197.36 ± 32.46 h (8.22 ± 1.35 days), respectively, it was 121.12 ± 29.48 h (5.04 ± 1.22 days) and 178.52 ± 28.52 h (7.43 ± 1.18 days) in Group N (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: A positive prayer sign is a useful bedside test for predicting increased ventilatory hours and increased length of ICU and hospital stay after CABG surgery. PMID:28074803

  14. The influence of gender and upper airway resistance on the ventilatory response to arousal in obstructive sleep apnoea in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S; McEvoy, R Doug; Edwards, Jill K; Schory, Karen; Yang, Chang-Kook; Catcheside, Peter G; Fogel, Robert B; Malhotra, Atul; White, David P

    2004-01-01

    The termination of obstructive respiratory events is typically associated with arousal from sleep. The ventilatory response to arousal may be an important determinant of subsequent respiratory stability/instability and therefore may be involved in perpetuating obstructive respiratory events. In healthy subjects arousal is associated with brief hyperventilation followed by more prolonged hypoventilation on return to sleep. This study was designed to assess whether elevated sleeping upper airway resistance (RUA) alters the ventilatory response to arousal and subsequent breathing on return to sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Inspired minute ventilation (VI), RUA and end-tidal CO2 pressure (PET,CO2) were measured in 22 patients (11 men, 11 women) with OSA (mean ±s.e.m., apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) 48.9 ± 5.9 events h−1) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep with low RUA (2.8 ± 0.3 cmH2O l−1 s; optimal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) = 11.3 ± 0.7 cmH2O) and with elevated RUA (17.6 ± 2.8 cmH2O l−1 s; sub-optimal CPAP = 8.4 ± 0.8 cmH2O). A single observer, unaware of respiratory data, identified spontaneous and tone-induced arousals of 3–15 s duration preceded and followed by stable NREM sleep. VI was compared between CPAP levels before and after spontaneous arousal in 16 subjects with tone-induced arousals in both conditions. During stable NREM sleep at sub-optimal CPAP, PET,CO2 was mildly elevated (43.5 ± 0.8 versus 42.5 ± 0.8 Torr). However, baseline VI (7.8 ± 0.3 versus 8.0 ± 0.3 l min−1) was unchanged between CPAP conditions. For the first three breaths following arousal, VI was higher for sub-optimal than optimal CPAP (first breath: 11.2 ± 0.9 versus 9.3 ± 0.6 l min−1). The magnitude of hypoventilation on return to sleep was not affected by the level of CPAP and both obstructive and central respiratory events were rare following arousal. Similar results occurred after tone-induced arousals which led to

  15. Effect of cigarette smoking on evolution of ventilatory lung function in young adults: an eight year longitudinal study.

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, M S; Ernst, P; Jaakkola, J J; N'gan'ga, L W; Becklake, M R

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are few data on the quantitative effects of cigarette smoking on lung function in young adults. These effects are important in the understanding of the early stages of chronic airflow obstruction. METHODS: A longitudinal study over eight years was carried out to estimate quantitatively the effect of cigarette smoking on ventilatory lung function in young adults and to examine the possibility that the effect is modified by other factors. The study population were 15 to 40 years of age at initial examination, when they underwent spirometry and completed an interviewer administered questionnaire on respiratory health. Eight years later 391 of the subjects were re-examined (38% response rate). The quantitative effect of cigarette smoking during the study period on the average change of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) over time (delta FEV1) was estimated in two linear regression models that included potential confounders and other determinants of outcome. RESULTS: The first model showed a significant dose-response relation between the average rate of smoking during the study period and delta FEV1, giving an estimate of annual change in FEV1 of -0.42 ml for each cigarette smoked per day (-8.4 ml for each pack) (p = 0.04). In the second model, which took smoking before the study period as a potential confounder, the effect of smoking during the study period was slightly smaller (-0.33 ml/year for each cigarette smoked per day). This indicated that smoking before the study period had a marginal latent effect on delta FEV1 during the study. However, neither the effect of smoking before the study nor that of smoking during the study was significant, presumably because of collinearity. Interactions between cigarette smoking and gender, wheezing, atopy, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke during the growth period were not significant with respect to their effect on the relation between cigarette smoking and delta FEV1. CONCLUSION

  16. Coordination between ventilatory pressure oscillations and venous return in the cephalopod Sepia officinalis under control conditions, spontaneous exercise and recovery.

    PubMed

    Melzner, Frank; Bock, Christian; Pörtner, Hans-O

    2007-01-01

    Venous blood flow was measured for the first time in a cephalopod. Blood velocity was determined in the anterior vena cava (AVC) of cuttlefish S. officinalis with a Doppler, while simultaneously, ventilatory pressure oscillations were recorded in the mantle cavity. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed to investigate pulsatile flow in other major vessels. Blood pulses in the AVC are obligatorily coupled to ventilatory pressure pulses, both in frequency and phase. AVC peak blood velocity (v(AVC)) in animals of 232 (+/- 30 SD) g wet mass at 15 degrees C was found to be 14.2 (+/- 7.1) cm s(-1), AVC stroke volume (SV(AVC)) was 0.2 (+/- 0.1) ml stroke(-1), AVC minute volume (MV(AVC)) amounted to 5.5 (+/- 2.8) ml min(-1). Intense exercise bouts of 1-2 min resulted in 2.2-fold increases in MV(AVC), enabled by 1.6-fold increments in both, AVC pulse frequency (f (AVC)) and v(AVC). As increases in blood flow occurred delayed in time by 1.7 min with regard to exercise periods, we concluded that it is not direct mantle cavity pressure conveyance that drives venous return in this cephalopod blood vessel. However, during jetting at high pressure amplitude (> 1 kPa), AVC blood flow and mantle cavity pressure pulse shapes completely overlap, suggesting that under these conditions, blood transport must be driven passively by mantle cavity pressure. MRI measurements at 15 degrees C also revealed that under resting conditions, f (AVC )and ventilation frequency (f (V)) match at 31.6 (+/- 2.1) strokes min(-1). In addition, rates of pulsations in the cephalic artery and in afferent branchial vessels did not significantly differ from f (AVC) and f (V). It is suggested that these adaptations are beneficial for high rates of oxygen extraction observed in S. officinalis and the energy conserving mode of life of the cuttlefish ecotype in general.

  17. The Coupling of Peripheral Blood Pressure and Ventilatory Responses during Exercise in Young Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Van Iterson, Erik H.; Wheatley, Courtney M.; Baker, Sarah E.; Olson, Thomas P.; Morgan, Wayne J.; Snyder, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cystic fibrosis (CF) is commonly recognized as a pulmonary disease associated with reduced airway function. Another primary symptom of CF is low exercise capacity where ventilation and gas-exchange are exacerbated. However, an independent link between pathophysiology of the pulmonary system and abnormal ventilatory and gas-exchange responses during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) has not been established in CF. Complicating this understanding, accumulating evidence suggests CF demonstrate abnormal peripheral vascular function; although, the clinical implications are unclear. We hypothesized that compared to controls, relative to total work performed (WorkTOT), CF would demonstrate increased ventilation accompanied by augmented systolic blood pressure (SBP) during CPET. Methods 16 CF and 23 controls (age: 23±4 vs. 27±4 years, P = 0.11; FEV1%predicted: 73±14 vs. 96±5, P<0.01) participated in CPET. Breath-by-breath oxygen uptake (V˙O2), ventilation (V˙E), and carbon dioxide output (V˙CO2) were measured continuously during incremental 3-min stage step-wise cycle ergometry CPET. SBP was measured via manual sphygmomanometry. Linear regression was used to calculate V˙E/V˙CO2 slope from rest to peak-exercise. Results Compared to controls, CF performed less WorkTOT during CPET (90±19 vs. 43±14 kJ, respectively, P<0.01). With WorkTOT as a covariate, peak V˙E (62±8 vs. 90±4 L/min, P = 0.76), V˙CO2 (1.8±0.3 vs. 2.7±0.1 L/min, P = 0.40), and SBP (144±13 vs. 152±6 mmHg, P = 0.88) were similar between CF and controls, respectively; whereas CF demonstrated increased V˙E/V˙CO2 slope (38±4 vs. 28±2, P = 0.02) but lower peak V˙O2 versus controls (22±5 vs. 33±4 mL/kg/min, P<0.01). There were modest-to-moderate correlations between peak SBP with V˙O2 (r = 0.30), V˙E (r = 0.70), and V˙CO2 (r = 0.62) in CF. Conclusions These data suggest that relative to WorkTOT, young adults with mild-to-moderate severity CF demonstrate augmented V˙E/V˙CO2

  18. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Taro; SUGANUMA, Narufumi; HERING, Kurt G.; VEHMAS, Tapio; ITOH, Harumi; AKIRA, Masanori; TAKASHIMA, Yoshihiro; HIRANO, Harukazu; KUSAKA, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects’ occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades. PMID:25810443

  19. Orexin in the toad Rhinella schneideri: The location of orexinergic neurons and the role of orexin in ventilatory responses to hypercarbia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Elisa M; Dias, Mirela B; Bícego, Kênia C; Gargaglioni, Luciane H

    2016-04-01

    Recent reports have suggested that orexins, also known as hypocretins, play an important role in the modulation of respiratory control in mammals, but there are no data available describing the role of the orexinergic system in the peripheral and central chemoreception of non-mammalian vertebrates. Therefore, the present study was designed to examine the localization of orexin-immunoreactive neurons in the brain of toads (Rhinella schneideri) and to investigate the contribution of orexin receptor-1 (OX1R) to the hypoxic and hypercarbic ventilatory responses of these animals during light and dark phases. Our results demonstrated that the orexinergic neurons of R. schneideri are located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the diencephalon. Additionally, the intracerebroventricular injection of SB-334867 (OX1R selective antagonist) attenuated the ventilatory response to hypercarbia during the dark phase by acting on tidal volume and breathing frequency, while during the light phase, SB-334867 attenuated the ventilatory response to hypoxia by acting on tidal volume only. We conclude that in the toad R. schneideri, orexinergic neurons are located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and that OX1R contributes to hypercarbic and hypoxic chemoreflexes.

  20. Comparison of Pulmonary Functions at Onset of Ventilatory Insufficiency in Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, and Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Eol; Lee, Jang Woo; Kang, Seong Woong; Choi, Won Ah; Oh, Hyeonjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate pulmonary functions of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) at the onset of ventilatory insufficiency. Methods This retrospective study included ALS, DMD, and MMD patients with regular outpatient clinic follow-up in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Gangnam Severance Hospital before the application of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). The patients were enrolled from August 2001 to March 2014. If patients experienced ventilatory insufficiency, they were treated with NIPPV, and their pulmonary functions were subsequently measured. Results Ninety-four DMD patients, 41 ALS patients, and 21 MMD patients were included in the study. The mean SpO2 was lower in the MMD group than in the other two groups. The mean forced vital capacity (FVC) in the supine position was approximately low to mid 20% on average in DMD and ALS patients, whereas it was 10% higher in MMD patients. ALS patients showed a significantly lower FVC in the supine position than in the sitting position. Maximal insufflation capacity, unassisted peak cough flow, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) were significantly higher in MMD group than in the other groups. MEP was significantly the lowest in DMD patients, followed by in ALS, and MMD patients, in order. Conclusion Disease-specific values of pulmonary function, including FVC, MEP, and MIP, can be accurately used to assess the onset of ventilatory insufficiency in patients with ALS, DMD, and MMD. PMID:26949672

  1. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Taro; Suganuma, Narufumi; Hering, Kurt G; Vehmas, Tapio; Itoh, Harumi; Akira, Masanori; Takashima, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Harukazu; Kusaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects' occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades.

  2. Safety of performing fiberoptic bronchoscopy in critically ill hypoxemic patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Christophe; Fartoukh, Muriel; Prodanovic, Hélène; Azoulay, Elie; Chenivesse, Cécile; Lorut, Christine; Beduneau, Gaëtan; Bui, Hoang Nam; Taille, Camille; Brochard, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Maitre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Safety of fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) in nonintubated critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure have not been extensively evaluated. We aimed to measure the incidence of intubation and need to increase ventilatory support following FOB and to identify predictive factors of this event. Methods A prospective multicenter observational study was carried out in 8 French adult intensive care units. 169 FOB performed in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 300 were analyzed. Our main end point was intubation rate. The secondary end point was rate of increased ventilatory support defined as greater than a 50% increase in oxygen requirement, the need to start non invasive-positive pressure ventilation (NI-PPV) or increase NI-PPV support. Results Within 24 hours, an increase in ventilatory support was required following 59 (35%) bronchoscopies, of which 25 (15%) led to endotracheal intubation. The existence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR:5.2 [1.6–17.8], p=0.007) or immunosuppression (OR : 5.4 [1.7–17.2], p=0.004) were significantly associated with the need for intubation in multivariable analysis. None of the baseline physiological parameters including the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with intubation. Conclusion Bronchoscopy is often followed by an increase in ventilatory support in hypoxemic critically ill patients, but less frequently by the need for intubation. COPD, immunosuppression are associated with a need for invasive ventilation in the following 24 hours. PMID:23070123

  3. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist during weaning from respiratory support in a case of guillain-barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dugernier, Jonathan; Bialais, Emilie; Reychler, Gregory; Vinetti, Marco; Hantson, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of Guillain-Barré syndrome complicated by respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) allowed proper patient-ventilator synchronization by pressure support proportional to the electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi). Prolonged ventilation with NAVA seems feasible in patients with neuromuscular impairment, but the weaning process conducted by a continuous monitoring of Edi for pressure support titration needed to be assessed in a Guillain-Barré syndrome patient. Beginning on day 12 after hospital admission, the patient was ventilated with NAVA for 8 d. The NAVA level (pressure support per unit of Edi) was decreased from 1.2 cm H2O/μV to zero over the 8-d period. A simultaneous decrease in the tidal volume/Edi ratio was interpreted as a sign of recovery. A spontaneous breathing trial was successfully performed on day 20, followed by decannulation 4 d later. In conclusion, NAVA should be further investigated in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, particularly during the weaning period.

  4. Unusual Ventilatory Response to Exercise in Patient with Arnold-Chiari Type 1 Malformation after Posterior Fossa Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Keely; Gomez-Rubio, Ana M.; Harris, Tomika S.; Brooks, Lauren E.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 17-year-old Hispanic male with Arnold-Chiari Type 1 [AC-Type 1] with syringomyelia, status post decompression, who complains of exercise intolerance, headaches, and fatigue with exertion. The patient was found to have diurnal hypercapnia and nocturnal alveolar hypoventilation. Cardiopulmonary testing revealed blunting of the ventilatory response to the rise in carbon dioxide (CO2) resulting in failure of the parallel correlation between increased CO2 levels and ventilation; the expected vertical relationship between PETCO2 and minute ventilation during exercise was replaced with an almost horizontal relationship. No new pathology of the brainstem was discovered by MRI or neurological evaluation to explain this phenomenon. The patient was placed on continuous noninvasive open ventilation (NIOV) during the day and CPAP at night for a period of 6 months. His pCO2 level decreased to normal limits and his symptoms improved; specifically, he experienced less headaches and fatigue during exercise. In this report, we describe the abnormal response to exercise that patients with AC-Type 1 could potentially experience, even after decompression, characterized by the impairment of ventilator response to hypercapnia during exertion, reflecting a complete loss of chemical influence on breathing with no evidence of abnormality in the corticospinal pathway. PMID:27418995

  5. Activation of microglia and astrocytes in the nucleus tractus solitarius during ventilatory acclimatization to 10% hypoxia in unanesthetized mice.

    PubMed

    Tadmouri, A; Champagnat, J; Morin-Surun, M P

    2014-05-01

    Nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the integrative sensory relay of autonomic functions in the brainstem. To explore the nonneuronal cellular basis of central chemosensitivity during the first 24 hr of ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VHA), we have investigated glial activation markers in the NTS. Conscious mice (C57/BL6) were placed in a hermetic hypoxia chamber containing a plethysmograph to record ventilation. After 4 days of habituation to the normoxic environment, mice were subjected to physiological hypoxia (10% O2 ) for 1, 6, or 24 hr. To dissociate interactions between microglia and astrocytes, another group received daily minocycline, a microglia activation blocker. By immunochemical localization of astrocytes (GFAP), activated microglia (Cd11b), and total microglia (Iba-1), we identified an oxygen-sensing glial layer in the NTS, in which astrocytes are first activated after 1-6 hr of hypoxia, followed by microglia after 6-24 hr of hypoxia. Minocycline administration suppressed microglial activation and decreased astrocyte activation at 6 hr and VHA at 24 hr of hypoxia. These results suggest that astrocytes contribute to the neuronal response during the first hour of hypoxia, whereas microglial cells, via cross-talk with astrocytes, are involved in the VHA during the first 24 hr of acclimatization.

  6. β-alanine Supplementation Fails to Increase Peak Aerobic Power or Ventilatory Threshold in Aerobically Trained Males.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau Kjerulf; Katalinas, Matthew E; Shaholli, Danielle M; Gallo, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of 30 days of β-alanine supplementation on peak aerobic power and ventilatory threshold (VT) in aerobically fit males. Fourteen males (28.8 ± 9.8 yrs) were assigned to either a β-alanine (SUPP) or placebo (PLAC) group; groups were matched for VT as it was the primary outcome measure. β-alanine supplementation consisted of 3 g/day for 7 days, and 6 g/day for the remaining 23 days. Before and after the supplementation period, subjects performed a continuous, graded cycle ergometry test to determine VO2 peak and VT. Metabolic data were analyzed using a 2 × 2 ANOVA with repeated measures. Thirty days of β-alanine supplementation (SUPP) did not increase VO2 peak (4.05 ± 0.6 vs. 4.14 ± 0.6 L/min) as compared to the placebo (PLAC) group (3.88 ± 0.2 vs. 3.97 ± 0.2 L/min) (p > .05). VT did not significantly improve in either the SUPP (3.21 ± 0.5 vs. 3.33 ± 0.5 L/min) or PLAC (3.19 ± 0.1 vs. 3.20 ± 0.1 L/min) group (p > .05). In conclusion, 30 days of β-alanine supplementation had no effect on VO2 peak or VT in aerobically trained athletes.

  7. Ventilatory responses to exercise and CO2 after menopause in healthy women: effects of age and fitness.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Margie H; Beaudin, Andrew E; Brown, Allison D; Leigh, Richard; Poulin, Marc J

    2012-10-15

    The extent to which aging affects respiratory control in postmenopausal women remains relatively unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 39 postmenopausal women (50-79 years), we examined the influence of age and fitness on the ventilatory responses to hypercapnia (HCVR; +8 mmHg) and exercise (ΔV˙(E)/ΔV˙CO2) above and below the anaerobic threshold (AT). Data were analyzed using the full cohort, by age (younger postmenopausal: YPM, 50-64 years; and older postmenopausal: OPM, 65-79 years) and fitness as per our previous work (Active: V˙O2max ≥90% age-predicted values; and Sedentary: V˙O2max <90% age-predicted values). Although age did not affect the sensitivity of HCVR, Active women had significantly lower HCVR gain compared to sedentary women (Sedentary: 2.12±0.80; Active: 1.57±0.73, p=0.02). In contrast, age, but not fitness, was inversely related to ΔV˙(E)/ΔV˙CO2 above AT (YPM: 46.8±11.5; OPM: 34.8±6.9, p<0.01) which may be explained, at least in part, by age-related declines in lung function. HCVR and ΔV˙(E)/ΔV˙CO2 were not correlated.

  8. Acrolein Inhalation Alters Myocardial Synchrony and Performance at and Below Exposure Concentrations that Cause Ventilatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Leslie C; Ledbetter, Allen D; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Cascio, Wayne E; Hazari, Mehdi S; Farraj, Aimen K

    2017-04-01

    Acrolein is an irritating aldehyde generated during combustion of organic compounds. Altered autonomic activity has been documented following acrolein inhalation, possibly impacting myocardial synchrony and function. Given the ubiquitous nature of acrolein in the environment, we sought to better define the immediate and delayed functional cardiac effects of acrolein inhalation in vivo. We hypothesized that acrolein inhalation would increase markers of cardiac mechanical dysfunction, i.e., myocardial dyssynchrony and performance index in mice. Male C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to filtered air (FA) or acrolein (0.3 or 3.0 ppm) for 3 h in whole-body plethysmography chambers (n = 6). Echocardiographic analyses were performed 1 day before exposure and at 1 and 24 h post-exposure. Speckle tracking echocardiography revealed that circumferential strain delay (i.e., dyssynchrony) was increased at 1 and 24 h following exposure to 3.0 ppm, but not 0.3 ppm, when compared to pre-exposure and/or FA exposure. Pulsed wave Doppler of transmitral blood flow revealed that acrolein exposure at 0.3 ppm, but not 3.0 ppm, increased the Tei index of myocardial performance (i.e., decreased global heart performance) at 1 and 24 h post-exposure compared to pre-exposure and/or FA exposure. We conclude that short-term inhalation of acrolein can acutely modify cardiac function in vivo and that echocardiographic evaluation of myocardial synchrony and performance following exposure to other inhaled pollutants could provide broader insight into the health effects of air pollution.

  9. Effects of subanaesthetic sevoflurane on ventilation. 1: Response to acute and sustained hypercapnia in humans.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J J; Manning-Fox, J; Dorrington, K L; Robbins, P A

    1999-08-01

    We have determined the influence of 0.1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane on ventilation, the acute ventilatory response to a step change in end-tidal carbon dioxide and the ventilatory response to sustained hypercapnia in 10 healthy adult volunteers. Subjects undertook a preliminary 10-min period of breathing air without sevoflurane to determine their normal ventilation and natural end-tidal PCO2. This 10-min period was repeated while breathing 0.1 MAC of sevoflurane. Subjects then undertook two procedures: end-tidal PO2 was maintained at 13.3 kPa and end-tidal PCO2 at 1.3 kPa above the subject's normal value for 30 min of data collection, first with and then without 0.1 MAC of sevoflurane. A dynamic end-tidal forcing system was used to generate these gas profiles. Sevoflurane did not significantly change ventilation: 10.1 (SEM 1.0) litre min-1 without sevoflurane, 9.6 (0.9) litre min-1 with sevoflurane. The response to acute hypercapnia was also unchanged: mean carbon dioxide response slopes were 20.2 (2.7) litre min-1 kPa-1 without sevoflurane and 18.8 (2.7) litre min-1 kPa-1 with sevoflurane. Sustained hypercapnia caused a significant gradual increase in ventilation and tidal volume over time and significant gradual reduction in inspiratory and expiratory times. Sevoflurane did not affect these trends during sustained hypercapnia. These results suggest that 0.1 MAC of sevoflurane does not significantly affect the acute ventilatory response to hypercapnia and does not modify the progressive changes in ventilation and pattern of breathing that occur with sustained hypercapnia.

  10. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute bronchitis, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests. Treatments include rest, fluids, and aspirin (for adults) or ...

  11. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality.

  12. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality. PMID:26312101

  13. Validity of electromyographic fatigue threshold as a noninvasive method for tracking changes in ventilatory threshold in college-aged men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Smith, Abbie E; Graef, Jennifer L; Walter, Ashley A; Moon, Jordan R; Lockwood, Christopher M; Beck, Travis W; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    The submaximal electromyographic fatigue threshold test (EMG(FT)) has been shown to be highly correlated to ventilatory threshold (VT) as determined from maximal graded exercise tests (GXTs). Recently, a prediction equation was developed using the EMG(FT) value to predict VT. The aim of this study, therefore, was to determine if this new equation could accurately track changes in VT after high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Eighteen recreationally trained men (mean +/- SD; age 22.4 +/- 3.2 years) performed a GXT to determine maximal oxygen consumption rate (V(O2)peak) and VT using breath-by-breath spirometry. Participants also completed a discontinuous incremental cycle ergometer test to determine their EMGFT value. A total of four 2-minute work bouts were completed to obtain 15-second averages of the electromyographic amplitude. The resulting slopes from each successive work bout were used to calculate EMG(FT). The EMG(FT) value from each participant was used to estimate VT from the recently developed equation. All participants trained 3 days a week for 6 weeks. Training consisted of 5 sets of 2-minute work bouts with 1 minute of rest in between. Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated no significant difference between actual and predicted VT values after 3 weeks of training. However, there was a significant difference between the actual and predicted VT values after 6 weeks of training. These findings suggest that the EMG(FT) may be useful when tracking changes in VT after 3 weeks of HIIT in recreationally trained individuals. However, the use of EMG(FT) to predict VT does not seem to be valid for tracking changes after 6 weeks of HIIT. At this time, it is not recommended that EMG(FT) be used to predict and track changes in VT.

  14. Is ventilatory efficiency dependent on the speed of the exercise test protocol in healthy men and women?

    PubMed

    Davis, James A; Sorrentino, Kristin M; Soriano, April C; Pham, Patrick H; Dorado, Silvia

    2006-03-01

    Indices of ventilatory efficiency have proven useful in assessing patients with heart and lung disease. One of these indices is the slope of the ventilation (V(E)) versus carbon dioxide output (VCO(2)) relationship during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) for work rates where the relationship is linear. However, this relationship is defined not only by the slope but also by the y-intercept. To examine whether this relationship is dependent on the speed of the CPET protocol, 30 healthy subjects (16 males) were administered a rapid CPET with 1-min increment duration (1-min CPET) to the limit of tolerance and a slow CPET with 4-min increment duration (4-min CPET) to the lactate threshold. Ventilation and the gas fractions for oxygen and CO(2) were measured with a Vacumed metabolic cart. The average increment size of both protocols for both sexes was not significantly different (P>0.05). For the males, the mean (SD) slope for the 1- and 4-min CPET was 20.12 (2.61) and 20.37 (2.41), respectively. The corresponding values for the y-intercept were 4..89 (2.08) and 5..10 (2.00) l min(-1). For the females, the mean (SD) slope for the 1- and 4-min CPET was 23.90 (2.38) and 24.16 (2.55), respectively. The corresponding values for the y-intercept were 3.93 (0.39) and 3.77 (0.71) l min(-1). Paired t-test analysis demonstrated for both sexes that the slopes and y-intercepts were not different for the two protocols (P>0.05). The results of this study demonstrate that the V(E) versus VCO(2) relationship is not dependent on the speed of the CPET protocol.

  15. Effect of biological maturation on maximal oxygen uptake and ventilatory thresholds in soccer players: an allometric approach.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Giovani; Lorenzi, Thiago; Sapata, Katiuce; Lopes, Andre Luiz; Gaya, Adroaldo Cezar; Oliveira, Álvaro

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of biological maturation on maximal oxygen uptake ([Vdot]O(2max)) and ventilatory thresholds (VT(1) and VT(2)) in 110 young soccer players separated into pubescent and post-pubescent groups.. Maximal oxygen uptake and [Vdot]O(2) corresponding to VT(1) and VT(2) were expressed as absolute values, ratio standards, theoretical exponents, and experimentally observed exponents. Absolute [Vdot]O(2) (ml · min(-1)) was different between groups for VT(1), VT(2), and [Vdot]O(2max). Ratio standards (ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) were not significantly different between groups for VT(1), VT(2), and [Vdot]O(2max). Theoretical exponents (ml · kg(-0.67) · min(-1) and ml · kg(-0.75) · min(-1)) were not properly adjusted for the body mass effects on VT(1), VT(2), and [Vdot]O(2max). When the data were correctly adjusted using experimentally observed exponents, VT(1) (ml · kg(-0.94) · min(-1)) and VT(2) (ml · kg(-0.95) · min(-1)) were not different between groups. The experimentally observed exponent for [Vdot]O(2max) (ml · kg(-0.90) · min(-1)) was different between groups (P = 0.048); however, this difference could not be attributed to biological maturation. In conclusion, biological maturation had no effect on VT(1), VT(2) or [Vdot]O(2max) when the effect of body mass was adjusted by experimentally observed exponents. Thus, when evaluating the physiological performance of young soccer players, allometric scaling needs to be taken into account instead of using theoretical approaches.

  16. Increases in .VO2max with "live high-train low" altitude training: role of ventilatory acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D; Laymon, Abigail S; Chapman, Robert F

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the percentage of the increase in whole body maximal oxygen consumption (.VO(2max)) that is accounted for by increased respiratory muscle oxygen uptake after altitude training. Six elite male distance runners (.VO(2max) = 70.6 ± 4.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and one elite female distance runner (.VO(2max)) = 64.7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed a 28-day "live high-train low" training intervention (living elevation, 2,150 m). Before and after altitude training, subjects ran at three submaximal speeds, and during a separate session, performed a graded exercise test to exhaustion. A regression equation derived from published data was used to estimate respiratory muscle .VO(2) (.VO(2RM)) using our ventilation (.VE) values. .VO(2RM) was also estimated retrospectively from a larger group of distance runners (n = 22). .VO(2max) significantly (p < 0.05) increased from pre- to post-altitude (196 ± 59 ml min(-1)), while (.VE) at .VO(2max) also significantly (p < 0.05) increased (13.3 ± 5.3 l min(-1)). The estimated .VO(2RM) contributed 37 % of Δ .VO(2max). The retrospective group also saw a significant increase in .VO(2max) from pre- to post-altitude (201 ± 36 ml min(-1)), along with a 10.8 ± 2.1 l min(-1) increase in (.VE), thus requiring an estimated 27 % of Δ .VO(2max) Our data suggest that a substantial portion of the improvement in .VO(2max) with chronic altitude training goes to fuel the respiratory muscles as opposed to the musculature which directly contributes to locomotion. Consequently, the time-course of decay in ventilatory acclimatization following return to sea-level may have an impact on competitive performance.

  17. Non-invasive ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of acute type 2 respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Brown, J L; Reinhardt, A K; Kaul, S; Scales, K; Mikelsons, C; Reid, K; Winter, R; Young, K; Restrick, L; Plant, P K

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of acute type 2 respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the major technical advances in respiratory care over the last decade. This document updates the 2002 British Thoracic Society guidance and provides a specific focus on the use of NIV in COPD patients with acute type 2 respiratory failure. While there are a variety of ventilator units available most centres now use bi-level positive airways pressure units and this guideline refers specifically to this form of ventilatory support although many of the principles encompassed are applicable to other forms of NIV. The guideline has been produced for the clinician caring for COPD patients in the emergency and ward areas of acute hospitals.

  18. Occurrence of respiratory symptoms in persons with restrictive ventilatory impairment compared with persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The PLATINO study.

    PubMed

    Nonato, Nívia L; Nascimento, Oliver A; Padilla, Rogelio P; de Oca, Maria M; Tálamo, Carlos; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Lisboa, Carmen; López, Maria V; Celli, Bartolomé; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Jardim, José R

    2015-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually complain of symptoms such as cough, sputum, wheezing, and dyspnea. Little is known about clinical symptoms in individuals with restrictive ventilatory impairment. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence and type of respiratory symptoms in patients with COPD to those reported by individuals with restrictive ventilatory impairment in the Proyecto Latinoamericano de Investigacion en Obstruccion Pulmonar study. Between 2002 and 2004, individuals ≥40 years of age from five cities in Latin America performed pre and post-bronchodilator spirometry and had their respiratory symptoms recorded in a standardized questionnaire. Among the 5315 individuals evaluated, 260 (5.1%) had a restrictive spirometric diagnosis (forced vital capacity (FVC) < lower limit of normal (LLN) with forced expiratory volume in the first second to forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC) ≥ LLN; American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) 2005) and 610 (11.9%) were diagnosed with an obstructive pattern (FEV1/FVC < LLN; ATS/ERS 2005). Patients with mild restriction wheezed more ((30.8%) vs. (17.8%); p < 0.028). No difference was seen in dyspnea, cough, and sputum between the two groups after adjusting for severity stage. The health status scores for the short form 12 questionnaire were similar in restricted and obstructed patients for both physical (48.4 ± 9.4 vs. 48.3 ± 9.8) and mental (50.8 ± 10.6 vs. 50.0 ± 11.5) domains. Overall, respiratory symptoms are not frequently reported by patients with restricted and obstructed patterns as defined by spirometry. Wheezing was more frequent in patients with restricted pattern compared with those with obstructive ventilatory defect. However, the prevalence of cough, sputum production, and dyspnea are not different between the two groups when adjusted by the same severity stage.

  19. Importance of ventricular rate after mode switching during low intensity exercise as assessed by clinical symptoms and ventilatory gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Brunner-La Rocca, H P; Rickli, H; Weilenmann, D; Duru, F; Candinas, R

    2000-01-01

    Automatic mode switching from DDD(R) to DDI(R) or VVI(R) pacing modes has improved dual chamber pacing in patients at high risk for supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. However, little is known about the effect of ventricular pacing rate adaptation after mode switching. We conducted a single-blinded, crossover study in 15 patients (58 +/- 21 years) with a DDD pacemaker who had AV block and normal sinus node function to investigate the influence of pacing rate adaptation to intrinsic heart rate during low intensity exercise. Patients performed two tests (A/B) of low intensity treadmill exercise (0.5 W/kg) in randomized order. They initially walked for 6 minutes while paced in DDD mode. The pacing mode was then switched to VVI with a pacing rate of either 70 beats/min (test A) or matched to the intrinsic heart rate (95 +/- 11 beats/min test B). Respiratory gas exchange variables were determined and patients classified the effort before and after mode switching on a Borg scale from 6 to 20. Percentage changes of respiratory gas exchange measurements were significantly larger (O2 consumption: -8.2 +/- 5.0% vs. -0.6 +/- 7.2%; ventilatory equivalent of CO2 exhalation: 5.3 +/- 4.9% vs. 1.5 +/- 4.3%; respiratory exchange ratio: 7.0 +/- 2.2% vs. 3.5 +/- 3.0%; end-tidal CO2: -5.7 +/- 2.9% vs. -1.8 +/- 2.7%; all P < 0.01) and the increase in subjective assessment of the effort tended to be higher (mean increase on Borg scale: 1.6 +/- 1.9 vs. 1.1 +/- 1.8, P = 0.07) after heart rate unadjusted than after adjusted mode switching. Mode switching from DDD to VVI pacing is better tolerated and gas exchange measurements are less influenced if ventricular pacing rate is adjusted to the level of physical activity. Thus, pacing rate adjustment should be considered as part of automatic mode switch algorithms.

  20. Ventilators for noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario

    2008-08-01

    The application of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat acute respiratory failure has increased tremendously both inside and outside the intensive care unit. The choice of ventilator is crucial for success of NIV in the acute setting, because poor tolerance and excessive air leaks are significantly correlated with NIV failure. Patient-ventilator asynchrony and discomfort can occur if the physician or respiratory therapist fails to adequately set NIV to respond to the patient's ventilatory demand, so clinicians need to fully understood the ventilator's technical peculiarities (eg, efficiency of trigger and cycle systems, speed of pressurization, air-leak compensation, CO(2) rebreathing, reliability of fraction of inspired oxygen reading, monitoring accuracy). A wide range of ventilators of different complexity have been introduced into clinical practice to noninvasively support patients in acute respiratory failure, but the numerous commercially available ventilators (bi-level, intermediate, and intensive care unit ventilators) have substantial differences that can influence patient comfort, patient-ventilator interaction, and, thus, the chance of NIV clinical success. This report examines the most relevant aspects of the historical evolution, the equipment, and the acute-respiratory-failure clinical application of NIV ventilators.

  1. Pulmonary function after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Nysom, K.; Holm, K.; Olsen, J. H.; Hertz, H.; Hesse, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pulmonary function after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and identify risk factors for reduced pulmonary function. We studied a population-based cohort of 94 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood who were in first remission after treatment without spinal irradiation or bone marrow transplantation. Pulmonary function test results were compared with reference values for our laboratory, based on 348 healthy subjects who had never smoked from a local population study. A median of 8 years after cessation of therapy (range 1-18 years) the participants had a slight, subclinical, restrictive ventilatory insufficiency and reduced transfer factor and transfer coefficient. The changes in lung function were related to younger age at treatment and to more dose-intensive treatment protocols that specified more use of cranial irradiation and higher cumulative doses of anthracyclines, cytosine arabinoside and intravenous cyclophosphamide than previous protocols. We conclude that, 8 years after treatment without bone marrow transplantation or spinal irradiation, survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission were without pulmonary symptoms but had signs of slight restrictive pulmonary disease including reduced transfer factor. The increased dose intensity of many recent protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may lead to increased late pulmonary toxicity. PMID:9662245

  2. Changes in ventilatory capacity, exercise capacity, and pulmonary blood flow after lobectomy in patients with lung cancer--which lobectomy has the most loss in exercise capacity?

    PubMed

    Kushibe, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Takeshi; Kimura, Michitaka; Takahama, Makoto; Tojo, Takashi; Taniguchi, Shigeki

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the changes in ventilatory capacity, exercise capacity, and pulmonary blood flow (PBF) in the operated lung after lobectomy according to the lobe resected. Thirty-one patients underwent right upper lobectomy (RUL), 26 left upper lobectomy (LUL), 24 right lower lobectomy (RLL), and 25 left lower lobectomy (LLL). Pulmonary function tests, exercise capacity tests, and perfusion lung scans were performed preoperatively and six months to one year after lobectomy. RUL was associated with significantly less loss in forced vital capacity (FVC) than RLL or LLL (P<0.05). LUL was associated with the greatest loss in maximum oxygen consumption (VO2) (P<0.05). LUL was associated with significantly greater loss in PBF in the operated lung than RUL (P<0.05). LUL had a significantly higher negative value in percentage change in (VO2) --percentage change in FVC, and percentage change in PBF--percentage change in FVC than RLL or LLL (P<0.05). LUL was not associated with the greatest loss in ventilatory capacity or PBF, although it was associated with the greatest loss in . Each lobectomy has its own peculiarity in magnitude of loss in (VO2), PBF or FVC.

  3. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  4. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  5. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... to breathe. Other symptoms of bronchitis are a cough and coughing up mucus. Acute means the symptoms ... diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough with mucus on most days for at least ...

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is inflammation of your bronchial tree. The bronchial tree consists of tubes that carry air into your ... weeks or months. This happens because the bronchial tree takes a while to heal. A lasting cough ...

  7. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application.

  8. Clinical review: Acute respiratory distress syndrome - clinical ventilator management and adjunct therapy.

    PubMed

    Silversides, Jonathan A; Ferguson, Niall D

    2013-04-29

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury with a high short-term mortality rate and significant long-term consequences among survivors. Supportive care, principally with mechanical ventilation, remains the cornerstone of therapy - although the goals of this support have changed in recent years - from maintaining normal physiological parameters to avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury while providing adequate gas exchange. In this article we discuss the current evidence base for ventilatory support and adjunctive therapies in patients with ARDS. Key components of such a strategy include avoiding lung overdistension by limiting tidal volumes and airway pressures, and the use of positive end-expiratory pressure with or without lung recruitment manoeuvres in patients with severe ARDS. Adjunctive therapies discussed include pharmacologic techniques (for example, vasodilators, diuretics, neuromuscular blockade) and nonpharmacologic techniques (for example, prone position, alternative modes of ventilation).

  9. End-of-life discontinuation of destination therapy with cardiac and ventilatory support medical devices: physician-assisted death or allowing the patient to die?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die." Discussion Advances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used for permanent support of respiration. Clinical studies have shown that destination therapy with ventricular assist devices improves patient survival compared to medical management, but at the cost of a substantial alteration in end-of-life trajectories. The moral and legal assessment of the appropriateness and permissibility of complying with a patient's request to electively discontinue destination therapy in a life-terminating act in non-futile situations has generated controversy. Some argue that complying with this request is ethically justified because patients have the right to request withdrawal of unwanted treatment and be allowed to die of preexisting disease. Other commentators reject the argument that acceding to an elective request for death by discontinuing destination therapy is 'allowing a patient to die' because of serious flaws in interpreting the intention, causation, and moral responsibility of the ensuing death. Summary Destination therapy with cardiac and/or ventilatory medical devices replaces native physiological functions and successfully treats a preexisting disease. We posit that discontinuing cardiac and/or ventilatory support at the request of a patient or surrogate can be viewed as allowing the patient to die if--and only if--concurrent lethal pathophysiological conditions are present that are unrelated to those functions already supported by medical devices in

  10. Divergent cardio-ventilatory and locomotor effects of centrally and peripherally administered urotensin II and urotensin II-related peptides in trout

    PubMed Central

    Vanegas, Gilmer; Leprince, Jérôme; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Vaudry, Hubert; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    The urotensin II (UII) gene family consists of four paralogous genes called UII, UII-related peptide (URP), URP1 and URP2. UII and URP peptides exhibit the same cyclic hexapeptide core sequence (CFWKYC) while the N- and C-terminal regions are variable. UII, URP1, and URP2 mRNAs are differentially expressed within the central nervous system of teleost fishes, suggesting that they may exert distinct functions. Although the cardiovascular, ventilatory and locomotor effects of UII have been described in teleosts, much less is known regarding the physiological actions of URPs. The goal of the present study was to compare the central and peripheral actions of picomolar doses (5–500 pmol) of trout UII, URP1, and URP2 on cardio-ventilatory variables and locomotor activity in the unanesthetized trout. Compared to vehicle, intracerebroventricular injection of UII, URP1 and URP2 evoked a gradual increase in total ventilation (VTOT) reaching statistical significance for doses of 50 and 500 pmol of UII and URP1 but for only 500 pmol of URP2. In addition, UII, URP1 and URP2 provoked an elevation of dorsal aortic blood pressure (PDA) accompanied with tachycardia. All peptides caused an increase in locomotor activity (ACT), at a threshold dose of 5 pmol for UII and URP1, and 50 pmol for URP2. After intra-arterial (IA) injection, and in contrast to their central effects, only the highest dose of UII and URP1 significantly elevated VTOT and ACT. UII produced a dose-dependent hypertensive effect with concomitant bradycardia while URP1 increased PDA and heart rate after injection of only the highest dose of peptide. URP2 did not evoke any cardio-ventilatory or locomotor effect after IA injection. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that endogenous UII, URP1 and URP2 in the trout brain may act as neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators acting synergistically or differentially to control the cardio-respiratory and locomotor systems. In the periphery, the only

  11. Risk factors for treatment failure in patients with severe acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, F; Tresoldi, S; Maggiolini, S; Bozzano, A; Bellani, G; Pesenti, A; Fumagalli, R

    2008-05-01

    Intubation is necessary in 7 to 20% of patients with severe acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema despite optimal treatment. This study evaluated the usefulness of parameters largely available in clinical practice to predict the need for intubation in a population of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema patients treated with medical therapy and continuous positive airway pressure. The present retrospective cohort study involved 142 patients with severe acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema who were admitted to coronary care or the intensive care unit of a university hospital and were treated by an in-hospital protocol. Physiological measurements and blood gas samples were evaluated at 'baseline' (just after admission), 'early' (one to three hours after beginning treatment) and 'late' (eight to 10 hours after beginning treatment). Twenty-two patients (15.5%) required intubation. A systolic blood pressure at admission lower than 140 mmHg was significantly associated with a higher risk for intubation, while hypercapnic patients or those with a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction at admission did not show a worse prognosis. A simple score based on largely available parameters (1 point for each: age >78 years, systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg at admission, arterial blood gas acidosis and heart rate >95 bpm at early time) is proposed. The rate of intubation according to this score ranged from 0% (score of 0) to 90% (score of 3). Our study found that simple parameters available in clinical practice are significantly associated with the need for intubation in acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema patients treated with continuous positive airway pressure and medical therapy. A simple score to evaluate the need for endotracheal intubation is proposed.

  12. The use of a prospective audit proforma to improve door-to-mask times for acute exacerbations chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requiring non-invasive ventilation (NIV).

    PubMed

    Mandal, S; Howes, T Q; Parker, M; Roberts, C M

    2014-12-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is an evidence based management of acidotic, hypercapnic exacerbations of COPD. Previous national and international audits of clinical practice have shown variation against guideline standards with significant delays in initiating NIV. We aimed to map the clinical pathway to better understand delays and reduce the door-to-NIV time to less than 3 hours for all patients with acidotic, hypercapnic exacerbations of COPD requiring this intervention, by mandating the use of a guideline based educational management proforma.The proforma was introduced at 7 acute hospitals in North London and Essex and initiated at admission of the patient. It was used to record the clinical pathway and patient outcomes until the point of discharge or death. Data for 138 patients were collected. 48% of patients commenced NIV within 3 hours with no reduction in door-to-mask time during the study period. Delays in starting NIV were due to: time taken for review by the medical team (101 minutes) and time taken for NIV to be started once a decision had been made (49 minutes). There were significant differences in door-to-NIV decision and mask times between differing respiratory on-call systems, p < 0.05). The introduction of the proforma had no effect on door-to-mask times over the study period. Main reasons for delay were related to timely access to medical staff and to NIV equipment; however, a marked variation in practice within these hospitals was been noted, with a 9-5 respiratory on-call system associated with shorter NIV initiation times.

  13. Combined use of Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) and Vertical Expandable Prostethic Titanium Rib (VEPTR) in a patient with Spondylocostal dysostosis and associated bronchomalacia.

    PubMed

    Pons-Odena, Martí; Verges, Alba; Arza, Natalia; Cambra, Francisco José

    2017-02-14

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by defects in vertebral and costal segmentation of varying severity. Respiratory complications are the main cause of death or severe comorbidity due to a restrictive rib cage. A 3 months old infant with Spondylocostal dysostosis and associated bronchomalacia experiencing severe asynchrony during the weaning process is reported. The Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) mode was used to improve adaptation to mechanical ventilation after Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Ribs (VEPTRs) were implanted. The synchrony achieved with the NAVA mode allowed a decrease of the sedoanalgesia he received. A follow-up CT scan showed a reduction in the volume of the posterobasal atelectasis. The evolution of this patient suggests that the combined use of VEPTR for thoracic expansion and ventilation using NAVA can favour the global improvement. This mode could be an option to consider in selected patients with difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation in paediatric intensive care units.

  14. Combined use of Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) and Vertical Expandable Prostethic Titanium Rib (VEPTR) in a patient with Spondylocostal dysostosis and associated bronchomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Pons-Odena, Martí; Verges, Alba; Arza, Natalia; Cambra, Francisco José

    2017-01-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by defects in vertebral and costal segmentation of varying severity. Respiratory complications are the main cause of death or severe comorbidity due to a restrictive rib cage. A 3 months old infant with Spondylocostal dysostosis and associated bronchomalacia experiencing severe asynchrony during the weaning process is reported. The Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) mode was used to improve adaptation to mechanical ventilation after Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Ribs (VEPTRs) were implanted. The synchrony achieved with the NAVA mode allowed a decrease of the sedoanalgesia he received. A follow-up CT scan showed a reduction in the volume of the posterobasal atelectasis. The evolution of this patient suggests that the combined use of VEPTR for thoracic expansion and ventilation using NAVA can favour the global improvement. This mode could be an option to consider in selected patients with difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation in paediatric intensive care units. PMID:28196820

  15. Role of nitric oxide-containing factors in the ventilatory and cardiovascular responses elicited by hypoxic challenge in isoflurane-anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, James P.; Passafaro, Rachael J.; Baby, Santhosh M.; Young, Alex P.; Bates, James N.; Gaston, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to hypoxia elicits changes in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate, and frequency of breathing (fr). The objective of this study was to determine the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses elicited by brief exposures to hypoxia in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. The rats were instrumented to record MAP, heart rate, and fr and then exposed to 90 s episodes of hypoxia (10% O2, 90% N2) before and after injection of vehicle, the NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), or the inactive enantiomer d-NAME (both at 50 μmol/kg iv). Each episode of hypoxia elicited a decrease in MAP, bidirectional changes in heart rate (initial increase and then a decrease), and an increase in fr. These responses were similar before and after injection of vehicle or d-NAME. In contrast, the hypoxia-induced decreases in MAP were attenuated after administration of l-NAME. The initial increases in heart rate during hypoxia were amplified whereas the subsequent decreases in heart rate were attenuated in l-NAME-treated rats. Finally, the hypoxia-induced increases in fr were virtually identical before and after administration of l-NAME. These findings suggest that NO factors play a vital role in the expression of the cardiovascular but not the ventilatory responses elicited by brief episodes of hypoxia in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Based on existing evidence that NO factors play a vital role in carotid body and central responses to hypoxia in conscious rats, our findings raise the novel possibility that isoflurane blunts this NO-dependent signaling. PMID:24744389

  16. Ventilatory and cardiovascular actions of centrally and peripherally administered trout pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the unanaesthetized trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, J-C; Lancien, F; Mimassi, N; Conlon, J M

    2009-12-01

    In mammals, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) are involved in cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of PACAP, VIP and their receptors in various tissues of teleost fish, including the brain, but little is known about their respiratory and cardiovascular effects. The present study was undertaken to compare the central and peripheral actions of graded doses (25-100 pmol) of trout PACAP and trout VIP on ventilatory and cardiovascular variables in the unanaesthetized rainbow trout. Compared with vehicle, only intracerebroventricular injection of PACAP significantly (P<0.05) elevated the ventilation frequency and the ventilation amplitude, but both peptides significantly increased the total ventilation (total ventilation). However, the maximum hyperventilatory effect of PACAP was approximately 2.5-fold higher than the effect of VIP at the 100 pmol dose (PACAP, (total ventilation)=+5407+/-921 arbitrary units, a.u.; VIP, (total ventilation)=+2056+/-874 a.u.; means +/- s.e.m.). When injected centrally, only PACAP produced a significant increase in mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) (100 pmol: +21%) but neither peptide affected heart rate (f(H)). Intra-arterial injections of either PACAP or VIP were without effect on the ventilatory variables. PACAP was without significant action on P(DA) and f(H) while VIP significantly elevated P(DA) (100 pmol: +36%) without changing f(H). In conclusion, the selective central hyperventilatory actions of exogenously administered trout PACAP, and to a lesser extent VIP, suggest that the endogenous peptides may be implicated in important neuroregulatory functions related to the central control of ventilation in trout.

  17. Respiratory symptoms and ventilatory function among health-care workers exposed to cleaning and disinfectant chemicals, a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    El-Helaly, Mohamed; Balkhy, Hanan H; Waseem, Khan; Khawaja, Sahdia

    2016-12-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies have shown that exposure to cleaning chemicals among health-care workers (HCWs) is associated with respiratory disorders and ventilatory function changes. This study aimed to further explore this association using a longitudinal approach. A prospective 2-year follow-up study was carried out at a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia from June 2012 to June 2014 among 56 nurses who were responsible for disinfection and sterilization of medical instruments and equipment. The workplaces of the participants were assessed for engineering, environmental, and safety control measures. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to all participants to assess their exposure to cleaning chemicals and their medical history. Spirometric parameters were measured for all nurses in 2012 (baseline) and again in 2014 (follow-up). The prevalence of work-related respiratory symptoms did not increase significantly over this time. Among all the spirometric parameters, only forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio decreased significantly, and only 10.7% of participants who were exposed to cleaning chemicals for more than 10 years had FEV1 and FVC less than their longitudinal normal limits at the end of the study. Smoking and gender were associated with statistically significant decreases in some of the spirometric parameters. Our 2-year follow-up study did not demonstrate significant association between exposure to cleaning chemicals among HCWs and changes in the prevalence of work-related respiratory symptoms, but indicated early effects on ventilatory function among them. The study highlights the importance of periodic spirometry, proper work practices, and effective control measures to protect HCWs against potentially harmful workplace chemicals for disinfection and sterilization.

  18. Lack of involvement of the autonomic nervous system in early ventilatory and pulmonary vascular acclimatization to hypoxia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun; Smith, Thomas G; Balanos, George M; Brooks, Jerome; Crosby, Alexi; Herigstad, Mari; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    The activity within the autonomic nervous system may be altered following sustained exposure to hypoxia, and it is possible that this increase in activity underlies the early acclimatization of both ventilation and the pulmonary vasculature to hypoxia. To test this hypothesis, seven individuals were infused with the ganglionic blocker trimetaphan before and after an 8 h exposure to hypoxia. The short half-life of trimetaphan should ensure that the initial infusion does not affect acclimatization to the 8 h hypoxia exposure, and the use of a ganglion blocking agent should inhibit activity within all branches of the autonomic nervous system. During the infusions of trimetaphan, measurements of ventilation and echocardiographic assessments of pulmonary vascular tone (ΔPmax) were made during euoxia and during a short period of isocapnic hypoxia. Subjects were also studied on two control days, when a saline infusion was substituted for trimetaphan. Trimetaphan had no effect on either euoxic ventilation or the sensitivity of ventilation to acute hypoxia. Trimetaphan significantly reduced ΔPmax in euoxia (P < 0.05), but had no significant effect on the sensitivity of ΔPmax to acute hypoxia once changes in cardiac output had been controlled for. The 8 h period of hypoxia elevated euoxic ventilation (P < 0.001) and ΔPmax (P < 0.001) and increased their sensitivities to acute hypoxia (P < 0.001 for both), indicating that significant acclimatization had occurred. Trimetaphan had no effect on the acclimatization response of any of these variables. We conclude that altered autonomic activity following 8 h of hypoxia does not underlie the acclimatization observed in ventilation or pulmonary vascular tone. PMID:17138611

  19. Acute exposure to acid fog. Effects on mucociliary clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, B.L.; Bowes, S.M. III; Links, J.M.; Thomas, K.K.; Frank, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Submicrometric sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol can affect mucociliary clearance without eliciting irritative symptoms or changes in pulmonary function. The effect of larger fog droplets containing H2SO4 on mucociliary clearance is unknown. We quantified mucociliary clearance from the trachea (n = 4) and small airways (n = 7) of young healthy male adults after an acute exposure to H2SO4 fog (MMAD = 10.3 microns; pH = 2.0; liquid water content = 481 +/- 65 mg/m3; osmolarity = 30 mOsm). Acid fog (AF) or saline fog (SF) (10.9 microns; 492 +/- 116 mg/m3; 30 mOsm) was administered for 40 min of unencumbered breathing (no mouth-piece) at rest and for 20 min of exercise sufficient to produce oronasal breathing. Fog exposures were followed by a methacholine (MCh) challenge (a measure of airway reactivity) or inhalation of technetium-99M radioaerosol (MMAD = 3.4 microns) on 2 study days each. Changes in symptoms and forced ventilatory function were also assessed. Clearance was quantified from computer-assisted analyses of gamma camera images of the lower respiratory tract in terms of %removal/min of the radiolabel from the trachea 25 min after inhalation and from the outer zone of the right lung after 1.9 to 3 h. Symptoms, forced ventilatory function, and MCh response were unaffected by either fog. Tracheal clearance was more rapid in four of four subjects after AF (0.83 +/- 1.58% removal/min) compared with that after SF (-0.54 +/- 0.85% removal/min). Outer zone clearance was more rapid in six of seven subjects after AF (0.22 +/- 0.15% removal/min) compared with that after SF (0.01 +/- 0.09% removal/min).

  20. Effects of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular responses to carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Okazaki, Kazunobu; Shibasaki, Manabu; Subudhi, Andrew W; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2014-06-01

    In normoxic conditions, a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension causes cerebral vasoconstriction, thereby reducing cerebral blood flow and modifying dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA). It is unclear to what extent these effects are altered by acute hypoxia and the associated hypoxic ventilatory response (respiratory chemoreflex). This study tested the hypothesis that acute hypoxia attenuates arterial CO2 tension-mediated regulation of cerebral blood flow to help maintain cerebral O2 homeostasis. Eight subjects performed three randomly assigned respiratory interventions following a resting baseline period, as follows: (1) normoxia (21% O2); (2) hypoxia (12% O2); and (3) hypoxia with wilful restraint of the respiratory chemoreflex. During each intervention, 0, 2.0, 3.5 or 5.0% CO2 was sequentially added (8 min stages) to inspired gas mixtures to assess changes in steady-state cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity and dCA. During normoxia, the addition of CO2 increased internal carotid artery blood flow and middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean), while reducing dCA (change in phase = -0.73 ± 0.22 rad, P = 0.005). During acute hypoxia, internal carotid artery blood flow and MCA Vmean remained unchanged, but cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity (internal carotid artery, P = 0.003; MCA Vmean, P = 0.031) and CO2-mediated effects on dCA (P = 0.008) were attenuated. The effects of hypoxia were not further altered when the respiratory chemoreflex was restrained. These findings support the hypothesis that arterial CO2 tension-mediated effects on the cerebral vasculature are reduced during acute hypoxia. These effects could limit the degree of hypocapnic vasoconstriction and may help to regulate cerebral blood flow and cerebral O2 homeostasis during acute periods of hypoxia.

  1. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  2. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  3. Acute Blindness.

    PubMed

    Meekins, Jessica M

    2015-09-01

    Sudden loss of vision is an ophthalmic emergency with numerous possible causes. Abnormalities may occur at any point within the complex vision pathway, from retina to optic nerve to the visual center in the occipital lobe. This article reviews specific prechiasm (retina and optic nerve) and cerebral cortical diseases that lead to acute blindness. Information regarding specific etiologies, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for vision is discussed.

  4. Inspiratory-resistive loading increases the ventilatory response to arousal but does not reduce genioglossus muscle activity on the return to sleep.

    PubMed

    Cori, Jennifer M; Nicholas, Christian L; Baptista, Shaira; Huynh, Ivan; Rochford, Peter D; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Trinder, John A; Jordan, Amy S

    2012-09-01

    Arousals from sleep are thought to predispose to obstructive sleep apnea by causing hyperventilation and hypocapnia, which reduce airway dilator muscle activity on the return to sleep. However, prior studies of auditory arousals have not resulted in reduced genioglossus muscle activity [GG-electromyogram (EMG)], potentially because airway resistance prior to arousal was low, leading to a small ventilatory response to arousal and minimal hypocapnia. Thus we aimed to increase the ventilatory response to arousal by resistive loading prior to auditory arousal and determine whether reduced GG-EMG occurred on the return to sleep. Eighteen healthy young men and women were recruited. Subjects were instrumented with a nasal mask with a pneumotachograph, an epiglottic pressure catheter, and intramuscular GG-EMG electrodes. Mask CO(2) levels were monitored. Three- to 15-s arousals from sleep were induced with auditory tones after resting breathing (No-Load) or inspiratory-resistive loading (Load; average 8.4 cmH(2)O·l(-1)·s(-1)). Peak minute ventilation following arousal was greater after Load than No-Load (mean ± SE; 8.0 ± 0.6 vs. 7.4 ± 0.6 l/min, respectively). However, the nadir end tidal partial pressure of CO(2) did not differ between Load conditions (43.1 ± 0.6 and 42.8 ± 0.5 mmHg, respectively), and no period of reduced GG activity occurred following the return to sleep (GG-EMG baseline, minimum after Load and No-Load = 2.9 ± 1.2%, 3.1 ± 1.3%, and 3.0 ± 1.3% max, respectively). These findings indicate that the hyperventilation, which occurs following tone-induced arousal, is appropriate for the prevailing level of respiratory drive, because loading did not induce marked hypocapnia or lower GG muscle activity on the return to sleep. Whether similar findings occur following obstructive events in patients remains to be determined.

  5. Cardiac, ventilatory, and metabolic adjustments in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients during the performance of Glittre activities of daily living test.

    PubMed

    Tufanin, Andréa; Souza, Gerson Fonseca; Tisi, Guilherme Rocha; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Nascimento, Oliver A; Jardim, José R

    2014-11-01

    Functional status and quality of life are measures of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient's health status and can demonstrate the impact of the disease on the patient's ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). The Glittre-ADL test was developed to evaluate the functional status of COPD patients and their ability to perform activities of daily life. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cardiac, respiratory, and metabolic adjustments and reproducibility of the Glittre ADL test performed by COPD patients. Twenty-two mild to severe COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1): 56.6 ± 19.9% predicted; mean age: 66.3 ± 9.18 years old) were enrolled in this study. Metabolic (oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE)/VCO2, and VE/VO2), ventilatory (tidal volume, respiratory rate, and VE), and cardiovascular (pulse oxygen saturation, VO2/heart rate (HR), and HR) variables, lower limbs fatigue, and dyspnea (Borg score) after each lap of two Glittre ADL test were analyzed. All metabolic, ventilatory, and cardiac variables increased their values up to the third lap and remained stable (plateau) until the end of the test (five laps; multivariate analysis); there was no difference among the time spent to complete each of the five laps in each test and between tests (total time of second test: 4 minutes and 3 seconds); the second test was 17.8 seconds (6.6%) shorter than the first one (NS). All variables were highly reproducible in the two tests (NS). At the end of the test, patients reached 87.7% of the VO2 max, 81% of VE peak, and 88.5% of the HR peak obtained from an incremental maximal test on a treadmill. The Glittre ADL test is easy for COPD patients to perform and is a highly reproducible test in COPD patients with mild to severe stages of the disease. In addition, our results suggest that it is possible to demonstrate the patient's functional capacity with a single test of

  6. Phase I/II trial of adeno-associated virus-mediated alpha-glucosidase gene therapy to the diaphragm for chronic respiratory failure in Pompe disease: initial safety and ventilatory outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Barbara K; Collins, Shelley W; Conlon, Thomas J; Mah, Cathryn S; Lawson, Lee Ann; Martin, Anatole D; Fuller, David D; Cleaver, Brian D; Clément, Nathalie; Phillips, Dawn; Islam, Saleem; Dobjia, Nicole; Byrne, Barry J

    2013-06-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited neuromuscular disease caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) leading to glycogen accumulation in muscle and motoneurons. Cardiopulmonary failure in infancy leads to early mortality, and GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) results in improved survival, reduction of cardiac hypertrophy, and developmental gains. However, many children have progressive ventilatory insufficiency and need additional support. Preclinical work shows that gene transfer restores phrenic neural activity and corrects ventilatory deficits. Here we present 180-day safety and ventilatory outcomes for five ventilator-dependent children in a phase I/II clinical trial of AAV-mediated GAA gene therapy (rAAV1-hGAA) following intradiaphragmatic delivery. We assessed whether rAAV1-hGAA results in acceptable safety outcomes and detectable functional changes, using general safety measures, immunological studies, and pulmonary functional testing. All subjects required chronic, full-time mechanical ventilation because of respiratory failure that was unresponsive to both ERT and preoperative muscle-conditioning exercises. After receiving a dose of either 1×10(12) vg (n=3) or 5×10(12) vg (n=2) of rAAV1-hGAA, the subjects' unassisted tidal volume was significantly larger (median [interquartile range] 28.8% increase [15.2-35.2], p<0.05). Further, most patients tolerated appreciably longer periods of unassisted breathing (425% increase [103-851], p=0.08). Gene transfer did not improve maximal inspiratory pressure. Expected levels of circulating antibodies and no T-cell-mediated immune responses to the vector (capsids) were observed. One subject demonstrated a slight increase in anti-GAA antibody that was not considered clinically significant. These results indicate that rAAV1-hGAA was safe and may lead to modest improvements in volitional ventilatory performance measures. Evaluation of the next five patients will determine whether earlier intervention can

  7. The relation of respiratory symptoms and ventilatory function to moderate occupational exposure in a general population. Results from the French PAARC study of 16,000 adults.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowski, M; Kauffmann, F

    1988-06-01

    Data from the French PAARC (Pollution Atmosphérique et Affections Respiratoires Chroniques) study were used to assess the effect of a priori moderate occupational exposure to dust, gases or chemical fumes on the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and ventilatory function. In this community-based population, without households 'headed' by manual workers, 34% of the 8692 men and 23% of the 7772 women, 25-59 years of age, ever occupationally active, reported some exposure. The studied relationships were adjusted for age, height, smoking habits, socio-occupational class, education and air pollution by logistic or linear regression methods. For men and women, some 50% increase (p less than 0.01) in chronic cough, chronic bronchitis, dyspnoea grade 2 and wheezing prevalence was observed in the exposed group compared to the never exposed, with the strongest association for wheezing. FEV1 and FEF25-75% were not associated with occupational exposure. Among men, FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75%/FVC were significantly lower (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.05) among the exposed compared to never exposed, but FVC was significantly greater (p less than 0.05). Among women, occupational exposure was significantly related to a lower FEV1/FVC in the subgroup with a history of asthma or wheezing. Results suggest that occupational exposures of relatively low intensity, encountered in the non-industrial work places may constitute a non-negligible risk for respiratory health.

  8. Evaluation of chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and ventilatory function among workers exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, G.M.; Sweeney, M.H.; Morris, J.A.; Fingerhut, M.A.; Hornung, R.W.; Halperin, W.E. )

    1991-12-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is produced as an undesirable contaminant in the manufacture of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP) and its derivatives. There is considerable concern about the health effects that may be associated with exposure to TCDD-contaminated substances. A cross-sectional medical study that included a comprehensive medical history, medical examination, and measurement of pulmonary function was conducted on workers employed more than 15 yr earlier in the manufacture of NaTCP and its derivatives at two chemical plants. The workers had substantial exposure to substances contaminated with TCDD, as evidenced by a mean serum TCDD level, lipid adjusted, of 200 ppt compared with a mean of 7 ppt in the unexposed reference group. The comparison group consisted of individuals with no occupational exposure to phenoxy herbicides who lived in the same communities as the workers. A total of 281 workers and 260 unexposed referents participated in the medical examination. Logistic and linear regression analyses, which contained categorical and continuous measures of TCDD exposure, were performed to control for important confounders, including cigarette and alcohol consumption. No difference was found between workers and referents in the risk for chronic bronchitis or COPD. Analysis of the ventilatory function data revealed no association between history of exposure to substances contaminated with TCDD and the forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), or the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (FEV1/FVC%).

  9. Postoperative ventilatory and circulatory effects of heating after aortocoronary bypass surgery. Extended rewarming during cardiopulmonary bypass and postoperative radiant heat supply.

    PubMed

    Joachimsson, P O; Nyström, S O; Tydén, H

    1987-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with stable angina pectoris were studied after aortocoronary bypass surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Twelve patients (radiant heat supply group) were rewarmed during CPB to a nasopharyngeal temperature of at least 38 degrees C and a mean rectal temperature of 34.4 degrees C. Postoperatively they received radiant heat supply from a thermal ceiling. In addition, a heating water mattress was used during the end of the operation and heated, humidified inspired gases were administered intra- and postoperatively. The other 12 patients (combination heat supply group) had the rewarming during CPB extended until the rectal temperature exceeded 36 degrees C, but otherwise received the same treatment as the radiant heat supply group. The combination of extended rewarming during CPB and postoperative radiant heat supply significantly reduced oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production and the required ventilation volumes during early recovery as compared with the values in the radiant heat supply group. The reduced metabolic demands were accompanied by lower cardiac index and oxygen delivery, which, however, were sufficient for adequate tissue perfusion as judged by the similarity in oxygen extraction and arterial base excess values in the two groups. The metabolic demands and ventilatory requirements were reduced to a level at which safe early extubation is possible.

  10. Mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome: The open lung revisited.

    PubMed

    Amado-Rodríguez, L; Del Busto, C; García-Prieto, E; Albaiceta, G M

    2017-02-23

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still related to high mortality and morbidity rates. Most patients with ARDS will require ventilatory support. This treatment has a direct impact upon patient outcome and is associated to major side effects. In this regard, ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) is the main concern when this technique is used. The ultimate mechanisms of VALI and its management are under constant evolution. The present review describes the classical mechanisms of VALI and how they have evolved with recent findings from physiopathological and clinical studies, with the aim of analyzing the clinical implications derived from them. Lastly, a series of knowledge-based recommendations are proposed that can be helpful for the ventilator assisted management of ARDS at the patient bedside.

  11. Acute respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation in pregnant patient: A narrative review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Pradeep Kumar; Biyani, Ghansham; Mohammed, Sadik; Sethi, Priyanka; Bihani, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Physiological changes of pregnancy imposes higher risk of acute respiratory failure (ARF) with even a slight insult and remains an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although pregnant women have different respiratory physiology and different causes of ARF, guidelines specific to ventilatory settings, goals of oxygenation and weaning process could not be framed due to lack of large-scale randomized controlled trials. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, pregnant women had higher morbidity and mortality compared to nonpregnant women. During this period, alternative strategies of ventilation such as high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, inhalational of nitric oxide, prone positioning, and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation were increasingly used as a desperate measure to rescue pregnant patients with severe hypoxemia who were not improving with conventional mechanical ventilation. This article highlights the causes of ARF and recent advances in invasive, noninvasive and alternative strategies of ventilation used during pregnancy. PMID:28096571

  12. Acute laminitis.

    PubMed

    Baxter, G M

    1994-12-01

    Laminitis is an inflammation of the sensitive laminae along the dorsal aspect of the digit and is considered to be a secondary complication of several predisposing or primary factors. Affected horses are usually very lame, have increased digital pulses, are painful to hoof testers along the toe of the foot, and have evidence of downward rotation or distal displacement of the distal phalanx present on radiographs. Treatments for acute laminitis include anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-endotoxin therapy, vasodilators, antithrombotic therapy, corrective trimming and shoeing, and surgical procedures. Treatment regimens are very controversial and the true efficacy of these treatments is unknown. The quality of laminae damage that occurs with laminitis, however, probably has greater influence on the success of treatment and outcome of the horse than the treatment regimen itself.

  13. Interval training based on ventilatory anaerobic threshold increases cardiac vagal modulation and decreases high-sensitivity c-reative protein: randomized clinical trial in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Tamburus, Nayara Y.; Paula, Roberta F. L.; Kunz, Vandeni C.; César, Marcelo C.; Moreno, Marlene A.; da Silva, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autonomic dysfunction and inflammatory activity are involved in the development and progression of coronary artery disease (CAD), and exercise training has been shown to confer a cardiovascular benefit. Objective: To evaluate the effects that interval training (IT) based on ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) has on heart rate variability (HRV) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels, as well as the relationship between both levels, in patients with CAD and/or cardiovascular risk factors (RF). Method: Forty-two men (aged 57.88±6.20 years) were divided into two training groups, CAD-T (n= 12) and RF-T (n= 10), and two control groups, CAD-C (n= 10) and RF-C (n=10). Heart rate and RR intervals in the supine position, cardiopulmonary exercise tests, and hs-CRP levels were measured before and after IT. HRV was analyzed by spectral and symbolic analysis. The CAD-T and RF-T underwent a 16-week IT program of three weekly sessions at training intensities based on the VAT. Results: In the RF-T, cardiac sympathetic modulation index and hs-CRP decreased (p<0.02), while cardiac parasympathetic modulation index increased (p<0.02). In the CAD-T, cardiac parasympathetic modulation index increased, while hs-CRP, systolic, and diastolic blood pressures decreased (p<0.02). Both control groups showed increase in hs-CRP parameters (p<0.02). There was a strong and significant association between parasympathetic and sympathetic modulations with hs-CRP. Conclusion: The IT program based on the VAT promoted a decrease in hs-CRP associated with improvement in cardiac autonomic modulation. PMID:26647745

  14. A randomized clinical trial of neurally adjusted ventilatory assist versus conventional weaning mode in patients with COPD and prolonged mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nai-Ying; Tu, Mei-Lien; Hung, Tsai-Yi; Liu, Shih-Feng; Chung, Yu-Hsiu; Lin, Meng-Chih; Wu, Chao-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-ventilator asynchrony is a common problem in mechanically ventilated patients; the problem is especially obvious in COPD. Neutrally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) can improve patient-ventilator asynchrony; however, the effect in COPD patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation is still unknown. The goals of this study are to evaluate the effect of NAVA and conventional weaning mode in patients with COPD during prolonged mechanical ventilation. Methods The study enrolled a total of 33 COPD patients with ventilator dependency for more than 21 days in the weaning center. A diaphragm electrical activity (Edi) catheter was inserted in patients within 24 hours after admission to the respiratory care center, and patients were randomly allocated to NAVA or conventional group. A spontaneous breathing trial was performed every 24 hours. The results correlated with the clinical parameters. Results There were significantly higher asynchrony incidence rates in the whole group after using Edi catheter (before vs post-Edi catheter insertion =60.6% vs 87.9%, P<0.001). Asynchrony index: before vs post-Edi catheter insertion =7.4%±8.5% vs 13.2%±13.5%, P<0.01. Asynchrony incidence: NAVA vs conventional =0% vs 84.2%, P<0.001. Asynchrony index: NAVA vs conventional =0 vs 11.9±11.2 (breath %), P<0.001. The most common asynchrony events were ineffective trigger and delayed trigger. Conclusion Compared to conventional mode, NAVA mode can significantly enhance respiratory monitoring and improve patient-ventilator interaction in COPD patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation in respiratory care center. PMID:27274216

  15. The use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine the ventilatory threshold and the relation between skeletal muscle oxygenation and RPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessmer, Kathryn Anne

    This study: (1) compared three (i.e., V-slope, Bhambhani et al., 1997, and Belardinelli et al., 1995) techniques of measuring the ventilatory threshold (VT), (2) examined the relation between OMNI RPE and muscle deoxygenation (MD), and (3) evaluated the impact of gender on MD and RPE. Subjects included 20 males and 13 females, aged 25-29 years. A commercial NIRS sensor (NIRS Micro-Run Man model # MRM-96) was placed over the right vastus lateralis and secured with an elastic wrap. Next, each subject underwent a progressive multistage cycle ergometer test to establish the VT using the V-slope method and NIRS methods. The V-slope (58.62 +/- 10.47% VO2peak), Bhambhani et al. 1997 (49.75 +/- 20.13% VO2peak), and Belardinelli et al. 1995 (60.87 +/- 10.15% VO2peak) methods did not result in different (F(2,49) = 2.77, p > 0.05) VT values. The following significant linear regression equation was generated (p = 0.016): OMNI RPE = 5.97 - (15.20)MD (R = -0.20, R 2 = 0.04, and SE = 2.76). The two-way ANOVA (gender x power output) conducted on OMNI RPE revealed a significant main effect for gender ( F(1,193) = 19.53, p < 0.05). Males had lower RPEs (6.32 +/- .17) than females (7.16 +/- .28). A significant main effect for power output was also found (F(9, 193) = 56.21, p < 0.05). In addition, a significant gender x power output interaction was found ( F(7, 193) = 2.11, p < 0.05). With respect to MD, the two-way ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for gender (F(1, 133) = 10.61, p < 0.05). Females had less MD (0.012 +/- .007) than males (0.002 +/- .005). The results of this study indicate that the three methods of determining the VT were not different. MD values decreased with increasing ratings of perceived exertion. RPE differed between genders, with males having lower RPE's than females (p < 0.05). Also, a significant gender x power output interaction was found (p < 0.05). Finally, women experienced less skeletal MD than men during a progressively incremented cycle

  16. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  17. Use of a venting PEG tube in the management of recurrent acute gastric dilatation associated with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ahmed M A; Dennis, Robert J

    2016-01-12

    A patient with Prader-Willi Syndrome was admitted to the ICU with features of recurrent acute gastric dilatation, aspiration pneumonia and a massive pulmonary embolus. He was initially managed with intubation, assisted ventilation, intravenous fluids and anticoagulation. Decompression of the stomach was achieved with a nasogastric tube. After ventilator weaning, he did not tolerate the nasogastric intubation that led to a further episode of aspiration pneumonia as a result of non-resolving gastric dilatation. He required readmission to intensive care for a further period of ventilatory support. While the patient was sedated and ventilated, a venting percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) with a jejunal feeding extension was placed, permitting both continued decompression of the stomach and enteral feeding. The patient tolerated the PEG-J well and his nutritional needs were successfully addressed. Oral intake was slowly re-established with ongoing decompression of the stomach with the PEG. He was discharged from hospital with the PEG in place.

  18. Use of a venting PEG tube in the management of recurrent acute gastric dilatation associated with Prader-Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ahmed M.A.; Dennis, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    A patient with Prader-Willi Syndrome was admitted to the ICU with features of recurrent acute gastric dilatation, aspiration pneumonia and a massive pulmonary embolus. He was initially managed with intubation, assisted ventilation, intravenous fluids and anticoagulation. Decompression of the stomach was achieved with a nasogastric tube. After ventilator weaning, he did not tolerate the nasogastric intubation that led to a further episode of aspiration pneumonia as a result of non-resolving gastric dilatation. He required readmission to intensive care for a further period of ventilatory support. While the patient was sedated and ventilated, a venting percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) with a jejunal feeding extension was placed, permitting both continued decompression of the stomach and enteral feeding. The patient tolerated the PEG-J well and his nutritional needs were successfully addressed. Oral intake was slowly re-established with ongoing decompression of the stomach with the PEG. He was discharged from hospital with the PEG in place. PMID:26763981

  19. Acute cor pulmonale in ARDS: rationale for protecting the right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Repessé, Xavier; Charron, Cyril; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The ventilatory strategy for ARDS has been regularly amended over the last 40 years as knowledge of the pathophysiology of ARDS has increased. Initially focused mainly on the lung with the objectives of "opening the lung" and optimizing arterial oxygen saturation, this strategy now also takes into account pulmonary vascular injury and its effects on the right ventricle and on hemodynamics. Hemodynamic devices now available at the bedside, such as echocardiography, allow intensivists to evaluate respiratory settings according to right ventricular tolerance. Here, we review the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in ARDS, consider the beneficial and deleterious effects of mechanical ventilation, describe the incidence and meaning of acute cor pulmonale based on recent studies in large series of patients, and propose a new, although not strictly validated, approach based on the protection of both the lung and right ventricle. One of our conclusions is that evaluating the right ventricle may help intensivists to assess the balance between recruitment and overdistension induced by the ventilatory strategy. Prone positioning with its beneficial effects on the lung and also on hemodynamics (the right ventricle) is a good illustration of this. Readers should be aware that most of the information given in this article reflects the point of view of the authors. Although based on clinical observations, clinical studies, and well-known pathophysiology, there is no evidence-based medicine to support this clinical commentary. Other approaches may be favored, in which case our article should be read as another attempt to help intensivists to improve management of ARDS.

  20. Acute bacterial parotitis following acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, V K; Kimbrough, D J; Jarquin-Valdivia, A A

    2009-06-01

    Acute bacterial parotitis (ABP) is a relatively uncommon condition that tends to occur in debilitated older patients. We report a case of an older woman that presented with an acute intracerebral hemorrhage who developed ABP. This morbidity led to endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy and gastrostomy, all of which were not initially needed. We discuss the proposed physiopathology and etiopathogenesis of ABP in adults.

  1. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  2. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  3. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  4. Acute phosphate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Habibzadeh, Seyed Mahmoud; Mesbah, Seyed Alireza

    2014-05-01

    We present acute phosphate nephropathy in a 28-year-old man, which was developed after a car accident due to rhabdomyolysis. Treatment of acute kidney injury was done with administration of sodium bicarbonate.

  5. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as the sudden inflammation ... the incidence of recurrent attacks minimized. Timothy Gardner, MD is Director of Pancreatic Disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock ...

  6. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this study, we examined age-related susceptibility to O3 using 1 mo (adolescent), 4 mo (young adult), 12 mo (adult) and 24 mo (senescent) male Brown Norway rats exposed to filtered air or O3 (0.25and 1.00 ppm), 6 h/day, two days/week for 1 week (acute) or 13 weeks (subchronic). Ventilatory function, assessed by whole-body plethysmography, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) biomarkers of injury and inflammation were used to examine O3-induced pulmonary effects.Relaxation time declined in all ages following the weekly exposures; however, this effect persisted only in the 24 mo rats following a five days recovery, demonstrating an inability to induce adaptation commonly seen with repeated O3 exposures. PenH was increased in all groups with an augmented response in the 4 mo rats following the subchronic O3 exposures. O3 led to increased breathing frequency and minute volume in the 1 and 4 mo animals. Markers ofpulmonary permeability were increased in all age groups. Elevations in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity and lung inflammation following an acute O3 exposure were noted in only the 1 and 4 mo rats, which likely received an increased effective O3 dose. These data demonstrate that ado

  7. Acute health effects of accidental chlorine gas exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to report the course of an accidental release of chlorine gas that occurred in a factory in Gumi-si, South Korea, on March 5, 2013. We describe the analysis results of 2 patients hospitalized because of chlorine-induced acute health problems, as well as the clinical features of 209 non-hospitalized patients. Methods We analyzed the medical records of the 2 hospitalized patients admitted to the hospital, as well as the medical records and self-report questionnaires of 209 non-hospitalized patients completed during outpatient treatment. Results Immediately after the exposure, the 2 hospitalized patients developed acute asthma-like symptoms such as cough and dyspnea, and showed restrictive and combined pattern ventilatory defects on the pulmonary function test. The case 1 showed asthma-like symptoms over six months and diurnal variability in peak expiratory flow rate was 56.7%. In case 2, his FEV1 after treatment (93%) increased by 25% compared to initial FEV1 (68%). Both cases were diagnosed as chlorine-induced reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) on the basis of these clinical features. The most frequent chief complaints of the 209 non-hospitalized patients were headache (22.7%), followed by eye irritation (18.2%), nausea (11.2%), and sore throat (10.8%), with asymptomatic patients accounting for 36.5%. The multiple-response analysis of individual symptom revealed headache (42.4%) to be the most frequent symptom, followed by eye irritation (30.5%), sore throat (30.0%), cough (29.6%), nausea (27.6%), and dizziness (27.3%). Conclusions The 2 patients hospitalized after exposure to chlorine gas at the leakage site showed a clinical course corresponding to RADS. All of the 209 non-hospitalized patients only complained of symptoms of the upper airways and mucous membrane irritation. PMID:25852940

  8. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  9. Severe hypoglycemia in a nondiabetic patient leading to acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Muhammad Ahsan; Ali, Shaukat; Rasheed, Javeria; Bergman, Michael; Privman, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a unique case of prolonged hypoglycemia in a nondiabetic patient with end-stage renal disease and chronic liver disease. Following a less-than-24-hour period of being NPO (nothing per oral), the patient developed hypercapnic respiratory failure. Severe hypoglycemia in such a patient leading to respiratory failure provides major challenges in identification and management of his illness. To our knowledge, this is the first ever reported case of severe hypoglycemia leading to hypercapnic respiratory failure. We believe that the pathogenic basis for this patient's severe hypoglycemia is failure of contribution by the kidneys and liver to glucose production. PMID:16916139

  10. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies.

    PubMed

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G; Sopori, Mohan L

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD50 sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD50 sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, >90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD50 sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin.

  11. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness.

  12. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Jignesh Mukeshkumar; Dhareshwar, Shashank; Sharma, Anand; Karanth, Raghuveer; Ramkumar, V. S.; Ramaiah, Indira

    2014-01-01

    A 25-year-old young male patient presented in casualty department with severe respiratory distress on the fourth day from onset of symptoms. The patient was nonsmoker and had no antecedent medical or drug history. Prior to admission, patient had dry cough and bilateral pleuritic chest pain for the last three days. He was in severe respiratory distress with use of accessory muscles of respiration. On examination, he had heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure (BP) of 150/80, respiratory rate of 48-52/min and central cyanosis present. On systemic examination, reduced intensity of breath sounds with extensive rhonchi and crepitation was found in both lung fields, with other examination being within normal limits. On pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation was 28% on room air, which increased up to 36% with the help of 4 L oxygen via nasal prongs. PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 100. Chest X-ray analysis was suggestive of non-cardiac pulmonary edema in view of bilateral fluffy opacity without cardiomegaly. In view of 2/3 positive criteria, his provisional diagnosis was Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). He required mechanical ventilatory support and was gradually weaned over a period of 10 days. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and other supportive measures. On re-evaluation of history, we found that he was a goldsmith by occupation, smelting silver and gold for the past 8-10 years. On the day of onset of symptoms, while smelting silver he was exposed to golden yellow fumes for around 15 minutes, with the quantum of exposure more than any other day earlier. From previous experience and analysis of similar silver metals, he was able to tell us that the silver was adulterated with large amount of cadmium on that day than before. Serum level of cadmium was 2.9 μg/L 6 days after initial exposure. At the time of discharge, he had residual opacities in the chest radiograph and resting oxygen saturation was 94% on room air. PMID:25006313

  14. Role of tachykinins in ozone-induced acute lung injury in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Tepper, J.S.; Costa, D.L.; Fitzgerald, S.; Doerfler, D.L.; Bromberg, P.A. )

    1993-09-01

    To examine the hypothesis that the acute reversible changes caused by ozone (O3) exposure are mediated by tachykinin release, guinea pigs were depleted of tachykinins by use of repeated capsaicin (CAP) injections before O3 exposure in an attempt to prevent O3-induced functional changes. Unexpectedly, CAP pretreatment caused divergent results in the functional responses to O3. Ventilatory measurements obtained from CAP-pretreated O3-exposed (CAP-O3) animals were exacerbated rather than diminished compared with the effects of O3 alone. Similarly, lavage fluid protein accumulation was enhanced in the CAP-O3 group compared with the O3-exposed group. In better agreement with our initial hypothesis, the CAP-O3 group was less responsive than the O3-exposed animals to histamine aerosol challenge. Additionally, Evans blue dye accumulation, a hallmark of tachykinin release, was increased in O3-exposed animals and was partially blocked in the CAP-O3 group. These data suggest that tachykinin-containing sensory fibers are unlikely to mediate the acute effects of O3 exposure on tidal breathing and lavage fluid protein accumulation but may play a role in causing post-O3 airway hyperreactivity and protein extravasation into the trachea.

  15. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  16. Naloxone application to the ventrolateral medulla enhances the respiratory response to inspired carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Trouth, C.O.; Bada, F.J.; Pan, Yi; Holloway, J.A.; Millis, R.M.; Bernard, D.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that systemic administration of the opiate antagonist naloxone potentiates the ventilatory response to inspired carbon dioxide. The present study was designed to localize the site of action of naloxone for increasing the respiratory chemosensitivity to inhaled carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in cats. Naloxone applied topically to the caudal chemosensitive area on the ventral medullary surface (VMS) during hypercapnic breathing produced a 75% greater increase in minute ventilation than hypercapnic breathing alone. Furthermore, hypercapnic breathing produced a 200% increase in neuronal activity of VMS chemosensitive cells; this was further increased 120% by naloxone. It is concluded that naloxone increases the sensitivity of neurons in the caudal respiratory chemosensitive area of cats to hypercapnia, and that endogenous opiates may act as modulators at VMS chemosensitive sites during hypercapnic breathing.

  17. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  18. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  19. Infant acute myocarditis mimicking acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tilouche, Samia; Masmoudi, Tasnim; Sahnoun, Maha; Chkirbène, Youssef; Mestiri, Sarra; Boughamoura, Lamia; Ben Dhiab, Mohamed; Souguir, Mohamed Kamel

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium with heterogeneous clinical manifestations and progression. In clinical practice, although there are many methods of diagnosis of acute myocarditis, the diagnosis remains an embarrassing dilemma for clinicians. The authors report the case of 9-month-old infant who was brought to the Pediatric Emergency Department with sudden onset dyspnea. Examination disclosed heart failure and resuscitation was undertaken. The electrocardiogram showed an ST segment elevation in the anterolateral leads with a mirror image. Cardiac enzyme tests revealed a significant elevation of troponin and creatine phosphokinase levels. A diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was made, and heparin therapy was prescribed. The infant died on the third day after admission with cardiogenic shock. The autopsy showed dilatation of the ventricles and massive edema of the lungs. Histological examinations of myocardium samples revealed the presence of a marked lymphocytic infiltrate dissociating myocardiocytes. Death was attributed to acute myocarditis. The authors call attention to the difficulties of differential diagnosis between acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction especially in children, and to the important therapeutic implications of a correct diagnosis. PMID:28210569

  20. Acute myocardial infarction and subclavian artery occlusion in a 41-year-old woman with Behçet’s disease: coronary and large vessel arteritis

    PubMed Central

    So, Ho; Yip, Man Lung

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old Chinese woman with Behçet’s disease (BD) complicated by acute myocardial infarction, requiring inotropic and ventilatory support. Angiography showed critical left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis, a blocked left subclavian artery and left carotid artery stenosis. The patient was successfully treated with a high dose of immunosuppressants, standard anti-ischaemic therapy and percutaneous coronary intervention. Although life-threatening, coronary arteritis is a treatable manifestation of BD. We suggest that the diagnosis of coronary arteritis be considered in patients with BD who present with chest pain. Involvement of other arteries should also be looked out for in these patients. PMID:25273943

  1. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) following a H3N3 parainfluenza virus infection in a pregnant asthmatic woman with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Qaiser; Alegria, Ana

    2014-10-03

    This case report relates to a 31-year-old pregnant woman, asthmatic, admitted to the intensive care unit with respiratory failure, secondary to a viral community-acquired pneumonia. A type 3 (H3N3) parainfluenza virus RNA was isolated in her throat swab. The patient developed neurological symptoms (behavioural changes, irritability, agitation and impaired consciousness) while being weaned off sedation and ventilatory support. Cerebrospinal fluid was clear with an opening pressure of 26 cm H2O. Brain MRI showed features compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Immune screen and EEG were normal. She was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone. The patient made an almost full neurological recovery within 4 weeks after starting on steroids. The patient delivered a healthy baby at 38 weeks gestation. This case highlights the importance to keep in mind rare conditions that need early recognition and prompt treatment. Brain MRI is the key to early diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Spontaneous Rectus Sheath Hematoma in Pregnancy Complicated by the Development of Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Jennifer; Bridges, Firas; Trivedi, Kiran; Vullo, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) represents a rare, but serious cause of abdominal pain. Case Here we discuss the case of a healthy multigravida female who presented at 28 weeks gestation with spontaneous RSH. Conservative management with multiple blood transfusions led to the development of transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and intensive care unit admission. She was managed with noninvasive ventilatory support, gradually improved, and was weaned of ventilation. After hospital discharge, she progressed to full term and delivered a viable male infant vaginally at 37 weeks gestation. Conclusion Review of the literature demonstrates 13 cases of RSH in pregnancy, including our own. No other cases were complicated by transfusion related morbidity. RSH and TRALI are rare, but life threatening entities that can complicate pregnancy. PMID:27651980

  3. Adult Acute Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, K.; Wells, D. G.; Clink, H. McD.; Kay, H. E. M.; Powles, R.; McElwain, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL). The periodic acid-Schiff stain was of little value in differentiating the 3 groups. The treatment response in each group was different: 94% of patients with ALL (16/17) achieved complete remission with prednisone, vincristine and other drugs in standard use in childhood ALL; 59% of patients with AML (27/46) achieved complete remission with cytosine arabinoside and daunorubicin (22 patients), or 6-thioguanine and cyclophosphamide (2 patients), 6-thioguanine, cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin (1 patient), and cytosine and Adriamycin (1 patient); only 2 out of 14 patients (14%) with acute undifferentiated leukaemia achieved complete remission using cytosine and daunorubicin after an initial trial of prednisone and vincristine had failed. Prednisone and vincristine would seem to be of no value in acute undifferentiated leukaemia. It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as “adult acute leukaemia” and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen. The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4141625

  4. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies.

  5. Acute kidney injury during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, James W

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates the care of a relatively small number of pregnant and postpartum women. Several pregnancy-related disorders such as preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathies may produce acute kidney injury. Prerenal azotemia is another common cause of acute kidney injury in pregnancy. This manuscript will review pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury from a renal functional perspective. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury will be reviewed. Specific conditions causing acute kidney injury and treatments will be compared.

  6. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  7. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Alper, Gulay

    2012-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an immune-mediated inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, commonly preceded by an infection. It principally involves the white matter tracts of the cerebral hemispheres, brainstem, optic nerves, and spinal cord. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis mainly affects children. Clinically, patients present with multifocal neurologic abnormalities reflecting the widespread involvement in central nervous system. Cerebrospinal fluid may be normal or may show a mild pleocytosis with or without elevated protein levels. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) shows multiple demyelinating lesions. The diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis requires both multifocal involvement and encephalopathy by consensus criteria. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis typically has a monophasic course with a favorable prognosis. Multiphasic forms have been reported, resulting in diagnostic difficulties in distinguishing these cases from multiple sclerosis. In addition, many inflammatory disorders may have a similar presentation with frequent occurrence of encephalopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  8. A Critical Role for Astrocytes in Hypercapnic Vasodilation in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Barbara Lykke; LeDue, Jeffrey M.; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is controlled by arterial blood pressure, arterial CO2, arterial O2, and brain activity and is largely constant in the awake state. Although small changes in arterial CO2 are particularly potent to change CBF (1 mmHg variation in arterial CO2 changes CBF by 3%–4%), the coupling mechanism is incompletely understood. We tested the hypothesis that astrocytic prostaglandin E2 (PgE2) plays a key role for cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity, and that preserved synthesis of glutathione is essential for the full development of this response. We combined two-photon imaging microscopy in brain slices with in vivo work in rats and C57BL/6J mice to examine the hemodynamic responses to CO2 and somatosensory stimulation before and after inhibition of astrocytic glutathione and PgE2 synthesis. We demonstrate that hypercapnia (increased CO2) evokes an increase in astrocyte [Ca2+]i and stimulates COX-1 activity. The enzyme downstream of COX-1 that synthesizes PgE2 (microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1) depends critically for its vasodilator activity on the level of glutathione in the brain. We show that, when glutathione levels are reduced, astrocyte calcium-evoked release of PgE2 is decreased and vasodilation triggered by increased astrocyte [Ca2+]i in vitro and by hypercapnia in vivo is inhibited. Astrocyte synthetic pathways, dependent on glutathione, are involved in cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. Reductions in glutathione levels in aging, stroke, or schizophrenia could lead to dysfunctional regulation of CBF and subsequent neuronal damage. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal activity leads to the generation of CO2, which has previously been shown to evoke cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases via the release of the vasodilator PgE2. We demonstrate that hypercapnia (increased CO2) evokes increases in astrocyte calcium signaling, which in turn stimulates COX-1 activity and generates downstream PgE2 production. We demonstrate that astrocyte calcium-evoked production of the vasodilator PgE2 is critically dependent on brain levels of the antioxidant glutathione. These data suggest a novel role for astrocytes in the regulation of CO2-evoked CBF responses. Furthermore, these results suggest that depleted glutathione levels, which occur in aging and stroke, will give rise to dysfunctional CBF regulation and may result in subsequent neuronal damage. PMID:28137973

  9. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  10. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... Comes Back After Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  12. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  13. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  14. Acute pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jessica; Graham, David; O'Reilly, Sarah; Punton, Gillian

    2016-02-03

    Acute pulmonary oedema is a distressing and life-threatening illness that is associated with a sudden onset of symptoms. For the best possible patient outcomes, it is essential that nurses in all clinical areas are equipped to accurately recognise, assess and manage patients with acute pulmonary oedema. This article outlines the pathophysiology of acute cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, and suggests a systematic approach to the recognition and management of its most serious manifestations. Long-term care and symptom recognition are discussed and suggestions for ongoing patient self-management are provided.

  15. Acute porphyric disorders.

    PubMed

    Moore, A W; Coke, J M

    2000-09-01

    Acute porphyrias are classified into 3 distinct groups of rare genetic disorders of metabolic enzyme biosynthesis. Acute porphyrias can significantly impact multiple organ systems, which often provides a challenge to the dentist presented with such a patient. A case of hereditary coproporphyria is reported in a patient with many of the classical signs and symptoms. The patient also had complex dental needs that required special medical and pharmacotherapeutic modifications. The acute porphyrias are reviewed by the authors with presentation of this challenging case. Recommendations for other dental health care professionals encountering these patients are then presented.

  16. State of the art management of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Andrew D; Kor, Daryl J

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality in most developed countries. Despite this fact, well-designed investigations on specific management strategies for TRALI are lacking. Indeed, current recommendations are primarily based on data extrapolated from trials of the histo-pathologically similar Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndromes. The cornerstone of TRALI management is supportive care with oxygen supplementation and ventilatory assistance when needed. When mechanical ventilation is required, attenuating additional ventilator-induced lung injury through the avoidance of high tidal volumes and elevated airway pressures, with additional measures such as positive end-expiratory pressure to prevent low-volume shear stress injury, are recommended. The literature is not currently sufficient to support either corticosteroids or statins as effective therapies in TRALI. Conservative fluid practices are desirable, provided care is taken to avoid hypotension. Preventative strategies have shown the most promise in mitigating this transfusion-related pulmonary complication. Specifically, conservative transfusion practices and deferral of high-plasma component donors who have, or at high risk of having, anti-human leukocyte antigen and/or anti-human neutrophil antigen antibodies have meaningfully impacted the incidence of TRALI. Future considerations for patients who are at increased risk for developing TRALI may include therapies such as anti-platelet agents and alternatives to traditional blood components such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC). However, these potential TRALI prevention strategies are insufficiently studied, have unclear risk/benefit profiles and cannot be currently recommended.

  17. The potential role and limitations of echocardiography in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Cianchi, Giovanni; Bonizzoli, Manuela; Batacchi, Stefano; Peris, Adriano; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2016-04-01

    Bedside use of Doppler echocardiography is being featured as a promising, clinically useful tool in assessing the pulmonary circulation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present review is aimed at summarizing the available evidence obtained with echocardiography on right ventricle (RV) function and pulmonary circulation in ARDS and to highlight the potential of this technique in clinical practice (only articles in English language were considered). According to the available evidence on echocardiographic findings, the following conclusions can be drawn: (a) echocardiography (transthoracic and transesophageal) has a growing role in the management ARDS patients mainly because of the strict interactions between the lung (and ventilation) and the RV and pulmonary circulation; (b) there may be a continuum of alterations in RV size and function and pulmonary circulation which may end in the development of acute cor pulmonale, probably paralleling ARDS disease severity; and (c) the detection of acute cor pulmonale should prompt intensivists to tailor their ventilatory strategy to the individual patient depending on the echocardiography findings. Bearing in mind the clinical role and growing importance of echocardiography in ARDS and the available evidence on this topic, we present a flow chart including the parameters to be measured and the timing of echo exams in ARDS patients. Despite the important progress that echocardiography has gained in the evaluation of patients with ARDS, several open questions remain and echocardiography still appears to be underused in these patients. A more systematic use of echocardiography (mainly through shared protocols) in ARDS could help intensivists to tailor the optimal treatment in individual patients as well as highlighting the limits and potential of this methodology in patients with ALI.

  18. Acute lung injury following refrigeration coil deicing.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Nathanael J; Burton, Brent T

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of a worker who developed ALI requiring mechanical ventilatory support after attempting to melt ice condensate by applying the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch to refrigeration coils charged with a halocarbon refrigerant in a closed environment. A discussion of possible etiologies are discussed, including phosgene, carbonyl fluoride, and nitrogen oxides. Primary prevention with adequate respiratory protection is recommended whenever deicing is performed in a closed space environment.

  19. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 Apr 05, 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week! Mar 23, 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week is ONE ... 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week (NPAW) 2017 date: Mar 1, 2017 FDA Meeting for Acute Porphyrias is ...

  20. [Acute radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    Cell death due to DNA damage by ionizing radiation causes acute radiation injury of tissues and organs. Frequency and severity of the injuries increase according to dose increase, when the dose becomes more than threshold dose. The threshold dose of acute human radiation death is 1 Gy and LD50 of human is 4 Gy. Human dies due to the cerebrovascular syndrome, the gastrointestinal syndrome or the hematopoetic syndrome, when he received more than 20 Gy, 10-20 Gy or 3-8 Gy to his total body, respectively. Any tissue or organ, including embryo and fetus, does not show the acute injury, when it received less than 100 mSv. Acute injuries are usually reversible, and late injuries are sometimes irreversible.

  1. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... angina? This content was last reviewed July 2015. Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ... Recovery FAQs • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources What Is a Heart Attack? How ...

  2. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  3. [Acute Kidney Injury].

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke; Stahl, Rolf

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important part of renal diseases and a common clinical problem. AKI is an acute decline in renal function. Due to a lack of therapeutic options, prevention and optimal management of patients with AKI are the most important strategies. Although seldom the sole cause of patients' death, AKI is associated with a significant increase in mortality. Our objective is to draw the attention towards the prevention of AKI of non-renal causes.

  4. Pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Wong, Fei Ling; Cao, Yang; Lau, Hon Yen; Huang, Jiali; Puneet, Padmam; Chevali, Lakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common clinical condition. It is a disease of variable severity in which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. It is generally believed that the earliest events in acute pancreatitis occur within acinar cells. Acinar cell injury early in acute pancreatitis leads to a local inflammatory reaction. If this inflammatory reaction is marked, it leads to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). An excessive SIRS leads to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). MODS associated with acute pancreatitis is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in this condition. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and the resultant MODS. At the same time, recent research has demonstrated the importance of acinar cell death in the form of apoptosis and necrosis as a determinant of pancreatitis severity. In this review, we will discuss about our current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

  5. The impact of recurrent acute chest syndrome on the lung function of young adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Forrester, Terrence S; Lewis, Norma A; Greenough, Anne

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS) episodes on the lung function of young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Our prospective study included 80 SCD adults [26 with recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS)] and 80 ethnically matched controls aged between 18 and 28 years. Lung function (spirometry and lung volumes) was measured and the results were expressed as the percentage predicted for height. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) was assessed by the response to either a bronchodilator or an exercise challenge. The adults with recurrent ACS (two or more ACS episodes) had lower median forced vital capacity (74 vs. 83%, p = 0.03), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (79 vs. 90%, p < 0.03), and total lung capacity (69 vs. 81%, p = 0.04) than SCD adults who had one or no ACS episodes. The greater the number of ACS episodes, the greater the reduction in lung function (p = 0.001). The adults with SCD had lower median forced vital capacity (81 vs. 106%), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (85 vs. 107%), and total lung capacity (80 vs. 87%) than the controls (p < 0.001). Similar numbers in each group had BHR (p = 0.2). The prevalence of restrictive ventilatory defect in the patients with SCD was almost double that of the controls (p = 0.004). Young adults with SCD have worse lung function than ethnically matched controls, particularly if they have suffered recurrent ACS episodes.

  6. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  7. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in burn patients: incidence and risk factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, L; Garcia, L; Oliveira, B; Tanita, M; Festti, J; Cardoso, L; Lavado, L; Grion, C

    2016-09-30

    After a burn lesion, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) may occur via direct lung injury due to inhaled smoke and fumes or mediated by the inflammatory response associated with the burn or its infectious complications. The aim of the present study is to assess the epidemiologic profile of ARDS in adult burn patients admitted to intensive care in a burn unit at a university hospital. A prospective cohort study was performed from January to December 2012. Demographic and diagnostic data, prognostic scores, etiology and data on the extent and depth of burns were collected. Data related to risk factors for ARDS and death were also recorded. A total of 85 patients were included in the study. Patients were aged 41.7 (SD = 15.7) years old; 71.8% were male and the mean total body surface area burned was 28.3% (SD = 19.1%); 35.3% presented inhalation injuries. Invasive ventilatory support was required in 44 ICU inpatients (51.8%). ARDS was diagnosed in 38.6% of patients under invasive mechanical ventilation. In multivariate analysis, the presence of inhalation injuries was a risk factor for ARDS (OR = 9.75; CI 95% 2.79 - 33.95; P < 0.001). ARDS is a common complication in burn patients admitted to specialized intensive care units. Inhalation injuries were an independent risk factor for ARDS. Mortality rate observed in the study patients was high and associated with ARDS diagnosis.

  9. Aminophylline treatment in meconium-induced acute lung injury in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Mokra, D; Mokry, J; Tatarkova, Z; Redfors, B; Petraskova, M; Calkovska, A

    2007-11-01

    Administration of methylxanthines may diminish meconium-induced acute lung injury. Meconium-instilled rabbits intravenously received aminophylline (2.0 mg/kg) at two doses 0.5 h and 2.5 h after meconium instillation or were left without treatment, and were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. At the end of experiment, lungs and trachea were excised. Within 5 h after the first dose of treatment, aminophylline significantly improved gas exchange and decreased right-to-left pulmonary shunts, central venous pressure, and ventilatory pressures. Moreover, aminophylline reduced meconium-induced lung edema formation, airway hyperreactivity to histamine, count of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid associated with higher total white blood cells and neutrophils in the blood, and diminished oxidative modifications of proteins and lipids in lung tissue compared with the non-treated meconium-instilled group. In a rabbit model of the meconium aspiration syndrome, aminophylline treatment enhanced pulmonary functions and alleviated oxidative injury and changes in airway reactivity related to lung inflammation.

  10. Acute Cadmium Fume Poisoning: Five Cases with one Death from Renal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Beton, D. C.; Andrews, G. S.; Davies, H. J.; Howells, Leonard; Smith, G. F.

    1966-01-01

    This paper describes the accidental poisoning of five workers by cadmium fume. The men were dismantling a frame of girders in a confined space by cutting bolts with an oxyacetylene burner. They were unaware at the time that the bolts were cadmium-plated or that this presented a serious industrial hazard. The paper sets out to give an appreciation of acute cadmium poisoning, the characteristics and uses of cadmium, and a review of the literature. The clinical picture of these cases is described, with the pathology of the fatal case which showed severe pulmonary oedema, alveolar metaplasia of the lung, and bilateral cortical necrosis of the kidneys. The lungs contained 0·25 g. cadmium oxide (CdO) per 100 g. wet specimen. An attempted estimation of the fatal dose of CdO fume is made. From the post-mortem findings, using an assumption that 11% of inhaled CdO will be retained in the lungs, approximately 51·7 mg. CdO fume must have been inhaled by the fatal case. As he worked for five hours with a probable ventilatory rate of 20 l./min. the concentration of CdO in the air breathed would be of the order of 8·6 mg./m.3. An estimation of the dose from a study of the working conditions proved unsatisfactory due to certain variables listed in the text. Images PMID:5928153

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in burn patients: incidence and risk factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, L.; Garcia, L.; Oliveira, B.; Tanita, M.; Festti, J.; Cardoso, L.; Lavado, L.; Grion, C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary After a burn lesion, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) may occur via direct lung injury due to inhaled smoke and fumes or mediated by the inflammatory response associated with the burn or its infectious complications. The aim of the present study is to assess the epidemiologic profile of ARDS in adult burn patients admitted to intensive care in a burn unit at a university hospital. A prospective cohort study was performed from January to December 2012. Demographic and diagnostic data, prognostic scores, etiology and data on the extent and depth of burns were collected. Data related to risk factors for ARDS and death were also recorded. A total of 85 patients were included in the study. Patients were aged 41.7 (SD = 15.7) years old; 71.8% were male and the mean total body surface area burned was 28.3% (SD = 19.1%); 35.3% presented inhalation injuries. Invasive ventilatory support was required in 44 ICU inpatients (51.8%). ARDS was diagnosed in 38.6% of patients under invasive mechanical ventilation. In multivariate analysis, the presence of inhalation injuries was a risk factor for ARDS (OR = 9.75; CI 95% 2.79 – 33.95; P < 0.001). ARDS is a common complication in burn patients admitted to specialized intensive care units. Inhalation injuries were an independent risk factor for ARDS. Mortality rate observed in the study patients was high and associated with ARDS diagnosis. PMID:28149245

  12. Enterobacter cloacae Sacroiliitis with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in an Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Soo; Ko, Jeong Hee; Lee, Seunghun; Jeon, Seok Chol; Oh, Sung Hee

    2015-06-01

    Enterobacter cloacae has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen, but is rarely a cause of sacroiliitis. Herein, we present the first reported case of Enterobacter cloacae sacroiliitis associated with sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A previously healthy 14-year-old boy presented with low-grade fever and pain in the left side of the hip that was aggravated by walking. Pelvic computed tomography (CT) showed normal findings, and the patient received supportive care for transient synovitis with no antibiotics. However, there was no clinical improvement. On the third day of hospitalization, magnetic resonance imaging of the hip revealed findings compatible with sacroiliitis, for which vancomycin and ceftriaxone were administered. The patient suddenly developed high fever with dyspnea. Chest radiography and CT findings and a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200 mmHg were suggestive of ARDS; the patient subsequently received ventilatory support and low-dose methylprednisolone infusions. Within one week, defervescence occurred, and the patient was able to breathe on his own. Following the timely recognition of, and therapeutic challenge to, ARDS, and after 6 weeks of parenteral antimicrobial therapy, the patient was discharged in good health with no complications.

  13. Enterobacter cloacae Sacroiliitis with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Ko, Jeong Hee; Lee, Seunghun; Jeon, Seok Chol

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen, but is rarely a cause of sacroiliitis. Herein, we present the first reported case of Enterobacter cloacae sacroiliitis associated with sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A previously healthy 14-year-old boy presented with low-grade fever and pain in the left side of the hip that was aggravated by walking. Pelvic computed tomography (CT) showed normal findings, and the patient received supportive care for transient synovitis with no antibiotics. However, there was no clinical improvement. On the third day of hospitalization, magnetic resonance imaging of the hip revealed findings compatible with sacroiliitis, for which vancomycin and ceftriaxone were administered. The patient suddenly developed high fever with dyspnea. Chest radiography and CT findings and a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200 mmHg were suggestive of ARDS; the patient subsequently received ventilatory support and low-dose methylprednisolone infusions. Within one week, defervescence occurred, and the patient was able to breathe on his own. Following the timely recognition of, and therapeutic challenge to, ARDS, and after 6 weeks of parenteral antimicrobial therapy, the patient was discharged in good health with no complications. PMID:26157593

  14. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Effect of repeated normobaric hypoxia exposures during sleep on acute mountain sickness, exercise performance, and sleep during exposure to terrestrial altitude.

    PubMed

    Fulco, Charles S; Muza, Stephen R; Beidleman, Beth A; Demes, Robby; Staab, Janet E; Jones, Juli E; Cymerman, Allen

    2011-02-01

    There is an expectation that repeated daily exposures to normobaric hypoxia (NH) will induce ventilatory acclimatization and lessen acute mountain sickness (AMS) and the exercise performance decrement during subsequent hypobaric hypoxia (HH) exposure. However, this notion has not been tested objectively. Healthy, unacclimatized sea-level (SL) residents slept for 7.5 h each night for 7 consecutive nights in hypoxia rooms under NH [n = 14, 24 ± 5 (SD) yr] or "sham" (n = 9, 25 ± 6 yr) conditions. The ambient percent O(2) for the NH group was progressively reduced by 0.3% [150 m equivalent (equiv)] each night from 16.2% (2,200 m equiv) on night 1 to 14.4% (3,100 m equiv) on night 7, while that for the ventilatory- and exercise-matched sham group remained at 20.9%. Beginning at 25 h after sham or NH treatment, all subjects ascended and lived for 5 days at HH (4,300 m). End-tidal Pco(2), O(2) saturation (Sa(O(2))), AMS, and heart rate were measured repeatedly during daytime rest, sleep, or exercise (11.3-km treadmill time trial). From pre- to posttreatment at SL, resting end-tidal Pco(2) decreased (P < 0.01) for the NH (from 39 ± 3 to 35 ± 3 mmHg), but not for the sham (from 39 ± 2 to 38 ± 3 mmHg), group. Throughout HH, only sleep Sa(O(2)) was higher (80 ± 1 vs. 76 ± 1%, P < 0.05) and only AMS upon awakening was lower (0.34 ± 0.12 vs. 0.83 ± 0.14, P < 0.02) in the NH than the sham group; no other between-group rest, sleep, or exercise differences were observed at HH. These results indicate that the ventilatory acclimatization induced by NH sleep was primarily expressed during HH sleep. Under HH conditions, the higher sleep Sa(O(2)) may have contributed to a lessening of AMS upon awakening but had no impact on AMS or exercise performance for the remainder of each day.

  16. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  17. Current concepts in acute respiratory support for neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Arca, Marjorie J; Uhing, Michael; Wakeham, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Current trends in mechanical respiratory support are evolving toward gentle approaches to avoid short- and long-term problems that are historically associated with mechanical ventilation. These ventilator-associated issues include the need for long-term sedation, muscle deconditioning, ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This article will describe recent trends of ventilatory support in neonates and children: (1) utilization of volume ventilation in infants, (2) synchrony and improving patient-ventilator interaction specifically using neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA), and (3) use of noninvasive ventilation techniques. When applicable, their uses in the surgical newborn and pediatric patients are described.

  18. Acute viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dennert, Robert; Crijns, Harry J.; Heymans, Stephane

    2008-01-01

    Acute myocarditis is one of the most challenging diagnosis in cardiology. At present, no diagnostic gold standard is generally accepted, due to the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic tests. This leads to the need for new diagnostic approaches, which resulted in the emergence of new molecular tests and a more detailed immunohistochemical analysis of endomyocardial biopsies. Recent findings using these new diagnostic tests resulted in increased interest in inflammatory cardiomyopathies and a better understanding of its pathophysiology, the recognition in overlap of virus-mediated damage, inflammation, and autoimmune dysregulation. Novel results also pointed towards a broader spectrum of viral genomes responsible for acute myocarditis, indicating a shift of enterovirus and adenovirus to parvovirus B19 and human herpes virus 6. The present review proposes a general diagnostic approach, focuses on the viral aetiology and associated autoimmune processes, and reviews treatment options for patients with acute viral myocarditis. PMID:18617482

  19. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  20. Acute Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    ÖZTÜRK, Vesile

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most frequent disabling neurological conditions with a major impact on the patient’s quality of life. Migraine has been described as a chronic disorder that characterized with attacks. Attacks are characterized by moderate–severe, often unilateral, pulsating headache attacks, typically lasting 4 to 72 hours. Migraine remains underdiagnosed and undertreated despite advances in the understanding of its pathophysiology. This article reviews management of migraine acute pharmacological treatment. Currently, for the acute treatment of migraine attacks, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and triptans (serotonin 5HT1B/1D receptor agonists) are recommended. Before intake of NSAID and triptans, metoclopramide or domperidone is useful. In very severe attacks, subcutaneous sumatriptan is first choice. The patient should be treated early in the attack, use an adequate dose and formulation of a medication. Ideally, acute therapy should be restricted to no more than 2 to 3 days per week to avoid medication overuse.

  1. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  2. Low back pain (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point in their lives. Acute low back pain can be self-limiting; however, 1 year after an initial episode, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. Acute low back pain has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Although acute episodes may resolve completely, they may increase in severity and duration over time. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatments for acute low back pain? What are the effects of local injections for acute low back pain? What are the effects of non-drug treatments for acute low back pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics (paracetamol, opioids), back exercises, back schools, bed rest, behavioural therapy, electromyographic biofeedback, epidural corticosteroid injections, lumbar supports, massage, multidisciplinary treatment programmes, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), spinal manipulation, temperature treatments (short-wave diathermy, ultrasound, ice, heat), traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

  3. Acute responses to exercise training and relationship with exercise adherence in moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Amanda K; Wardini, Rima; Chan-Thim, Emilie; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L; Pepin, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to (i) compare, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, acute responses to continuous training at high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at ventilatory threshold (CTVT) and interval training (IT); (ii) examine associations between acute responses and 12-week adherence; and (iii) investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated/moderated by affect/vigour. Thirty-five COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 60.2 ± 15.8% predicted), underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT or IT, were monitored throughout about before training, and underwent 12 weeks of exercise training during which adherence was tracked. Compared with CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate and respiratory rate (RR), while IT induced higher [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]maximal voluntary ventilation, RR and lower pulse oxygen saturation. From pre- to post-exercise, positive affect increased (F = 9.74, p < 0.001) and negative affect decreased (F = 6.43, p = 0.005) across groups. CTVT reported greater end-exercise vigour compared to CTHI (p = 0.01) and IT (p = 0.02). IT exhibited lowest post-exercise vigour (p = 0.04 versus CTHI, p = 0.02 versus CTVT) and adherence rate (F = 6.69, p = 0.004). Mean [Formula: see text] (r = -0.466, p = 0.007) and end-exercise vigour (r = 0.420, p = 0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. End-exercise vigour moderated the relationship between [Formula: see text] and adherence (β = 2.74, t(32) = 2.32, p = 0.03). In summary, CTHI, CTVT and IT improved affective valence from rest to post-exercise and induced a significant 12-week exercise training effect. However, they elicited different acute physiological responses, which in turn were associated with differences in 12-week adherence to the target training intensity. This association was moderated by acute end-exercise vigour.

  4. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis.

  5. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  6. Acute sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2013-04-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common illness in children. Viral upper respiratory tract infection is the most common presentation of rhinosinusitis. Most children resolve the infection spontaneously and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. The proper choice of antibiotic therapy depends on the likely infecting pathogens, bacterial antibiotic resistance, and pharmacologic profiles of antibiotics. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is currently recommended as the empiric treatment in those requiring antimicrobial therapy. Isolation of the causative agents should be considered in those who failed the initial treatment. In addition to antibiotics, adjuvant therapies and surgery may be used in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

  7. Recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Vishal; Ganguly, Ishita

    2014-09-28

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is commonly encountered, but less commonly understood clinical entity, especially idiopathic RAP, with propensity to lead to repeated attacks and may be chronic pancreatitis if attacks continue to recur. A great number of studies have been published on acute pancreatitis, but few have focused on RAP. Analysing the results of clinical studies focusing specifically on RAP is problematic in view due to lack of standard definitions, randomised clinical trials, standard evaluation protocol used and less post intervention follow-up duration. With the availability of newer investigation modalities less number of etiologies will remains undiagnosed. This review particularly is focused on the present knowledge in understanding of RAP.

  8. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nason, Katie S

    2015-08-01

    Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk, and immediate management options by the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical.

  9. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: Effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G.; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G.; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD{sub 50} sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24 h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD{sub 50} sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, > 90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD{sub 50} sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin. - Highlights: • Inhalation exposure of rats to LD{sub 50} sarin causes death through respiratory failure. • Severe bronchoconstriction is the major cause of sarin-induced respiratory failure. • Transfer of sarin exposed rats to 60% oxygen improves the mortality temporarily.

  10. Behavioral characterization of the alarm reaction and anxiolytic-like effect of acute treatment with fluoxetine in piauçu fish.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Júnior, Augusto; Alves, Fabiana Luca; Pereira, Aparecida de Sousa Fim; Ide, Liliam Midori; Hoffmann, Anette

    2012-02-01

    In Ostariophysan fish, the detection of the alarm substance liberated into the water as a consequence of an attack by a predator elicits an alarm reaction or anti-predatory behavior. In this study, experiments were performed to: (i) describe and quantitatively characterize the behavioral and ventilatory responses in piauçu fish (Leporinus macrocephalus), individually and as part of a school, to conspecific alarm substance (CAS) and; (ii) test the effect of acute fluoxetine treatment on alarm reaction. Histological analysis revealed the presence of club cells in the intermediate and superficial layers of the epidermis. The predominant behavioral response to CAS was freezing for fish held individually, characterized by the cessation of the swimming activity as the animal settles to a bottom corner of the aquarium. Fish exposed to CAS showed decrease in the mean ventilatory frequency (approximately 13%) relative to control. In schools, CAS elicited a biphasic response that was characterized by erratic movements followed by increased school cohesion and immobility, reflected as an increased school cohesion (65.5% vs. -5.8% for controls) and in the number of animals near the bottom of the aquarium (42.0% vs. 6.5% for controls). Animals treated with single i.p. injections of fluoxetine (10 μg/g b.w.) did not exhibit alarm behavior following CAS stimulation. These results show that an alarm pheromone system is present in piauçu fish, evidenced by the presence of epidermal club cells and an alarm reaction induced by CAS and consequently of a chemosensory system to transmit the appropriate information to neural structures responsible for initiating anti-predator behavioral responses. In addition, fluoxetine treatment caused an anxiolytic-like effect following CAS exposure. Thus, the alarm reaction in piauçu can be a useful model for neuroethological and pharmacological studies of anxiety-related states.

  11. S(p)O(2) values in acute medical admissions breathing air--implications for the British Thoracic Society guideline for emergency oxygen use in adult patients?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary B; Prytherch, David R; Watson, Duncan; Forde, Val; Windsor, Alastair; Schmidt, Paul E; Featherstone, Peter I; Higgins, Bernie; Meredith, Paul

    2012-10-01

    S(p)O(2) is routinely used to assess the well-being of patients, but it is difficult to find an evidence-based description of its normal range. The British Thoracic Society (BTS) has published guidance for oxygen administration and recommends a target S(p)O(2) of 94-98% for most adult patients. These recommendations rely on consensus opinion and small studies using arterial blood gas measurements of saturation (S(a)O(2)). Using large datasets of routinely collected vital signs from four hospitals, we analysed the S(p)O(2) range of 37,593 acute general medical inpatients (males: 47%) observed to be breathing room air. Age at admission ranged from 16 to 105 years with a mean (SD) of 64 (21) years. 19,642 admissions (52%) were aged <70 years. S(p)O(2) ranged from 70% to 100% with a median (IQR) of 97% (95-98%). S(p)O(2) values for males and females were similar. In-hospital mortality for the study patients was 5.27% (range 4.80-6.27%). Mortality (95% CI) for patients with initial S(p)O(2) values of 97%, 96% and 95% was 3.65% (3.22-4.13); 4.47% (3.99-5.00); and 5.67% (5.03-6.38), respectively. Additional analyses of S(p)O(2) values for 37,299 medical admissions aged ≥18 years provided results that were distinctly different to those upon which the current BTS guidelines based their definition of normality. Our findings suggest that the BTS should consider changing its target saturation for actively treated patients not at risk of hypercapnic respiratory failure to 96-98%.

  12. [Acute pancreatitis due to lupus].

    PubMed

    Hani, Mohamed Aziz; Guesmi, Fethi; Ben Achour, Jamel; Zribi, Riadh; Bouasker, Ibtissem; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2004-02-01

    Among digestive clinical presentations of systemic lupus erythematosus, acute pancreatitis remains a serious affection with very poor prognosis. To date, pathogenesis is still unclear. We report two cases of fatal acute pancreatitis related to systemic lupus erythematosus.

  13. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  14. Ventilation and oxygen consumption during acute hypoxia in newborn mammals: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Mortola, J P; Rezzonico, R; Lanthier, C

    1989-10-01

    We asked whether the lack of sustained hyperventilation during acute hypoxia, often reported to occur in the infant, is a common characteristic among newborn mammalian species, and to which extent inter-species differences may be accounted for by differences in metabolic responses. Ventilation (VE) and breathing pattern have been measured by flow-plethysmography or by the barometric method in normoxia and after 10 min of 10% O2 breathing in newborn mammals of 17 species over a 3 g to 20 kg range in body size. In 14 of these species oxygen consumption (VO2) has also been measured by a manometric technique or by calculation from the changes in chamber O2 pressure. VE and VO2 changed in proportion, among species, both in normoxia and hypoxia. In hypoxia, VE was higher, similar, or even lower than in normoxia, with some relation to the degree of maturity of the species at birth. In general, the small or absent VE responses to hypoxia resulted from small or no increase in tidal volume, while breathing frequency stayed elevated. The few departures from this pattern could be explained by interspecies differences in hypoxic sensitivity, since additional experiments in kittens and puppies indicated that, with more severe hypoxia, the pattern changed from rapid and shallow to deep and slow. In all cases, irrespective of the magnitude of the VE response, the VE/VO2 (and the mean inspiratory flow/VO2) increased during hypoxia, because the drop in VE, when present, was accompanied by an even larger drop in VO2. In fact, VO2 in hypoxia decreased in most species, although to variable degrees. Body temperature either did not change or decreased slightly, possibly indicating a trend toward a decrease of the set point of thermoregulation during hypoxia. In conclusion, the analysis gave further support to the concept that, during acute hypoxia, changes in metabolic rate play a paramount role in the ventilatory response of the newborn mammal.

  15. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  16. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  17. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  18. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  19. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  20. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  1. Acute stroke initiative involving an acute care team.

    PubMed

    Roth, Sean M; Keyser, Gabrielle; Winfield, Michelle; McNeil, Julie; Simko, Leslie; Price, Karen; Moffa, Donald; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Peacock, W Frank; Katzan, Irene L

    2012-06-01

    The Acute Care Team Educational Initiative (ACTEI) was developed as a quality improvement initiative for the recognition and initial management of time-sensitive medical conditions. For our first time-sensitive disease process, we focused on acute stroke [acute stroke initiative (ASI)]. As part of the larger ACTEI, the ASI included creating an ACT that responds to all suspected emergency department stroke patients. In this article, we describe the planning, process, and development of the ACTEI/ASI as well as how we created an acute response team for the diagnosis and management of suspected acute stroke.

  2. Acute organophosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Sheemona; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti

    2014-04-20

    Acute organophosphorus poisoning continues to be a detrimental problem and a potential cause of mortality especially in developing countries. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase enzyme is the main mechanism of toxicity of such pesticides and measurement of acetylcholinesterase activity is the commonly used laboratory diagnosis approved for the purpose. It is now proved beyond any doubt that early intervention is beneficial for cases of acute organophosphorus poisoning and, therefore, considerable current interest has been generated for development of point of care testing tool for screening of the same. However, to the best of our knowledge so far the matter is not reviewed from the view of point of care testing tool development. In this paper, this subject is reviewed highlighting the methodological aspects and point of care testing tool development in the context of organophosphorus poisoning.

  3. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Weigand, M A; Mayer, K

    2012-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the clinical manifestation of an acute lung injury caused by a variety of direct and indirect injuries to the lung. The cardinal clinical feature of ARDS, refractory arterial hypoxemia, is the result of protein-rich alveolar edema with impaired surfactant function, due to vascular leakage and dysfunction with consequently impaired matching of ventilation to perfusion. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of ARDS has led to the development of novel therapies, pharmacological strategies, and advances in mechanical ventilation. However, protective ventilation is the only confirmed option in ARDS management improving survival, and few other therapies have translated into improved oxygenation or reduced ventilation time. The development of innovative therapy options, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have the potential to further improve survival of this devastating disease.

  4. [Schistosomiasis and acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Jacinta; Santos, Ângela; Clemente, Horácio; Lourenço, Augusto; Costa, Sandra; Grácio, Maria Amélia; Belo, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis associated to Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni infection has been found in patients submitted to urgent appendectomy at the Hospital Américo Boavida in Luanda. Due to the high prevalence and morbidity caused by schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis) in the country, we suspect that the involvement of Schistosoma infection on appendicular pathology could be very frequent, in particular for those individuals more exposed to the parasite transmission. We report two clinical cases of acute appendicitis whose surgical specimens of the appendix revealed S. haematobium and S. mansoni eggs in histological samples. The reported patients live in endemic areas and have been exposed to schistosome during childhood, which may explain the infection's chronicity. Information of these clinical cases could be relevant, particularly for surgery specialists and clinical pathologists, due to the possibility of finding more patients with concurrent appendicitis and schistosomiasis.

  5. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  6. Myopathy in acute hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Kung, A. W.; Ma, J. T.; Yu, Y. L.; Wang, C. C.; Woo, E. K.; Lam, K. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Yeung, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    Hypothyroid myopathy has so far been reported in long standing cases of hypothyroidism. We describe two adult patients with myopathy associated with acute transient hypothyroidism. Both presented with severe muscle aches and cramps, stiffness and spasms. Muscle enzymes were markedly elevated and electromyography in one patient showed myopathic features. Histological changes were absent in muscle biopsy, probably because of the short duration of metabolic disturbance. The myopathy subsided promptly when the hypothyroid state was reversed. PMID:3422868

  7. Atrial fibrillation (acute onset)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute atrial fibrillation is rapid, irregular, and chaotic atrial activity of recent onset. Various definitions of acute atrial fibrillation have been used in the literature, but for the purposes of this review we have included studies where atrial fibrillation may have occurred up to 7 days previously. Risk factors for acute atrial fibrillation include increasing age, cardiovascular disease, alcohol, diabetes, and lung disease. Acute atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. The condition resolves spontaneously within 24 to 48 hours in more than 50% of people; however, many people will require interventions to control heart rate or restore sinus rhythm. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent embolism, for conversion to sinus rhythm, and to control heart rate in people with recent-onset atrial fibrillation (within 7 days) who are haemodynamically stable? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amiodarone, antithrombotic treatment before cardioversion, atenolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, digoxin, diltiazem, direct current cardioversion, flecainide, metoprolol, nebivolol, propafenone, sotalol, timolol, and verapamil. PMID:25430048

  8. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  9. Acute toxicity of arsenobetaine

    SciTech Connect

    Kaise, T.; Watanabe, S.; Itoh, K.

    1985-01-01

    The acute toxicity of arsenobetaine was studied in male mice. No deaths were observed with oral administration of 10 g/kg of arsenobetaine. Therefore the LD/sub 50/ value was higher than 10 g/kg. This compound was found in urine in the non-metabolized form. No particular toxic symptoms were observed following administration. These suggest that arsenobetaine has low toxicity and is not metabolized in mice.

  10. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  11. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication.

  12. [Acute pulmonary edema secondary to acute upper airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortega, J L; Carpintero-Moreno, F; Olivares-López, A; Borrás-Rubio, E; Alvarez-López, M J; García-Izquierdo, A

    1992-01-01

    We report a 72 years old woman with mild arterial hypertension and no other pathological history who presented an acute pulmonary edema due to acute obstruction of the upper airway secondary to vocal chord paralysis developing during the immediate postoperative phase of thyroidectomy. The acute pulmonary edema resolved after application of tracheal reintubation, mechanical ventilation controlled with end expiratory positive pressure, diuretics, morphine, and liquid restriction. We discuss the possible etiopathogenic possibilities of this infrequent clinical picture and we suggest that all patients who suffered and acute obstruction of the upper airways require a careful clinical surveillance in order to prevent the development of the pulmonary syndrome.

  13. Effectiveness of combining plasma exchange with continuous hemodiafiltration on acute Fatty liver of pregnancy complicated by multiple organ dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yu-Feng; Meng, Mei; Zeng, Juan; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Jin-Jiao; Ren, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Ji-Cheng; Zhu, Wen-Ying; Wang, Chun-Ting

    2012-06-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare disease of progressive hepatic insufficiency and secondary systemic complications that induce significant maternal risk. The application of combining plasma exchange (PE) and continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) is a novel concept for patients with AFLP. Since 2002, we have utilized the combination of PE with CHDF as adjunctive medical therapy for 11 AFLP patients with multiple organ dysfunction. Before PE and CHDF initiation, four patients had signs and symptoms of encephalopathy, four required ventilatory support, and all 11 were developing liver failure, significant renal compromise, and coagulopathy. PE combined with CHDF for patients was initiated a mean of 2 days postpartum (range, days 0-3). Daily or every other day PE combined with CHDF was undertaken on two to eight occasions for each of the 11 patients. Ten patients responded with composite clinical and laboratory improvement and were discharged to the ward, then cured and discharged from hospital; one patient died of septic shock. Average duration of hospitalization was 17 days (range, days 9-38) from time of admission to discharge; the average duration of intensive care unit was 10 days (range, days 4-23). No significant PE- and CHDF-related complications occurred. These results indicate that combing PE and CHDF in a series-parallel circuit is an effective and safe treatment for patients with severe AFLP. This finding may have important implications for the development of an effective treatment for patients with AFLP suffering multiple organ dysfunction.

  14. Negative-pressure pulmonary edema complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome in an orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus abelii).

    PubMed

    Kenny, David E; Knightly, Felicia; Haas, Bradley; Hergott, Lawrence; Kutinsky, Ilana; Eller, Jimmie L

    2003-12-01

    A 22-yr-old, 86-kg, morbidly obese female orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) was immobilized and transported to the Denver Zoological Gardens hospital for a routine physical examination. Immediately after arriving at the hospital, cyanosis and apparent inadequate ventilatory efforts were noted. Clinically significant hypoxia occurred despite attempts to ventilate the orangutan through face mask, and attempts to place an endotracheal tube began. A large volume of pink-tinged frothy fluid flowed from the trachea when the laryngoscope was inserted into the oropharynx. Severe pulmonary edema due to negative-pressure pulmonary edema, precipitating life-threatening hypoxia was suspected. The orangutan was maintained on a mechanical ventilator using the neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium besylate and sedation with periodic doses of isoflurane and midazolam for 48 hr. Positive end-expiratory pressure was used while the orangutan was ventilated mechanically to improve respiratory function. The edema and hypoxia improved, but respiratory arrest ensued 30 min after extubation, when the orangutan was removed from mechanical ventilation. Necropsy and histopathology demonstrated that serious lung injury had led to acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  15. Acute psychotic disorder and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Agrawal, J K; Srivastava, A S; Bhardwaj, V K; Bose, B S

    1994-04-01

    A variable array of neuroglycopenic symptoms are frequently encountered in the hypoglycemic stage, but acute psychotic disorders are quite rare. A fifty five year old female presented with an acute psychosis following oral sulfonylurea induced hypoglycemia without preceding features of adrenomedullary stimulation. This case report suggests that an acute and transient psychotic disorder may be an important neuroglycopenic feature and its early recognition protects the patient from severe hypoglycemic brain damage in a state of hypoglycemia unawareness.

  16. Acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ko, Fanny W; Chan, Ka Pang; Hui, David S; Goddard, John R; Shaw, Janet G; Reid, David W; Yang, Ian A

    2016-10-01

    The literature of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is fast expanding. This review focuses on several aspects of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) including epidemiology, diagnosis and management. COPD poses a major health and economic burden in the Asia-Pacific region, as it does worldwide. Triggering factors of AECOPD include infectious (bacteria and viruses) and environmental (air pollution and meteorological effect) factors. Disruption in the dynamic balance between the 'pathogens' (viral and bacterial) and the normal bacterial communities that constitute the lung microbiome likely contributes to the risk of exacerbations. The diagnostic approach to AECOPD varies based on the clinical setting and severity of the exacerbation. After history and examination, a number of investigations may be useful, including oximetry, sputum culture, chest X-ray and blood tests for inflammatory markers. Arterial blood gases should be considered in severe exacerbations, to characterize respiratory failure. Depending on the severity, the acute management of AECOPD involves use of bronchodilators, steroids, antibiotics, oxygen and noninvasive ventilation. Hospitalization may be required, for severe exacerbations. Nonpharmacological interventions including disease-specific self-management, pulmonary rehabilitation, early medical follow-up, home visits by respiratory health workers, integrated programmes and telehealth-assisted hospital at home have been studied during hospitalization and shortly after discharge in patients who have had a recent AECOPD. Pharmacological approaches to reducing risk of future exacerbations include long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled steroids, mucolytics, vaccinations and long-term macrolides. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in preventing COPD exacerbations.

  17. Acute brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, GT

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem. PMID:26688392

  18. Acute brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, G T

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem.

  19. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients.

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition with multiple causes and a high mortality rate. Approximately 150,000 cases are reported in the United States annually, making ARDS a public health concern. Management of the condition is complex because of its severity, and medical imaging is essential for both the diagnosis and management of ARDS. This article introduces common signs, symptoms, risk factors, and causes of ARDS. Diagnostic criteria, histopathology, treatment strategies, and prognostic information also are discussed. The article explains the value of medical imaging studies of ARDS, especially radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasonography.

  1. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  2. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  3. Acute abdomen. Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Madonna, M B; Boswell, W C; Arensman, R M

    1997-05-01

    The outcome for children with common surgical conditions that cause an acute abdomen is discussed. These conditions include appendicitis, intussusception, malrotation, inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal obstructions, and nonorganic pain. Emphasis is placed on surgical intervention and disease processes that significantly affect outcome. The outcome of many of the diseases discussed is strongly influenced by the timing of diagnosis and treatment. These children should have prompt care and intervention to prevent morbidity and mortality. In addition, many children who present with common pediatric surgical emergencies have other medical conditions and are best treated in an environment that has a multidisciplinary team to handle their care and decrease the long-term complications.

  4. Acute emphysematous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Abengowe, C U; McManamon, P J

    1974-11-16

    Acute emphysematous cholecystitis is an uncommon condition caused by gas-forming organisms and characterized by the presence of gas in the wall and lumen of the gallbladder. Its incidence is higher among male diabetics. AEC in an elderly North American diabetic man with Indian ancestry is reported with a brief review of the world literature. The diagnosis was made preoperatively with the aid of plain radiographic films of the abdomen. A gangrenous distended gallbladder was removed at operation. Clostridium perfringens was cultured from the gallbladder contents and wall. If AEC is suspected, intensive antimicrobial therapy and fluid and electrolyte replacement should be given prior to early surgical intervention.

  5. Acute intermittent hypoxia induced phrenic long-term facilitation despite increased SOD1 expression in a rat model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Harrigan, Daniel J.; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor neuron death. Since most ALS patients succumb to ventilatory failure from loss of respiratory motor neurons, any effective ALS treatment must preserve and/or restore breathing capacity. In rats over-expressing mutated superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1G93A), the capacity to increase phrenic motor output is decreased at disease end-stage, suggesting imminent ventilatory failure. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF), a form of spinal respiratory motor plasticity with potential to restore phrenic motor output in clinical disorders that compromise breathing. Since pLTF requires NADPH oxidase activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, it is blocked by NADPH oxidase inhibition and SOD mimetics in normal rats. Thus, we hypothesized that SOD1G93A (mutant; MT) rats do not express AIH-induced pLTF due to over-expression of active mutant superoxide dismutase-1. AIH-induced pLTF and hypoglossal (XII) LTF were assessed in young, pre-symptomatic and end-stage anesthetized MT rats and age-matched wild-type littermates. Contrary to predictions, pLTF and XII LTF were observed in MT rats at all ages; at end-stage, pLTF was actually enhanced. SOD1 levels were elevated in young and pre-symptomatic MT rats, yet superoxide accumulation in putative phrenic motor neurons (assessed with dihydroethidium) was unchanged; however, superoxide accumulation significantly decreased at end-stage. Thus, compensatory mechanisms appear to maintain ROS homoeostasis until late in disease progression, preserving AIH-induced respiratory plasticity. Following intrathecal injections of an NADPH oxidase inhibitor (apocynin; 600µM; 12µL), pLTF was abolished in pre-symptomatic, but not end-stage MT rats, demonstrating that pLTF is NADPH oxidase dependent in pre-symptomatic, but NADPH oxidase independent in end-stage MT rats. Mechanisms preserving

  6. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ayse; Tanir, Gonul; Ozkan, Mehpare; Oguz, Melek; Yıldız, Yasemin Tasci

    2013-03-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an acute demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, which principally affects the brain and spinal cord. It usually follows a benign infection or vaccination in children. Although a number of infectious agents have been implicated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been described previously in children. Acquired T. gondii infection presents with lymphadenopathy and fever and usually spontaneously resolves in immunocompetent patients. We describe a previously healthy 10-year-old boy with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection, the symptoms of which initially began with nuchal stiffness, difficulty in walking, and urinary and stool incontinence; he later had development of motor and sensory impairment in both lower extremities and classical magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of the disease. The patient recovered completely after the specific therapy for acquired T. gondii infection and pulse prednisolone. Although acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been reported previously in association with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, clinicians should keep in mind this uncommon cause of a common disease when evaluating a patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  7. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Matĕjovic, M; Novák, I; Srámek, V; Rokyta, R; Hora, P; Nalos, M

    1999-04-26

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the general term used for severe acute respiratory failure of diverse aetiology. It is associated with a high morbidity, mortality (50-70%), and financial costs. Regardless of aetiology, the basic pathogenesis of ARDS is a systemic inflammatory response leading to a diffuse inflammatory process that involves both lungs, thus causing diffuse alveolar and endothelial damage with increased pulmonary capillary permeability and excessive extravascular lung water accumulation. ARDS is commonly associated with sepsis and multiple organ failure. The clinical picture involves progressive hypoxaemia, radiographic evidence of pulmonary oedema, decreased lung compliance and pulmonary hypertension. Despite the scientific and technological progress in critical care medicine, there is no specific ARDS therapy available at the moment and its management remains supportive. Therapeutic goals include resolution of underlying conditions, maintenance of acceptable gas exchange and tissue oxygenation and prevention of iatrogenic lung injury. Many new specific therapeutic strategies have been developed, however, most of them require further scientific evaluation. The paper reviews definition, basic pathogenesis and pathophysiology of ARDS and discusses current concepts of therapeutic possibilities of ARDS.

  8. [Acute coronary syndrome -- 2012].

    PubMed

    Becker, Dávid; Merkely, Béla

    2012-12-23

    The acute coronary syndrome is the most severe form of coronary artery disease. It is an immediate threat of life and the mortality rate can be high without proper therapy and patient management. Based on the first ECG, two different forms can be distinguished: acute coronary syndrome with and without ST elevation. Besides adequate medication, management of these patients is an essential part of treatment. In case of ST elevation, coronarography and percutaneous coronary intervention is needed in general, within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms. When ST elevation is not detected on the ECG, individual ischemic risk factors and predictable mortality of the patient may define the necessity and the date of the invasive examination. The Hungarian hemodynamic laboratory network covers almost the whole country and, therefore, practically each patient may receive a state-of-the-art therapy. Although indicators of cardiovascular diseases are still prominent, the mortality rate of myocardial Infarction is decreasing in Hungary due to the well-organized invasive care.

  9. Acute unilateral isolated ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Court, Jennifer Helen; Janicek, David

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of acute onset painless left ptosis. He had no other symptoms; importantly pupils were equal and reactive and eye movements were full. There was no palpable mass or swelling. He was systemically well with no headache, other focal neurological signs, or symptoms of fatigue. CT imaging showed swelling of the levator palpebrae superioris suggestive of myositis. After showing no improvement over 5 days the patient started oral prednisolone 30 mg reducing over 12 weeks. The ptosis resolved quickly and the patient remains symptom free at 6 months follow-up. Acute ptosis may indicate serious pathology. Differential diagnoses include a posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing a partial or complete third nerve palsy, Horner’s syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. A careful history and examination must be taken. Orbital myositis typically involves the extraocular muscles causing pain and diplopia. Isolated levator myositis is rare. PMID:25564592

  10. [An acute monoclonal gammopathy?].

    PubMed

    Presle, Alexandra; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Schneider, Nathalie; Maquart, François-Xavier; Ramont, Laurent; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis is commonly used in case of acute or chronic renal failure. It can lead to the etiologic diagnosis by detecting monoclonal gammopathies which are frequently complicated by renal failure, such as cast nephropathy, Randall's disease or amyloidosis, or to explore an associated inflammatory syndrome. We report the occurrence of two monoclonal components in a patient without any monoclonal component 10 days earlier. The sudden appearance of these two monoclonal components associated to the context of sepsis of urinary origin suggested the diagnosis of transient monoclonal gammopathy. This hypothesis was confirmed by monitoring serum protein electrophoresis that showed a gradual decrease of these two monoclonal components few weeks after the resolution of the infectious disease. The main etiological factors of transient monoclonal gammopathies are infectious or autoimmune diseases. In this context, it is important to delay the achievement of serum protein electrophoresis after the acute episode, in order to avoid to falsely conclude to hematologic malignancy diagnosis. This can prevent costly biological examinations of these transient monoclonal gammopathies and invasive procedures like bone marrow examination.

  11. Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  12. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  13. Exercise capacity is not impaired after acute alcohol ingestion: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dejana; Damjanovic, Svetozar S; Plecas-Solarovic, Bosiljka; Pešić, Vesna; Stojiljkovic, Stanimir; Banovic, Marko; Ristic, Arsen; Mantegazza, Valentina; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-12-01

    The usage of alcohol is widespread, but the effects of acute alcohol ingestion on exercise performance and the stress hormone axis are not fully elucidated.We studied 10 healthy white men, nonhabitual drinkers, by Doppler echocardiography at rest, spirometry, and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) in two visits (2-4 days in between), one after administration of 1.5 g/kg ethanol (whisky) diluted at 15% in water, and the other after administration of an equivalent volume of water. Plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were also measured 10 min before the test, at maximal effort and at the third minute of recovery. Ethanol concentration was measured from resting blood samples by gas chromatography and it increased from 0.00 ± 0.00 to 1.25 ± 0.54‰ (P < 0.001). Basal echocardiographic and spirometric parameters were normal and remained so after acute alcohol intake, whereas ACTH, cortisol, and NT-pro-BNP nonsignificantly increased in all phases of the test. CPET data suggested a trend toward a slight reduction of exercise performance (peak VO2 = 3008 ± 638 vs. 2900 ± 543 ml/min, ns; peak workload = 269 ± 53 vs. 249 ± 40 W, ns; test duration 13.7 ± 2.2 vs. 13.3 ± 1.7 min, ns; VE/VCO2 22.1 ± 1.4 vs. 23.3 ± 2.9, ns). Ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide at rest was higher after alcohol intake (28 ± 2.5 vs. 30.4 ± 3.2, P = 0.039) and maximal respiratory exchange ratio was lower after alcohol intake (1.17 ± 0.02 vs. 1.14 ± 0.04, P = 0.04). In conclusion, we showed that acute alcohol intake in healthy white men is associated with a nonsignificant exercise performance reduction and stress hormone stimulation, with an unchanged exercise metabolism.

  14. Perioperative Ventilatory Management in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Courteille, Benoît; Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire; Dupont, Hervé; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protective ventilation is associated with a lower incidence of pulmonary complications. However, there are few published data on routine pulmonary management in adult cardiac surgery. The present study's primary objective was to survey pulmonary management in this high-risk population, as practiced by anesthesiologists in France. All 460 registered France-based cardiac anesthesiologists were invited (by e-mail) to participate in an online survey in January–February 2015. The survey's questionnaire was designed to assess current practice in pre-, per-, and postoperative pulmonary management. In all, 198 anesthesiologists (43% of those invited) participated in the survey. Other than during the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) per se, 179 anesthesiologists (91% of respondees) [95% confidence interval (CI): 87–95] used a low-tidal-volume approach (6–8 mL/kg), whereas techniques based on positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers vary greatly from 1 anesthesiologist to another. During CPB, 104 (53%) [95% CI: 46–60] anesthesiologists withdrew mechanical ventilation (with disconnection, in some cases) and 97 (49%) [95% CI: 42–56] did not prescribe positive end-expiratory pressure. One hundred sixty-five (83%) [95% CI: 78–88] anesthesiologists stated that a written protocol for peroperative pulmonary management was not available. Twenty (10%) [95% CI: 6–14] and 11 (5%) [95% CI: 2–8] anesthesiologists stated that they did use protocols for ventilator use and recruitment maneuvers, respectively. The preoperative period (pulmonary examinations and prescription of additional assessments) and the postoperative period (extubation, and noninvasive ventilation) periods vary greatly from 1 anesthesiologist to another. The great majority of French cardiac anesthesiologists use a low tidal volume during cardiac surgery (other than during CPB per se). However, pulmonary management procedures varied markedly from 1 anesthesiologist to another. There is a clear need for large clinical studies designed to identify best practice in pulmonary management. PMID:26945353

  15. 20 CFR 410.430 - Ventilatory studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... minute. The reported maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) or maximum breathing capacity (MBC) and 1-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) should represent the largest of at least three attempts. The MVV or the MBC reported should represent the observed value and should not be calculated from FEV1. The...

  16. 20 CFR 410.430 - Ventilatory studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... minute. The reported maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) or maximum breathing capacity (MBC) and 1-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) should represent the largest of at least three attempts. The MVV or the MBC reported should represent the observed value and should not be calculated from FEV1. The...

  17. Comparison of occlusion pressure and ventilatory responses.

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, D H; Altose, M D; Kelsen, S G; Cherniack, N S

    1977-01-01

    The airway pressure 100 msec after the onset of an inspiratory effort against a closed airway (P100, occlusion pressure) is theoretically a more accurate index of respiratory neuron motor output than ventilation. Occlusion pressure and ventilation responses to hypercapnia were compared in repeated trials in 10 normal subjects while in the seated and supine positions. During progressive hypercapnia changes in P100 were also compared to changes in tidal volume and inspiratory airflow. These studies show that occlusion pressure increases linearly with hypercapnia in both sitting and supine subjects. Changing from the seated to the supine position, or vice versa, had no significant effect on either ventilation or occlusion pressure responses to CO2. Correlations between P100 and ventilation or airflow rate were significantly higher than correlations between P100 and tidal volume or breathing frequency. Intermittent random airway occlusion had no effect on either ventilation or pattern of breathing during hypercapnia. Occlusion pressure responses were no less variable than ventilation responses in groups of subjects whether studied seated or supine. However, maintenance of a constant moderate breathing frequency (20 breaths per minute) reduced the interindividual variability in ventilation and occlusion pressure responses to hypercapnia. PMID:867336

  18. Baroreflex responsiveness during ventilatory acclimatization in humans.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Brian E; Tamisier, Renaud; Gilmartin, Geoffrey S; Curley, Mathew; Anand, Amit; Weiss, J Woodrow

    2008-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the decline in muscle sympathetic activity during and after 8 h of poikilocapnic hypoxia (Hx) was associated with a greater sympathetic baroreflex-mediated responsiveness. In 10 healthy men and women (n=2), we measured beat-to-beat blood pressure (Portapres), carotid artery distension (ultrasonography), heart period, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (SNA; microneurography) during two baroreflex perturbations using the modified Oxford technique before, during, and after 8 h of hypoxia (84% arterial oxygen saturation). The integrated baroreflex response [change of SNA (DeltaSNA)/change of diastolic blood pressure (DeltaDBP)], mechanical (Deltadiastolic diameter/DeltaDBP), and neural (DeltaSNA/Deltadiastolic diameter) components were estimated at each time point. Sympathetic baroreflex responsiveness declined throughout the hypoxic exposure and further declined upon return to normoxia [pre-Hx, -8.3+/-1.2; 1-h Hx, -7.2+/-1.0; 7-h Hx, -4.9+/-1.0; and post-Hx: -4.1+/-0.9 arbitrary integrated units (AIU) x min(-1) x mmHg(-1); P<0.05 vs. previous time point for 1-h, 7-h, and post-Hx values]. This blunting of baroreflex-mediated efferent outflow was not due to a change in the mechanical transduction of arterial pressure into barosensory stretch. Rather, the neural component declined in a similar pattern to that of the integrated reflex response (pre-Hx, -2.70+/-0.53; 1-h Hx, -2.59+/-0.53; 7-h Hx, -1.60+/-0.34; and post-Hx, -1.34+/-0.27 AIU x min(-1) x microm(-1); P < 0.05 vs. pre-Hx for 7-h and post-Hx values). Thus it does not appear as if enhanced baroreflex function is primarily responsible for the reduced muscle SNA observed during intermediate duration hypoxia. However, the central transduction of baroreceptor afferent neural activity into efferent neural activity appears to be reduced during the initial stages of peripheral chemoreceptor acclimatization.

  19. Ventilatory management of one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, G; Coccia, C

    2011-05-01

    Hypoxemia is considered to be the most important challenge during one-lung ventilation (OLV). Recent studies, however, have shown that one-lung ventilation can involve some lung damage and can therefore be per se a cause of hypoxemia. OLV can be associated to an injury: but the techniques used to improve oxygenation may also damage the lung. A new ventilator approach should be used and applied with regards to what is so far known in terms of "lung protection" also during OLV.

  20. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature.

  1. Acute care surgery in evolution.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kimberly A; Rozycki, Grace S

    2010-09-01

    At the center of the development of acute care surgery is the growing difficulty in caring for patients with acute surgical conditions. Care demands continue to grow in the face of an escalating crisis in emergency care access and the decreasing availability of surgeons to cover emergency calls. To compound this problem, there is an ever-growing shortage of general surgeons as technological advances have encouraged subspecialization. Developed by the leadership of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the specialty of acute care surgery offers a training model that would produce a new breed of specialist with expertise in trauma surgery, surgical critical care, and elective and emergency general surgery. This article highlights the evolution of the specialty in hope that these acute care surgeons, along with practicing general surgeons, will bring us closer to providing superb and timely care for patients with acute surgical conditions.

  2. Metabolic and behavior changes in surubim acutely exposed to a glyphosate-based herbicide.

    PubMed

    Sinhorin, Valéria D G; Sinhorin, Adilson P; Teixeira, Jhonnes Marcos S; Miléski, Kelly Márcia L; Hansen, Paula Carine; Moeller, Paulo Rafael; Moreira, Paula Sueli A; Baviera, Amanda M; Loro, Vânia L

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the effect of glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup Original), the major herbicide used in soybean crops in Mato Grosso state, at concentrations of 0, 2.25, 4.5, 7.5, and 15 mg L(-1) on metabolic and behavior parameters of the hybrid fish surubim in an acute exposure lasting 96 h. Glycogen content, glucose, lactate, and protein levels were measured in different tissues. Plasma levels of cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were also determined. Ventilatory frequency (VF) and swimming activity (SA) were considered behavior parameters. Results showed that herbicide exposure decreased plasma glucose levels and increased it in surubim liver. Lactate increased in both plasma and liver but decreased in muscle. Protein levels decreased in plasma and muscle but increased in liver. After herbicide exposure, liver and muscle glycogen was decreased. Cholesterol levels decreased in plasma at all concentrations tested. Plasma ALT increased, and no alterations were recorded for AST levels. VF increased after glyphosate exposure (5 min) and decreased after 96 h. SA showed differences among all groups (5 min). At the end of 96 h, SA was altered by the 7.5 mg L(-1) concentration. Fish used anaerobic glycolysis as indicated by generally decreased glycogen levels and decreased lactate levels in muscle but increased ones in plasma and liver. We suggest that the studied parameters could be used as indicators of herbicide toxicity in surubim and may provide extremely important information for understanding the biology of the animal and its responsiveness to external stimuli (stressors).

  3. Chest radiographic and CT findings in hyperleukocytic acute myeloid leukemia: A retrospective cohort study of 73 patients.

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Michael; Jamis-Dow, Carlos; Bayerl, Michael; Desai, Ruchi J; Claxton, David F; Van de Louw, Andry

    2016-11-01

    Hyperleukocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with pulmonary complications and high early mortality rate, but given its rarity, data on chest radiographic presentation are scarce.We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 73 AML patients admitted with white blood cell count >100 × 10/L between 2003 and 2014 in order to describe the chest radiographic and computed tomography (CT) findings and to correlate them with AML subtype and respiratory symptoms.Forty-two of the 73 patients (58%) overall and 36 of the 54 patients (67%) with clinical signs of pulmonary leukostasis had abnormal radiographs on admission. The presence of radiographic abnormalities was significantly associated with dyspnea and oxygen/ventilatory support requirements (P < 0.01) and with day 28 mortality (45% vs 13%, P = 0.005) but not with monocytic subtype of AML. Sixteen patients had isolated focal basilar airspace opacities, unilateral (n = 13) or bilateral (n = 3), while 16 patients had bilateral diffuse opacities, interstitial (n = 12) or airspace and interstitial (n = 4). Two patients had isolated pleural effusion, 2 patients had unilateral midlung airspace opacities, and 6 patients had a combination of focal airspace and diffuse interstitial opacities. Overall, 2 patterns accounted for 75% of abnormal findings: bilateral diffuse opacities tended to be associated with monocytic AML, whereas basilar focal airspace opacities were more frequent in nonmonocytic AML (P < 0.05). Eighteen patients had CT scans, revealing interlobular septal thickening (n = 12), airspace (n = 11) and ground-glass (n = 9) opacities, pleural effusions (n = 12), and acute pulmonary embolism (n = 2).Hyperleukocytic AML is frequently associated with abnormal chest radiographs, involving mostly focal basilar airspace opacities (more frequent in nonmonocytic AML) or diffuse bilateral opacities. CT scan should be considered broadly due to the suboptimal

  4. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. [Acute postpartum psychoses].

    PubMed

    Tabbane, K; Charfi, F; Dellagi, L; Guizani, L; Boukadida, L

    1999-11-01

    The post-partum is a high risk period for the development of acute psychotic disorders. The frequence of post-partum psychoses is evaluated at 1 to 2 per 1,000 births. Post-partum psychosis include major affective disorders which is the most frequent diagnosis. The clinical pictures have specific characteristics: rapid change of symptomatology, liability of mood, and frequent confusional signs. The short-term prognosis is generally good but the risk of recurrence of the mental disorder, in or outside puerperal context, is high. At clinical, evolutive and genetic levels, the studies do not provide arguments for nosological autonomy of post-partum psychosis. At therapeutic level, the ECT is particularly efficient in this indication.

  6. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; Wallis, Sebastian; Coatesworth, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common problem facing general practitioners, paediatricians and otolaryngologists. This article reviews the aetiopathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, natural history, complications and management of AOM. The literature was reviewed by using the PubMed search engine and entering a combination of terms including 'AOM', 'epidemiology' and 'management'. Relevant articles were identified and examined for content. What is the take-home message? AOM is a very common problem affecting the majority of children at least once and places a large burden on health care systems throughout the world. Although symptomatic relief is often enough for most children, more severe and protracted cases require treatment with antibiotics, especially in younger children.

  7. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  8. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  9. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali; Ahmad, Bakhtiar; Ahmed, Zahoor; Al-Quliti, Khalid W.

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured cerebral aneurysm is the most common cause of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Rarely cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) may present initially as acute SAH, and clinically mimics aneurysmal bleed. We report 2 cases of CVST who presented with severe headache associated with neck pain and focal seizures. Non-contrast brain CT showed SAH, involving the sulci of the convexity of hemisphere (cSAH) without involving the basal cisterns. Both patients received treatment with anticoagulants and improved. Awareness of this unusual presentation of CVST is important for early diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the inclusion of vascular neuroimaging like MRI with venography or CT venography in the diagnostic workup of SAH, especially in a patient with strong clinical suspicion of CVST or in a patient where neuroimaging showed cSAH. PMID:25630784

  10. Acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm and mimicking acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Andreas; Bagur, Rodrigo; Béliveau, Patrick; Potvin, Jean-Michel; Levesque, Pierre; Fillion, Nancy; Tremblay, Benoit; Larose, Éric; Gaudreault, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old healthy man consulted to our center because of typical on-and-off chest-pain and an electrocardiogram showing ST-segment elevation in inferior leads. An urgent coronary angiography showed angiographically normal coronary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging confirmed acute myocarditis. Although acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm is an uncommon association, it is important to recognize it, particularly for the management for those patients presenting with ST-segment elevation and suspect myocardial infarction and angiographically normal coronary arteries. The present report highlights the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to identify acute myocarditis as the underlying cause. PMID:25276306

  11. Acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm and mimicking acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Andreas; Bagur, Rodrigo; Béliveau, Patrick; Potvin, Jean-Michel; Levesque, Pierre; Fillion, Nancy; Tremblay, Benoit; Larose, Eric; Gaudreault, Valérie

    2014-09-26

    A 24-year-old healthy man consulted to our center because of typical on-and-off chest-pain and an electrocardiogram showing ST-segment elevation in inferior leads. An urgent coronary angiography showed angiographically normal coronary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging confirmed acute myocarditis. Although acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm is an uncommon association, it is important to recognize it, particularly for the management for those patients presenting with ST-segment elevation and suspect myocardial infarction and angiographically normal coronary arteries. The present report highlights the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to identify acute myocarditis as the underlying cause.

  12. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (ALL) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  13. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition.

  14. Acute abdomen caused by both acute appendicitis and epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hajime; Hamada, Shinichi; Okanoue, Toyotake; Kawamura, Akihiro; Inoue, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Shinya; Chikai, Takashi; Hiroi, Makoto; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Acute appendicitis often presents as right lower quadrant (RLQ) pain, severe tenderness at the point of McBurny or Lanz, and Blumberg's sign. Scrotal events with appendicitis are very rare. In our case, a 63-year-old Japanese man presented with severe RLQ pain and high fever. Physical examination revealed severe tenderness (including both points of McBurny and Lanz) and Blumberg's sign. The scrotum was slightly swollen and showed local heat with severe testicular pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed ascites in a pelvic space and the right side of the spermatic cord was swollen. Emergency operation was performed and the final diagnosis was catarrhal appendicitis and acute epididymitis. This is the first report of acute appendicitis concomitant with acute epididymitis.

  15. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  16. [Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acute cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Neufeld, D; Sivak, G; Jessel, J; Freund, U

    1996-04-01

    We performed 417 laparoscopic cholecystectomies, including 58 for acute cholecystitis, between September 1991 and April 1995,. All operations were successful, with no mortality or complications. In about 10%, the laparoscopic approach failed and we converted to open cholecystectomy. Average post-operative hospitalization was 24 hours. We also performed primary open cholecystectomies in 55 patients with acute cholecystitis, because of limitations of operating room and staff availability for unscheduled laparoscopic surgery. In these patients, hospital stay was longer and rate of complications higher. In our opinion laparoscopic cholecystectomy is safe and the preferred approach in acute cholecystitis.

  17. Non-invasive ventilation in acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, R; Aggarwal, A; Gupta, D; Jindal, S

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is the delivery of assisted mechanical ventilation to the lungs, without the use of an invasive endotracheal airway. NIV has revolutionised the management of patients with various forms of respiratory failure. It has decreased the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and its attendant complications. Cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (CPO) is a common medical emergency, and NIV has been shown to improve both physiological and clinical outcomes. From the data presented herein, it is clear that there is sufficiently high level evidence to favour the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and that the use of CPAP in patients with CPO decreases intubation rate and improves survival (number needed to treat seven and eight respectively). However, there is insufficient evidence to recommend the use of bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP), probably the exception being patients with hypercapnic CPO. More trials are required to conclusively define the role of BiPAP in CPO. PMID:16210459

  18. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease.

  19. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  20. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after a respiratory infection, such as a cold, and can be ...

  1. [Acute muscle weakness: differential diagnoses].

    PubMed

    Antoniuk, Sérgio A

    2013-09-06

    Acute muscle weakness, a common disorder in pediatrics, can occur from impairment of any part of the motor unit, including the upper motor neuron, lower motor neuron, peripheral nerve, neuromuscular junction or muscle. It usually manifests itself as an acute or hyperacute motor disorder of progressive or rapidly progressive course. Acute muscle weakness is a neuromuscular emergency, especially if it affects the respiratory or oropharyngeal musculature. The location of the motor weakness and associated neurological signs and symptoms usually indicate the location of the lesion. The onset, speed and clinical evolution, as well as other data from the patient's history, suggest the pathophysiological differential diagnosis. Successful treatment depends on the immediate and correct differential diagnosis. This paper presents the main differential diagnosis of main neuromuscular diseases that cause acute muscle weakness in children.

  2. Acute Pancreatitis after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tabakovic, Mithat; Salkic, Nermin N.; Bosnjic, Jasmina; Alibegovic, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare but life-threatening complication in patients with transplanted kidney. The incidence of acute pancreatitis after kidney transplantation ranges from 2% to 7%, with mortality rate between 50 and 100%. We report a case of a female patient aged 46 years, developing an interstitial acute pancreatitis 8 years following a renal transplantation. The specific aethiological factor was not clearly established, although possibility of biliary pancreatitis with spontaneous stone elimination and/or medication-induced pancreatitis remains the strongest. Every patient after renal transplantation with an acute onset of abdominal pain should be promptly evaluated for presence of pancreatitis with a careful application of the most appropriate diagnostic procedure for each individual patient. PMID:23259142

  3. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Villela, Luis; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The current treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia yields poor results, with expected cure rates in the order of 30–40% depending on the biological characteristics of the leukaemic clone. Therefore, new agents and schemas are intensively studied in order to improve patients’ outcomes. This review summarizes some of these new paradigms, including new questions such as which anthracycline is most effective and at what dose. High doses of daunorubicin have shown better responses in young patients and are well tolerated in elderly patients. Monoclonal antibodies are promising agents in good risk patients. Drugs blocking signalling pathways could be used in combination with chemotherapy or in maintenance with promising results. Epigenetic therapies, particularly after stem cell transplantation, are also discussed. New drugs such as clofarabine and flavopiridol are reviewed and the results of their use discussed. It is clear that many new approaches are under study and hopefully will be able to improve on the outcomes of the commonly used ‘7+3’ regimen of an anthracycline plus cytarabine with daunorubicin, which is clearly an ineffective therapy in the majority of patients. PMID:21861539

  5. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  6. Acute asthma: under attack.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, Niranjan

    2002-06-01

    The burden of asthma (death, disability, and an increasing prevalence) makes it a major public health problem worldwide. In an effort to decrease this burden, investigators are studying many aspects of this disease. The role of race, ethnicity, infections, and pollutants as triggers, as well as the risk factors are now being defined. Research into methods to decrease acute exacerbations and improve emergency and in-hospital management, using standardized protocols and incentives for follow-up care, has yielded valuable information but has met with limited success. Adherence to the national guidelines has been poor and to some extent can be attributed to the lack of a practical method of measuring the degree of lung inflammation and cumbersome treatment protocols. Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive marker of inflammation and may provide a rational method to titrate corticosteroid and leukotriene receptor antagonist therapy. The best route and dosing regimen for corticosteroid administration (oral vs intramuscular vs nebulized) are the subject of several studies, with no clear-cut winner. The burden of asthma in developing countries with limited financial resources has also triggered a search for simpler, cheaper, and practical methods for beta-agonist delivery using indigenous spacers. Recent research in asthma has unveiled our incomplete knowledge of the disease but has also provided a sense of where efforts should be expended. Research into the genetics and pharmacogenetics of asthma and into the societal factors limiting the delivery of optimal care is likely to yield useful and practical information.

  7. [Acute zincteral oral poisoning].

    PubMed

    Kamenczak, A; Pokorska, M; Wołek, E; Kobyłecka, K

    Zinc vapour poisoning by inhalation in the form of zinc fever is more frequent than oral zinc product poisoning, the product used in therapy. The main aim of the study was the evaluation of clinical manifestation present after Zincteral ingestion as well as attempt to find the relationship between the presence and aggravation of the clinical manifestation and zinc level in the blood. The course of acute clinical suicidal poisoning by ingestion of Zincteral 50 tablets (10.0 g) and 100 tablets (20.0 g) is presented. The clinical picture revealed the following symptoms and signs: tachycardia, changes of arterial BP, vascular shock; dyspeptic nausea, vomiting cramps in abdominal region, diarrhoea. Damage of the parenchymatous organs, mainly liver was evident. In pregnant woman (9-week-pregnancy) on the 12-th day of her stay in the Clinic complete miscarriage took place accompanied by haemorrhage from reproductive organs. The kind and exacerbation of the clinical manifestations in relation to the zinc level in body fluid were analysed.

  8. Acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Laura; Bernal, William

    2015-10-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare critical illness with high mortality whose successful management requires early recognition and effective initial management. Though it may result from a wide variety of causes, in the UK and much of the developed world most cases result from paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity, and administration of antidotal N-acetyl cysteine at first recognition is key. Involvement of local critical care services should occur at an early stage for stabilisation, monitoring and supportive care with parallel discussion with specialist liver centres to identify those patients who may benefit from transfer. Prognostic criteria are applied to identify patients for emergency liver transplantation, and candidates for surgery are prioritised on waitlisting schemes. Outcomes now approach that of elective surgery. However, the majority of cases, and particularly those with paracetamol-induced disease, recover with supportive medical care alone. Overall outcomes for patients with ALF have improved dramatically over the last three decades, but mortality remains unacceptable and further advances in care are required.

  9. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Suran L

    2012-05-01

    Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe cutaneous adverse reaction and is caused by drugs in >90% of cases. It is rare, with an incidence of 1-5 patients per million per year. The clinical manifestations are characterised by fever and the rapid appearance of disseminated sterile pustules 3-5 days after the commencement of treatment. It is accompanied by marked neutrophilia. Mucous membranes are not typically involved. The drugs conferring the highest risk of AGEP according to the EuroSCAR study are aminopenicillins, pristinamycin, hydroxychloroquine, antibacterial sulphonamides, terbinafine and diltiazem. The pathogenesis of AGEP involves the initial influx of CD8 cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the apoptosis of keratinocytes and formation of vesicles. Then CXCL-8-producing and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor-producing CD4 cells enter the epidermis, resulting in neutrophil mediated inflammation and the formation of pustules. As a result, the histology reveals intraepidermal, usually subcorneal, pustules and an accompanying neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate. Epicutaneous patch testing may also support the diagnosis by causing a localised pustular reaction 48-96 h after the offending drug is applied. The condition usually resolves by 15 days after the causative drug is withdrawn but oral corticosteroid therapy may be necessary in some individuals. The mortality rate is up to 5% and mostly occurs in elderly people who have significant comorbidities.

  10. Autophagy in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Man J.; Dong, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a major kidney disease associated with poor clinical outcomes. The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury is multifactorial and is characterized by tubular cell injury and death. Recent studies have demonstrated autophagy induction in proximal tubular cells during acute kidney injury. The regulatory mechanisms of tubular cell autophagy are poorly understood; however, some recent findings have set up a foundation for further investigation. Although autophagy may promote cell death under certain experimental conditions, pharmacological and autophagy-related gene knockout studies have established a renoprotective role for autophagy in acute kidney injury. The mechanisms by which autophagy protects cells from injury and how, possibly, its pro-survival role switches to pro-death under certain conditions are discussed. Further research is expected to help us understand the regulatory network of tubular cell autophagy, define its precise roles in specific context of acute kidney injury, and identify autophagy-targeting strategies for the prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury. PMID:24485026

  11. [Correlation between hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Monaco, R; Durante, E; Pampolini, M; Tioli, P

    1981-05-31

    It is often difficult to differentiate acute pancreatitis (A.P.) from some other acute abdominal diseases, when there is an elevated serum amylase. In contrast, the renal clearance of amylase, expressed as a percentage of creatinine clearance, can separate patients with A.P. from patients with acute colecistitis, common duct stone without pancreatitis, hyperamylasemia after biliary surgery, acute peptic ulcer and acute salivary diseases.

  12. Acute injuries in orienteerers.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Nylund, T; Taimela, S

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the type and severeity of acute injuries occurring in Finnish orienteerers in 1987 to 1991. The study is based on the orienteering license insurance records accounting for 2189 orienteering injuries during 69268 person-years of exposure in active orienteerers. Of these orienteerers, 73.0% were male; 73.5% (N = 1608) of all injuries occurred in males, so the injury rate was similar in males and females. The rate was highest in orienteerers 20 to 24 years of age and lowest in children. Injuries occurred most commonly during May to September (78.9% or all injuries), the months which include the orienteering competition season, and were more common during competitions (59.8%) than during training. A high number of the injuries occurred during weekends (58.9% of injuries) including 68.1% of all competition injuries and 44.9% of all training injuries. The lower limbs were involved in 1611 (73.6%) of cases, the ankle (28.7%) and the knee (23.2%) being the two most common injury locations. Sprains, strains and contusions were the most common injuries. Wounds were proportionally more common in males than in females while ankle sprains were more common in females. Fractures, seven open and 94 closed, accounted for 4.6% of injuries; they were most common in the hand/wrist/forearm (N = 44) and ankle (N = 16), and were more frequent during competition (62.3%) than during training. The most important areas for preventive measures seem to be the ankle and the knee.

  13. Acute Diarrheal Syndromic Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Kam, H.J.; Choi, S.; Cho, J.P.; Min, Y.G.; Park, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In an effort to identify and characterize the environmental factors that affect the number of patients with acute diarrheal (AD) syndrome, we developed and tested two regional surveillance models including holiday and weather information in addition to visitor records, at emergency medical facilities in the Seoul metropolitan area of Korea. Methods With 1,328,686 emergency department visitor records from the National Emergency Department Information system (NEDIS) and the holiday and weather information, two seasonal ARIMA models were constructed: (1) The simple model (only with total patient number), (2) the environmental factor-added model. The stationary R-squared was utilized as an in-sample model goodness-of-fit statistic for the constructed models, and the cumulative mean of the Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) was used to measure post-sample forecast accuracy over the next 1 month. Results The (1,0,1)(0,1,1)7 ARIMA model resulted in an adequate model fit for the daily number of AD patient visits over 12 months for both cases. Among various features, the total number of patient visits was selected as a commonly influential independent variable. Additionally, for the environmental factor-added model, holidays and daily precipitation were selected as features that statistically significantly affected model fitting. Stationary R-squared values were changed in a range of 0.651-0.828 (simple), and 0.805-0.844 (environmental factor-added) with p<0.05. In terms of prediction, the MAPE values changed within 0.090-0.120 and 0.089-0.114, respectively. Conclusion The environmental factor-added model yielded better MAPE values. Holiday and weather information appear to be crucial for the construction of an accurate syndromic surveillance model for AD, in addition to the visitor and assessment records. PMID:23616829

  14. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  15. [Anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with acute motor sensory neuropathy resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case study].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takeo; Wakida, Kenji; Kimura, Akio; Inuzuka, Takashi; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man experienced general malaise, weight loss, amnesia, gait disturbance, and restlessness a month prior to admission. Brain MRI showed high intensity areas in the bilateral medial temporal lobes and insular cortices on FLAIR images, and therefore, he was diagnosed with limbic encephalitis. After admission, quadriplegia and respiratory failure progressed rapidly, and he needed ventilatory management. A nerve conduction study revealed low compound muscle action potential amplitude with loss of sensory nerve action potential, which indicated axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We administered intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, but he did not recover. Although no tumor was found on CT, his serum was positive for anti-Hu antibody; therefore, we diagnosed him with paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. An FDG-PET study showed accumulation at lesions on two hilar lymph nodes. Small cell lung carcinoma was detected by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Although paraneoplastic acute sensorimotor neuropathy with respiratory failure resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome is rare, identification of antibodies and servey of tumors aids accurate diagnosis.

  16. Pancreatic pseudocyst after acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Ken; Ito, Tetsuhide; Arita, Yoshiyuki; Sadamoto, Yojiro; Harada, Naohiko; Yamaguchi, Koji; Tanaka, Masao; Nakano, Itsuro; Nawata, Hajime; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2006-04-01

    Acute organophosphate poisoning (OP) shows several severe clinical symptoms due to its strong blocking effect on cholinesterase. Acute pancreatitis is one of the complications associated with acute OP, but this association still may not be widely recognized. We report here the case of a 73-year-old man who had repeated abdominal pain during and after the treatment of acute OP. Hyperamylasemia and a 7-cm pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail were noted on investigations. We diagnosed pancreatic pseudocyst that likely was secondary to an episode of acute pancreatitis following acute OP. He was initially treated with a long-term intravenous hyperalimentation, protease inhibitors and octerotide, but eventually required surgical intervention, a cystgastrostomy. Acute pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia are known to be possible complications of acute OP. It is necessary to examine and assess pancreatic damage in patients with acute OP.

  17. Acute pancreatitis: The stress factor

    PubMed Central

    Binker, Marcelo G; Cosen-Binker, Laura I

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas that may cause life-threatening complications. Etiologies of pancreatitis vary, with gallstones accounting for the majority of all cases, followed by alcohol. Other causes of pancreatitis include trauma, ischemia, mechanical obstruction, infections, autoimmune, hereditary, and drugs. The main events occurring in the pancreatic acinar cell that initiate and propagate acute pancreatitis include inhibition of secretion, intracellular activation of proteases, and generation of inflammatory mediators. Small cytokines known as chemokines are released from damaged pancreatic cells and attract inflammatory cells, whose systemic action ultimately determined the severity of the disease. Indeed, severe forms of pancreatitis may result in systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome, characterized by a progressive physiologic failure of several interdependent organ systems. Stress occurs when homeostasis is threatened, and stressors can include physical or mental forces, or combinations of both. Depending on the timing and duration, stress can result in beneficial or harmful consequences. While it is well established that a previous acute-short-term stress decreases the severity of experimentally-induced pancreatitis, the worsening effects of chronic stress on the exocrine pancreas have received relatively little attention. This review will focus on the influence of both prior acute-short-term and chronic stress in acute pancreatitis. PMID:24914340

  18. Acute liver failure due to acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wand, S; Waeschle, R M; Von Ahsen, N; Hawighorst, T; Bräuer, A; Quintel, M

    2012-04-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare but serious liver disease and typically occurs during the third trimester. It carries the risk for significant perinatal and maternal mortality. Therefore an early diagnosis and delivery, followed by close monitoring and optimized management of the impaired liver function with all associated problems are necessary to prevent maternal and foetal death. This case report focuses on the management of acute liver failure due to AFLP in a 31 year old women treated in our intensive care unit (ICU) after an emergency C-section.

  19. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  20. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-10-16

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients.

  1. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  2. Appendicular sarcoidosis mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Hunjan, Tia; Chaudery, Muzzafer; Zaidi, Ahsan; Beggs, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Appendicular sarcoidosis is a very rare cause of acute abdominal pain, with only seven cases reported previously in the literature. A 45-year-old woman, known to have sarcoidosis, presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of epigastric and right iliac fossa abdominal pain. At diagnostic laparoscopy, an acutely inflamed appendix was found and removed as well as an omental mass which was biopsied. Subsequent histopathological examination of the appendix demonstrated appendicular sarcoidosis without acute appendicitis and chronic inflammatory changes in the omental biopsy. The patients’ symptoms completely resolved postoperatively. It is important to undertake urgent operative intervention in patients with sarcoidosis who present with right iliac fossa pain, owing to the high risk of perforation. PMID:23162022

  3. [Microbiology in acute otitis media].

    PubMed

    Bingen, E

    1998-04-15

    Acute otitis media is the most common bacterial infection in the child under 5 years of age and the leading reason for antibiotic prescriptions in Western countries. The choice of optimal antibiotic treatment is based essentially on microbiologic epidemiologic studies. The bacteria most often responsible for otitis belong to the commensal flora of the nasopharynx. French studies using paracentesis show that the main bacteria responsible for acute otitis media are H. influenzae, S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis. The epidemiology of resistance to antibiotics has recently changed, with the ap