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Sample records for acute hyperglycemia worsens

  1. Acute hyperglycemia worsens ischemic stroke-induced brain damage via high mobility group box-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingyang; Liu, Baoyi; Yang, Chenghui; Chen, Haili; Eunice, Dzivor; Yuan, Zhongrui

    2013-10-16

    Hyperglycemia adversely affects the outcome of ischemic stroke. Extracellular HMGB1 plays a role in aggravating brain damage in the postischemic brain. The aim of this study was to determine whether the extracellular HMGB1 is involved in the worsened ischemic damage during hyperglycemic stroke. Male Wistar rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 min with reperfusion. Acute hyperglycemia was induced by an injection of 50% dextrose. Rats received glycyrrhizin, a specific HMGB1 inhibitor, or vehicle. HMGB-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and in brain parenchyma was detected at 2 or 4 h post-reperfusion. Neurological deficits, infarct volume and cerebral edema were assessed 24 h post-MCAO the disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the expression of tight junction protein Occludin were measured at 4 h post-reperfusion. Hyperglycemia enhanced the early release of HMGB1 from ischemic brain tissue, which was accompanied by increased infarct volume, neurological deficit, cerebral edema and BBB disruption. Glycyrrhizin alleviated the aggravation of infarct volume, neurological deficit, cerebral edema and BBB disruption by decreasing the degradation of tight junction protein Occludin in the ischemic hemisphere of hyperglycemic rats. In conclusion, enhanced early extracellular release of HMGB1 might represent an important mechanism for worsened ischemic damage, particularly early BBB disruption, during hyperglycemic stroke. An HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin is a potential therapeutic option for hyperglycemic stroke.

  2. Exogenous Glucose–Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Worsens Post prandial Hyperglycemia in T ype 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Chee W.; Carlson, Olga D.; Kim, Wook; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Charles, Cornelia P.; Kim, Hee Seung; Melvin, Denise L.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), unlike glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, lacks glucose-lowering properties in patients with type 2 diabetes. We designed this study to elucidate the underlying pathophysiology. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-two insulin-naïve subjects with type 2 diabetes were given either synthetic human GIP (20 ng · kg−1 · min−1) or placebo (normal saline) over 180 min, starting with the first bite of a mixed meal (plus 1 g of acetaminophen) on two separate occasions. Frequent blood samples were obtained over 6 h to determine plasma GIP, GLP-1, glucose, insulin, glucagon, resistin, and acetaminophen levels. RESULTS Compared with placebo, GIP induced an early postprandial increase in insulin levels. Intriguingly, GIP also induced an early postprandial augmentation in glucagon, a significant elevation in late postprandial glucose, and a decrease in late postprandial GLP-1 levels. Resistin and acetaminophen levels were comparable in both interventions. By immunocytochemistry, GIP receptors were present on human and mouse α-cells. In αTC1 cell line, GIP induced an increase in intracellular cAMP and glucagon secretion. CONCLUSIONS GIP, given to achieve supraphysiological plasma levels, still had an early, short-lived insulinotropic effect in type 2 diabetes. However, with a concomitant increase in glucagon, the glucose-lowering effect was lost. GIP infusion further worsened hyperglycemia postprandially, most likely through its suppressive effect on GLP-1. These findings make it unlikely that GIP or GIP receptor agonists will be useful in treating the hyperglycemia of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:19276444

  3. Acute Worsening of Tics on Varenicline.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Klassen, Bryan T; Hassan, Anhar; Bower, James H; Coon, Elizabeth A

    The aim of this study was to report worsening of Tourette syndrome (TS) in 2 patients treated with varenicline. Abnormal dopaminergic signaling is likely involved in the pathophysiology of TS. Varenicline is a partial α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine agonist that enhances dopamine release. Therefore, the use of varenicline may influence tics in patients with TS. We analyzed and described 2 case studies on patients with significant worsening of tics after treatment with varenicline. Patient 1 had motor tics in childhood, which completely resolved by the age of 20 years. At the age of 25 years, he started varenicline and stopped smoking. Within 2 weeks, he developed motor followed by vocal tics that persisted despite stopping varenicline and restarting smoking. The tics were complex, medically refractory, and caused severe disability at work and school (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score, 86). Patient 2 developed motor and vocal tics in adolescence that persisted into her 20s and caused significant disability in association with psychiatric comorbidities. At the age of 31 years, she started varenicline to quit smoking, which led to a marked increase in tic frequency and severity. Varenicline was discontinued after 3 weeks with improvement to baseline tic severity (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score, 94). Ultimately, both patients successfully underwent deep brain stimulation to bilateral centromedian/parafascicular complex thalamic nuclei for medically refractory TS. We report 2 patients with motor and/or vocal tics that had severe worsening of tics after varenicline use. This may be due to varenicline-induced increased striatal dopamine in conjunction with nicotine cessation, influencing dopamine receptor sensitivity in TS. Providers should be cautious in prescribing varenicline to patients with TS.

  4. Stereotypies as a manifestation of acute hyperglycemia without ketosis.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Ondo, William G

    2012-04-15

    Acute hyperglycemia without ketosis is recognized to induce movement disorders characterized by hemichorea, hemiballismus, or hemidystonia. A video-case of hyperkinetic movement disorder resembling stereotypies in the context of uncompensated hyperglycemia without ketosis is presented, expanding the clinical phenotype of this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1+/− mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1+/−/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression. PMID:27406855

  6. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-07-12

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer's disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1(+/-) mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1(+/-)/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression.

  7. Acute Hyperglycemia Associated with Anti-Cancer Medication

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Yul

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia during chemotherapy occurs in approximately 10% to 30% of patients. Glucocorticoids and L-asparaginase are well known to cause acute hyperglycemia during chemotherapy. Long-term hyperglycemia is also frequently observed, especially in patients with hematologic malignancies treated with L-asparaginase-based regimens and total body irradiation. Glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycemia often develops because of increased insulin resistance, diminished insulin secretion, and exaggerated hepatic glucose output. Screening strategies for this condition include random glucose testing, hemoglobin A1c testing, oral glucose loading, and fasting plasma glucose screens. The management of hyperglycemia starts with insulin or sulfonylurea, depending on the type, dose, and delivery of the glucocorticoid formulation. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are associated with a high incidence of hyperglycemia, ranging from 13% to 50%. Immunotherapy, such as anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) antibody treatment, induces hyperglycemia with a prevalence of 0.1%. The proposed mechanism of immunotherapy-induced hyperglycemia is an autoimmune process (insulitis). Withdrawal of the PD-1 inhibitor is the primary treatment for severe hyperglycemia. The efficacy of glucocorticoid therapy is not fully established and the decision to resume PD-1 inhibitor therapy depends on the severity of the hyperglycemia. Diabetic patients should achieve optimized glycemic control before initiating treatment, and glucose levels should be monitored periodically in patients initiating mTOR inhibitor or PD-1 inhibitor therapy. With regard to hyperglycemia caused by anti-cancer therapy, frequent monitoring and proper management are important for promoting the efficacy of anti-cancer therapy and improving patients' quality of life. PMID:28345313

  8. Hyperglycemia in acute heart failure: an opportunity to intervene?

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2014-09-01

    In patients with acute heart failure (AHF) syndromes, little data are so far available on the relation between glucose values and insulin resistance and mortality, both in the short and long term. The present review is aimed at summarizing available evidence on the prognostic role of hyperglycemia in acute heart failure syndromes. Despite the fact that glucose values are widely measured, inexpensive, and easy to interpret, hyperglycemia in AHF patients still appears to be (or at least to have been) a neglected factor. Scarce information is available on incidence of admission hyperglycemia (especially in nondiabetic AHF patients) and data on in-hospital and discharge glucose values are lacking. Overall, the scarcity of data and the unanswered questions conjure up the need for trials investigating the clinical and prognostic role of glucose abnormalities (hyperglycemia and acute insulin resistance) on admission and during hospital stay in AHF patients. Preliminary evidence suggests that hyperglycemia is an important prognostic factor in AHF; however, whether targeting hyperglycemia via an aggressive versus permissive glycemic management strategy influences AHF outcomes remains unknown.

  9. The Influence of Acute Hyperglycemia in an Animal Model of Lacunar Stroke That Is Induced by Artificial Particle Embolization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Jun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Yu-Min; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have revealed that hyperglycemia during ischemic stroke increases the stroke's severity and the infarct size in clinical and animal studies. However, no conclusive evidence demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia worsens post-stroke outcomes and increases infarct size in lacunar stroke. In this study, we developed a rat model of lacunar stroke that was induced via the injection of artificial embolic particles during full consciousness. We then used this model to compare the acute influence of hyperglycemia in lacunar stroke and diffuse infarction, by evaluating neurologic behavior and the rate, size, and location of the infarction. The time course of the neurologic deficits was clearly recorded from immediately after induction to 24 h post-stroke in both types of stroke. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic deficit in diffuse infarction at 24 h after stroke, and also aggravated the cerebral infarct. Furthermore, the infarct volumes of the basal ganglion, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum but not the cortex were positively correlated with serum glucose levels. In contrast, acute hyperglycemia reduced the infarct volume and neurologic symptoms in lacunar stroke within 4 min after stroke induction, and this effect persisted for up to 24 h post-stroke. In conclusion, acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic outcomes in diffuse infarction, although it significantly reduced the size of the cerebral infarct and improved the neurologic deficits in lacunar stroke.

  10. Hyperglycemia predicts poststroke infections in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Thomas P; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Westendorp, Willeke F; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik; Kruyt, Nyika D

    2017-04-11

    To investigate whether admission hyperglycemia predicts poststroke infections and, if so, whether poststroke infections modify the effect of admission hyperglycemia on functional outcome in ischemic stroke. We used data from acute ischemic stroke patients in the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), a multicenter randomized controlled trial (n = 2,550) investigating the effect of preventive antibiotics on functional outcome. Admission hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L and poststroke infection as any infection during admission judged by an expert adjudication committee. Functional outcome at 3 months was assessed with the modified Rankin Scale. Of 1,676 nondiabetic ischemic stroke patients, 338 (20%) had admission hyperglycemia. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, admission hyperglycemia was associated with poststroke infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.31, 95% CI 1.31-4.07), worse 3-month functional outcome (common aOR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.73), and 3-month mortality (aOR 2.11, 95% CI 1.40-3.19). Additional adjustment for poststroke infection in the functional outcome analysis, done to assess poststroke infection as an intermediate in the pathway from admission hyperglycemia to functional outcome, did not substantially change the model. In patients with recorded diabetes mellitus (n = 418), admission hyperglycemia was not associated with poststroke infection (aOR 0.49, 95% CI 0.15-1.58). In nondiabetic acute ischemic stroke patients, admission hyperglycemia is associated with poststroke infection and worse functional outcome. Poststroke infections did not modify the effect of admission hyperglycemia on functional outcome in ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  12. Refractive properties of the healthy human eye during acute hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Nanouk G M; Eekhoff, Elisabeth M W; Simsek, Suat; Heine, Robert J; Ringens, Peter J; Polak, Bettine C P; Dubbelman, Michiel

    2008-07-01

    To measure the refractive properties of the healthy human eye during acute hyperglycemia by means of Scheimpflug imaging and Hartmann-Shack aberrometry. Acute hyperglycemia was induced in five healthy subjects (two males, three females, mean age +/-SD 24.8 years +/- 4.6) by means of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after subcutaneous somatostatin injection. Before and every 30 minutes after the OGTT, measurements with Scheimpflug imaging and Hartmann-Shack aberrometry were performed. The main outcome measures were the thickness and shape of the lens, and the ocular refractive error and higher order aberrations. The equivalent refractive index of the lens was calculated from these parameters. Measurements at baseline and during hyperglycemia were analyzed by means of Wilcoxon signed rank sum tests. During hyperglycemia (mean blood glucose level at baseline: 4.0 mmol/l; mean maximal blood glucose level: 18.4 mmol/l) no changes could be found in the refractive properties within the group. In one subject, a hyperopic shift (0.4 D) was observed, together with a more convex shape of the anterior lens surface and a decrease in the equivalent refractive index of the lens. This study shows that hyperglycemia generally does not cause changes in the refractive properties of the healthy eye. Nevertheless, in one subject a hyperopic shift accompanied by a change in shape and refractive index of the lens was measured. This finding could provide an explanation for the mechanism underlying the refractive changes that are often observed during hyperglycemia.

  13. Stress hyperglycemia and acute ischemic stroke in-hospital outcome.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Dimitriou, Panagiotis; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Kostaki, Stavroula; Angelopoulou, Stella-Maria; Papadopoulou, Maria; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2017-02-01

    Stress hyperglycemia is frequent in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is unclear whether stress hyperglycemia only reflects stroke severity or if it is directly associated with adverse outcome. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of stress hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke. We prospectively studied 790 consecutive patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke (41.0% males, age 79.4±6.8years). The severity of stroke was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Stress hyperglycemia was defined as fasting serum glucose levels at the second day after admission ≥126mg/dl in patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The outcome was assessed with adverse outcome rates at discharge (modified Rankin scale between 2 and 6) and with in-hospital mortality. In the total study population, 8.6% had stress hyperglycemia. Patients with stress hyperglycemia had more severe stroke. Independent predictors of adverse outcome at discharge were age, prior ischemic stroke and NIHSS at admission whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of adverse outcome were age, heart rate at admission, prior ischemic stroke, log-triglyceride (TG) levels and stress hyperglycemia, whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were atrial fibrillation (AF), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum log-TG levels and NIHSS at admission. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were age, AF, DBP, log-TG levels and stress hyperglycemia. Stress hyperglycemia does not appear to be directly associated with the outcome of acute ischemic stroke. However, given that patients with stress hyperglycemia had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors than

  14. Hyperglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar or glucose. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose into your ... taking medicines correctly. Other problems that can raise blood sugar include infections, certain medicines, hormone imbalances, or ...

  15. Early care of acute hyperglycemia benefits the outcome of traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xin; Liu, Yuepeng; Yuan, Tao; Jiang, Na-Na; Dong, Yan-Bin; Wang, Jian-Wei; Fu, Guang-Hui; Liu, Yu-Liang; Wang, Wen-Xue

    2016-11-01

    Previous animal studies showed contradictory clinical observations on whether acute hyperglycemia contributes to poor outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we tried to clarify this issue. Striking with depths of 3.0-4.25mm at right occipitoparietal brain region and with depth of 3.75mm at right/left occipitoparietal or right/left frontoparietal brain region were performed, respectively. Blood glucose and insulin levels were traced every four hours from 1 to 72h after striking. HOMA2-%S and HOMA2-%β were calculated. Modified neurological severity scores (mNSS) were used to evaluate neurological deficit within 72h. Striking with depths of 3.5-4.25mm induced increase in blood glucose lasting up to 24h after striking. The levels of blood glucose after striking with depths of 3.75-4.25mm were significantly different from that of striking with the depth of 3.0mm. Striking with depth of 3.75mm at right/left occipitoparietal region induced higher blood glucose in 24h than that at right/left frontoparietal region. Insulin concentration increased slowly during 72h after striking. Striking also induced decrease in insulin sensitivity and secretion lasting 72h. Evaluation of mNSS revealed that severe striking (beyond 3.75mm) worsened nerve function than slight striking (<3.0mm). Intervention of acute hyperglycemia could decrease the mNSS from 2 to 7 days after TBI. Our results suggested that only severe TBI could induce acute hyperglycemia by itself, and early care of acute hyperglycemia could benefit the outcome of TBI patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic hyperglycemia is related to poor functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Luitse, Merel Ja; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kappelle, L Jaap; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2017-02-01

    Background Acute hyperglycemia is associated with poor functional outcome after ischemic stroke, but the association between chronic antecedent hyperglycemia and outcome is unclear. Aim We assessed the association between chronic hyperglycemia, measured by hemoglobin A1c, and functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We included 812 patients with acute ischemic stroke (mean age 66 ± 14 years; 61.5% male). Patients were categorized per hemoglobin A1c level: no (<39 mmol/mol), moderate (39-42 mmol/mol), or severe chronic hyperglycemia (>42 mmol/mol). Poor functional outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale score > 2 after 3 months. The relation between chronic hyperglycemia and functional outcome was assessed with a Poisson regression analysis and expressed as risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals with no chronic hyperglycemia as the reference. Results Moderate chronic hyperglycemia was present in 234 (28.8%) patients and severe chronic hyperglycemia in 183 (22.5%) patients. Acute hyperglycemia on admission was present in 338 (41.6%) patients. Severe chronic hyperglycemia was associated with poor outcome (risk ratios 1.40; 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.79). After adjustment for age, sex, stroke severity, vascular risk factors, and acute hyperglycemia on admission the risk ratios was 1.35 (95% confidence interval 1.04-1.76). Moderate chronic hyperglycemia was not associated with poor outcome (risk ratios 1.12; 95% confidence interval 0.87-1.44). Conclusion Severe chronic hyperglycemia is associated with poor functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This association is independent of hyperglycemia in the acute stage of stroke and of an unfavorable vascular risk factor profile.

  17. Acute neurological worsening after Rituximab treatment in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sala, Emilie; Robert-Varvat, Florence; Paul, Stéphane; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe; Antoine, Jean-Christophe

    2014-10-15

    Patients with peripheral neuropathy and anti-MAG monoclonal IgM may respond to Rituximab, a humanized monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody. We report on three patients with peripheral neuropathy and anti-MAG monoclonal IgM who deteriorated under Rituximab and reviewed seven previously published cases. Worsening was acute and severe, and occurred during the treatment period. All the patients improved after deterioration but at final evaluation only one was improved comparatively to baseline, five were worsened and four were stabilized. Deterioration was not clearly associated with an increase of the anti-MAG antibody titer. Two patients received Rituximab prior or after the course which induced worsening without adverse reaction. Although rare, acute worsening of the neuropathy can occur after Rituximab. The deterioration is however reversible within some weeks to several months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol during pregnancy worsens acute respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Libster, Romina; Ferolla, Fausto M; Hijano, Diego R; Acosta, Patricio L; Erviti, Anabella; Polack, Fernando P

    2015-11-01

    This study explored whether alcohol consumption during pregnancy increased the risk of life-threatening respiratory infections in children. We prospectively evaluated children under the age of two years admitted to hospitals in Buenos Aires, Argentina, with severe acute respiratory infections during the winters of 2011 and 2012. Information on maternal alcohol consumption during the third trimester of pregnancy was collected using standardised questionnaires and categorised as never, low if it was once a week and high if it was equal or more than once a week. Of the 3423 children hospitalised with acute respiratory infection, 2089 (63.7%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Alcohol consumption during the last trimester was reported by 398 mothers (12.4%) and categorised as low (n = 210, 6.5%) or high (n = 188, 5.9%). A greater effect on life-threatening respiratory infection, defined as oxygen saturation of or up to 87%, was observed with higher alcohol intake due to all viruses and specifically RSV in the logistic regression analyses. Alcohol consumption was strongly associated with life-threatening disease, particularly in boys whose adjusted odds ratio rose from 3.67 to 13.52 when their mothers drank alcohol. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy was associated with life-threatening respiratory infections in boys. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Acute hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in retinal arterioles in cats.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Kenji; Nagaoka, Taiji; Izumi, Naohiro; Nakabayashi, Seigo; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effects of acute hyperglycemia on retinal microcirculation and endothelial function in cats and removal of superoxide to prevent retinal endothelial dysfunction from hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of 25% glucose to maintain the plasma glucose concentration at 30 mM. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the vessel diameter (D) and blood velocity (V) simultaneously and calculated retinal blood flow (RBF) in second-order retinal arterioles in cats. Intravitreous, endothelial-dependent vasodilator bradykinin (BK) and endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were administered into the vitreous cavity to evaluate endothelial function in the retinal arterioles. To control osmolality, 25% mannitol was administered the same way. Systemic hyperoxia was induced to noninvasively examine endothelial function during hyperglycemia. To determine the effect of the superoxide on the hyperglycemia-induced changes in the retinal circulation, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) was administered in drinking water for 14 days before the experiment. The D, V, and RBF increased with acute hyperglycemia and mannitol compared with baseline. BK-induced increases in D, V, and RBF significantly declined, whereas SNP-induced increases were unattenuated during acute hyperglycemia. Return of the decreased RBF to baseline after cessation of systemic hyperoxia was significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited by acute hyperglycemia. TEMPOL significantly (P < 0.05) prevented a decrease in the BK-induced increase in RBF during hyperglycemia. The results suggest that acute hyperglycemia increases RBF via increased osmolality and may cause retinal endothelial dysfunction partially via increased oxidative stress. Systemic hyperoxia can be used to noninvasively evaluate retinal endothelial function during hyperglycemia.

  20. Acute Clinical Worsening after Steroid Administration in Cervical Myelitis May Reveal a Subdural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Rain, Silvia; Udding, Jan; Broere, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Subdural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare condition characterized by clinical manifestations ranging from mild bilateral sensory deficits to quadriplegia. The diagnosis is often delayed due to unspecific neurological symptoms, initially diagnosed as polyneuropathy or myelopathy. The diagnosis can be delayed for as long as 1–15 years. The following report describes a cervical SDAVF case initially misdiagnosed as myelitis transversa and treated with intravenous steroids. A 56-year-old male presented with sensory deficits and mild leg and right arm weakness. Cervical MRI showed a central medullary hyperintense lesion with contrast enhancement. After metabolic, infectious, and malignant causes were excluded, myelitis transversa was presumed and the patient was treated intravenously with methylprednisolone. Shortly after that, he developed quadriplegia. Cervical MRI imaging showed engorged cervical perimedullary vessels, which were not visible on the initial MRI. The diagnosis was revised and a SDAVF identified. Prompt surgical treatment led to a complete recovery. The effect of intravenous steroids in SDAVF is controversial. Acute clinical worsening after steroid administration is previously reported in several publications; however, due to the paucity of clinical studies on SDAVF, this effect remains mostly overlooked or unknown. The findings in this patient support the causative relation between SDAVF clinical worsening and steroid administration. We propose that acute clinical worsening under steroids in patients initially diagnosed with myelitis should raise suspicion of an SDAVF. PMID:27920716

  1. Acute Clinical Worsening after Steroid Administration in Cervical Myelitis May Reveal a Subdural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Rain, Silvia; Udding, Jan; Broere, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Subdural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare condition characterized by clinical manifestations ranging from mild bilateral sensory deficits to quadriplegia. The diagnosis is often delayed due to unspecific neurological symptoms, initially diagnosed as polyneuropathy or myelopathy. The diagnosis can be delayed for as long as 1-15 years. The following report describes a cervical SDAVF case initially misdiagnosed as myelitis transversa and treated with intravenous steroids. A 56-year-old male presented with sensory deficits and mild leg and right arm weakness. Cervical MRI showed a central medullary hyperintense lesion with contrast enhancement. After metabolic, infectious, and malignant causes were excluded, myelitis transversa was presumed and the patient was treated intravenously with methylprednisolone. Shortly after that, he developed quadriplegia. Cervical MRI imaging showed engorged cervical perimedullary vessels, which were not visible on the initial MRI. The diagnosis was revised and a SDAVF identified. Prompt surgical treatment led to a complete recovery. The effect of intravenous steroids in SDAVF is controversial. Acute clinical worsening after steroid administration is previously reported in several publications; however, due to the paucity of clinical studies on SDAVF, this effect remains mostly overlooked or unknown. The findings in this patient support the causative relation between SDAVF clinical worsening and steroid administration. We propose that acute clinical worsening under steroids in patients initially diagnosed with myelitis should raise suspicion of an SDAVF.

  2. Effects of acute hyperglycemia on myocardial glycolytic activity in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Wisneski, J A; Stanley, W C; Neese, R A; Gertz, E W

    1990-01-01

    The effects of hyperglycemia on myocardial glucose metabolism were investigated in seven healthy male subjects (age 24 +/- 4 yr). [6-14C]Glucose and [U-13C]lactate were infused as tracers. Circulating glucose was elevated to two hyperglycemic levels using a clamp technique for 1 h at each level. The mean arterial glucose concentration was 4.95 +/- 0.29 (control), 8.33 +/- 0.31 and 10.84 +/- 0.60 mumols/ml, respectively. Glucose extraction increased significantly from control (0.15 +/- 0.13 mumols/ml) during each level of the glucose clamp (0.28 +/- 0.12, P less than 0.02, and 0.54 +/- 0.14 mumols/ml, P less than 0.005, respectively). Myocardial production of 14CO2 showed that during control 9 +/- 10% of exogenous glucose was oxidized immediately upon extraction. Despite a significant increase in the amount of exogenous glucose oxidized with level II hyperglycemia, it represented only 32 +/- 10% of the glucose extracted. [13C]Lactate analysis showed that the myocardium was releasing lactate; during control 40 +/- 30% of this lactate was derived from exogenous glucose and during hyperglycemia this value increased to 97 +/- 37% (P less than 0.005). Thus, these data show that during short-term hyperglycemia, myocardial glucose extraction is enhanced. However, despite increases in exogenous glucose oxidation and the contribution of exogenous glucose to lactate release, the majority of the extracted glucose (i.e., 57%) is probably stored as glycogen. PMID:2185277

  3. Patients With Fibrotic Interstitial Lung Disease Hospitalized for Acute Respiratory Worsening: A Large Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moua, Teng; Westerly, Blair D; Dulohery, Megan M; Daniels, Craig E; Ryu, Jay H; Lim, Kaiser G

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory worsening (ARW) requiring hospitalization in patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease (f-ILD) is common. Little is known about the frequency and implications of ARW in IPF and non-IPF ILD patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation (AE) vs known causes of ARW. All consecutive patients with f-ILD hospitalized with ARW at our institution from 2000 to 2014 were reviewed. ARW was defined as any worsening of respiratory symptoms with new or worsened hypoxemia or hypercapnia within 30 days of admission. Suspected AE was defined using modified 2007 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria. Known causes of ARW were reviewed and collated along with in-hospital and all-cause mortality postdischarge. A total of 220 patients (100 with IPF and 120 non-IPF) composed 311 admissions for ARW. Suspected AE (SAE) comprised 52% of ARW admissions, followed by infection (20%), and subacute progression of disease (15%). In-hospital mortality was similar in patients with IPF vs patients without (55 vs 45%, P = .18), but worse in suspected AE admission types (OR, 3.1 [1.9-5.14]). One-year survival after last ARW admission for the whole cohort was 22%, despite only 27% of patients presenting with baseline oxygen requirement at admission and a mean admission Charlson Comorbidity Index score of 5.4 (expected 1-year survival, 89%). Survival after discharge was similar between SAE and secondary ARW admission types in both IPF and non-IPF patients. Among patients with f-ILD, hospitalization for ARW appears associated with significant in-hospital and postdischarge mortality regardless of underlying fibrotic lung disease or non-AE cause of acute respiratory decline. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute hyperglycemia associated with short-term use of atypical antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Liao, T Vivian; Phan, Stephanie V

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of metabolic disturbances associated with long-term use of antipsychotic medications has been widely reported in the literature. The use of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) has gained popularity due to a lower potential for adverse effects compared with conventional antipsychotics. However, current studies evaluating safety and efficacy of antipsychotics in the ICU setting do not include metabolic parameters as a potential adverse effect that requires monitoring. It is thought that long-term adverse effects of antipsychotics may be out of context for the intensive care setting. A literature review was conducted to investigate the prevalence of acute hyperglycemia associated with short-term use of antipsychotics, with the purpose of reviewing evidence that hyperglycemia may occur even with short-term use of atypical antipsychotics. A MEDLINE search for acute hyperglycemia from short-term use of antipsychotics resulted in studies involving animal models and healthy volunteers. These studies indicate that acute hyperglycemia may occur after short-term treatment. A review of the literature shows preliminary evidence to suggest that atypical antipsychotics impact glucose sensitivity and induce insulin resistance even after a single dose. Although no studies have been conducted evaluating the impact of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients from the short-term use of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of delirium, the potential to affect clinical outcomes exist and warrants further research in this area.

  5. Intravenous tPA Therapy Does Not Worsen Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foerch, Christian; Rosidi, Nathanael L.; Schlunk, Frieder; Lauer, Arne; Cianchetti, Flor A.; Mandeville, Emiri; Arai, Ken; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Fan, Xiang; Wang, Xiaoying; van Leyen, Klaus; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Schaffer, Chris B.; Lo, Eng H.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only FDA-approved treatment for reperfusing ischemic strokes. But widespread use of tPA is still limited by fears of inadvertently administering tPA in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Surprisingly, however, the assumption that tPA will worsen ICH has never been biologically tested. Here, we assessed the effects of tPA in two models of ICH. In a mouse model of collagenase-induced ICH, hemorrhage volumes and neurological deficits after 24 hrs were similar in saline controls and tPA-treated mice, whereas heparin-treated mice had 3-fold larger hematomas. In a model of laser-induced vessel rupture, tPA also did not worsen hemorrhage volumes, while heparin did. tPA is known to worsen neurovascular injury by amplifying matrix metalloproteinases during cerebral ischemia. In contrast, tPA did not upregulate matrix metalloproteinases in our mouse ICH models. In summary, our experimental data do not support the assumption that intravenous tPA has a deleterious effect in acute ICH. However, due to potential species differences and the inability of models to fully capture the dynamics of human ICH, caution is warranted when considering the implications of these findings for human therapy. PMID:23408937

  6. Intravenous tPA therapy does not worsen acute intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Foerch, Christian; Rosidi, Nathanael L; Schlunk, Frieder; Lauer, Arne; Cianchetti, Flor A; Mandeville, Emiri; Arai, Ken; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Fan, Xiang; Wang, Xiaoying; van Leyen, Klaus; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Schaffer, Chris B; Lo, Eng H

    2013-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only FDA-approved treatment for reperfusing ischemic strokes. But widespread use of tPA is still limited by fears of inadvertently administering tPA in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Surprisingly, however, the assumption that tPA will worsen ICH has never been biologically tested. Here, we assessed the effects of tPA in two models of ICH. In a mouse model of collagenase-induced ICH, hemorrhage volumes and neurological deficits after 24 hrs were similar in saline controls and tPA-treated mice, whereas heparin-treated mice had 3-fold larger hematomas. In a model of laser-induced vessel rupture, tPA also did not worsen hemorrhage volumes, while heparin did. tPA is known to worsen neurovascular injury by amplifying matrix metalloproteinases during cerebral ischemia. In contrast, tPA did not upregulate matrix metalloproteinases in our mouse ICH models. In summary, our experimental data do not support the assumption that intravenous tPA has a deleterious effect in acute ICH. However, due to potential species differences and the inability of models to fully capture the dynamics of human ICH, caution is warranted when considering the implications of these findings for human therapy.

  7. Hyperglycemia during induction therapy is associated with increased infectious complications in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at high risk for developing hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemic adult ALL patients have shorter remissions, more infections, and increased mortality. No corresponding data are available in children. We hypothesized that children with ALL who become hypergl...

  8. IL-34 mediates acute kidney injury and worsens subsequent chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jea-Hyun; Zeng, Rui; Weinmann-Menke, Julia; Valerius, M Todd; Wada, Yukihiro; Ajay, Amrendra K; Colonna, Marco; Kelley, Vicki R

    2015-08-03

    Macrophages (Mø) are integral in ischemia/reperfusion injury-incited (I/R-incited) acute kidney injury (AKI) that leads to fibrosis and chronic kidney disease (CKD). IL-34 and CSF-1 share a receptor (c-FMS), and both cytokines mediate Mø survival and proliferation but also have distinct features. CSF-1 is central to kidney repair and destruction. We tested the hypothesis that IL-34-dependent, Mø-mediated mechanisms promote persistent ischemia-incited AKI that worsens subsequent CKD. In renal I/R, the time-related magnitude of Mø-mediated AKI and subsequent CKD were markedly reduced in IL-34-deficient mice compared with controls. IL-34, c-FMS, and a second IL-34 receptor, protein-tyrosine phosphatase ζ (PTP-ζ) were upregulated in the kidney after I/R. IL-34 was generated by tubular epithelial cells (TECs) and promoted Mø-mediated TEC destruction during AKI that worsened subsequent CKD via 2 distinct mechanisms: enhanced intrarenal Mø proliferation and elevated BM myeloid cell proliferation, which increases circulating monocytes that are drawn into the kidney by chemokines. CSF-1 expression in TECs did not compensate for IL-34 deficiency. In patients, kidney transplants subject to I/R expressed IL-34, c-FMS, and PTP-ζ in TECs during AKI that increased with advancing injury. Moreover, IL-34 expression increased, along with more enduring ischemia in donor kidneys. In conclusion, IL-34-dependent, Mø-mediated, CSF-1 nonredundant mechanisms promote persistent ischemia-incited AKI that worsens subsequent CKD.

  9. Hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke: Is it time to re-evaluate our understanding?

    PubMed

    Reshi, Rwoof; Streib, Chris; Ezzeddine, Mustapha; Biros, Michelle; Miller, Benjamin; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Anderson, David; Ardelt, Agnieszka

    2017-09-01

    Among 700,000 new and recurrent ischemic stroke patients per year, forty percent are hyperglycemic on admission. In-vitro, hyperglycemia is toxic to neurons. Acute ischemic stroke patients who are hyperglycemic on admission experience higher morbidity and mortality. Results of multiple trials have provided no evidence supporting benefit in achieving normoglycemia. On the contrary, there is some evidence that tight glycemic control in acute brain injury is associated with poor outcome. Current consensus derived guidelines from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommend an upper limit of blood glucose of 140-180mg/dl, as there is no evidence to support strict control. The lack of improved outcomes with normoglycemia in this population dictates reconsideration of assumptions regarding the underlying pathophysiology of hyperglycemia. Review of the current data suggests there are two distinct pathophysiologic entities of hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke patients: diabetic and non-diabetic. We propose that the lack of positive results from well-designed intention-to-treat trials in hyperglycemic acute ischemic stroke patients could be attributed to treating these distinct groups as one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transient and persistent worsening renal function during hospitalization for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Greiner, Melissa A; Sharma, Puza P; DeVore, Adam D; Johnson, Katherine Waltman; Fonarow, Gregg C; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2014-12-01

    Transient and persistent worsening renal function (WRF) may be associated with different risks during hospitalization for acute heart failure. We compared outcomes of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure with transient, persistent, or no WRF. We identified patients 65 years or older hospitalized with acute heart failure from a clinical registry linked to Medicare claims data. We defined WRF as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥ 0.3 mg/dL after admission. We further classified patients with WRF by the difference between admission and last recorded serum creatinine levels into transient WRF (< 0.3 mg/dL) or persistent WRF (≥ 0.3 mg/dL). We examined unadjusted rates and adjusted associations between 90-day outcomes and WRF status. Among 27,309 patients, 18,568 (68.0%) had no WRF, 3,205 (11.7%) had transient WRF, and 5,536 (20.3%) had persistent WRF. Patients with WRF had higher observed rates of 90-day postdischarge all-cause readmission and 90-day postadmission mortality (P < .001). After multivariable adjustment, transient WRF (hazard ratio [HR] 1.19, 99% CI 1.05-1.35) and persistent WRF (HR 1.73, 99% CI 1.57-1.91) were associated with higher risks of 90-day postadmission mortality (P < .001 for both). Compared with transient WRF, persistent WRF was associated with a higher risk of 90-day postadmission mortality (HR 1.46, 99% CI 1.28-1.66, P < .001). Transient and persistent WRF during hospitalization for acute heart failure were associated with higher adjusted risks for 90-day all-cause postadmission mortality. Patients with persistent WRF had worse outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence on prognosis and prevalence of stress hyperglycemia in a cohort of patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Modenesi, Renata de Faria; Pena, Felipe Montes; de Faria, Carlos Augusto Cardoso; Carvalho, Ricardo Viana; de Souza, Nelson Robson Mendes; Soares, Jamil da Silva; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco

    2012-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the prevalence of stress hyperglycemia in a cohort of patients with acute coronary syndrome and to determine the correlation of stress hyperglycemia with death, heart failure and/or left ventricular systolic dysfunction during the intrahospital phase. Methods A prospective initial cohort study of hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndrome with or without ST segment elevation. The groups were compared to demonstrate the correlation between stress hyperglycemia and cardiovascular events. The chi-square test or Fisher's exact test and student's t-test were used to compare the groups with and without stress hyperglycemia. The variables with p<0.20 in the univariate analysis were submitted to logistic regression. Results In total, 363 patients with an average age of 12.45 ± 62.06 were studied. There was a predominance of males (64.2%). In total, 96 patients (26.4%) presented with stress hyperglycemia. There were no differences between the groups with or without stress hyperglycemia. The area under the ROC curve was 0.67 for the relationship between stress hyperglycemia and the composite outcome heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction or death at the end of the hospital admission. The ROC curve proved that stress hyperglycemia was the predictor of the composite outcome (death, heart failure and/or ventricular dysfunction). The multivariate analysis did not indicate age, stress hyperglycemia or admission heart rate as risk factors. Conclusion Stress hyperglycemia was common in the studied sample. In the univariate analysis, the presence of stress hyperglycemia was associated with such events as death, heart failure and/or intrahospital ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute coronary syndrome. PMID:23917932

  12. Safety and efficacy of metformin for therapy-induced hyperglycemia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Bruce; Uppal, Priya; Chu, Julie; Messinger, Yoav; Gandrud, Laura; McEvoy, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Hyperglycemia during corticosteroid and asparaginase therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a significant side effect that is usually treated with insulin. Metformin is an oral antidiabetic biguanide that may cause metabolic acidosis and liver enzyme abnormalities of possible concern in patients receiving chemotherapy. We reviewed patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with corticosteroids and asparaginase who received metformin for control of hyperglycemia. Seventeen patients received metformin, including 4 who received insulin before starting metformin therapy. Twelve were treated during initial induction therapy and 5 during relapse reinduction. Corticosteroids included dexamethasone in 11, prednisone in 5, and megesterol in 1. Fifteen received pegasparaginase.Patients were treated with metformin for a median of 6 days (range, 2 to 46 d). Metformin was started at a median glucose level of 286 mg/dL (range, 112 to 499 mg/mL). The glucose level was controlled with metformin alone in 12 patients without the need for insulin. Four patients received insulin before or concomitantly with metformin. In 1 patient, metformin failed to control the glucose level, and insulin was administered.No significant toxicity from metformin was seen. Two patients had an elevated anion gap and creatinine level because of extreme hyperglycemia. One patient had mild elevation in total bilirubin and 5 patients had mild elevation in serum alanine aminotransferase levels. There were no episodes of hypoglycemia. Metformin is safe and effective for therapy-induced hyperglycemia. Initially, insulin may be required for significant hyperglycemia or metabolic abnormalities. We are unaware of any prior studies using metformin in this population.

  13. Assessment of acute moderate hyperglycemia on traditional and thromboelastometry coagulation parameters in healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kate F; Lascola, Kara M; Smith, Stephanie A; Clark-Price, Stuart C; McMichael, Maureen; Wilkins, Pamela A

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether experimentally induced acute moderate hyperglycemia is associated with coagulation activation in healthy adult horses. Prospective experimental study. University veterinary teaching hospital. Six healthy adult horses. Hyperglycemia (10.0-13.3 mmol/L [180-240 mg/dL]) was induced and maintained for 6 hours using a hyperglycemic clamp technique. Blood glucose concentrations were assessed using a point of care (POC) glucometer at 10- and 20-minute intervals throughout the hyperglycemic clamp procedure. Platelet count, fibrinogen concentration, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin antithrombin complex level (TAT), and thromboelastometry (TEM) were determined before and after jugular catheter placement, prior to glucose administration, and at 3 and 6 hours of sustained hyperglycemia. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance with significance defined as P < 0.05. All horses maintained blood glucose concentration >10.0 mmol/L (>180 mg/dL) throughout the duration of the hyperglycemic clamp with a mean concentration of 11.9 ± 0.3 mmol/L [216 ± 6 mg/dL] as measured by the POC glucometer. No significant difference was found for any evaluated parameter associated with sustained hyperglycemia. Intravenous catheter placement resulted in a significant increase in mean TAT (0.8 ± 0.3 μg/L pre-catheter, 2.3 ± 0.8 μg/L post-catheter; P = 0.008). Acute, moderate hyperglycemia in healthy adult horses does not have a detectable effect on coagulation based on evaluated parameters. Jugular catheter placement results in a transient increase in thrombin generation as determined by increased TAT concentrations. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  14. Effect and clinical prediction of worsening renal function in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Breidthardt, Tobias; Socrates, Thenral; Noveanu, Markus; Klima, Theresia; Heinisch, Corinna; Reichlin, Tobias; Potocki, Mihael; Nowak, Albina; Tschung, Christopher; Arenja, Nisha; Bingisser, Roland; Mueller, Christian

    2011-03-01

    We aimed to establish the prevalence and effect of worsening renal function (WRF) on survival among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Furthermore, we sought to establish a risk score for the prediction of WRF and externally validate the previously established Forman risk score. A total of 657 consecutive patients with acute decompensated heart failure presenting to the emergency department and undergoing serial creatinine measurements were enrolled. The potential of the clinical parameters at admission to predict WRF was assessed as the primary end point. The secondary end point was all-cause mortality at 360 days. Of the 657 patients, 136 (21%) developed WRF, and 220 patients had died during the first year. WRF was more common in the nonsurvivors (30% vs 41%, p = 0.03). Multivariate regression analysis found WRF to independently predict mortality (hazard ratio 1.92, p <0.01). In a single parameter model, previously diagnosed chronic kidney disease was the only independent predictor of WRF and achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.60. After the inclusion of the blood gas analysis parameters into the model history of chronic kidney disease (hazard ratio 2.13, p = 0.03), outpatient diuretics (hazard ratio 5.75, p <0.01), and bicarbonate (hazard ratio 0.91, p <0.01) were all predictive of WRF. A risk score was developed using these predictors. On receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the Forman and Basel prediction rules achieved an area under the curve of 0.65 and 0.71, respectively. In conclusion, WRF was common in patients with acute decompensated heart failure and was linked to significantly worse outcomes. However, the clinical parameters failed to adequately predict its occurrence, making a tailored therapy approach impossible.

  15. Association of statin use and stress-induced hyperglycemia in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chen; Qin, Ma; Juan, Yang S; Tao, Li Y; dong, Gao M; Zechun, Zeng; Chun, Yang X; Liang, Cong H; Yin, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background Only a few information is available on the risk of stress hyperglycemia following acute myocardial infarction after statin use. We investigate the association of stress-induced hyperglycemia following statin use in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods An observational analysis of 476 consecutive patients who suffered acute myocardial infarction was carried out. All selected patients were divided into diabetes mellitus and non-diabetes based on the presence or absence of diabetes. The cardiac incidence of in-hospital and stress-induced hyperglycemia was recorded. Results Among patients with stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetes mellitus subgroups, the average fasting plasma glucose values in statin users were higher than in non-statin users (P < 0.05). But in diabetes mellitus subgroups, the average fasting plasma glucose did not have a significant difference between statin users and non-statin users (P > 0.05). In non-diabetes mellitus patients, the incidence of stress hyperglycemia with statin therapy was significantly higher than with non-statin therapy (P = 0.003). But in diabetes mellitus patients group, there is no significant difference in incidence of stress hyperglycemia between patients with statin therapy and patients without statin therapy (P = 0.902).The incidence of heart failure and in-hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in patients with stress-induced hyperglycemia was significantly higher than in non-hyperglycemia patients (P < 0.05). Conclusion Statins are related to higher stress hyperglycemia and cardiac incidences after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27158481

  16. Risk Factors for Worsening of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients Admitted with Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhouxiang; Xu, Lubai; Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Dinghua

    2017-02-26

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for developing more severe pancreatitis, including moderately severe (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), in patients admitted with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP). MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients admitted with MAP to our hospital from March 2013 to May 2016 were included and prospectively evaluated. Possible risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP were age, blood glucose level on admission, etiology, sex, Ranson score, amylase level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, serum calcium level, visceral fat area (VFA), body mass index (BMI), whether this was the first episode of AP, and method of administration of octreotide. The effects of variables for developing MSAP or SAP were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality, hospital duration, and rate of ICU transfer of patients were compared between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and patients who did not. RESULTS A total of 602 patients admitted with MAP were recruited into this study (256 men and 346 women). Seventy-four patients (12.3%) developed MSAP or SAP. According to univariate logistic regression analyses, the results indicated that there were 5 significant differences between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and those who did not: VFA (>100 cm²) (p=0.003), BMI (≥25 kg/m²) (p=0.001), Ranson score(p=0.004), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.040). Further multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BMI (≥25 kg/m²) (p=0.005), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.004) were independent risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP. Moreover, patients who developed MSAP or SAP had a mortality rate of 5.4%. CONCLUSIONS Significant risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted

  17. Risk Factors for Worsening of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients Admitted with Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhouxiang; Xu, Lubai; Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Dinghua

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for developing more severe pancreatitis, including moderately severe (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), in patients admitted with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP). Material/Methods Patients admitted with MAP to our hospital from March 2013 to May 2016 were included and prospectively evaluated. Possible risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP were age, blood glucose level on admission, etiology, sex, Ranson score, amylase level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, serum calcium level, visceral fat area (VFA), body mass index (BMI), whether this was the first episode of AP, and method of administration of octreotide. The effects of variables for developing MSAP or SAP were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality, hospital duration, and rate of ICU transfer of patients were compared between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and patients who did not. Results A total of 602 patients admitted with MAP were recruited into this study (256 men and 346 women). Seventy-four patients (12.3%) developed MSAP or SAP. According to univariate logistic regression analyses, the results indicated that there were 5 significant differences between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and those who did not: VFA (>100 cm2) (p=0.003), BMI (≥25 kg/m2) (p=0.001), Ranson score(p=0.004), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.040). Further multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BMI (≥25 kg/m2) (p=0.005), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.004) were independent risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP. Moreover, patients who developed MSAP or SAP had a mortality rate of 5.4%. Conclusions Significant risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP

  18. Fluid loss, venous congestion, and worsening renal function in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Doron; Abassi, Zaid; Allon, Eyal; Burger, Andrew J

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between decongestion, central venous pressure, and risk of worsening renal function (WRF) in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We studied 475 patients with ADHF, of whom 238 underwent right heart catheterization. Right atrial pressure (RAP) was measured at baseline and at 24 h. Net fluid loss was recorded in the first 24 h. WRF was defined as a >0.3 mg/dL increase in serum creatinine above baseline. WRF occurred in 84 catheterized patients (35.3%). There was a weak correlation between baseline RAP and baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.17, P = 0.009). The amount of fluid removed during the first 24 h did not correlate with the magnitude of RAP reduction (r = 0.06, P = 0.35). No association was observed between WRF and baseline RAP [odds ratio (OR) 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-1.41, P = 0.68 per 6.6 mmHg] or the decrease in RAP (adjusted OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.85-1.49, P = 0.40 per 5.3 mmHg reduction in RAP). In contrast, smaller net fluid loss was strongly associated with increased WRF risk. Compared with the first net fluid loss tertile, the adjusted OR was 1.85 (95% CI 0.90-3.80, P = 0.10) and 2.58 (95% CI 1.27-5.25; P = 0.009) for the second and third tertile, respectively (P for trend <0.0001). Smaller early net fluid loss is associated with increased risk for WRF. RAP is not a reliable surrogate of the magnitude of decongestion and risk of WRF. Future research is necessary to determine if targeting congestion may help prevent WRF.

  19. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on erythrocyte membrane ion transport in offspring of hypertensive parents.

    PubMed

    Suchánková, Gabriela; Vlasáková, Zuzana; Zicha, Josef; Vokurková, Martina; Dobesová, Zdena; Pelikánová, Terezie

    2003-07-01

    Patients with essential hypertension exhibit several red blood cell (RBC) ion transport abnormalities, insulin resistance (IR) and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The aims of this study were to assess RBC ion transport activities under basal conditions and to test the in vivo effect of acute hyperglycemia on RBC ion transport in the offspring of hypertensive parents (OHP) and healthy controls (C). Activities of Na+-K+ pump, Na+-K+ cotransport, Na+-Li+ countertransport (SLC) and Na+, Rb+ and Li+ leaks were measured before and after a 5-h hyperglycemic (12 mmol/l) clamp (HGC) and compared to values found under euglycemic isovolumic conditions in OHP (n = 12) and C (n = 14). Insulin action was calculated as insulin sensitivity index (M/I) during HGC. The offspring of hypertensive parents were characterized by lower M/I (0.07 +/- 0.03 versus 0.12 +/- 0.07 mg/kg per min per microU per ml; P < 0.05) and elevated SLC (0.080 +/- 0.004 versus 0.068 +/- 0.003 mmol/h per litre; P < 0.05), as well as by higher Li+ (0.106 +/- 0.004 versus 0.093 +/- 0.003 mmol/h per litre; P < 0.05) and Rb+ leaks (0.160 +/- 0.014 versus 0.120 +/- 0.007 mmol/h per litre; P < 0.05) compared to controls. Acute hyperglycemia did not cause significant changes in any investigated RBC ion transport parameters. The offspring of hypertensive parents displayed higher insulin resistance, enhanced activity of SLC and formerly undocumented augmented Li+ and Rb+ leaks. Acute hyperglycemia did not modify any RBC ion transport activities in either offspring of hypertensive parents or controls.

  20. The Effect of Acute Hyperglycemia on Muscular Strength, Power and Endurance.

    PubMed

    Lime-Ma, Franklin; Cotter, Joshua A; Schick, Evan E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the impact of acute hyperglycemia on skeletal muscle strength, power, and endurance. Ten male collegiate athletes (age 21.5 ± 1.5 years, height 186 ± 2.03 cm, body mass 108.8 ± 7.6 kg) participated in 2 testing sessions, separated by 7 days and randomized for either high glucose (HG) or control (C) treatment conditions. HG consumed a high glucose drink (2 g glucose/kg body weight) while controls consumed an isocaloric nutrition bar (40% protein, 30% fat, and 30% carbohydrate). Blood glucose (BC) levels for HG and C were tested at 0 (basal) and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes (mins) post consumption. At 30 mins post consumption, HG and C muscular strength was assessed by a 1RM bench press (BP) test followed by lower body power at 60 mins via vertical jump test. Muscular endurance was examined with a 3-set-to-failure BP test at 90 mins. HG exhibited significantly greater BC values (p<0.05) at the 30, 60, 90, and 120 minute time points. HG glucose area under the curve was significantly greater (p<0.05) than C and was positively correlated with %body fat, a finding that trended towards significance, r = 0.587, n= 10, p = 0.074. There were no between group differences in maximal strength, power or muscular endurance. Although performance measures were unaffected by acute hyperglycemia, acute hyperglycemia can be induced and maintained in healthy, active and young subjects. Despite regular physical activity, excess body fat negatively impacts glucose metabolism.

  1. Pituitary apoplexy associated with cortisol-induced hyperglycemia and acute delirium.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yi-Ming; Chang, Meng-Wei; Weng, Chia-Sui

    2008-11-01

    Pituitary apoplexy indicates pituitary adenoma hemorrhage, which could result in acute pituitary insufficiency and mortality. The typical symptoms are headache, visual disturbance, nausea, vomiting, altered mental status, and panhypopituitarism. However, cortisol-induced hyperglycemia and acute delirium could be an initial presentation of a pituitary adenoma hemorrhage with stormy release of the adrenocorticotrophic hormone. A 28-year-old woman presented with severe vomiting, irritable state, and delusion. She had medical history of irregular menstrual cycles and marked body weight gain after her second childbirth 8 years ago. She was diagnosed of diabetic ketoacidosis 2 days before this visiting at local medical department. On physical examination, Cushing appearance without definite neurological deficit was disclosed. Further blood tests revealed high blood sugar, cortisol, and adrenocorticotrophic hormone levels without evidence of diabetic ketoacidosis. The brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed pituitary macroadenoma and pituitary hemorrhage. Cushing disease with pituitary apoplexy was then diagnosed. Conservative management with delayed neurosurgery was applied. The patient became clear with normalized cortisol and blood sugar levels soon after. Follow-up computed tomography scan of the brain revealed no progression of tumor bleeding or mass effect. To our knowledge, pituitary apoplexy associated with cortisol-induced hyperglycemia and acute delirium has never been reported before. This case reminds us of pituitary apoplexy and its rare manifestations.

  2. Fuzzy linguistic prediction model for sinoatrial node field potential analysis in acute hyperglycemia environment.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Cao, Hui; Wang, Yanxia; Zhang, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to build a fuzzy linguistic prediction model (FLPM) for analyzing the actuation duration of acute hyperglycemia to sinoatrial node field potential. The field potential was recorded using microelectrode arrays (MEA). The experimental data were analyzed using partial least squares (PLS), support vector machine (SVM), back propagation neural network (BPNN) and the proposed method. The experimental results showed that the fuzzy linguistic prediction model could be adopted for predicting the actuation duration of high glucose to the sinoatrial node field potential. Compared with the other aforementioned models, the proposed model had higher prediction accuracy.

  3. Impact of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on in-hospital outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Masashi; Ishihara, Masaharu; Honda, Satoshi; Kawakami, Shoji; Yamane, Takafumi; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Kumasaka, Leon; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Tahara, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Michio; Noguchi, Teruo; Kusano, Kengo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Goto, Yoichi; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-15

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute hyperglycemia (acute-HG) and chronic hyperglycemia (chronic-HG) on short-term outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study consisted of 696 patients with AMI. Acute-HG was defined as admission plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl and chronic-HG as hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%. Acute-HG was associated with higher peak serum creatine kinase (4,094 ± 4,594 vs 2,526 ± 2,227 IU/L, p <0.001) and in-hospital mortality (9.8% vs 1.6%, p <0.001). On the contrary, there was no significant difference in peak creatine kinase (2,803 ± 2,661 vs 2,940 ± 3,181 IU/L, p = 0.59) and mortality (3.3 vs 3.7%, p = 0.79) between patients with chronic-HG and those without. Multivariate analysis showed that admission plasma glucose was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.27, p <0.001), but hemoglobin A1c was not. When only patients with acute-HG were analyzed, chronic-HG was associated with a significantly smaller infarct size (3,221 ± 3,001 vs 5,904 ± 6,473 IU/L, p <0.001) and lower in-hospital mortality (5.5 vs 18.9%, p = 0.01). In conclusion, these results suggested that acute-HG, but not chronic-HG, was associated with adverse short-term outcomes after AMI. Paradoxically, in patients with acute-HG, chronic-HG might abate the adverse effects of acute-HG.

  4. Surface expression of P-selectin on platelets is related with clinical worsening in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae-Kwan; Jeong, Min-Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lim, Yeong-Jin; Ha, Byung-Ryp; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Jae Woo

    2002-01-01

    Platelet activation has a critical role in arterial disorders. In this study, we showed that the upregulation of P-selectin expression on platelets was related with clinical worsening in acute ischemic stroke. We serially (within 24 hr, at 72 hr, and 7 days) measured the expression of P-selectin on platelets in patients with acute ischemic stroke (n=45) and investigated the correlation between their extents and clinical severity of ischemic stroke. A significant relationship between the P-selectin expressions and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was observed at 72 hr and 7 days after ischemic stroke onset. Patients with clinical deterioration showed significantly increased expression of P-selectin on platelets as compared to those without deterioration. These results suggest that the P-selectin expression on platelets may contribute to the aggravation of clinical course in acute ischemic stroke. Thus, adequate manipulation of activated platelets is an important therapeutic strategy in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:12483007

  5. Urine Albumin Excretion as a Marker of Acute Glycemic Changes in Isolated Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, Alagilawada S; Patil, Vidya S; Patil, Vijayetha P; Ingleshwar, Deepti G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Postprandial hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), and Most of the times it occurs in patients with normal glycemic control diagnosed by fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycated hemoglobin levels. Urine albumin excretion (UAE) is an independent predictor of CVD risk. Aim: To estimate UAE in isolated postprandial hyperglycemia (IPPHG) patients and to assess the relationship of UAE with FBG and postprandial blood glucose (PPBG) levels. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 318 patients with Type II diabetes in the age group 30–60 years for 6 months. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided into five groups based on their FBG and PPBG values. UAE and lipid profile were measured in all the groups. Statistical Analysis: UAE and lipid profile in different groups were compared using ANOVA. Regression analysis was used to predict the variation of UAE with FBG, PPBG, and total cholesterol (TC). Results: Patients with IPPHG had significantly higher albumin excretion compared to normoglycemia (NG) group [P < 0.0001]. In impaired glucose tolerance and isolated fasting hyperglycemia groups, it did not differ significantly from NG group [P = 0.206 and P = 0.173]. Lipid profile did not show any significant difference between the groups. On regression analysis, PPBG but not FBG or TC correlated positively with UAE. Conclusion: UAE is easy, less expensive, and Widely available method done on spot urine samples which predicts the acute glycemic changes and increased risk of developing CVDs in patients with IPPHG. PMID:28042215

  6. Dyskinetic patients show rebound worsening of affect after an acute L-dopa challenge.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew H; Farrell, Michael J; Gibson, Stephen J; Helme, Robert D; Lim, Shen-Yang

    2012-06-01

    Motor response complications that arise with repeated L-dopa administration for the treatment of Parkinson's disease are well understood but the relationship between motor response complications and affect are not. We proposed that patients with dyskinesias would report rebound worsening in affect during wearing-off of L-dopa effect. Fifty Parkinson's disease patients with were assessed with the Purdue Pegboard test and rated Positive Affect and Negative Affect after overnight withdrawal of dopaminergic medications and half hourly for 6 h after a standard L-dopa challenge. Patients were carefully classified into stable responder (n = 12), fluctuator (n = 15), and dyskinetic (n = 23) groups. Positive Affect was improved by L-dopa in dyskinetics and to a lesser degree in fluctuators but not in stable responders. At T = 4-6 h, Positive Affect rebounded below baseline in dyskinetics only. On regression analysis, rebound worsening positively correlated with ratings of dyskinesia severity. Negative Affect improved with L-dopa in all groups and tended to remain below baseline for 6 h after L-dopa challenge. Peak effects of L-dopa on Positive Affect and Negative Affect occurred significantly earlier than effects on Purdue Pegboard test and were positively correlated with L-dopa equivalent daily dose. There is a clinical dissociation between L-dopa effects on motor function, Positive Affect and Negative Affect. Rebound worsening in Positive Affect occurred only in dyskinetic patients and the onset of rebound worsening occurred before the end of the motor benefit phase. These observations could explain why some Parkinson patients report wearing-off symptoms despite the external impression of good motor control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Senescence marker protein-30/gluconolactonase deletion worsens glucose tolerance through impairment of acute insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kadono, Mayuko; Tanaka, Muhei; Asano, Mai; Senmaru, Takafumi; Kondo, Yoshitaka; Fukui, Michiaki; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Naoki; Nakamura, Naoto; Ishigami, Akihito

    2010-02-01

    Senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) is an androgen-independent factor that decreases with age. We recently identified SMP30 as the lactone-hydrolyzing enzyme gluconolactonase (GNL), which is involved in vitamin C biosynthesis in animal species. To examine whether the age-related decrease in SMP30/GNL has effects on glucose homeostasis, we used SMP30/GNL knockout (KO) mice treated with L-ascorbic acid. In an ip glucose tolerance test at 15 wk of age, blood glucose levels in SMP30/GNL KO mice were significantly increased by 25% at 30 min after glucose administration compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Insulin levels in SMP30/GNL KO mice were significantly decreased by 37% at 30 min after glucose compared with WT mice. Interestingly, an insulin tolerance test showed a greater glucose-lowering effect in SMP30/GNL KO mice. High-fat diet feeding severely worsened glucose tolerance in both WT and SMP30/GNL KO mice. Morphometric analysis revealed no differences in the degree of high-fat diet-induced compensatory increase in beta-cell mass and proliferation. In the static incubation study of islets, insulin secretion in response to 20 mm glucose or KCl was significantly decreased in SMP30/GNL KO mice. On the other hand, islet ATP content at 20 mm in SMP30/GNL KO mice was similar to that in WT mice. Collectively, these data indicate that impairment of the early phase of insulin secretion due to dysfunction of the distal portion of the secretion pathway underlies glucose intolerance in SMP30/GNL KO mice. Decreased SMP30/GNL may contribute to the worsening of glucose tolerance that occurs in normal aging.

  8. Hyperglycemia in Acutely Ill Non-diabetic Children in the Emergency Rooms of 2 Tertiary Hospitals in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oyenusi, Elizabeth E; Oduwole, Abiola O; Aronson, A Stefan; Jonsson, Björn G; Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin; Njokanma, Olisamedua F

    2016-09-01

    The study aimed to determine the prevalence of hyperglycemia in sick children admitted into the emergency rooms and to investigate its relationship with adverse outcomes. A prospective study involving 2 tertiary hospitals in Lagos. Study subjects included all children aged beyond 1 month. An Accu-Chek Active glucometer was used for the bedside blood glucose determination. Hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose greater than 7.8 mmol/L. A total of 1045 patients were recruited with hyperglycemia being recorded in 135 patients (prevalence rate of 12.9%). Mean age of the hyperglycemic patients was 29.0 ± 31.23 months. Prevalence rates of hyperglycemia among the leading diagnoses were 17.4% in acute respiratory tract infections, 11% in malaria, 15.3% in septicemia, 14.9% in gastroenteritis, and 18.2% in burns. Other conditions include sickle cell anemia, meningitis, and malnutrition. Mortality rate was significantly higher overall in hyperglycemic compared with the normoglycemic patients (15.4% vs 8.0%, P = 0.011). With regard to specific diagnoses, significantly higher mortality rates were recorded in hyperglycemic patients with acute respiratory tract infections (28% vs 8%, P = 0.011) and malaria (21.4% vs 5.0%, P = 0.006) than in their normoglycemic counterparts. Hyperglycemia is common in ill children admitted to the emergency rooms and is associated with 2 to 4 times higher mortality in common childhood diseases encountered. Blood glucose determination is important in all acutely ill children at presentation. The practice of empirical administration of intravenous glucose in some resource-constrained facilities where blood glucose testing facilities are not readily available should be discouraged.

  9. Chronic kidney disease and worsening renal function in acute heart failure: different phenotypes with similar prognostic impact?

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Lombardi, Carlo; Ruocco, Gaetano; Padeletti, Margherita; Nuti, Ranuccio; Metra, Marco; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Nearly a third of patients with acute heart failure experience concomitant renal dysfunction. This condition is often associated with increased costs of care, length of hospitalisation and high mortality. Although the clinical impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been well established, the exact clinical significance of worsening renal function (WRF) during the acute and post-hospitalisation phases is not completely understood. Therefore, it is still unclear which of the common laboratory markers are able to identify WRF at an early stage. Recent studies comparing CKD with WRF showed contradictory results; this could depend on a different WRF definition, clinical characteristics, haemodynamic disorders and the presence of prior renal dysfunction in the population enrolled. The current definition of acute cardiorenal syndrome focuses on both the heart and kidney but it lacks precise laboratory marker cut-offs and a specific diagnostic approach. WRF and CKD could represent different pathophysiological mechanisms in the setting of acute heart failure; the traditional view includes reduced cardiac output with systemic and renal vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, it has become a mixed model that encompasses both forward and backward haemodynamic dysfunction. Increased central venous pressure, renal congestion with tubular obliteration, tubulo-glomerular feedback and increased abdominal pressure are all potential additional contributors. The impact of WRF on patients who experience preserved renal function and individuals affected with CKD is currently unknown. Therefore it is extremely important to understand the origins, the clinical significance and the prognostic impact of WRF on CKD.

  10. Heart rate variability is differentially altered in multiple sclerosis: implications for acute, worsening and progressive disability.

    PubMed

    Studer, Valeria; Rocchi, Camilla; Motta, Caterina; Lauretti, Benedetta; Perugini, Jacopo; Brambilla, Laura; Pareja-Gutierrez, Lorena; Camera, Giorgia; Barbieri, Francesca Romana; Marfia, Girolama A; Centonze, Diego; Rossi, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Sympathovagal imbalance has been associated with poor prognosis in chronic diseases, but there is conflicting evidence in multiple sclerosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the autonomic nervous system dysfunction correlation with inflammation and progression in multiple sclerosis. Heart rate variability was analysed in 120 multiple sclerosis patients and 60 healthy controls during supine rest and head-up tilt test; the normalised units of low frequency and high frequency power were considered to assess sympathetic and vagal components, respectively. Correlation analyses with clinical and radiological markers of disease activity and progression were performed. Sympathetic dysfunction was closely related to the progression of disability in multiple sclerosis: progressive patients showed altered heart rate variability with respect to healthy controls and relapsing-remitting patients, with higher rest low frequency power and lacking the expected low frequency power increase during the head-up tilt test. In relapsing-remitting patients, disease activity, even subclinical, was associated with lower rest low frequency power, whereas stable relapsing-remitting patients did not differ from healthy controls. Less sympathetic reactivity and higher low frequency power at rest were associated with incomplete recovery from relapse. Autonomic balance appears to be intimately linked with both the inflammatory activity of multiple sclerosis, which is featured by an overall hypoactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, and its compensatory plastic processes, which appear inefficient in case of worsening and progressive multiple sclerosis.

  11. Differential Impact of Hyperglycemia in Critically Ill Patients: Significance in Acute Myocardial Infarction but Not in Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Wernly, Bernhard; Lichtenauer, Michael; Franz, Marcus; Kabisch, Bjoern; Muessig, Johanna; Masyuk, Maryna; Kelm, Malte; Hoppe, Uta C.; Jung, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a common condition in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). These patients represent an inhomogeneous collective and hyperglycemia might need different evaluation depending on the underlying disorder. To elucidate this, we investigated and compared associations of severe hyperglycemia (>200 mg/dL) and mortality in patients admitted to an ICU for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or sepsis as the two most frequent admission diagnoses. From 2006 to 2009, 2551 patients 69 (58–77) years; 1544 male; 337 patients suffering from type 2 diabetes (T2DM)) who were admitted because of either AMI or sepsis to an ICU in a tertiary care hospital were investigated retrospectively. Follow-up of patients was performed between May 2013 and November 2013. In a Cox regression analysis, maximum glucose concentration at the day of admission was associated with mortality in the overall cohort (HR = 1.006, 95% CI: 1.004–1.009; p < 0.001) and in patients suffering from myocardial infarction (HR = 1.101, 95% CI: 1.075–1.127; p < 0.001) but only in trend in patients admitted to an ICU for sepsis (HR = 1.030, 95% CI: 0.998–1.062; p = 0.07). Severe hyperglycemia was associated with adverse intra-ICU mortality in the overall cohort (23% vs. 13%; p < 0.001) and patients admitted for AMI (15% vs. 5%; p < 0.001) but not for septic patients (39% vs. 40%; p = 0.48). A medical history of type 2 diabetes (n = 337; 13%) was not associated with increased intra-ICU mortality (15% vs. 15%; p = 0.93) but in patients with severe hyperglycemia and/or a known medical history of type 2 diabetes considered in combination, an increased mortality in AMI patients (intra-ICU 5% vs. 13%; p < 0.001) but not in septic patients (intra-ICU 38% vs. 41%; p = 0.53) could be evidenced. The presence of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients has differential impact within the different etiological groups. Hyperglycemia in AMI patients might identify a sicker patient

  12. Influence of acute hyperglycemia on otoacoustic emissions and the medial olivocochlear reflexa)

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Peter G.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn; Mcmillan, Garnett P.; McDermott, Daniel; Fausti, Stephen A.; Kagen, David; Wan, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus-frequency (SF) otoacoustic emission (OAE) amplitude and the amplitude of medial olivocochlear (MOC) inhibition of SF OAEs for ipsilateral, contralateral and bilateral MOC reflex elicitors were recorded in six subjects with type 2 diabetes during a glucose tolerance test (GTT). Five of the six subjects were tested twice for a total of 11 trials and three subjects were tested in a control experiment. During the GTT experiment, the subjects’ blood glucose was elevated from a euglycemic level below 150 mg/dL to a hyperglycemic level above 160 mg/dL following the consumption of a bolus of 80 g of sugar. A subset of three subjects were tested in a control experiment during which SF OAE and MOC reflex measurements were made while blood sugar levels remained constant within the euglycemic region. Mean SF OAE amplitudes were elevated following glucose consumption. A statistically significant increase in MOC inhibition amplitude was observed during elevated sugar levels for the 11 GTT trials. Maximum inhibition occurred about an hour after glucose consumption when blood glucose levels peaked. Results indicate that acute hyperglycemia influences efferent control of the cochlea in people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22352503

  13. [IC triage in patients with an acutely worsening condition; challenges, considerations and decisions].

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, C; Klijnsma, A F; Balk, E; Janse, A; Tjan, D H T

    2016-01-01

    Acute intensive care (IC) triage involves a challenging decision-making process. Physicians are required to make life or death decisions about an unfamiliar patient within a short time frame. An 84-year-old female was admitted to the stroke unit following an extensive cerebral infarction. The intensive care unit (ICU) physician was consulted because of a suspected severe abdominal sepsis even though ICU treatment had never previously been discussed. A 77-year-old female with a previous history of myocardial infarction and severe COPD developed acute respiratory failure on the ward, and was admitted to the ICU for support by a mechanical ventilator. The family felt this was an inappropriate course of treatment, considering her former poor quality of life. When physicians are confronted with sudden deterioration of the patient's clinical condition without advanced care planning a limited-time IC treatment trial is often initiated, possibly leading to inappropriate ICU admissions. ICU treatment options should preferably be discussed beforehand; preliminary background information regarding the patient's wishes is essential for adequate decision-making.

  14. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  15. Early treatment with nebulised salbutamol worsens physiological measures and does not improve survival following phosgene induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grainge, C; Brown, R; Jugg, B J; Smith, A J; Mann, T M; Jenner, J; Rice, P; Parkhouse, D A

    2009-06-01

    To examine the effectiveness of nebulised salbutamol in the treatment of phosgene induced acute lung injury. Using previously validated methods, 12 anaesthetised large white pigs were exposed to phosgene (Ct 1978 +/- 8 mg min m(-3)), established on mechanical ventilation and randomised to treatment with either nebulised salbutamol (2.5 mg per dose) or saline control. Treatments were given 1, 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21 hours following phosgene exposure. The animals were followed to 24 hours following phosgene exposure. Salbutamol treatment had no effect on mortality and had a deleterious effect on arterial oxygenation, shunt fraction and heart rate. There was a reduction in the number of neutrophils from 24.0% +/- 4.4 to 12.17% +/- 2.1 (p < 0.05) in bronchoalveolar lavage, with some small decreases in inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage but not in plasma. Nebulised salbutamol treatment following phosgene induced acute lung injury does not improve survival, and worsens various physiological parameters including arterial oxygen partial pressure and shunt fraction. Salbutamol treatment reduces neutrophil influx into the lung. Its sole use following phosgene exposure is not recommended.

  16. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context.

  17. Baseline albumin is associated with worsening renal function in patients with acute decompensated heart failure receiving continuous infusion loop diuretics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Megan M; Dorsch, Michael P; Kim, Susie; Aaronson, Keith D; Koelling, Todd M; Bleske, Barry E

    2013-06-01

    To identify baseline predictors of worsening renal function (WRF) in an acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) patient population receiving continuous infusion loop diuretics. Retrospective observational analysis. Academic tertiary medical center. A total of 177 patients with ADHF receiving continuous infusion loop diuretics from January 2006 through June 2009. The mean patient age was 61 years, 63% were male, ~45% were classified as New York Heart Association functional class III, and the median length of loop diuretic infusion was 4 days. Forty-eight patients (27%) developed WRF, and 34 patients (19%) died during hospitalization. Cox regression time-to-event analysis was used to determine the time to WRF based on different demographic and clinical variables. Baseline serum albumin 3 g/dl or less was the only significant predictor of WRF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-5.16, p=0.0004), which remained significant despite adjustments for other covariates. Serum albumin 3 g/dl or less is a practical baseline characteristic associated with the development of WRF in patients with ADHF receiving continuous infusion loop diuretics. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  18. Hyperglycemia in acute aluminum phosphide poisoning as a potential prognostic factor.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, O; Alfred, S; Shadnia, S; Keyler, D E; Soltaninejad, K; Chalaki, N; Sedaghat, M

    2008-07-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a solid fumigant widely used in Iran as a grain preservative. When reacted with water or acids, AIP produces phosphine gas, a mitochondrial poison that interferes with oxidative phosphorylation and protein synthesis. Poisoning by AIP is one of the most important causes of fatal chemical toxicity in Iran. There are few studies in the medical literature addressing prognostic factors associated with AlP poisoning. In this prospective study conducted across a 14-month period commencing on 21st March 2006, we enrolled all patients admitted to the ICU of Loghman-Hakim Hospital Poison Center (Tehran, Iran) with AIP poisoning, no history of diabetes mellitus diagnosed before hospitalization, and normal body mass index. We recorded patient-specific demographic information, blood glucose level on presentation (before treatment), arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis, time elapsed between ingestion and presentation, ingested dose, duration of intensive care admission, and outcome data related to each presentation. We enrolled the group of patients who survived the intoxication as a control group and compared their blood glucose levels with those who died because of AlP poisoning. Data were analyzed by Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS) software (Version 12; Chicago, Ilinois, USA) using logistic regression, Pearson correlation coefficient and Student's t-test. P values of 0.05 or less were considered as the statistical significant levels. Forty-five patients (21 women and 24 men) with acute AlP poisoning were included in the study. The mean age was 27.3 +/- 11.5 years (range: 14-62 years). Thirteen patients survived (29%) and 32 expired (71%). AlP poisoning followed deliberate ingestion in all patients. The time elapsed between ingestion and arrival at the hospital was 3.2 +/- 0.4 h. There was no significant difference between survived and non-survived groups according to age, gender, and time to treatment. However, the difference between

  19. Acute administration of diosgenin or dioscorea improves hyperglycemia with increases muscular steroidogenesis in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Fujita, S; Iemitsu, M

    2014-09-01

    Acute dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration improves hyperglycemia in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus. Diosgenin, a steroid structurally similar to DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), is contained highly levels in dioscorea; however, it is still unclear whether this natural product improves hyperglycemia in the type 1 diabetes model rats through an increase muscular GLUT4 signaling. After 1 week of STZ injection, fasting glucose level was measured in blood taken from the tail vein every 30 min for 150 min after injection of diosgenin or dioscorea (3mg/kg). On another day, muscle was resected 150 min after diosgenin or dioscorea injections. Serum DHEA level increased significantly 120 min after diosgenin or dioscorea injections; concomitantly, blood glucose level decreased significantly. Moreover, GLUT4 translocation, as well as phosphorylation of Akt and PKC ζ/λ, increased significantly by diosgenin or dioscorea administration. However, these effects of diosgenin and dioscorea were blocked by a 5α-reductase inhibitor that inhibits synthesizing dehydrotestosterone (DHT) from testosterone. Additionally, significant correlations were observed between blood glucose level, GLUT4 translocation level, and muscular sex steroid hormone level 150 min after the administrations. These results suggest that the diosgenin-induced increase in the DHEA level may contribute to the improvement of hyperglycemia by activating the muscular GLUT4 signaling pathway in type 1 diabetes model rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Problems associated with glucose toxicity: Role of hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kawahito, Shinji; Kitahata, Hiroshi; Oshita, Shuzo

    2009-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis deficiency leads to a chronic increase in blood glucose concentration. In contrast to physiological glucose concentration, chronic superphysiological glucose concentration negatively affects a large number of organs and tissues. Glucose toxicity means a decrease in insulin secretion and an increase in insulin resistance due to chronic hyperglycemia. It is now generally accepted that glucose toxicity is involved in the worsening of diabetes by affecting the secretion of β-cells. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the adverse effects of hyperglycemia. It was found that persistent hyperglycemia caused the functional decline of neutrophils. Infection is thus the main problem resulting from glucose toxicity in the acute phase. In other words, continued hyperglycemia is a life-threatening risk factor, not only in the chronic but also the acute phase, and it becomes a risk factor for infection, particularly in the perioperative period. PMID:19725147

  1. 24 hours on-call and acute fatigue no longer worsen resident mood under the 80-hour work week regulations.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, Michael; Civetta, Joseph; Bartus, Christine; Walsh, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Studies in on-call residents have shown that mood is worsened by fatigue as indicated by increased scores on measures of depression, anxiety, confusion, and anger using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). In prior sleep deprivation studies, mood has been shown to be more affected than either cognitive or motor performances. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 80-hour work week regulations on resident mood in general and in a post-call period (PC). Institutional Review Board approval was obtained to survey the residents and publish the results. POMS is a 65-item adjective questionnaire that includes subscales for measuring tension-anxiety, anger-hostility, depression-dejection, vigor-activity, fatigue-inertia, and confusion-bewilderment, with the summation of the scales forming a total mood disturbance score. Surgical residents were tested at a 9 am didactic curriculum session (9 am has been shown to correlate with the nadir of performance). Residents were tested after nights off call (NOC) or after PC. Time asleep in the preceding 24 hours and other demographic data were also collected. Acute fatigue (AF) was defined as <4 hours sleep. The two-sample t-test and linear regression were used to assess differences between groups. A total of 123 standardized POMS mood questionnaires were administered on 4 occasions to 51 surgical residents, 35 men and 16 women at levels PGY-1 through PGY-5. Overall, 33 tests (27%) were taken after PC and 90 (73%) were taken after NOC. Acute fatigue residents had a mean sleep time of 2.2 (+/-1.5) hours, whereas rested (R) residents had a mean sleep time of 6.7 (+/-2.2) hours (whether PC or NOC). No statistical differences in mean values of vigor, anger, depression, concentration, fatigue, tension, or total score were observed between PC and NOC or between AF and R residents. There was no significant relationship between acute sleep deprivation and total mood disturbance, whether PC or NOC. In linear relationships

  2. Protracted Administration of L-Asparaginase in Maintenance Phase Is the Risk Factor for Hyperglycemia in Older Patients with Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideki; Imamura, Toshihiko; Saito, Akiko M; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Suenobu, So-ichi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Deguchi, Takao; Hashii, Yoshiko; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Endo, Mikiya; Hori, Hiroki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Hara, Junichi; Oda, Megumi; Sato, Atsushi; Horibe, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Although L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia is well known adverse event, it is not studied whether the profile of this adverse event is affected by intensification of L-asparaginase administration. Here, we analyzed the profile of L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia in a 1,176 patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study ALL-02 protocol using protracted L-asparaginase administration in maintenance phase. We determined that a total of 75 L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia events occurred in 69 patients. Although 17 events (17/1176, 1.4%) developed in induction phase, which was lower incidence than those (10-15%) in previous reports, 45 events developed during the maintenance phase with protracted L-asparaginase administration. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at onset (≥ 10 years) was a sole independent risk factor for L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia (P<0.01), especially in maintenance phase. Contrary to the previous reports, obesity was not associated with L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that protracted administration of L-asparaginase is the risk factor for hyperglycemia when treating adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

  3. The acute effect of clamped hyperglycemia on the urinary excretion of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in uncomplicated type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cherney, David Z I; Scholey, James W; Sochett, Etienne; Bradley, Timothy J; Reich, Heather N

    2011-01-01

    Acute glycemic variability contributes to diabetic complications potentially through induction of inflammation. Our objective was to determine whether acute hyperglycemia affects urinary secretion of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in humans with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes. Blood pressure, renal hemodynamics (inulin and paraaminohippurate clearances), and urine samples were obtained after 6 h of clamped euglycemia (4-6 mmol/l) and hyperglycemia (9-11 mmol/l) on two consecutive days in subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 25). Forty-two urinary cytokines/chemokines were measured using a Luminex platform. Clamped hyperglycemia produced an expected increase in glomerular filtration rate (131 ± 4 to 148 ± 8 ml/min/1.73 m²). Clamped hyperglycemia was associated with significant increases in urinary eotaxin, fibroblast growth factor-2, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon-α 2, interleukin-2 and -12, monocyte chemoattractant protein-3, macrophage-derived chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, platelet-derived growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and CD40 ligand (P < 0.05). Acute hyperglycemia results in increased urinary excretion of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in humans with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes, and this may contribute to kidney injury.

  4. Acute Suppression of Circulating sCD40L during Hyperglycemia and Euglycemic-Hyperinsulinemia in Healthy Young Males

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Stacy R.; Flores, Rebecca L.; Pontello, Andria M.; Rosa, Jaime S.; Zaldivar, Frank P.; Galassetti, Pietro R.

    2013-01-01

    sCD40L is a pro-atherogenic cytokine, part of the TNF superfamily and consistently associated with obesity, diabetes, and increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. While the role of sCD40L in the onset/progression of CV complications of dysmetabolic diseases may be modulated by acute and/or chronic fluctuations of plasma insulin and glucose, very little has been done to clarify this interaction. The kinetic profile of sCD40L (and, in an exploratory manner, of several immuno-modulatory factors), were measured during hyperglycemia and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemia in a group of ten healthy young males (26.8±1.4 yrs). After an overnight fast, i.v. catheters were placed in antecubital veins of both arms for blood drawing and dextrose/insulin i.v. infusions. Procedures lasted 240 min, including baseline (t = 0–60), hyperglycemia (t = 60–150; plasma glucose ~220 mg/dL via i.v. dextrose infusion); and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemia (t = 150–240; glucose infusion continued to clamp glycemic levels between 80 and 110 mg/dL; constant insulin infusion @ 1.5 mU/kg/min). Plasma for cytokine assays was sampled at 12 separate time-points. Plasma levels of sCD40L were significantly reduced (p<0.01) during hyperglycemia and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemia, paralleling the kinetic profiles of FFA and ketone bodies. This pattern was also observed in other immuno-moduatory factors (notably cortisol and EGF), while (IL-1α, -4, -6, -9, -10, TNF-α, Eotaxin) did not change significantly. Significant reductions of the pro-atherogenic cytokine sCD40L were observed during endogenous and exogenous hyperinsulinemia, independent of prevailing glucose concentration, in young healthy males. Our data suggest a mechanism by which correct insulin action may exert a beneficial protective role against inflammation independent of its immediate glucose-lowering effect. PMID:18797414

  5. Acute Peripheral but Not Central Administration of Olanzapine Induces Hyperglycemia Associated with Hepatic and Extra-Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Girault, Elodie M.; Alkemade, Anneke; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2012-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as Olanzapine induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic side-effects of these centrally acting drugs are still unknown to a large extent. We compared the effects of peripheral (intragastric; 3 mg/kg/h) versus central (intracerebroventricular; 30 µg/kg/h) administration of Olanzapine on glucose metabolism using the stable isotope dilution technique (Experiment 1) in combination with low and high hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps (Experiments 2 and 3), in order to evaluate hepatic and extra-hepatic insulin sensitivity, in adult male Wistar rats. Blood glucose, plasma corticosterone and insulin levels were measured alongside endogenous glucose production and glucose disappearance. Livers were harvested to determine glycogen content. Under basal conditions peripheral administration of Olanzapine induced pronounced hyperglycemia without a significant increase in hepatic glucose production (Experiment 1). The clamp experiments revealed a clear insulin resistance both at hepatic (Experiment 2) and extra-hepatic levels (Experiment 3). The induction of insulin resistance in Experiments 2 and 3 was supported by decreased hepatic glycogen stores in Olanzapine-treated rats. Central administration of Olanzapine, however, did not result in any significant changes in blood glucose, plasma insulin or corticosterone concentrations nor in glucose production. In conclusion, acute intragastric administration of Olanzapine leads to hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in male rats. The metabolic side-effects of Olanzapine appear to be mediated primarily via a peripheral mechanism, and not to have a central origin. PMID:22905238

  6. Protective effects of flavanol-rich dark chocolate on endothelial function and wave reflection during acute hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Desideri, Giovambattista; Necozione, Stefano; Ruggieri, Fabrizio; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Stornello, Michele; Ferri, Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Nitric oxide plays a pivotal role in regulating vascular tone. Different studies show endothelial function is impaired during hyperglycemia. Dark chocolate increases flow-mediated dilation in healthy and hypertensive subjects with and without glucose intolerance; however, the effect of pretreatment with dark chocolate on endothelial function and other vascular responses to hyperglycemia has not been examined. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of flavanol-rich dark chocolate administration on (1) flow-mediated dilation and wave reflections; (2) blood pressure, endothelin-1 and oxidative stress, before and after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Twelve healthy volunteers (5 males, 28.2±2.7 years) randomly received either 100 g/d dark chocolate or flavanol-free white chocolate for 3 days. After 7 days washout period, volunteers were switched to the other treatment. Flow-mediated dilation, stiffness index, reflection index, peak-to-peak time, blood pressure, endothelin-1 and 8-iso-PGF(2α) were evaluated after each treatment phase and OGTT. Compared with white chocolate, dark chocolate ingestion improved flow-mediated dilation (P=0.03), wave reflections, endothelin-1 and 8-iso-PGF(2α) (P<0.05). After white chocolate ingestion, flow-mediated dilation was reduced after OGTT from 7.88±0.68 to 6.07±0.76 (P=0.027), 6.74±0.51 (P=0.046) at 1 and 2 h after the glucose load, respectively. Similarly, after white chocolate but not after dark chocolate, wave reflections, blood pressure, and endothelin-1 and 8-iso-PGF(2α) increased after OGTT. OGTT causes acute, transient impairment of endothelial function and oxidative stress, which is attenuated by flavanol-rich dark chocolate. These results suggest cocoa flavanols may contribute to vascular health by reducing the postprandial impairment of arterial function associated with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  7. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a marker for the prediction of worsening renal function in children hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Elsharawy, Sahar; Raslan, Lila; Morsy, Saed; Hassan, Basheir; Khalifa, Naglaa

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is frequently associated with worsening renal function in adult patients. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) serves as an early marker for acute renal tubular injury. To assess the role of plasma NGAL in predicting worsening renal function (WRF) in children with AHF, we studied 30 children hospitalized for AHF; children with history of chronic renal disease or on nephrotoxic drugs were excluded. Twenty age- and sex-matched healthy children were included in the study as a control group. Echocardiographic examination was performed on admission. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and plasma NGAL levels were measured on admission and 72 h later. Seventeen (56.6%) patients developed WRF within the three-day follow-up period. At presentation, plasma NGAL level was significantly elevated in children who developed WRF. Admission plasma NGAL level correlated with renal parameters (BUN, creatinine and eGFR) as well as with left ventricular systolic parameters (ejection fraction and fractional shortening). For prediction of WRF, admission plasma, NGAL level>27.5 μg/L had sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 68%, respectively. The area under the receiver-operator curve was higher for NGAL (0.869) than for BUN (0.569) or eGFR (0.684). We conclude that admission plasma NGAL level can predict WRF in children hospitalized for AHF.

  8. Hydrogen Gas Reduced Acute Hyperglycemia-Enhanced Hemorrhagic Transformation in a Focal Ischemia Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, C.H.; ANATOL, M.; ZHAN, Y.; LIU, W.W.; OSTROWKI, R.P.; TANG, JIPING; ZHANG, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague–Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H2); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H2 (MCAO+H2). All the rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6ml/kg intraperitoneally) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 hr during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 hr, 0.5 hr, 4 hr, and 6 hr after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluating by the level of 8OHG, HNE and nitrotyrosine), MMP-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 hr after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 hr reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen is accompanied by a reduction of the expressions of 8OHG, HNE, nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500±32.51 to 366±68.22 mg/dl at 4 hr after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occluding, collagen IV or AQP4. In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced the infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological functions in rat. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation. PMID:20423721

  9. Hydrogen gas reduced acute hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation in a focal ischemia rat model.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Manaenko, A; Zhan, Y; Liu, W W; Ostrowki, R P; Tang, J; Zhang, J H

    2010-08-11

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested the effect of hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H(2)); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H(2) (MCAO+H(2)). All rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6 ml/kg i.p.) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 h during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 h, 0.5 h, 4 h, and 6 h after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluated by measuring the level of 8 Hydroxyguanosine (8OHG), 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (HNE) and nitrotyrosine), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 h after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 h reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen was accompanied by a reduction of the expression of 8OHG, HNE, and nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500+/-32.51 to 366+/-68.22 mg/dl at 4 h after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occludin, collagen IV or aquaporin4 (AQP4). In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced brain infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological function in rats. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation.

  10. Hyperglycemia - infants

    MedlinePlus

    High blood sugar - infants; High blood glucose level - infants ... have a low insulin level that results in high blood sugar. ... hyperglycemia often have no symptoms. Sometimes, babies with high blood sugar will produce large amounts of urine ...

  11. Acute effects of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia on vascular inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial function in overweight and obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Jennifer M.; Joy, Nino G.; Tate, Donna B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the separate and combined effects of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia on markers of endothelial function, proinflammatory and proatherothrombotic responses in overweight/obese nondiabetic humans. Twenty-two individuals (13 F/9 M, BMI 30.1 ± 4.1 kg/m2) were studied during four randomized, single-blind protocols. The pancreatic clamp technique was combined with 4-h glucose clamps consisting of either 1) euinsulinemia-euglycemia, 2) euinsulinemia-hyperglycemia, 3) hyperinsulinemia-hyperglycemia, or 4) hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia. Insulin levels were higher (998 ± 66 vs. 194 ± 22 pmol/l) during hyperinsulinemia compared with euinsulinemia. Glucose levels were 11.1 mmol/l during hyperinsulinemia compared with 5.1 ± 0.1 mmol/l during euglycemia. VCAM, ICAM, P-selectin, E-selectin, IL-6, adiponectin, and PAI-1 responses were all increased (P < 0.01-0.0001), and endothelial function was decreased (P < 0.0005) during euinsulinemia-hyperglycemia compared with other protocols. Hyperinsulinemia in the presence of hyperglycemia prevented the increase in proinflammatory and proatherothrombotic markers while also normalizing vascular endothelial function. We conclude that 4 h of moderate hyperglycemia can result in increases of proinflammatory markers (ICAM, VCAM, IL-6, E-selectin), platelet activation (P-selectin), reduced fibrinolytic balance (increased PAI-1), and disordered endothelial function in a group of obese and overweight individuals. Hyperinsulinemia prevents the actions of moderate hyperglycemia to reduce endothelial function and increase proinflammatory and proatherothrombotic markers. PMID:26015434

  12. Persistent hyperglycemia >155 mg/dL in acute ischemic stroke patients: how well are we correcting it?: implications for outcome.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Blanca; Ortega-Casarrubios, Maria Angeles; Sanjosé, Belén; Castillo, José; Leira, Rogelio; Serena, Joaquín; Vivancos, José; Dávalos, Antonio; Gil-Nuñez, Antonio; Egido, José; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2010-10-01

    We aimed to analyze the frequency of persistent hyperglycemia (PH), its implications for outcome, and to document the inpatient management of hyperglycemia. Post hoc analysis of the GLIAS (Glycemia in Acute Stroke) study, a multicenter, prospective, and observational cohort study of 476 acute ischemic stroke patients. Capillary finger-prick glucose was determined on admission and during the first 48 hours. We defined PH was defined as at least 2 values ≥155 mg/dL. Outcome (modified Rankin Scale) was evaluated at 3 months. PH developed in 117 patients (24.7%). PH was associated with poorer outcome (modified Rankin Scale score >2: 56.2% vs 28.1%; P<0.01) and higher mortality (26.7% vs 5.9%; P<0.01) than those with glycemia <155 mg/dL. PH ≥155 mg/dL was associated with a 4-fold increase in the odds of poor outcome at 3 months (odds ratio, 4.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-10.2) after adjustment for age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, stroke severity, admission glycemia, and infarct volume. Only 20% of patients with hyperglycemia ≥155 mg/dL received insulin on admission, with a progressive increase in the use of insulin during the following 48 hours. However, 114 (39.1%) out of 291 patients who received corrective treatment for hyperglycemia still had levels ≥155 mg/dL. PH ≥155 mg/dL is a common observation in acute ischemic stroke patients that is associated with poorer outcome and higher mortality. Almost 40% of patients maintained levels ≥155 mg/dL despite corrective treatment.

  13. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  14. [A case of acute ethanol intoxication with remarkable hyperglycemia by "ume-shu", a Japanese apricot liquor made with a large amount of sugar].

    PubMed

    Sugano, Takayuki; Kojima, Naoki; Kaneko, Susumu; Ishida, Junro; Terada, Taizo; Inagawa, Hiroshi; Okada, Yasusei

    2002-07-01

    A 19-year-old woman ingested 2.2 L of "umeshu", a Japanese apricot liquor made with a large amount of sugar. She was unconscious and in shock. The estimated blood ethanol concentration was 607 mg/dl, and the blood glucose level was 576 mg/dl. Because her respiration and circulation was highly suppressed, blood purification was indicated. Continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) was performed instead of hemodialysis because her hemodynamics was unstable. After CHDF was instituted, her blood glucose level reduced to normal range, and her consciousness became alert. CHDF was effective in eliminating ethanol and stabilizing her hemodynamics within an early stage. Though acute ethanol intoxication is known to inhibit glucogenesis, leading to hypoglycemia, marked hyperglycemia was seen in this case. Ingestion of a large amount of glucose-rich liquor and being in shock seemed to be the causes of hyperglycemia.

  15. 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1, But Not Type 2, Deficiency Worsens Acute Inflammation and Experimental Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Agnes E.; Gray, Mohini; Brownstein, David G.; Salter, Donald M.; Sawatzky, Deborah A.; Clay, Spike; Gilmour, James S.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Savill, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids profoundly influence immune responses, and synthetic glucocorticoids are widely used clinically for their potent antiinflammatory effects. Endogenous glucocorticoid action is modulated by the two isozymes of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD). In vivo, 11β-HSD1 catalyzes the reduction of inactive cortisone or 11-dehydrocorticosterone into active cortisol or corticosterone, respectively, thereby increasing intracellular glucocorticoid levels. 11β-HSD2 catalyzes the reverse reaction, inactivating intracellular glucocorticoids. Both enzymes have been postulated to modulate inflammatory responses. In the K/BxN serum transfer model of arthritis, 11β-HSD1-deficient mice showed earlier onset and slower resolution of inflammation than wild-type controls, with greater exostoses in periarticular bone and, uniquely, ganglion cysts, consistent with greater inflammation. In contrast, K/BxN serum arthritis was unaffected by 11β-HSD2 deficiency. In a distinct model of inflammation, thioglycollate-induced sterile peritonitis, 11β-HSD1-deficient mice had more inflammatory cells in the peritoneum, but again 11β-HSD2-deficient mice did not differ from controls. Additionally, compared with control mice, 11β-HSD1-deficient mice showed greater numbers of inflammatory cells in pleural lavages in carrageenan-induced pleurisy with lung pathology consistent with slower resolution. These data suggest that 11β-HSD1 limits acute inflammation. In contrast, 11β-HSD2 plays no role in acute inflammatory responses in mice. Regulation of local 11β-HSD1 expression and/or delivery of substrate may afford a novel approach for antiinflammatory therapy. PMID:22067318

  16. Effects of intra-aortic balloon pump versus centrifugal pump on myocardial energetics and systemic circulation in a porcine model of rapidly worsening acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ntalianis, Argyrios S; Drakos, Stavros G; Charitos, Christos; Dolou, Paraskevi; Pierrakos, Charalampos N; Terrovitis, John V; Papaioannou, Theodoros; Charitos, Efstratios; Nanas, John N

    2008-01-01

    The present experimental study compared the effectiveness of counterpulsation provided by the intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) versus that of a nonpulsatile, radial-flow centrifugal pump (CFP) in rapidly worsening acute heart failure (HF). Eighteen pigs were included in the study. After the induction of acute moderate HF, circulatory support was randomly provided with either the IABP or CFP. No significant change in cardiac output (CO) and mean aortic pressure (MAP) was observed with either pump. The IABP caused a significantly greater decrease than the CFP in 1) double product (13.138 +/- 2.476 mm Hg/min vs. 14.217 +/- 2.673 mm Hg/min, p = 0.023), 2) left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP, 100 +/- 8 mm Hg vs. 106 +/- 10 mm Hg, p = 0.046), and 3) end-diastolic aortic pressure (EDAP, 70 +/- 6 mm Hg vs. 86 +/- 6 mm Hg, p = 0.000). The effects of both pumps on total tension time index and LAD flow were similar. After the induction of severe HF, the IABP had its main effects on afterload and decreased LVSP from 88 +/- 6 mm Hg to 78 +/- 9 mm Hg, (p = 0.008), and EDAP from 57 +/- 9 mm Hg to 49 +/- 14 mm Hg, (p = 0.044), whereas the CFP exerted its effects mainly on preload, lowering LV end-diastolic pressure from 19 +/- 5 mm Hg to 11 +/- 4 mm Hg, (p = 0.002). CO and MAP were similarly increased by both assist systems. The IABP (by lowering afterload) and CFP (by lowering preload) both offered significant mechanical support in acute HF. However, afterload reduction offered principally by the IABP seems preferable for the recovery of the acutely failing heart.

  17. Chronic kidney disease-induced HMGB1 elevation worsens sepsis and sepsis-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Huang, Yuning; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Tsuji, Takayuki; Chen, Richard; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Schnermann, Jürgen; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Star, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that kidney dysfunction/interstitial fibrosis by folate predisposes mice to sepsis mortality (normal/sepsis: 15%; folate/sepsis: 90%); agents that increased survival in normal septic mice were ineffective in the two-stage model. We used a recently characterized 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) mouse model of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) to study how CKD impacts sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by cecal ligation-puncture (CLP). CKD intensified sepsis severity (by kidney and liver injury, cytokines, and spleen apoptosis). Accumulation of HMGB1, VEGF, TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10 was increased in CKD or sepsis alone and to a greater extent in CKD-sepsis, and only part of this effect could be explained by decreased renal clearance. Surprisingly, we found splenic apoptosis in CKD, even in the absence of sepsis. Although sFLT-1 effectively treated sepsis, it was ineffective against CKD-sepsis. Conversely, a single dose of HMGB1-neutralizing antiserum, administered 6h after sepsis alone was ineffective; however, CKD/sepsis was attenuated by anti-HMGB1. Splenectomy transiently decreased circulating HMGB1 levels, which reversed the effectiveness of anti-HMGB1 treatment on CKD/sepsis. We conclude that progressive CKD increases sepsis severity, in part, by reducing renal clearance of cytokines; CKD-induced splenic apoptosis and HMGB1 could be important common mediators for both CKD and sepsis. PMID:21832986

  18. Worsening of renal function during 1 year after hospital discharge is a strong and independent predictor of all-cause mortality in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Tomoya; Kawakami, Rika; Sugawara, Yu; Okada, Sadanori; Nishida, Taku; Onoue, Kenji; Soeda, Tsunenari; Okayama, Satoshi; Takeda, Yukiji; Watanabe, Makoto; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Shiro; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2014-11-04

    Renal impairment is a common comorbidity and the strongest risk factor for poor prognosis in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). In clinical practice, renal function is labile during episodes of ADHF, and often worsens after discharge. The significance of worsening of renal function (WRF) after discharge has not been investigated as extensively as baseline renal function at admission or WRF during hospitalization. Among 611 consecutive patients with ADHF emergently admitted to our hospital, 233 patients with 3 measurements of serum creatinine (SCr) level measurements (on admission, at discharge, and 1 year after discharge) were included in the present study. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of WRF at 1 year after discharge (1y-WRF), defined as an absolute increase in SCr >0.3 mg/dL (>26.5 μmol/L) plus a ≥25% increase in SCr at 1 year after discharge compared to the SCr value at discharge. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality were assessed as adverse outcomes. During a mean follow-up of 35.4 months, 1y-WRF occurred in 48 of 233 patients. There were 66 deaths from all causes. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality were significantly higher in patients with 1y-WRF (log-rank P<0.0001 and P<0.0001, respectively) according to Kaplan-Meier analysis. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, 1y-WRF was a strong and independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Hemoglobin and B-type natriuretic peptide at discharge, as well as left ventricular ejection fraction <50%, were independent predictors of 1y-WRF. In patients with ADHF, 1y-WRF is a strong predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  19. The previous use of digoxin does not worsen early outcome of acute coronary syndromes: an analysis of the ARIAM Registry.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rubira, Juan Carlos; Calvo-Taracido, Manuel; Francisco-Aparicio, Francisca; Almendro-Delia, Manuel; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Reina Toral, Antonio; Aramburu-Bodas, Oscar; Gallego García de Vinuesa, Pastora; Cruz Fernández, José Maria; Alcántara, Angel Garcia; Hidalgo-Urbano, Rafael

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the previous use of digoxin on the hospital mortality and complications of patients admitted because of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We analyzed the data of patients included in the ARIAM-Andalucia Registry, which involves 49 hospitals in Andalucia, Spain, from 2007 to 2012. Patients on digoxin treatment prior to their admission because of ACS constituted the digoxin group (DG), and were compared with the group of patients not on digoxin. Logistic regression and propensity score matching were used to analyze the differences. We included 20,331 patients, of whom 244 (1.2%) were on digoxin. DG patients were older (73.1 vs 63.7 years old), more often women, and had more diabetes, hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease, obstructive pulmonary disease or kidney disease. On univariate analysis, DG patients had significantly higher hospital mortality (13.5 vs 5.3% P < 0.001), and more cardiogenic shock, but less ventricular fibrillation, and no differences in atrioventricular block, stroke or reinfarction. After the multivariate analysis, DG had no significant influence on hospital prognosis [odds ratio (OR) 1.21, 95% confidence interval 0.79-1.86]. The analysis of a propensity-matched cohort of 464 patients (232 DG and 232 NoDG) did not find differences in hospital mortality (13.4 vs 13.4%) nor other complications. In our cohort of ACS patients, the previous treatment with digoxin was not associated with an increase in dysrhythmic complications nor was an independent predictor of mortality during hospitalization.

  20. Matrix Metalloprotease 3 Exacerbates Hemorrhagic Transformation and Worsens Functional Outcomes in Hyperglycemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Sherif; Abdelsaid, Mohammed; El-Shafey, Sally; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Fagan, Susan C.; Ergul, Adviye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute hyperglycemia worsens the clinical outcomes and exacerbates cerebral hemorrhage after stroke. The mediators of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in hyperglycemic stroke are not fully understood. Matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) plays a critical role in the tissue plasminogen activator induced HT. However, the role of MMP3 in exacerbating the HT and worsening the functional outcomes in hyperglycemic stroke remains unknown. Methods Control/normoglycemic and hyperglycemic (blood glucose: 140–200 mg/dl) male Wistar rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 minutes and either 24 h or 7 days reperfusion. MMP3 was inhibited pharmacologically (UK 356618, 15 mg/kg, IV at reperfusion) or knocked down in the brain by shRNA lentiviral particles (injected ICV). Neurovascular injury was assessed at 24 h and functional outcomes were assessed at 24 hours, day 3 and day 7. MMP3 activity was measured in brain homogenate and cerebral macrovessels. Localization of MMP3 within the neurovascular unit after hyperglycemic stroke was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. Results Hyperglycemia significantly increased MMP3 activity in the brain after stroke and this was associated with exacerbated HT and worsened functional outcomes. MMP3 inhibition significantly reduced HT and improved functional outcomes. Conclusion MMP3 plays a critical role in mediating cerebrovascular injury in hyperglycemic stroke. Our findings point out MMP3 as a potential therapeutic target in hyperglycemic stroke. PMID:26839355

  1. Extra-cellular expansion in the normal, non-infarcted myocardium is associated with worsening of regional myocardial function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj; Broadbent, David A; Swoboda, Peter P; Foley, James R J; Fent, Graham J; Musa, Tarique A; Ripley, David P; Erhayiem, Bara; Dobson, Laura E; McDiarmid, Adam K; Haaf, Philip; Kidambi, Ananth; Crandon, Saul; Chew, Pei G; van der Geest, R J; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2017-09-25

    Expansion of the myocardial extracellular volume (ECV) is a surrogate measure of focal/diffuse fibrosis and is an independent marker of prognosis in chronic heart disease. Changes in ECV may also occur after myocardial infarction, acutely because of oedema and in convalescence as part of ventricular remodelling. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in the pattern of distribution of regional (normal, infarcted and oedematous segments) and global left ventricular (LV) ECV using semi-automated methods early and late after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Fifty patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging acutely (24 h-72 h) and at convalescence (3 months). The CMR protocol included: cines, T2-weighted (T2 W) imaging, pre-/post-contrast T1-maps and LGE-imaging. Using T2 W and LGE imaging on acute scans, 16-segments of the LV were categorised as normal, oedema and infarct. 800 segments (16 per-patient) were analysed for changes in ECV and wall thickening (WT). From the acute studies, 325 (40.6%) segments were classified as normal, 246 (30.8%) segments as oedema and 229 (28.6%) segments as infarct. Segmental change in ECV between acute and follow-up studies (Δ ECV) was significantly different for normal, oedema and infarct segments (0.8 ± 6.5%, -1.78 ± 9%, -2.9 ± 10.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). Normal segments which demonstrated deterioration in wall thickening at follow-up showed significantly increased Δ ECV compared with normal segments with preserved wall thickening at follow up (1.82 ± 6.05% versus -0.10 ± 6.88%, P < 0.05). Following reperfused STEMI, normal myocardium demonstrates subtle expansion of the extracellular volume at 3-month follow up. Segmental ECV expansion of normal myocardium is associated with worsening of contractile function.

  2. The influence of reduced insulin sensitivity via short-term reductions in physical activity on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during acute hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Holwerda, S W; Reynolds, L J; Restaino, R M; Credeur, D P; Leidy, H J; Thyfault, J P; Fadel, P J

    2015-12-15

    Reduced insulin sensitivity and impaired glycemic control are among the consequences of physical inactivity and have been associated with reduced cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). However, the effect of reduced insulin sensitivity and acute hyperglycemia following glucose consumption on cardiac BRS in young, healthy subjects has not been well characterized. We hypothesized that a reduction in insulin sensitivity via reductions in physical activity would reduce cardiac BRS at rest and following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Nine recreationally active men (23 ± 1 yr; >10,000 steps/day) underwent 5 days of reduced daily physical activity (RA5) by refraining from planned exercise and reducing daily steps (<5,000 steps/day). Spontaneous cardiac BRS (sequence technique) was compared at rest and for 120 min following an OGTT at baseline and after RA5. A substudy (n = 8) was also performed to independently investigate the influence of elevated insulin alone on cardiac BRS using a 120-min hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) was significantly reduced following RA5 (BL 9.2 ± 1.3 vs. RA5 6.4 ± 1.1, P < 0.001). Resting cardiac BRS was unaffected by RA5 and significantly reduced during the OGTT similarly at baseline and RA5 (baseline 0 min, 28 ± 4 vs. 120 min, 18 ± 4; RA5 0 min, 28 ± 4 vs. 120 min, 21 ± 3 ms/mmHg). Spontaneous cardiac BRS was also reduced during the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (P < 0.05). Collectively, these data demonstrate that acute elevations in plasma glucose and insulin can impair spontaneous cardiac BRS in young, healthy subjects, and that reductions in cardiac BRS following acute hyperglycemia are unaffected by reduced insulin sensitivity via short-term reductions in physical activity.

  3. Molecular cloning of glucose transporter 1 in grouper Epinephelus coioides and effects of an acute hyperglycemia stress on its expression and glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyu; Dong, Xiaohui; Chi, Shuyan; Yang, Qihui; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Liqiao; Tan, Beiping

    2017-02-01

    The glucose transporter family proteins play pivotal roles in glucose metabolism. In this study, we successfully cloned the orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) glucose transporter 1 (EcGlut1) gene (GenBank accession: JQ623903). The full-length EcGlut1 cDNA was 2126 bp with a 1476 bp ORF, a 437bp5'-UTR and 223bp3'-UTR. EcGlut1 is predicted to encode a 491 amino acid protein with a MW of 53.9 kDa, a pI of 8.66 and a Pfam domain. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that EcGlut1 was evolutionally conserved between fishes with 80-89 % amino acid identities. EcGlut1 was expressed predominantly in heart and liver and at lower levels in muscle, intestine, stomach and brain. We also investigated the effect of acute hyperglycemia stress on EcGlut1 expression. In glucose tolerance test, changes in EcGlut1 mRNA expression in response to glucose injection and glucose metabolism-related indictors were assessed at the same time. Glucose injection significantly suppressed EcGlut1 mRNA expression in liver at 12 h and in brain at 24 h postinjection (P < 0.05). EcGlut1 mRNA levels in heart were increased at 6 h (P < 0.05). Plasma glucose level increased significantly and reached its maximum at 3 h postinjection (P < 0.05). The spatiotemporal expression of EcGlut1 and glucose metabolism suggested that orange spotted grouper might rely on fat anabolism to reduce acute hyperglycemia stress and the delayed transcription of EcGlut1 gene might be one reason for glucose intolerance in E. coioides.

  4. Hyperglycemia Determines Increased Specific MicroRNAs Levels in Sera and HDL of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients and Stimulates MicroRNAs Production in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Carnuta, Mihaela G.; Sanda, Gabriela M.; Stancu, Camelia S.; Popescu, Andreea C.; Popescu, Mihaela R.; Vlad, Adelina; Dimulescu, Doina R.; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) in sera and HDL of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to stable angina (SA) patients with/without hyperglycemia, and evaluate comparatively the functional effect of these sera on the processing machinery proteins (Drosha, DGCR8, Dicer) and miRNAs production in human macrophages. MiRNAs levels in sera and HDL from 35 SA and 72 ACS patients and 30 healthy subjects were measured by using microRNA TaqMan assays. MiR-223, miR-92a, miR-486, miR-122, miR-125a and miR-146a levels were higher in the hyperglycemic ACS compared to normoglycemic sera. MiR-223 and miR-486 prevailed in HDL2, while miR-92a predominated in HDL3, all three miRNAs discriminating between ACS and SA patients; their levels were increased in HDL from hyperglycemic ACS patients versus normoglycemic ones. The incubation of human macrophages with sera from ACS and SA patients showed that all patients’ sera induced an increase of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expressions and of selected miRNAs levels compared to control sera, the effect being higher in the case of hyperglycemic versus normoglycemic ACS sera. The addition of glucose to SA and ACS sera increased Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and miRNAs levels in the exposed macrophages. In conclusion, hyperglycemia is associated with increased miR-223, miR-92a, miR-486 levels in HDL, which discriminate between ACS and SA patients. Exposure of human macrophages to ACS compared to SA sera determines the upregulation of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and the increase of selected miRNAs production, the effect being augmented by an increased glucose concentration. PMID:27519051

  5. Hyperglycemia Determines Increased Specific MicroRNAs Levels in Sera and HDL of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients and Stimulates MicroRNAs Production in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Simionescu, Natalia; Niculescu, Loredan S; Carnuta, Mihaela G; Sanda, Gabriela M; Stancu, Camelia S; Popescu, Andreea C; Popescu, Mihaela R; Vlad, Adelina; Dimulescu, Doina R; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) in sera and HDL of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to stable angina (SA) patients with/without hyperglycemia, and evaluate comparatively the functional effect of these sera on the processing machinery proteins (Drosha, DGCR8, Dicer) and miRNAs production in human macrophages. MiRNAs levels in sera and HDL from 35 SA and 72 ACS patients and 30 healthy subjects were measured by using microRNA TaqMan assays. MiR-223, miR-92a, miR-486, miR-122, miR-125a and miR-146a levels were higher in the hyperglycemic ACS compared to normoglycemic sera. MiR-223 and miR-486 prevailed in HDL2, while miR-92a predominated in HDL3, all three miRNAs discriminating between ACS and SA patients; their levels were increased in HDL from hyperglycemic ACS patients versus normoglycemic ones. The incubation of human macrophages with sera from ACS and SA patients showed that all patients' sera induced an increase of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expressions and of selected miRNAs levels compared to control sera, the effect being higher in the case of hyperglycemic versus normoglycemic ACS sera. The addition of glucose to SA and ACS sera increased Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and miRNAs levels in the exposed macrophages. In conclusion, hyperglycemia is associated with increased miR-223, miR-92a, miR-486 levels in HDL, which discriminate between ACS and SA patients. Exposure of human macrophages to ACS compared to SA sera determines the upregulation of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and the increase of selected miRNAs production, the effect being augmented by an increased glucose concentration.

  6. Mortality Reduction for Fever, Hyperglycemia, and Swallowing Nurse-Initiated Stroke Intervention: QASC Trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sandy; Coughlan, Kelly; Mnatzaganian, George; Low Choy, Nancy; Dale, Simeon; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Levi, Chris; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Ward, Jeanette; Cadilhac, Dominique A; McElduff, Patrick; Hiller, Janet E; D'Este, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    Implementation of nurse-initiated protocols to manage fever, hyperglycemia, and swallowing dysfunction decreased death and disability 90 days poststroke in the QASC trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) conducted in 19 Australian acute stroke units (2005-2010). We now examine long-term all-cause mortality. Mortality was ascertained using Australia's National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression compared time to death adjusting for correlation within stroke units using the cluster sandwich (Huber-White estimator) method. Primary analyses included treatment group only unadjusted for covariates. Secondary analysis adjusted for age, sex, marital status, education, and stroke severity using multiple imputation for missing covariates. One thousand and seventy-six participants (intervention n=600; control n=476) were followed for a median of 4.1 years (minimum 0.3 to maximum 70 months), of whom 264 (24.5%) had died. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were generally well balanced by group. The QASC intervention group had improved long-term survival (>20%), but this was only statistically significant in adjusted analyses (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-1.07; P=0.13; adjusted HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.59-0.99; P=0.045). Older age (75-84 years; HR, 4.9; 95% CI, 2.8-8.7; P<0.001) and increasing stroke severity (HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.9; P<0.001) were associated with increased mortality, while being married (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49-0.99; P=0.042) was associated with increased likelihood of survival. Cardiovascular disease (including stroke) was listed either as the primary or secondary cause of death in 80% (211/264) of all deaths. Our results demonstrate the potential long-term and sustained benefit of nurse-initiated multidisciplinary protocols for management of fever, hyperglycemia, and swallowing dysfunction. These protocols should be a routine part of acute stroke care. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique

  7. Effect of an optimized treatment with insulin on platelet reactivity after discharge in patients with an acute coronary syndrome and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Vivas, David; García-Rubira, Juan C; Bernardo, Esther; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Martín, Patricia; Calle, Alfonso; Núñez-Gil, Iván; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Intensive glucose control with insulin in patients with an acute coronary syndrome reduces platelet reactivity during hospitalization, compared to conventional control. However, the effect of strict, long-term glucose control on platelet reactivity in these patients remains uncertain. This is a prospective, randomized trial evaluating the effects of optimized glucose control (target glucose, 80-120mg/dL) with insulin, compared with conventional control (target glucose, <180 mg/dL), on platelet reactivity after hospital discharge in patients with an acute coronary syndrome and hyperglycemia. The primary endpoint was assessment of platelet aggregation after stimulation with adenosine diphosphate 20 μM at 12-month follow-up. One hundred four patients were randomized to optimized management (n=53) or conventional management (n=51). There were no differences between groups in baseline characteristics or platelet function. After 12 months of follow-up, blood glucose levels were significantly lower in the optimized treatment group (104 vs 119 mg/dL; P<.001). However, platelet aggregation following adenosine diphosphate 20 μM stimulation showed no differences between the groups (54.2% [14.3%] vs 55.1% [18.3%] respectively; P=.81). There were no significant differences for other platelet function tests. Long-term optimized glucose control with insulin in patients with an acute coronary syndrome did not result in a reduction in platelet reactivity compared to conventional control. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. [Hyperglycemia in the pediatric emergency. Not everything is diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bilkis, Manuel D

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a rare finding in pediatric emergency. Hyperglycemia as pediatric emergency presentation (blood glucose>126 mg/dl), may correspond to a diabetes mellitus type 1, the finding of a casual hyperglycemia in an obese patient and type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia without decompensation of the monogenic diabetes or stress hyperglycemia. The latter are often not ketosis, limited to acute illness and usually do not develop diabetes at follow-up. We found only 2.9% of patients (8/270 children) with stress hyperglycemia who developed diabetes mellitus at follow-up. The use of insulin in the most severe cases improves the evolution and decreases morbidity. There is an overlap of intermediate states in the presentation of hyperglycemia requiring specialist help to unravel the underlying state in the follow-up.

  9. [Continuous adaptation of rats to hypobaric hypoxia prevents stressor hyperglycemia and optimizes mitochondrial respiration under acute hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Portnichenko, V I; Nosar, V I; Sydorenko, A M; Portnichenko, A H; Man'kovs'ka, I M

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen consumption, glucose blood level and liver mitochondrial respiration were investigated in male Wistar rats permanently living in middle altitude (2100 m, Elbrus region). The animals were characterized by reduced body oxygen consumption and blood glucose level, as well as by intensified utilization of NAD-dependent substrates in mitochondrial respiratory chain with increasing indices of ADP-stimulated respiration in comparison with plains rats. As a result of adaptive rebuilding of oxidative metabolism in rats--inhabitants of midlands, the nature and severity of metabolic responses to acute hypoxia were also changed. After lifting in barochamber to a "height" of 5600 m during 3 hours, plains rats transiently demonstrated hypometabolic and hyperglycemic reactions. A rapid adaptation of mitochondrial function occurred due to increase in the rate of FAD-dependent substrate oxidation accompanied by a decrease in the effectiveness of phosphorylation. In midland rats, by contrast, hypoglycemic reaction was developed, and further reduction of aerobic metabolism was limited. Rapid adaptation of mitochondrial function to acute hypoxia in those rats was more intense than in the plains animals. This was achieved by a significant increase in the rate of NAD-dependent substrate oxidation, especially lipids, and an improved efficiency of mitochondrial respiration and an increased economy of oxygen utilization.

  10. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Because the body can't use glucose for energy properly, kids with hyperglycemia may be unusually tired. continue Checking for High Blood Sugar Levels As part of the diabetes management plan, you'll need to check your child's ...

  11. In-hospital and 1-year outcomes of acute heart failure patients according to presentation (de novo vs. worsening) and ejection fraction. Results from IN-HF Outcome Registry.

    PubMed

    Senni, Michele; Gavazzi, Antonello; Oliva, Fabrizio; Mortara, Andrea; Urso, Renato; Pozzoli, Massimo; Metra, Marco; Lucci, Donata; Gonzini, Lucio; Cirrincione, Vincenzo; Montagna, Laura; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the outcomes of hospitalized patients with both de-novo and worsening heart failure (HF) with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (HFpEF) (LVEF ≥ 50%), compared to those with reduced LVEF (HFrEF). We studied 1669 patients (22.6% HFpEF) hospitalized for acute HF in the prospective multi-center nationwide Italian Network on Heart Failure (IN-HF) Outcome Registry. In all patients LVEF was assessed during hospitalization. De-novo HF presentations constituted 49.6% of HFpEF and 43.1% of HFrEF hospitalizations. All-cause mortality during hospitalization was lower in HFpEF than HFrEF (2.9% vs 6.5%, p=0.01), but this mortality difference was not significant at 1 year (19.6% vs 24.4%, p=0.06), even after adjusting for clinical covariates. Similarly, there were no differences in 1-year mortality between HFpEF and HFrEF when compared by cause of death (cardiovascular vs non-cardiovascular) or mode of presentation (worsening HF vs de novo). Rehospitalization rates (all-cause, non-cardiovascular, cardiovascular, HF-related) at 90 days and 1 year were also similar. Mode of presentation influenced rehospitalizations in HFpEF, where those presenting with worsening HFpEF had higher all-cause (36.8% vs 21.6%, p=0.001), cardiovascular (28.1% vs 14.9%, p=0.002), and HF-related (21.1% vs 7.7%, p=0.0003) rehospitalization rates at 1 year compared to those with de novo presentations. Outcomes at 1 year following hospitalization for HFpEF are as poor as that of HFrEF. A prior history of HF decompensation or hospitalization identifies patients with HFpEF at particularly high risk of recurrent events. These findings may have implications for clinical practice, quality and process improvements and trial design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prefrontal blood flow and oxygenation measured by NIRS during long-term memory tasks are impaired by acute hyperglycemia (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. Luke; Bell, Lindsay; Reimer, Andrea; Pettersen, Jacqueline A.; Siakaluk, Paul; Duffels, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Our goal was to use 2-channel frequency domain near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to investigate the hemodynamic and metabolic mechanisms underlying hyperglycemia-associated long-term memory impairment. We hypothesized that prefrontal cortex (PFC) oxygen saturation (%Sat) and perfusion (tHb, i.e. total hemoglobin) would decrease due to hyperglycemia during learning, and then increase during recall. During learning, participants' blood glucose was manipulated with beverages containing either 47.4 mg saccharine control (CON, n = 10), or 50 g dextrose + 23.7 mg saccharine (GLC, n = 10). In the Symbol-Digit Modalities Test (SMDT) participants matched nine symbols to corresponding digits (1-9 inclusive), completing 105 learning and 15 testing trials on day 1 and 15 testing trials on day 2. From learning to recall, CON SMDT performance was unchanged, but GLC SMDT performance was decreased 11% (P = 0.0173). There were significant interactions (2-way ANOVA) between the CON-GLC treatment effects and the learning-recall effects for both PFC perfusion and oxygen saturation. Specifically, comparing learning to recall, CON exhibited no tHb differences but for GLC there was a large tHb decrease during learning with a partial recovery toward CON values during recall (P = 0.0012); and, comparing learning to recall, CON exhibited a large %Sat decrease but GLC exhibited a large %Sat increase (P = 0.021). We speculate that, during learning, after overnight fasting (CON) the PFC demands more hemodynamic and metabolic resources and "works" harder, but with readily available sugar (GLC) the PFC exhibits decreased "effort."

  13. Worsening of Lymphopenia during Apremilast Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kolios, Antonios G.A.; French, Lars E.; Navarini, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Apremilast is an oral phosphodiesterase IV inhibitor recently registered for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in Switzerland and other countries. Even though it offers only moderate efficacy compared to biologics, many patients prefer drugs given by the oral route. Apremilast is frequently used in private practice, as it showed no relevant safety signals in clinical trials and often, laboratory tests are omitted completely. Here we report a patient who developed acute lymphopenia and worsening of psoriasis during apremilast treatment, which resolved with discontinuation of apremilast. We suggest that at least in prospective registries, that regular monitoring of laboratory surrogate markers should be performed on a long-term basis to detect rare but potentially important safety signals. PMID:27920684

  14. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  15. Depression May Worsen Health for Cancer Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166958.html Depression May Worsen Health for Cancer Caregivers Identifying signs ... 29, 2017 THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is known to be linked to worsening physical ...

  16. Poor Sleep May Worsen Suicidal Thoughts

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166928.html Poor Sleep May Worsen Suicidal Thoughts Treating insomnia might help ... 28, 2017 WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep problems may provide early clues about worsening suicidal ...

  17. Assessment and treatment of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Marina Verçoza; Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Fabbrin, Amanda Rodrigues; Santos, Manoella Freitas; Gerchman, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a commonly encountered issue in critically ill patients in the intensive care setting. The presence of hyperglycemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, regardless of the reason for admission (e.g., acute myocardial infarction, status post-cardiovascular surgery, stroke, sepsis). However, the pathophysiology and, in particular, the treatment of hyperglycemia in the critically ill patient remain controversial. In clinical practice, several aspects must be taken into account in the management of these patients, including blood glucose targets, history of diabetes mellitus, the route of nutrition (enteral or parenteral), and available monitoring equipment, which substantially increases the workload of providers involved in the patients' care. This review describes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and monitoring of hyperglycemia in the critically ill adult patient. PMID:24770692

  18. Glycosaminoglycans, hyperglycemia, and disease.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Linda M; Han, Juying; Mandal, Anil Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes is a widespread disease with many clinical pathologies. Despite numerous pharmaceutical strategies for treatment, the incidence of diabetes continues to increase. Hyperglycemia, observed in diabetes, causes endothelial injury resulting in microvascular and macrovascular complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, and increased atherosclerosis. Proteoglycans are chemically diverse macromolecules consisting of a protein core with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) attached. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are important compounds found on the endothelial cell membrane and in the extracellular matrix, which play an important role in growth regulation and serve as a reservoir for cytokines and other bioactive molecules. Endothelial cells are altered in hyperglycemia by a reduction in heparan sulfate and upregulation and secretion of heparanase, an enzyme that degrades heparan sulfate GAGs on proteoglycans. Reactive oxygen species, increased in diabetes, also destroy GAGs. Preservation of heparan sulfate proteoglycans on endothelial cells may be a strategy to prevent angiopathy associated with diabetes. The use of GAGs and GAG-like compounds may increase endothelial heparan sulfate and prevent an increase in the heparanase enzyme. Elucidating the mechanisms of GAG depletion and its significance in endothelial health may help to further understand, prevent, and treat cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes. Further studies examining the role of GAGs and GAG-like compounds in maintaining endothelial health, including their effect on heparanase, will determine the feasibility of these compounds in diabetes treatment. Preservation of heparan sulfate by decreasing heparanase may have important implications not only in diabetes, but also in cardiovascular disease and tumor biology.

  19. Hyperglycemia, tumorigenesis, and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Chun; Yang, Wei-Chung Vivian

    2016-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is the most prominent sign that characterizes diabetes. Hyperglycemia favors malignant cell growth by providing energy to cancer cells. Clinical studies also showed an increased risk of diabetes being associated with different types of cancers. In addition, poorly regulated glucose metabolism in diabetic patients is often found with increased levels of chronic inflammatory markers, e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and emerging evidence has highlighted activation of the immune response in the progression and development of cancer cells. Therefore, uncontrolled proinflammatory responses could conceivably create a chronic inflammatory state, promoting a tumor-favorable microenvironment and potentially triggering immune overactivation and cancer growth. To further understand how hyperglycemia contributes to immune overactivation, the tumor microenvironment and the development of chronic inflammation-associated tumors may provide insights into tumor biology and immunology. This paper provides a brief introduction to hyperglycemia-associated diseases, followed by a comprehensive overview of the current findings of regulatory molecular mechanisms of glycosylation on proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix under hyperglycemic conditions. Then, the authors discuss the role of hyperglycemia in tumorigenesis (particularly in prostate, liver, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers), as well as the contribution of hyperglycemia to chronic inflammation. The authors end with a brief discussion on the future perspectives of hyperglycemia/tumorigenesis and potential applications of alternative/effective therapeutic strategies for hyperglycemia-associated cancers.

  20. Glucose metabolism and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio; Esposito, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Islet dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are both present in type 2 diabetes and are both necessary for the development of hyperglycemia. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, large, prospective clinical studies have shown a strong relation between time-averaged mean values of glycemia, measured as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular diabetic complications. These studies are the basis for the American Diabetes Association's current recommended treatment goal that HbA1c should be <7%. The measurement of the HbA1c concentration is considered the gold standard for assessing long-term glycemia; however, it does not reveal any information on the extent or frequency of blood glucose excursions, but provides an overall mean value only. Postprandial hyperglycemia occurs frequently in patients with diabetes receiving active treatment and can occur even when metabolic control is apparently good. Interventional studies indicate that reducing postmeal glucose excursions is as important as controlling fasting plasma glucose in persons with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. Evidence exists for a causal relation between postmeal glucose increases and microvascular and macrovascular outcomes; therefore, it is not surprising that treatment with different compounds that have specific effects on postprandial glucose regulation is accompanied by a significant improvement of many pathways supposed to be involved in diabetic complications, including oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation. The goal of therapy should be to achieve glycemic status as near to normal as safely possible in all 3 components of glycemic control: HbA1c, fasting glucose, and postmeal glucose peak.

  1. Ser1928 phosphorylation by PKA stimulates the L-type Ca2+ channel CaV1.2 and vasoconstriction during acute hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nystoriak, Matthew A.; Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Buonarati, Olivia R.; Prada, Maria Paz; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora; Fernandes, Julia Dos Santos; Forbush, Katherine; Hofmann, Franz; Sasse, Kent C.; Scott, John D.; Ward, Sean M.; Hell, Johannes W.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2017-01-01

    Hypercontractility of arterial myocytes and enhanced vascular tone during diabetes are, in part, attributed to the effects of increased glucose (hyperglycemia) on L-type CaV1.2 channels. In murine arterial myocytes, kinase-dependent mechanisms mediate the increase in CaV1.2 activity in response to increased extracellular glucose. We identified a subpopulation of the CaV1.2 channel pore-forming subunit (α1C) within nanometer proximity of protein kinase A (PKA) at the sarcolemma of murine and human arterial myocytes. This arrangement depended upon scaffolding of PKA by an A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150) in mice. Glucose-mediated increases in CaV1.2 channel activity were associated with PKA activity, leading to α1C phosphorylation at Ser1928. Compared to arteries from low-fat diet (LFD)–fed mice and nondiabetic patients, arteries from high-fat diet (HFD)–fed mice and from diabetic patients had increased Ser1928 phosphorylation and CaV1.2 activity. Arterial myocytes and arteries from mice lacking AKAP150 or expressing mutant AKAP150 unable to bind PKA did not exhibit increased Ser1928 phosphorylation and CaV1.2 current density in response to increased glucose or to HFD. Consistent with a functional role for Ser1928 phosphorylation, arterial myocytes and arteries from knockin mice expressing a CaV1.2 with Ser1928 mutated to alanine (S1928A) lacked glucose-mediated increases in CaV1.2 activity and vasoconstriction. Furthermore, the HFD-induced increases in CaV1.2 current density and myogenic tone were prevented in S1928A knockin mice. These findings reveal an essential role for α1C phosphorylation at Ser1928 in stimulating CaV1.2 channel activity and vasoconstriction by AKAP-targeted PKA upon exposure to increased glucose and in diabetes. PMID:28119464

  2. [Complications associated with hyperglycemia in liver transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Builes Montaño, Carlos Esteban; Montoya, Julián Felipe; Londoño, Carolina Aguilar; Palacios Bayona, Karen Lorena; Restrepo Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos; Restrepo, Johnayro Gutiérrez; Arango Toro, Clara María; Jaimes Barragan, Fabián Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a frequent phenomenon in hospitalized patients that is associated with negative outcomes. It is common in liver transplant patients as a result of stress and is related to immunosuppressant drugs. Although studies are few, a history of diabetes and the presentation of hyperglycemia during liver transplantation have been associated with a higher risk for rejection. To analyze whether hyperglycemia during the first 48hours after liver transplantation was associated with a higher risk for infection, rejection, or longer hospital stay. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients above the age of 15years that received a liver transplant. Hyperglycemia was defined as a value above 140mg/dl and it was measured in three different manners (as an isolated value, as a mean value, and as a weighted value over time). The relation of hyperglycemia to a risk for acute rejection, infection, or longer hospital stay was evaluated. Some form of hyperglycemia was present in 94% of the patients during the first 48 post-transplantation hours, regardless of its definition. There was no increased risk for rejection (OR: 1.49; 95%CI: 0.55-4.05), infection (OR: 0.62; 95%CI: 0.16-2.25), or longer hospital stay between the patients that presented with hyperglycemia and those that did not. Hyperglycemia during the first 48hours after transplantation appeared to be an expected phenomenon in the majority of patients and was not associated with a greater risk for rejection or infection and it had no impact on the duration of hospital stay. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucosamine: Can It Worsen Gout Symptoms?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gout My husband takes glucosamine supplements to treat gout. But I'm wondering if glucosamine, which contains shellfish, may actually worsen gout symptoms? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. ...

  4. Metabolic mechanisms of stress hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2006-01-01

    Stress hyperglycemia has gained the attention of virtually every physician who encounters critically ill patients, with the emergence of clinical data supporting tight glycemic control and intensive insulinization for optimal outcome. In order to effectively manage stress hyperglycemia, newer theories of critical illness and the interactions of the brain, neuroendocrine axis, and immune system need to be explored. Nonlinear physiologic processes, glucose allostasis, immune-neuroendocrine axis activation, and molecular mechanisms of insulin receptor signal transduction contribute to a novel model of stress hyperglycemia. In chronic critical illness, allostatic overload leads to a plurality of organ-system derangements and eventually death. Intervention not only involves insulinization according to neurofuzzy logic but also targeting more proximate events with cognitive/behavioral therapy and hypothalamic releasing factors.

  5. Influence of HbA1c levels on platelet function profiles associated with tight glycemic control in patients presenting with hyperglycemia and an acute coronary syndrome. A subanalysis of the CHIPS Study ("Control de HIperglucemia y Actividad Plaquetaria en Pacientes con Síndrome Coronario Agudo").

    PubMed

    Vivas, David; García-Rubira, Juan C; Bernardo, Esther; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Martín, Patricia; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Núñez-Gil, Iván; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    Patients with hyperglycemia, an acute coronary syndrome and poor glycemic control have increased platelet reactivity and poor prognosis. However, it is unclear the influence of a tight glycemic control on platelet reactivity in these patients. This is a subanalysis of the CHIPS study. This trial randomized patients with hyperglycemia to undergo an intensive glucose control (target blood glucose 80-120 mg/dL), or conventional glucose control (target blood glucose <180 mg/dL). We analyzed platelet function at discharge on the subgroup of patients with poor glycemic control, defined with admission levels of HbA1c higher than 6.5%. The primary endpoint was maximal platelet aggregation following stimuli with 20 μM ADP. We also measured aggregation following collagen, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor-activated peptide, as well as P2Y12 reactivity index and surface expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin. A total of 67 patients presented HbA1c ≥ 6.5% (37 intensive, 30 conventional), while 42 had HbA1c < 6.5% (20 intensive, 22 conventional). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between groups. At discharge, patients with HbA1c ≥6.5% had significantly reduced MPA with intensive glucose control compared with conventional control (46.1 ± 22.3 vs. 60.4 ± 20.0%; p = 0.004). Similar findings were shown with other measures of platelet function. However, glucose control strategy did not affect platelet function parameters in patients with HbA1c < 6.5%. Intensive glucose control in patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome and hyperglycemia results in a reduction of platelet reactivity only in the presence of elevated HbA1c levels.

  6. Hyperglycemia with occipital seizures: images and visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Pang; Hsieh, Peiyuan F; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Lin, Wan-Yu; Hu, Wei-Hsiung; Yang, Dar-Yu; Chang, Ming-Hong

    2005-07-01

    Hyperglycemia may rarely be seen with visual seizures. Observation of both visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in visual status epilepticus (SE) has not been reported. We describe acute and follow-up VEP and MRI findings of a patient with hyperglycemia-related visual SE of occipital origin. In a 59-year-old diabetic woman, complex visual hallucinations and illusions developed with < or =10 seizures per hour as an initial manifestation of nonketotic hyperglycemia. Neurologic examination revealed ictal nystagmus to the right and continuous right hemianopsia. Ictal electroencephalography (EEG) and Tc-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) revealed an epileptogenic focus in the left occipital lobe. MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery showed focal subcortical hypointensity and gyral hyperintensity. Follow-up MRI showed only minimal gyral hyperintensity at 6 months. The P100 amplitude of VEP was significantly higher at the right occipital area during SE, but slightly higher on the left after the patient had been seizure free for 6 months. Occipital seizures and hemianopsia can be caused by hyperglycemia and may be accompanied by special MRI and VEP findings.

  7. Combined contributions of over-secreted glucagon-like peptide 1 and suppressed insulin secretion to hyperglycemia induced by gatifloxacin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yunli; Wang, Xinting; Liu, Can; Yao, Dan; Hu, Mengyue; Li, Jia; Hu, Nan; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-02-01

    Accumulating evidences have showed that gatifloxacin causes dysglycemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Our preliminary study demonstrated that gatifloxacin stimulated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal cells. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release and dysglycemia in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and explore the possible mechanisms. Oral administration of gatifloxacin (100 mg/kg/day and 200 mg/kg/day) for 3 and 12 days led to marked elevation of GLP-1 levels, accompanied by significant decrease in insulin levels and increase in plasma glucose. Similar results were found in normal rats treated with 3-day gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release was further confirmed in NCI-H716 cells, which was abolished by diazoxide, a K{sub ATP} channel opener. QT-PCR analysis showed that gatifloxacin also upregulated expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 mRNA. To clarify the contradiction on elevated GLP-1 without insulinotropic effect, effects of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin on insulin release were investigated using INS-1 cells. We found that short exposure (2 h) to GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion and biosynthesis, whereas long exposure (24 h and 48 h) to high level of GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. Moreover, we also confirmed gatifloxacin acutely stimulated insulin secretion while chronically inhibited insulin biosynthesis. All the results gave an inference that gatifloxacin stimulated over-secretion of GLP-1, in turn, high levels of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin synergistically impaired insulin release, worsening hyperglycemia. -- Highlights: ► Gatifloxacin induced hyperglycemia both in diabetic rats and normal rats. ► Gatifloxacin enhanced GLP-1 secretion but inhibited insulin secretion in rats. ► Long-term exposure to high GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. ► GLP-1 over-secretion may be

  8. Glycerol and Fatty Acids in Serum Predict the Development of Hyperglycemia and Type 2 Diabetes in Finnish Men

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Cederberg, Henna; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Laakso, Markku

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We investigated the association of fasting serum glycerol and fatty acids (FAs) as predictors for worsening of hyperglycemia and incident type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of the population-based METabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM) Study included 9,398 Finnish men (mean age 57 ± 7 years). At baseline, levels of serum glycerol, free FAs (FFAs), and serum FA profile, relative to total FAs, were measured with proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS At baseline, levels of glycerol, FFAs, monounsaturated FAs, saturated FAs, and monounsaturated n-7 and -9 FAs, relative to total FAs, were increased in categories of fasting and 2-h hyperglycemia, whereas the levels of n-3 and n-6 FAs, relative to total FAs, decreased (N = 9,398). Among 4,335 men with 4.5-year follow-up data available, 276 developed type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of glycerol, FFAs, monounsaturated FAs, and saturated and monounsaturated n-7 and -9 FAs, relative to total FAs, predicted worsening of hyperglycemia and development of incident type 2 diabetes after adjustment for confounding factors. n-6 FAs, mainly linoleic acid (LA), relative to total FAs, were associated with reduced risk for the worsening of hyperglycemia and conversion to type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Our large population-based study shows that fasting serum levels of glycerol, FFAs, monounsaturated FAs, saturated FAs, and n-7 and -9 FAs are biomarkers for an increased risk of development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes, whereas high levels of serum n-6 FAs, reflecting dietary intake of LA, were associated with reduced risk for hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24026559

  9. Hyperglycemia secondary to consumption of cocaine and atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Argente Villaplana, Carlos R; Civera Andrés, Miguel; Real Collado, José T; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Ascaso Gimilio, Juan F; Carmena Rodríguez, Rafael

    2008-10-01

    Drugs such as cocaine and atypical antipsychotic agents, such as olanzapine, are sometimes related to hyperglycemia. Whereas cocaine raises plasma glucose through catecholamine release, atypical antipsychotic agents mainly increase appetite and induce weight gain and the development of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the latter group of drugs also act independently from weight gain or adiposity, due to inhibition of beta pancreatic cells and reduction of peripheral insulin action. We present the case of a 29-year-old non-diabetic woman with severe acute hyperglycemia in the context of a suicide attempt through intake of olanzapine and cocaine. After discontinuation of olanzapine and cocaine consumption, glycemia was immediately normalized without subsequent diagnosis of diabetes.

  10. Damaging effects of hyperglycemia on cardiovascular function: spotlight on glucose metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Mapanga, Rudo F; Essop, M Faadiel

    2016-01-15

    The incidence of cardiovascular complications associated with hyperglycemia is a growing global health problem. This review discusses the link between hyperglycemia and cardiovascular diseases onset, focusing on the role of recently emerging downstream mediators, namely, oxidative stress and glucose metabolic pathway perturbations. The role of hyperglycemia-mediated activation of nonoxidative glucose pathways (NOGPs) [i.e., the polyol pathway, hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and protein kinase C] in this process is extensively reviewed. The proposal is made that there is a unique interplay between NOGPs and a downstream convergence of detrimental effects that especially affect cardiac endothelial cells, thereby contributing to contractile dysfunction. In this process the AGE pathway emerges as a crucial mediator of hyperglycemia-mediated detrimental effects. In addition, a vicious metabolic cycle is established whereby hyperglycemia-induced NOGPs further fuel their own activation by generating even more oxidative stress, thereby exacerbating damaging effects on cardiac function. Thus NOGP inhibition, and particularly that of the AGE pathway, emerges as a novel therapeutic intervention for the treatment of cardiovascular complications such as acute myocardial infarction in the presence hyperglycemia.

  11. Stress Induced Hyperglycemia and the Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Survivors of Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Mark P.; Finnis, Mark E.; Phillips, Liza K.; Kar, Palash; Bihari, Shailesh; Biradar, Vishwanath; Moodie, Stewart; Horowitz, Michael; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Deane, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stress induced hyperglycemia occurs in critically ill patients who have normal glucose tolerance following resolution of their acute illness. The objective was to evaluate the association between stress induced hyperglycemia and incident diabetes in survivors of critical illness. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting All adult patients surviving admission to a public hospital intensive care unit (ICU) in South Australia between 2004 and 2011. Patients Stress induced hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) within 24 hours of ICU admission. Prevalent diabetes was identified through ICD-10 coding or prior registration with the Australian National Diabetes Service Scheme (NDSS). Incident diabetes was identified as NDSS registration beyond 30 days after hospital discharge until July 2015. The predicted risk of developing diabetes was described as sub-hazard ratios using competing risk regression. Survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Main Results Stress induced hyperglycemia was identified in 2,883 (17%) of 17,074 patients without diabetes. The incidence of type 2 diabetes following critical illness was 4.8% (821 of 17,074). The risk of diabetes in patients with stress induced hyperglycemia was approximately double that of those without (HR 1.91 (95% CI 1.62, 2.26), p<0.001) and was sustained regardless of age or severity of illness. Conclusions Stress induced hyperglycemia identifies patients at subsequent risk of incident diabetes. PMID:27824898

  12. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease.

  13. Nigerian Honey Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O.; Nwobodo, Ndubuisi N.; Akpan, Joseph L.; Okorie, Ugochi A.; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum T.; Ezeokpo, Basil C.; Nwadike, Kenneth I.; Erhiano, Erhirhie; Abdul Wahab, Mohd S.; Sulaiman, Siti A.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic dyslipidemia contributes to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Hence, its treatment is necessary to reduce cardiovascular events. Honey reduces hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. The reproducibility of these beneficial effects and their generalization to honey samples of other geographical parts of the world remain controversial. Currently, data are limited and findings are inconclusive especially with evidence showing honey increased glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. It was hypothesized that this deteriorating effect might be due to administered high doses. This study investigated if Nigerian honey could ameliorate hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It also evaluated if high doses of honey could worsen glucose and lipid abnormalities. Honey (1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 g/kg) was administered to diabetic rats for three weeks. Honey (1.0 or 2.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) increased high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol while it significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, triglycerides (TGs), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, coronary risk index (CRI) and cardiovascular risk index (CVRI). In contrast, honey (3.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced TGs and VLDL cholesterol. This study confirms the reproducibility of glucose lowering and hypolipidemic effects of honey using Nigerian honey. However, none of the doses deteriorated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. PMID:26927161

  14. Nigerian Honey Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O; Nwobodo, Ndubuisi N; Akpan, Joseph L; Okorie, Ugochi A; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum T; Ezeokpo, Basil C; Nwadike, Kenneth I; Erhiano, Erhirhie; Abdul Wahab, Mohd S; Sulaiman, Siti A

    2016-02-24

    Diabetic dyslipidemia contributes to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Hence, its treatment is necessary to reduce cardiovascular events. Honey reduces hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. The reproducibility of these beneficial effects and their generalization to honey samples of other geographical parts of the world remain controversial. Currently, data are limited and findings are inconclusive especially with evidence showing honey increased glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. It was hypothesized that this deteriorating effect might be due to administered high doses. This study investigated if Nigerian honey could ameliorate hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It also evaluated if high doses of honey could worsen glucose and lipid abnormalities. Honey (1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 g/kg) was administered to diabetic rats for three weeks. Honey (1.0 or 2.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) increased high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol while it significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, triglycerides (TGs), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, coronary risk index (CRI) and cardiovascular risk index (CVRI). In contrast, honey (3.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced TGs and VLDL cholesterol. This study confirms the reproducibility of glucose lowering and hypolipidemic effects of honey using Nigerian honey. However, none of the doses deteriorated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia.

  15. Worsening of Parkinson's disease by citalopram.

    PubMed

    Linazasoro

    2000-04-01

    More than 50% of the patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may experience mood disturbances. Serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are very active in the management of depression. Citalopram is a new SSRI increasingly used in the treatment of depression. The question of a negative impact of SSRI on the motor function of patients with PD is an important clinical issue. A number of such observations have published with various SSRI, but none, up-to-now with citalopram. We report the case of a patient with PD who experienced a worsening in the motor status soon after the addition of citalopram to her antiparkinsonian drug regime. This single case report suggests that this potential adverse event is a class related side effect.

  16. Myeloid Bmal1 deletion increases monocyte recruitment and worsens atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Mingyu; Huang, Yuhong; Qu, Dan; Zhang, Hongsong; Wong, Wing Tak; Chawla, Ajay; Huang, Yu; Tian, Xiao Yu

    2017-03-01

    BMAL1, the nonredundant transcription factor in the core molecular clock, has been implicated in cardiometabolic diseases in mice and humans. BMAL1 controls the cyclic trafficking of Ly6c(hi) monocytes to sites of acute inflammation. Myeloid deficiency of Bmal1 also worsens chronic inflammation in diet-induced obesity. We studied whether myeloid Bmal1 deletion promotes atherosclerosis by enhancing monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic lesions. By generating Bmal1(FloxP/FloxP);LysM(Cre) mice on the Apoe(-/-) background, we showed that Bmal1 deletion in myeloid cells increased the size of atherosclerotic lesions. Bmal1 deficiency in monocytes and macrophages resulted in an increased total number of lesional macrophages in general and Ly6c(hi) infiltrating monocyte-macrophages in particular, accompanied by skewed M2 to M1 macrophage phenotype. Ly6c(hi) and/or Ly6c(lo) monocyte subsets in blood, spleen, and bone marrow were not altered. Cell tracking and adoptive transfer of Ly6c(hi) monocytes showed Bmal1 deficiency induced more trafficking of Ly6c(hi) monocytes to atherosclerotic lesions, preferential differentiation of Ly6c(hi) monocytes into M1 macrophages, and increased macrophage content and lesion size in the carotid arteries. We demonstrated that Bmal1 deficiency in macrophages promotes atherosclerosis by enhancing recruitment of Ly6c(hi) monocytes to atherosclerotic lesions.-Huo, M., Huang, Y., Qu, D., Zhang, H., Wong, W. T., Chawla, A., Huang, Y., Tian, X. Y. Myeloid Bmal1 deletion increases monocyte recruitment and worsens atherosclerosis.

  17. Hyperglycemia enhances excessive superoxide anion radical generation, oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Fujita, Motoki; Ono, Takeru; Koda, Yoichi; Koga, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Nanba, Masahiro; Shitara, Masaki; Kasaoka, Shunji; Maruyama, Ikuro; Yuasa, Makoto; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-14

    The aim of this study was to confirm the effect of acute hyperglycemia on the superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)) generation, using a novel electrochemical O(2)(-) sensor in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion rats. Fourteen male Wistar rats were allocated to a normoglycemia group (n= 7) and a hyperglycemia group (n=7). Hyperglycemia was induced by intravenous infusion of glucose solution. Forebrain ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion with hemorrhagic hypotension for 10 min and then was reperfused. The generated O(2)(-) was measured as the current produced, which was integrated as a quantified partial value of electricity (Q), in the jugular vein using the O(2)(-) sensor. The reacted O(2)(-) current and the Q began to increase gradually during the forebrain ischemia in both groups. These values increased remarkably just after reperfusion in the normoglycemia group and were further increased significantly in the hyperglycemia group after the reperfusion. Concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in the brain and plasma, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the plasma in the hyperglycemia group were significantly higher than those in the normoglycemia group. Brain and plasma MDA, HMGB1, and ICAM-1 were correlated with a sum of Q during ischemia and after reperfusion. In conclusion, acute transient hyperglycemia enhanced the O(2)(-) generation in blood and exacerbated oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury after the forebrain ischemia/reperfusion in the rats.

  18. Hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression in mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kumar, Nikit; Olivas, Victor R; Eberlé, Delphine; Stephens, Kyle; Raffai, Robert L

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic patients are known to be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and its associated cardiovascular complications. However, the effects of hyperglycemia on atherosclerosis regression remain unclear. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression by modulating the biological function of lesional macrophages. HypoE (Apoe(h/h)Mx1-Cre) mice express low levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) and develop atherosclerosis when fed a high-fat diet. Atherosclerosis regression occurs in these mice upon plasma lipid lowering induced by a change in diet and the restoration of apoE expression. We examined the morphological characteristics of regressed lesions and assessed the biological function of lesional macrophages isolated with laser-capture microdissection in euglycemic and hyperglycemic HypoE mice. Hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin treatment impaired lesion size reduction (36% versus 14%) and lipid loss (38% versus 26%) after the reversal of hyperlipidemia. However, decreases in lesional macrophage content and remodeling in both groups of mice were similar. Gene expression analysis revealed that hyperglycemia impaired cholesterol transport by modulating ATP-binding cassette A1, ATP-binding cassette G1, scavenger receptor class B family member (CD36), scavenger receptor class B1, and wound healing pathways in lesional macrophages during atherosclerosis regression. Hyperglycemia impairs both reduction in size and loss of lipids from atherosclerotic lesions upon plasma lipid lowering without significantly affecting the remodeling of the vascular wall.

  19. Chorea-Ballismus Associated with Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    KOCASOY ORHAN, Elif; ATMACA, M. Mert; ATMACA, Melek; HANAĞASI, Haşmet A.

    2013-01-01

    Chorea-ballismus which is a rare complication of nonketotic hyperglycemia may be the first symptom of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this paper, we present two patients, who had involuntary movements and were diagnosed as having ballismus-chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia. While one of the patients was not diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, the other one did not administer insulin therapy for a long time which was prescribed. The patients were investigated by cranial imaging and biochemical tests. The symptoms improved in one of them within hours, however, it took days to improve for the other one. This clinical situation, which is thought to be caused by hyperglycemia, cerebral ischemia and failure of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and which probably improves with regulation of blood glucose levels, should be kept in mind by emergency physicians, because it can be the first presentation of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Danielle; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E.; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE). Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro) and fluid transport (in vivo). Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina. PMID:27617745

  1. Hyperglycemia and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Boyd E; Lowe, Lynn P; Dyer, Alan R; Trimble, Elisabeth R; Chaovarindr, Udom; Coustan, Donald R; Hadden, David R; McCance, David R; Hod, Moshe; McIntyre, Harold David; Oats, Jeremy J N; Persson, Bengt; Rogers, Michael S; Sacks, David A

    2008-05-08

    It is controversial whether maternal hyperglycemia less severe than that in diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes. A total of 25,505 pregnant women at 15 centers in nine countries underwent 75-g oral glucose-tolerance testing at 24 to 32 weeks of gestation. Data remained blinded if the fasting plasma glucose level was 105 mg per deciliter (5.8 mmol per liter) or less and the 2-hour plasma glucose level was 200 mg per deciliter (11.1 mmol per liter) or less. Primary outcomes were birth weight above the 90th percentile for gestational age, primary cesarean delivery, clinically diagnosed neonatal hypoglycemia, and cord-blood serum C-peptide level above the 90th percentile. Secondary outcomes were delivery before 37 weeks of gestation, shoulder dystocia or birth injury, need for intensive neonatal care, hyperbilirubinemia, and preeclampsia. For the 23,316 participants with blinded data, we calculated adjusted odds ratios for adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with an increase in the fasting plasma glucose level of 1 SD (6.9 mg per deciliter [0.4 mmol per liter]), an increase in the 1-hour plasma glucose level of 1 SD (30.9 mg per deciliter [1.7 mmol per liter]), and an increase in the 2-hour plasma glucose level of 1 SD (23.5 mg per deciliter [1.3 mmol per liter]). For birth weight above the 90th percentile, the odds ratios were 1.38 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32 to 1.44), 1.46 (1.39 to 1.53), and 1.38 (1.32 to 1.44), respectively; for cord-blood serum C-peptide level above the 90th percentile, 1.55 (95% CI, 1.47 to 1.64), 1.46 (1.38 to 1.54), and 1.37 (1.30 to 1.44); for primary cesarean delivery, 1.11 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.15), 1.10 (1.06 to 1.15), and 1.08 (1.03 to 1.12); and for neonatal hypoglycemia, 1.08 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.19), 1.13 (1.03 to 1.26), and 1.10 (1.00 to 1.12). There were no obvious thresholds at which risks increased. Significant associations were also observed for secondary outcomes, although these

  2. Coronary angiography in worsening heart failure: determinants, findings and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Rossignol, Patrick; Demissei, Biniyam; Sharma, Abhinav; Girerd, Nicolas; Anker, Stefan D; Cleland, John G; Dickstein, Kenneth; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Hillege, Hans L; Lang, Chim C; Metra, Marco; Ng, Leong L; Ponikowski, Piotr; Samani, Nilesh J; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Voors, Adriaan; Zannad, Faiez

    2017-08-10

    Coronary angiography is regularly performed in patients with worsening signs and/or symptoms of heart failure (HF). However, little is known on the determinants, findings and associated clinical outcomes of coronary angiography performed in patients with worsening HF. The BIOSTAT-CHF (a systems BIOlogy Study to TAilored Treatment in Chronic Heart Failure) programme enrolled 2516 patients with worsening symptoms and/or signs of HF, either hospitalised or in the outpatient setting. All patients were included in the present analysis. Of the 2516 patients included, 315 (12.5%) underwent coronary angiography within the 30 days after the onset of worsening symptoms and/or signs of HF. Subjects who underwent angiography were more often observed as inpatients, had more often an overt acute coronary syndrome, had higher troponin I levels, were younger and had better renal function (all p≤0.01). Patients who underwent coronary angiography had a lower risk of the primary outcome of death and/or HF hospitalisation (adjusted HR=0.71, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.89, p=0.003) and death (adjusted HR=0.59, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.80, p=0.001). Among the patients who underwent coronary angiography, those with a coronary stenosis (39%) had a worse prognosis than those without stenosis (adjusted HR for the primary outcome=1.71, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.64, p=0.016). Coronary angiography was performed in <13% of patients with symptoms and/or signs of worsening HF. These patients were remarkably different from those who did not undergo coronary angiography and had a lower risk of subsequent events. The presence of coronary stenosis on coronary angiography was associated with a worse prognosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Transient Worsening of Photosensitivity due to Cholelithiasis in a Variegate Porphyria Patient.

    PubMed

    Susa, Shinji; Sato-Monma, Fumiko; Ishii, Kouta; Hada, Yurika; Takase, Kaoru; Tada, Kyoko; Wada, Kiriko; Kameda, Wataru; Watanabe, Kentaro; Oizumi, Toshihide; Suzuki, Tamio; Daimon, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    Variegate porphyria (VP) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations of the protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene. This porphyria has unique characteristics which can induce acute neurovisceral attacks and cutaneous lesions that may occur separately or together. We herin report a 58-years-old VP patient complicated with cholelithiasis. A sequencing analysis indicated a novel c.40G>C mutation (p.G14R) in the PPOX gene. His cutaneous photosensitivity had been worsening for 3 years before the emergence of cholecystitis and it then gradually improved after cholecystectomy and ursodeoxycholic acid treatment with a slight decline in the porphyrin levels in his blood, urine and stool. In VP patients, a worsening of photosensitivity can thus be induced due to complications associated with some other disease, thereby affecting their porphyrin-heme biosynthesis.

  4. Transient Worsening of Photosensitivity due to Cholelithiasis in a Variegate Porphyria Patient

    PubMed Central

    Susa, Shinji; Sato-Monma, Fumiko; Ishii, Kouta; Hada, Yurika; Takase, Kaoru; Tada, Kyoko; Wada, Kiriko; Kameda, Wataru; Watanabe, Kentaro; Oizumi, Toshihide; Suzuki, Tamio; Daimon, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Variegate porphyria (VP) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations of the protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene. This porphyria has unique characteristics which can induce acute neurovisceral attacks and cutaneous lesions that may occur separately or together. We herin report a 58-years-old VP patient complicated with cholelithiasis. A sequencing analysis indicated a novel c.40G>C mutation (p.G14R) in the PPOX gene. His cutaneous photosensitivity had been worsening for 3 years before the emergence of cholecystitis and it then gradually improved after cholecystectomy and ursodeoxycholic acid treatment with a slight decline in the porphyrin levels in his blood, urine and stool. In VP patients, a worsening of photosensitivity can thus be induced due to complications associated with some other disease, thereby affecting their porphyrin-heme biosynthesis. PMID:27746433

  5. Non-Cholesterol Sterol Levels Predict Hyperglycemia and Conversion to Type 2 Diabetes in Finnish Men

    PubMed Central

    Cederberg, Henna; Gylling, Helena; Miettinen, Tatu A.; Paananen, Jussi; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Stančáková, Alena; Smith, Ulf; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the levels of non-cholesterol sterols as predictors for the development of hyperglycemia (an increase in the glucose area under the curve in an oral glucose tolerance test) and incident type 2 diabetes in a 5-year follow-up study of a population-based cohort of Finnish men (METSIM Study, N = 1,050) having non-cholesterol sterols measured at baseline. Additionally we determined the association of 538,265 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with non-cholesterol sterol levels in a cross-sectional cohort of non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetes (the Kuopio cohort of the EUGENE2 Study, N = 273). We found that in a cross-sectional METSIM Study the levels of sterols indicating cholesterol absorption were reduced as a function of increasing fasting glucose levels, whereas the levels of sterols indicating cholesterol synthesis were increased as a function of increasing 2-hour glucose levels. A cholesterol synthesis marker desmosterol significantly predicted an increase, and two absorption markers (campesterol and avenasterol) a decrease in the risk of hyperglycemia and incident type 2 diabetes in a 5-year follow-up of the METSIM cohort, mainly attributable to insulin sensitivity. A SNP of ABCG8 was associated with fasting plasma glucose levels in a cross-sectional study but did not predict hyperglycemia or incident type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, the levels of some, but not all non-cholesterol sterols are markers of the worsening of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23840693

  6. Qualitative analysis of subcutaneous Lispro and regular insulin injections for stress hyperglycemia: a pilot numerical study.

    PubMed

    Strilka, Richard J; Armen, Scott B; Indeck, Matthew C

    2014-09-07

    Increased glucose variability (GV) is an independent risk factor for mortality in the critically ill; unfortunately, the optimal insulin therapy that minimizes GV is not known. We simulate the glucose-insulin feedback system to study how stress hyperglycemia (SH) states, taken to be a non-uniform group of physiologic disorders with varying insulin resistance (IR) and similar levels of hyperglycemia, respond to the type and dose of subcutaneous (SQ) insulin. Two groups of 100 virtual patients are studied: those receiving and those not receiving continuous enteral feeds. Stress hyperglycemia was facilitated by doubling the gluconeogenesis rate and IR was stepwise varied from a borderline to a high value. Lispro and regular insulin were simulated with dosages that ranged from 0 to 6 units; the resulting GV was analyzed after each insulin injection. The numerical model used consists of a set of non-linear differential equations with two time delays and five adjustable parameters. The results show that regular insulin decreased GV in both patient groups and rarely caused hypoglycemia. With continuous enteral feeds and borderline to mild IR, Lispro showed minimal effect on GV; however, rebound hyperglycemia that increased GV occurred when the IR was moderate to high. Without a nutritional source, Lispro worsened GV through frequent hypoglycemia episodes as the injection dose increased. The inferior performance of Lispro is a result of its rapid absorption profile; half of its duration of action is similar to the glucose ultradian period. Clinical trials are needed to examine whether these numerical results represent the glucose-insulin dynamics that occur in intensive care units, and if such dynamics are present, their clinical effects should be evaluated.

  7. Effects of hyperglycemia on gasping and autoresuscitation in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S Z; Blennow, M; Runold, M; Lagercrantz, H

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of glucose on the gasping ability and survival in a rat pup model during acute anoxia. Newborn rat pups of both 1 and 8 days of age were given glucose (30 and 60 mg/animal) or saline intraperitoneally and subsequently subjected to anoxia (100% N2). Glucose supplement induced hyperglycemia. Respiration was recorded by barometric plethysmography. The rat pups responded to acute anoxia with a robust sequence of respiratory pattern: hyperpnea, primary apnea, hypoxic gasping and secondary apnea. During anoxia the 1-day-old rats gasped much longer than the 8-day-old rats (23.4 +/- 1.0 vs. 6.1 +/- 0.5 min, p < 0.001). No difference was found in gasping duration between the saline control and the glucose-supplemented 1-day-old rat pups. The 8-day-old supplemented rats gasped much longer (9.3 +/- 0.5 min) than the control rats (6.1 +/- 0.5 min, p < 0.01). The animals autoresuscitated when they received oxygen (100%) during the gasping period. When oxygen was given after the gasping period, the survival rate was 33.3% in control and 0% in supplemented 1-day-old rats, and 100% in control and 50% in glucose-supplemented 8-day-old rats (p < 0.02). Further controlled experiments for a fixed period of anoxia to 13.5 min resulted in survival rates of 50.0% for controls and 28.6% for supplemented animals, respectively. The overall survival rate was then 85.2% in control and 52.9% in supplemented 8-day-old rats (p < 0.05). Lactate concentration in blood rapidly increased in the first 6 min of anoxia and thereafter gradually increased to 22.1 mmol/l around the last gasp in the 1-day-old rats. Hyperglycemia did not cause further accumulation of lactate despite a transient elevation over the control rats at 6 min of anoxia. In the 8-day-old supplemented animals the lactate level was only modestly increased, probably due to the prolonged gasping period. In conclusion, we found that gasping performance was well preserved in the 8-day

  8. Effect of acid-sensing ion channel 1a on the process of liver fibrosis under hyperglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Ying-hong; Yang, Feng; Li, Xiao-feng; Tian, Yuan-yao; Ni, Ming-ming; Zuo, Long-quan; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Huang, Yan

    2015-12-25

    Metabolic syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia contributes to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-associated liver fibrosis. This study was to investigate the effects of Acid-sensing ion Channel 1a (ASIC1a) on the process of liver fibrosis under hyperglycemia. Results showed that high glucose significantly worsen the pathology of liver fibrosis in vivo. In vitro, high glucose stimulated proliferation, activation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production in HSCs, and enhanced the effect of PDGF-BB on the activation and proliferation of HSCs. These effects could be attenuated by ASIC1a specific inhibitor Psalmotoxin-1(PcTx1) or specific ShRNA for ASIC1a through Notch1/Hes-1 pathways. These data indicate that ASIC1a plays an important role in diabetes complication liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • Hyperglycemia is a risk factor for the process of liver fibrosis. • ASIC1a may be a key factor linking between high glucose and liver fibrosis. • Notch1/Hes-1 may involve to the process of liver fibrosis under hyperglycemia.

  9. Hospital-Related Delirium May Help Worsen Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163123.html Hospital-Related Delirium May Help Worsen Dementia But disorienting condition can ... WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalization-related delirium may speed mental decline in patients with dementia, ...

  10. [A Case of Renal Cell Carcinoma with High Everolimus Blood Concentrations and Hyperglycemia Due to Everolimus-Induced Hepatic Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Shinya; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Kawasaki, Yoshihide; Ito, Akihiro; Arai, Yoichi; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Mano, Nariyasu

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who had renal cell carcinoma with high everolimus blood concentrations and hyperglycemia due to everolimus-induced hepatic dysfunction. A 74-year-old man who underwent right nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma was administered everolimus for multiple lung metastases. Everolimus caused grade 3 hepatic dysfunction and hyperglycemia; hence, high blood levels of everolimus were observed. Although the patient was re-administrated everolimus after recovering from hepatic dysfunction, hepatic function test values worsened again. Everolimus was discontinued before its blood concentration increased, and the patient was switched to axitinib treatment. Therefore, the measurement of everolimus blood level is considered useful for the management of adverse events in renal cell carcinoma.

  11. Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus Following Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Rodolfo J; Wallia, Amisha

    2016-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is common following organ transplantation, regardless of the pre-transplant diabetes status. Transient post-transplant hyperglycemia and/or new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) are common and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. NODAT and type 2 diabetes share similar characteristics, but the pathophysiology may differ. Immunosuppressive agents and steroids play a key role in the development of NODAT. Glycemic control is challenging in this population due to fluctuating renal/end-organ function, immunosuppressive dosing, nutritional status, and drug-drug interactions. A proactive and multidisciplinary approach is essential, along with flexible protocols to adjust to patient status, type of organ transplanted, and corticosteroid regimens. Insulin is the preferred agent for hospitalized patients and during the early post-transplant period; optimal glycemic control (BG < 180 mg/dl with minimal hypoglycemia [<70 mg/dl]) is desired.

  12. Predictors of disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Spelman, Tim; Kalincik, Tomas; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, François; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Cabrera-Gomez, José; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Fernández-Bolaños, Ricardo; Iuliano, Gerardo; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Verheul, Freek; van Pesch, Vincent; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Fiol, Marcela; Moore, Fraser; Cristiano, Edgardo; Alroughani, Raed; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Barnett, Michael; Slee, Mark; Vella, Norbert; Herbert, Joseph; Shaw, Cameron; Saladino, Maria Laura; Amato, Maria Pia; Liew, Danny; Paolicelli, Damiano; Butzkueven, Helmut; Trojano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess demographic, clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment exposure predictors of time to 3 or 12-month confirmed disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We utilized the MSBase Incident Study (MSBasis), a prospective cohort study of outcome after CIS. Predictors of time to first 3 and 12-month confirmed expanded disability status scale worsening were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results About 1989 patients were analyzed, the largest seen-from-onset cohort reported to-date. A total of 391 patients had a first 3-month confirmed disability worsening event, of which 307 were sustained for 12 months. Older age at CIS onset (adjusted hazard ratio: aHR 1.17, 95% 1.06, 1.30), pyramidal (aHR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13, 1.89) and ambulation (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.09, 2.34) system dysfunction, annualized relapse rate (aHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.18, 1.22), and lower proportion of observation time on treatment were associated with 3-month confirmed worsening. Predictors of time to 12-month sustained worsening included pyramidal system dysfunction (Hazard ratio: aHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05, 1.83), and older age at CIS onset (aHR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04, 1.31). Greater proportion of follow-up time exposed to treatment was associated with greater reductions in the rate of worsening. Interpretation This study provides class IV evidence for a strong protective effect of disease-modifying treatment to reduce disability worsening events in patients with CIS and early MS, and confirms age and pyramidal dysfunction at onset as risk factors. PMID:26000321

  13. Administration of Anti-Reg I and Anti-PAPII Antibodies Worsens Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Viterbo, Domenico; Callender, Gordon E; DiMaio, Theresa; Mueller, Cathy M; Smith-Norowitz, Tamar; Zenilman, Michael E; Bluth, Martin H

    2009-01-01

    Context The regeneration protein family (Reg), which includes Reg I and PAPII, is expressed in pancreas acinar cells, and increases in acute pancreatitis. We have demonstrated that Reg gene knockdown worsens severity of acute pancreatitis in the rat and hypothesize that the proteins offer a protective effect in this disease. Objective We investigated the ability of anti-Reg and anti-PAP antibody to neutralize pancreatic Reg protein and affect pancreatitis severity. Intervention Pancreatitis was induced in rats by retrograde ductal injection of 4% sodium taurocholate. Animals Eighty-four rats: 48 with induced pancreatitis, 30 sham operated, and 6 normal animals. Setting Intraductal anti-Reg I and/or anti-PAPII antibody was administered at induced pancreatitis and sham operated subgroups of 6 rats each. Main outcome measure Serum and pancreata were harvested 24 and/or 48 hours later and assessed for pancreatitis severity by pancreatic wet weight, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), amylase, PAPII levels, and histopathology. Results Animals induced with pancreatitis with administration of anti-Reg/PAP antibodies had significantly higher wet weights compared with taurocholate and histopathological analysis revealed that anti-Reg/PAP treated animals had worse tissue inflammation and necrosis compared with controls. Serum CRP, amylase, and Reg levels did not significantly differ between experimental and sham control groups. Conclusions Administration of anti-Reg/PAP antibody worsened taurocholate-induced organ specific pancreatitis. These data suggest that the Reg family of proteins is protective in acute pancreatitis. PMID:19129610

  14. HYPERGLYCEMIA MANAGEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH POSTTRANSPLANTATION DIABETES.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Rodolfo J; Fried, Martin; Breen, Tracy; Tamler, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Posttransplantation diabetes (PTDM) is a common occurrence after solid-organ transplantation and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. There is a limited number of studies addressing strategies for hyperglycemia management in this population, with a few articles emerging recently. We performed a PubMed search of studies published in English addressing hyperglycemia management of PTDM/new-onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT). Relevant cited articles were also retrieved. Most of the 25 publications eligible for review were retrospective studies. Insulin therapy during the early posttransplantation period showed promise in preventing PTDM development. Thiazolidinediones have been mostly shown to exert glycemic control in retrospective studies, at the expense of weight gain and fluid retention. Evidence with metformin, sulfonylureas, and meglitinides is very limited. Incretins have shown promising results in small prospective studies using sitagliptin, linaglitpin, and vildagliptin and a case series using liraglutide. Prospective randomized studies assessing the management of hyperglycemia in PTDM are urgently needed. In the meantime, clinicians need to be aware of the high risk of PTDM and associated complications and current concepts in management.

  15. Mechanism Underlying Induction of Hyperglycemia in Rats by Single Administration of Olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Masashi; Nakajima, Mayumi; Ishiwata, Yasuyoshi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Negishi, Kenichi; Yasuhara, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Acute administration of olanzapine rapidly elevates blood glucose levels. However, the mechanism underlying the rapid development of hyperglycemia with the administration of olanzapine remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism underlying olanzapine-induced acute hyperglycemia. Male Wistar rats received an intravenous infusion of saline (control) or olanzapine 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg. Blood samples were obtained periodically after olanzapine infusion to determine serum concentrations of glucose, olanzapine, and several endogenous substances. In a separate experiment, rats received an intravenous injection of propranolol (2 mg/kg) 30 min before infusion of olanzapine (10 mg/kg). The intravenous infusion of olanzapine induced dose-dependent increases in the serum concentrations of glucose, epinephrine, and insulin. Pretreatment with propranolol suppressed olanzapine-induced elevations in the serum concentration of glucose, but did not affect the serum concentration of olanzapine or olanzapine-induced increase in the serum concentration of epinephrine. Although the serum concentration of corticosterone increased after administration of olanzapine, no significant differences were observed among the olanzapine dose groups. Furthermore, administration of olanzapine did not affect the serum concentration of glucagon or histamine. We developed a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model assuming that the olanzapine-induced secretion of epinephrine leads to elevated serum glucose concentrations. This model appeared to satisfactorily characterize olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia. In conclusion, a single intravenous dose of olanzapine dose-dependently increased the serum concentration of glucose in rats, and epinephrine plays a role in olanzapine-induced acute hyperglycemia.

  16. Care-seeking decisions for worsening symptoms in heart failure: a qualitative metasynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ivynian, S E; DiGiacomo, M; Newton, P J

    2015-11-01

    Over 50 % of heart failure (HF) patients delay seeking help for worsening symptoms until these reach acute levels and require emergency hospitalisation. This metasynthesis aimed to identify and explore factors influencing timely care-seeking in patients with HF. Electronic databases searched were MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL. Studies were included if they were peer-reviewed journal articles, written in English, and reported perspectives of HF patients following qualitative data collection and analysis. Forty articles underwent analysis following the approach of Thomas and Harden. Leventhal's self-regulatory model (SRM) was used to organise the literature. Much of the literature fits within the SRM; however, this model did not account for all factors that influence patients' care-seeking for worsening symptoms. Factors not accounted for included patients' appraisals of previous care-seeking experiences, perceived system and provider barriers to accessing care, and the influence of external appraisals. When added to factors already represented in the model, such as misattribution of symptoms, not identifying with HF diagnosis, cognitive status, lack of understanding information provided, adaptation to symptoms, and emotional responses, a more comprehensive account of patients' decision-making was revealed. This metasynthesis identified factors, as yet unaccounted for, in a prominent model, and has suggested a more comprehensive framework for addressing care-seeking in HF patients. This information can be used to tailor education, communication, and service initiatives to improve HF patients' responses to worsening symptoms and target those most at risk of delay.

  17. The serum level of soluble CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 increases in response to acute hyperglycemia after an oral glucose load in healthy subjects: association with high-molecular weight adiponectin and hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yoshimasa; Terasawa, Tomoko; Kato, Kanako; Jojima, Teruo; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Iijima, Toshie; Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Mikami, Shigeru; Kubota, Yoshiro; Inukai, Toshihiko; Kasai, Kikuo

    2013-11-01

    A soluble form of CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (sCD26/DPP4) is found in serum and it has DPP4 enzymatic activity. We investigated whether the serum level of sCD26/DPP4 was influenced by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy subjects. The serum sCD26/DPP4 level increased significantly from 824.5 ng/mL (interquartile range, from 699.0 to 1050 ng/mL) at baseline to a peak of 985.0 ng/mL (interquartile range, from 796.5 to 1215 ng/mL) during the OGTT (P < 0.0001). The peak sCD26/DPP4 level correlated positively with the baseline age and body mass index, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), triglycerides (TG), alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels whereas it correlated negatively with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and the serum levels of total and high-molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin. Stepwise regression analysis was done with forward selection of variables, including age, FPG, HOMA-IR, TG, HDL cholesterol, uric acid, GGT, C-reactive protein, and HMW adiponectin. In a model that explained 57.5% of the variation of the peak sCD26/DPP4 level, GGT (β = 0.382, P = 0.007) and HOMA-IR (β = 0.307, P = 0.034) were independent determinants of the peak serum level of sCD26/DPP4. Serum HMW adiponectin decreased significantly from 4.43 μg/mL (interquartile range, from 2.80 to 6.65 μg/mL) at baseline to 4.17 μg/mL (interquartile range, from 2.48 to 6.96 μg/mL) 120 minutes after the oral glucose load (P < 0.0001). The baseline serum level of sCD26/DPP4 showed a significant negative correlation with the percent change of HMW adiponectin during the OGTT. In conclusion, the serum level of sCD26/DPP4 increased acutely after an oral glucose load in apparently healthy subjects. The abrupt increase of serum sCD26/DPP4 after a glucose load may be a marker of insulin resistance that could come from liver or muscle. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights

  18. The impact of hyperglycemia and obesity on hospitalization costs and clinical outcome in general surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Lauren; Fayfman, Maya; Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Zhao, Liping; Farrokhi, Farnoosh; Weaver, Jeff; Smiley-Byrd, Dawn; Pasquel, Francisco J; Vellanki, Priyathama; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2015-01-01

    The impact of obesity on clinical outcomes and hospitalization costs in general surgery patients with and without diabetes (DM) is unknown. We reviewed medical records of 2451 patients who underwent gastrointestinal surgery at two university hospitals. Hyperglycemia was defined as BG ≥140 mg/dl. Overweight was defined by body mass index (BMI) between 25-29.9 kg/m(2) and obesity as a BMI ≥30 kg/m(2). Hospital cost was calculated using cost-charge ratios from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Hospital complications included a composite of major cardiovascular events, pneumonia, bacteremia, acute kidney injury (AKI), respiratory failure, and death. Hyperglycemia was present in 1575 patients (74.8%). Compared to patients with normoglycemia, those with DM and non-DM with hyperglycemia had higher number of complications (8.9% vs. 35.8% vs. 30.0%, p<0.0001), longer hospital stay (5 days vs. 9 days vs. 9 days, p<0.0001), more readmissions within 30 days (9.3% vs. 18.8% vs. 17.2%, p<0.0001), and higher hospitalization costs ($20,273 vs. $79,545 vs. $72,675, p<0.0001). In contrast, compared to normal-weight subjects, overweight and obesity were not associated with increased hospitalization costs ($58,313 vs. $58,173 vs. $66,633, p=0.74) or risk of complications, except for AKI (11.9% vs. 14.8% vs. 20.5%, p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that DM (OR=4.4, 95% CI=2.8,7.0) or perioperative hyperglycemia (OR=4.1, 95% CI=2.7-6.2) were independently associated with increased risk of complications. Hyperglycemia but not increasing BMI, in patients with and without diabetes undergoing gastrointestinal surgery was associated with a higher number of complications and hospitalization costs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperglycemia related to high-dose glucocorticoid use in noncritically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids commonly cause drug-induced diabetes. This association is well recognized but available evidence does not answer clinically relevant issues in subjects without diabetes. Methods Thirty-five individuals without diabetes with a recent diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma on high-dose glucocorticoid therapy were studied. Close systematic monitoring of fasting and postprandial glycemia and fasting insulin determinations, HOMA-insulin resistance and HOMA β-cell function were performed. The primary objective was to define the incidence of secondary diabetes in patients treated with high-dose glucocorticoids. Secondary objectives were to specify the intensity, the moment it appears and the evolution of hyperglycemia, in addition to the risk factors, mechanisms and impact of continuous and cyclical glucocorticoids on the development of hyperglycemia. Results Mean age of patients was 38.4 ± 18.7 years. The incidence of diabetes was 40.6% and was found after the first week; half the time it occurred between the second and fourth. Two-thirds spontaneously normalized by eight weeks. Continuous glucocorticoid administration had a higher incidence of fasting hyperglycemia (P = 0.003). Mean peak insulin levels were significantly higher in cases of diabetes. Conclusions High-dose prednisone for 2 to 3 months produced an elevated incidence of diabetes, usually with mild hyperglycemia occurring between the second and fourth week, normalizing spontaneously in all cases. Hyperglycemia was more frequent with continuous doses and occurred in cases with increased insulin resistance. The clinical and therapeutic characteristics of our participants, who were otherwise healthy, could represent the clinical setting of many patients with illness from other medical areas that might require high doses of GC for six to twelve weeks. PMID:23557386

  20. Clinical worsening after pulmonary endarterectomy in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schölzel, B; Snijder, R; Morshuis, W; Saouti, N; Plokker, T; Post, M

    2011-12-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is the most effective treatment for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The aim of this study is to evaluate long-term survival and freedom from clinical worsening after PEA. All patients who underwent PEA in our hospital between May 2000 and August 2009 were included. Follow-up parameters were all-cause mortality and time to clinical worsening, defined as a combination of death, need for pulmonary hypertension-specific medication or 15% decrease in six-minute walk distance without improvement in functional class. The Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify predictors. Seventy-four consecutive patients (mean age 55.9 ± 13.8 years, 51% female) underwent PEA. Prior to surgery, 55 patients were in NYHA functional class III or higher. The mean pulmonary artery pressure was 41.3 ± 11.9 mmHg with a mean pulmonary vascular resistance of 521 ± 264 dyn·s·cm(-5) (range 279-1331 dyn·s·cm(-5)). Five patients (6.8%) died in-hospital. Out of hospital, 5 out of 69 patients (7.2%) died during a median follow-up of 3.7 ± 2.2 years [range 0.1-8.5 years]). The one- and five-year survival rates were 93% and 89%, respectively. During follow-up, clinical worsening occurred in 13 out of 69 patients (18.8%). The one- and five-year rates of freedom from clinical worsening were 94% and 72%, respectively. The baseline NT-pro BNP level tended to be a predictor for occurrence of clinical worsening. Pulmonary endarterectomy is associated with good long-term survival in patients with CTEPH. However, clinical worsening occurred in a substantial number of patients at long-term follow-up.

  1. Hyperglycemia may determine fibrinopeptide A plasma level increase in humans.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Torella, R

    1989-12-01

    The effects of hyperglycemia on plasma fibrinopeptide A (FPA) levels in normal subjects are reported. An increase of FPA concentration parallel to sustained hyperglycemia was observed; when the glycemia returned to basal values, FPA showed values in normal range. Heparin infusion was able to significantly decrease the hyperglycemia-induced augment of FPA levels. Isovolumic-isotonic NaCl solution infusion produced a slight (NS) increase in FPA levels; however, mild hyperglycemia, achieved by glucagon, was also able to produce a significant increase in FPA concentration. These data demonstrate the direct role of hyperglycemia in conditioning FPA level, and suggest that hyperglycemia, by itself, is a sufficient stimulus to produce thrombin activation in humans.

  2. Management of Hyperglycemia and Enteral Nutrition in the Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia Ann; Wien, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    There has been increased attention on the importance of identifying and distinguishing the differences between stress-induced hyperglycemia (SH), newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH), and hyperglycemia in persons with established diabetes mellitus (DM). Inpatient blood glucose control is now being recognized as not only a cost issue for hospitals but also a concern for patient safety and care. The reasons for the increased incidence of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients include preexisting DM, undiagnosed DM or prediabetes, SH, and medication-induced hyperglycemia with resulting transient blood glucose variability. It is clear that identifying and documenting hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with and without a previous diagnosis of DM and initiating prompt insulin treatment are important. Agreement on the optimum treatment goals for hyperglycemia remains quite controversial, and the benefits of intensive glucose management may be lost at the cost of hypoglycemia in intensive care unit patients. Nutrition support in the form of enteral nutrition (EN) increases the risk of hyperglycemia in both critical and non-critically ill hospitalized patients. Reasons for beginning a tube feeding are the same whether a person has NDH or DM. What differs is how to incorporate EN into the established insulin management protocols. The risk for hyperglycemia with the addition of EN is even higher in those without a previous diagnosis of DM. This review discusses the incidence of hyperglycemia, the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, factors contributing to hyperglycemia in the hospitalized patient, glycemic management goals, current glycemic management recommendations, and considerations for EN formula selection, administration, and treatment. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  4. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI.

  5. Hyperglycemia triggers HIPK2 protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Marisa; Cuomo, Laura; Pistritto, Giuseppa; Cirone, Mara; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    Homeodomain interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is an evolutionary conserved kinase that modulates several key molecular pathways to restrain tumor growth and induce p53-depending apoptotic cell-death in response to anticancer therapies. HIPK2 silencing in cancer cells leads to chemoresistance and cancer progression, in part due to p53 inhibition. Recently, hyperglycemia has been shown to reduce p53 phosphorylation at serine 46 (Ser46), the target residue of HIPK2, thus impairing p53 apoptotic function. Here we asked whether hyperglycemia could, upstream of p53, target HIPK2. We focused on the effect of high glucose (HG) on HIPK2 protein stability and the underlying mechanisms. We found that HG reduced HIPK2 protein levels, therefore impairing HIPK2-induced p53 apoptotic activity. HG-triggered HIPK2 protein downregulation was rescued by both proteasome inhibitor MG132 and by protein phosphatase inhibitors Calyculin A (CL-A) and Okadaic Acid (OA). Looking for the phosphatase involved, we found that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) induced HIPK2 degradation, as evidenced by directly activating PP2A with FTY720 or by silencing PP2A with siRNA in HG condition. The effect of PP2A on HIPK2 protein degradation could be in part due to hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activity which has been previously shown to induce HIPK2 proteasomal degradation through several ubiquitin ligases. Validation analysed performed with HIF-1α dominant negative or with silencing of Siah2 ubiquitin ligase clearly showed rescue of HG-induced HIPK2 degradation. These findings demonstrate how hyperglycemia, through a complex protein cascade, induced HIPK2 downregulation and consequently impaired p53 apoptotic activity, revealing a novel link between diabetes/obesity and tumor resistance to therapies. PMID:27901482

  6. The Ketogenic Diet Improves Recently Worsened Focal Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Nathalie; Pinton, Florence; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Nabbout, Rima

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We observed a dramatic response to the ketogenic diet in several patients with highly refractory epilepsy whose seizure frequency had recently worsened. This study aimed to identify whether this characteristic was a useful indication for the ketogenic diet. Method: From the 70 patients who received the ketogenic diet during a 3-year period at…

  7. The Ketogenic Diet Improves Recently Worsened Focal Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Nathalie; Pinton, Florence; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Nabbout, Rima

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We observed a dramatic response to the ketogenic diet in several patients with highly refractory epilepsy whose seizure frequency had recently worsened. This study aimed to identify whether this characteristic was a useful indication for the ketogenic diet. Method: From the 70 patients who received the ketogenic diet during a 3-year period at…

  8. Hyperglycemia and diabetes have different impacts on outcome of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Snarska, Katarzyna K.; Bachórzewska-Gajewska, Hanna; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Drozdowski, Wiesław; Chorąży, Monika; Kułakowska, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is the second leading cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Diabetes and hyperglycemia may impact the outcome of stroke. We examined the impact of hyperglycemia and diabetes on in-hospital death among ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients. Material and methods Data from 766 consecutive patients with ischemic (83.15%) and hemorrhagic stroke were analyzed. Patients were classified into four groups: ischemic and diabetic; ischemic and non-diabetic; hemorrhagic and diabetic; and hemorrhagic and non-diabetic. Serum glucose was measured on admission at the emergency department together with biochemical and clinical parameters. Results Mean admission glucose in ischemic stroke patients with diabetes was higher than in non-diabetic ones (p < 0.001) and in hemorrhagic stroke patients with diabetes than in those without diabetes (p < 0.05). Mean admission glucose in all patients who died was significantly higher than in patients who survived. In multivariate analysis, the risk factors for outcome in patients with ischemic stroke and without diabetes were age, admission glucose level and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), while in diabetics they were female gender, admission glucose level, and eGFR; in patients with hemorrhagic stroke and without diabetes they were age and admission glucose levels. The cut-off value in predicting death in patients with ischemic stroke and without diabetes was above 113.5 mg/dl, while in diabetics it was above 210.5 mg/dl. Conclusions Hyperglycemia on admission is associated with worsened clinical outcome and increased risk of in-hospital death in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients. Diabetes increased the risk of in-hospital death in hemorrhagic stroke patients, but not in ischemic ones. PMID:28144261

  9. Armanni-Ebstein Lesions in Terminal Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong; Yool, Andrea J; Byard, Roger W

    2016-12-16

    Armanni-Ebstein lesions (AEL) occur in deaths related to uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. To investigate the relationship between AEL and terminal hyperglycemia, we retrospectively reviewed 71 cases with vitreous glucose levels ≥11.1 mmol/L; 27 (38%) cases had AEL (vitreous glucose 14.0-77.3 mmol/L); and 44 cases (62%) did not (vitreous glucose 11.1-91.9 mmol/L). There was no significant difference (p = 0.271) in vitreous glucose levels between the cases with AEL (mean 39.2, SD 16.7 mmol/L) and those without (mean 34.2, SD 19.8 mmol/L). Similarly, there was no difference in the degree of dehydration, renal failure, or osmolality. However, there was a significantly higher level of β-hydroxybutyrate among the cases with AEL compared to those without (p = 0.007), suggesting that ketoacidosis may facilitate the development of AEL. Given the possible synergistic role of β-hydroxybutyrate, the correlation between AEL and terminal hyperglycemia in animal studies may not be applicable to humans. AEL may also possibly occur with sublethal elevations in glucose.

  10. [Management of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Cruz-Domínguez, María Pilar; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo Osiris; Morales-González, José Antonio; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a global health problem and Mexico rank sixth in prevalence of this entity. In our country, is the leading cause of death and is a major cause of hospital care being responsible for about 1 in 5 discharges. In the hospital setting, it has been observed that hyperglycemia, both diabetic and non-diabetic patients, is associated with an increased risk of complications, disability and death, and that adequate control in the blood glucose level produces a reduction in these complications. With these bases, several associations have recommended the treatment of hospital hyperglycemia through insulin administration, with the therapeutic goal of maintaining a fasting blood glucose level between 100-140 mg/dL and glucose at any time of day less than 180 mg/dL. The insulin application method most recommended consisting in a basal-bolus regimen which has shown efficacy with a low risk of hypoglycemia. The usual practice of the application of insulin through a correction scheme should be abandoned because it is inefficient and involves risks.

  11. Sleep deprivation worsens inflammation and delays recovery in a mouse model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yueming; Preuss, Fabian; Turek, Fred W; Jakate, Shriram; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2009-06-01

    We recently showed that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) report significantly more sleep disturbances. To determine whether disrupted sleep can affect the severity of inflammation and the course of IBD, we used an animal model of colonic inflammation to determine the effects of acute and chronic intermittent sleep deprivation on the severity of colonic inflammation and tissue damage in colitis and recovery from this damage. Acute sleep deprivation (ASD) consisted of 24h of forced locomotor activity in a mechanical wheel rotating at a constant speed. Chronic intermittent sleep deprivation (CISD) consisted of an acute sleep deprivation episode, followed by additional sleep deprivation periods in the wheel for 6h every other day throughout the 10day study period. To induce colitis, mice were given 2% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in their daily drinking water for 7days. The development and severity of colitis were monitored by measuring weight loss and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity daily and colon histology scores 10days after initiation of colitis. ASD or CISD did not cause colonic inflammation in vehicle-treated mice. Changes in daily body weight, tissue MPO levels and colon histopathology score were similar between mice that were sleep deprived and controls. Daily DSS ingestion caused colitis in mice. ASD worsened colonic inflammation: tissue MPO levels in ASD/DSS-treated mice were significantly higher than in DSS-treated mice that were not sleep deprived. However, the worsening of colonic inflammation by ASD was not enough to exacerbate clinical manifestations of colitis such as weight loss. In contrast, the deleterious effects of CISD were severe enough to cause worsening of histological and clinical manifestations of colitis. The deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on severity of colitis appeared to be due to both increased colonic inflammation and a decrease in the ability of mice to recover from DSS-induced colonic injury. Both acute

  12. Oxygen Administration Improves Survival but Worsens Cardiopulmonary Functions in Chlorine Exposed Rats.

    PubMed

    Okponyia, Obiefuna C; McGraw, Matthew D; Dysart, Marilyn M; Garlick, Rhonda B; Rioux, Jacqueline S; Murphy, Angela L; Roe, Gates B; White, Carl W; Veress, Livia A

    2017-08-28

    Chlorine is a highly reactive gas that can cause significant injury when inhaled. Unfortunately, its use as a chemical weapon has increased in recent years. Massive chlorine inhalation can cause death within 4h of exposure. Survivors usually require hospitalization after massive exposure. No countermeasures exist for massive chlorine exposure, and supportive care measures lack controlled trials. Adult rats were exposed to chlorine gas (LD58-67) in a whole-body exposure chamber, and given oxygen (0.8 FiO2) or air (0.21 FiO2) for 6h after obtaining baseline measurements. Oxygen saturation, vital signs, respiratory distress and neuromuscular scores, arterial blood gases and hemodynamic measurements were obtained hourly. Massive chlorine inhalation caused severe acute respiratory failure, hypoxemia, decreased cardiac output, neuromuscular abnormalities (ataxia, hypotonia) and seizures resulting in early death. Oxygen improved survival to 6h (87% vs. 42%), and prevented observed seizure-related deaths. However, oxygen administration worsened severity of acute respiratory failure compared to control, with increased respiratory acidosis (pH 6.91 ± 0.04 vs. 7.06 ± 0.01 at 2h) and increased hypercapnia (180.0 ± 19.8 vs. 103.2 ± 3.9 mmHg at 2h). In addition, oxygen did not improve neuromuscular abnormalities, cardiac output or respiratory distress associated with chlorine exposure. Massive chlorine inhalation causes severe acute respiratory failure and multi-organ damage. Oxygen administration can improve short-term survival, but appears to worsen respiratory failure, with no improvements in cardiac output or neuromuscular dysfunction. Oxygen should be used with caution after massive chlorine inhalation, and need for early assisted ventilation should be assessed in victims.

  13. Effect of Admission Hyperglycemia on 6-Month Functional Outcome in Patients with Spontaneous Cerebellar Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chuanyuan; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jiajing; You, Chao

    2017-03-08

    BACKGROUND Cerebellar hemorrhage (CH) has a quite different treatment strategy and prognostic factors compared with supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia has been discussed mainly in cases of supratentorial hemorrhage; it remains to be elucidated following CH. We aimed to determine the association of hyperglycemia on admission with 6-month functional outcome in CH patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively analyzed 77 patients with acute CH between September 2010 and April 2015 in West China Hospital. Blood glucose level was measured when the patients were admitted. Primary outcome was 6-month functional outcome, which could comprehensively reflect the patient's recovery of physical and social ability after stroke and was assessed by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Association of hyperglycemia with functional outcome was identified in logistic regression models. RESULTS There were 50 (64.9%) patients with poor functional outcomes. Patients with poor outcome were much older (P<0.001) and had a significantly higher glucose level on admission (P<0.001), a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (P<0.001), a larger hematoma (P=0.003), and a higher incidence of intraventricular extension (P=0.002), brainstem compression (P=0.013), and hydrocephalus (P=0.023). Multivariate analysis showed that hyperglycemia (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07-2.08, P=0.017 when glucose level was analyzed as a continuous variable; OR 7.46, 95% CI 1.41-39.51, P=0.018 when glucose level was dichotomized by the critical threshold of 6.78 mmol/L) emerged as an independent predictor for adverse functional outcome at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on the relationship between hyperglycemia and long-term functional outcome after CH. The study combined with previous pertinent reports definitely indicates the poor effect of hyperglycemia on both supra- and infratentorial ICH independent of hemorrhage site

  14. Effect of Admission Hyperglycemia on 6-Month Functional Outcome in Patients with Spontaneous Cerebellar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Chuanyuan; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jiajing; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Background Cerebellar hemorrhage (CH) has a quite different treatment strategy and prognostic factors compared with supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia has been discussed mainly in cases of supratentorial hemorrhage; it remains to be elucidated following CH. We aimed to determine the association of hyperglycemia on admission with 6-month functional outcome in CH patients. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed 77 patients with acute CH between September 2010 and April 2015 in West China Hospital. Blood glucose level was measured when the patients were admitted. Primary outcome was 6-month functional outcome, which could comprehensively reflect the patient’s recovery of physical and social ability after stroke and was assessed by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Association of hyperglycemia with functional outcome was identified in logistic regression models. Results There were 50 (64.9%) patients with poor functional outcomes. Patients with poor outcome were much older (P<0.001) and had a significantly higher glucose level on admission (P<0.001), a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (P<0.001), a larger hematoma (P=0.003), and a higher incidence of intraventricular extension (P=0.002), brainstem compression (P=0.013), and hydrocephalus (P=0.023). Multivariate analysis showed that hyperglycemia (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07–2.08, P=0.017 when glucose level was analyzed as a continuous variable; OR 7.46, 95% CI 1.41–39.51, P=0.018 when glucose level was dichotomized by the critical threshold of 6.78 mmol/L) emerged as an independent predictor for adverse functional outcome at 6 months. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on the relationship between hyperglycemia and long-term functional outcome after CH. The study combined with previous pertinent reports definitely indicates the poor effect of hyperglycemia on both supra- and infratentorial ICH independent of hemorrhage site

  15. Image-size differences worsen stereopsis independent of eye position

    PubMed Central

    Vlaskamp, Björn N. S.; Filippini, Heather R.; Banks, Martin S.

    2010-01-01

    With the eyes in forward gaze, stereo performance worsens when one eye’s image is larger than the other’s. Near, eccentric objects naturally create retinal images of different sizes. Does this mean that stereopsis exhibits deficits for such stimuli? Or does the visual system compensate for the predictable image-size differences? To answer this, we measured discrimination of a disparity-defined shape for different relative image sizes. We did so for different gaze directions, some compatible with the image-size difference and some not. Magnifications of 10–15% caused a clear worsening of stereo performance. The worsening was determined only by relative image size and not by eye position. This shows that no neural compensation for image-size differences accompanies eye-position changes, at least prior to disparity estimation. We also found that a local cross-correlation model for disparity estimation performs like humans in the same task, suggesting that the decrease in stereo performance due to image-size differences is a byproduct of the disparity-estimation method. Finally, we looked for compensation in an observer who has constantly different image sizes due to differing eye lengths. She performed best when the presented images were roughly the same size, indicating that she has compensated for the persistent image-size difference. PMID:19271927

  16. [Worsening of migraine symptoms due to giant pineal cyst apoplexy].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Argüelles, J M; Mata, P; Bermejo, P E; Anciones, B

    Although the association between headaches and pineal gland cysts has been suggested on a number of occasions, no precise evidence of exactly what this relation involves has been produced to date. It is known, however, that a cyst in the pineal gland can bring on or worsen headaches, especially if it is large or there has been bleeding, due to obstructive compromise in the third ventricle and the resulting hydrocephalus that is produced. A 15 years-old male who had suffered from migraine from the age of 6 years and who suddenly experienced a worsening of his headaches, both as regards their frequency and their intensity, over the previous days; no known precipitating factor appeared to be involved. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed the presence of a giant cyst in the pineal gland, with a notable amount of blood inside it, which was producing an obstructive hydrocephalus. The decision was made to resort to surgical treatment, with resection of the cyst and placement of a shunt valve. As a result the patient's headaches improved greatly and this improvement continued throughout a six-month follow-up. Worsening of a headache, in this case migraine, for no apparent cause must make us consider secondary processes, although they may be as rare as the one described here.

  17. Short-Term Hyperinsulinemia and Hyperglycemia Increase Myocardial Lipid Content in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Winhofer, Yvonne; Krššák, Martin; Janković, Draženka; Anderwald, Christian-Heinz; Reiter, Gert; Hofer, Astrid; Trattnig, Siegfried; Luger, Anton; Krebs, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Increased myocardial lipid content (MYCL) recently has been linked to the development of cardiomyopathy in diabetes. In contrast to steatosis in skeletal muscle and liver, previous investigations could not confirm a link between MYCL and insulin resistance. Thus, we hypothesized that cardiac steatosis might develop against the background of the metabolic environment typical for prediabetes and early type 2 diabetes: combined hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, we aimed to prove the principle that acute hyperglycemia (during a 6-h clamp) affects MYCL and function (assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging) in healthy subjects (female subjects: n = 8, male subjects: n = 10; aged 28 ± 5 years; BMI 22.4 ± 2.6 kg/m2). Combined hyperglycemia (202.0 ± 10.6 mg/dL) and hyperinsulinemia (110.6 ± 59.0 μU/mL) were, despite insulin-mediated suppression of free fatty acids, associated with a 34.4% increase in MYCL (baseline: 0.20 ± 0.17%, clamp: 0.26 ± 0.22% of water signal; P = 0.0009), which was positively correlated with the area under the curve of insulin (R = 0.59, P = 0.009) and C-peptide (R = 0.81, P < 0.0001) during the clamp. Furthermore, an increase in ejection fraction (P < 0.0001) and a decrease in end-systolic volume (P = 0.0002) were observed, which also were correlated with hyperinsulinemia. Based on our findings, we conclude that combined hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia induce short-term myocardial lipid accumulation and alterations in myocardial function in normal subjects, indicating that these alterations might be directly responsible for cardiac steatosis in metabolic diseases. PMID:22396203

  18. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, attenuates cerebral infarction and hemorrhagic infarction in rats with hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Koichi; Tsubokawa, Tamiji; Johshita, Hiroo; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Thrombolysis due to acute ischemic stroke is associated with the risk of hemorrhagic infarction, especially after reperfusion. Recent experimental studies suggest that the main mechanism contributing to hemorrhagic infarction is oxidative stress caused by disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, decreases oxidative stress, thereby preventing hemorrhagic infarction during ischemia and reperfusion. In this study, we investigated the effects of edaravone on hemorrhagic infarction in a rat model of hemorrhagic transformation. We used a previously established hemorrhagic transformation model of rats with hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia was induced by intraperitoneal injection of glucose to all rats (n  =  20). The rats with hyperglycemia showed a high incidence of hemorrhagic infarction. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1.5 hours followed by reperfusion for 24 hours was performed in edaravone-treated rats (n  =  10) and control rats (n  =  10). Upon completion of reperfusion, both groups were evaluated for infarct size and hemorrhage volume and the results obtained were compared. Edaravone significantly decreased infarct volume, with the average infarct volume in the edaravone-treated rats (227.6 mm(3)) being significantly lower than that in the control rats (264.0 mm(3)). Edaravone treatment also decreased the postischemic hemorrhage volumes (53.4 mm(3) in edaravone-treated rats vs 176.4 mm(3) in controls). In addition, the ratio of hemorrhage volume to infarct volume was lower in the edaravone-treated rats (23.5%) than in the untreated rats (63.2%). Edaravone attenuates cerebral infarction and hemorrhagic infarction in rats with hyperglycemia.

  19. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Hyperglycemia accelerates apparent diffusion coefficient-defined lesion growth after focal cerebral ischemia in rats with and without features of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tarr, David; Graham, Delyth; Roy, Lisa A; Holmes, William M; McCabe, Christopher; Mhairi Macrae, I; Muir, Keith W; Dewar, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    Poststroke hyperglycemia is associated with a poor outcome yet clinical management is inadequately informed. We sought to determine whether clinically relevant levels of hyperglycemia exert detrimental effects on the early evolution of focal ischemic brain damage, as determined by magnetic resonance imaging, in normal rats and in those modeling the 'metabolic syndrome'. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) or fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (ffSHRSP) rats were randomly allocated to groups for glucose or vehicle administration before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging was carried out over the first 4 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion and lesion volume calculated from apparent diffusion coefficient maps. Infarct volume and immunostaining for markers of oxidative stress were measured in the fixed brain sections at 24 hours. Hyperglycemia rapidly exacerbated early ischemic damage in both WKY and ffSHRSP rats but increased infarct volume only in WKY rats. There was only limited evidence of oxidative stress in hyperglycemic animals. Acute hyperglycemia, at clinically relevant levels, exacerbates early ischemic damage in both normal and metabolic syndrome rats. Management of hyperglycemia may have greatest benefit when performed in the acute phase after stroke in the absence or presence of comorbidities.

  1. Hyperglycemia Induces Embryopathy, Even in the Absence of Systemic Maternal Diabetes: An In Vivo Test of the Fuel Mediated Teratogenesis Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Baack, Michelle L.; Wang, Chunlin; Hu, Shanming; Segar, Jeffrey L.; Norris, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic exposure to excess circulating fuels is proposed to underlie diabetic embryopathy. To isolate the effects of hyperglycemia from the many systemic anomalies of diabetes, we infused 4 mg/min glucose into the left uterine artery of non-diabetic pregnant rats on gestation days (GD) 7–9. Right-sided embryos and dams exhibited no glucose elevation. Embryos were assessed on GD13, comparing the left versus right uterine horns. Hyperglycemic exposure increased rates of embryopathy, resorptions, and worsened embryopathy severity. By contrast, saline infusion did not affect any of these parameters. To assess for possible embryopathy susceptibility bias between uterine horns, separate dams were given retinoic acid (25 mg/kg, a mildly embryopathic dose) systemically on GD7.5. The resultant embryopathy rates were equivalent between uterine horns. We conclude that hyperglycemia, even in the absence of systemic maternal diabetes, is sufficient to produce in vivo embryopathy during organogenesis. PMID:24721120

  2. Hyperglycemia induces embryopathy, even in the absence of systemic maternal diabetes: an in vivo test of the fuel mediated teratogenesis hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Baack, Michelle L; Wang, Chunlin; Hu, Shanming; Segar, Jeffrey L; Norris, Andrew W

    2014-07-01

    Embryonic exposure to excess circulating fuels is proposed to underlie diabetic embryopathy. To isolate the effects of hyperglycemia from the many systemic anomalies of diabetes, we infused 4 mg/min glucose into the left uterine artery of non-diabetic pregnant rats on gestation days (GD) 7-9. Right-sided embryos and dams exhibited no glucose elevation. Embryos were assessed on GD13, comparing the left versus right uterine horns. Hyperglycemic exposure increased rates of embryopathy, resorptions, and worsened embryopathy severity. By contrast, saline infusion did not affect any of these parameters. To assess for possible embryopathy susceptibility bias between uterine horns, separate dams were given retinoic acid (25mg/kg, a mildly embryopathic dose) systemically on GD7.5. The resultant embryopathy rates were equivalent between uterine horns. We conclude that hyperglycemia, even in the absence of systemic maternal diabetes, is sufficient to produce in vivo embryopathy during organogenesis.

  3. Stress Hyperglycemia During Surgery and Anesthesia: Pathogenesis and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Nadine E; Gianchandani, Roma Y; McDonnell, Marie E; Alexanian, Sara M

    2016-03-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated an association between hyperglycemia in the perioperative period and adverse clinical outcomes. Many patients who experience hyperglycemia while hospitalized do not have a known history of diabetes and experience a transient phenomenon often described as "stress hyperglycemia" (SH). We discuss the epidemiology and pathogenesis of SH as well as evidence to date regarding predisposing factors and outcomes. Further research is needed to identify the long-term sequelae of SH as well as perioperative measures that may modulate glucose elevations and optimal treatment strategies.

  4. Predicting worsening asthma control following the common cold

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Michael J.; Castro, Mario; Kunselman, Susan J.; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Reno, Melissa; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor P.; Avila, Pedro C.; Boushey, Homer A.; Ameredes, Bill T.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Calhoun, William J.; Cherniack, Reuben M.; Craig, Timothy J.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Israel, Elliot; Fahy, John V.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Kraft, Monica; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Martin, Richard J.; Peters, Stephen P.; Ramsdell, Joe W.; Sorkness, Christine A.; Rand Sutherland, E.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Wechsler, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    The asthmatic response to the common cold is highly variable and early characteristics that predict worsening of asthma control following a cold have not been identified. In this prospective multi-center cohort study of 413 adult subjects with asthma, we used the mini-Asthma Control Questionnaire (mini-ACQ) to quantify changes in asthma control and the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 (WURSS-21) to measure cold severity. Univariate and multivariable models examined demographic, physiologic, serologic, and cold-related characteristics for their relationship to changes in asthma control following a cold. We observed a clinically significant worsening of asthma control following a cold (increase in mini-ACQ of 0.69 ± 0.93). Univariate analysis demonstrated season, center location, cold length, and cold severity measurements all associated with a change in asthma control. Multivariable analysis of the covariates available within the first 2 days of cold onset revealed the day 2 and the cumulative sum of the day 1 and 2 WURSS-21 scores were significant predictors for the subsequent changes in asthma control. In asthmatic subjects the cold severity measured within the first 2 days can be used to predict subsequent changes in asthma control. This information may help clinicians prevent deterioration in asthma control following a cold. PMID:18768579

  5. Histoplasmosis presenting with progressively worsening backache--a case report.

    PubMed

    Lachmanan, S R; Haniza, O; Hisham, A N; Subramaniam, J; Merican, I

    2001-11-01

    Bilateral adrenal enlargement is often the result of disseminated malignant disease, and this diagnosis is particularly likely in a patient with severe weight loss. We describe a case with bilateral adrenal enlargement presenting with progressively worsening backache as a prominent symptom. A 55-year-old man presented with intermittent low back pain which was progressively worsening, fever, anorexia, low back pain and a 10-kg weight loss. He had underlying diabetes mellitus and ischaemic heart disease. He gave a history of travel to caves for worship. Clinically, the most significant findings included nodular lesions in the anterior fauces and left palatoglossal region. Computed tomographic scan revealed bilateral adrenal masses. Biopsies were taken from the palatal nodules, which revealed histiocytes with numerous histoplasma organisms. He was commenced on itraconazole 200 mg daily for a period of 9 months. There was a dramatic initial response with settling of his fever and this was followed by subjective improvement in his well-being. He is presently on follow-up and has completed 9 months of itraconazole therapy with resolution of all his symptoms and has gained about 10 kg of weight.

  6. Thyroid function and stress hormones in children with stress hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Taj-Aldini, Reza; Karamizadeh, Zohre; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Karimi, Mehran; Omrani, Gholam Hossein

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of stress hyperglycemia and to investigate how thyroid and stress hormones alter during stress hyperglycemia in children admitted to pediatric emergency wards. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in children, less than 19 years old, who were admitted to pediatric emergency wards of Nemazee and Dastgheib Hospitals, Shiraz, Southern Iran. Those patients taking steroids, beta-agonists or intravenously administered glucose before venipuncture, and patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or thyroid diseases were excluded. Children with blood glucose ≥ 150 mg/dL during admission were regarded as cases. The controls were age- and- sex- matched, euglycemic children. Stress hormones including cortisol, insulin, growth hormone, and prolactin were measured, and thyroid function was tested with a radioimmunoassay (RIA) method in all cases and controls. The results showed that among 1,054 screened children, 39 cases (3.7 %) had stress hyperglycemia and 89 controls were included in the study. The occurrence of hyperglycemia was independent of sex, but it occurred mostly in children under 6 years old. Hyperglycemia occurred more frequently in patients with a positive family history of DM (odds ratio = 3.2, 95 % CI = 1.3-7.9, and P = 0.009). There were no significant differences between cases and controls regarding any hormones except higher cortisol, and lower total T3 and T4 in cases compared with controls. Neither of cases developed diabetes in the 24-month follow-up period. These findings led us to the conclusion that stress hyperglycemia is occasionally seen in critically ill patients. Among the stress hormones measured, only cortisol increased during hyperglycemia. It seems that hyperglycemia is not an important risk factor for future diabetes.

  7. Melatonin rescues cardiac thioredoxin system during ischemia-reperfusion injury in acute hyperglycemic state by restoring Notch1/Hes1/Akt signaling in a membrane receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liming; Fan, Chongxi; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Jian; Xue, Xiaodong; Xu, Yinli; Zhao, Guolong; Yang, Yang; Wang, Huishan

    2017-01-01

    Stress hyperglycemia is commonly observed in patients suffering from ischemic heart disease. It not only worsens cardiovascular prognosis but also attenuates the efficacies of various cardioprotective agents. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of melatonin against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injury in acute hyperglycemic state with a focus on Notch1/Hes1/Akt signaling and intracellular thioredoxin (Trx) system. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to MI/R surgery and high-glucose (HG, 500 g/L) infusion (4 mL/kg/h) to induce temporary hyperglycemia. Rats were treated with or without melatonin (10 mg/kg/d) during the operation. Furthermore, HG (33 mmol/L)-incubated H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were treated in the presence or absence of luzindole (a competitive melatonin receptor antagonist), DAPT (a γ-secretase inhibitor), LY294002 (a PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitor), or thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) adenoviral vectors. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated MI/R injury by suppressing Notch1/Hes1/Akt signaling and intracellular Trx activity. Melatonin treatment effectively ameliorated MI/R injury by reducing infarct size, myocardial apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Moreover, melatonin also markedly enhanced Notch1/Hes1/Akt signaling and rescued intracellular Trx system by upregulating Notch1, N1ICD, Hes1, and p-Akt expressions, increasing Trx activity, and downregulating Txnip expression. However, these effects were blunted by luzindole, DAPT, or LY294002. Additionally, Txnip overexpression not only decreased Trx activity, but also attenuated the cytoprotective effect of melatonin. We conclude that impaired Notch1 signaling aggravates MI/R injury in acute hyperglycemic state. Melatonin rescues Trx system by reducing Txnip expression via Notch1/Hes1/Akt signaling in a membrane receptor-dependent manner. Its role as a prophylactic/therapeutic drug deserves further clinical study. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  8. Hyperglycemia is associated with enhanced gluconeogenesis in a rat model of permanent cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Yu; Chen, Chun-Jung; Lin, Shih-Yi; Chuang, Yu-Han; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Tung, Kwong-Chung

    2013-03-10

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke. In the acute phase of stroke (within 24h), rats with permanent cerebral ischemia developed higher fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in association with up-regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. In addition, hepatic gluconeogenesis-associated positive regulators, such as FoxO1, CAATT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs), and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB), were up-regulated. For insulin signaling transduction, phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) at the tyrosine residue, Akt, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), were attenuated in the liver, while negative regulators of insulin action, including phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) at the serine residue, were increased. In addition, the brains of rats with stroke exhibited a reduction in phosphorylation of IRS1 at the tyrosine residue and Akt. Circulating cortisol, glucagon, C-reactive protein (CRP), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and resistin levels were elevated, but adiponectin was reduced. Our data suggest that cerebral ischemic insults might modify intracellular and extracellular environments, favoring hepatic gluconeogenesis and the consequences of hyperglycemia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Melatonin synthesis impairment as a new deleterious outcome of diabetes-derived hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Fernanda G; Turati, Ariane O; Barone, Mark; Scialfa, Julieta H; do Carmo Buonfiglio, Daniella; Peres, Rafael; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; Afeche, Solange C; Lima, Larissa; Scavone, Cristoforo; Bordin, Silvana; Reiter, Russel J; Menna-Barreto, Luiz; Cipolla-Neto, José

    2014-08-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone that works as a nighttime signal for circadian integrity and health maintenance. It is crucial for energy metabolism regulation, and the diabetes effects on its synthesis are unresolved. Using diverse techniques that included pineal microdialysis and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography, the present data show a clear acute and sustained melatonin synthesis reduction in diabetic rats as a result of pineal metabolism impairment that is unrelated to cell death. Hyperglycemia is the main cause of several diabetic complications, and its consequences in terms of melatonin production were assessed. Here, we show that local high glucose (HG) concentration is acutely detrimental to pineal melatonin synthesis in rats both in vivo and in vitro. The clinically depressive action of high blood glucose concentration in melatonin levels was also observed in type 1 diabetes patients who presented a negative correlation between hyperglycemia and 6-sulfatoxymelatonin excretion. Additionally, high-mean-glycemia type 1 diabetes patients presented lower 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels when compared to control subjects. Although further studies are needed to fully clarify the mechanisms, the present results provide evidence that high circulating glucose levels interfere with pineal melatonin production. Given the essential role played by melatonin as a powerful antioxidant and in the control of energy homeostasis, sleep and biological rhythms and knowing that optimal glycemic control is usually an issue for patients with diabetes, melatonin supplementation may be considered as an additional tool to the current treatment.

  10. How should worsening in osteoarthritis be defined? Development and initial validation of preliminary criteria for clinical worsening in knee and hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Eam; den Broeder, A A; Woodworth, T G; Busch, Vjjf; van den Hoogen, F H; Bijlsma, Jwj; van den Ende, Chm

    2017-09-01

    There is a need to define and validate measures of clinical worsening in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA). The objectives of this exploratory project were: (i) to characterize worsening criteria in knee and hip OA using psychometric methods; (ii) to estimate their sensitivity and specificity; and (iii) to validate and compare these criteria with worsening criteria previously described in the literature. An Expert Group reached consensus on 10 sets of worsening criteria to be tested in observational data sets of patients with knee or hip OA who received multimodal conservative treatment. These sets included 219 patients (derivation cohort) and 296 patients (validation cohort). We estimated minimal clinically important worsening (MCIW) values for pain, function, stiffness, and patient global assessment, and tested candidate worsening criteria in the derivation cohort. Finally, using patient judgement, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of literature-based as well as candidate worsening criteria in the validation cohort. Literature-based worsening criteria were found to have high specificity (range 60-92%) but low sensitivity (range 22-59%). Two out of 10 candidate worsening criteria constructed by the Expert Group showed an acceptable combination of sensitivity and specificity in the derivation cohort, which was confirmed in the validation cohort (ranging from 54% to 65% and 67% to 74%, respectively). This is the first study to describe symptomatic worsening criteria based on expert consensus after examining the performance of candidate criteria derived from the literature applied to data in an observational study. The newly proposed worsening criteria show an acceptable combination of sensitivity and specificity.

  11. Use of glycated albumin to distinguish occult diabetes mellitus from stress-induced hyperglycemia in Chinese orthopedic trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jiemin; Zou, Jian; Bao, Yuqian; Zhang, Lei; Han, Junfeng; Tang, Junling; Ma, Xiaojing; Li, Qing; Jia, Weiping

    2012-05-01

    Some nondiabetic trauma patients with hyperglycemia have been found to have occult diabetes mellitus (ODM). We studied whether glycated albumin (GA) was an effective tool for detecting ODM in orthopedic trauma patients with elevated glucose levels. A cross-sectional, sequential case series study of adult patients presenting to the Orthopedic Trauma Center between September 2009 and March 2010 with new limb fractures was performed. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and GA levels were measured in hyperglycemic patients with no prior diabetes mellitus. A receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted to examine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of GA in identifying occult diabetes in hospitalized patients with acute hyperglycemia. A total of 2,058 trauma patients were screened and 399 patients (19.4%) with no known diabetes mellitus were noted to be hyperglycemic. Of these 399 patients, 38.3% (n = 153) had ODM according to the HbA1c diagnosis cutoff point. GA level was strongly correlated with HbA1c using Pearson's correlation analysis (r = 0.887, p < 0.01). Using logistic regression analysis, GA (odds ratio [OR] = 1.60, p < 0.001) and fasting plasma glucose (OR = 1.974, p < 0.001) were identified as significant risk factors for the diagnosis of ODM. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a GA value of 17.5% gave an optimal sensitivity of 73.20% and specificity of 99.12% for distinguishing ODM from stress-induced hyperglycemia. Almost 40% of nondiabetic orthopedic trauma patients presenting with hyperglycemia were found to have ODM. A GA value of 17.5%, the optimal cutoff point, could distinguish between ODM and stress-induced hyperglycemia in Chinese orthopedic trauma subjects. II, diagnostic study.

  12. Multiple sclerosis presenting initially with a worsening of migraine symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guan-Yu; Wang, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Tsung-Ta; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2013-08-09

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that targets myelinated axons in the central nervous system. Headache has been reported as a subtle symptom of the onset of MS, with a variable frequency of 1.6-28.5%; however, it remains unclear whether headache is a true symptom of MS onset. Here, we report the case of a female patient who had a history of migraine without aura and experienced worsening of migraine-headache symptoms as the initial manifestation of MS. Three similar cases were reported previously; however, unlike this case, those cases had no history of migraine without aura. In our case, we excluded factors that could trigger migraine attacks, such as changes in weather, drugs, alcohol, caffeine withdrawal, stress, fatigue, lack of sleep, hormonal therapy, diet, and hunger. The patient had one episode of MS attack with the simultaneous presence of asymptomatic gadolinium-enhancing and non-enhancing lesions, including hyperintense lesions in the bilateral periventricular white matter, body of the corpus callosum, and periaqueductal grey matter, as observed on the T2-weighted images obtained at the first brain magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, after the injection of gadolinium contrast, ring enhancement over these lesions was noted in T1-weighted images, which was suggestive of active demyelination. MS was diagnosed according to the McDonald criteria (2010 revision). We conclude that MS with periaqueductal grey matter involvement may present with worsening migraine. It is important to be cautious if any secondary causes exist, especially when the patient has a history of migraine without aura. MS should be one of the differential diagnoses in young women showing a change in headache pattern or poor clinical drug response to migraine treatment accompanied by episodes of focal neurological deficit. Failure to recognize MS may lead to inappropriate treatment and worse prognosis; early diagnosis in patients with MS is essential to improve

  13. Antiseptic mouthwashes could worsen xerostomia in patients taking polypharmacy.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Marlene; Sakarovitch, Charlotte; Precheur, Isabelle; Lamure, Julie; Pouyssegur-Rougier, Valerie

    2015-05-01

    Polypharmacy is a common cause of xerostomia. This study aimed to investigate whether xerostomia could be an adverse drug event of mouthwashes, when they are used for longer than 2 weeks by patients taking polypharmacy. This cross-sectional observational study included 120 hospitalized patients (60 middle-aged and 60 elderly patients), taking polypharmacy (≥4 drugs daily) and at risk of drug-induced xerostomia. Xerostomia was assessed by questioning participants. A total of 62.5% of patients complained of xerostomia. In the middle-aged group (mean age=44.0 (8.7) years; 35.0% women) xerostomia seemed independently associated to mouthwashes, at the limit of significance (OR=5.00, 95% CI=0.99-25.3, p=0.052). Active principles in mouthwashes were mainly quaternary ammonium compounds (91.9%). Mouthwashes may disturb the healthy balance of the biofilm moisturizing the oral mucosa. The biofilm contains mucins, salivary glycoproteins with oligosaccharides side chains able to sequester water and endogenous bacteria surrounded by a glycocalyx. Oral bacteria are fully susceptible to quaternary ammonium (chlorhexidine, hexetidine, cetylpyridinium chloride) and to other antiseptics used in mouthwashes, such as betain, resorcin, triclosan, essential oils and alcohol. However, caregivers currently recommend such dental plaque control products to patients suffering from xerostomia in order to reduce the risk of caries and periodontitis. This study is the first report that use of antiseptic mouthwashes for more than 2 weeks could worsen xerostomia in patients taking polypharmacy. Oral care protocols should avoid this iatrogenic practice, particularly when xerostomia alters the quality-of-life and worsens malnutrition.

  14. Hyperglycemia in Critically Ill Patients: Management and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Godinjak, Amina; Iglica, Amer; Burekovic, Azra; Jusufovic, Selma; Ajanovic, Anes; Tancica, Ira; Kukuljac, Adis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperglycemia is a common complication of critical illness. Patients in intensive care unit with stress hyperglycemia have significantly higher mortality (31%) compared to patients with previously confirmed diabetes (10%) or normoglycemia (11.3%). Stress hyperglycemia is associated with increased risk of critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and prolonged mechanical ventilation. Intensive monitoring and insulin therapy according to the protocol are an important part of the treatment of critically ill patients. Objective: To evaluate the incidence of stress hyperglycemia, complications and outcome in critically ill patients in our Medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods: This study included 100 patients hospitalized in Medical intensive care unit during the period January 2014–March 2015 which were divided into three groups: Diabetes mellitus, stress-hyperglycemia and normoglycemia. During the retrospective-prospective observational clinical investigation the following data was obtained: age, gender, SAPS, admission diagnosis, average daily blood glucose, highest blood glucose level, glycemic variability, vasopressor and corticosteroid therapy, days on mechanical ventilation, total days of hospitalization in Medical intensive care unit, and outcome. Results: Patients with DM treated with a continuous insulin infusion did not have significantly more complications than patients with normoglycemia, unlike patients with stress hyperglycemia, which had more severe prognosis. There was a significant difference between the maximum level of blood glucose in recovered and patients with adverse outcome (p = 0.0277). Glycemic variability (difference between max. and min. blood glucose) was the strongest predictor of adverse outcome. The difference in glycemic variability between the stress-hyperglycemia and normoglycemic group was statistically significant (p = 0.0066). There was no statistically significant difference in duration of mechanical

  15. Role of the extended MAPT haplotype in the worsening of psychotic symptoms and treatment response in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Creese, Byron; Corbett, Anne; Jones, Emma; Fox, Chris; Ballard, Clive

    2014-12-01

    There is evidence that neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) burden is associated with psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer disease (AD). However, it is not clear whether this association is direct or mediated through the increased cognitive impairment associated with NFTs. We sought to determine whether the extended MAPT haplotype was associated with the worsening of delusions and hallucinations in a combined cohort of 95 patients who participated in 2 clinical trials of treatment with memantine. After controlling for baseline dementia severity, exposure to memantine, and antipsychotics, analysis shows that carriers of at least one H2 allele had a 5.4-fold (P = .03) increased risk of worsening hallucinations. There was some evidence of association with worsening delusions but only in analysis by allele. These results are the first to indicate that the H2 allele of the extended MAPT haplotype negatively affects the course of psychotic symptoms in AD independently of disease severity. It will be important for future research to examine MAPT transcription in people with AD with and without psychotic symptoms to understand the exact mechanisms underlying these findings. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship of hyperglycemia and surgical-site infection in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Richards, Justin E; Kauffmann, Rondi M; Zuckerman, Scott L; Obremskey, William T; May, Addison K

    2012-07-03

    The impact of perioperative hyperglycemia in orthopaedic surgery is not well defined. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia is an independent risk factor for thirty-day surgical-site infection in orthopaedic trauma patients without a history of diabetes at hospital admission. Patients eighteen years of age or older with isolated orthopaedic injuries requiring acute operative intervention were studied. Patients with diabetes, injuries to other body systems, a history of corticosteroid use, or admission to the intensive care unit were excluded. Blood glucose values were obtained, and hyperglycemia was defined in two ways. First, patients with two or more blood glucose levels of ≥200 mg/dL were identified. Second, the hyperglycemic index, a validated measure of overall glucose control during hospitalization, was calculated for each patient. A hyperglycemic index of ≥1.76 (equivalent to ≥140 mg/dL) was considered to indicate hyperglycemia. The primary outcome was thirty-day surgical-site infection. Multivariable logistic regression models evaluating the effect of the markers of hyperglycemia, after controlling for open fractures, were constructed. Seven hundred and ninety patients were identified. There were 268 open fractures (33.9%). Twenty-one thirty-day surgical-site infections (2.7%) were recorded. Age, race, comorbidities, injury severity, and blood transfusion were not associated with the primary outcome. Of the 790 patients, 294 (37.2%) had more than one glucose value of ≥200 mg/dL. This factor was associated with thirty-day surgical-site infection, with thirteen (4.4%) of the 294 patients with that indication of hyperglycemia having a surgical-site infection versus eight (1.6%) of the 496 patients without more than one glucose value of ≥200 mg/dL (p = 0.02). One hundred and thirty-four (17.0%) of the 790 patients had a hyperglycemic index of ≥1.76, and this was also associated was thirty-day surgical-site infection (ten [7.5%] of 134 versus eleven [1

  17. Worsening atrioventricular conduction after hospital discharge in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: the HORIZONS-AMI trial.

    PubMed

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Redfors, Björn; McAndrew, Thomas; Embacher, Monica; Mehran, Roxana; Dizon, José M; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Mintz, Gary S; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-06-21

    The chronic effects of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) on the atrioventricular conduction (AVC) system have not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence, predictors, and outcomes of worsened AVC post-STEMI in patients treated with a primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The current analysis included patients from the HORIZONS-AMI trial who underwent primary PCI and had available ECGs. Patients with high-grade atrioventricular block or pacemaker implant at baseline were excluded. Analysis of ECGs excluding the acute hospitalization period indicated worsened AVC in 131 patients (worsened AVC group) and stable AVC in 2833 patients (stable AVC group). Patients with worsened AVC were older, had a higher frequency of hypertension, diabetes, renal insufficiency, previous coronary artery bypass grafting, and predominant left anterior descending culprit lesions. Predictors of worsened AVC included age, hypertension, and previous history of coronary artery disease. Worsened AVC was associated with an increased rate of all-cause death and major adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, ischemic target vessel revascularization, and stroke) as well as death or reinfarction at 3 years. On multivariable analysis, worsened AVC remained an independent predictor of all-cause death (hazard ratio: 2.005, confidence interval: 1.051-3.827, P=0.0348) and major adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio 1.542, confidence interval: 1.059-2.244, P=0.0238). Progression of AVC system disease in patients with STEMI treated with primary PCI is uncommon, occurs primarily in the setting of anterior myocardial infarction, and portends a high risk for death and major adverse cardiac events.

  18. Acute intensive insulin therapy exacerbates diabetic blood-retinal barrier breakdown via hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Poulaki, Vassiliki; Qin, Wenying; Joussen, Antonia M.; Hurlbut, Peter; Wiegand, Stanley J.; Rudge, John; Yancopoulos, George D.; Adamis, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    Acute intensive insulin therapy is an independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy. Here we demonstrate that acute intensive insulin therapy markedly increases VEGF mRNA and protein levels in the retinae of diabetic rats. Retinal nuclear extracts from insulin-treated rats contain higher hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) levels and demonstrate increased HIF-1α–dependent binding to hypoxia-responsive elements in the VEGF promoter. Blood-retinal barrier breakdown is markedly increased with acute intensive insulin therapy but can be reversed by treating animals with a fusion protein containing a soluble form of the VEGF receptor Flt; a control fusion protein has no such protective effect. The insulin-induced retinal HIF-1α and VEGF increases and the related blood-retinal barrier breakdown are suppressed by inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, but not inhibitors of p42/p44 MAPK or protein kinase C. Taken together, these findings indicate that acute intensive insulin therapy produces a transient worsening of diabetic blood-retinal barrier breakdown via an HIF-1α–mediated increase in retinal VEGF expression. Insulin-induced VEGF expression requires p38 MAPK and PI 3-kinase, whereas hyperglycemia-induced VEGF expression is HIF-1α–independent and requires PKC and p42/p44 MAPK. To our knowledge, these data are the first to identify a specific mechanism for the transient worsening of diabetic retinopathy, specifically blood-retinal barrier breakdown, that follows the institution of intensive insulin therapy. PMID:11901189

  19. NAP reduces murine microvascular endothelial cells proliferation induced by hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Scuderi, Soraya; Maugeri, Grazia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; Drago, Filippo; D'Agata, Velia

    2014-11-01

    Hyperglycemia has been identified as a risk factor responsible for micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetes. NAP (Davunetide) is a peptide whose neuroprotective actions are widely demonstrated, although its biological role on endothelial dysfunctions induced by hyperglycemia remains uninvestigated. In the present study we hypothesized that NAP could play a protective role on hyperglycemia-induced endothelial cell proliferation. To this end we investigated the effects of NAP on an in vitro model of murine microvascular endothelial cells grown in high glucose for 7 days. The MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and cyclin D1 protein expression analysis revealed that NAP treatment significantly reduces viability and proliferation of the cells. Hyperglycemia induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and/or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathways in a time-dependent manner. NAP treatment reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK and AKT in cells grown in high glucose. These evidences suggest that NAP might be effective in the regulation of endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia.

  20. Stress hyperglycemia, insulin treatment, and innate immune cells.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Fangming; Stanojcic, Mile; Diao, Li; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia (HG) and insulin resistance are the hallmarks of a profoundly altered metabolism in critical illness resulting from the release of cortisol, catecholamines, and cytokines, as well as glucagon and growth hormone. Recent studies have proposed a fundamental role of the immune system towards the development of insulin resistance in traumatic patients. A comprehensive review of published literatures on the effects of hyperglycemia and insulin on innate immunity in critical illness was conducted. This review explored the interaction between the innate immune system and trauma-induced hypermetabolism, while providing greater insight into unraveling the relationship between innate immune cells and hyperglycemia. Critical illness substantially disturbs glucose metabolism resulting in a state of hyperglycemia. Alterations in glucose and insulin regulation affect the immune function of cellular components comprising the innate immunity system. Innate immune system dysfunction via hyperglycemia is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality in critical illness. Along with others, we hypothesize that reduction in morbidity and mortality observed in patients receiving insulin treatment is partially due to its effect on the attenuation of the immune response. However, there still remains substantial controversy regarding moderate versus intensive insulin treatment. Future studies need to determine the integrated effects of HG and insulin on the regulation of innate immunity in order to provide more effective insulin treatment regimen for these patients.

  1. Objectively-measured sleep duration and hyperglycemia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Sharon J.; Nelson, Deborah B.; Pien, Grace W.; Homko, Carol; Goetzl, Laura M.; Davey, Adam; Foster, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our primary purpose was to assess the impact of objectively-measured nighttime sleep duration on gestational glucose tolerance. We additionally examined associations of objectively-measured daytime sleep duration and nap frequency on maternal glycemic control. Methods 63 urban, low-income, pregnant women wore wrist actigraphs for an average of 6 full days in mid-pregnancy prior to screening for hyperglycemia using the 1-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Correlations of nighttime and daytime sleep durations with 1-hour OGTT values were analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate independent associations between sleep parameters and hyperglycemia, defined as 1-hour OGTT values ≥ 130 mg/dL. Results Mean nighttime sleep duration was 6.9 ± 0.9 hours which was inversely correlated with 1-hour OGTT values (r = −0.28, p = 0.03). Shorter nighttime sleep was associated with hyperglycemia, even after controlling for age and body mass index (adjusted OR: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1, 0.8). There were no associations of daytime sleep duration and nap frequency with 1-hour OGTT values or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Using objective measures of maternal sleep time, we found that women with shorter nighttime sleep durations had an increased risk of gestational hyperglycemia. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm our negative daytime sleep findings. PMID:24239498

  2. Combination approaches to attenuate hemorrhagic transformation after tPA thrombolytic therapy in patients with poststroke hyperglycemia/diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiang; Jiang, Yinghua; Yu, Zhanyang; Yuan, Jing; Sun, Xiaochuan; Xiang, Shuanglin; Lo, Eng H; Wang, Xiaoying

    2014-01-01

    To date, tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA)-based thrombolytic stroke therapy is the only FDA-approved treatment for achieving vascular reperfusion and clinical benefit, but this agent is given to only about 5% of stroke patients in the USA. This may be related, in part, to the elevated risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, and consequently limited therapeutic time window. Clinical investigations demonstrate that poststroke hyperglycemia is one of the most important risk factors that cause intracerebral hemorrhage and worsen neurological outcomes. There is a knowledge gap in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms, and lack of effective therapeutics targeting the severe complication. This short review summarizes clinical observations and experimental investigations in preclinical stroke models of the field. The data strongly suggest that interactions of multiple pathogenic factors including hyperglycemia-mediated vascular oxidative stress and inflammation, ischemic insult, and tPA neurovascular toxicity in concert contribute to the BBB damage-intracerebral hemorrhagic transformation process. Development of combination approaches targeting the multiple pathological cascades may help to attenuate the hemorrhagic complication.

  3. Acute cor pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Jardin, François; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine

    2009-02-01

    Acute cor pulmonale is a form of acute right heart failure produced by a sudden increase in resistance to blood flow in the pulmonary circulation, which is now rapidly recognized by bedside echocardiography. In the clinical setting, acute cor pulmonale is mainly observed as a complication of massive pulmonary embolism or acute respiratory distress syndrome. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, the worsening effect of mechanical ventilation has been recently emphasized. As a general rule, the treatment consists in rapidly reducing resistance to blood flow in the pulmonary circulation, obtained by a specific strategy according to etiology.

  4. Ethanol-induced hypothermia and hyperglycemia in genetically obese mice

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.W.; Wittmers, L.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Blood glucose and rectal temperatures were monitored in two strains of genetically obese mice (C57 BL/6J ob/ob) prior to and following intragastric ethanol administration in an attempt to relate the hypothermic response to ethanol to extracellular glucose concentration. In contrast to expectation, ethanol administration was typically associated with a hyperglycemia and a hypothermic response. In the ob/ob genotype, the hypothermic response was associated with pronounced hyperglycemia which was more emphatic in older animals. The data support the conclusion that ethanol-induced hypothermia is independent of blood glucose levels. In light of the known sensitivity of ob/ob mice to insulin, it is suggested further that the observed hypothermic response was not a function of the animals' ability to transport glucose into peripheral cells. The observed hyperglycemia of the obese animals was most likely stress-related

  5. Diabetes and mitochondrial function: Role of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M. . E-mail: palmeira@ci.uc.pt

    2006-04-15

    Hyperglycemia resulting from uncontrolled glucose regulation is widely recognized as the causal link between diabetes and diabetic complications. Four major molecular mechanisms have been implicated in hyperglycemia-induced tissue damage: activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms via de novo synthesis of the lipid second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG), increased hexosamine pathway flux, increased advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation, and increased polyol pathway flux. Hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of superoxide is the causal link between high glucose and the pathways responsible for hyperglycemic damage. In fact, diabetes is typically accompanied by increased production of free radicals and/or impaired antioxidant defense capabilities, indicating a central contribution for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the onset, progression, and pathological consequences of diabetes. Besides oxidative stress, a growing body of evidence has demonstrated a link between various disturbances in mitochondrial functioning and type 2 diabetes. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and decreases in mtDNA copy number have been linked to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The study of the relationship of mtDNA to type 2 diabetes has revealed the influence of the mitochondria on nuclear-encoded glucose transporters, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and nuclear-encoded uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in {beta}-cell glucose toxicity. This review focuses on a range of mitochondrial factors important in the pathogenesis of diabetes. We review the published literature regarding the direct effects of hyperglycemia on mitochondrial function and suggest the possibility of regulation of mitochondrial function at a transcriptional level in response to hyperglycemia. The main goal of this review is to include a fresh consideration of pathways involved in hyperglycemia-induced diabetic complications.

  6. Hyperglycemia is associated with lower levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in wound fluid.

    PubMed

    Akinci, Baris; Terzi, Cem; Sevindik, Gokmen; Yuksel, Faize; Tunc, Ulku Aybuke; Tunali, Sunay; Yesil, Sena

    2014-01-01

    Wounds in patients with hyperglycemia show impaired healing. Plasminogen activation is crucial in several overlapping phases of wound healing process. In this study, we aimed i) to compare acute wound fluid in patients with hyperglycemia and normoglycemia, ii) to focus on the elements of plasminogen activation in the wound fluid, and iii) to determine if the acute wound fluid characteristics are associated with surgical site infections. In a cohort of 54 patients, a closed suction drain was placed in the wound above the anterior abdominal wall fascia under the skin in order to collect postoperative acute wound fluid samples for 3 following days after colorectal surgery. Patients were classified as normoglycemic (n=25) or hyperglycemic (n=29; 17 with type 2 diabetes and 12 with stress induced hyperglycemia). Surgical site infection was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria. The levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAr), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1) were measured in the wound fluid. Compared to normoglycemic subjects, patients with hyperglycemia had significantly lower levels of uPA and uPAr in the wound fluid despite similar or even higher circulating levels. There was no significant difference in IL-1β, TNF-α, PAI-1 and FGF-1 levels. In the whole study population, the wound fluid levels of uPA and uPAr were negatively correlated with circulating glucose levels. No difference was detected in the wound fluid characteristics of patients with and without surgical site infection. Patients with hyperglycemia exhibit decreased levels of uPA and uPAr in the wound fluid, suggesting a local failure in plasminogen activation at the wound site. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CT and MR Unilateral Brain Features Secondary to Nonketotic Hyperglycemia Presenting as Hemichorea-Hemiballism

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Vega, Víctor Manuel; Sánchez Almaraz, Carlos; Bernardo, Ana Isabel; Rodríguez-Díaz, Ricardo; Díez Barrio, Ana; Martín Gil, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Hemichorea-hemiballism is an unusual hyperkinetic movement disorder characterized by continuous involuntary movements of an entire limb or both limbs on one side of the body. The acute onset of this disorder occurs with an insult in contralateral basal ganglia. Ischemic events represent the most common cause. Nonketotic hyperglycemia comes in second place. Nonketotic hyperglycemic hemichorea-hemiballism (NHH) is a rare cause of unilateral brain abnormalities on imaging studies confined to basal ganglia (mainly putaminal region as well as caudate nucleus). Subtle hyperdensity in striatal region can be found on CT studies whereas brain MR imaging typically shows T1 hyperintensity and T2 hypointensity in the basal ganglia contralateral to the movements. Diagnosis is based on both glucose levels and neuroimaging findings. Elevated blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels occur with poorly controlled diabetes. In this case report, our aim is to present neuroimaging CT and MR unilateral findings in an elderly woman secondary to nonketotic hyperglycemia presenting as hemichorea-hemiballism. PMID:27247821

  8. Intrathoracic impedance vs daily weight monitoring for predicting worsening heart failure events: results of the Fluid Accumulation Status Trial (FAST).

    PubMed

    Abraham, William T; Compton, Steven; Haas, Garrie; Foreman, Blair; Canby, Robert C; Fishel, Robert; McRae, Scott; Toledo, Gloria B; Sarkar, Shantanu; Hettrick, Douglas A

    2011-01-01

    The relative sensitivity and unexplained detection rate of changes in intrathoracic impedance has not been compared with standard heart failure (HF) monitoring using daily weight changes. The Fluid Accumulation Status Trial (FAST) prospectively followed 156 HF patients with implanted cardioverter-defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator devices modified to record daily changes in intrathoracic impedance in a blinded fashion for 537±312 days. Daily impedance changes were used to calculate a fluid index that could be compared with a prespecified threshold. True positives were defined as adjudicated episodes of worsening HF occurring within 30 days of a fluid index above threshold or an acute weight gain. Unexplained detections were defined as threshold crossings or acute weight gains not associated with worsening HF. Impedance measurements were performed on >99% of follow-up days, compared with only 76% of days for weight measurements. Sixty-five HF events occurred during follow-up (0.32/patient-year). Forty HF events were detected by impedance but not weight, whereas 5 were detected by weight but not impedance. Sensitivity was greater (76% vs 23%; P<.0001) and unexplained detection rate was lower (1.9 vs 4.3/patient-year; P<.0001) for intrathoracic impedance monitoring at the threshold of 60Ω days compared with acute weight increases of 3 lbs in 1 day or 5 lbs in 3 days and also over a wide range of fluid index and weight thresholds. The sensitivity and unexplained detection rate of intrathoracic impedance monitoring was superior to that seen for acute weight changes. Intrathoracic impedance monitoring represents a useful adjunctive clinical tool for managing HF in patients with implanted devices.

  9. Clostridium difficile infection worsens the prognosis of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Negrón, María E; Barkema, Herman W; Rioux, Kevin; De Buck, Jeroen; Checkley, Sylvia; Proulx, Marie-Claude; Frolkis, Alexandra; Beck, Paul L; Dieleman, Levinus A; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of Clostridium difficile infections among ulcerative colitis (UC) patients is well characterized. However, there is little knowledge regarding the association between C difficile infections and postoperative complications among UC patients. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether C difficile infection is associated with undergoing an emergent colectomy and experiencing postoperative complications. METHODS: The present population-based case-control study identified UC patients admitted to Calgary Health Zone hospitals for a flare between 2000 and 2009. C difficile toxin tests ordered in hospital or 90 days before hospital admission were provided by Calgary Laboratory Services (Calgary, Alberta). Hospital records were reviewed to confirm diagnoses and to extract clinical data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed among individuals tested for C difficile to examine the association between C difficile infection and emergent colectomy and diagnosis of any postoperative complications and, secondarily, an infectious postoperative complication. Estimates were presented as adjusted ORs with 95% CIs. RESULTS: C difficile was tested in 278 (58%) UC patients and 6.1% were positive. C difficile infection was associated with an increased risk for emergent colectomy (adjusted OR 3.39 [95% CI 1.02 to 11.23]). Additionally, a preoperative diagnosis of C difficile was significantly associated with the development of postoperative infectious complications (OR 4.76 [95% CI 1.10 to 20.63]). CONCLUSION: C difficile diagnosis worsened the prognosis of UC by increasing the risk of colectomy and postoperative infectious complications following colectomy. Future studies are needed to explore whether early detection and aggressive management of C difficile infection will improve UC outcomes. PMID:25157528

  10. Sleep restriction worsens mood and emotion regulation in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Baum, Katherine T; Desai, Anjali; Field, Julie; Miller, Lauren E; Rausch, Joseph; Beebe, Dean W

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between inadequate sleep and mood has been well-established in adults and is supported primarily by correlational data in younger populations. Given that adolescents often experience shortened sleep on school nights, we sought to better understand the effect of experimentally induced chronic sleep restriction on adolescents' mood and mood regulation. Fifty healthy adolescents, ages 14-17, completed a 3-week sleep manipulation protocol involving a baseline week, followed by a sleep restriction (SR) condition (6.5 hr in bed per night for five nights) and healthy sleep duration (HS) condition (10 hr in bed per night for five nights). The study used a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover experimental design. Participants' sleep was monitored at home via self-report and actigraphy. At the end of each condition, participants and their parents completed questionnaires of mood and mood regulation. To assess for expectancy effects, we also analyzed parent and teen ratings of hyperactivity/impulsivity, which prior research suggests is not sensitive to SR in adolescents. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests compared questionnaire outcomes across the two conditions. Participants averaged 2.5 more hours of sleep per night during HS relative to SR. Compared with HS, adolescents rated themselves as significantly more tense/anxious, angry/hostile, confused, and fatigued, and as less vigorous (p = .001-.01) during SR. Parents and adolescents also reported greater oppositionality/irritability and poorer emotional regulation during SR compared with HS (p < .05). There were no cross-condition differences in depression or hyperactivity/impulsivity (p > .05). Findings complement prior correlational study results to show that after only a few days of shortened sleep, at a level of severity that is experienced regularly by millions of adolescents on school nights, adolescents have worsened mood and decreased ability to regulate negative emotions. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of

  11. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C.; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S.; Irace, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk. Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods. We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women. Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:26937904

  12. AICAR Administration Attenuates Hemorrhagic Hyperglycemia and Lowers Oxygen Debt in Anesthetized Male Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Ratz, Paul H; Miner, Amy S; Locke, Victoria A; Chen, Grace; Chen, Yang; Barbee, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many strategies have been utilized to treat traumatic shock via improved oxygen delivery (DO2), while fewer have been used to in an attempt to reduce oxygen demand (VO2). The cellular energy sensor 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has the potential to modulate both whole-body DO2 and VO2. Therefore, we determined the effect of the AMPK activator AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribonucleoside) given acutely or chronically on key metabolites, hemodynamics, and oxygen consumption/delivery before and during hemorrhage in anesthetized male rabbits. Methods: Chronically treated animals received AICAR (40 mg/kg/day, IV) for 10 days prior to hemorrhage, while rabbits in the acute study were infused with AICAR (7.5 mg/kg bolus, 2 mg/kg/min infusion) or vehicle (0.3 ml/kg saline bolus, 0.03 ml/kg/min infusion) IV for 2 h prior to severe hemorrhage. Both acutely and chronically treated animals were sedated (ketamine/xylazine cocktail) the morning of the terminal experiment and surgically prepared for hemorrhage, including the implantation of arterial and venous catheters (for blood removal/sampling and drug/vehicle administration) and thoracotomy for implantation of transit-time flow transducers (for cardiac output determination). Results: AICAR given acutely lowered arterial blood glucose and increased blood lactate levels before hemorrhage, and abolished the well-documented hemorrhage-induced hyperglycemia seen in vehicle treated animals. Animals given AICAR chronically had blunted hemorrhage-induced hyperglycemia without prior baseline changes. Chronically treated AICAR animals showed significantly lower lactate levels during hemorrhage. Rabbits receiving AICAR both acutely and chronically experienced similar falls in mean arterial pressure, cardiac output and hence DO2 to their vehicle counterparts throughout the hemorrhage period. However, rabbits treated either acutely or chronically with AICAR accumulated lower oxygen

  13. Loss of matrix metalloproteinase-8 is associated with worsened recovery after ischemic kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Basu, Rajit K; Donaworth, Emily; Siroky, Brian; Devarajan, Prasad; Wong, Hector R

    2015-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) leads to chronic kidney disease. The mechanisms involved with recovery from AKI are poorly understood and molecular mediators responsible for healing and restoration of kidney function are understudied. We previously discovered differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) mRNA and protein in patients with severe sepsis associated AKI versus sepsis without AKI. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of MMP-8 in purely ischemic AKI. Mice subjected to 30 min of bilateral renal ischemia developed increased plasma creatinine and MMP-8 expression within 24 h versus sham controls. After an initial surge and subsequent return toward baseline, both kidney MMP-8 expression and activity exhibited a late increase (Days 5-7 post-ischemia reperfusion) in mice subjected to AKI. Neutrophil infiltration of the kidney was significantly higher after AKI in wild-type mice than in MMP-8 null mice, starting at 4 days. Additionally, MMP-8 null mice subjected to AKI demonstrated a persistent histopathologic and functional injury and worsened health (greater overall weight loss) versus wild-type cohorts after seven days. Taken together, our findings suggest that MMP-8 is involved with restoration of baseline kidney health after ischemic kidney injury and that a potential mechanism involves the interaction of MMP-8 and neutrophil recruitment to the site of injury.

  14. Hypertension, Hyperglycemia, and Hyperlipemia among Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to assess the hypertension, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia prevalence of adolescents with intellectual disabilities, and to recognize the health disparities between the study participants and the general population. This study conducted a cross-sectional medical chart analysis of 856 students who participated in school…

  15. Hemichorea/Hemiballism Associated with Hyperglycemia: Report of 20 Cases.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis; Nuñez, Yesenia; Suarez, Rafael; Velez, Miriam; Flores, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia is a well-recognized syndrome, but few case series have been reported in the literature. We describe 20 patients with hemichorea/hemiballism associated with hyperglycemia (9 males and 11 females) with mean age of 67.8 years. Ten patients had a previous diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and one had type 1 diabetes mellitus. Six of them had documentation of poor diabetic control over at least the last 3 months. Nine patients had new-onset hyperglycemia with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus made after discharge. Seventeen patients had unilateral chorea/ballism, while three had bilateral chorea/ballism. Eighteen cases had striatal hyperdensities on computed tomography (CT) and/or hyperintense signals on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The putamen was affected in all cases, and the caudate nucleus was involved in nine. Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia can be the presenting sign of diabetes mellitus in almost half of cases or can occur after a few months of poor glycemic control in patients with diagnosed diabetes. This case series is one of the largest to date and adds valuable information about clinical and neuroimaging features that are comparable with published data but also emphasize the role of adequate diabetes mellitus control.

  16. Hemichorea/Hemiballism Associated with Hyperglycemia: Report of 20 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis; Nuñez, Yesenia; Suarez, Rafael; Velez, Miriam; Flores, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia is a well-recognized syndrome, but few case series have been reported in the literature. Case Report We describe 20 patients with hemichorea/hemiballism associated with hyperglycemia (9 males and 11 females) with mean age of 67.8 years. Ten patients had a previous diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and one had type 1 diabetes mellitus. Six of them had documentation of poor diabetic control over at least the last 3 months. Nine patients had new-onset hyperglycemia with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus made after discharge. Seventeen patients had unilateral chorea/ballism, while three had bilateral chorea/ballism. Eighteen cases had striatal hyperdensities on computed tomography (CT) and/or hyperintense signals on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The putamen was affected in all cases, and the caudate nucleus was involved in nine. Discussion Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia can be the presenting sign of diabetes mellitus in almost half of cases or can occur after a few months of poor glycemic control in patients with diagnosed diabetes. This case series is one of the largest to date and adds valuable information about clinical and neuroimaging features that are comparable with published data but also emphasize the role of adequate diabetes mellitus control. PMID:27536463

  17. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) reverses hyperglycemia in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Luguang Luo, John Z.Q. Jackson, Ivor M.D.

    2008-09-12

    Hyperglycemia in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) null mice indicates that TRH is involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Further, TRH levels in the pancreas peak during the stages of late embryonic and early neonatal {beta} cell development. These observations are consistent in linking TRH to islet cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we examined the effect of TRH administration in damaged pancreatic rat (streptozotocin, STZ) to determine whether TRH could improve damaged pancreatic {beta} cells function. We hypothesize that TRH is able to reverse STZ-induced hyperglycemia by increasing pancreatic islet insulin content, preventing apoptosis, and potentially induce islet regeneration. It was found that following intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, TRH (10 {mu}g/kg body weight (bwt)) reverses STZ (65 mg/kg bwt)-induced hyperglycemia (TRH given 3 days after STZ injection). Increased circulating insulin levels and insulin content in extracted pancreas suggests that TRH reversed STZ-induced hyperglycemia through improving pancreatic islet {beta} cell function. Further studies show a significantly lower level of apoptosis in islets treated with TRH as well as the presence of proliferation marker nestin and Brdu, suggesting that the TRH has the potential to prevent apoptosis and stimulate islet proliferation.

  18. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly.

    PubMed

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed.

  19. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H. G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed. PMID:26286620

  20. Effects of Hyperglycemia on Vascular Smooth Muscle Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    El-Najjar, Nahed; Kulkarni, Rashmi P.; Nader, Nancy; Hodeify, Rawad

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease that is characterized with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. These pathologies are associated with significant cardiovascular implications that affect both the macro- and microvasculature. It is therefore important to understand the effects of various pathologies associated with diabetes on the vasculature. Here we directly test the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular smooth muscle (VSM) Ca2+ signaling in an isolated in vitro system using the A7r5 rat aortic cell line as a model. We find that prolonged exposure of A7r5 cells to hyperglycemia (weeks) is associated with changes to Ca2+ signaling, including most prominently an inhibition of the passive ER Ca2+ leak and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). To translate these findings to the in vivo condition, we used primary VSM cells from normal and diabetic subjects and find that only the inhibition of the ER Ca2+ leaks replicates in cells from diabetic donors. These results show that prolonged hyperglycemia in isolation alters the Ca2+ signaling machinery in VSM cells. However, these alterations are not readily translatable to the whole organism situation where alterations to the Ca2+ signaling machinery are different. PMID:28713824

  1. Characterization of a Mouse Model of Hyperglycemia and Retinal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Rahman, Ireni S. Ali; Binz, Nicolette; Li, Cai-Rui; Vagaja, Nermina N.; de Pinho, Marisa; Lai, Chooi-May

    2010-01-01

    One of the limitations of research into diabetic retinopathy is the lack of suitable animal models. To study how the two important factors—hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor—interact in diabetic retinopathy, the Akimba mouse (Ins2AkitaVEGF+/−) was generated by crossing the Akita mouse (Ins2Akita) with the Kimba mouse (VEGF+/+). C57Bl/6 and the parental and Akimba mouse lines were characterized by biometric measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Spectralis Heidelberg retinal angiography and optical coherence tomography. The Akimba line not only retained the characteristics of the parental strains, such as developing hyperglycemia and retinal neovascularization, but developed higher blood glucose levels at a younger age and had worse kidney-body weight ratios than the Akita line. With aging, the Akimba line demonstrated enhanced photoreceptor cell loss, thinning of the retina, and more severe retinal vascular pathology, including more severe capillary nonperfusion, vessel constriction, beading, neovascularization, fibroses, and edema, compared with the Kimba line. The vascular changes were associated with major histocompatibility complex class II+ cellular staining throughout the retina. Together, these observations suggest that hyperglycemia resulted in higher prevalences of edema and exacerbated the vascular endothelial growth factor-driven neovascular and retinal changes in the Akimba line. Thus, the Akimba line could become a useful model for studying the interplay between hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor and for testing treatment strategies for potentially blinding complications, such as edema. PMID:20829433

  2. Hypertension, Hyperglycemia, and Hyperlipemia among Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to assess the hypertension, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia prevalence of adolescents with intellectual disabilities, and to recognize the health disparities between the study participants and the general population. This study conducted a cross-sectional medical chart analysis of 856 students who participated in school…

  3. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  4. [NOPHAL Proyect: an integreting vision of hyperglycemia at the hospital].

    PubMed

    Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; Gómez-de Ossio, María Dolores; Bahena-García, Ana; Rodríguez-Valadez, Florisa; Tamez-Peña, Alejandra Lorena

    2009-01-01

    Patients with hyperglycemia are more likely to be hospitalized, and evidence links it with poor outcomes. Recognizing the importance of glycemic control, we develop a multidisciplinary educational program on inpatient glycemic management, with metabolic goals that are reasonable, achievable and safe.

  5. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  6. Outcomes and worsening renal function in patients hospitalized with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kavita; Hill, Terence; Grams, Morgan; Daya, Natalie R; Hays, Allison G; Fine, Derek; Thiemann, David R; Weiss, Robert G; Tedford, Ryan J; Kass, David A; Schulman, Steven P; Russell, Stuart D

    2015-11-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has been described as a disease of elderly subjects with female predominance and hypertension. Our clinical experience suggests patients with HFpEF from an urban population are far more heterogenous, with greater co-morbidities and significant inhospital morbidity. There are limited data on the hospitalization course and outcomes in acute decompensated HFpEF. Hospitalizations for acute heart failure at our institution from July 2011 to June 2012 were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes and physician review for left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50% and were reviewed for patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Worsening renal function (WRF) was defined as creatinine increase of ≥0.3 mg/dl by 72 hours after admission. Hospital readmission and mortality data were captured from electronic medical records and the Social Security Death Index. Of 434 heart failure admissions, 206 patients (47%) with HFpEF were identified. WRF developed in 40%, the highest reported in HFpEF to date, and was associated with higher blood pressure and lower volume of diuresis. Compared to previous reports, hospitalized patients with HFpEF were younger (mean age 63.2 ± 13.6 years), predominantly black (74%), and had more frequent and severe co-morbidities: hypertension (89%), diabetes (56%), and chronic kidney disease (55%). There were no significant differences in 1- and 12-month outcomes by gender, race, or WRF. In conclusion, we found hospitalized patients with HFpEF from an urban population develop a high rate of WRF are younger than previous cohorts, often black, and have greater co-morbidities than previously described.

  7. Genetic differences in ethanol-induced hyperglycemia and conditioned taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Risinger, F.O.; Cunningham, C.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Genetic differences in the hyperglycemic response to acute ethanol exposure and ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion were examined using inbred mice. Adult male C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice were injected with ethanol and blood glucose levels determined over 4 h. C57 mice demonstrated greater dose-dependent elevations in blood glucose compared to DBA mice. In a conditioned taste aversion procedure, water deprived mice received ethanol injections immediately after access to a NaCl flavored solution. DBA mice developed aversion to the ethanol-paired flavor at a lower dose than C57 mice. These results provide further support for a possible inverse genetic relationship between sensitivity to ethanol-induced hyperglycemia and sensitivity to conditioned taste aversion.

  8. Can We Predict Those With Osteoarthritis Who Will Worsen Following a Chronic Disease Management Program?

    PubMed

    Eyles, Jillian P; Mills, Kathryn; Lucas, Barbara R; Williams, Matthew J; Makovey, Joanna; Teoh, Laurence; Hunter, David J

    2016-09-01

    To identify predictors of worsening symptoms and overall health of the treated hip or knee joint following 26 weeks of a nonsurgical chronic disease management program for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to examine the consistency of these predictors across 3 definitions of worsening. This prospective cohort study followed 539 participants of the program for 26 weeks. The 3 definitions of worsening included symptomatic worsening based on change in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index Global score (WOMAC-G) measuring pain, stiffness, and function; a transition scale that asked about overall health of the treated hip or knee joint; and a composite outcome including both. Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed for the 3 definitions of worsening. Complete data were available for 386 participants: mean age was 66.3 years, 69% were female, 85% reported knee joint pain as primary symptom (signal joint), 46% were waitlisted for total joint arthroplasty (TJA). TJA waitlist status, signal joint, 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), depressive symptoms, pain, and age were independently associated with at least 1 definition of worsening. TJA waitlist status and 6MWT remained in the multivariate models for the transition and composite definitions of worsening. Participants reporting worsening on the transition scale did not consistently meet the WOMAC-G definition of worsening symptoms. TJA waitlist status was predictive of the composite definition of worsening, a trend apparent for the transition definition. However, variables that predict worsening remain largely unknown. Further research is required to direct comprehensive and targeted management of patients with hip and knee OA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Hospitalization for Recently Diagnosed Versus Worsening Chronic Heart Failure: From the ASCEND-HF Trial.

    PubMed

    Greene, Stephen J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Dunning, Allison; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Armstrong, Paul W; Butler, Javed; Cerbin, Lukasz P; Coles, Adrian; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Metra, Marco; Starling, Randall C; Teerlink, John R; Voors, Adriaan A; O'Connor, Christopher M; Mentz, Robert J

    2017-06-27

    age, race, prior ischemic heart disease, or ejection fraction (all interactions, p ≥ 0.23). In this acute HF trial, patient profile differed according to duration of the HF diagnosis. A diagnosis of HF for ≤1 month before hospitalization was independently associated with greater early dyspnea relief and improved post-discharge survival compared to patients with chronic HF diagnoses. The distinction between de novo or recently diagnosed HF and worsening chronic HF should be considered in the design of future acute HF trials. (A Study Testing the Effectiveness of Nesiritide in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure; NCT00475852). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Periodontal Pocket Depth, Hyperglycemia, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jia-Feng; Yeh, Jih-Chen; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Liou, Jian-Chiun; Hsiung, Jing-Ru; Tung, Tao-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    No large epidemiological study has been conducted to investigate the interaction and joint effects of periodontal pocket depth and hyperglycemia on progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. Periodontal pocket depth was utilized for the grading severity of periodontal disease in 2831 patients from January 2002 to June 2013. Progression of chronic kidney disease was defined as progression of color intensity in glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria grid of updated Kidney Disease-Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) in various models were presented across different levels of periodontal pocket depth and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in forest plots and 3-dimensional histograms. During 7621 person-years of follow-up, periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C levels were robustly associated with incremental risks for progression of chronic kidney disease (aHR 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-4.6 for periodontal pocket depth >4.5 mm, and 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.4 for HbA1C >6.5%, respectively). The interaction between periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C on progression of chronic kidney disease was strong (P <.01). Patients with higher periodontal pocket depth (>4.5 mm) and higher HbA1C (>6.5%) had the greatest risk (aHR 4.2; 95% CI, 1.7-6.8) compared with the lowest aHR group (periodontal pocket depth ≤3.8 mm and HbA1C ≤6%). Our study identified combined periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C as a valuable predictor of progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. While considering the interaction between periodontal diseases and hyperglycemia, periodontal survey and optimizing glycemic control are warranted to minimize the risk of worsening renal function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hyperglycemia exacerbates colon cancer malignancy through hexosamine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos-Dos-Santos, A; Loponte, H F B R; Mantuano, N R; Oliveira, I A; de Paula, I F; Teixeira, L K; de-Freitas-Junior, J C M; Gondim, K C; Heise, N; Mohana-Borges, R; Morgado-Díaz, J A; Dias, W B; Todeschini, A R

    2017-03-20

    Hyperglycemia is a common feature of diabetes mellitus, considered as a risk factor for cancer. However, its direct effects in cancer cell behavior are relatively unexplored. Herein we show that high glucose concentration induces aberrant glycosylation, increased cell proliferation, invasion and tumor progression of colon cancer. By modulating the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT), we demonstrate that hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is involved in those processes. Biopsies from patients with colon carcinoma show increased levels of GFAT and consequently aberrant glycans' expression suggesting an increase of HBP flow in human colon cancer. All together, our results open the possibility that HBP links hyperglycemia, aberrant glycosylation and tumor malignancy, and suggest this pathway as a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer.

  12. Ambient levels of air pollution induce clinical worsening of blepharitis.

    PubMed

    Malerbi, Fernando Korn; Martins, Lourdes Conceição; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Even though air pollutants exposure is associated with changes in the ocular surface and tear film, its relationship to the clinical course of blepharitis, a common eyelid disease, had not yet been investigated. Our objective was to investigate the correlation between air pollution and acute manifestations of blepharitis. We recorded all cases of changes in the eyelids and ocular surface, and rated clinical findings on a scale from zero (normal) to two (severe alterations). Daily values of carbon monoxide, particulate matter smaller than 10 μm in diameter and nitrogen dioxide concentrations and meteorological variables (temperature and relative humidity) in the vicinity of the medical service were obtained. Specific linear regression models for each outcome were constructed including pollutants as independent variables (single pollutant models). Temperature and humidity were included as confounding variables. increases of 28.8 μg/m(3) in the concentration of particulate matter and 1.1 ppm in the concentration of CO were associated with increases in cases of blepharitis on the day of exposure (5 cases, 95% CI: 1-10 and 6 cases, 95% CI: 1-12, respectively). Exposure to usual air pollutants concentrations present in large cities affects, in a consistent manner, the eyes of residents contributing to the increasing incidence of diseases of the eyelid margin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Coffee Ingestion Suppresses Hyperglycemia in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Kurata, Takao; Hamana, Yoshiki; Hiramitsu, Masanori; Inoue, Takashi; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2017-01-01

    Coffee consumption reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes in humans, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of coffee on pancreatic β-cells in the induction of diabetes by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment in mice. We examined the effect of coffee, caffeine, or decaffeinated coffee ingestion on STZ-induced hyperglycemia. After STZ injection in Exp. 1 and 2, serum glucose concentration and water intake in coffee ingestion (Coffee group) tended to be lowered or was significantly lowered compared to those in water ingestion (Water group) instead of coffee. In Exp. 1, the values for water intake and serum glucose concentration in caffeine ingestion (Caffeine group) were similar to those in the Water group. In Exp. 2, serum glucose concentrations in the decaffeinated coffee ingestion (Decaf group) tended to be lower than those in the Water group. Pancreatic insulin contents tended to be higher in the Coffee and Decaf groups than in the Water group (Exp. 1 and 2). In Exp. 3, subsequently, we showed that coffee ingestion also suppressed the deterioration of hyperglycemia in diabetic mice which had been already injected with STZ. This study showed that coffee ingestion prevented the development of STZ-induced diabetes and suppressed hyperglycemia in STZ-diabetic mice. Caffeine or decaffeinated coffee ingestion did not significantly suppress STZ-induced hyperglycemia. These results suggest that the combination of caffeine and other components of decaffeinated coffee are needed for the preventive effect on pancreatic β-cell destruction. Coffee ingestion may contribute to the maintenance of pancreatic insulin contents.

  14. Hyperglycemia induces attention and gait deficits in diabetic mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Sattar, L; Renneboog, B; Decaux, G

    2017-08-23

    Patients with diabetes mellitus experience a large number of falls and bone fractures that are not related solely to complications of the disease. The purpose of our study was to determine whether transient hyperglycemia affects attentional functions and gait. This was a case-control study. We asked 17 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus to perform three visual tests and one visual and auditory attention test (Phasic Alert A1-4 and A2-3, Go/No Go, Intermodal Comparison). Mean response time (ms) and total number of errors were assessed. Ten of the patients also performed a tandem gait test consisting of three steps. The total distance travelled (TDT, in mm) by the center of pressure was measured with a pressure-sensitive calibrated platform. Transient hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose level greater than 13, 8 mmol/L at the time of the test. These same patients were retested 1-3 days later at a blood glucose level at least 5, 5 mmol/L lower than the initial values (T24-72h). Nineteen patients with diabetes mellitus were matched with the original participants and performed the same test under normoglycemic conditions. During transient hyperglycemia, the mean response time (ms) and the TDT were significantly longer. The mean response time for the four tests increased by 53, 5 ms (P < 0.001). There was no increase in the number of errors. The TDT of the center of pressure increased significantly by 102 mm (P < 0.001). Transient hyperglycemia alters attention and gait in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  15. Approach to the Metabolic Implications of Peritoneal Dialysis in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Góes, Cassiana Regina; Berbel, Marina Nogueira; Balbi, Andre Luis; Ponce, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, peritoneal dialysis (PD) was widely accepted as the standard treatment for acute kidney injury (AKI). However, advances in the techniques of extracorporeal blood purification gradually reduced its use, making PD an underused modality in this context. Although PD for AKI is an underutilized modality worldwide, it is frequently used in developing countries because of its lower cost and minimal infrastructure requirements. Recent studies have shown that PD administered continuously through a flexible catheter and cycler is an effective treatment in AKI because it ensures adequate fluid status and metabolic control. However, the use of PD in AKI has several limitations, such as the need for an intact peritoneal cavity and, in emergency situations such as severe fluid overload and severe hyperkalemia, an efficacy that is lower than that with extracorporeal blood purification techniques. Metabolic, infectious, and mechanical disorders related to PD are also limitations. Among the metabolic complications of PD are hyperglycemia, hypernatremia, protein loss into the dialysate, and hypercatabolism. Hyperglycemia is caused by the use of dialysate containing high concentrations of glucose. Hypernatremia is a result of short dialysate dwell times during the rapid exchanges of high-volume PD. Protein loss into the dialysate can reach 48 g daily, worsening the nutrition status of patients already depleted by AKI. Severe hypercatabolism caused by PD remains controversial and occurs because PD methods cannot provide an adequate dialysis dose for AKI patients. Few studies have assessed the metabolic implications of PD in AKI patients. Evaluation of these implications is relatively simple, imposes no additional costs, and can provide information about the severity of the disease. Evaluation could also guide the selection of therapeutic, dialytic, and nutrition measures, preventing metabolic complications. The present manuscript describes the metabolic

  16. Approach to the Metabolic Implications of Peritoneal Dialysis in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Góes, Cassiana Regina; Berbel, Marina Nogueira; Balbi, Andre Luis; Ponce, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, peritoneal dialysis (PD) was widely accepted as the standard treatment for acute kidney injury (AKI). However, advances in the techniques of extracorporeal blood purification gradually reduced its use, making PD an underused modality in this context. Although PD for AKI is an underutilized modality worldwide, it is frequently used in developing countries because of its lower cost and minimal infrastructure requirements. Recent studies have shown that PD administered continuously through a flexible catheter and cycler is an effective treatment in AKI because it ensures adequate fluid status and metabolic control. However, the use of PD in AKI has several limitations, such as the need for an intact peritoneal cavity and, in emergency situations such as severe fluid overload and severe hyperkalemia, an efficacy that is lower than that with extracorporeal blood purification techniques. Metabolic, infectious, and mechanical disorders related to PD are also limitations.Among the metabolic complications of PD are hyperglycemia, hypernatremia, protein loss into the dialysate, and hypercatabolism. Hyperglycemia is caused by the use of dialysate containing high concentrations of glucose. Hypernatremia is a result of short dialysate dwell times during the rapid exchanges of high-volume PD. Protein loss into the dialysate can reach 48 g daily, worsening the nutrition status of patients already depleted by AKI. Severe hypercatabolism caused by PD remains controversial and occurs because PD methods cannot provide an adequate dialysis dose for AKI patients.Few studies have assessed the metabolic implications of PD in AKI patients. Evaluation of these implications is relatively simple, imposes no additional costs, and can provide information about the severity of the disease. Evaluation could also guide the selection of therapeutic, dialytic, and nutrition measures, preventing metabolic complications. The present manuscript describes the metabolic

  17. Management of new hyperglycemia in patients prescribed antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Viverito, Kristen; Owen, Richard; Mittal, Dinesh; Li, Chenghui; Williams, James Silas

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the extent to which patients found to have clinically significant hyperglycemia after beginning a new antipsychotic receive guideline concordant management. This retrospective cohort analysis (N=403) used U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs databases and multivariable logistic regression models to examine the association of patient characteristics with the likelihood of receiving recommended management. Overall, 63% of patients (N=254) received at least one type of management action within 30 days of identification of hyperglycemia. A primary care encounter was the most common action. Weight management program encounter, nutrition encounter, diabetes clinic encounter, and change in antipsychotic medications were underutilized interventions. Counseling related to weight management, nutrition, and diabetes that occurred during other visits with providers was not measured. Older patients and female patients were less likely to receive timely management. Preexisting comorbidities inconsistently influenced management practices. Timely hyperglycemia management actions were not recorded in administrative data for a sizable minority of patients. Further research is needed to determine the full extent of appropriate management actions in this context.

  18. Pathway for the management of hyperglycemia in critical care units.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Eyal; Aziz, Emad; Croitor, Sherryl; Frankenberger, Olivier; Gurunathan, Rajan; Albu, Jeanine; Mezitis, Nicholas

    2006-06-01

    Inhospital morbidity and mortality are increased in hyperglycemia. Normalization of blood glucose levels using intensive insulin infusion protocols improves clinical outcomes. Insulin infusion algorithms have been shown to be safe and effective; however, a major obstacle in their implementation is their complexity. We have developed a novel pathway for the management of hyperglycemia, which introduces the "wheel" concept for insulin dosing complemented by "catchup" insulin dosing. The "wheel" serves as a treatment guide. It is made up of 4 concentric circles. The inner circle features blood glucose ranges and the 3 outer circles correspond to increasing rates of insulin infusion. Simple guidelines are provided to facilitate conversion from insulin infusion to a subcutaneous insulin-delivery regimen in preparation for transfer from the critical care unit setting. Our protocols eliminate reliance on the familiar "sliding scale" insulin administration schemes with the introduction of "catchup" insulin dosing to supplement the basic regimen. This pathway is comprehensive yet simple and provides guidelines for treatment of hyperglycemia for all patients screened to a critical care unit or to a stepdown unit.

  19. Peri-operative hyperglycemia: a consideration for general surgery?

    PubMed

    Bower, Wendy F; Lee, Ping Yin; Kong, Alice P S; Jiang, Johnny Y; Underwood, Malcolm J; Chan, Juliana C N; van Hasselt, C Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Intraoperative hyperglycemia in cardiac and neurosurgical patients is significantly associated with morbidity. Little is known about the perioperative glycemic profile or its impact in other surgical populations or in nondiabetic patients. A systematic review of blood glucose values during major general surgical procedures reported since 1980 was conducted. Data extracted included blood glucose measures, study sample size, gender distribution, age grouping, study purpose, surgical procedure, anesthetic details, and infusion regime. Excluded studies were those with subjects with diabetes insipidus, insulin-treated diabetes, renal or hepatic failure, adrenal gland tumors or dysfunction, pregnancy, and emergency or trauma surgery. Blood glucose levels rose significantly with the induction of anesthesia (P < .001) in nondiabetic patients. At incision, 2 hours, 4 hours, and 6 hours, 30%, 40%, 38%, and 40% of studies, respectively, reported hyperglycemia. Factors that confound or protect against significant rises in perioperative glycemic levels in nondiabetic patients were identified. The findings facilitate investigating the impact of hyperglycemia on general surgical outcomes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antidepressants worsen rapid-cycling course in bipolar depression: A STEP-BD randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    El-Mallakh, Rif S; Vöhringer, Paul A; Ostacher, Michael M; Baldassano, Claudia F; Holtzman, Niki S; Whitham, Elizabeth A; Thommi, Sairah B; Goodwin, Frederick K; Ghaemi, S Nassir

    2015-09-15

    The use of antidepressants in rapid-cycling bipolar disorder has been controversial. We report the first randomized clinical trial with modern antidepressants on this topic. As part of the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study, we analyzed, as an a priori secondary outcome, rapid cycling as a predictor of response in 68 patients randomized to continue vs. discontinue antidepressant treatment, after initial response for an acute major depressive episode. Outcomes assessed were percent time well and total number of episodes. All patients received standard mood stabilizers. In those continued on antidepressants (AD), rapid cycling (RC) subjects experienced 268% (3.14/1.17) more total mood episodes/year, and 293% (1.29/0.44) more depressive episodes/year, compared with non-rapid cycling (NRC) subjects (mean difference in depressive episodes per year RC vs. NRC was 0.85 ± 0.37 (SE), df = 28, p = 0.03). In the AD continuation group, RC patients also had 28.8% less time in remission than NRC patients (95% confidence intervals (9.9%, 46.5%), p = 0.004). No such differences between RC and NRC subjects were seen in the AD discontinuation group (Table 1). Analyses within the rapid-cycling subgroup alone were consistent with the above comparisons between RC and NRC subjects, stratified by maintenance antidepressant treatment, though limited by sample size. In an a priori analysis, despite preselection for good antidepressant response and concurrent mood stabilizer treatment, antidepressant continuation in rapid-cycling was associated with worsened maintenance outcomes, especially for depressive morbidity, vs. antidepressant discontinuation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antidepressants worsen rapid-cycling course in bipolar depression: A STEP-BD randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Vöhringer, Paul A.; Ostacher, Michael M.; Baldassano, Claudia F.; Holtzman, Niki S.; Whitham, Elizabeth A.; Thommi, Sairah B.; Goodwin, Frederick K.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of antidepressants in rapid-cycling bipolar disorder has been controversial. We report the first randomized clinical trial with modern antidepressants on this topic. Methods As part of the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study, we analyzed, as an a priori secondary outcome, rapid cycling as a predictor of response in 68 patients randomized to continue versus discontinue antidepressant treatment, after initial response for an acute major depressive episode. Outcomes assessed were percent time well and total number of episodes. All patients received standard mood stabilizers. Results In those continued on antidepressants (AD), rapid cycling (RC) subjects experienced 268% (3.14/1.17) more total mood episodes/year, and 293% (1.29/0.44) more depressive episodes/year, compared with non-rapid cycling (NRC) subjects (mean difference in depressive episodes per year RC vs NRC was 0.85 ± 0.37 (SE), df=28, p =0.03). In the AD continuation group, RC patients also had 28.8% less time in remission than NRC patients (95% confidence intervals [9.9%, 46.5%], p = 0.004). No such differences between RC and NRC subjects were seen in the AD discontinuation group (Table 1). Analyses within the rapid-cycling subgroup alone were consistent with the above comparisons between RC and NRC subjects, stratified by maintenance antidepressant treatment, though limited by sample size. Conclusions In an a priori analysis, despite preselection for good antidepressant response and concurrent mood stabilizer treatment, antidepressant continuation in rapid-cycling was associated with worsened maintenance outcomes, especially for depressive morbidity, versus antidepressant discontinuation. PMID:26142612

  2. Demonstration of insulin resistance in untreated adult onset diabetic subjects with fasting hyperglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, H; Kimmerling, G; Olefsky, J M; Reaven, G M

    1975-01-01

    We have used a continuous intravenous infusion of glucose (6 mg/kg/min), insulin (80 mU/min), epinephrine (6 mug/min), and propranolol (0.08 mg/min) to directly assess insulin resistance in 14 untreated adult onset diabetics with a mean (plus or minus SE) fasting plasma glucose level of 217 plus or minus 17 mg/100 ml. During the infusion endogenous insulin secretion is inhibited and steady-state plasma glucose and insulin levels are achieved after 90 min. Since similar steady-state levels of plasma insulin are achieved in all subjects, the plasma glucose concentration observed during the steady-state period is a measure of an individual's insulin resistance. Under these conditions, the mean (plus or minus SE) steady-state plasma glucose level of the 14 diabetic patients was 350 plus or minus 16 mg/100 ml, while that of 12 normal subjects was 121 plus or minus 4 mg/100 ml. Additional studies were performed in which control subjects and patients with diabetes had their fasting plasma glucose levels acutely raised or lowered to comparable levels before receiving the basic infusion mixture of glucose, insulin, epinephrine, and propranolol. The results of these studies indicated that differences in initial plasma glucose levels could not account for the different glucose responses of the two groups to the basic infusion. Finally, the mean (plus or minus SE) steady-state plasma glucose level of 104 plus or minus 17 mg/100 ml observed during the same basic infusion in five patients with fasting hyperglycemia (mean plus or minus SE, 142 plus or minus 12 mg/100 ml) secondary to chronic pancreatitis suggested that neither chronic hyperglycemia nor hypoinsulinemia per se necessarily lead to insulin resistance. These results demonstrate that marked insulin resistance exists in adult onset diabetics with fasting hyperglycemia. Since previous studies have documented the presence of insulin resistance in patients with chemical diabetes, the possibility exists that insulin

  3. Risk factors for perioperative hyperglycemia in primary hip and knee replacements

    PubMed Central

    Jämsen, Esa; Nevalainen, Pasi I; Eskelinen, Antti; Kalliovalkama, Jarkko; Moilanen, Teemu

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Background and purpose — Perioperative hyperglycemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in several fields of surgery. In this observational study, we identified factors associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia following hip and knee replacement. Patients and methods Patients and methods — We prospectively monitored changes in glucose following primary hip and knee replacements in 191 patients with osteoarthritis. Possible associations of patient characteristics and operation-related factors with hyperglycemia (defined as glucose > 7.8 mmol/L in 2 consecutive measurements) and severe hyperglycemia (glucose > 10 mmol/L) were analyzed using binary logistic regression with adjustment for age, sex, operated joint, and anesthesiological risk score. Results Results — 76 patients (40%) developed hyperglycemia, and 48 of them (25% of the whole cohort) had severe hyperglycemia. Glycemic responses were similar following hip replacement and knee replacement. Previously diagnosed diabetes was associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia and severe hyperglycemia, compared to patients with normal glucose metabolism, whereas newly diagnosed diabetes and milder glucose metabolism disorders had no effect. In patients without previously diagnosed diabetes, increased values of preoperative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting glucose on the day of operation were associated with hyperglycemia. Higher anesthesiological risk score—but none of the operation-related factors analyzed—was associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia. Interpretation Interpretation — Perioperative hyperglycemia is common in primary hip and knee replacements. Previously diagnosed diabetes is the strongest risk factor for hyperglycemia. In patients with no history of diabetes, preoperative HbA1c and fasting glucose on the day of operation can be used to stratify the risk of hyperglycemia. PMID:25409255

  4. DIETARY HYPERGLYCEMIA, GLYCEMIC INDEX AND METABOLIC RETINAL DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during the early postprandial stage (0~2 h) and a compensatory hyperlipidemia associated with counter-regulatory hormone responses during late postprandial stage (4~6 h). Over the past three decades, several human health disorders have been related to GI. The strongest relationship suggests that consuming low-GI foods prevents diabetic complications. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes. In this aspect, GI appears to be useful as a practical guideline to help diabetic people choose foods. Abundant epidemiological evidence also indicates positive associations between GI and risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more recently, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in people without diabetes. Although data from randomized controlled intervention trials are scanty, these observations are strongly supported by evolving molecular mechanisms which explain the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. This wide range of evidence implies that dietary hyperglycemia is etiologically related to human aging and diseases, including DR and AMD. In this context, these diseases can be considered metabolic retinal diseases. Molecular theories that explain hyperglycemic pathogenesis involve a mitochondria-associated pathway and four glycolysis-associated pathways, including advanced glycation end products formation, protein kinase C activation, polyol pathway, and hexosamine pathway. While the four glycolysis-associated pathways appear to be universal for both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the mitochondria-associated mechanism appears to be most relevant to the hyperglycemic, normoxic pathogenesis. For diseases that affect tissues with highly active metabolism and that

  5. Diesel exhaust worsens cardiac conduction instability in dobutamine-challenged spontaneously hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study demonstrated that diesel exhaust worsened arrhythmia and cardiac function during dobutamine (simulated exercise) challenge in normotensive and hypertensive rats. The data presented here are a mathematically-derived indicator of cardiac risk, which can be used for risk ...

  6. Diesel exhaust worsens cardiac conduction instability in dobutamine-challenged spontaneously hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study demonstrated that diesel exhaust worsened arrhythmia and cardiac function during dobutamine (simulated exercise) challenge in normotensive and hypertensive rats. The data presented here are a mathematically-derived indicator of cardiac risk, which can be used for risk ...

  7. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia - Worsening Pain in Opioid-Dependent Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    other symptoms. His medical history was significant for posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, chronic pain , phantom limb pain , insomnia, and depression...FEB 2013 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Opioid-induced hyperalgesia--worsening pain in opioid-dependent...Report Opioid-induced hyperalgesia—worsening pain in opioid-dependent patients☆ Abstract Patients with chronic opioid use are commonly treated in the

  8. Neurotrophin Genes and Antidepressant-Worsening Suicidal Ideation: A Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramoz, Nicolas; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Courtet, Philippe; Gorwood, Philip; Kelsoe, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant-worsening suicidal ideation is a rare but serious phenomenon. This study aimed to test for association between antidepressant-worsening suicidal ideation and polymorphisms of BDNF/NTRK2 neurotrophin pathway genes, known to be involved in depression and suicide. Methods: This was a case-control study comparing patients with antidepressant-worsening suicidal ideation to patients without. Patients were collected from the GENESE cohort (3771 depressed tianeptine-treated outpatients). Antidepressant-worsening suicidal ideation was defined by an increase of at least 2 points on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale-item10 during treatment. Controls were matched for age, sex, and baseline Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale-item10 score. Thirteen single nucleotide polymorphisms covering 5 BDNF/NTRK2 pathway genes were genotyped. Results: A total 78 cases and 312 controls were included. Two NTRK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated to antidepressant-worsening suicidal ideation: rs1439050 (P=.01) and rs1867283 (P=.04). Association with rs1439050 remained significant after adjustment for potentially confounding factors, including previous suicide attempts (P<.01). Conclusions: This naturalistic prospective study is consistent with previous studies on highlighting the potential role of the neurotrophin pathway, and especially of NTRK2, in antidepressant-worsening suicidal ideation. PMID:27378793

  9. Prognostic Significance of Hyperglycemia in Patients with Brain Tumors: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Zhixiong; Jiang, Bing; Ding, Xiping; Huo, Lei; Wan, Xin; Liu, Jinfang; Xia, Zhenyun

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia has been associated with poor outcomes of patients with various diseases. There were several studies published to assess the association between hyperglycemia and prognosis of patients with brain tumors, but no consistent conclusion was available. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of available studies to evaluate the prognostic role of hyperglycemia in brain tumors. Several common databases were searched for eligible studies on the association between hyperglycemia and survival of patients with brain tumors. Two investigators used a set of predefined inclusion criteria to assess eligible studies independently. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the prognostic role of hyperglycemia. Finally, seven studies with a total of 2168 patients with brain tumors were included into the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of total seven studies showed that hyperglycemia was significantly associated with shorter overall survival of brain tumors (HR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.51-2.76, P < 0.001). Meta-analysis of studies focusing on hyperglycemia showed that hyperglycemia was still significantly associated with shorter overall survival of brain tumors (HR = 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.59, P = 0.001). Meta-analysis of three studies on diabetes showed that diabetes was significantly associated with shorter overall survival of brain tumors (HR = 2.09, 95% CI 1.22-3.57, P = 0.007). Meta-regression analysis showed that there was no obvious difference in the roles of between hyperglycemia caused by glucocorticoids and hyperglycemia from diabetes (P = 0.25). Thus, hyperglycemia has an obvious prognostic significance in patients with brain tumors, and hyperglycemia is significantly associated with shorter overall survival of brain tumors.

  10. Children Experiencing First-Time or Prolonged Febrile Seizure Are Prone to Stress Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Jung-Heon; Cho, Hyung-Rae; Lee, Jong-Seung; Ryu, Jeong-Min; Yum, Mi-Sun; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2016-03-01

    The risk factors and clinical implications of stress hyperglycemia in children with febrile seizure remain uncertain. Among 479 children with febrile seizure, the prevalence of the stress hyperglycemia (blood glucose concentration ≥ 150 mg/dL) was 10.0%. Stress hyperglycemia group included larger proportion of first-time febrile seizure, prolonged febrile seizure, and smaller proportion of short febrile seizure in comparison with the non-stress hyperglycemia group. Stress hyperglycemia group demonstrated a lower pH and higher lactate levels than the non-stress hyperglycemia group. Multivariate analysis revealed that first-time febrile seizure (aOR = 3.741, P = .004) and prolonged febrile seizure (aOR = 12.855, P < .001) were significant risk factors for stress hyperglycemia. The rate of early febrile seizure recurrence in the emergency department was not different between the groups. These findings suggest that children experiencing first-time or prolonged febrile seizure are prone to stress hyperglycemia, and this can be related to febrile seizure severity. However, stress hyperglycemia is not predictive of early febrile seizure recurrence in the emergency department. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  12. Atypical presentation of central pontine myelinolysis in hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Talluri, Swapna; Charumathi, Raghu; Khan, Muhammad; Kissell, Kerri

    2017-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) usually occurs with rapid correction of severe chronic hyponatremia. Despite the pronounced fluctuations in serum osmolality, CPM is rarely seen in diabetics. This is a case report of CPM associated with hyperglycemia. A 45-year-old non-smoking and non-alcoholic African American male with past medical history of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, stage V chronic kidney disease and hypothyroidism presented with a two-week history of intermittent episodes of gait imbalance, slurred speech and inappropriate laughter. Physical examination including complete neurological assessment and fundoscopic examination were unremarkable. Laboratory evaluation was significant for serum sodium: 140 mmol/L, potassium: 3.9 mmol/L, serum glucose: 178 mg/dL and serum osmolality: 317 mosmol/kg. His ambulatory blood sugars fluctuated between 100 and 600 mg/dL in the six weeks prior to presentation, without any significant or rapid changes in his corrected serum sodium or other electrolyte levels. MRI brain demonstrated a symmetric lesion in the central pons with increased signal intensity on T2- and diffusion-weighted images. After neurological consultation and MRI confirmation, the patient was diagnosed with CPM secondary to hyperosmolar hyperglycemia. Eight-week follow-up with neurology was notable for near-complete resolution of symptoms. This case report highlights the importance of adequate blood glucose control in diabetics. Physicians should be aware of complications like CPM, which can present atypically in diabetics and is only diagnosed in the presence of a high index of clinical suspicion. Despite the pronounced fluctuations in serum osmolality, central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is rarely seen in diabetics. This case report of CPM associated with hyperglycemia highlights the importance of adequate blood glucose control in diabetics.Physicians should be aware of complications like CPM in diabetics.CPM can present atypically in diabetics

  13. Carotid body denervation prevents fasting hyperglycemia during chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Yao, Qiaoling; Jun, Jonathan C; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Yoo, Doo-Young; Han, Woobum; Mesarwi, Omar; Richardson, Ria; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Schwartz, Alan R; Shirahata, Machiko; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, but mechanisms are unknown. Carotid bodies orchestrate physiological responses to hypoxemia by activating the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that carotid body denervation would abolish glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by chronic IH. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent carotid sinus nerve dissection (CSND) or sham surgery and then were exposed to IH or intermittent air (IA) for 4 or 6 wk. Hypoxia was administered by decreasing a fraction of inspired oxygen from 20.9% to 6.5% once per minute, during the 12-h light phase (9 a.m.-9 p.m.). As expected, denervated mice exhibited blunted hypoxic ventilatory responses. In sham-operated mice, IH increased fasting blood glucose, baseline hepatic glucose output (HGO), and expression of a rate-liming hepatic enzyme of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), whereas the whole body glucose flux during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was not changed. IH did not affect glucose tolerance after adjustment for fasting hyperglycemia in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CSND prevented IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia and increases in baseline HGO and liver PEPCK expression. CSND trended to augment the insulin-stimulated glucose flux and enhanced liver Akt phosphorylation at both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. IH increased serum epinephrine levels and liver sympathetic innervation, and both increases were abolished by CSND. We conclude that chronic IH induces fasting hyperglycemia increasing baseline HGO via the CSN sympathetic output from carotid body chemoreceptors, but does not significantly impair whole body insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Effect of transient post-transplantation hyperglycemia on the development of diabetes mellitus and transplantation outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Park, S-C; Yoon, Y-D; Jung, H-Y; Kim, K-H; Choi, J-Y; Park, S-H; Kim, C-D; Kim, Y-L; Kim, H-K; Huh, S; Cho, J-H

    2015-04-01

    Hyperglycemia occurs frequently after kidney transplantation and may be reversed when the dosage of the immunosuppressive agents is tapered. However, the effect of transient post-transplantation hyperglycemia (PTH) on transplantation outcomes is not well described. Kidney transplant recipients without diabetes who underwent kidney transplantation between 2001 and 2012 were enrolled in the study. Transient PTH was defined as recovery from PTH without further antidiabetic therapy and the maintenance of glycated hemoglobin levels <6.5% at 1 year after transplantation. Persistent PTH until 1 year after transplantation was considered to be new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT). The factors associated with increased risk of PTH were analyzed. We compared the development of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and other transplantation outcomes among patients with no PTH, transient PTH, and NODAT. Among 176 kidney transplant recipients, 106 (60.2%) developed PTH and 58 (54.7%) of 106 patients with PTH had transient PTH. Older age, high body mass index (BMI), and female gender were independent risk factors for transient PTH. The incidence of diabetes was not significantly different between patients with no PTH and those with transient PTH. The incidence of cardiovascular disease was significantly increased in NODAT group compared with that in no PTH and transient PTH groups. However, the incidences of acute rejection, allograft loss, and patient death were comparable among the three groups. Transient hyperglycemia after kidney transplantation was found to be associated with older age, high body mass index, and female gender. Transient elevation of blood glucose level did not affect post-transplantation outcomes, including diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. However, patients with NODAT should be carefully monitored for the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surrogate endpoints for EDSS worsening in multiple sclerosis. A meta-analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Sormani, M P; Bonzano, L; Roccatagliata, L; Mancardi, G L; Uccelli, A; Bruzzi, P

    2010-07-27

    To evaluate whether the effects on potential surrogate endpoints, such as MRI markers and relapses, observed in trials of experimental treatments are able to predict the effects of these treatments on disability progression as defined in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) trials. We used a pooled analysis of all the published randomized controlled clinical trials in RRMS reporting data on Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) worsening and relapses or MRI lesions or both. We extracted data on relapses, MRI lesions, and the proportion of progressing patients. A regression analysis weighted on trial size and duration was performed to study the relationship between the treatment effect observed in each trial on relapses and MRI lesions and the observed treatment effect on EDSS worsening. A set of 19 randomized double-blind controlled trials in RRMS were identified, for a total of 44 arms, 25 contrasts, and 10,009 patients. A significant correlation was found between the effect of treatments on relapses and the effect of treatments on EDSS worsening: the adjusted R(2) value of the weighted regression was 0.71. The correlation between the treatment effect on MRI lesions and EDSS worsening was slightly weaker (R(2) = 0.57) but significant. These findings support the use of commonly used surrogate markers of EDSS worsening as endpoints in multiple sclerosis clinical trials. Further research is warranted to validate surrogate endpoints at the individual level rather than at the trial level, to draw important conclusions in the management of the individual patient.

  16. Lack of concordance in defining worsening renal function by rise in creatinine vs rise in cystatin C.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Matthias; Shrestha, Kevin; Singh, Dhssraj; Finucan, Michael; Tang, W H Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Worsening renal function (WRF) during treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is generally associated with adverse outcomes. An increase ≥0.3 mg/dL in creatinine level is widely used as the definition of WRF. The authors sought to determine the level of agreement between WRF based on changes in creatinine and changes in cystatin C (CysC) by analyzing data from 121 ADHF patients with available admission and day 3 creatinine and CysC levels. Admission creatinine and CysC levels were 1.39 (0.98-2.11) mg/dL and 1.95 (1.42-2.69) mg/L, respectively, and correlated well (r=0.81). On average, creatinine (-0.04±0.40 mg/dL) and CysC (0.001±0.34 mg/L) changed minimally from admission to day 3. Although the correlation between both markers on day 3 was still good (r=0.79), the correlation between changes therein was only modest (r=0.43). From the 14 and 15 patients who had WRF based on a ≥0.3 mg/dL increase in creatinine and ≥0.3 mg/L increase in CysC, respectively, only four (about 30%) met both definitions. These observations, together with recent insights in the inconsistencies of creatinine-defined concept of worsening renal function and outcomes, raises the need to research more reliable measures of renal function during treatment of ADHF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of cimetidine on pentamidine induced hyperglycemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Arino, Toru; Karakawa, Seiji; Ishiwata, Yasuyoshi; Nagata, Masashi; Yasuhara, Masato

    2012-10-15

    The antiprotozoal agent pentamidine, used for the treatment of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP), is known to cause abnormalities in blood glucose homeostasis, such as hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Pentamidine has been reported to be a substrate of organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1). We investigated the combination effects of cimetidine, an OCT1 inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics of pentamidine and on pentamidine-induced hyperglycemia. Pentamidine was infused intravenously to rats for 20 min at a dose of 7.5 or 15 mg/kg and serum samples were obtained periodically. The serum concentration of glucose did not change significantly after pentamidine infusion at 7.5mg/kg, while it increased with pentamidine at 15 mg/kg, and the maximal concentration of glucose was 167 ± 36 mg/dl, 30 min after the start of pentamidine infusion. Cimetidine (50mg/kg) enhanced the pentamidine-induced elevation of glucose concentration and the maximal concentration of glucose was 208 ± 33 mg/dl in the pentamidine 15 mg/kg treated group. Cimetidine combination significantly reduced total body clearance of pentamidine and increased pentamidine concentrations in the liver, kidneys, and lungs. A significant correlation was found between changes in serum glucose concentrations and serum concentrations of pentamidine 30 min after the start of pentamidine infusion. These results suggest that the hyperglycemic effect of pentamidine is dependent on the concentration of pentamidine and can be enhanced by cimetidine combination.

  18. Fetal cardiac effects of maternal hyperglycemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Niamh; Brazil, Derek P; McAuliffe, Fionnuala

    2009-06-01

    Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with increased teratogenesis, which can occur in pregestational type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Cardiac defects and with neural tube defects are the most common malformations observed in fetuses of pregestational diabetic mothers. The exact mechanism by which diabetes exerts its teratogenic effects and induces embryonic malformations is unclear. Whereas the sequelae of maternal pregestational diabetes, such as modulating insulin levels, altered fat levels, and increased reactive oxygen species, may play a role in fetal damage during diabetic pregnancy, hyperglycemia is thought to be the primary teratogen, causing particularly adverse effects on cardiovascular development. Fetal cardiac defects are associated with raised maternal glycosylated hemoglobin levels and are up to five times more likely in infants of mothers with pregestational diabetes compared with those without diabetes. The resulting anomalies are varied and include transposition of the great arteries, mitral and pulmonary atresia, double outlet of the right ventricle, tetralogy of Fallot, and fetal cardiomyopathy.A wide variety of rodent models have been used to study diabetic teratogenesis. Both genetic and chemically induced models of type 1 and 2 diabetes have been used to examine the effects of hyperglycemia on fetal development. Factors such as genetic background as well as confounding variables such as obesity appear to influence the severity of fetal abnormalities in mice. In this review, we will summarize recent data on fetal cardiac effects from human pregestational diabetic mothers, as well as the most relevant findings in rodent models of diabetic cardiac teratogenesis.

  19. Locating the source of hyperglycemia: Liver versus muscle

    PubMed Central

    YU, Haoyong; ZHOU, Dequan; JIA, Weiping; GUO, ZengKui

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucose homeostasis relies on insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production and to stimulate glucose uptake by peripheral tissues (primarily skeletal muscle) during and after a meal or glucose load. Glucose metabolism impairments in the liver and/or muscle attenuate these insulin actions, causing hyperglycemia. Thus, identifying the loci of the impairments can improve the understanding of hyperglycemia and enable organtargeted interventions. Methods Studies were performed to identify such loci using modified oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) techniques in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and overweight/obese individuals. Results Individuals with severe T2D were found to have significantly impaired glucose metabolism in both the liver and muscle. In contrast, impairments in glucose metabolism in individuals with non-severe T2D were predominantly localized in the liver or muscle, but not both. Similarly, milder impairments in overweight or obese individuals were clearly localized in either the liver or muscle, but not both. All these impairments are quantifiable. Conclusion Impairments in glucose metabolism in the liver and muscle can be differentiated and quantified in a clinical setting. PMID:22074132

  20. Gynura procumbens Extract Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-In; Park, Mi Hwa; Han, Ji-Sook

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effect of Gynura procumbens extract against carbohydrate digesting enzymes and its ability to ameliorate postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. G. procumbens extract showed prominent α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory effects. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of G. procumbens extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase was 0.092±0.018 and 0.084±0.027 mg/mL, respectively, suggesting that the α-amylase inhibition activity of the G. procumbens extract was more effective than that of the positive control, acarbose (IC50=0.164 mg/mL). The increase in postprandial blood glucose levels was more significantly alleviated in the G. procumbens extract group than in the control group of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Moreover, the area under the curve significantly decreased with G. procumbens extract administration in STZ-induced diabetic mice. These results suggest that G. procumbens extract may help alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia by inhibiting carbohydrate digesting enzymes. PMID:27752493

  1. [Stress hyperglycemia in sick cats: a retrospective study over 4 years].

    PubMed

    Laluha, P; Gerber, B; Laluhová, D; Boretti, F S; Reusch, C E

    2004-08-01

    Between January 1997 and December 2000 blood glucose concentrations were measured in 2278 sick cats at the time of their initial presentation at the hospital. In 827 cats (36%) hyperglycemia (blood glucose >8 mmol/l) was documented, 1388 cats (61%) had normal blood glucose levels, 63 cats (3%) were hypoglycemic. In 674 of 827 cats (81.5%) no further investigations were performed and the veterinarian judged the hyperglycemia to be stress related. In 153 of the 827 cats (18.5%) blood glucose measurements were repeated and/or serum fructosamine concentrations evaluated. In 106 cats (69%) stress hyperglycemia and in 47 (31%) diabetes mellitus was then diagnosed. Blood glucose concentrations in cats with stress hyperglycemia were between 8.1 and 60.4 mmol/l (Median 10.3), in cats with diabetes mellitus between 8.5 and 70.0 (Median 27.7). Blood glucose concentrations in cats with diabetes mellitus were significantly higher than in cats with stress hyperglycemia. Cats with stress hyperglycemia suffered from a variety of different diseases, the most frequently encountered were surgical problems, neoplasia, heart diseases, upper and lower urinary tract diseases. Blood glucose concentrations in cats with heart diseases and in cats with neoplasia was higher than in cats with other disorders, however, the difference was not significant. Cats with diabetes mellitus were significantly more frequent male castrated than cats with stress hyperglycemia. Cats with stress hyperglycemia were significantly older than cats with normoglycemia.

  2. Relationship between inpatient hyperglycemia and insulin treatment after kidney transplantation and future new onset diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chakkera, Harini A; Knowler, William C; Devarapalli, Yugandhara; Weil, E Jennifer; Heilman, Raymond L; Dueck, Amylou; Mulligan, David C; Reddy, Kunam S; Moss, Adyr A; Mekeel, Kristin L; Mazur, Marek J; Hamawi, Khaled; Castro, Janna C; Cook, Curtiss B

    2010-09-01

    Approximately two-thirds of kidney transplant recipients with no previous history of diabetes experience inpatient hyperglycemia immediately after kidney transplant surgery; whether inpatient hyperglycemia predicts future new onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT) is not established. A retrospective study was conducted to determine the risk conferred by inpatient hyperglycemia on development of NODAT within 1 year posttransplant. All adult nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients between June 1999 and January 2008 were included. Posttransplant inpatient hyperglycemia was defined as any bedside capillary blood glucose > or = 200 mg/dl or insulin therapy during hospitalization. NODAT was defined as HbA1C > or = 6.5%, fasting venous serum glucose > or = 126 mg/dl, or prescribed diet or medical therapy for diabetes mellitus. The study cohort included 377 patients. NODAT developed in 1 (4%) of the 28 patients without inpatient hyperglycemia, 4 (18%) of the 22 patients with inpatient hyperglycemia but not treated with insulin, and in 98 (30%) of the 327 of the patients who were diagnosed with inpatient hyperglycemia and were treated with insulin. In adjusted analyses, requirement of insulin therapy during hospitalization posttransplant was associated with a 4-fold increase in NODAT (relative risk 4.01; confidence interval, 1.49 to 10.7; P = 0.006). Development of inpatient hyperglycemia after kidney transplantation in nondiabetic patients significantly increased the risk of NODAT. Additionally, we observed a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients who developed NODAT.

  3. Relationship between Inpatient Hyperglycemia and Insulin Treatment after Kidney Transplantation and Future New Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Knowler, William C.; Devarapalli, Yugandhara; Weil, E. Jennifer; Heilman, Raymond L.; Dueck, Amylou; Mulligan, David C.; Reddy, Kunam S.; Moss, Adyr A.; Mekeel, Kristin L.; Mazur, Marek J.; Hamawi, Khaled; Castro, Janna C.; Cook, Curtiss B.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Approximately two-thirds of kidney transplant recipients with no previous history of diabetes experience inpatient hyperglycemia immediately after kidney transplant surgery; whether inpatient hyperglycemia predicts future new onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT) is not established. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A retrospective study was conducted to determine the risk conferred by inpatient hyperglycemia on development of NODAT within 1 year posttransplant. All adult nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients between June 1999 and January 2008 were included. Posttransplant inpatient hyperglycemia was defined as any bedside capillary blood glucose ≥ 200 mg/dl or insulin therapy during hospitalization. NODAT was defined as HbA1C ≥ 6.5%, fasting venous serum glucose ≥ 126 mg/dl, or prescribed diet or medical therapy for diabetes mellitus. Results: The study cohort included 377 patients. NODAT developed in 1 (4%) of the 28 patients without inpatient hyperglycemia, 4 (18%) of the 22 patients with inpatient hyperglycemia but not treated with insulin, and in 98 (30%) of the 327 of the patients who were diagnosed with inpatient hyperglycemia and were treated with insulin. In adjusted analyses, requirement of insulin therapy during hospitalization posttransplant was associated with a 4-fold increase in NODAT (relative risk 4.01; confidence interval, 1.49 to 10.7; P = 0.006). Conclusion: Development of inpatient hyperglycemia after kidney transplantation in nondiabetic patients significantly increased the risk of NODAT. Additionally, we observed a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients who developed NODAT. PMID:20558559

  4. Do lifestyle, health and social participation mediate educational inequalities in frailty worsening?

    PubMed

    Etman, Astrid; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M; van der Cammen, Tischa J M; Burdorf, Alex; van Lenthe, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Lower educated older persons are at increased risk of becoming frail as compared with higher educated older persons. To reduce educational inequalities in the development of frailty, we investigated whether lifestyle, health and social participation mediate this relationship. Longitudinal data of 14 082 European community-dwelling persons aged 55 years and older participating in the Survey on Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) in 2004 and 2006, were used. Associations of lifestyle (smoking behaviour and alcohol consumption), health (depression, memory function, chronic diseases) and social participation, with educational level and frailty worsening were investigated using regression models. In multinomial logistic regression analysis, mediators were added to models in which educational level was associated with worsening in frailty over 2 years follow-up. In all countries, frailty worsening was more prevalent among lower as compared with higher educated persons, although odds ratios were only statistically significant in five of the 11 countries included [ORs varying from 1.40 (95% CI: 1.06-1.84) to 1.61 (95% CI: 1.21-2.14)]. Except for smoking behaviour and memory function, the factors under study all showed associations with educational level and frailty worsening that met the conditions for mediation. After inclusion of the four relevant mediators, attenuation of odds ratios varied between 4.9 and 31.5%. While lifestyle, health and social participation were associated with frailty worsening over 2 years among European community-dwelling older persons, only small to moderate parts of educational inequalities in frailty worsening were explained by these factors. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of Hyperglycemia in Burned Patients: Evidence-Based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mecott, Gabriel A.; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Severely burned patients typically experience a systemic response expressed as increased metabolism, inflammation, alteration of cardiac and immune function, and associated hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Until recently and for many years, hyperglycemia has been expectantly managed and considered a normal and desired response of an organism to stress. However, findings reported from recent studies now suggest beneficial effects of intensive insulin treatment for critically-ill patients. The literature on the management of hyperglycemia in severely burned patients is sparse, with most of the available studies involving only small numbers of burned patients. The purpose of this article is to describe the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia following severe burns and review the available literature on the outcome of intensive insulin treatment and other anti-hyperglycemic modalities in burned patients in an evidence-based-medicine approach. PMID:19503020

  6. Hyperglycemia Induces Cellular Hypoxia through Production of Mitochondrial ROS Followed by Suppression of Aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Sada, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Kukidome, Daisuke; Yoshinaga, Tomoaki; Kajihara, Nobuhiro; Sonoda, Kazuhiro; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously proposed that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation is a key event in the development of diabetic complications. Interestingly, some common aspects exist between hyperglycemia and hypoxia-induced phenomena. Thus, hyperglycemia may induce cellular hypoxia, and this phenomenon may also be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In endothelial cells (ECs), cellular hypoxia increased after incubation with high glucose (HG). A similar phenomenon was observed in glomeruli of diabetic mice. HG-induced cellular hypoxia was suppressed by mitochondria blockades or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpression, which is a specific SOD for mtROS. Overexpression of MnSOD also increased the expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1), a water and oxygen channel. AQP1 overexpression in ECs suppressed hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia, endothelin-1 and fibronectin overproduction, and apoptosis. Therefore, hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia and mtROS generation may promote hyperglycemic damage in a coordinated manner.

  7. Spontaneous and transient predinner hyperglycemia in some patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Du, Si-na; Shi, Min-jia; Sun, Zhan-zhan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Blood glucose fluctuations have higher risk than absolute blood glucose level in diabetic chronic complications. At present, “dawn phenomenon” is well known by clinicians, but “dusk phenomenon” has not been recognized. This study explored the objective existence of “dusk phenomenon” (spontaneous and transient predinner hyperglycemia) and its clinical significance. The data of 54 patients with diabetes, who received routine insulin pump therapy between December 2010 and October 2012 in our hospital, were retrospectively analyzed. These patients included 4 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) (T1DM) and 50 patients with type 2 DM (T2DM). According to the difference between predinner and postlunch blood glucose levels, the 50 patients with T2DM were divided into dusk phenomenon group (4 patients, all the differences ≥0 mmol/L during insulin pump therapy), nondusk phenomenon group (12 patients, all the differences <0 mmol/L during insulin pump therapy), and suspicious group (34 patients, the differences were uncertain during insulin pump therapy). In the 4 patients with T1DM of this study, the differences all were more than 0 mmol/L during insulin pump therapy. The changes in blood glucose levels were observed, and the correlations of blood glucose level with other factors were analyzed in T1DM and T2DM patients, respectively. In T1DM patients, blood glucose level was significantly higher in predinner than in prebreakfast and prelunch (all P < 0.01), and in postdinner 2 hour than in postlunch 2 hour (P = 0.021). The predinner blood level had no significant correlations with the blood glucose level at other time points and insulin dosages (all P > 0.05). In T2DM patients, the predinner blood glucose level was significantly higher in dusk phenomenon group than in suspicious group and nondusk phenomenon group (all P < 0.05). In dusk phenomenon group, the blood glucose level remained rising from predinner to prebed, and

  8. Frequency and management of diabetes and hyperglycemia at emergency departments: the GLUCE-URG Study.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esther; Laguna Morales, Inmaculada; Rosende Tuya, Alicia; Tapia Santamaría, Raquel; Martín Martínez, Alfonso; López Riquelme, Pascual; Merinero Palomares, Raúl; Portero Sánchez, Isabel

    2017-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is a common finding at hospital emergency rooms in diabetic patients, but few data are available on its frequency, management, and subsequent impact based on the assessment made at Emergency rooms. To ascertain the frequency of diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia in patients admitted from Emergency rooms. Second, to describe management of hyperglycemia at Emergency rooms, and to analyze its potential impact on the course and management of patients during admission. All patients admitted from the Emergency room for three consecutive weeks were enrolled. Hyperglycemia was defined as two blood glucose measurements ≥ 180mg/dl in the first 48hours after admission. 36.6% of patients admitted from the Emergency room were diabetic, and 58% of these had early, sustained hyperglycemia. On the other hand, 27% of patients admitted from the Emergency room had hyperglycemia (78.3% of diabetic patients and 21.7% with no known diabetes). Diabetic patients with hyperglycemia had higher blood glucose levels than non-diabetic patients (p<.01). Average hospital stay was 8±6.4 days, with no differences between the groups. Hyperglycemia is rarely reported as a diagnosis in the emergency rooms discharge report. In standard hospitalization, this diagnosis appears more commonly in patients with known diabetes (OR 2.5 p<.001). Prevalence of diabetic patients admitted from emergency rooms is very high. In addition, although hyperglycemia is very common in patients admitted from emergency rooms, there is a trend to underestimate its significance. Based on our results, we think that implementation of measures to give greater visibility to diagnosis of hyperglycemia could help improve application of established protocols. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-inflammatory and organ protective effect of insulin in scalded MODS rats without controlling hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongzhen; Hu, Tian; Wang, Zhanke; Wang, Jin; Liu, Rui; Yang, Qianyong; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Xiong, Yuanyuan

    2017-07-22

    Insulin, as an anti-inflammatory drug, could not be freely used in patients who experienced trauma according to the degree of inflammation, because of the side effect of hypoglycemia. In vivo experimental evidence is lacking concerning whether the effect is dosage dependent and whether it relies on controlling hyperglycemia. By adjusting the dosage ratio of glucose and insulin, different dosages of insulin were used to treat severely scalded MODS rats to achieve uncontrolled or controlled hyperglycemia. One hundred forty rats with severe scalded were randomly divided into a hyperglycemia-controlled group, hyperglycemia-uncontrolled group, and control group. The levels of inflammation response indexes and major organ dysfunction indexes were measured and compared between groups. The blood indexes of inflammatory response and major organ dysfunction did not show statistical difference between hyperglycemia-controlled groups (A) and uncontrolled groups (B) in the same dosage of insulin (all P>0.05). The blood indexes of inflammatory response and major organ dysfunction demonstrated statistical difference in different dosages of insulin with hyperglycemia-controlled groups (A1-A3 groups) and hyperglycemia-uncontrolled groups (B1-B3 groups) (all P<0.01). The higher dosage of insulin, the better effect of anti-inflammation and organ protection it would demonstrate with or without controlling hyperglycemia. The effect of anti-inflammation and organ protection of insulin is dosage dependent in vivo; it does not rely on controlling hyperglycemia. Temporary traumatic hyperglycemia itself might not be detrimental to the body. Adjusting the ratio of insulin and glucose could provide a novel train of thought for freely treating patients with severe traumatic injury with different dosages of insulin according to the degree of inflammation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Persistent impaired glucose metabolism in a zebrafish hyperglycemia model.

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Antonioli, Régis; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects over 10% of the world's population. Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of this disease. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an established model organism for the study of various metabolic diseases. In this paper, hyperglycemic zebrafish, when immersed in a 111 mM glucose solution for 14 days, developed increased glycation of proteins from the eyes, decreased mRNA levels of insulin receptors in the muscle, and a reversion of high blood glucose level after treatment with anti-diabetic drugs (glimepiride and metformin) even after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. Additionally, hyperglycemic zebrafish developed an impaired response to exogenous insulin, which was recovered after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. These data suggest that the exposure of adult zebrafish to high glucose concentration is able to induce persistent metabolic changes probably underlined by a hyperinsulinemic state and impaired peripheral glucose metabolism.

  11. Hemiballism-hemichorea induced by ketotic hyperglycemia: case report with PET study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hemiballism-hemichorea (HB-HC) is commonly used to describe the basal ganglion dysfunction in non-ketotic hyperglycemic elderly patients. Here we report two elderly female patients with acute onset of involuntary movements induced by hyperglycemia with positive urine ketones. We described the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in these two patients, which is similar to that of non-ketotic hyperglycemic HB-HC patients. FDG-PET was performed and the glucose metabolism in the corresponding lesion in these two patients was contradictory with each other. We tried to clarify the underlying mechanisms of HB-HC and explain the contradictory neuroradiological findings in FDG-PET as being performed at different clinical stages. PMID:25031834

  12. Adenosine A₂A-receptor antagonist istradefylline enhances the motor response of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia in MPTP-treated common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shin-ichi; Tashiro, Tomomi; Kawai-Uchida, Mika; Mori, Akihisa; Jenner, Peter; Kanda, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    The adenosine A₂A-receptor antagonist istradefylline decreases OFF time in patients with Parkinson's disease who are already treated with optimal doses of dopaminergic medication but can cause an increase in non-troublesome dyskinesia. Preclinical experiments have shown that A₂A antagonists are most effective in potentiating motor function when combined with sub-maximal doses of L-DOPA. However, the effects of combining istradefylline with sub-optimal L-DOPA treatment on established dyskinesia have not been studied. We now examine the effects of acute and repeated administration of istradefylline on dyskinesia in MPTP-treated common marmosets previously primed to exhibit involuntary movements by prior exposure to L-DOPA. In these animals, single dose acute oral administration of istradefylline (10 mg/kg) enhanced and prolonged the anti-parkinsonian effects of a sub-optimal dose of L-DOPA (2.5 mg/kg). The chronic co-administration of istradefylline (10 mg/kg) with L-DOPA (2.5 mg/kg) for 21 days did not worsen the severity of existing dyskinesia. Rather, the severity of dyskinesia tended to be reduced over the 21-day treatment period. These results suggest that istradefylline can be used to potentiate the effects of sub-optimal doses of L-DOPA in the treatment of Parkinson's disease without causing or worsening dyskinesia.

  13. Roles of Polyuria and Hyperglycemia on Bladder Dysfunction in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan; Wang, Zhiping; Huang, Yexiang; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) causes diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD). We aimed to identify the pathogenic roles of polyuria and hyperglycemia on DBD in rats. Materials and Methods Seventy-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided: age-matched controls (control), sham urinary diversion (sham), urinary diversion (UD), streptozotocin-induced diabetes after sham UD (DM), streptozotocin-induced diabetes after UD (UD+DM), and 5% sucrose-induced diuresis after sham UD (DIU). UD was performed by ureterovaginostomy 10d before DM induction. Animals were evaluated 20 wks after DM or diuresis induction. We measured 24-hr drinking and voiding volumes and cystometry (CMG). Bladders were harvested for quantification of smooth muscle, urothelium, and collagen. We measured nitrotyrosine and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in bladder. Results Diabetes and diuresis caused increases in drinking volume, voiding volume and bladder weight. Bladder weights decreased in the UD and UD+DM groups. Intercontractile intervals, voided volume, and compliance increased in the DIU and DM groups, decreased in the UD, and further decreased in the UD+DM group. The total cross-sectional tissue, smooth muscle and urothelium areas increased in the DIU and DM groups, and decreased in the UD and UD+DM groups. As percentages of total tissue area, collagen decreased in the DIU and DM groups, and increased in the UD and UD+DM groups, and smooth muscle and urothelium decreased in the UD and UD+DM groups. Nitrotyrosine and MnSOD increased in DM and UD+DM rats. Conclusions Polyuria induced bladder hypertrophy, while hyperglycemia induced substantial oxidative stress in the bladder, which may play a pathogenic role in late stage DBD. PMID:22999997

  14. Pregnancy Hyperglycemia and Risk of Prenatal and Postpartum Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tianyi; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Ertel, Karen A.; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Kleinman, Ken; Gillman, Matthew W.; Oken, Emily; James-Todd, Tamarra

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucose dysregulation in pregnancy may affect maternal depressive symptoms during the prenatal and postpartum periods via both physiologic and psychological pathways. Methods During mid-pregnancy, a combination of 50-gram 1-h non-fasting glucose challenge test (GCT) and 100-gram 3-h fasting oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was used to determine pregnancy glycemic status among women participating in Project Viva: normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated hyperglycemia (IHG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), we assessed depressive symptoms at mid-pregnancy and again at 6 months postpartum. We used logistic regression, adjusted for sociodemographic, anthropometric and lifestyle factors, to estimate the risk of elevated prenatal and postpartum depressive symptoms (EPDS ≥ 13 on 0–30 scale) in relation to GCT glucose levels and GDM status in separate models. Results 9.6% of women showed prenatal and 8.4% postpartum depressive symptoms. Women with higher GCT glucose levels were at greater odds of elevated prenatal depressive symptoms (multivariable-adjusted OR per SD increase in glucose levels (27 mg/dL): 1.25; 95%: 1.07, 1.48). Compared with NGT women, the association appeared stronger among women with IHG (OR: 1.80; 95% CI: 1.08, 3.00) than among those with GDM (OR: 1.45; 95% CI: 0.72, 2.91) or IGT (OR: 1.43; 95% CI: 0.59, 3.46). Neither glucose levels assessed from the GCT nor pregnancy glycemic status were significantly associated with elevated postpartum depressive symptoms. Conclusion Pregnancy hyperglycemia was cross-sectionally associated with higher risk of prenatal depressive symptoms, but not with postpartum depressive symptoms. PMID:26058318

  15. Minimal Clinically Important Worsening on the Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hewer, Sarah; Varley, Sue; Boxer, Adam L.; Paul, Eldho; Williams, David R

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Introduction Despite the widespread use of the PSP rating scale it is not known what change in this scale is meaningful for patients. Methods We analyzed data from a large clinical trial in PSP-Richardson’s syndrome (AL-108-231) to calculate minimal clinically important worsening. This was defined as the difference in mean change of PSP rating scale in subjects rated ‘a little worse’ and those rated ‘unchanged’ on the Clinicians’ Global Impression of Change Scale. A multivariate analysis using logistic regression assessed the relationship between clinical worsening, PSP rating scale, depression and activities of daily living. Results The minimal clinically important worsening on the PSP rating scale was 5.7 points, corresponding to the mean decline over six months in the trial. Changes in activities of daily living and PSP rating scale were significantly associated with clinical worsening. Conclusion Clinically meaningful change is measurable on the PSP rating scale over six months. PMID:27324431

  16. Psychosis or Obsessions? Clozapine Associated with Worsening Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    One underrecognized adverse event of clozapine is the emergence or worsening of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS). OCS, particularly violent thoughts, can be inaccurately described as psychosis and result in a misdiagnosis. We report a case of a 42-year-old man, initially diagnosed with schizoaffective, who was placed on clozapine for the management of “violent delusions.” However, clozapine led to a worsening of these violent thoughts resulting in suicidal ideation and hospitalization. After exploration of the intrusive thoughts and noting these to be egodystonic, clearly disturbing, and time consuming, an alternative diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was made. Clozapine was inevitably discontinued resulting in a significant reduction of the intrusive thoughts without emergence of psychosis or adverse events. While an overlapping phenomenology between OCD and psychotic disorders has been described, clozapine and other antiserotonergic antipsychotics have been implicated with the emergence or worsening of OCS. Unique to our case is that the patient's obsessions had been treated as psychosis leading to the inadequate treatment of his primary illness, OCD. This case highlights the potential for OCD to masquerade as a psychotic disorder and reminds clinicians that clozapine may worsen OCS. PMID:27313938

  17. Ventricular Tachycardia and Resembling Acute Coronary Syndrome During Pheochromocytoma Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-jun; Wang, Tao; Wang, Lin; Pang, Zhan-qi; Ma, Ben; Li, Ya-wen; Yang, Jian; Dong, He

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pheochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumors, and its cardiac involvement may include transient myocardial dysfunction, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and even ventricular arrhythmias. A patient was referred for evaluation of stuttering chest pain, and his electrocardiogram showed T-wave inversion over leads V1 to V4. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), which was stented. Five days later, the patient had ventricular tachycardia, and severe hypertension, remarkable blood pressure fluctuation between 224/76 and 70/50 mm Hg. The patient felt abdominal pain and his abdominal ultrasound showed suspicious right adrenal gland tumor. Enhanced computed tomography of adrenal gland conformed that there was a tumor in right adrenal gland accompanied by an upset level of aldosterone. The tumor was removed by laparoscope, and the pathological examination showed pheochromocytoma. After the surgery, the blood pressure turned normal gradually. There was no T-wave inversion in lead V1-V4. Our case illustrates a rare pheochromocytoma presentation with a VT and resembling ACS. In our case, the serious stenosis in the mid of LAD could be explained by worsen the clinical course of myocardial ischemia or severe coronary vasospasm by the excessive amounts of catecholamines released from the tumor. Coronary vasospasm was possible because he had no classic coronary risk factors (e.g. family history and smoking habit, essential hypertension, hyperglycemia and abnormal serum lipoprotein, high body mass index). Thus, pheochromocytoma was missed until he revealed the association of his symptoms with abdominalgia. As phaeochromocytomas that present with cardiovascular complications can be fatal, it is necessary to screen for the disease when patients present with symptoms indicating catecholamine excess. PMID:27057898

  18. Hyperlactatemia affects the association of hyperglycemia with mortality in nondiabetic adults with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeffrey P; Berger, Tony; Garg, Nidhi; Horeczko, Timothy; Suarez, Alison; Radeos, Michael S; Hagar, Yolanda; Panacek, Edward A

    2012-11-01

    Admission hyperglycemia has been reported as a mortality risk factor for septic nondiabetic patients; however, hyperglycemia's known association with hyperlactatemia was not addressed in these analyses. The objective was to determine whether the association of hyperglycemia with mortality remains significant when adjusted for concurrent hyperlactatemia. This was a post hoc, nested analysis of a retrospective cohort study performed at a single center. Providers had identified study subjects during their emergency department (ED) encounters; all data were collected from the electronic medical record (EMR). Nondiabetic adult ED patients hospitalized for suspected infection, two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and simultaneous lactate and glucose testing in the ED were enrolled. The setting was the ED of an urban teaching hospital from 2007 to 2009. To evaluate the association of hyperglycemia (glucose > 200 mg/dL) with hyperlactatemia (lactate ≥ 4.0 mmol/L), a logistic regression model was created. The outcome was a diagnosis of hyperlactatemia, and the primary variable of interest was hyperglycemia. A second model was created to determine if coexisting hyperlactatemia affects hyperglycemia's association with mortality; the main outcome was 28-day mortality, and the primary risk variable was hyperglycemia with an interaction term for simultaneous hyperlactatemia. Both models were adjusted for demographics; comorbidities; presenting infectious source; and objective evidence of renal, respiratory, hematologic, or cardiovascular dysfunction. A total of 1,236 ED patients were included, and the median age was 77 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 60 to 87 years). A total of 115 (9.3%) subjects were hyperglycemic, 162 (13%) were hyperlactatemic, and 214 (17%) died within 28 days of their initial ED visits. After adjustment, hyperglycemia was significantly associated with simultaneous hyperlactatemia (odds ratio [OR] = 4.14, 95% confidence

  19. CCR2 knockout exacerbates cerulein-induced chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia via decreased GLP-1 receptor expression and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuji; Kanai, Takanori; Saeki, Keita; Takabe, Miho; Irie, Junichiro; Miyoshi, Jun; Mikami, Yohei; Teratani, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Miyata, Naoteru; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Yamagishi, Yoshiyuki; Higuchi, Hajime; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Hozawa, Shigenari; Saito, Hidetsugu; Itoh, Hiroshi; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes insulin release; however, the relationship between the GLP-1 signal and chronic pancreatitis is not well understood. Here we focus on chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor (CCR2) axis, which regulates various immune cells, including macrophages, to clarify the mechanism of GLP-1-mediated insulin secretion in chronic pancreatitis in mice. One and multiple series of repetitive cerulein administrations were used to induce acute and chronic cerulein pancreatitis, respectively. Acute cerulein-administered CCR2-knockout (KO) mice showed suppressed infiltration of CD11b(+)Gr-1(low) macrophages and pancreatic inflammation and significantly upregulated insulin secretion compared with paired wild-type (WT) mice. However, chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice showed significantly increased infiltration of CD11b(+)/Gr-1(-) and CD11b(+)/Gr-1(high) cells, but not CD11b(+)/Gr-1(low) cells, in pancreas with severe inflammation and significantly decreased insulin secretion compared with their WT counterparts. Furthermore, although serum GLP-1 levels in chronic cerulein-administered WT and CCR2-KO mice were comparably upregulated after cerulein administrations, GLP-1 receptor levels in pancreases of chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice were significantly lower than in paired WT mice. Nevertheless, a significantly higher hyperglycemia level in chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice was markedly restored by treatment with a GLP-1 analog to a level comparable to the paired WT mice. Collectively, the CCR2/CCL2 axis-mediated CD11b(+)-cell migration to the pancreas is critically involved in chronic pancreatitis-mediated hyperglycemia through the modulation of GLP-1 receptor expression and insulin secretion.

  20. Relationship between nadir hematocrit during cardiopulmonary bypass and postoperative hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sevuk, Utkan; Cakil, Nevzat; Altindag, Rojhat; Baysal, Erkan; Altintas, Bernas; Yaylak, Baris; Adiyaman, Mehmet Sahin; Bahadir, Mehmet Veysi

    2014-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after cardiac surgery in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Association between nadir hematocrit levels on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and postoperative hyperglycemia is not clear. This study was carried out to determine the relationship between nadir hematocrit during CPB and postoperative hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients. Records of 200 nondiabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting operation were retrospectively reviewed. In the first analysis, patients were divided into two subgroups according to the presence or absence of hyperglycemia. Further analysis was made after dividing the patients into 3 subgroups according to nadir hematocrit levels on CPB (less than 20%; 20% to 25%; greater than or equal to 25%). Compared to patients without hyperglycemia, patients with postoperative hyperglycemia had significantly lower preoperative hematocrit levels (p = 0.004) and were associated with lower nadir hematocrit levels during CPB (p= 0.002). Peak intensive care unit blood glucose levels and number of blood transfusions were significantly higher in patients with nadir hematocrit levels less than 20. (p<0.001 and p<0.001 respectively). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that nadir hematocrit levels less than 20% (OR 2.9, p=0.009) and allogenic blood transfusion (OR 1.5, p=0.003) were independently associated with postoperative hyperglycemia. Nadir hematocrit levels on CPB less than 20% and allogenic blood transfusions were independently associated with postoperative hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients. Patients with a nadir hematocrit levels less than 20 % during CPB should be closely monitored for hyperglycemia in the perioperative period.

  1. Hyperglycemia after pediatric cardiac surgery: impact of age and residual lesions.

    PubMed

    Moga, Michael-Alice; Manlhiot, Cedric; Marwali, Eva M; McCrindle, Brian W; Van Arsdell, Glen S; Schwartz, Steven M

    2011-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of patient age and significant residual cardiac lesions on the association between hyperglycemia and adverse outcomes in children after cardiac surgery. The incidence, severity, and duration of hyperglycemia in this patient population and perioperative factors predisposing to hyperglycemia were also delineated. Retrospective, observational cohort study. Eighteen-bed pediatric cardiac critical care unit. Seven hundred seventy-two children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass during 2006 and 2007. None. Postoperative glucose levels were reviewed in all children who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution during 2006 and 2007 who met all inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria (n = 772). The composite morbidity-mortality outcome included hospital death, cardiac arrest, renal/hepatic failure, lactic acidosis, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use, or infection. Hyperglycemia occurred in 90% of patients and resolved within 72 hrs in most without exogenous insulin. Preoperative factors, including prostaglandins, mechanical ventilation, and cyanosis, were significantly associated with increased odds of significant hyperglycemia (>180 mg/dL for >12 hrs or any level >270 mg/dL) as were increased surgical complexity and perioperative steroid administration. Thirty-one percent of the entire cohort reached the composite outcome and the odds were significantly increased after 54 hrs of mild (elevated, but <180 mg/dL), 12 hrs of moderate (180-270 mg/dL), or any period of severe hyperglycemia (>270 mg/dL). Neonates (<1 month of age) tolerated longer periods of hyperglycemia before showing increased odds of reaching the composite morbidity-mortality end point. In the setting of important residual cardiac lesions, mild or moderate hyperglycemia was not as strongly associated with adverse outcomes. Age and residual cardiac lesions are important modifiers of the association between

  2. Investigating the Mechanism of Hyperglycemia-Induced Fetal Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zheng-lai; Jia, Wei-jing; Wu, Xia; Wang, Xiao-yu; He, Mei-yao; Cheng, Xin; Li, Wei-jing; Yang, Xuesong; Liu, Guo-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic mothers enhances the risk of fetal cardiac hypertrophy during gestation. However, the mechanism of high-glucose-induced cardiac hypertrophy is not largely understood. In this study, we first demonstrated that the incidence rate of cardiac hypertrophy dramatically increased in fetuses of diabetic mothers using color ultrasound examination. In addition, human fetal cardiac hypertrophy was successfully mimicked in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mouse model, in which mouse cardiac hypertrophy was diagnosed using type-M ultrasound and a histological assay. PH3 immunofluorescent staining of mouse fetal hearts and in vitro-cultured H9c2 cells indicated that cell proliferation decreased in E18.5, E15.5 and E13.5 mice, and cell apoptosis in H9c2 cells increased in the presence of high glucose in a dose-dependent manner. Next, we found that the individual cardiomyocyte size increased in pre-gestational diabetes mellitus mice and in response to high glucose exposure. Meanwhile, the expression of β-MHC and BMP-10 was up-regulated. Nkx2.5 immunofluorescent staining showed that the expression of Nkx2.5, a crucial cardiac transcription factor, was suppressed in the ventricular septum, left ventricular wall and right ventricular wall of E18.5, E15.5 and E13.5 mouse hearts. However, cardiac hypertrophy did not morphologically occur in E13.5 mouse hearts. In cultured H9c2 cells exposed to high glucose, Nkx2.5 expression decreased, as detected by both immunostaining and western blotting, and the expression of KCNE1 and Cx43 was also restricted. Taken together, alterations in cell size rather than cell proliferation or apoptosis are responsible for hyperglycemia-induced fetal cardiac hypertrophy. The aberrant expression of Nkx2.5 and its regulatory target genes in the presence of high glucose could be a principal component of pathogenesis in the development of fetal cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26418041

  3. Excess α-synuclein worsens disease in mice lacking ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Shimshek, Derya R; Schweizer, Tatjana; Schmid, Peter; van der Putten, P Herman

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in α-synuclein (αSN) and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Physical and functional interactions between these two proteins have been described. Whether they act additively in vivo to influence disease has remained controversial. αSN is a presynaptic protein and the major constituent of Lewy inclusions, histopathological hallmarks of PD. UCH-L1 regulates ubiquitin stability in the nervous system and its loss results in neurodegeneration in peripheral and central neurons. Here, we used genetics to show that UCH-L1-deficiency together with excess αSN worsen disease. Double mutant mice show earlier-onset motor deficits, a shorter lifespan and forebrain astrogliosis but the additive disease-worsening effects of UCH-L1-deficiency and excess αSN are not accompanied by microgliosis, ubiquitin pathology or changes in pathological αSN protein levels and species.

  4. Reversible worsening of Parkinson disease motor symptoms after oral intake of Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw).

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (UT), also known as cat's claw, isa Peruvian Rubiaceae species widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide range of health problems. There is no report about the use, safety, and efficacy of UT in neurological disorders. We describe reversible worsening of motor signs in a patient with Parkinson disease after oral intake of UT, and some possible explanations are discussed.

  5. New-Onset Diabetes After Acute and Critical Illness: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jivanji, Chirag J; Asrani, Varsha M; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-03-13

    Hyperglycemia is commonly observed during acute and critical illness. Recent studies have investigated the risk of developing diabetes after acute and critical illness, but the relationship between degree of in-hospital hyperglycemia and new-onset diabetes has not been investigated. This study examines the evidence for the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia and prevalence of new-onset diabetes after acute and critical illness. A literature search was performed of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus databases for relevant studies published from January 1, 2000, through August 4, 2016. Patients with no history of diabetes before hospital discharge were included in the systematic review. In-hospital glucose concentration was classified as normoglycemia, mild hyperglycemia, or severe hyperglycemia for the meta-analysis. Twenty-three studies were included in the systematic review, and 18 of these (111,078 patients) met the eligibility criteria for the meta-analysis. The prevalence of new-onset diabetes was significantly related to in-hospital glucose concentration and was 4% (95% CI, 2%-7%), 12% (95% CI, 9%-15%), and 28% (95% CI, 18%-39%) for patients with normoglycemia, mild hyperglycemia, and severe hyperglycemia, respectively. The prevalence of new-onset diabetes was not influenced by disease setting, follow-up duration, or study design. In summary, this study found stepwise growth in the prevalence of new-onset diabetes with increasing in-hospital glucose concentration. Patients with severe hyperglycemia are at the highest risk, with 28% developing diabetes after hospital discharge.

  6. Hyperglycemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a potentially modifiable risk factor for poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kruyt, Nyika D; Biessels, Geert Jan; DeVries, J Hans; Luitse, Merel J A; Vermeulen, Marinus; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vandertop, W Peter; Roos, Yvo B

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) occurs frequently and is associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor clinical outcome. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms that cause hyperglycemia after aSAH, and we discuss how hyperglycemia may contribute to poor clinical outcome in these patients. As hyperglycemia is potentially modifiable with intensive insulin therapy (IIT), we systematically reviewed the literature on IIT in aSAH patients. In these patients, IIT seems to be difficult to achieve in terms of lowering blood glucose levels substantially without an increased risk of (serious) hypoglycemia. Therefore, before initiating a large-scale randomized trial to investigate the clinical benefit of IIT, phase II studies, possibly with the help of cerebral blood glucose monitoring by microdialysis, will first have to improve this therapy in terms of both safety and adequacy. PMID:20628402

  7. Worsening of Heart Failure after Abdominal Surgery – Can we predict it?

    PubMed Central

    TOMA, Nora; DRAGOI GALRINHO, Ruxandra; BICESCU, Gabriela; ENACHE, Raluca; CINTEZA, Mircea; GHERASIM, Leonida

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The cardiopulmonary test has demonstrated its role in predicting long term prognostic of patients with heart failure, but only few data are available regarding its utility on short term period. Methods: During 2011-2013, the study enrolled 55 patients over 18 years, with different cardiovascular, metabolic and/or pulmonary pathologies, and 10 control patients matched for age, sex and surgical intervention type, without an associated pathological history who underwent elective abdominal surgery with general anesthesia. Results: The most important predictors of the heart failure worsening after abdominal surgery were peak VO2 as percent of predicted VO2 lower than 59.42±12.52, ventilator equivalent for CO2 at anaerobic threshold over 39.53±5.27 and VD/VT ratio at anaerobic threshold over 0.33±0.06. Lean VO2 lower than 9.58±2.47 also correlated with the above mentioned complication. The ventilator equivalent for CO2, above 39.53±5.27 at anaerobic threshold, respectively 40.67±6.73 at peak exercise, correlates with short term worsening of heart failure after general anesthesia for abdominal surgery. Conclusion: The CPX test has a certain value in predicting short term worsening of heart failure after general anesthesia for elective abdominal surgery in patients known with cardiovascular, pulmonary and/or metabolic disorders. PMID:24371475

  8. Predicting favorable and unfavorable consequences of perceptual learning: worsening and the peak shift.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Matthew G

    2017-04-01

    Discrimination learning can cause improved and worsened ability to perceive differences. This subsequently affects how stimuli are associated with meanings and behaviors. Here, human listeners were trained with frequency-modulated (FM) tonal sweeps (500-1000 Hz) in a paradigm where one FM rate (8.29 octaves per second) required a 'Target' response, while a rate either slower (5.76 octaves per second) or faster (11.94 octaves per second) required a 'Non-Target' response. Training led to a shift in 'Target' responding along the FM rate dimension away from the 'Target' in a direction opposite the trained 'Non-Target'. This peak shift was paralleled by an asymmetry in acuity along the FM rate dimension in an untrained ABX task (a.k.a. match-to-sample). Performance improved relative to pre-training on trials where the 'Target' was contrasted with stimuli nearer the trained 'Non-Target'. Performance worsened on trials containing stimuli displaced along the FM dimension further from the trained 'Non-Target'. A connectionist model of perceptual learning containing non-associative representational modification and associative-based task-specific reweighting was able to simulate behavior. Simulations generated novel testable predictions regarding peak shift and worsening as a result of discrimination learning. Data have theoretical and practical consequences for predicting trends in the generalization of learned behaviors and modifiable perceptual acuities.

  9. Nerve growth factor partially recovers inflamed skin from stress-induced worsening in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J; Liezmann, Christiane; Spatz, Katharina; Daniltchenko, Maria; Joachim, Ricarda; Gimenez-Rivera, Andrey; Hendrix, Sven; Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Brandner, Johanna M; Klapp, Burghard F

    2011-03-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation characterizes atopic disease, but its nature and clinical impact remain ill-defined. Induced by stress, the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) may worsen cutaneous inflammation. We therefore studied the role of NGF in the cutaneous stress response in a mouse model for atopic dermatitis-like allergic dermatitis (AlD). Combining several methods, we found that stress increased cutaneous but not serum or hypothalamic NGF in telogen mice. Microarray analysis showed increased mRNAs of inflammatory and growth factors associated with NGF in the skin. In stress-worsened AlD, NGF-neutralizing antibodies markedly reduced epidermal thickening together with NGF, neurotrophin receptor (tyrosine kinase A and p75 neurotrophin receptor), and transforming growth factor-β expression by keratinocytes but did not alter transepidermal water loss. Moreover, NGF expression by mast cells was reduced; this corresponded to reduced cutaneous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA levels but not to changes in mast cell degranulation or in the T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th2 cytokine balance. Also, eosinophils expressed TNF receptor type 2, and we observed reduced eosinophil infiltration after treatment with NGF-neutralizing antibodies. We thus conclude that NGF acts as a local stress mediator in perceived stress and allergy and that increased NGF message contributes to worsening of cutaneous inflammation mainly by enhancing epidermal hyperplasia, pro-allergic cytokine induction, and allergy-characteristic cellular infiltration.

  10. Biological therapies (immunomodulatory drugs), worsening of psoriasis and rebound effect: new evidence of similitude.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Marcus Zulian

    2016-11-01

    Employing the secondary action or adaptative reaction of the organism as therapeutic response, homeopathy uses the treatment by similitude (similia similibus curentur) administering to sick individuals the medicines that caused similar symptoms in healthy individuals. Such homeostatic or paradoxical reaction of the organism is scientifically explained through the rebound effect of drugs, which cause worsening of symptoms after withdrawal of several palliative treatments. Despite promoting an improvement in psoriasis at the beginning of the treatment, modern biological therapies provoke worsening of the psoriasis (rebound psoriasis) after discontinuation of drugs. Exploratory qualitative review of the literature on the occurrence of the rebound effect with the use of immunomodulatory drugs [T-cell modulating agents and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors drugs] in the treatment of psoriasis. Several researches indicate the rebound effect as the mechanism of worsening of psoriasis with the use of efalizumab causing the suspension of its marketing authorization in 2009, in view of some severe cases. Other studies also have demonstrated the occurrence of rebound psoriasis with the use of alefacept, etanercept and infliximab. As well as studied in other classes of drugs, the rebound effect of biologic agents supports the principle of similitude (primary action of the drugs followed by secondary action and opposite of the organism). Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ketogenesis prevents diet-induced fatty liver injury and hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Ercal, Baris; Huang, Xiaojing; Leid, Jamison M.; d’Avignon, D. André; Graham, Mark J.; Dietzen, Dennis J.; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Patti, Gary J.; Crawford, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spectrum disorders affect approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. However, the drivers of progressive steatohepatitis remain incompletely defined. Ketogenesis can dispose of much of the fat that enters the liver, and dysfunction in this pathway could promote the development of NAFLD. Here, we evaluated mice lacking mitochondrial 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase (HMGCS2) to determine the role of ketogenesis in preventing diet-induced steatohepatitis. Antisense oligonucleotide–induced loss of HMGCS2 in chow-fed adult mice caused mild hyperglycemia, increased hepatic gluconeogenesis from pyruvate, and augmented production of hundreds of hepatic metabolites, a suite of which indicated activation of the de novo lipogenesis pathway. High-fat diet feeding of mice with insufficient ketogenesis resulted in extensive hepatocyte injury and inflammation, decreased glycemia, deranged hepatic TCA cycle intermediate concentrations, and impaired hepatic gluconeogenesis due to sequestration of free coenzyme A (CoASH). Supplementation of the CoASH precursors pantothenic acid and cysteine normalized TCA intermediates and gluconeogenesis in the livers of ketogenesis-insufficient animals. Together, these findings indicate that ketogenesis is a critical regulator of hepatic acyl-CoA metabolism, glucose metabolism, and TCA cycle function in the absorptive state and suggest that ketogenesis may modulate fatty liver disease. PMID:25347470

  12. Hyperglycemia-Induced Vasculopathy in the Murine Vitelline Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Emese; Mahooti, Sepi; Wang, Yi; Imhof, Beat A.; Madri, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased incidence of congenital abnormalities as well as embryonic and perinatal lethality. In particular, a wide range of cardiovascular abnormalities have been noted in children of diabetic mothers and in the offspring of diabetic animals. The vascular system is the first organ system to develop in the embryo and is critical for normal organogenesis. The organization of mesodermal cells into endothelial and hematopoietic cells and into a complex vascular system is, in part, mediated by a series of specific cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix, and cell-factor interactions. PECAM-1 expression has been observed during the earliest stages of vasculogenesis, and changes in PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation have been associated with endothelial cell migration, vasculogenesis, and angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. In this report we demonstrate that exposure to hyperglycemia during gastrulation causes yolk sac and embryonic vasculopathy in cultured murine conceptuses and in the conceptuses of streptozotocin-induced diabetic pregnant mice. In addition, we correlate the presence of yolk sac and embryonic vasculopathy with the failure of PECAM-1 tyrosine dephosphorylation during the formation of blood islands/vessels from clusters of extra-embryonic and embryonic angioblasts in the murine conceptus using both in vitro and in vivo models. The importance of these findings in the development of vasculopathy in the offspring of diabetic mothers and the potential effects and benefits of glucose regulation during the periods of vasculogenesis/angiogenesis in embryonic development are discussed. PMID:10329590

  13. Management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes: evidence and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Katherine; Gentile, Sandro; Candido, Riccardo; De Micheli, Alberto; Gallo, Marco; Medea, Gerardo; Ceriello, Antonio

    2013-05-30

    The panoply of treatment algorithms, periodically released to improve guidance, is one mean to face therapeutic uncertainty in pharmacological management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, especially after metformin failure. Failure of recent guidelines to give advice on the use of specific antidiabetic drugs in patients with co-morbidity may generate further uncertainty, given the frequent association of type 2 diabetes with common comorbidity, including, although not limited to obesity, cardiovascular disease, impaired renal function, and frailty. The Italian Association of Diabetologists (Associazione Medici Diabetologi, AMD) recognized the need to develop personalized treatment plans for people with type 2 diabetes, taking into account the patients' individual profile (phenotype), with the objective of the safest possible glycemic control. As not every subject with type 2 diabetes benefits from intensive glycemic control, flexible regimens of treatment with diabetes drugs (including insulin) are needed for reaching individualized glycemic goals. Whether personalized diabetology will improve the quality healthcare practice of diabetes management is unknown, but specific research has been launched.

  14. Management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes: evidence and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The panoply of treatment algorithms, periodically released to improve guidance, is one mean to face therapeutic uncertainty in pharmacological management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, especially after metformin failure. Failure of recent guidelines to give advice on the use of specific antidiabetic drugs in patients with co-morbidity may generate further uncertainty, given the frequent association of type 2 diabetes with common comorbidity, including, although not limited to obesity, cardiovascular disease, impaired renal function, and frailty. The Italian Association of Diabetologists (Associazione Medici Diabetologi, AMD) recognized the need to develop personalized treatment plans for people with type 2 diabetes, taking into account the patients' individual profile (phenotype), with the objective of the safest possible glycemic control. As not every subject with type 2 diabetes benefits from intensive glycemic control, flexible regimens of treatment with diabetes drugs (including insulin) are needed for reaching individualized glycemic goals. Whether personalized diabetology will improve the quality healthcare practice of diabetes management is unknown, but specific research has been launched. PMID:23721170

  15. Hyperglycemia and mechanical stress: targeting the renal podocyte.

    PubMed

    Lewko, Barbara; Stepinski, Jan

    2009-11-01

    Hyperglycemia and deriving from glomerular hypertension mechanical stress are the key factors underlying pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Multiple direct and secondary effects of both these factors are mediated by complex signaling pathways with extensive interactions. The common signaling pathways stimulated by high glucose and mechanical insult may act in an additive manner, thereby accelerating the cell damage. Podocytes, the cells covering the outer aspect of glomerular basement membrane (GBM), are subjected not only to the load of filtered glucose but also to diverse mechanical forces. Bulging into the Bowman's space, they have no support from the apical side, which makes them particularly susceptible to the effects of mechanical strain. Both high glucose and mechanical stress may impair the protein systems anchoring the podocyte foot processes in GBM, therefore blunting resistance of these cells to mechanical forces. Modulation by these factors of expression and activity of numerous structural and functional proteins results in the (auto)inflammatory responses, dysfunction, apoptosis or necrosis of the podocytes. Loss of the podocytes is irreversible due to their inability to proliferate and to replenish damaged cells. Podocytes are injured early in the course of DN, which, most likely, underlies further glomerular and renal damage in diabetes. This review summarizes the effects of elevated glucose and mechanical stress that seem to be involved in podocyte impairment in diabetes, with particular focus on the possible interactions between these factors.

  16. Extracts of Momordica charantia suppress postprandial hyperglycemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Uebanso, Takashi; Arai, Hidekazu; Taketani, Yutaka; Fukaya, Makiko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Mizuno, Akira; Uryu, Keisuke; Hada, Takahiko; Takeda, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    Momordica charantia (bitter melon) is commonly known as vegetable insulin, but the mechanisms underlying its hypoglycemic effect remain unclear. To address this issue, the effects of bitter melon extracts on postprandial glycemic responses have been investigated in rats. An aqueous extract (AE), methanol fraction (MF) and methanol insoluble fraction (MIF) were prepared from bitter melon. An oral sucrose tolerance test revealed that administration of AE, MF or MIF each significantly suppressed plasma glucose levels at 30 min as compared with the control. In addition, the plasma insulin level at 30 min was also significantly lower after MF administration than in the control in the oral sucrose tolerance test. By contrast, these effects of bitter melon extracts were not observed in the oral glucose tolerance test. In terms of mechanism, bitter melon extracts dose-dependently inhibited the sucrase activity of intestinal mucosa with IC(50) values of 8.3, 3.7 and 12.0 mg/mL for AE, MF and MIF, respectively. The fraction with a molecular weight of less than 1,300 (LT 1,300) obtained from MF inhibited the sucrase activity most strongly in an uncompetitive manner with an IC(50) value of 2.6 mg/mL. Taken together, these results demonstrated that bitter melon suppressed postprandial hyperglycemia by inhibition of alpha-glucosidase activity and that the most beneficial component is present in the LT 1,300 fraction obtained from MF.

  17. [Hyperglycemia and cardiovascular risk: lessons from randomized trials].

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, André

    2010-04-20

    Diabetes is a major cardiovascular risk factor However, hyperglycemia is much more closely associated with microangiopathy than with macrovascular complications. Epidemiologic studies have shown a 15% increase of myocardial infarction for 1% increase in HbA1c level. It is accepted but not absolutely demonstrated, that reduction of HbA1c results in an equal reduction of cardiovascular events. An initial good glycemic control has long-term benefical effects on the risk of cardiovascular disease. On the contrary, benefit of an intensive glucose control is not demonstrated in diabetic patients with previous myocardial infarction. Two recent studies (ACCORD and VADT) showed an increase of cardiovascular mortality by severe hypoglycemia. In diabetic patients with previous myocardial infarction, glycemic goal must be modulated by the hypoglycaemic risk. A goal of 7.5% HbA1c seems reasonable for the diabetic patients treated by sulfonylureas or insulin, at risk of hypoglycaemia. HbA1c target < 7% remains the general goal and HbA1c target < 6.5% is appropriated to the patients treated by insulin sensitizing medications without risk of hypoglycaemia.

  18. Brain Hyperglycemia Induced by Heroin: Association with Metabolic Neural Activation.

    PubMed

    Solis, Ernesto; Bola, R Aaron; Fasulo, Bradley J; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2017-02-15

    Glucose enters the brain extracellular space from arterial blood, and its proper delivery is essential for metabolic activity of brain cells. By using enzyme-based biosensors coupled with high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats, we previously showed that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) display high variability, increasing rapidly following exposure to various arousing stimuli. In this study, the same technology was used to assess NAc glucose fluctuations induced by intravenous heroin. Heroin passively injected at a low dose optimal for maintaining self-administration behavior (100 μg/kg) induces a rapid but moderate glucose rise (∼150-200 μM or ∼15-25% over resting baseline). When the heroin dose was doubled and tripled, the increase became progressively larger in magnitude and longer in duration. Heroin-induced glucose increases also occurred in other brain structures (medial thalamus, lateral striatum, hippocampus), suggesting that brain hyperglycemia is a whole-brain phenomenon but changes were notably distinct in each structure. While local vasodilation appears to be the possible mechanism underlying the rapid rise in extracellular glucose levels, the driving factor for this vasodilation (central vs peripheral) remains to be clarified. The heroin-induced NAc glucose increases positively correlated with increases in intracerebral heat production determined in separate experiments using multisite temperature recordings (NAc, temporal muscle and skin). However, glucose levels rise very rapidly, preceding much slower increases in brain heat production, a measure of metabolic activation associated with glucose consumption.

  19. [Effects of maternal hyperglycemia on fetal growing mechanism].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Ueda, Y; Morikawa, H; Mochizuki, M

    1991-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on fetal growth in rats. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, maternal serum glucose levels during pregnancy were controlled by daily injection of NPH insulin or saline from day 3 to 21 of pregnancy. The body weight, hepatic glycogen content and serum concentrations of insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) in fetuses from these rats were measured on Day 21 of pregnancy. Fetal body weight positively correlated with maternal mean blood glucose (MBG) during pregnancy in the groups of diabetic mothers whose MBG was less than 220 mg/dl, whereas a negative correlation was observed in the groups whose MBG was more than 220 mg/dl. In addition, a similar correlation between hepatic glycogen content, serum concentrations of insulin or IGF-I and maternal MBG was observed. On the other hand, in the culture of fetal rat hepatocytes, glycogen content indicated a dose-related increase according to the increase in glucose concentration in the medium. These results suggest that the growth retardation observed in rats whose maternal mean glucose level is higher than 220 mg/dl is not caused by abnormalities in the metabolic function of the fetal metabolic organ (liver), but it is caused by a decrease in the production and/or secretion of growth-promoting factors (for example insulin and IGF-I) in the fetuses.

  20. Characterization of Remitting and Relapsing Hyperglycemia in Post-Renal-Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Boloori, Alireza; Saghafian, Soroush; Chakkera, Harini A.; Cook, Curtiss B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia following solid organ transplant is common among patients without pre-existing diabetes mellitus (DM). Post-transplant hyperglycemia can occur once or multiple times, which if continued, causes new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT). Objective To study if the first and recurrent incidence of hyperglycemia are affected differently by immunosuppressive regimens, demographic and medical-related risk factors, and inpatient hyperglycemic conditions (i.e., an emphasis on the time course of post-transplant complications). Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 407 patients who underwent kidney transplantation at Mayo Clinic Arizona. Among these, there were 292 patients with no signs of DM prior to transplant. For this category of patients, we evaluated the impact of (1) immunosuppressive drugs (e.g., tacrolimus, sirolimus, and steroid), (2) demographic and medical-related risk factors, and (3) inpatient hyperglycemic conditions on the first and recurrent incidence of hyperglycemia in one year post-transplant. We employed two versions of Cox regression analyses: (1) a time-dependent model to analyze the recurrent cases of hyperglycemia and (2) a time-independent model to analyze the first incidence of hyperglycemia. Results Age (P = 0.018), HDL cholesterol (P = 0.010), and the average trough level of tacrolimus (P<0.0001) are significant risk factors associated with the first incidence of hyperglycemia, while age (P<0.0001), non-White race (P = 0.002), BMI (P = 0.002), HDL cholesterol (P = 0.003), uric acid (P = 0.012), and using steroid (P = 0.007) are the significant risk factors for the recurrent cases of hyperglycemia. Discussion This study draws attention to the importance of analyzing the risk factors associated with a disease (specially a chronic one) with respect to both its first and recurrent incidence, as well as carefully differentiating these two perspectives: a fact that is currently overlooked in the literature

  1. Prevalence and clinical outcome of inpatient hyperglycemia in a community pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Andres; Smiley, Dawn; Ceron, Miguel; Klein, Robin; Cho, Irene S; Mejia, Roberto; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2008-05-01

    Inpatient hyperglycemia in adult patients with and without a history of diabetes is a predictor of poor clinical outcome. No previous studies, however, have examined the association of hyperglycemia and clinical outcome in children admitted to a community pediatric hospital. The study was a retrospective observational cohort of pediatric patients admitted to a community children's hospital from January 2004 to August 2004. Medical records of 903 consecutive children admitted to critical and non-critical care areas were reviewed. Of them, 342 patients (38%) had no blood glucose measurements during their hospital stay. In the remaining patients, we determined the prevalence of hyperglycemia and examined the association of hyperglycemia with clinical outcome. A total of 406 patients (75%) had an admission blood glucose < or =120 mg/dL (mean +/- SEM 98 +/- 1 mg/dL), 103 children (19%) had an admission blood glucose level of 121-179 mg/dL (mean 143 +/- 2 mg/dL), and 32 patients (5.9%) had a blood glucose level > or =180 mg/dL (mean 260 +/- 18 mg/dL). Seventeen patients (13%) had a known history of diabetes prior to admission. Children with hyperglycemia were more likely to be admitted to the ICU (P < .001) and had a longer length of ICU stay (P < .001), but admission hyperglycemia was not associated with longer hospital stay or higher hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia is present in one-fourth of children admitted to the hospital, most of them without a history of diabetes prior to admission. Hyperglycemia was associated with a greater need for ICU care and longer ICU stay but not with increased in-hospital mortality. (c) 2008 Society of Hospital Medicine

  2. Non Diabetic and Stress Induced Hyperglycemia [SIH] in Orthopaedic Practice What do we know so Far?

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Randeep; Sud, Ambuj; Ghorpade, Nilesh; Gupta, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is also seen amongst non-diabetics and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. SIH has been reported in literature and studied in relation to trauma and critically ill patients. However, literature specific to orthopaedics on this topic is very small. Further, management of hyperglycemia in such patients is still a matter of debate and no universal consensus exists regarding its management. Future studies are needed on this topic to provide appropriate management guidelines and optimal patient outcomes. PMID:25478381

  3. Fructose improves the ability of hyperglycemia per se to regulate glucose production in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Meredith; Gabriely, Ilan; Wozniak, Robert; Vilcu, Cristian; Shamoon, Harry; Rossetti, Luciano

    2002-03-01

    The ability of hyperglycemia per se to suppress endogenous glucose production (GP) is blunted in type 2 diabetes. This could be due in part to decreased glucose-induced flux through glucokinase (GK). Because fructose activates hepatic GK, we examined whether catalytic amounts of fructose could restore inhibition of GP by hyperglycemia in humans with type 2 diabetes. Glucose fluxes ([3-(3)H]glucose) were measured during euglycemia (5 mmol/l) and after abrupt onset of hyperglycemia (10 mmol/l; variable dextrose infusion) under fixed hormonal conditions (somatostatin infusion for 6 h with basal insulin/glucagon/growth hormone replacement). A total of 10 subjects with moderately controlled type 2 diabetes and 7 age- and BMI-matched nondiabetic subjects were studied on up to three separate occasions under the following conditions: without fructose (F(-)) or with infusion of fructose at two dosages: 0.6 mg/kg center dot min (low F) and 1.8 mg/kg center dot min (high F). Although GP failed to decrease in response to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, the coinfusion of both doses of fructose was associated with comparable decreases in GP in response to hyperglycemia (low F = -27%, high F = -33%; P < 0.01 vs. F(-) at both dosages), which approached the 44% decline in GP observed without fructose in the nondiabetic subjects. GP responses to hyperglycemia were not altered by the addition of fructose in the nondiabetic group (low F = -47%, high F = -42%; P > 0.05 vs. F(-)). Thus, the administration of small amounts of fructose to type 2 diabetic subjects partially corrected the regulation of GP by hyperglycemia per se, yet did not affect this regulation in the nondiabetic subjects. This suggests that the liver's inability to respond to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, likely caused by impaired GK activity, contributes substantially to the increased GP in these individuals.

  4. Risk factors for worsened quality of life in patients on mechanical ventilation. A prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Busico, M; Intile, D; Sívori, M; Irastorza, N; Alvarez, A L; Quintana, J; Vazquez, L; Plotnikow, G; Villarejo, F; Desmery, P

    2016-10-01

    To identify risk factors for worsened quality of life (QoL) and activities of daily living (ADL) at 3 and 12 months after discharge from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). A prospective, multicentric observational study was made. Three ICUs in Argentina. The study included a total of 84 out of 129 mainly clinical patients admitted between 2011-2012 and requiring over 24hours of MV. No interventions were carried out. Quality of life was assessed with the EQ-5D (version for Argentina), and ADL with the Barthel index. The EQ-5D and Barthel scores were assessed upon admission to the ICU (baseline) and after three months and one year of follow-up. Comorbidities, delirium, ICU acquired weakness (ICUAW), and medication received were daily assessed during ICU stay. The baseline QoL of the global sample showed a median index of [0.831 (IQR25-75% 0.527-0.931)], versus [0.513 (IQR0.245-0.838)] after three months and [0.850 (IQR0.573-1.00)] after one year. Significant differences were observed compared with QoL in the Argentinean general population [mean 0.880 (CI 0.872-0.888), p<0.001; p<0.001; p0.002]. Individual analysis showed that 67% of the patients had worsened their QoL at three months, while 33% had recovered their QoL. In the multivariate analysis, the variables found to be independent predictors of worsened QoL were a hospital stay ≥21 days [OR 12.57 (2.75-57.47)], age ≥50 years [OR 5.61 (1.27-24.83)], previous poor QoL [OR 0.11 (0.02-0.54)] and persistent ICUAW [OR 8.32 (1.22-56.74)]. Similar results were found for the worsening of ADL. Quality of life is altered after critical illness, and its recovery is gradual over time. Age, length of hospital stay, previous QoL and persistent ICUAW seem to be risk factors for worsened QoL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  5. Race, sex, and risk factors in radiographic worsening of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vina, Ernest R; Ran, Di; Ashbeck, Erin L; Ratzlaff, Charles; Kwoh, C Kent

    2017-08-31

    Characterize radiographic worsening in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) by race and sex over 4 years and evaluate the role of established risk factors in observed race/sex differences. Whites (WHs) (694 males and 929 females) and African-Americans (AAs) (92 males and 167 females) at risk for radiographic KOA were eligible. Cox shared frailty models were used to estimate race and sex group differences in radiographic worsening, defined by Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) and OARSI joint space narrowing (JSN). Mixed effect models for repeated measures were used to estimate race- and sex-specific mean medial and lateral fixed joint space width (fJSW) over 4 years of follow-up, as well as annual loss of fJSW. Risk of OARSI medial JSN grade worsening was higher among AA males than WH females [HR = 2.28, (95% CI: 1.14-4.57)], though adjustment for KOA risk factors attenuated the association. Compared to WH females, WH males had lower risk of K-L grade worsening [adjusted HR = 0.75 (95% CI: 0.58-0.96)]. Mean baseline medial fJSW (mm) was 6.49 in WH and AA males, 5.42 in WH females, and 5.41 in AA females. Annual change in mean medial fJSW was greater in AA males (-0.19mm/year) than in other subgroups (-0.09 WH males, -0.07 WH females, -0.10 AA females, p < 0.0001). Compared to WHs, AAs had less lateral fJSW at baseline and throughout follow-up. Compared to WHs and AA females, AA males experienced higher risk of medial joint space loss. Controlling for established risk factors attenuated associations between race/sex and disease worsening, suggesting that risk factors such as obesity, history of knee injury, and bony finger joint enlargements largely explain race/sex variations in rates of KOA development and progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The mechanism underlying the central glucagon-induced hyperglycemia and anorexia in chicks.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi; Uemura, Taku; Yanagi, Takashi; Saito, Noboru; Kurose, Yohei; Sugahara, Kunio; Katoh, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Shin

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the mechanism underlying central glucagon-induced hyperglycemia and anorexia in chicks. Male 8-day-old chicks (Gallus gallus) were used in all experiments. Intracerebroventricular administration of glucagon in chicks induced hyperglycemia and anorexia from 30 min after administration. However, the plasma insulin level did not increase until 90 min after glucagon administration, suggesting that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells may be suppressed by central glucagon. The plasma corticosterone concentration significantly increased from 30 min to 120 min after administration, suggesting that central glucagon activates the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis in chicks. However, central administration of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which activates the HPA axis in chicken hypothalamus, significantly reduced not only food intake but also plasma glucose concentration, suggesting that CRF and the activation of the HPA axis are related to the glucagon-induced anorexia but not hyperglycemia in chicks. Phentolamine, an α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the glucagon-induced hyperglycemia, suggesting that glucagon induced hyperglycemia at least partly via α-adrenergic neural pathway. Co-administration of phentolamine and α-helical CRF, a CRF receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated glucagon-induced hyperglycemia and anorexia. It is therefore likely that central administration of glucagon suppresses food intake at least partly via CRF-induced anorexigenic pathway in chicks.

  7. Managing hyperglycemia in patients with Cushing's disease treated with pasireotide: medical expert recommendations.

    PubMed

    Colao, Annamaria; De Block, Christophe; Gaztambide, Maria Sonia; Kumar, Sudhesh; Seufert, Jochen; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2014-04-01

    To recommend an approach to monitoring and treating hyperglycemia in pasireotide-treated patients with Cushing's disease, a severe clinical condition caused by a pituitary adenoma hypersecreting adrenocorticotropic hormone. Advisory Board meeting of ten European experts in pituitary disease and diabetes mellitus in Munich, Germany, on February 23, 2012, to obtain expert recommendations. Cushing's disease presents a number of management challenges. Pasireotide, a novel agent for the treatment of Cushing's disease with proven biochemical and clinical efficacy, improves outcomes and expands treatment options. Clinical trials have shown that the pasireotide adverse event profile is similar to that of other somatostatin analogs, except for a higher frequency of hyperglycemia. Mechanistic studies in healthy volunteers suggest that pasireotide-associated hyperglycemia is due to reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, and insulin; however, it is associated with intact postprandial glucagon secretion. Individual patients' results demonstrate effective hyperglycemia management by following standard guidelines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus with individual adaptation to the specific underlying pathophysiology, i.e., preferential use of GLP-1 based-medications. Patients on pasireotide treatment should be monitored for changes in glucose metabolism and hyperglycemia. Diabetes mellitus should be managed by initiation of medical therapy with metformin and staged treatment intensification with a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, with a switch to a GLP-1 receptor agonist and initiation of insulin, as required, to achieve and maintain glycemic control. Further research into hyperglycemia following pasireotide treatment will help refine the optimal strategy in Cushing's disease.

  8. Soluble epoxide hydrolase in podocytes is a significant contributor to renal function under hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Koike, Shinichiro; Hsu, Ming-Fo; Ito, Yoshihiro; Chahed, Samah; Bachaalany, Santana; Gruzdev, Artiom; Calvo-Rubio, Miguel; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Inceoglu, Bora; Imig, John D; Villalba, Jose M; Zeldin, Darryl C; Hammock, Bruce D; Haj, Fawaz G

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of renal failure, and podocyte dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of DN. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, encoded by Ephx2) is a conserved cytosolic enzyme whose inhibition has beneficial effects on renal function. The aim of this study is to investigate the contribution of sEH in podocytes to hyperglycemia-induced renal injury. Mice with podocyte-specific sEH disruption (pod-sEHKO) were generated, and alterations in kidney function were determined under normoglycemia, and high-fat diet (HFD)- and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemia. sEH protein expression increased in murine kidneys under HFD- and STZ-induced hyperglycemia. sEH deficiency in podocytes preserved renal function and glucose control and mitigated hyperglycemia-induced renal injury. Also, podocyte sEH deficiency was associated with attenuated hyperglycemia-induced renal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, inflammation and fibrosis, and enhanced autophagy. Moreover, these effects were recapitulated in immortalized murine podocytes treated with a selective sEH pharmacological inhibitor. Furthermore, pharmacological-induced elevation of ER stress or attenuation of autophagy in immortalized podocytes mitigated the protective effects of sEH inhibition. These findings establish sEH in podocytes as a significant contributor to renal function under hyperglycemia. These data suggest that sEH is a potential therapeutic target for podocytopathies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyperglycemia in children with meningococcal sepsis and septic shock: the relation between plasma levels of insulin and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    van Waardenburg, Dick A; Jansen, Tim C; Vos, Gijs D; Buurman, Wim A

    2006-10-01

    Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are common findings in critically ill adult patients and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate the hyperglycemic response to critical illness in children. The study was designed as an observational cohort study. The study was set in a university-affiliated pediatric intensive care unit. Six children with meningococcal sepsis (MS) without shock and 10 children with meningococcal septic shock (MSS) were patients. Differences in blood glucose levels (measured during 72 h after admission) and differences in plasma levels of glucoregulatory hormones (insulin, GH, IGF-I, cortisol, glucagons, leptin), soluble cytokine receptors (sTNF-R55, R75, sIL-1R2), and IL-6 (measured on d 3) between MS and MSS patients were assessed. Blood glucose levels on d 2 and 3 were higher in MSS patients than in MS patients [7.5 (3.9-13.0) vs. 5.1 (4.0-6.0) and 6.5 (4.0-9.9) vs. 5.5 (4.8-6.8) mmol/liter, both P < 0.05]. Maximum blood glucose values recorded in individual patients were higher in MSS patients [9.3 (6.5-13) vs. 7.2 (6.2-9.9), P < 0.05] and correlated with severity of illness (r = 0.833, P < 0.001). Insulin levels in MSS patients were significantly lower (7.2 vs. 19.0 mU/liter, P < 0.001), compatible with insufficient insulin response to hyperglycemia, whereas MS patients showed insulin resistance. Insulin levels correlated inversely with levels of sTNF-R55 and R75 (r = -0.814 and -0.878, both P < 0.001), suggesting suppression of the proinflammatory response on insulin secretion. Hyperglycemia associated with hypoinsulinemia rather than insulin resistance may be the normal pathophysiological response in acute MSS in children. Our study emphasizes that application of intensive insulin therapy in critically ill children demands further investigation.

  10. Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections are Promoted by Systemic Hyperglycemia after Severe Burn Injury in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Williams, Felicia N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injuries are associated with hyperglycemia leading to increased incidence of infections with pneumonia being one of the most prominent and adverse complication. Recently, various studies in critically ill patients indicated that increased pulmonary glucose levels with airway/blood glucose threshold over 150 mg/dl lead to an overwhelming growth of bacteria in the broncho-pulmonary system, subsequently resulting in an increased risk of pulmonary infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar cutoff value exists for severely burned pediatric patients. Methods One-hundred six severely burned pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided in two groups: high (H) defined as daily average glucose levels >75% of LOS >150 mg/dl), and low (L) with daily average glucose levels >75% of the LOS <150 mg/dl). Incidences of pneumonia, atelectasis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were assessed. Incidence of infections, sepsis, and respiratory parameters were recorded. Blood was analyzed for glucose and insulin levels. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and chi-square test. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results Patient groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Pneumonia in patients on the mechanical ventilation (L: 21% H: 32%) and off mechanical ventilation (L: 5% H: 15%), as well as ARDS were significantly higher in the high group (L: 3% H: 19%), p<0.05, while atelectasis was not different. Patients in the high group required significantly longer ventilation compared to low patients (p<0.05). Furthermore, incidence of infection and sepsis were significantly higher in the high group, p<0.05. Conclusion Our results indicate that systemic glucose levels over 150 mg/dl are associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia confirming the previous studies in critically ill patients. PMID:24074819

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning attenuates hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases in focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Yoshiteru; Hu, Qin; Krafft, Paul R; Fujii, Mutsumi; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2013-09-01

    Hyperglycemia dramatically aggravates brain infarct and hemorrhagic transformation (HT) after ischemic stroke. Oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in the pathophysiology of HT. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO-PC) has been proved to decrease oxidative stress and has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective in experimental stroke models. The present study determined whether HBO-PC would ameliorate HT by a pre-ischemic increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and a suppression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in hyperglycemic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats. Rats were pretreated with HBO (100% O₂, 2.5 atmosphere absolutes) 1 h daily for 5 days before MCAO. Acute hyperglycemia was induced by an injection of 50% dextrose. Neurological deficits, infarction volume and hemorrhagic volume were assessed 24 h and 7 days after ischemia. ROS scavenger n-acetyl cysteine (NAC), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), inhibitor 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) and activator cobalt chloride (CoCl₂), and MMP inhibitor SB-3CT were administrated for mechanism study. The activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and the expression HIF-1α were measured. HBO-PC improved neurological deficits, and reduced hemorrhagic volume; the expression of HIF-1α was significantly decreased, and the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was reduced by HBO-PC compared with vehicle group. Our results suggested that HBO-PC attenuated HT via decreasing HIF-1α and its downstream MMP-2 and MMP-9 in hyperglycemic MCAO rats.

  12. Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Deletion Impairs Glucose Tolerance and Exacerbates Hyperglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic MiceS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Reisman, Scott A.; Yeager, Ronnie L.; Goedken, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) induces a battery of cytoprotective genes after oxidative stress. Nrf2 aids in liver regeneration by altering insulin signaling; however, whether Nrf2 participates in hepatic glucose homeostasis is unknown. Compared with wild-type mice, mice lacking Nrf2 (Nrf2-null) have lower basal serum insulin and prolonged hyperglycemia in response to an intraperitoneal glucose challenge. In the present study, blood glucose, serum insulin, urine flow rate, and hepatic expression of glucose-related genes were quantified in male diabetic wild-type and Nrf2-null mice. Type 1 diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose (200 mg/kg) of streptozotocin (STZ). Histopathology and serum insulin levels confirmed depleted pancreatic β-cells in STZ-treated mice of both genotypes. Five days after STZ, Nrf2-null mice had higher blood glucose levels than wild-type mice. Nine days after STZ, polyuria occurred in both genotypes with more urine output from Nrf2-null mice (11-fold) than wild-type mice (7-fold). Moreover, STZ-treated Nrf2-null mice had higher levels of serum β-hydroxybutyrate, triglycerides, and fatty acids 10 days after STZ compared with wild-type mice. STZ reduced hepatic glycogen in both genotypes, with less observed in Nrf2-null mice. Increased urine output and blood glucose in STZ-treated Nrf2-null mice corresponded with enhanced gluconeogenesis (glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase)- and reduced glycolysis (pyruvate kinase)-related mRNA expression in their livers. Furthermore, the Nrf2 activator oltipraz lowered blood glucose in wild-type but not Nrf2-null mice administered STZ. Collectively, these data indicate that the absence of Nrf2 worsens hyperglycemia in type I diabetic mice and Nrf2 may represent a therapeutic target for reducing circulating glucose levels. PMID:20086057

  13. Development of hyperglycemia and diabetes in captive Polish bank voles.

    PubMed

    Bartelik, Aleksandra; Ciesla, Maciej; Kotlinowski, Jerzy; Bartelik, Stanislaw; Czaplicki, Dominik; Grochot-Przeczek, Anna; Kurowski, Krzysztof; Koteja, Paweł; Dulak, Jozef; Józkowicz, Alicja

    2013-03-01

    Diabetes has been detected in Danish and Swedish bank voles (Myodes glareolus). There are no data, however, concerning the prevalence of diabetes in populations from other geographic regions. We investigated the frequency and physiological effects of glucose metabolism disorders in captive bank voles from Poland. Single measurement of fasting blood glucose concentration performed in the 3-4month old captive-born bank Polish voles without any disease symptoms showed that 8% of individuals (22/284) displayed an impaired fasting glucose (IFG, blood glucose (BG) ≥100mg/dL) and 1% (4/284) showed hyperglycemia (BG ≥126mg/dL) which could suggest diabetes. Next, we analyzed blood glucose in samples taken once a month from an additional cohort of bank voles with (FHD), or without (H), a family history of diabetes. The prevalence of IFG at age six months was 26% (16/62) among bank voles from the H group. In the FHD group the prevalence increased to 49% (43/88), and additional 12% (11/88) became diabetic (DB, BG ≥126mg/dL at two time points). Postnatal stress (three maternal deprivations before weaning) did not affect the risk of developing IFG or DB in H voles, but significantly reduced the frequency of glucose metabolism disorders (IFG and DB combined) in FHD voles. IFG was associated with hyperinsulinemia, but not with other biochemical disturbances. Diabetic animals displayed a progressive malformation and vacuolization of β-cells in the pancreas, without visible leukocytic infiltrations. In summary, our results indicate that Polish captive bank voles can develop diabetes, which shows features of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in humans. Risk of diabetes is higher in animal with FHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High white blood cell count is associated with a worsening of insulin sensitivity and predicts the development of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vozarova, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Lindsay, Robert S; Pratley, Richard E; Bogardus, Clifton; Tataranni, P Antonio

    2002-02-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We examined whether a high white blood cell count (WBC), a marker of inflammation, predicts a worsening of insulin action, insulin secretory function, and the development of type 2 diabetes in Pima Indians. We measured WBC in 352 nondiabetic Pima Indians (215 men and 137 women, aged 27 +/- 6 years [means +/- SD], body fat 32 +/- 8%, WBC 8,107 +/- 2,022 cells/mm(3)) who were characterized for body composition (by hydrodensitometry or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), glucose tolerance (by 75-g oral glucose tolerance test), insulin action (M; by hyperinsulinemic clamp), and acute insulin secretory response (AIR; by 25-g intravenous glucose challenge). Among 272 subjects who were normal glucose tolerant (NGT) at baseline, 54 developed diabetes over an average follow-up of 5.5 +/- 4.4 years. Among those who remained nondiabetic, 81 subjects had follow-up measurements of M and AIR. Cross-sectionally, WBC was related to percent body fat (r = 0.32, P < 0.0001) and M (r = -0.24, P < 0.0001), but not to AIR (r = 0.06, P = 0.4). In a multivariate analysis, when adjusted for age and sex, both percent body fat (P < 0.0001) and M (P = 0.03) were independently associated with WBC. A high WBC value predicted diabetes (relative hazard 90th vs. 10th percentiles [95%CI] of 2.7 [1.3-5.4], P = 0.007) when adjusted for age and sex. The predictive effect of WBC persisted after additional adjustment for established predictors of diabetes, i.e., percent body fat, M, and AIR (relative hazard 2.6 [1.1-6.2], P = 0.03). After adjustment for follow-up duration, a high WBC at baseline was associated with a subsequent worsening of M (P = 0.003), but not a worsening of AIR. A high WBC predicts a worsening of insulin action and the development of type 2 diabetes in Pima Indians. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a chronic activation of the immune system may play a

  15. Importance of genetics in fetal alcohol effects: null mutation of the nNOS gene worsens alcohol-induced cerebellar neuronal losses and behavioral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Bonthius, Daniel J.; Winters, Zachary; Karacay, Bahri; Bousquet, Samantha Larimer; Bonthius, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is a major target of alcohol-induced damage in the developing brain. However, the cerebella of some children are much more seriously affected than others by prenatal alcohol exposure. As a consequence of in utero alcohol exposure, some children have substantial reductions in cerebellar volume and corresponding neurodevelopmental problems, including microencephaly, ataxia, and balance deficits, while other children who were exposed to similar alcohol quantities are spared. One factor that likely plays a key role in determining the impact of alcohol on the fetal cerebellum is genetics. However, no specific gene variant has yet been identified that worsens cerebellar function as a consequence of developmental alcohol exposure. Previous studies have revealed that mice carrying a homozygous mutation of the gene for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS−/− mice) have more severe acute alcohol-induced neuronal losses from the cerebellum than wild type mice. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine whether alcohol induces more severe cerebellum-based behavioral deficits in nNOS−/− mice than in wild type mice and to determine whether these worsened behavior deficits are associated with worsened cerebellar neuronal losses. nNOS−/− mice and their wild type controls received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4 mg/g) daily over postnatal days 4–9. In adulthood, the mice underwent behavioral testing, followed by neuronal quantification. Alcohol caused dose-related deficits in rotarod and balance beam performance in both nNOS−/− and wild type mice. However, the alcohol-induced behavioral deficits were substantially worse in the nNOS−/− mice than in wild type. Likewise, alcohol exposure led to losses of Purkinje cells and cerebellar granule cells in mice of both genotypes, but the cell losses were more severe in the nNOS−/− mice than in wild type. Behavioral performances were correlated with neuronal number in the nNOS−/− mice, but not

  16. Importance of genetics in fetal alcohol effects: null mutation of the nNOS gene worsens alcohol-induced cerebellar neuronal losses and behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Bonthius, Daniel J; Winters, Zachary; Karacay, Bahri; Bousquet, Samantha Larimer; Bonthius, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is a major target of alcohol-induced damage in the developing brain. However, the cerebella of some children are much more seriously affected than others by prenatal alcohol exposure. As a consequence of in utero alcohol exposure, some children have substantial reductions in cerebellar volume and corresponding neurodevelopmental problems, including microencephaly, ataxia, and balance deficits, while other children who were exposed to similar alcohol quantities are spared. One factor that likely plays a key role in determining the impact of alcohol on the fetal cerebellum is genetics. However, no specific gene variant has yet been identified that worsens cerebellar function as a consequence of developmental alcohol exposure. Previous studies have revealed that mice carrying a homozygous mutation of the gene for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-/- mice) have more severe acute alcohol-induced neuronal losses from the cerebellum than wild type mice. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine whether alcohol induces more severe cerebellum-based behavioral deficits in nNOS-/- mice than in wild type mice and to determine whether these worsened behavior deficits are associated with worsened cerebellar neuronal losses. nNOS-/- mice and their wild type controls received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4mg/g) daily over postnatal days 4-9. In adulthood, the mice underwent behavioral testing, followed by neuronal quantification. Alcohol caused dose-related deficits in rotarod and balance beam performance in both nNOS-/- and wild type mice. However, the alcohol-induced behavioral deficits were substantially worse in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. Likewise, alcohol exposure led to losses of Purkinje cells and cerebellar granule cells in mice of both genotypes, but the cell losses were more severe in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. Behavioral performances were correlated with neuronal number in the nNOS-/- mice, but not in wild type. Thus, homozygous

  17. Echocardiographic Predictors for Worsening of Six-Minute Walk Distances in Patients With Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Kenya; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Nishio, Susumu; Hirata, Yukina; Seno, Hiromitsu; Saijo, Yoshihito; Ise, Takayuki; Tobiume, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Koji; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Sata, Masataka

    2017-07-15

    Change in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) has been used as a clinical marker in pulmonary hypertension. Determinants and worsening of 6MWD remain a matter of debate because nonpulmonary factors have an impact on the 6MWD. We hypothesized that future reduction of 6MWD in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) was more closely associated with cardiac dysfunction. We prospectively performed standard clinical and echocardiographic evaluations in SSc patients with the 6-minute walk test at enrollment. Features associated with the 6MWD were sought in a multiple linear regression analysis and compared using standardized β. Worsening of the 6MWD was defined as a 15% reduction and served as the primary outcome. Eighty-one patients were included. In the multivariate analysis, baseline 6MWD was related to SSc severity score (β = -0.250, p = 0.024), left atrial volume index (β = -0.222, p = 0.046), right ventricular fractional area change (β = 0.252, p = 0.025), and the ratio of mean pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac output (β = -0.31, p = 0.002). During follow-up, 20 patients reached the primary outcome. In sequential Cox models, a model based on right ventricular fractional area change at baseline (chi-square 4.8) was improved by left atrial volume index (chi-square 10.3, p = 0.007). In conclusion, determinants and worsening of 6MWD are explained by cardiac factors. When using the 6MWD as a clinical marker in pulmonary hypertension patients, their left ventricular diastolic function and right ventricular systolic function should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploratory analysis of the effect of intravitreal ranibizumab or triamcinolone on worsening of diabetic retinopathy in a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bressler, Susan B; Qin, Haijing; Melia, Michele; Bressler, Neil M; Beck, Roy W; Chan, Clement K; Grover, Sandeep; Miller, David G

    2013-08-01

    The standard care for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) usually is panretinal photocoagulation, an inherently destructive treatment that can cause iatrogenic vision loss. Therefore, evaluating the effects of therapies for diabetic macular edema on development or worsening of PDR might lead to new therapies for PDR. To evaluate the effects of intravitreal ranibizumab or triamcinolone acetonide, administered to treat diabetic macular edema, on worsening of diabetic retinopathy. Exploratory analysis was performed on worsening of retinopathy, defined as 1 or more of the following: (1) worsening from no PDR to PDR, (2) worsening of 2 or more severity levels on reading center assessment of fundus photographs in eyes without PDR at baseline, (3) having panretinal photocoagulation, (4) experiencing vitreous hemorrhage, or (5) undergoing vitrectomy for the treatment of PDR. Community- and university-based ophthalmology practices. Individuals with central-involved diabetic macular edema causing visual acuity impairment. Eyes were assigned randomly to sham with prompt focal/grid laser, 0.5 mg of intravitreal ranibizumab with prompt or deferred (≥24 weeks) laser, or 4 mg of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide with prompt laser. Three-year cumulative probabilities for retinopathy worsening. For eyes without PDR at baseline, the 3-year cumulative probabilities for retinopathy worsening (P value comparison with sham with prompt laser) were 23% using sham with prompt laser, 18% with ranibizumab with prompt laser (P = .25), 7% with ranibizumab with deferred laser (P = .001), and 37% with triamcinolone with prompt laser (P = .10). For eyes with PDR at baseline, the 3-year cumulative probabilities for retinopathy worsening were 40%, 21% (P = .05), 18% (P = .02), and 12% (P < .001), respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Intravitreal ranibizumab appears to be associated with a reduced risk of diabetic retinopathy worsening in eyes with or without PDR. Intravitreal

  19. Hyperglycemia induces memory impairment linked to increased acetylcholinesterase activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; De Moraes, Daiani Almeida; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus, which causes hyperglycemia, affects the central nervous system and can impairs cognitive functions, such as memory. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia on memory as well as on the activity of acethylcholinesterase. Hyperglycemia was induced in adult zebrafish by immersion in glucose 111mM by 14 days. The animals were divided in 4 groups: control, glucose-treated, glucose-washout 7-days and glucose-washout 14-days. We evaluated the performance in inhibitory avoidance task and locomotor activity. We also determined acethylcholinesterase activity and gene expression from whole brain. In order to counteract the effect of hyperglycemia underlined by effects on acethylcholinesterase activity, we treated the animals with galantamine (0.05ng/g), an inhibitor of this enzyme. Also we evaluated the gene expression of insulin receptor and glucose transporter from zebrafish brain. The hyperglycemia promoted memory deficit in adult zebrafish, which can be explained by increased AChE activity. The ache mRNA levels from zebrafish brain were decrease in 111mM glucose group and returned to normal levels after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. Insulin receptors (insra-1, insra-2, insrb-1 and insrb-2) and glut-3 mRNA levels were not significantly changed. Our results also demonstrated that galantamine was able to reverse the memory deficit caused by hyperglycemia, demonstrating that these effects involve modulation of AChE activity. These data suggest that the memory impairment induced by hyperglycemia is underlined by the cholinergic dysfunction caused by the mechanisms involving the control of acetylcholinesterase function and gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Hyperglycemia on Gene Expression during Early Organogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Willemsen, A. Marcel; Jongejan, Aldo; Sokolovic, Milka; Bradley, Edward J.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Baas, Frank; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular and neural malformations are common sequels of diabetic pregnancies, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that maternal hyperglycemia would affect the embryos most shortly after the glucose-sensitive time window at embryonic day (ED) 7.5 in mice. Methods Mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin, treated with slow-release insulin implants and mated. Pregnancy aggravated hyperglycemia. Gene expression profiles were determined in ED8.5 and ED9.5 embryos from diabetic and control mice using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression and deep sequencing. Results Maternal hyperglycemia induced differential regulation of 1,024 and 2,148 unique functional genes on ED8.5 and ED9.5, respectively, mostly in downward direction. Pathway analysis showed that ED8.5 embryos suffered mainly from impaired cell proliferation, and ED9.5 embryos from impaired cytoskeletal remodeling and oxidative phosphorylation (all P ≤ E-5). A query of the Mouse Genome Database showed that 20–25% of the differentially expressed genes were caused by cardiovascular and/or neural malformations, if deficient. Despite high glucose levels in embryos with maternal hyperglycemia and a ~150-fold higher rate of ATP production from glycolysis than from oxidative phosphorylation on ED9.5, ATP production from both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was reduced to ~70% of controls, implying a shortage of energy production in hyperglycemic embryos. Conclusion Maternal hyperglycemia suppressed cell proliferation during gastrulation and cytoskeletal remodeling during early organogenesis. 20–25% of the genes that were differentially regulated by hyperglycemia were associated with relevant congenital malformations. Unexpectedly, maternal hyperglycemia also endangered the energy supply of the embryo by suppressing its glycolytic capacity. PMID:27433804

  1. Impact of Hyperglycemia on Outcomes among Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Bulky Early Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huai-wu; Zhang, Bing-zhong; Wang, Li-juan; Lin, Zhong-qiu

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of hyperglycemia on survival of patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for bulky early stage cervical cancer (BESCC) has not been explored. Method Records of patients who received NACT and radical hysterectomy in our institution between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. Results In total, 347 patients were included. The median follow-up time was 37 months (range: 4–65). Patients with hyperglycemia (fasting blood glucose ≥ 100 mg/dl) had shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) (univariate hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.16, 3.28], P = 0.010) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (univariate HR = 2.24, 95% CI [1.33, 3.78], P = 0.002) compared with those with euglycemia (fasting blood glucose <100 mg/dl). In multivariate analysis, positive surgical margins, parametrium invasion, node metastasis, hyperglycemia and complete response to NACT independently predicted recurrence and cancer-specific death. To further validate the prognostic value of hyperglycemia, we conducted a subgroup analysis based on patient baseline characteristics and prognostic effect of hyperglycemia remained significant in all subgroups. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, euglycemia before NACT, squamous cell tumor and pre-treatment squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels < 3.5 ng/ml were identified as independent predictors of complete response after NACT. Conclusions FBG ≥100 mg/dl is a negative prognostic predictor for cervical cancer patients receiving NACT for BESCC. Patients with hyperglycemia are less likely to achieve complete response after NACT. Our findings underscore the clinical utility of hyperglycemia screening of for cervical cancer patients. PMID:27851819

  2. The correlation between peri-operative hyperglycemia and mortality in cardiac surgery patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Nenekidis, Ioannis; Brokalaki, Hero

    2012-03-01

    Hyperglycemia occurs frequently in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It has been identified as a risk factor for increased peri-operative morbidity and mortality. To review the evidence of the correlation of peri-operative hyperglycemia with mortality in cardiac surgery patients and to discuss the main results in order to provide evidence-based knowledge for the appropriate glycemic control. We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE in June 2010. The material of our study was articles published between 1 January 1990 and 31 May 2010, which investigated the correlation between peri-operative hyperglycemia and in-hospital and/or 30-day cardiac surgery mortality. Out of the 16 reviewed articles in our study, 12 (75%) significantly associated hyperglycemia and inadequate blood glucose control with increased mortality. In addition, four of the reviewed articles were controlled randomized trials and among them only one demonstrated strong correlation between poor glycemic control and mortality. No study was multi-centre and the reviewed articles were characterized by different definitions of peri-operative hyperglycemia, different intensity and duration of the applied therapy and heterogeneity of the population. It is clear that peri-operative hyperglycemia is harmful for cardiac surgery patients. The significant shortage of randomized controlled trials, the absence of multicentre studies, the different definitions of peri-operative hyperglycemia, the different intensity and duration of the applied insulin therapy protocol and the heterogeneity of the studied population (diabetics and non-diabetics) are significant limitations, which could explain the inconsistent findings of the literature. These limitations indicate the need for further research.

  3. Intracardiac impedance after cardiac resynchronization therapy is a novel predictor for worsening of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Nodera, Minoru; Kamioka, Masashi; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Kamiyama, Yoshiyuki; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2017-02-08

    Intrathoracic impedance measured by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) varies because several factors other than pulmonary congestion may affect this parameter. Therefore, we hypothesized that changes in intracardiac impedance between the right and left ventricular leads would be more accurate to identify worsening heart failure in patients with CRT. The study enrolled 21 patients with CRT defibrillator (15 males, 70 ± 12 years). During the follow-up period (12 ± 7 months), the subjects experienced 37 fluid index threshold (60 ohm-days) crossing events. These events were divided into two groups whether hospitalization due to worsening heart failure was required (group-H, n = 14) or not (group-NH, n = 23). Based on the intracardiac impedance at the beginning of increasing fluid index (BI) and the crossing of 60 ohm-days (CI), the rate of impedance change (BI-CI/BI) was estimated. Then, the time elapsed from BI to CI (T) was evaluated. We calculated the rate of intracardiac impedance change per day (BI-CI/BI × T) in each group. The rate of intrathoracic impedance change per day was also determined using the same method. The median rate of intracardiac impedance change per day was 0.27 (IQR 0.22-0.54) %/day in group-H, and 0 (IQR 0-0.08) %/day in group-NH with a significant difference (P < 0.0001), whereas the rate of intrathoracic impedance change per day was similar between the two groups. By receiver operating characteristic curve for identification of hospitalization due to worsening heart failure, the best cutoff value of the rate of intracardiac impedance change per day was 0.20%/day (sensitivity 92%, specificity 88%, and AUC 0.98). In contrast, the best cutoff value of the rate of intrathoracic impedance change per day was 0.19%/day (sensitivity 86%, specificity 43%, and AUC 0.68). These results suggest that increased rate of change of decreasing intracardiac impedance measured by CRT is a novel useful predictor for

  4. The lack of antiepileptic drugs and worsening of seizures among physically handicapped patients with epilepsy during the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Endo, Wakaba; Inui, Takehiko; Wakusawa, Keisuke; Tanaka, Soichiro; Onuma, Akira; Haginoya, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Takuto Rehabilitation Center for Children is located in Sendai, the capital of the Miyagi prefecture, and faces the Pacific Ocean. The tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake resulted in tremendous damage to this region. Many physically handicapped patients with epilepsy who are treated at our hospital could not obtain medicine. We surveyed patients with epilepsy, using a questionnaire to identify the problems during the acute phase of the Great East Japan Earthquake. After the earthquake, we mailed questionnaires to physically handicapped patients with epilepsy who are treated and prescribed medications at our hospital, or to their parents. A total of 161 respondents completed the questionnaire. Overall, 68.4% of patients had seven days or less of stockpiled medication when the earthquake initially struck, and 28.6% of patients had no medication or almost no medication during the acute phase after the earthquake. Six patients were forced to stop taking their medication and nine patients experienced a worsening of seizures. Most (93.6%) patients stated they require a stockpile of medication for more than seven days: 20months after the earthquake, 76.9% patients a supply of drugs for more than seven days. We suggest that physically handicapped patients with epilepsy are recommended to prepare for natural disasters by stockpiling additional medication. Even if the stock of antiepileptic drugs is sufficient, stress could cause worsening of seizures. Specialized support is required after a disaster among physically handicapped patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lactoferrin ameliorates corticosterone-related acute stress and hyperglycemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    MAEKAWA, Yuta; SUGIYAMA, Akihiko; TAKEUCHI, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effects of lactoferrin (Lf) on glycemic regulatory responses under restraint stress (RS) in rats. Bovine Lf (bLf, 100 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered to rats before oral saline administration or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) following 60 min of RS load. In the case of oral saline administration, RS significantly raised plasma glucose, but bLf did not affect the level. Plasma glucose in OGTT showed an overall lower transition in the bLf group, and the levels at 30 and 180 min or the area under the curve (AUC) were significantly decreased. Although bLf suppressed an increase in plasma corticosterone during RS, the levels of plasma insulin, epinephrine and glucagon were not changed by the bLf treatment. PMID:27941304

  6. Glucagon receptor knockout mice are protected against acute olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Laura N; Peppler, Willem T; Sutton, Charles D; Whitfield, Jamie; Charron, Maureen J; Wright, David C

    2017-08-01

    To determine if glucagon is involved in mediating the increase in blood glucose levels caused by the second-generation antipsychotic drug olanzapine. Whole body glucagon receptor deficient mice (Gcgr(-/-)) or WT littermate controls were injected with olanzapine (5mg/kg BW IP) and changes in blood glucose measured over the following 120min. Separate cohorts of mice were treated with olanzapine and changes in pyruvate tolerance, insulin tolerance and whole body substrate oxidation were determined. Olanzapine treatment increased serum glucagon and lead to rapid increases in blood glucose concentrations in WT mice. Gcgr(-/-) mice were protected against olanzapine-induced increases in blood glucose but this was not explained by differences in terminal serum insulin concentrations, enhanced AKT phosphorylation in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue or liver or differences in RER. In both genotypes olanzapine induced an equivalent degree of insulin resistance as measured using an insulin tolerance test. Olanzapine treatment led to an exaggerated glucose response to a pyruvate challenge in WT but not Gcgr(-/-) mice and this was paralleled by reductions in the protein content of PEPCK and G6Pase in livers from Gcgr(-/-) mice. Gcgr(-/-) mice are protected against olanzapine-induced increases in blood glucose. This is likely a result of reductions in liver glucose output, perhaps secondary to decreases in PEPCK and G6Pase protein content. Our findings highlight the central role of the liver in mediating olanzapine-induced disturbances in glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Irreversible Hemichorea–Hemiballism in a Case of Nonketotic Hyperglycemia Presenting as the Initial Manifestation of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ujjawal; Das, Shyamal Kumar; Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Debsadhan; Pan, Koushik; Biswas, Atanu; Panwar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemichorea–hemiballism (HCHB) is a hyperkinetic movement disorder with features of both chorea and ballism occurring on the same side. Case report We present a case of HCHB due to nonketotic hyperglycemia (NKH) that was the initial presentation of diabetes and was irreversible clinically even after 6 months of optimal blood sugar control. Discussion Although HCHB due to hyperglycemia is a potentially reversible condition in the majority of patients, prolonged uncontrolled hyperglycemia may cause ischemic insult and persistent symptoms. Hyperglycemia should always be kept in the list of differentials while dealing with patients who are newly diagnosed with HCHB. PMID:27679748

  8. Hyperglycemia induced by pasireotide in patients with Cushing's disease or acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Julie M

    2016-10-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) and acromegaly are characterized by excessive hormone secretion resulting in comorbidities such as impaired glucose metabolism, diabetes and hypertension. Pasireotide is a new-generation, multireceptor-targeted somatostatin receptor ligand approved for CD (subcutaneous [SC] injection formulation) and acromegaly (long-acting release [LAR] formulation). In clinical studies of pasireotide, hyperglycemia-related adverse events (AEs) were frequently observed. This review highlights differences in reported rates of hyperglycemia in pasireotide trials and discusses risk factors for and management of pasireotide-associated hyperglycemia. Clinical trials evaluating pasireotide in patients with CD or acromegaly were reviewed. The frequency of hyperglycemia-related AEs was lower in patients with acromegaly treated with pasireotide LAR (57.3-67.0 %) than in patients with CD treated with pasireotide SC (68.4-73.0 %). Fewer patients with acromegaly treated with pasireotide LAR discontinued therapy because of hyperglycemia-related AEs (Colao et al. in J Clin Endocrinol Metab 99(3):791-799, 2014, 3.4 %; Gadelha et al. in Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2(11):875-884, 2014, 4.0 %) than did patients with CD treated with pasireotide SC (Boscaro et al. in Pituitary 17(4):320-326, 2014, 5.3 %; Colao et al. in N Engl J Med 366(10):914-924, 2012, 6.0 %). Hyperglycemia-related AEs occurred in 40.0 % of patients with acromegaly treated with pasireotide SC, and 10.0 % discontinued treatment because of hyperglycemia. Ongoing studies evaluating pasireotide LAR in patients with CD and management of pasireotide-induced hyperglycemia in patients with CD or acromegaly (ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers NCT01374906 and NCT02060383, respectively) will address these key safety issues. Disease pathophysiology, drug formulation, and physician experience potentially influence the differences in reported rates of pasireotide-induced hyperglycemia in CD and acromegaly

  9. Does mandatory postgraduate clinical training worsen geographic distribution of dentists in Japan?

    PubMed

    Hirata, SoIchiro; Okawa, Yoshikazu; Sugito, Hiroki; Mataki, Shiro; Sakayori, Takaharu; Maki, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    Postgraduate clinical training for dentists has been mandatory in Japan since 2006. Hirata et al. reported that the geographic distribution of postgraduate dental trainees by prefecture in 2006 was worse than that of practicing dentists. This suggests that the postgraduate clinical training system could intensify the problem of distribution of dentists. In this study, therefore, we reviewed the geographic distribution of postgraduate dental trainees and practicing dentists between 2006 and 2010 in detail by city, ward, town and village by using the Lorenz curve and Gini coefficient. The results showed that while there was no significant worsening of geographic distribution of postgraduate dental trainees, the distribution of practicing dentists continued to deteriorate. A number of reasons may explain these findings: the clinical training system is based on a one-year employment contract, and dentists subsequently relocate as driven by the market; and geographic distribution among cities, towns and villages has worsened as a result of the merger of municipalities. The geographic distribution of practicing dentists is expected to deteriorate further if the number of dentists takes a downward turn in the future. Therefore, it is necessary to continuously review the distribution of postgraduate dental trainees.

  10. Expected outcomes from topical haemoglobin spray in non-healing and worsening venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Arenberger, P; Elg, F; Petyt, J; Cutting, K

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of topical haemoglobin spray on treatment response and wound-closure rates in patients with chronic venous leg ulcers. A linear regression model was used to forecast healing outcomes over a 12-month period. Simulated data were taken from normal distributions based on post-hoc analysis of a 72-patient study in non-healing and worsening wounds (36 patients receiving standard care and 36 receiving standard care plus topical haemoglobin spray). Using a simulated 25,000 'patients' from each group, the proportion of wound closure over time was projected. Simulation results predicted a 55% wound closure rate at six months in the haemoglobin group, compared with 4% in the standard care group. Over a 12-month simulation period, a 43% overall reduction in wound burden was predicted. With the haemoglobin spray, 85% of wounds were expected to heal in 12 months, compared with 13% in the standard care group. Topical haemoglobin spray promises a more effective treatment for chronic venous leg ulcers than standard care alone in wounds that are non-healing or worsening. Further research is required to validate these predictions and to identify achievable outcomes in other chronic wound types.

  11. Responder definition of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale physical impact subscale for patients with physical worsening

    PubMed Central

    Wyrwich, Kathleen W; Guo, Shien; Medori, Rossella; Altincatal, Arman; Wagner, Linda; Elkins, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 29-item Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) was developed to examine the impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) on physical and psychological functioning from a patient’s perspective. Objective: To determine the responder definition (RD) of the MSIS-29 physical impact subscale (PHYS) in a group of patients with relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS) participating in a clinical trial. Methods: Data from the SELECT trial comparing daclizumab high-yield process with placebo in patients with RRMS were used. Physical function was evaluated in SELECT using three patient-reported outcomes measures and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Anchor- and distribution-based methods were used to identify an RD for the MSIS-29. Results: Results across the anchor-based approach suggested MSIS-29 PHYS RD values of 6.91 (mean), 7.14 (median) and 7.50 (mode). Distribution-based RD estimates ranged from 6.24 to 10.40. An RD of 7.50 was selected as the most appropriate threshold for physical worsening based on corresponding changes in the EDSS (primary anchor of interest). Conclusion: These findings indicate that a ≥7.50 point worsening on the MSIS-29 PHYS is a reasonable and practical threshold for identifying patients with RRMS who have experienced a clinically significant change in the physical impact of MS. PMID:24740371

  12. Is Perioperative Fluid and Salt Balance a Contributing Factor in Postoperative Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    PubMed

    Lam, Thach; Singh, Mandeep; Yadollahi, Azadeh; Chung, Frances

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying recurrent upper airway collapse may help anesthesiologists better manage patients in the postoperative period. There is convincing evidence in the sleep medicine literature to suggest that a positive fluid and salt balance can worsen upper airway collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnea through the redistribution of fluid from the legs into the neck and upper airway while supine, in a process known as "rostral fluid shift." According to this theory, during the day the volume from a fluid bolus or from fluid overload states (i.e., heart failure and chronic kidney disease) accumulates in the legs due to gravity, and when a person lies supine at night, the fluid shifts rostrally to the neck, also owing to gravity. The fluid in the neck can increase the extraluminal pressure around the upper airways, causing the upper airways to narrow and predisposing to upper airway collapse. Similarly, surgical patients also incur large fluid and salt balance shifts, and when recovered supine, this may promote fluid redistribution to the neck and upper airways. In this commentary, we summarize the sleep medicine literature on the impact of fluid and salt balance on obstructive sleep apnea severity and discuss the potential anesthetic implications of excessive fluid and salt volume on worsening sleep apnea.

  13. Worsening of coronary spasm during the perioperative period: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Teragawa, Hiroki; Nishioka, Kenji; Fujii, Yuichi; Idei, Naomi; Hata, Takaki; Kurushima, Shuji; Shokawa, Tomoki; Kihara, Yasuki

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old male with vasospastic angina (VSA) whose condition worsened during the perioperative period. He had been diagnosed with VSA 10 years prior. He was treated with two types of vasodilators and had not experienced any chest symptoms for 5 years. At this juncture, he underwent surgery for relapsed maxillary sublingual carcinoma. He had taken two vasodilators one day prior to surgery. Intravenous infusion of nitroglycerin (NTG) was initiated immediately before the surgery and continued the following day. Instead of stopping NTG, a dermal isosorbide dinitrate tape was applied on post-operative day 1. Two days later, a complete atrioventricular block with pulseless electrical activity appeared. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emergent coronary angiography showed severe coronary spasm in both the left and right coronary arteries. Intracoronary infusion of nitroglycerin and epinephrine with percutaneous cardiopulmonary support relieved the coronary spasm. During the perioperative period, several factors can trigger coronary vasospasm, including the discontinuation of vasodilators. Thus, surgeons, anesthetists, and cardiologists should watch for coronary vasospasm during this period and for worsening coronary spasm when discontinuing vasodilators in patients at risk for VSA. PMID:25068030

  14. Responder definition of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale physical impact subscale for patients with physical worsening.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Glenn A; Wyrwich, Kathleen W; Guo, Shien; Medori, Rossella; Altincatal, Arman; Wagner, Linda; Elkins, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    The 29-item Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) was developed to examine the impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) on physical and psychological functioning from a patient's perspective. To determine the responder definition (RD) of the MSIS-29 physical impact subscale (PHYS) in a group of patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) participating in a clinical trial. Data from the SELECT trial comparing daclizumab high-yield process with placebo in patients with RRMS were used. Physical function was evaluated in SELECT using three patient-reported outcomes measures and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Anchor- and distribution-based methods were used to identify an RD for the MSIS-29. Results across the anchor-based approach suggested MSIS-29 PHYS RD values of 6.91 (mean), 7.14 (median) and 7.50 (mode). Distribution-based RD estimates ranged from 6.24 to 10.40. An RD of 7.50 was selected as the most appropriate threshold for physical worsening based on corresponding changes in the EDSS (primary anchor of interest). These findings indicate that a ≥7.50 point worsening on the MSIS-29 PHYS is a reasonable and practical threshold for identifying patients with RRMS who have experienced a clinically significant change in the physical impact of MS. © The Author(s), 2014.

  15. Gradually Then Suddenly? Decline in Vision-Related Quality of Life as Glaucoma Worsens

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the relationship between self-reported vision-related quality of life (VRQL) and visual field (VF) loss in people from glaucoma clinics. Methods. A postal survey using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) was administered to people with a range of VF loss identified from a UK hospital-based glaucoma service database. Trends were assessed in a composite score from NEI VFQ-25 against better-eye mean deviation (BEMD) using linear regression and a spline-fitting method that can highlight where a monotonic relationship may have different stages. Results. A total of 636 patients (median [interquartile range] BEMD −2.1 [−5.2, −0.4] dB, median age 70 [60, 77] years) were analysed. Analysis of trends in the data revealed an average patient loses approximately 2 units (out of 100) on NEI VFQ-25 for every loss of 1 dB (BEMD) as VF defects first become bilateral, up to BEMD −5 dB. NEI VFQ-25 deterioration then appears to slow before a more rapid phase of change (4–5 units per 1 dB loss) after BEMD worsens beyond −15 dB. Conclusions. Relationship between decline in VRQL and VF worsening in glaucoma is unlikely to be linear; it more likely has different phases, and these should be further explored in longitudinal studies. PMID:28469940

  16. Gradually Then Suddenly? Decline in Vision-Related Quality of Life as Glaucoma Worsens.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee; Bryan, Susan R; Crabb, David P

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the relationship between self-reported vision-related quality of life (VRQL) and visual field (VF) loss in people from glaucoma clinics. Methods. A postal survey using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) was administered to people with a range of VF loss identified from a UK hospital-based glaucoma service database. Trends were assessed in a composite score from NEI VFQ-25 against better-eye mean deviation (BEMD) using linear regression and a spline-fitting method that can highlight where a monotonic relationship may have different stages. Results. A total of 636 patients (median [interquartile range] BEMD -2.1 [-5.2, -0.4] dB, median age 70 [60, 77] years) were analysed. Analysis of trends in the data revealed an average patient loses approximately 2 units (out of 100) on NEI VFQ-25 for every loss of 1 dB (BEMD) as VF defects first become bilateral, up to BEMD -5 dB. NEI VFQ-25 deterioration then appears to slow before a more rapid phase of change (4-5 units per 1 dB loss) after BEMD worsens beyond -15 dB. Conclusions. Relationship between decline in VRQL and VF worsening in glaucoma is unlikely to be linear; it more likely has different phases, and these should be further explored in longitudinal studies.

  17. Hyperglycemia is a predictor of mortality and morbidity in low birth weight newborn.

    PubMed

    Banik, S K; Baki, M A; Sarker, S; Rahat, F; Akhter, S; Nahar, N

    2014-07-01

    Early onset of hyperglycemia is common among low birth weight neonates. Increased risk for death and major morbidities has been observed among hyperglycemic low birth weight infants. This prospective observational study was done to find out hyperglycemia as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality in the low birth weight sick newborn and was conducted among the hospitalized newborn of Special Care Baby Unit (SCABU), BIRDEM hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2009 to December 2009. A total of 198 LBW neonates were included in this study. One third (30.8%) LBW neonates were found hyperglycemic. The mean gestational age was 33.2±3.6 weeks and mean birth weight was 1535.8±780gm in the hyperglycemic neonates. In this study, highest prevalence of hyperglycemia was observed in birth weight <1000gm (38.46%) and in gestational age ≤28 weeks (46.15%). Apnoea, confirmed sepsis and suspected sepsis, confirmed necrotizing enterocollitis (NEC) and neonatal jaundice showed statistically significant association with hyperglycemia than that of non hyperglycemic group. Mortality of neonates in hyperglycemic group was higher (31.15%) than that of non hyperglycemic neonates (10.22%) and the difference in mortality between two groups were found statistically significant (p<0.002). From this study it can be concluded that hyperglycemia in early neonatal period is related to increased morbidity and mortality in low birth weight newborn.

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Related to Hyperglycemia: Prevalence in Adults with Type I Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Renna, Chelsea P; Boyer, Bret A; Prout, Maurice F; Scheiner, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of hyperglycemia-related posttraumatic stress (PTS) was assessed in 239 adults with type 1 diabetes using the posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale (PDS; Foa, Posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale manual, National Computer Systems, Inc., Minneapolis, 1995) by an anonymous online survey. Additionally, this study aimed to identify variables related to hyperglycemia-related PTS. Over 30 % of participants reported symptoms consistent with PTSD related to hyperglycemia with standard PDS scoring, and 10 % with more conservative scoring. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that diabetes self-management behavior and perceived helplessness about hyperglycemia predicted PTSD with standard scoring. Perceived death threat, self-management behavior, helplessness about hyperglycemia, and severity of hypoglycemia in past month predicted PTSD using more conservative scoring. Perceived helplessness, hypoglycemia severity, perceived death-threat, HbA1c, and self-management behavior predicted PTS severity. When fear, helplessness, and perceived death-threat were combined to represent an overall cognitive appraisal factor, this variable was the strongest predictor of PTSD and PTS severity. Scores for PTSD symptom clusters appeared similar to data on hypoglycemia-related PTS.

  19. Hyperglycemia Induces Cellular Hypoxia through Production of Mitochondrial ROS Followed by Suppression of Aquaporin-1

    PubMed Central

    Sada, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Kukidome, Daisuke; Yoshinaga, Tomoaki; Kajihara, Nobuhiro; Sonoda, Kazuhiro; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously proposed that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation is a key event in the development of diabetic complications. Interestingly, some common aspects exist between hyperglycemia and hypoxia-induced phenomena. Thus, hyperglycemia may induce cellular hypoxia, and this phenomenon may also be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In endothelial cells (ECs), cellular hypoxia increased after incubation with high glucose (HG). A similar phenomenon was observed in glomeruli of diabetic mice. HG-induced cellular hypoxia was suppressed by mitochondria blockades or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpression, which is a specific SOD for mtROS. Overexpression of MnSOD also increased the expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1), a water and oxygen channel. AQP1 overexpression in ECs suppressed hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia, endothelin-1 and fibronectin overproduction, and apoptosis. Therefore, hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia and mtROS generation may promote hyperglycemic damage in a coordinated manner. PMID:27383386

  20. Hyperglycemia Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Pancreatic Cancer via Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and pancreatic cancer are intimately related, as approximately 85% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have impaired glucose tolerance or even DM. Our previous studies have indicated that high glucose could promote the invasive and migratory abilities of pancreatic cancer cells. We therefore explored the underlying mechanism that hyperglycemia modulates the metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that streptozotocin- (STZ-) treated diabetic nude mice exhibit larger tumor size than that of the euglycemic mice. The number of nude mice that develop liver metastasis or ascites is much more in the STZ-treated group than that in the euglycemic group. Hyperglycemic mice contain a higher plasma H2O2-level than that from euglycemic mice. The injection of polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT), an H2O2 scavenger, may reverse hyperglycemia-induced tumor metastasis. In addition, hyperglycemia could also modulate the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition- (EMT-) related factors in pancreatic tumor tissues, as the E-cadherin level is decreased and the expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin as well as transcription factor snail is strongly increased. The injection of PEG-CAT could also reverse hyperglycemia-induced EMT. These results suggest that the association between hyperglycemia and poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer can be attributed to the alterations of EMT through the production of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:27433288

  1. Pre-existing Renal Disease Promotes Sepsis-induced Acute Kidney Injury and Worsens Sepsis Outcome via Multiple Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Hu, Xuzhen; Sidransky, Karen L.; Qin, Yan; Eisner, Christoph; Schnermann, Jurgen; Yuen, Peter S. T.; Star, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at significantly higher risk of death from sepsis, although the mechanism by which CKD increases mortality has not been investigated. We established a mouse two-stage model of pre-existing renal disease with subsequent sepsis by combining folic acid (FA) injection and sub-lethal cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Mice were injected with FA then made septic (FA-CLP) or were injected with vehicle then made septic (Veh-CLP). FA-CLP mice had significantly higher mortality than Veh-CLP mice. Sepsis increased serum creatinine in the FA-CLP but not in the Veh-CLP group. FA-CLP mice had more severe septic shock and significantly increased vascular permeability, plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), bacteremia, serum IL-10 and splenocyte apoptosis compared to Veh-CLP. To evaluate the contribution of vascular and immunological dysfunction, we treated FA-CLP mice with soluble Flt-1 and chloroquine. Mice treated with combination therapy showed a significant improvement in kidney injury, hemodynamics, and survival. In conclusion, the sequential FA-CLP model mimics human sepsis that is frequently complicated with pre-existing conditions including CKD. This animal model would be useful to evaluate preventative and therapeutic strategies under conditions more typical of human sepsis. PMID:18633340

  2. Review: Traumatic brain injury and hyperglycemia, a potentially modifiable risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yumin; Guan, Wei; Cao, Jiachao; Zhu, Rongxing; Wang, Suinuan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs frequently and is associated with poor clinical outcome and increased mortality. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms that lead to hyperglycemia and discuss how they may contribute to poor outcomes in patients with severe TBI. Moreover, we systematically review the proper management of hyperglycemia after TBI, covering topics such as nutritional support, glucose control, moderated hypothermia, naloxone, and mannitol treatment. However, to date, an optimal and safe glycemic target range has not been determined, and may not be safe to implement among TBI patients. Therefore, there is a mandate to explore a reasonable glycemic target range that can facilitate recovery after severe TBI. PMID:27626493

  3. [Effect of aged garlic extract (AGE) on hyperglycemia induced by immobilization stress in mice].

    PubMed

    Kasuga, S; Ushijima, M; Morihara, N; Itakura, Y; Nakata, Y

    1999-09-01

    The effect of aged garlic extract (AGE) on stress induced hyperglycemia was investigated using the immobilization stress model in mice. After the exposure to immobilization stress for 16 hr per day for 2 consecutive days, the adrenal glands of the mice hypertrophied, and their serum glucose level and corticosterone secretion became elevated, but insulin secretion did not change. These results suggest that the elevation of serum glucose was probably due to the stimulation of the pituitary-adrenocortical axis by the stress. Pretreatment of AGE (5 and 10 ml/kg, p.o.) significantly prevented adrenal hypertrophy, hyperglycemia and elevation of corticosterone, but did not alter serum insulin level. The efficacy of AGE was the same as that of diazepam (5 mg/kg, p.o.). From these results, it is suggested that AGE may prevent stress-induced hyperglycemia, which is the risk of suffering from diabetes mellitus and its progression.

  4. Hyperglycemia induces apoptosis and p53 mobilization to mitochondria in RINm5F cells.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Camarillo, C; Guzmán-Grenfell, A M; García-Macedo, R; Rosales-Torres, A M; Avalos-Rodríguez, A; Durán-Reyes, G; Medina-Navarro, R; Cruz, M; Díaz-Flores, M; Kumate, J

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms related to hyperglycemia-induced pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis are poorly defined. Rat insulin-producing cells (RINm5F) cultured in high glucose concentrations (30 mM) showed increased apoptosis and protein p53 translocation to mitochondria. In addition, hyperglycemia induced both the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta psi (m)), and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), as shown by fluorescence changes of JC-1 and dichlorodihydrofluorescein-diacetate (DCDHF-DA), respectively. The increased intracellular ROS by high glucose exposure was blunted by mitochondrial-function and NADPH-oxidase inhibitors. We postulate that the concomitant mobilization of p53 protein to the mitochondria and the subsequent changes on the Delta psi (m), lead to an important pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis mechanism induced by oxidative stress caused by hyperglycemia.

  5. Protein C deficiency in insulin-dependent diabetes: a hyperglycemia-related phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Milani, M R; Giugliano, D

    1990-08-13

    In 30 insulin-dependent diabetic patients protein C (PC) antigen and PC activity were significantly lower than those of matched control healthy subjects. An inverse correlation between fasting plasma glucose and both PC concentration and activity was present in diabetics, while a direct correlation between PC concentration and PC activity was observed. Induced hyperglycemia in diabetic and normal subjects was able to decrease both PC antigen levels and PC activity, and heparin reversed in part this effect. In diabetic patients euglycemia obtained by insulin infusion restored to normal the depressed PC levels. Heparin did not alter both the basal PC concentration and activity in healthy controls. These data stress the major role of hyperglycemia in determining PC decrease in diabetics, and suggest that PC reduction is probably associated to hyperglycemia-enhanced thrombin formation.

  6. The glucose intolerance of acute pancreatitis: hormonal response to arginine.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S S; Duckworth, W C; Jallepalli, P; Bobal, M A; Iyer, R

    1980-01-01

    Patients with acute pancreatitis were studied by arginine infusion at 48--72 h. 7--10 days, and 18--21 days after onset of their illness. Plasma glucose, insulin, and glucagon values were determined. Acute pancreatitis was characterized by fasting hyperglycemia and hyperglucagonemia, associated with relative hyoinsulinemia. Arginine stimulation early in the disease (48--72 h) demonstrated hyperglycemia and hyperglucagonemia, which normalized by 18--21 days. Both phases of the normal biphasic insulin response to arginine were decreased during the initial arginine infusion. By 18--21 days, although the first phase was completely normal, the second phase of insulin secretion remained depressed. Acute pancreatitis is associated with damage to both the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. Glucose intolerance seen with this disease appears to be the result of hyperglucagonemia and relative hypoinsulinemia. Although the healing process at 3 wk is associated with return of plasma glucose and glucagon concentrations to normal, the impaired second phase insulin secretion persists.

  7. Shenqi Fuzheng Injection Alleviates the Transient Worsening Caused by Steroids Pulse Therapy in Treating Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Guo-Yan; Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment effect and side effect of Shenqi Fuzheng Injection (SFI) on alleviating transient worsening of myasthenia gravis (MG) symptoms caused by high-dose steroids pulse therapy. Methods. Sixty-six consecutive patients with MG were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group treated with SFI and methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPT) and the control group treated with MPT alone. The severity of MG before, during, and after MPT and the duration of transient worsening (TW) were evaluated and compared with the clinical absolute scoring (AS) and relative scoring (RS) system. Results. Twenty-nine patients experienced TW in each group. At TW, the AS was significantly increased (P < 0.000) in both groups compared with baseline data, with the AS increase in the treatment group (16.8 ± 2) significantly smaller (P < 0.05) than in the control group (24.9 ± 2.5). At the end of the treatment course, the AS for the treatment group was significantly decreased (7.5 ± 0.9) compared with at TW, although no significant difference compared with the control (9.7 ± 1.1). The TW lasted 1–6 days (mean 3.7) for the treatment group, significantly shorter (P < 0.05) than 2–12 days (mean 7.8) for the control. The RS for the treatment group at the end of treatment was 43.8%–100% (mean 76.8% ± 2.6%), significantly better than the control group: 33.3%–100% (mean 67.2 ± 3.6%). Slight side effects (18.75%) included maldigestion and rash in the treatment group. Conclusion. SFI has a better treatment effect and few side effects and can alleviate the severity and shorten the duration of the transient worsening of MG during steroids pulse therapy. PMID:24348721

  8. EUGLYCEMIC PROGRESSION: WORSENING OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN POORLY CONTROLLED TYPE 2 DIABETES IN MINORITIES

    PubMed Central

    Shurter, A.; Genter, P.; Ouyang, D.; Ipp, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims In type 2 diabetes, early effects of strict near-normalization of glucose control on macrovascular and microvascular disease are still uncertain. We evaluated the effects of early dramatic improvement in glycemia on retinal disease in poorly controlled diabetes. Methods A retrospective, case-control study in public hospital patients with type 2 diabetes, who had annual retinal imaging as part of a case management program or standard diabetes care. Patients included had ≥2 two retinal images ≥1 one year apart, and at least 3 HbA1C measurements. Retinal images were graded using a modified Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy grading scheme. An ‘intensive’ group (n=34) with HbA1C decrease >1.5% was compared with randomly chosen patients (n=34) with minimal HbA1C changes. Results Mean HbA1C (±SEM) over two years was similar in intensive (8.5±0.21%) and control groups (8.1±0.28%, p=NS). However, the intensive group had higher baseline HbA1C and a mean maximal decrease of 4.0±0.41% in contrast to the control group (0.2±0.11%). Retinopathy grade progressed +0.7±0.25 units from baseline in the intensive group (p = 0.015), a 22.6% worsening. The control group changed minimally from baseline (0.03±0.14 units, p=NS). Change in retinopathy grade was significantly different between groups (p=0.02). More eyes worsened by ≥1 retinal grade (p=0.0025) and developed sight-threatening retinopathy (p=0.003) in the intensive group. Visual acuity was unchanged. Conclusions Diabetic retinopathy significantly worsened in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes after early intensification of glycemic control and dramatic HbA1C change. Retinal status should be part of risk-factor evaluation in patients likely to experience marked reductions in HbA1C in poorly controlled diabetes. PMID:23566652

  9. Euglycemic progression: worsening of diabetic retinopathy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in minorities.

    PubMed

    Shurter, A; Genter, P; Ouyang, D; Ipp, E

    2013-06-01

    In type 2 diabetes, early effects of strict near-normalization of glucose control on macrovascular and microvascular disease are still uncertain. We evaluated the effects of early dramatic improvement in glycemia on retinal disease in poorly controlled diabetes. A retrospective, case-control study in public hospital patients with type 2 diabetes, who had annual retinal imaging as part of a case management program or standard diabetes care. Patients included had ≥2 two retinal images ≥1 one year apart, and at least 3 HbA1C measurements. Retinal images were graded using a modified Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy grading scheme. An 'intensive' group (n=34) with HbA1C decrease >1.5% was compared with randomly chosen patients (n=34) with minimal HbA1C changes. Mean HbA1C (±SEM) over two years was similar in intensive (8.5 ± 0.21%) and control groups (8.1 ± 0.28%, p=NS). However, the intensive group had higher baseline HbA1C and a mean maximal decrease of 4.0 ± 0.41% in contrast to the control group (0.2 ± 0.11%). Retinopathy grade progressed +0.7 ± 0.25 units from baseline in the intensive group (p=0.015), a 22.6% worsening. The control group changed minimally from baseline (0.03 ± 0.14 units, p=NS). Change in retinopathy grade was significantly different between groups (p=0.02). More eyes worsened by ≥ 1 retinal grade (p=0.0025) and developed sight-threatening retinopathy (p=0.003) in the intensive group. Visual acuity was unchanged. Diabetic retinopathy significantly worsened in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes after early intensification of glycemic control and dramatic HbA1C change. Retinal status should be part of risk-factor evaluation in patients likely to experience marked reductions in HbA1C in poorly controlled diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MicroRNA-206 prevents hepatosteatosis and hyperglycemia by facilitating insulin signaling and impairing lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Heng; Zhang, Tianpeng; Pan, Fei; Steer, Clifford J.; Li, Zhuoyu; Chen, Xin; Song, Guisheng

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims The paradox of selective hepatic insulin resistance, wherein the insulin-resistant liver fails to suppress glucose production but continues to produce lipids, has been central to the pathophysiology of hepatosteatosis and hyperglycemia. Our study was designed to investigate the mechanism(s) by which microRNA-206 alleviates the pathogenesis of hepatosteatosis and hyperglycemia. Methods Dietary obese mice induced by a high fat diet were used to study the role of microRNA-206 in the pathogenesis of hepatosteatosis and hyperglycemia. A mini-circle vector was used to deliver microRNA-206 into the livers of mice. Results Lipid accumulation impaired biogenesis of microRNA-206 in fatty livers of dietary obese mice and human hepatocytes (p <0.01). Delivery of microRNA-206 into the livers of dietary obese mice resulted in the strong therapeutic effects on hepatosteatosis and hyperglycemia. Mechanistically, miR-206 interacted with the 3′ untranslated region of PTPN1 (protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 1) and induced its degradation. By inhibiting PTPN1 expression, microRNA-206 facilitated insulin signaling by promoting phosphorylation of INSR (insulin receptor) and impaired hepatic lipogenesis by inhibiting Srebp1c transcription. By simultaneously modulating lipogenesis and insulin signaling, microRNA-206 reduced lipid (p = 0.006) and glucose (p = 0.018) production in human hepatocytes and livers of dietary obese mice (p <0.001 and p <0.01 respectively). Re-introduction of Ptpn1 into livers offset the inhibitory effects of microRNA-206, indicating that PTPN1 mediates the inhibitory effects of microRNA-206 on both hepatosteatosis and hyperglycemia. Conclusions MicroRNA-206 is a potent inhibitor of lipid and glucose production by simultaneously facilitating insulin signaling and impairing hepatic lipogenesis. Our findings potentially provide a novel therapeutic agent for both hepatosteatosis and hyperglycemia. PMID:28025059

  11. Hyperglycemia and xerostomia are key determinants of tooth decay in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Harris, Stephen E; Mohan, Sumathy; Horn, Diane; Fajardo, Roberto; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Jorgensen, James; Macdougall, Mary; Abboud-Werner, Sherry

    2012-06-01

    Insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and oral diseases are closely interrelated. Poor metabolic control in diabetics is associated with a high risk of gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth loss. Salivary flow declines in diabetics and patients suffer from xerostomia. Reduced saliva predisposes to enamel hypomineralization and caries formation; however, the mechanisms that initiate and lead to progression of tooth decay and periodontitis in type 1 DM have not been explored. To address this issue, we analyzed tooth morphology in Akita ⁻/⁻ mice that harbor a point mutation in the Ins2 insulin gene, which leads to progressive hyperglycemia. Mandibles from Akita ⁻/⁻ and wild-type littermates were analyzed by microCT, scanning EM and histology; teeth were examined for amelogenin (Amel) and ameloblastin (Ambn) expression. Mice were injected with pilocarpine to assess saliva production. As hyperglycemia may alter pulp repair, the effect of high glucose levels on the proliferation/differentiation of cultured MD10-F2 pulp cells was also analyzed. Results showed that Akita ⁻/⁻ mice at 6 weeks of age showed chalky white incisors that correlated with marked hyperglycemia and impaired saliva production. MicroCT of Akita ⁻/⁻ teeth revealed excessive enamel wearing and hypomineralization; immunostaining for Amel and Ambn was decreased. A striking feature was invasion of dentinal tubules with Streptococcus mitis and microabcesses that originated in the coronal pulp and progressed to pulp necrosis and periapical periodontitis. High levels of glucose also inhibited MD10-F2 cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia in combination with reduced saliva in a model of type1 DM leads to decreased enamel mineralization/matrix proteins and predisposes to excessive wearing and decay. Importantly, hyperglycemia adversely affects enamel matrix proteins and pulp repair. Early detection and treatment of hyperglycemia

  12. Leptin Therapy Reverses Hyperglycemia in Mice With Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes, Independent of Hepatic Leptin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Denroche, Heather C.; Levi, Jasna; Wideman, Rhonda D.; Sequeira, Roveena M.; Huynh, Frank K.; Covey, Scott D.; Kieffer, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Leptin therapy has been found to reverse hyperglycemia and prevent mortality in several rodent models of type 1 diabetes. Yet the mechanism of leptin-mediated reversal of hyperglycemia has not been fully defined. The liver is a key organ regulating glucose metabolism and is also a target of leptin action. Thus we hypothesized that exogenous leptin administered to mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes reverses hyperglycemia through direct action on hepatocytes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS After the induction of diabetes in mice with a high dose of STZ, recombinant mouse leptin was delivered at a supraphysiological dose for 14 days by an osmotic pump implant. We characterized the effect of leptin administration in C57Bl/6J mice with STZ-induced diabetes and then examined whether leptin therapy could reverse STZ-induced hyperglycemia in mice in which hepatic leptin signaling was specifically disrupted. RESULTS Hyperleptinemia reversed hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia in diabetic C57Bl/6J mice and dramatically improved glucose tolerance. These effects were associated with reduced plasma glucagon and growth hormone levels and dramatically enhanced insulin sensitivity, without changes in glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. Leptin therapy also ameliorated STZ-induced hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia in mice with disrupted hepatic leptin signaling to a similar extent as observed in wild-type littermates with STZ-induced diabetes. CONCLUSIONS These observations reveal that hyperleptinemia reverses the symptoms of STZ-induced diabetes in mice and that this action does not require direct leptin signaling in the liver. PMID:21464443

  13. Hyperglycemia and xerostomia are key determinants of tooth decay in type 1 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Harris, Stephen E; Mohan, Sumathy; Horn, Diane; Fajardo, Roberto; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Jorgensen, James; MacDougall, Mary; Abboud-Werner, Sherry

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and oral diseases are closely interrelated. Poor metabolic control in diabetics is associated with a high risk of gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth loss. Salivary flow declines in diabetics and patients suffer from xerostomia. Reduced saliva predisposes to enamel hypomineralization and caries formation; however, the mechanisms that initiate and lead to progression of tooth decay and periodontitis in type 1 DM have not been explored. To address this issue, we analyzed tooth morphology in Akita −/− mice that harbor a point mutation in the Ins2 insulin gene, which leads to progressive hyperglycemia. Mandibles from Akita −/− and wild-type littermates were analyzed by microCT, scanning EM and histology; teeth were examined for amelogenin (Amel) and ameloblastin (Ambn) expression. Mice were injected with pilocarpine to assess saliva production. As hyperglycemia may alter pulp repair, the effect of high glucose levels on the proliferation/differentiation of cultured MD10-F2 pulp cells was also analyzed. Results showed that Akita −/− mice at 6 weeks of age showed chalky white incisors that correlated with marked hyperglycemia and impaired saliva production. MicroCT of Akita −/− teeth revealed excessive enamel wearing and hypomineralization; immunostaining for Amel and Ambn was decreased. A striking feature was invasion of dentinal tubules with Streptococcus mitis and microabcesses that originated in the coronal pulp and progressed to pulp necrosis and periapical periodontitis. High levels of glucose also inhibited MD10-F2 cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia in combination with reduced saliva in a model of type1 DM leads to decreased enamel mineralization/matrix proteins and predisposes to excessive wearing and decay. Importantly, hyperglycemia adversely affects enamel matrix proteins and pulp repair. Early detection and treatment of hyperglycemia

  14. Nitrones Reverse Hyperglycemia-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Headley, Colwyn A.; DiSilvestro, David; Hemann, Craig; Bryant, Kelsey E.; Chen, Chun-Aun; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse eNOS dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5 mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50 mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC cells with nitrones for 24 h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased BH4 levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and SOD activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC cells grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC cells. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted. PMID:26774452

  15. Hyperglycemia and Arterial Stiffness: the Atherosclerosis Risk in the Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Jonathan; Nambi, Vijay; Chambless, Lloyd E.; Steffes, Michael W.; Juraschek, Stephen P.; Coresh, Josef; Sharrett, A. Richey; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hyperglycemia has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although numerous studies have demonstrated that hyperglycemia is associated with the atherosis component of atherosclerosis, limited studies have addressed the independent role of hyperglycemia in the pathophysiology of sclerotic vascular disease. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia, as assessed by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), would be independently associated two common indices of arterial stiffness (pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep) and Young’s elastic modulus (YEM)). Methods We examined the cross-sectional association between HbA1c and arterial stiffness using B-mode ultrasound examination of the carotid artery in 9,050 participants from the community-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. We used multivariable linear and logistic regression models to characterize the association between HbA1c and increased Ep and YEM. Results Higher values of HbA1c were associated in a graded fashion with increased arterial stiffness (P-trend <0.001 for both EP and YEM). After adjusting for traditional risk factors, increasing HbA1c deciles were significantly associated with elevated EP (OR for the highest decile of HbA1c compared to the lowest, 2.01, 95% CI 1.30, 3.11) and YEM (OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.15, 2.55). Conclusion Elevated HbA1c is associated with measures of increased arterial stiffness, even after accounting for arterial wall thickness. This is consistent with the hypothesis that hyperglycemia contributes to arterial stiffness beyond its effects on atherosis and suggests that hyperglycemia is associated with altered material within the arterial wall. PMID:23031361

  16. Hyperglycemia-associated alterations in cellular signaling and dysregulated mitochondrial bioenergetics in human metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Challenger, Sean; Kream, Richard M

    2016-12-01

    The severity of untreated or refractory diabetes mellitus has been functionally linked to elevated concentrations of free plasma glucose, clinically defined as hyperglycemia. Operationally, the pathophysiological presentations of prolonged hyperglycemia may be categorized within insulin-dependent and insulin-independent, type 1 and type 2 diabetic phenotypes, respectively. Accordingly, major areas of empirical biomedical research have focused on the elucidation of underlying mechanisms driving key cellular signaling systems that are significantly altered in patients presenting with diabetes-associated chronic hyperglycemia. Presently, we provide a translationally oriented review of key studies evaluating the aberrant effects of hyperglycemia on two major signaling pathways linked to debilitating cellular and systemic effects via targeted disruption of mitochondrial bioenergetics: (1) advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)/and their cognate receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGEs), and (2) the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In preclinical models, cultured vascular endothelial cells exposed to hyperglycemic glucose concentrations were observed to produce enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) functionally linked to increased formation of AGEs and expression of their cognate RAGEs. Importantly, inhibitors of AGEs formation, mitochondrial complex II, or un-couplers of oxidative phosphorylation, were observed to significantly reduce the effects of hyperglycemia on ROS production and cellular damage, thereby establishing a critical linkage to multiple levels of mitochondrial functioning. Hyperglycemia-mediated enhancement of mitochondrial ROS/superoxide production in vascular endothelial cells has been functionally linked to the shunting of glucose into the HBP with resultant long-term activation of pro-inflammatory signaling processes. Additionally, exposure of cultured cells to hyperglycemic conditions resulted in enhanced HBP

  17. Ventricular Tachycardia and Resembling Acute Coronary Syndrome During Pheochromocytoma Crisis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Jun; Wang, Tao; Wang, Lin; Pang, Zhan-Qi; Ma, Ben; Li, Ya-Wen; Yang, Jian; Dong, He

    2016-04-01

    Pheochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumors, and its cardiac involvement may include transient myocardial dysfunction, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and even ventricular arrhythmias.A patient was referred for evaluation of stuttering chest pain, and his electrocardiogram showed T-wave inversion over leads V1 to V4. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), which was stented. Five days later, the patient had ventricular tachycardia, and severe hypertension, remarkable blood pressure fluctuation between 224/76 and 70/50 mm Hg. The patient felt abdominal pain and his abdominal ultrasound showed suspicious right adrenal gland tumor. Enhanced computed tomography of adrenal gland conformed that there was a tumor in right adrenal gland accompanied by an upset level of aldosterone.The tumor was removed by laparoscope, and the pathological examination showed pheochromocytoma. After the surgery, the blood pressure turned normal gradually. There was no T-wave inversion in lead V1-V4. Our case illustrates a rare pheochromocytoma presentation with a VT and resembling ACS. In our case, the serious stenosis in the mid of LAD could be explained by worsen the clinical course of myocardial ischemia or severe coronary vasospasm by the excessive amounts of catecholamines released from the tumor. Coronary vasospasm was possible because he had no classic coronary risk factors (e.g. family history and smoking habit, essential hypertension, hyperglycemia and abnormal serum lipoprotein, high body mass index). Thus, pheochromocytoma was missed until he revealed the association of his symptoms with abdominalgia.As phaeochromocytomas that present with cardiovascular complications can be fatal, it is necessary to screen for the disease when patients present with symptoms indicating catecholamine excess.

  18. Diabetic Hyperglycemia: Link to Impaired Glucose Transport in Pancreatic β Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Roger H.

    1991-03-01

    Glucose uptake into pancreatic β cells by means of the glucose transporter GLUT-2, which has a high Michaelis constant, is essential for the normal insulin secretory response to hyperglycemia. In both autoimmune and nonautoimmune diabetes, this glucose transport is reduced as a consequence of down-regulation of the normal β-cell transporter. In autoimmune diabetes, circulating immunoglobulins can further impair this glucose transport by inhibiting functionally intact transporters. Insights into mechanisms of the unresponsiveness of β cells to hyperglycemia may improve the management and prevention of diabetes.

  19. Clinical and epidemiological study of stress hyperglycemia among medical intensive care unit patients in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jitendra; Chittawar, Sachin; Maniram, Ram Singh; Dubey, T. N.; Singh, Ambrish

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stress hyperglycemia is common in patients presenting at the emergency medical ward and is associated with poor prognosis and increased risk of mortality. Aims and Objective: To study and determine the prevalence and factors associated with stress hyperglycemia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed on 536 nondiabetic patients presented to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Gandhi Medical College and allied Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, between March 31, 2015, and May 28, 2015. A detailed history including demographic profile, presence of chronic disease, history of hospitalization and ICU admission, surgical status, and major reason for ICU admission (i.e., predominant diagnostic category) was collected. Hematological and other parameters based on profile of study population were also analyzed. Results: Out of 536 patients, 109 (20.33%) had stress hyperglycemia. Out of 109 patients with stress hyperglycemia, 87 (16.23%) patients had glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) <5.7% and 22 (4.10%) patients had HbA1c between 5.7% and 6.4%. Mean age of the study population was 40.27 ± 1.44 years, with male dominance. Mean random blood glucose level was 181.46 ± 3.80 mg/dl. Frequency of stress hyperglycemia was 24.13% in stroke, 19.54% in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), 17.24% in chronic kidney disease (CKD), 12.64% in central nervous system (CNS) infection, 8.05% in chronic liver disease (CLD), and 8.05% in seizure patients. Association between stroke and stress hyperglycemia was significant (P = 0.036). Association between hospital stay more than 7 days and stress hyperglycemia was significant in stroke patients (P = 0.0029), CKD patients (P = 0.0036), CLD (P = 0.0099), and MODS patients (P = 0.0328). Conclusions: The factors associated with stress hyperglycemia were stroke, MODS, CKD, CNS infection, CLD, seizure patients, with prolonged hospital stay and expected proportion. PMID:28217513

  20. Hyperglycemia as an effect of cardiopulmonary bypass: intra-operative glucose management.

    PubMed

    Najmaii, Samira; Redford, Daniel; Larson, Douglas F

    2006-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is associated with surgical stress, hypothermia, hyperoxia, enhancement of neuroendocrine outflow, and administration of glucogenic catecholamines that are associated with glucogonolysis and glucogenesis that result in hyperglycemia. The hyperglycemic state during CPB has been associated with adverse outcomes, such as infection, neurological impairment, cardiac dysfunction, prolonged hospitalization, and higher mortality rates. This report justifies vigilant monitoring of blood glucose levels and a rational protocol for the treatment of hyperglycemia of all open heart surgical patients that may improve post-CPB surgical outcomes.

  1. Hyperglycemia and Endothelial Dysfunction in Atherosclerosis: Lessons from Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Steven Daniel; Yurdagul, Arif; Orr, A. Wayne

    2012-01-01

    A clear relationship between diabetes and cardiovascular disease has been established for decades. Despite this, the mechanisms by which diabetes contributes to plaque formation remain in question. Some of this confusion derives from studies in type 2 diabetics where multiple components of metabolic syndrome show proatherosclerotic effects independent of underlying diabetes. However, the hyperglycemia that defines the diabetic condition independently affects atherogenesis in cell culture systems, animal models, and human patients. Endothelial cell biology plays a central role in atherosclerotic plaque formation regulating vessel permeability, inflammation, and thrombosis. The current paper highlights the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia affects endothelial cell biology to promote plaque formation. PMID:22489274

  2. Treatment of hypophosphatemic rickets in generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) without worsening of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Carlos R; Ziegler, Shira G; Gupta, Ashutosh; Groden, Catherine; Hsu, Kevin S; Gahl, William A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) develop vascular calcifications early in life. About half of them die within the first 6 months despite optimal medical care. A subset of those who survive eventually develop hypophosphatemic rickets. Since hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphaturia have been previously associated with increased survival in GACI patients, physicians often avoid phosphate repletion as treatment for rickets. As a consequence, GACI patients develop severe rachitic complications such as short stature and skeletal deformities. It appears that the recognition of hypophosphatemia later in life in some GACI patients is a consequence of having survived the first few months of life, and not the cause of their survival per se. Here, we report the long-term follow-up of a GACI patient who was phosphate-repleted for his rickets for more than 7 years without worsening of vascular calcification.

  3. Clinical inquiries: Do glucosamine and chondroitin worsen blood sugar control in diabetes?

    PubMed

    Marshall, Peter D; Poddar, Sourav; Tweed, Elizabeth M; Brandes, Lisa

    2006-12-01

    Despite theoretical risks based on animal models given high intravenous doses, glucosamine/chondroitin (1500 mg/1200 mg daily) does not adversely affect short-term glycemic control for patients whose diabetes is well-controlled, or for those without diabetes or glucose intolerance (SOR: A, consistent, good-quality patient-oriented evidence). Some preliminary evidence suggests that glucosamine may worsen glucose intolerance for patients with untreated or undiagnosed glucose intolerance or diabetes (SOR: C, extrapolation from disease-oriented evidence). Long-term effects are unknown; however, no compelling theoretical or incidental data suggest that long-term results should be different (SOR: C, expert opinion). Further studies are required to clarify the effects of glucosamine on patients with poorly controlled diabetes or glucose intolerance.

  4. Weather conditions may worsen symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis patients: the possible effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Abasolo, Lydia; Tobías, Aurelio; Leon, Leticia; Carmona, Loreto; Fernandez-Rueda, Jose Luis; Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Jover, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) complain that weather conditions aggravate their symptoms. We investigated the short-term effects of weather conditions on worsening of RA and determined possible seasonal fluctuations. We conducted a case-crossover study in Madrid, Spain. Daily cases of RA flares were collected from the emergency room of a tertiary level hospital between 2004 and 2007. 245 RA patients who visited the emergency room 306 times due to RA related complaints as the main diagnostic reason were included in the study. Patients from 50 to 65 years old were 16% more likely to present a flare with lower mean temperatures. Our results support the belief that weather influences rheumatic pain in middle aged patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Administration of caffeic acid worsened bone mechanical properties in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zych, Maria; Folwarczna, Joanna; Pytlik, Maria; Sliwiński, Leszek; Gołden, Magdalena A; Burczyk, Jan; Trzeciak, Henryk I

    2010-03-01

    Natural phenolic acids, commonly present in plants that are normally consumed in the diet, have been reported to exert antiresorptive and/or bone formation increasing activity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ferulic, caffeic, P-coumaric, and chlorogenic acids on the skeletal system of normal, mature female rats. The phenolic acids (10 mg/kg p. o. daily for 4 weeks) were administered to 3-month-old female Wistar Cmd:(WI)WU rats. Bone mass, mineral and calcium content, macrometric and histomorphometric parameters, and mechanical properties were examined. Phenolic acids had differential effects on the rat skeletal system. Although none of them affected bone macrometric parameters, mass and mineralization, all of them increased the width of femoral trabeculae. Administration of caffeic acid worsened bone mechanical properties (decreasing ultimate load sustained by the femur in three-point bending test). In conclusion, high intake of caffeic acid may unfavorably affect the skeletal system.

  6. Increments in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations after neuroleptic discontinuation are associated with worsening of schizophrenic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Khan, R S; Amin, F; Powchik, P; Knott, P; Goldstein, M; Apter, S; Kerman, B; Jaff, S; Davidson, M

    1990-01-01

    1. Thirty-two male schizophrenic patients participated in this study. 2. Plasma concentrations of the dopamine metabolite, homovanillic acid (pHVA) were assessed once on neuroleptic medication and twice a week for a maximum of six weeks after its discontinuation. 3. Psychiatric symptomatology was assessed once on neuroleptic medication and once a week for a maximum of six weeks after its discontinuation, using the brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS). 4. pHVA and total BPRS score increased significantly after discontinuation of neuroleptic as compared to baseline. 5. The magnitude of pHVA and BPRS increments after discontinuation of neuroleptic correlated significantly. 6. Results of this study suggest that worsening of schizophrenic symptoms after discontinuation of neuroleptic treatment is associated with increased pHVA concentrations.

  7. Podocyte-specific JAK2 overexpression worsens diabetic kidney disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Nair, Viji; Saha, Jharna; Atkins, Kevin B; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Saunders, Thomas L; Myers, Martin G; Werner, Thomas; Kretzler, Matthias; Brosius, Frank C

    2017-10-01

    Activation of JAK-STAT signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease. An increased expression of JAK-STAT genes was found in kidney glomerular cells, including podocytes, in patients with early diabetic kidney disease. However, it is not known whether increased expression of JAK or STAT isoforms in glomerular cells can lead to worsening nephropathy in the setting of diabetes. Therefore, we overexpressed JAK2 mRNA specifically in glomerular podocytes of 129S6 mice to determine whether this change alone could worsen diabetic kidney disease. A 2-3 fold increase in glomerular JAK2 expression, an increase similar to that found in humans with early diabetic kidney disease, led to substantial and statistically significant increases in albuminuria, mesangial expansion, glomerulosclerosis, glomerular fibronectin accumulation, and glomerular basement membrane thickening, and a significant reduction in podocyte density in diabetic mice. Treatment with a specific JAK1/2 inhibitor for 2 weeks partly reversed the major phenotypic changes of diabetic kidney disease and specifically normalized expression of a number of downstream STAT3-dependent genes implicated in diabetic kidney disease progression. Thus, moderate increases in podocyte JAK2 expression at levels similar to those in patients with early diabetic kidney disease can lead directly to phenotypic and other alterations of progressive diabetic glomerulopathy. Hence, inhibition of these changes by treatment with a JAK1/2 inhibitor suggests that such treatment may help retard progression of early diabetic kidney disease in patients. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Maternal Cigarette Smoke Exposure Worsens Neurological Outcomes in Adolescent Offspring with Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yik L; Saad, Sonia; Machaalani, Rita; Oliver, Brian G; Vissel, Bryce; Pollock, Carol; Jones, Nicole M; Chen, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy occurs in approximately 6 per 1000 term newborns leading to devastating neurological consequences, such as cerebral palsy and seizures. Maternal smoking is one of the prominent risk factors contributing to HI injury. Mitochondrial integrity plays a critical role in neural injury and repair during HI. We previously showed that maternal cigarette smoke exposure (SE) can reduce brain mitochondrial fission and autophagosome markers in male offspring. This was accompanied by increased brain cell apoptosis (active caspase-3) and DNA fragmentation (TUNEL staining). Here, we aimed to investigate whether maternal SE leads to more severe neurological damage after HI brain injury in male offspring. Female BALB/c mice (8 weeks) were exposed to cigarette smoke prior to mating, during gestation, and lactation. At postnatal day 10, half of the pups from each litter underwent left carotid artery occlusion, followed by exposure to 8% oxygen (92% nitrogen). At postnatal day 40-44, maternal SE reduced grip strength in grip traction and foot fault tests, which were also reduced by HI injury to similar levels regardless of the maternal group. Limb coordination was impaired by maternal SE which was not worsened by HI injury. Maternal SE increased anxiety level in the offspring, which was normalized by HI injury. Apoptosis markers were increased in different brain regions by maternal SE, with the cortex having further increased TUNEL by HI injury, along with increased markers of inflammation and mitophagy. We conclude that maternal SE can worsen HI-induced cellular damage in male offspring well into adolescence.

  9. [Anesthesic practices in patients with severe postpartum hemorrhage with persistent or worsening bleeding].

    PubMed

    Boulay, G; Hamza, J

    2004-12-01

    Severe postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a rare and critical situation which requires fast and well-planned management where close collaboration between obstetricians and anesthesiologists is essential. In case of persisting or worsening bleeding in spite of initially adequate management, the main goal of the anesthesiologist is to maintain hemodynamic stability (fluid resuscitation, transfusion, vasoactive drugs) and optimal respiratory state (oxygenation) and to correct the frequent clotting disorders, whereas the obstetrician and/or the radiologist have to achieve definitive hemostasis. Assessment of the severity of PPH is determined from: quantity of blood loss and/or duration of bleeding, difficulty in maintaining a correct hemodynamic state in spite of active vascular fluid resuscitation, need for vasoactive therapy and transfusion, occurrence and worsening of clotting disorders. Continuous drip Sulprostone requires close clinical surveillance and continuous monitoring (electrocardiography, non-invasive blood pressure monitor, pulse oximetry). When this treatment does not enable sufficiently rapid control of the bleeding (consensus = within 30 minutes), invasive therapy (arterial embolization, vascular ligation even hysterectomy) should be started promptly. When the bleeding continues despite aggressive medical treatments, general anesthesia (even if an epidural catheter is already in place) is needed to proceed with the invasive surgical procedure. This anaesthesia of a "full stomach" patient justifies a rapid-sequence induction with cricoid pressure and intubation. The risk is particularly high in case of hemorrhagic shock. Angiographic embolization should be carried out in an angiography suite which must be equipped for this kind of situation (anesthesia and resuscitation material, adapted monitoring). A member of the anesthesia team must be present throughout this procedure. At best, a multidisciplinary team, specially trained for this purpose, including

  10. The right to health in the courts of Brazil: worsening health inequities?

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Octavio Luiz Motta

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the recent and growing phenomenon of right-to-health litigation in Brazil from the perspective of health equity. It argues that the prevailing model of litigation is likely worsening the country's already pronounced health inequities. The model is characterized by a prevalence of individualized claims demanding curative medical treatment (most often drugs) and by a high success rate for the litigant. Both elements are largely a consequence of the way Brazilian judges have interpreted the scope of the right to health recognized in Article 6 and Article 196 of the Brazilian constitution, that is, as an entitlement of individuals to the satiSfaction of all their health needs with the most advanced treatment available, irrespective of its costs. Given that resources are always scarce in relation to the health needs of the population as a whole, this interpretation can only be sustained at the expense of universality, that is, so long as only a part of the population is granted this unlimited right at any given time. The individuals and (less often) groups who manage to access the judiciary and realize this right are therefore privileged over the rest of the population. This is potentially detrimental to health equity because the criterion for privileging litigants over the rest of the population is not based on any conception of need or justice but purely on their ability to access the judiciary, something that only a minority of citizens possess. This paper examines studies that are beginning to confirm that a majority of right-to-health litigants come from social groups that are already considerably advantaged in terms of all socioeconomic indicators, including health conditions. It is a plausible assumption that the model of right-to-health litigation currently prevalent in Brazil is likely worsening health inequities.

  11. C-reactive protein -717C>T genetic polymorphism associates with esophagectomy-induced stress hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Satoru; Miura, Masatomo; Hinai, Yudai; Maruyama, Kiyotomi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Ogawa, Jun-Ichi

    2010-05-01

    Stress hyperglycemia refers to the transient hyperglycemia seen during illness and is usually restricted to patients without previous evidence of diabetes. The influence of genetics on surgery-induced hyperglycemia remains only partially understood. The study participants were Japanese patients treated for thoracic esophageal cancer with curative esophagectomy at Akita University Hospital between 2003 and 2007. We determined the associations between esophagectomy-induced stress hyperglycemia (> or =30 mg/dl increases in blood glucose during surgery) and genetic polymorphisms for C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, -beta, interferon-gamma, transforming growth factor-beta1, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-6 receptors, IL-10, IL-12beta, adiponectin, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma. In 28 (46%) patients, blood glucose levels increased more than 30 mg/dl during surgery. Among the genetic polymorphisms tested, CRP -717C>T was significantly associated with stress hyperglycemia during esophagectomy. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that patients with the CRP -717T/T genotype had a significantly greater risk of developing surgery-induced hyperglycemia than those with the CRP -717C/T genotype. Stress hyperglycemia was also significantly associated with postoperative infectious complications and duration of intensive care unit stay. It is suggested that CRP -717 C>T genetic polymorphism may be a predictive factor for stress hyperglycemia in patients receiving esophagectomy for thoracic esophageal cancer.

  12. The Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) trial: an adaptive trial design case study.

    PubMed

    Connor, Jason T; Broglio, Kristine R; Durkalski, Valerie; Meurer, William J; Johnston, Karen C

    2015-03-04

    The 'Adaptive Designs Accelerating Promising Trials into Treatments (ADAPT-IT)' project is a collaborative effort supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and United States Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to explore how adaptive clinical trial design might improve the evaluation of drugs and medical devices. ADAPT-IT uses the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders & Stroke-supported Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials (NETT) network as a 'laboratory' in which to study the development of adaptive clinical trial designs in the confirmatory setting. The Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) trial was selected for funding by the NIH-NINDS at the start of ADAPT-IT and is currently an ongoing phase III trial of tight glucose control in hyperglycemic acute ischemic stroke patients. Within ADAPT-IT, a Bayesian adaptive Goldilocks trial design alternative was developed. The SHINE design includes response adaptive randomization, a sample size re-estimation, and monitoring for early efficacy and futility according to a group sequential design. The Goldilocks design includes more frequent monitoring for predicted success or futility and a longitudinal model of the primary endpoint. Both trial designs were simulated and compared in terms of their mean sample size and power across a range of treatment effects and success rates for the control group. As simulated, the SHINE design tends to have slightly higher power and the Goldilocks design has a lower mean sample size. Both designs were tuned to have approximately 80% power to detect a difference of 25% versus 32% between control and treatment, respectively. In this scenario, mean sample sizes are 1,114 and 979 for the SHINE and Goldilocks designs, respectively. Two designs were brought forward, and both were evaluated, revised, and improved based on the input of all parties involved in the ADAPT-IT process. However, the SHINE investigators were tasked with choosing only a single design to

  13. [Improvement of hospital hyperglycemia: creation of a new governance model?].

    PubMed

    Sofrà, Daniela; Berwart, Sylvie Masmont; Egli, Marc; Ruiz, Juan

    2012-06-06

    The report of significant decrease of the inpatient hospital mortality and morbidity with an efficient insulin therapy has demonstrated the need of a good glycaemic control for patients hospitalised in acute care. However, one is faced with numerous difficulties in the hospital management of patients with hyperglycaemia, errors often occur when prescribing insulin, and the management skills are insufficient. Our goal is to change the medical and nursing practices to evolve towards an efficient and safe management of the hospitalised patient. The model we lay out in this article is based upon observation of the therapeutic support of patients with a chronic condition, whilst using a systemic management approach.

  14. Dry-powder inhalers in acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Selroos, Olof

    2014-01-01

    An updated literature search was performed to evaluate the efficacy of rapid-acting β2-agonists delivered via dry powder inhalers in the treatment of moderate-to-severe acute asthma. Databases were searched from 1985 up to December 2012. A total of 23 randomized, double-blind or open clinical studies in acute asthma comparing the efficacy of a dry powder inhaler with a pressurized metered-dose inhaler or a nebulizer, and performed under controlled hospital conditions, were identified. This review found that administration of β2-agonist bronchodilators via dry powder inhalers (formoterol, salbutamol, terbutaline and budesonide/formoterol) was effective during severe asthma worsening and acute asthma attacks, and was as effective as established therapies with a pressurized metered-dose inhaler with or without a spacer, or nebulization. These results ensure that patients can rely upon dry powder inhalers equally well as other inhaler devices during episodes of asthma worsening.

  15. MPC Design for Rapid Pump-Attenuation and Expedited Hyperglycemia Response to Treat T1DM with an Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gondhalekar, Ravi; Dassau, Eyal; Doyle, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The design of a Model Predictive Control (MPC) strategy for the closed-loop operation of an Artificial Pancreas (AP) for treating Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is considered in this paper. The contribution of this paper is to propose two changes to the usual structure of the MPC problems typically considered for control of an AP. The first proposed change is to replace the symmetric, quadratic input cost function with an asymmetric, quadratic function, allowing negative control inputs to be penalized less than positive ones. This facilitates rapid pump-suspensions in response to predicted hypoglycemia, while simultaneously permitting the design of a conservative response to hyperglycemia. The second proposed change is to penalize the velocity of the predicted glucose level, where this velocity penalty is based on a cost function that is again asymmetric, but additionally state-dependent. This facilitates the accelerated response to acute, persistent hyperglycemic events, e.g., as induced by unannounced meals. The novel functionality is demonstrated by numerical examples, and the efficacy of the proposed MPC strategy verified using the University of Padova/Virginia metabolic simulator. PMID:28479660

  16. Primum non nocere (first do no harm): symptom worsening and improvement in female assault victims after prolonged exposure for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Jayawickreme, Nuwan; Cahill, Shawn P; Riggs, David S; Rauch, Sheila A M; Resick, Patricia A; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Foa, Edna B

    2014-05-01

    Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy is an efficacious treatment for PTSD; despite this, many clinicians do not utilize it due to concerns it could cause patient decompensation. Data were pooled from four published well-controlled studies of female assault survivors with chronic PTSD (n = 361) who were randomly assigned to PE, waitlist (WL), or another psychotherapy, including cognitive processing therapy (CPT), Eye Movement and Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR), or the combination of PE plus stress inoculation training (SIT) or PE plus cognitive restructuring. PTSD and depression severity scores were converted to categorical outcomes to evaluate the proportion of participants who showed reliable symptom change (both reliable worsening and reliable improvement). The majority of participants completing one of the active treatments showed reliable improvement on both PTSD and depression compared to WL. Among treatment participants in general, as well as those who received PE, reliable PTSD worsening was nonexistent and the rate of reliable worsening of depression was low. There were no differences on any outcome measures among treatments. By comparison, participants in WL had higher rates of reliable symptom worsening for both PTSD and depression. Potential alternative explanations were also evaluated. PE and a number of other empirically supported therapies are efficacious and safe treatments for PTSD, reducing the frequency of which symptom worsening occurs in the absence of treatment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction are independent predictors of worsening of glucose tolerance during each stage of type 2 diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Weyer, C; Tataranni, P A; Bogardus, C; Pratley, R E

    2001-01-01

    Although prospective studies indicate that insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction predict type 2 diabetes, they provide limited information on the relative contributions of both abnormalities to worsening glucose tolerance at different developmental stages of the disease. We therefore assessed the predictive effect of insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction separately for the progression from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and from IGT to diabetes. Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (M) (hyperinsulinemic clamp), acute insulin secretory response (AIR) (25-g intravenous glucose tolerance test), and body composition (hydrodensitometry or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were measured in 254 Pima Indians with NGT and in 145 Pima Indians with IGT, who were then followed for 0.5-13 years. After follow-ups of 4.4 +/- 3.1 and 5.5 +/- 3.4 years, 79 (31%) of the subjects with initial NGT had developed IGT, and 64 (44%) of the subjects with initial IGT had developed diabetes. In proportional-hazards analyses with adjustment for age, sex, and percent body fat, low M and low AIR were independent predictors of both the progression from NGT to IGT (relative hazards [95% CI] for 10th vs. 90th percentile: M 2.4 [1.2-4.7], P < 0.02; AIR 2.1 [1.1-4.1], P < 0.04) and from IGT to diabetes (M 2.5 [1.3-5.0], P < 0.01; AIR 1.8 [0.99-3.3], P = 0.055). During each stage of the development of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction are independent predictors of worsening glucose tolerance and are, therefore, both targets for the primary prevention of the disease.

  18. Zinc supplementation alleviates hyperglycemia and associated metabolic abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Barman, Susmita; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2016-12-01

    The cause and effect relationship between diabetes and zinc is complex and unclear. This animal study has examined the potential of zinc supplementation in beneficial modulating hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, and metabolic abnormalities associated with diabetes. The study was conducted in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Groups of hyperglycemic rats were subjected to dietary interventions for 6 weeks with zinc supplementation (5 times and 10 times the normal level). Supplemental-zinc-fed diabetic groups showed significant control on hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. There was a significant reduction in protein glycosylation, glucosuria, and urinary excretion of proteins and urea in diabetic animals maintained on a zinc-supplemented diet. Diabetic rats showed significantly higher plasma albumin and lower plasma urea and creatinine levels upon zinc supplementation. Significant alterations in insulin sensitivity indices HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, and QUICKI were also indicated by zinc supplementation. The pathological abnormalities in pancreatic islets of diabetic animals were significantly alleviated by dietary zinc intervention. This study provides the first evidence that zinc supplementation can partially ameliorate the severity of diabetic hyperglycemia and associated metabolic abnormalities, hypoinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and altered pancreatic morphology. Thus, zinc supplementation may offer a significant potential for clinical application in managing diabetic hyperglycemia and related metabolic complications.

  19. Bromocriptine-Induced Hyperglycemia in Nonobese Diabetic Mice: Kinetics and Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Sylvie; Coulaud, Josiane; Homo-Delarche, Francoise

    2007-01-01

    The effects of bromocriptine (10 mg/kg), known to inhibit prolactin secretion and lower autoimmune processes, were studied on glucose homeostasis in non-fasted non-obese diabetic mice, a spontaneous model of type 1 diabetes. Hyperglycemia was observed 120 and 240 min after i.p. but not s.c. injection. Bromocriptine administration i.p. led to rapid and marked hyperglycemia characterized by sexual dimorphism with males having higher glycemia than females. Bromocriptine induced a rapid but transient decrease in insulinemia in males only and biphasic increases in glucagon levels and a sustained stimulatory effect on circulating corticosterone in both sexes. Bromocriptine-induced hyperglycemia involved D2-dopaminergic receptors, as demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of the D2-dopamine antagonist, metoclopramide (10 mg/kg). Simultaneous injection of bromocriptine and metoclopramide also blocked the rise in blood corticosterone. In conclusion, by inducing hyperglycemia, i.p. bromocriptine administration to prediabetic autoimmune mice may counteract its beneficial anti-immunostimulatory effects. PMID:18084676

  20. Association between Serum Antibodies to Oral Microorganisms and Hyperglycemia in Adults.

    PubMed

    Merchant, A T; Shrestha, D; Chaisson, C; Choi, Y H; Hazlett, L J; Zhang, J

    2014-08-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to evaluate the relationship between serum antibody titers against 19 selected oral microorganisms and measures of hyperglycemia in a large, nationally representative data set. The study population consisted of 7,848 participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994) who were at least 40 yrs old, with complete serum IgG antibody data against 19 oral microorganisms. The 19 antibody titers were grouped into 4 categories via cluster analysis--orange-red, yellow-orange, orange-blue, and red-green--named to reflect predominant antibody titers against microorganisms in Socransky's classification scheme for oral microbes. Linear regression models weighted for complex survey design were used in which fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, and HbA1c were outcomes and antibody cluster scores were exposures, adjusting for potential confounders. Higher orange-red cluster scores were associated with increased hyperglycemia, while higher orange-blue cluster scores were related with decreased hyperglycemia. A 1-unit-higher orange-red cluster score was associated with 0.46 mg/dL higher fasting blood glucose (p = .0038), and a 1-unit-higher orange-blue cluster score was associated with 0.34% lower HbA1c (p = .0257). Groups of antibody titers against periodontal microorganisms were associated with hyperglycemia independent of known risk factors. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  1. Impact of Diabetes and Hyperglycemia on Survival in Advanced Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Shaw-Dulin, Robin; Lara-Medina, Fernando; Bacon, Ludwing; Rivera, Daniel; Urzua, Lorena; Aguila, Christian; Ramirez-Morales, Rebeca; Santamaria, Julieta; Bargallo, Enrique; Mohar, Alejandro; Herrera, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We examined the impact of diabetes and hyperglycemia on cancer-specific survival of patients with metastatic or recurrent breast cancer (BC). Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of 265 patients with advanced BC receiving palliative chemotherapy. BC-specific mortality was compared for diabetic and nondiabetic patients as well as for patients that presented hyperglycemia during treatment. Results. No difference was observed between the diabetic and nondiabetic patients in terms of overall survival (OS). A difference in OS was observed between nondiabetic patients and diabetic patients who had hyperglycemia. The OS was greater in diabetic patients with proper metabolic control than diabetic patients with hyperglycemia. The risk of death was higher in patients with mean glucose levels >130 mg/dL during treatment. Several factors were associated with poor OS: tumor stage, hormone-receptor-negative tumors, HER2 negative disease, multiple metastatic sites, presence of visceral metastases, and mean glucose >130 mg/dL. Conclusion. Elevated glucose levels are associated with a poor outcome in diabetic and nondiabetic patients in contrast to patients with normoglycemic levels, conferring an elevated risk of death. According to these results, clinicians should monitor glucose levels during treatment for advanced breast cancer disease and take action to maintain normal glucose levels. PMID:22919369

  2. Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and age-related metabolic retinal diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during ...

  3. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted.

  4. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K.; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  5. [Diabetes mellitus in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rubio, José Luis; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo

    2002-01-01

    Exocrine and endocrine components of pancreas are interrelated anatomically and functionally. Exocrine pancreatic dysfunction often accompanies endocrine pancreatic impairment and vice versa. Diabetes mellitus resulting from alterations of exocrine pancreas, such as acute or chronic pancreatitis, is known as pancreatic diabetes. Hyperglycemia during acute pancreatitis (AP) can be due to abnormalities in insulin secretion, increase in counterregulatory hormones release, or decrease in glucose utilization by peripheral tissues. Causal association is suggested between diabetic ketoacidosis and AP and is attributed to alternation in metabolism of triglycerides. High blood glucose levels are associated with severe AP and constitute factor of worst prognosis. Some patients are discharged with diabetes after AP episode, while others develop diabetes during first year of follow-up. Origin and frequency of glycemic abnormalities associated with AP have not been settled yet accurately. Also, predictive factors for diabetes development and persistence after AP have not been recognized to date.

  6. Diabetes, insulin, and development of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Honiden, Shyoko; Gong, Michelle N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Recently, many studies have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of insulin and glucose control in critical illness. This review examines evidence regarding the relationship between diabetes and the development of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), reviews studies of lung injury related to glycemic and nonglycemic metabolic features of diabetes, and examines the effect of diabetic therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection A MEDLINE/PubMed search from inception to August 1, 2008, was conducted using the search terms acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, hyperglycemia, diabetes mellitus, insulin, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, including combinations of these terms. Bibliographies of retrieved articles were manually reviewed. Data Extraction and Synthesis Available studies were critically reviewed, and data were extracted with special attention to the human and animal studies that explored a) diabetes and ALI; b) hyperglycemia and ALI; c) metabolic nonhyperglycemic features of diabetes and ALI; and d) diabetic therapies and ALI. Conclusions Clinical and experimental data indicate that diabetes is protective against the development of ALI/ARDS. The pathways involved are complex and likely include effects of hyperglycemia on the inflammatory response, metabolic abnormalities in diabetes, and the interactions of therapeutic agents given to diabetic patients. Multidisciplinary, multifaceted studies, involving both animal models and clinical and molecular epidemiology techniques, are essential. PMID:19531947

  7. Even a Chronic Mild Hyperglycemia Affects Membrane Fluidity and Lipoperoxidation in Placental Mitochondria in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-García, María del Consuelo; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; Martinez-Montes, Federico; Palomar-Morales, Martín; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    It is known the deleterious effects of diabetes on embryos, but the effects of diabetes on placenta and its mitochondria are still not well known. In this work we generated a mild hyperglycemia model in female wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 48 hours-old rats. The sexual maturity onset of the female rats was delayed around 6–7 weeks and at 16 weeks-old they were mated, and sacrificed at day 19th of pregnancy. In placental total tissue and isolated mitochondria, the fatty acids composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and lipoperoxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Membrane fluidity in mitochondria was measured with the excimer forming probe dipyrenylpropane and mitochondrial function was measured with a Clark-type electrode. The results show that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia increases lipoperoxidation and decreases mitochondrial function in placenta. Simultaneously, placental fatty acids metabolism in total tissue is modified but in a different way than in placental mitochondria. Whereas the chronic mild hyperglycemia induced a decrease in unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) in placental total tissue, the ratio increased in placental mitochondria. The measurements of membrane fluidity showed that fluidity of placenta mitochondrial membranes increased with hyperglycemia, showing consistency with the fatty acids composition through the U/S index. The thermotropic characteristics of mitochondrial membranes were changed, showing lower transition temperature and activation energies. All of these data together demonstrate that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy of early reproductive Wistar rats, generates an increment of lipoperoxidation, an increase of placental mitochondrial membrane fluidity apparently derived from changes in fatty acids composition and consequently, mitochondrial malfunction. PMID:26630275

  8. Even a Chronic Mild Hyperglycemia Affects Membrane Fluidity and Lipoperoxidation in Placental Mitochondria in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-García, María del Consuelo; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; Martinez-Montes, Federico; Palomar-Morales, Martín; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    It is known the deleterious effects of diabetes on embryos, but the effects of diabetes on placenta and its mitochondria are still not well known. In this work we generated a mild hyperglycemia model in female wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 48 hours-old rats. The sexual maturity onset of the female rats was delayed around 6-7 weeks and at 16 weeks-old they were mated, and sacrificed at day 19th of pregnancy. In placental total tissue and isolated mitochondria, the fatty acids composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and lipoperoxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Membrane fluidity in mitochondria was measured with the excimer forming probe dipyrenylpropane and mitochondrial function was measured with a Clark-type electrode. The results show that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia increases lipoperoxidation and decreases mitochondrial function in placenta. Simultaneously, placental fatty acids metabolism in total tissue is modified but in a different way than in placental mitochondria. Whereas the chronic mild hyperglycemia induced a decrease in unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) in placental total tissue, the ratio increased in placental mitochondria. The measurements of membrane fluidity showed that fluidity of placenta mitochondrial membranes increased with hyperglycemia, showing consistency with the fatty acids composition through the U/S index. The thermotropic characteristics of mitochondrial membranes were changed, showing lower transition temperature and activation energies. All of these data together demonstrate that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy of early reproductive Wistar rats, generates an increment of lipoperoxidation, an increase of placental mitochondrial membrane fluidity apparently derived from changes in fatty acids composition and consequently, mitochondrial malfunction.

  9. Go-6976 Reverses Hyperglycemia-Induced Insulin Resistance Independently of cPKC Inhibition in Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Katherine A.; Hegyi, Krisztina; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Buse, Maria G.; Sethi, Jaswinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia induces insulin resistance by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. One model of hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance involves chronic preincubation of adipocytes in the presence of high glucose and low insulin concentrations. We have previously shown that the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a partial role in the development of insulin resistance in this model. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with Go-6976, a widely used “specific” inhibitor of cPKCs, alleviates hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance. However, the effects of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin and Go-6976 were not additive and only rapamycin restored impaired insulin-stimulated AKT activation. Although, PKCα, (but not –β) was abundantly expressed in these adipocytes, our studies indicate cPKCs do not play a major role in causing insulin-resistance in this model. There was no evidence of changes in the expression or phosphorylation of PKCα, and PKCα knock-down did not prevent the reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose transport. This was also consistent with lack of IRS-1 phosphorylation on Ser-24 in hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistant adipocytes. Treatment with Go-6976 did inhibit a component of the mTORC1 pathway, as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein. Raptor knock-down enhanced the effect of insulin on glucose transport in insulin resistant adipocytes. Go-6976 had the same effect in control cells, but was ineffective in cells with Raptor knock-down. Taken together these findings suggest that Go-6976 exerts its effect in alleviating hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistance independently of cPKC inhibition and may target components of the mTORC1 signaling pathway. PMID:25330241

  10. Hydrogen sulfide replacement therapy protects the vascular endothelium in hyperglycemia by preserving mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunihiro; Olah, Gabor; Modis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Kulp, Gabriella; Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Chang, Tuanjie; Zhou, Zongmin; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-08-16

    The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of changes in hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) homeostasis in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of bEnd3 microvascular endothelial cells to elevated extracellular glucose (in vitro "hyperglycemia") induced the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted in an increased consumption of endogenous and exogenous H(2)S. Replacement of H(2)S or overexpression of the H(2)S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced enhancement of ROS formation, attenuated nuclear DNA injury, reduced the activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and improved cellular viability. In vitro hyperglycemia resulted in a switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, an effect that was partially corrected by H(2)S supplementation. Exposure of isolated vascular rings to high glucose in vitro induced an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, which was prevented by CSE overexpression or H(2)S supplementation. siRNA silencing of CSE exacerbated ROS production in hyperglycemic endothelial cells. Vascular rings from CSE(-/-) mice exhibited an accelerated impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to in vitro hyperglycemia, compared with wild-type controls. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats resulted in a decrease in the circulating level of H(2)S; replacement of H(2)S protected from the development of endothelial dysfunction ex vivo. In conclusion, endogenously produced H(2)S protects against the development of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesize that, in hyperglycemic endothelial cells, mitochondrial ROS production and increased H(2)S catabolism form a positive feed-forward cycle. H(2)S replacement protects against these alterations, resulting in reduced ROS formation, improved endothelial metabolic state, and maintenance of normal endothelial function.

  11. Reduced glucose clearance as the major determinant of postabsorptive hyperglycemia in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wi, J K; Kim, J K; Youn, J H

    1998-02-01

    The relationships between postabsorptive glucose concentration and hepatic glucose output (HGO) and glucose clearance were studied in rats one day after treatment with various doses of streptozotocin (STZ; 0, 15, 30, 40, 50, or 75 mg/kg; n = 6 per dose; study 1). Glucose fluxes were estimated using a prolonged (6-h) infusion of [3-3H]glucose to ensure complete tracer equilibration at hyperglycemia. Postabsorptive glucose was significantly increased at the high doses of STZ (50 and 75 mg/kg; P < 0.01) and was strongly correlated with glucose clearance across all doses (r = -0.85, P < 0.001) but less strongly with HGO (r = 0.46, P < 0.01). In the group treated with 50 mg/kg STZ, postabsorptive glucose was increased twofold compared with the control (i.e., zero dose) group, with no change in HGO and a 45% decrease in glucose clearance, indicating that the hyperglycemia was due to a decrease in glucose clearance. To understand the cellular mechanisms of decreased glucose clearance in STZ diabetic rats, skeletal muscle glucose clearance and intracellular glucose and glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P) concentrations were determined in normal and STZ (50 mg/kg) diabetic rats at their postabsorptive glucose levels as well as at matched hyperglycemia (12 mM; study 2). Glucose clearance was significantly decreased in soleus (P < 0.05) muscles of the diabetic rats, and this was associated with significantly decreased intracellular glucose and G-6-P levels at matched hyperglycemia (P < 0.05), suggestive of decreased glucose transport. In conclusion, postabsorptive hyperglycemia in STZ diabetic rats was largely due to decreased glucose clearance, although increased HGO may also have been a contributing factor at the highest STZ dose. The decrease in postabsorptive glucose clearance in STZ diabetic rats appeared to be associated with an impairment of glucose transport in soleus (type I) muscles.

  12. The effects of hyperglycemia and endotoxemia on coagulation parameters in healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    McGovern, K F; Lascola, K M; Smith, S A; Clark-Price, S C; Wilkins, P A; Schaeffer, D J; Foreman, J H

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and endotoxemia have been associated with coagulation abnormalities in horses. Studies in humans suggest greater disturbances in coagulation with hyperglycemia and concurrent endotoxemia. To compare coagulation parameters in horses administered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with and without concurrent hyperglycemia. Twelve healthy adult horses. Hyperglycemia (180-240 mg/dL) was maintained for 6 hours in 6 horses (GLU-LPS) using 140 mg/kg IV bolus of dextrose followed by a 20% dextrose constant rate infusion. A similar volume of saline was administered to an additional 6 horses (SAL-LPS). LPS (20 ng/kg) was administered to each horse. Fibrogen concentration, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin antithrombin concentration (TAT), and thromboelastometry were measured at baseline and after 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, and 22 hours. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine temporal changes. Increases in PT (P = .001) and TAT (P = .027) were observed in the GLU-LPS group. Changes in thromboelastometry parameters including increased clot formation time (In-TEM, P = .006; Ex-TEM, P = .002) and decreased alpha angle (Ex-TEM, P = .04) and maximal clot firmness (Ex-TEM, P = .014) were observed in the SAL-LPS group. Differences between SAL-LPS and GLU-LPS groups were limited to increased maximal clot firmness (Ex-TEM) at 3, 6, and 22 hours (P < .001) in the SAL-LPS group. Minor alterations in coagulation parameters identified for each group are most likely not clinically relevant. Observed differences between groups do not suggest that concurrent hyperglycemia and endotoxemia are associated with greater coagulation abnormalities in horses. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome Unmasking or Worsening AIDS-Related Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Anna; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuèle; Dina, Julia; Kazemi, Apolline; Verdon, Renaud; Mortier, Emmanuel; de La Blanchardière, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    Incidence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in HIV-infected patients has declined in the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era although a growing number of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes (PML-IRIS) have been published during the same period. Therapeutic management of PML-IRIS is not consensual and mainly relies on corticosteroids. Our main aim was, in addition to provide a thoughtful analysis of published PML-IRIS cases, to assess the benefit of corticosteroids in the management of PML-IRIS, focusing on confirmed cases. We performed a literature review of the 46 confirmed cases of PML-IRIS cases occurring in HIV-infected patients from 1998 to September 2016 (21 unmasking and 25 paradoxical PML-IRIS). AIDS-related PML-IRIS patients were mostly men (sex ratio 4/1) with a median age of 40.5 years (range 12–66). Median CD4 T cell count before cART and at PML-IRIS onset was 45/μl (0–301) and 101/μl (20–610), respectively. After cART initiation, PML-IRIS occurred within a median timescale of 38 days (18–120). Clinical signs were motor deficits (69%), speech disorders (36%), cognitive disorders (33%), cerebellar ataxia (28%), and visual disturbances (23%). Brain MRI revealed hyperintense areas on T2-weighted sequences and FLAIR images (76%) and suggestive contrast enhancement (87%). PCR for John Cunningham virus (JCV) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive in only 84% of cases; however, when performed, brain biopsy confirmed diagnosis of PML in 90% of cases and demonstrated histological signs of IRIS in 95% of cases. Clinical worsening related to PML-IRIS and leading to death was observed in 28% of cases. Corticosteroids were prescribed in 63% of cases and maraviroc in one case. Statistical analysis failed to demonstrate significant benefit from steroid treatment, despite spectacular improvement in certain cases. Diagnosis of PML-IRIS should be considered in HIV

  14. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome Unmasking or Worsening AIDS-Related Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Anna; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuèle; Dina, Julia; Kazemi, Apolline; Verdon, Renaud; Mortier, Emmanuel; de La Blanchardière, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    Incidence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in HIV-infected patients has declined in the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era although a growing number of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes (PML-IRIS) have been published during the same period. Therapeutic management of PML-IRIS is not consensual and mainly relies on corticosteroids. Our main aim was, in addition to provide a thoughtful analysis of published PML-IRIS cases, to assess the benefit of corticosteroids in the management of PML-IRIS, focusing on confirmed cases. We performed a literature review of the 46 confirmed cases of PML-IRIS cases occurring in HIV-infected patients from 1998 to September 2016 (21 unmasking and 25 paradoxical PML-IRIS). AIDS-related PML-IRIS patients were mostly men (sex ratio 4/1) with a median age of 40.5 years (range 12-66). Median CD4 T cell count before cART and at PML-IRIS onset was 45/μl (0-301) and 101/μl (20-610), respectively. After cART initiation, PML-IRIS occurred within a median timescale of 38 days (18-120). Clinical signs were motor deficits (69%), speech disorders (36%), cognitive disorders (33%), cerebellar ataxia (28%), and visual disturbances (23%). Brain MRI revealed hyperintense areas on T2-weighted sequences and FLAIR images (76%) and suggestive contrast enhancement (87%). PCR for John Cunningham virus (JCV) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive in only 84% of cases; however, when performed, brain biopsy confirmed diagnosis of PML in 90% of cases and demonstrated histological signs of IRIS in 95% of cases. Clinical worsening related to PML-IRIS and leading to death was observed in 28% of cases. Corticosteroids were prescribed in 63% of cases and maraviroc in one case. Statistical analysis failed to demonstrate significant benefit from steroid treatment, despite spectacular improvement in certain cases. Diagnosis of PML-IRIS should be considered in HIV

  15. Selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists worsen disease in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Snoek, Susanne A; Verstege, Marleen I; van der Zanden, Esmerij P; Deeks, Nigel; Bulmer, David C; Skynner, Michael; Lee, Kevin; Te Velde, Anje A; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; de Jonge, Wouter J

    2010-05-01

    In various models vagus nerve activation has been shown to ameliorate intestinal inflammation, via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed on immune cells. As the alpha7 nAChR has been put forward to mediate this effect, we studied the effect of nicotine and two selective alpha7 nAChR agonists (AR-R17779, (-)-spiro[1-azabicyclo[2.2.2] octane-3,5'-oxazolidin-2'-one and GSK1345038A) on disease severity in two mouse models of experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by administration of 1.5% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in drinking water or 2 mg 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) intrarectally. Nicotine (0.25 and 2.50 micromol.kg(-1)), AR-R17779 (0.6-30 micromol.kg(-1)) or GSK1345038A (6-120 micromol.kg(-1)) was administered daily by i.p. injection. After 7 (DSS) or 5 (TNBS) days clinical parameters and colonic inflammation were scored. Nicotine and both alpha7 nAChR agonists reduced the activation of NF-kappaB and pro-inflammatory cytokines in whole blood and macrophage cultures. In DSS colitis, nicotine treatment reduced colonic cytokine production, but failed to reduce disease parameters. Reciprocally, treatment with AR-R17779 or GSK1345038A worsened disease and led to increased colonic pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in DSS colitis. The highest doses of GSK1345038A (120 micromol.kg(-1)) and AR-R17779 (30 micromol.kg(-1)) ameliorated clinical parameters, without affecting colonic inflammation. Neither agonist ameliorated TNBS-induced colitis. Although nicotine reduced cytokine responses in vitro, both selective alpha7 nAChR agonists worsened the effects of DSS-induced colitis or were ineffective in those of TNBS-induced colitis. Our data indicate the need for caution in evaluating alpha7 nAChR as a drug target in colitis.

  16. Acute Exacerbations of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Harold R.; Moore, Bethany B.; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Brown, Kevin K.; Kaner, Robert J.; King, Talmadge E.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Loyd, James E.; Noth, Imre; Olman, Mitchell A.; Raghu, Ganesh; Roman, Jesse; Ryu, Jay H.; Zisman, David A.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Colby, Thomas V.; Egan, Jim J.; Hansell, David M.; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lynch, David A.; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Myers, Jeffrey L.; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Selman, Moisés; Toews, Galen B.; Wells, Athol U.; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    The natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has been characterized as a steady, predictable decline in lung function over time. Recent evidence suggests that some patients may experience a more precipitous course, with periods of relative stability followed by acute deteriorations in respiratory status. Many of these acute deteriorations are of unknown etiology and have been termed acute exacerbations of IPF. This perspective is the result of an international effort to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding acute exacerbations of IPF. Acute exacerbations of IPF are defined as acute, clinically significant deteriorations of unidentifiable cause in patients with underlying IPF. Proposed diagnostic criteria include subjective worsening over 30 days or less, new bilateral radiographic opacities, and the absence of infection or another identifiable etiology. The potential pathobiological roles of infection, disordered cell biology, coagulation, and genetics are discussed, and future research directions are proposed. PMID:17585107

  17. Genetic Activation of mTORC1 Signaling Worsens Neurocognitive Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rozas, Natalia S.; Redell, John B.; Hill, Julia L.; McKenna, James; Moore, Anthony N.; Gambello, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the mechanisms that contribute to the development of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related deficits are not fully understood, it has been proposed that altered energy utilization may be a contributing factor. The tuberous sclerosis complex, a heterodimer composed of hamartin/Tsc-1 and tuberin/Tsc-2, is a critical regulatory node that integrates nutritional and growth signals to govern energy using processes by regulating the activity of mechanistic Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). mTORC1 activation results in enhanced protein synthesis, an energy consuming process. We show that mice that have a heterozygous deletion of Tsc2 exhibit elevated basal mTORC1 activity in the cortex and the hippocampus while still exhibiting normal motor and neurocognitive functions. In addition, a mild closed head injury (mCHI) that did not activate mTORC1 in wild-type mice resulted in a further increase in mTORC1 activity in Tsc2+/KO mice above the level of activity observed in uninjured Tsc2+/KO mice. This enhanced level of increased mTORC1 activity was associated with worsened cognitive function as assessed using the Morris water maze and context discrimination tasks. These results suggest that there is a threshold of increased mTORC1 activity after a TBI that is detrimental to neurobehavioral performance, and interventions to inhibit excessive mTORC1 activation may be beneficial to neurocognitive outcome. PMID:25025304

  18. Early-life febrile seizures worsen adult phenotypes in Scn1a mutants.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Stacey B B; Dutt, Karoni; Papale, Ligia A; Helmers, Sandra; Goldin, Alan L; Escayg, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene SCN1A, encoding the Nav1.1 channel, are responsible for a number of epilepsy disorders including genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and Dravet syndrome (DS). Patients with SCN1A mutations often experience prolonged early-life febrile seizures (FSs), raising the possibility that these events may influence epileptogenesis and lead to more severe adult phenotypes. To test this hypothesis, we subjected 21-23-day-old mice expressing the human SCN1A GEFS+ mutation R1648H to prolonged hyperthermia, and then examined seizure and behavioral phenotypes during adulthood. We found that early-life FSs resulted in lower latencies to induced seizures, increased severity of spontaneous seizures, hyperactivity, and impairments in social behavior and recognition memory during adulthood. Biophysical analysis of brain slice preparations revealed an increase in epileptiform activity in CA3 pyramidal neurons along with increased action potential firing, providing a mechanistic basis for the observed worsening of adult phenotypes. These findings demonstrate the long-term negative impact of early-life FSs on disease outcomes. This has important implications for the clinical management of this patient population and highlights the need for therapeutic interventions that could ameliorate disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial abnormalities in cybrid cell models of sporadic Alzheimer's disease worsen with passage in culture.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Patricia A; Keeney, Paula M; Borland, M Kate; Simon, Frederic A; Almeida, Jatanna; Swerdlow, Russell H; Parks, Janice P; Parker, W Davis; Bennett, James P

    2004-02-01

    We created and studied new cybrid cell lines from sporadic Alzheimer's disease (SAD) or control (CTL) subjects to assess mitochondrial abnormalities just after metabolic selection ("early passage") and again six passages later ("late passage"). Cytochrome oxidase (CO) activities in early passage SAD cybrids created independently from the same platelet samples were highly correlated. Early passage SAD and CTL cybrids showed equivalent mitochondrial morphologies. Late passage SAD cybrids showed increased mitochondrial number, reduced mitochondrial size, and an approximately eightfold increase in morphologically abnormal mitochondria. Deficiency of SAD cybrid mitochondrial membrane potentials (DeltaPsi(M)) increased with passage. Mitochondrial bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake to estimate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) synthesis did not change with passage in CTL but increased in SAD cybrids. With time in culture, SAD mtDNA appears to replicate faster in cybrids, yielding cells with relative worsening of bioenergetic function. Metabolically deleterious SAD mitochondrial genes, like those in yeast, may have a replicative advantage over nondeleterious mitochondrial genes that assume dominance in CTL cybrids.

  20. Paradoxical Worsening of Tubercular Serpiginous-Like Choroiditis after Initiation of Antitubercular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Ebru; Sızmaz, Selçuk; Kunt, Zeynep; Demircan, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a case with tubercular choroiditis showing severe macular edema and progression of choroidal lesions following initiation of antitubercular treatment is presented and the management of posterior uveitis associated with tuberculosis is evaluated. A 40-year-old female patient was admitted with decreased vision in her right eye and her fundoscopic examination revealed serpiginous choroiditis. It was learned from her medical history that she had taken antitubercular therapy 9 years ago. Mantoux tuberculin skin test showed an area of induration measuring 15 mm and a positive interferon-gamma release assay was documented. Additionally, sequelae lesions due to previous tubercular infection were remarkable on her chest imaging. By excluding other causes of uveitis, the patient was considered presumed ocular tuberculosis and a full standard course of 4-drug antitubercular therapy was initiated. On the seventh day of the treatment existing choroidal lesions showed progression, new foci of choroiditis appeared and severe macular edema occurred. After adding systemic corticosteroid to the treatment, the macular edema resolved and choroidal lesions began to inactivate. In patients with tubercular choroiditis, continued progression may develop after initiation of antitubercular therapy. This paradoxical worsening is thought to be a hyperacute immunologic reaction occurring against antigen load released after antitubercular therapy. This phenomenon may be suppressed by the addition of systemic corticosteroids to the treatment. PMID:28058156

  1. Dry eye findings worsen with anticholinergic therapy in patients with urge incontinence.

    PubMed

    Ozen Tunay, Zuhal; Ozdemir, Ozdemir; Ergintürk Acar, Damla; Cavkaytar, Sabri; Ersoy, Ebru

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral anticholinergic (OAC) drugs on tear secretion in women with overactive bladder over a 3-month follow-up period. In this prospective study, 108 women with a diagnosis of overactive bladder were evaluated. All patients were examined ophthalmologically at baseline (day 0), and after 1 month (day 30) and 3 months (day 90) of OAC treatment. Tear film break-up time (BUT) and Schirmer 1 test results were recorded. The subjective complaints of the patients including dry mouth, and burning, dryness and foreign body sensation in the eyes, were also recorded. The chi-squared test or the paired sample t test as appropriate, was used for statistical analysis. The mean age of the patients was 51.8 ± 9.2 years (30 - 69 years). The most frequent subjective complaints were dry mouth and dry eyes and both complaints were significant on both day 30 and day 90. Both tear film BUT and Schirmer 1 test results were significantly lower on day 30 and day 90. Dry eye measurement values worsened with prolongation of OAC treatment (p = 0.037 and p = 0.012 for BUT, and p = 0.046 and p = 0.035 for Schirmer 1 test, on day 30 and day 90, respectively). OAC treatment in women with overactive bladder significantly and progressively affects tear secretion.

  2. Paraneoplastic syndrome and underlying breast cancer: a worsening rash despite initiation of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Shradha; Makkar, Priyanka; Gupta, Sorab; Vigoda, Ivette

    2016-05-01

    Skin may show the first clinical evidence of systemic disease and can be the first clue to malignancy in 1% of cases. Dermatomyositis is an immunologically mediated inflammatory myopathy characterized by proximal muscle weakness, muscle inflammation, and characteristic skin findings. It has an incidence of 1 in 100,000 patients. In 15%-30% cases of dermatomyositis, an underlying malignancy is the cause of paraneoplastic syndrome. Ovarian and breast cancer in women and lung cancer in men are the most common malignancies associated with dermatomyositis. Here we report the case of a 55-year-old postmenopausal woman who initially presented with a facial rash. She was treated for chemical dermatitis without resolution of symptoms and was subsequently found to have dermatomyositis associated with stage IV invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. In most cases, the skin changes resolve after treatment for the underlying malignancy has been initiated, but in this case of paraneoplastic dermatomyositis, the rash worsened with initiation of treatment for underlying breast cancer.

  3. Bully/Victim Profiles’ Differential Risk for Worsening Peer Acceptance: The Role of Friendship

    PubMed Central

    Kochel, Karen P.; Ladd, Gary W.; Bagwell, Catherine L.; Yabko, Brandon A.

    2015-01-01

    Study aims were to: (1) evaluate the association between bully/victim profiles, derived via latent profile analysis (LPA), and changes in peer acceptance from the fall to spring of 7th grade, and (2) investigate the likelihood of friendlessness, and the protective function of mutual friendship, among identified profiles. Participants were 2,587 7th graders; peer nomination and rating-scale data were collected in the fall and spring. Four profiles, including bullies, victims, bully-victims, and uninvolved adolescents, were identified at each time point. Findings showed that for victims, more so than for bullies and uninvolved profiles, acceptance scores worsened over time. Results further revealed that bully-victim and victim profiles included a greater proportion of friendless youth relative to the bully profile, which, in turn, contained a greater proportion of friendless adolescents than the uninvolved profile. Findings also provided evidence for the buffering role of friendship among all bully/victim profiles and among bully-victims especially. PMID:26309346

  4. Genetic activation of mTORC1 signaling worsens neurocognitive outcome after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rozas, Natalia S; Redell, John B; Hill, Julia L; McKenna, James; Moore, Anthony N; Gambello, Michael J; Dash, Pramod K

    2015-01-15

    Although the mechanisms that contribute to the development of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related deficits are not fully understood, it has been proposed that altered energy utilization may be a contributing factor. The tuberous sclerosis complex, a heterodimer composed of hamartin/Tsc-1 and tuberin/Tsc-2, is a critical regulatory node that integrates nutritional and growth signals to govern energy using processes by regulating the activity of mechanistic Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). mTORC1 activation results in enhanced protein synthesis, an energy consuming process. We show that mice that have a heterozygous deletion of Tsc2 exhibit elevated basal mTORC1 activity in the cortex and the hippocampus while still exhibiting normal motor and neurocognitive functions. In addition, a mild closed head injury (mCHI) that did not activate mTORC1 in wild-type mice resulted in a further increase in mTORC1 activity in Tsc2(+/KO) mice above the level of activity observed in uninjured Tsc2(+/KO) mice. This enhanced level of increased mTORC1 activity was associated with worsened cognitive function as assessed using the Morris water maze and context discrimination tasks. These results suggest that there is a threshold of increased mTORC1 activity after a TBI that is detrimental to neurobehavioral performance, and interventions to inhibit excessive mTORC1 activation may be beneficial to neurocognitive outcome.

  5. Excess Visceral Adipose Tissue Worsens the Vascular Endothelial Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kurozumi, Akira; Okada, Yosuke; Arao, Tadashi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Objective Visceral fat obesity and metabolic syndrome correlate with atherosclerosis in part due to insulin resistance and various other factors. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between vascular endothelial dysfunction and excess visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods In 71 T2DM patients, the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) was measured using an Endo-PAT 2000, and VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were measured via CT. We also measured various metabolic markers, including high-molecular-weight adiponectin (HMW-AN). Results VAT correlated negatively with the natural logarithm of RHI (L_RHI), the primary endpoint (p=0.042, r=-0.242). L_RHI did not correlate with SAT, VAT/SAT, abdominal circumference, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, urinary C-peptide reactivity, HMW-AN, or alanine amino transferase, the secondary endpoints. A linear multivariate analysis via the forced entry method using age, sex, VAT, and smoking history as independent variables and L_RHI as the dependent variable revealed a lack of any determinants of L_RHI. Conclusion Excess VAT worsens the vascular endothelial function, represented by RHI which was analyzed using Endo-PAT, in Japanese patients with T2DM. PMID:27803400

  6. Desiccating Stress-Induced MMP Production and Activity Worsens Wound Healing in Alkali-Burned Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Fang; Pelegrino, Flavia S. A.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Volpe, Eugene A.; Li, De-Quan; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of dry eye on ocular surface protease activity and sight threatening corneal complications following ocular surface chemical injury. Methods C57BL/6 mice were subjected to unilateral alkali burn (AB) with or without concomitant dry eye for 2 or 5 days. Mice were observed daily for appearance of corneal perforation. Whole corneas were harvested and lysed for RNA extraction. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to measure expression of inflammation cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Matrix metalloproteinase–9 activity, gelatinase activity, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were evaluated in corneal lysates. Presence of infiltrating neutrophils was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results Eyes subjected to the combined model of AB and dry eye (CM) had 20% sterile corneal perforation rate as soon as 1 day after the initial injury, which increased to 35% by 5 days, delayed wound closure and increased corneal opacity. Increased levels of IL-1β, -6, and MMPs-1, -3, -8, -9, and -13, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CSCL1) transcripts were found after 2 days in CM compared with AB corneas. Increased MMP-1, -3, -9, and -13 immunoreactivity and gelatinolytic activity were seen in CM corneas compared with AB. Increased neutrophil infiltration and MPO activity was noted in the CM group compared with AB 2 days post injury. Conclusions Desiccating stress worsens outcome of ocular AB, creating a cytokine and protease storm with greater neutrophil infiltration, increasing the risk of corneal perforation. PMID:26225631

  7. Esophageal mucosal damage may promote dysmotility and worsen esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Adam T; Tedesco, Pietro; Damani, Tanuja; Patti, Marco G

    2005-12-01

    This study determines the relationship among esophageal dysmotility, esophageal acid exposure, and esophageal mucosal injury in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 827 patients with GERD (confirmed by ambulatory pH monitoring) were divided into three groups based on the degree of mucosal injury: group A, no esophagitis, 493 patients; group B, esophagitis grades I to III, 273 patients; and group C, Barrett's esophagus, 61 patients. As mucosal damage progressed from no esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus, there was a significant decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure and amplitude of peristalsis in the distal esophagus, with a subsequent increase in the number of reflux episodes in 24 hours, the number of reflux episodes longer than 5 minutes, and the reflux score. These data suggest that in patients with GERD, worsening of esophageal mucosal injury may determine progressive deterioration of esophageal motor function with impairment of acid clearance and increase of esophageal acid exposure. These findings suggest that Barrett's esophagus is an end-stage form of gastroesophageal reflux, and that if surgical therapy is performed early in the course of the disease, this cascade of events might be blocked.

  8. Only adding stationary storage to vaccine supply chains may create and worsen transport bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Haidari, Leila A; Connor, Diana L; Wateska, Angela R; Brown, Shawn T; Mueller, Leslie E; Norman, Bryan A; Schmitz, Michelle M; Paul, Proma; Rajgopal, Jayant; Welling, Joel S; Leonard, Jim; Claypool, Erin G; Weng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Sheng-I; Lee, Bruce Y

    2013-01-01

    Although vaccine supply chains in many countries require additional stationary storage and transport capacity to meet current and future needs, international donors tend to donate stationary storage devices far more often than transport equipment. To investigate the impact of only adding stationary storage equipment on the capacity requirements of transport devices and vehicles, we used HERMES (Highly Extensible Resource for Modeling Supply Chains) to construct a discrete event simulation model of the Niger vaccine supply chain. We measured the transport capacity requirement for each mode of transport used in the Niger vaccine cold chain, both before and after adding cold rooms and refrigerators to relieve all stationary storage constraints in the system. With the addition of necessary stationary storage, the average transport capacity requirement increased from 88% to 144% for cold trucks, from 101% to 197% for pickup trucks, and from 366% to 420% for vaccine carriers. Therefore, adding stationary storage alone may worsen or create new transport bottlenecks as more vaccines flow through the system, preventing many vaccines from reaching their target populations. Dynamic modeling can reveal such relationships between stationary storage capacity and transport constraints.

  9. Evidence-based recommendations and expert consensus on enteral nutrition in the adult patient with diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Álvarez Hernández, Julia; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Botella-Romero, Francisco; León-Sanz, Miguel; Martín-Palmero, Ángela; Martínez Olmos, Miguel Ángel; Olveira, Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop evidence-based recommendations for glycemic control of patients with diabetes mellitus or stress hyperglycemia who are receiving enteral nutrition (EN). A Delphi survey method using Grading Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria was utilized for evaluation of suitable studies. In patients with diabetes or stress hyperglycemia who were on EN support, the following results were found: CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations and suggestions regarding enteral feeding in patients with diabetes and hyperglycemia have direct clinical applicability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of hyperglycemia in a general Japanese population with late-night-dinner eating alone, but not breakfast skipping alone.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kei; Suwa, Kaname

    2015-01-01

    The unhealthy habit of late-night-dinner eating (LNDE) is often observed in adults. Since LNDE can lead to breakfast skipping (BS) the next morning, we examined the associations of LNDE and BS with hyperglycemia (HbA1c ≥ 5.7% and/or pharmacotherapy for diabetes), separately and in combination, in 61,364 apparently healthy Japanese adults aged 30-70 years. Although LNDE alone was significantly associated with hyperglycemia, even after adjustment for body mass index, BS alone was not. Our results indicate that hyperglycemia in the general Japanese population is associated with LNDE alone, but not BS alone.

  11. Hyperglycemia-conditioned increase in alpha-2-macroglobulin in healthy normal subjects: a phenomenon correlated with deficient antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Giugliano, D

    1989-01-01

    Induced hyperglycemia in normal subjects increases alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and alpha 2M concentration and reduces antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, while it does not affect ATIII plasma concentration. Hyperglycemia-determined variations in ATIII activity and alpha 2M molecules are correlated in an inverse and parallel fashion. A compensatory role for the increase in alpha 2M in the regulation of the coagulation system may be hypothesized. Moreover, these data provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may influence the levels of some risk factors for the development of complications in diabetes.

  12. Admission Glucose and Effect of Intra-Arterial Treatment in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Osei, Elizabeth; den Hertog, Heleen M; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Fransen, Puck S S; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Beumer, Debbie; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Schonewille, Wouter J; Boiten, Jelis; Zandbergen, Adrienne A M; Koudstaal, Peter J; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2017-05-01

    Hyperglycemia on admission is common after ischemic stroke. It is associated with unfavorable outcome after treatment with intravenous thrombolysis and after intra-arterial treatment. Whether hyperglycemia influences the effect of reperfusion treatment is unknown. We assessed whether increased admission serum glucose modifies the effect of intra-arterial treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We used data from the MR CLEAN (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands). Hyperglycemia was defined as admission serum glucose >7.8 mmol/L. The primary outcome measure was the adjusted common odds ratio for a shift in the direction of a better outcome on the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days, estimated with ordinal logistic regression. Secondary outcome variable was symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. We assessed treatment effect modification of hyperglycemia and admission serum glucose levels with multiplicative interaction factors and adjusted for prognostic variables. Four hundred eighty-seven patients were included. Mean admission serum glucose was 7.2 mmol/L (SD, 2.2). Fifty-seven of 226 patients (25%) randomized to intra-arterial treatment were hyperglycemic compared with 61 of 261 patients (23%) in the control group. The interaction of either hyperglycemia or admission serum glucose levels and treatment effect on modified Rankin Scale scores was not significant (P=0.67 and P=0.87, respectively). The same applied for occurrence of symptomatic hemorrhage (P=0.39 for hyperglycemia, P=0.39 for admission serum glucose). We found no evidence for effect modification of intra-arterial treatment by admission serum glucose in patients with acute ischemic stroke. URL: www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN10888758. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Weight changes after hospitalization for worsening heart failure and subsequent re-hospitalization and mortality in the EVEREST trial.

    PubMed

    Blair, John E A; Khan, Sadiya; Konstam, Marvin A; Swedberg, Karl; Zannad, Faiez; Burnett, John C; Grinfeld, Liliana; Maggioni, Aldo P; Udelson, James E; Zimmer, Christopher A; Ouyang, John; Chen, Chien-Feng; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2009-07-01

    Increases in body weight (BW) are important determinants for hospitalization in ambulatory patients with heart failure (HF), but have not yet been explored in patients hospitalized for worsening HF. We explore the relationship between change in BW after hospitalization for worsening HF and risk for repeat hospitalization and mortality in the EVEREST trial. The EVEREST trial randomized 4133 patients hospitalized for worsening HF and low ejection fraction (< or =40%) to tolvaptan, a vasopressin antagonist, or placebo. Following discharge, BW was assessed at 1, 4, and 8 weeks, and every 8 weeks thereafter. A time-dependent Cox proportional Hazard model explored the relationship between change in BW at 60, 120, and 180 days from discharge and the risks of HF hospitalization, cardiovascular (CV) hospitalization, and all-cause mortality. For subjects re-hospitalized for heart failure at 60, 120, and 180 days after discharge, mean BW increase prior to the event was 1.96, 2.07, and 1.97 kg, respectively, compared with 0.74, 0.90, and 1.04 kg in patients without re-hospitalization (P < 0.001 all groups). A similar pattern was observed with CV hospitalization. However, increases in BW were not predictive of all-cause mortality. Increases in BW after hospitalization for worsening HF was predictive of repeat hospitalization events, but not mortality in the post-discharge period.

  14. Combined Vitamin C and Vitamin E Deficiency Worsens Early Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Babaev, Vladimir R.; Li, Liying; Shah, Sanket; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae F.; May, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition associated with oxidative stress, but controversy persists regarding whether antioxidants such as vitamins C and E are preventative. To assess the role of combined deficiencies of vitamins C and E on the earliest stages of atherosclerosis, four combinations of vitamin supplementation (Low C/Low E, Low C/High E, High C/Low E, High C/High E) were studied in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice also unable to synthesize their own vitamin C (gulo−/−). The effect of a more severe depletion of vitamin C alone was evaluated in a second experiment using gulo−/− mice carrying the hemizygous deletion of SVCT2, the vitamin C transporter. Methods and Results After 8 weeks on a high-fat diet (16% lard, 0.2% cholesterol), atherosclerosis developed in the aortic sinus areas of mice in all diet groups. Each vitamin-deficient diet significantly decreased liver and brain contents of the corresponding vitamin. Combined deficiency of both vitamins increased lipid peroxidation, doubled plaque size, and increased plaque macrophage content by 2-3-fold in males, although only plaque macrophage content was increased in females. A more severe deficiency of vitamin C in gulo−/− mice with defective cellular uptake of vitamin C increased both oxidative stress and atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice compared to littermates on a diet replete in vitamin C, again most clearly in males. Conclusion Combined vitamin E and C deficiencies are required to worsen early atherosclerosis in an apoE-deficient mouse model. However, a more severe cellular deficiency of vitamin C alone promotes atherosclerosis when vitamin E is replete. PMID:20558818

  15. Regional cortical thinning and cerebrospinal biomarkers predict worsening daily functioning across the Alzheimer disease spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Gad A.; Lorius, Natacha; Locascio, Joseph J.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impairment in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) heralds the transition from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and is a major source of burden for both the patient and caregiver. Objective To investigate the relationship between IADL and regional cortical thinning and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers cross-sectionally and longitudinally in clinically normal (CN) elderly, MCI, and mild AD dementia subjects. Methods Two hundred and twenty nine CN, 395 MCI, and 188 AD dementia subjects participating in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging, baseline lumbar puncture, and clinical assessments, including the Functional Activities Questionnaire used to measure IADL, every 6 to 12 months up to 3 years. General linear regression and mixed effects models were employed. Results IADL impairment was associated with the interactions between lower inferior temporal cortical thickness and diagnosis (p<0.0001), greater lateral occipital cortical thickness and diagnosis (p<0.0001), and greater amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ1-42) and diagnosis (p=0.0002) at baseline (driven by AD dementia). Lower baseline supramarginal (p=0.02) and inferior temporal (p=0.05) cortical thickness, lower Aβ1-42 (p<0.0001), and greater total tau (t-tau) (p=0.02) were associated with greater rate of IADL impairment over time. Conclusions Temporal atrophy is associated with IADL impairment in mild AD dementia at baseline, while baseline parietal and temporal atrophy, lower CSF Aβ1-42, and greater t-tau predict worsening IADL impairment over time across the AD spectrum. These results emphasize the importance of assessing IADL at the stage of MCI and even at the transition from CN to MCI. PMID:24685624

  16. Lung-specific loss of α3 laminin worsens bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa I; Rogel, Micah R; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Soberanes, Saul; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Chi, Monica; Cho, Takugo; Radigan, Kathryn A; Ridge, Karen M; Misharin, Alexander V; Woychek, Alex; Hopkinson, Susan; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Jones, Jonathan C R; Budinger, G R Scott

    2015-04-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric proteins that are secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the basement membrane, and their expression is altered in extracellular matrices from patients with pulmonary fibrosis. In a small number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, we found that the normal basement membrane distribution of the α3 laminin subunit was lost in fibrotic regions of the lung. To determine if these changes play a causal role in the development of fibrosis, we generated mice lacking the α3 laminin subunit specifically in the lung epithelium by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-Cre) with mice expressing floxed alleles encoding the α3 laminin gene (Lama3(fl/fl)). These mice exhibited no developmental abnormalities in the lungs up to 6 months of age, but, compared with control mice, had worsened mortality, increased inflammation, and increased fibrosis after the intratracheal administration of bleomycin. Similarly, the severity of fibrosis induced by an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor-β was worse in mice deficient in α3 laminin in the lung. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of α3 laminin in the lung epithelium does not affect lung development, but plays a causal role in the development of fibrosis in response to bleomycin or adenovirally delivered transforming growth factor-β. Thus, we speculate that the loss of the normal basement membrane organization of α3 laminin that we observe in fibrotic regions from the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis contributes to their disease progression.

  17. Chronic widespread pain is associated with worsening frailty in European men

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Katie Fredrika; Lee, David M.; McBeth, John; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Gielen, Evelien; Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Pendleton, Neil; Finn, Joseph D.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C. W.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: we hypothesised that chronic widespread pain (CWP), by acting as a potential stressor, may predispose to the development of, or worsening, frailty. Setting: longitudinal analysis within the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). Participants: a total of 2,736 community-dwelling men aged 40–79. Methods: subjects completed a pain questionnaire and shaded a manikin, with the presence of CWP defined using the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and depression were measured. Repeat assessments took place a median of 4.3 years later. A frailty index (FI) was used, with frail defined as an FI >0.35. The association between CWP at baseline and the new occurrence of frailty was examined using logistic regression; the association between CWP at baseline and change in FI was examined using negative binomial regression. Results: at baseline, 218 (8.3%) men reported CWP. Of the 2,631 men who were defined as non-frail at baseline, 112 (4.3%) were frail at follow-up; their mean FI was 0.12 (SD 0.1) at baseline and 0.15 (SD 0.1) at follow-up, with a mean change of 0.03 (SD 0.08) P ≤ 0.001. Among men who were non-frail at baseline, those with CWP were significantly more likely to develop frailty. After adjustment for age and centre, compared with those with no pain, those with CWP at baseline had a 70% higher FI at follow-up; these associations remained significant after further adjustment for smoking, body mass index, depression, physical activity and FI at baseline. Conclusion: the presence of CWP is associated with an increased risk of frailty in older European men. PMID:26679698

  18. Fatigue predicts disease worsening in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Michele; Palotai, Miklos; Glanz, Bonnie I; Egorova, Svetlana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Healy, Brian C; Chitnis, Tanuja; Guttmann, Charles Rg

    2016-12-01

    It is unclear whether fatigue is a consequence or a predictive trait of disease worsening. To investigate the predictive value of fatigue toward conversion to confirmed moderate-severe disability in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). We retrospectively selected from the Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigations in MS at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB) study cohort RRMS patients who converted to confirmed (⩾2 years) Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ⩾3 within a follow-up period ⩾3 years. We contrasted the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) score of 33 converters, obtained at least 1 year before conversion to EDSS ⩾3, with that of 33 non-converter RRMS patients matched for baseline characteristics. Total MFIS score was higher in converter versus non-converter MS patients (median 37 vs 13; p < 0.0001). EDSS and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) scores were also higher in the converters (median EDSS 1.5 vs 0, p < 0.0001; median CES-D 30 vs 24, p < 0.0001) and were both associated with MFIS score (EDSS: rho = 0.42, p = 0.0005; CES-D: rho = 0.72, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for EDSS and CES-D in multivariate analysis, MFIS remained a significant predictor of subsequent conversion to confirmed EDSS ⩾3. Fatigue is a promising indicator of risk for conversion to confirmed moderate-severe disability in RRMS patients. © The Author(s), 2016.

  19. Is worsening multiple organ failure the cause of death in patients with severe sepsis?

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Nelson, David R; Williams, Mark D

    2011-05-01

    Although the mortality of severe sepsis is easily quantified, the actual cause and timing of death from severe sepsis are less defined. We used the INDEPTH (International Integrated Database for the Evaluation of Severe Sepsis and Drotrecogin alfa activated) database to investigate the reported cause of death in patients with severe sepsis. Retrospective database analysis. Data from 4459 patients with severe sepsis (drotrecogin alfa activated, n = 3228; placebo, n = 1231) included in five clinical trials conducted in tertiary care institutions in 28 countries. We examined the cause of death and the pattern of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores near the time of death. We also evaluated the time course of biomarker levels at this late stage. A total of 1201 (27.0%) patients died during the 28-day study period. The main causes of death were as follows: sepsis-associated multiple organ failure (43.1%), refractory septic shock (22.6%), and respiratory failure (13.0%). There were no significant differences in the distributions of cause of death between drotrecogin alfa activated and placebo patients, so that all patients were combined for analysis. The mean cardiovascular Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score increased from 2.4, 4 days before death, to 2.9, 1 day before death, and the mean respiratory Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score increased from 2.6, 4 days before death, to 2.9, 1 day before death. The increase in these individual Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores was more prominent in patients who died early (day 0-5). Protein C levels decreased and interleukin-6 levels increased in the days before death. Patients with severe sepsis typically die of multiple organ failure, refractory shock, or respiratory failure. Persistent, more than worsening, organ failure is the more common pattern before death.

  20. Trans-oral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy does not worsen the speech after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; Khalifa, Badawy; Shawky, Ahmed; Rashed, Mohammed; Naguib, Nader; Abdel-Hameed, Asmaa

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid hypertrophy may play a role in velopharyngeal closure especially in patients with palatal abnormality; adenoidectomy may lead to velopharyngeal insufficiency and hyper nasal speech. Patients with cleft palate even after repair should not undergo adenoidectomy unless absolutely needed, and in such situations, conservative or partial adenoidectomy is performed to avoid the occurrence of velopharyngeal insufficiency. Trans-oral endoscopic adenoidectomy enables the surgeon to inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy on the speech of children with repaired cleft palate. Twenty children with repaired cleft palate underwent transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy to relieve their airway obstruction. The procedure was completely visualized with the use of a 70° 4mm nasal endoscope; the upper part of the adenoid was removed using adenoid curette and St. Claire Thompson forceps, while the lower part was retained to maintain the velopharyngeal competence. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation of speech was performed, subjectively by auditory perceptual assessment, and objectively by nasometric assessment. Speech was not adversely affected after surgery. The difference between preoperative and postoperative auditory perceptual assessment and nasalance scores for nasal and oral sentences was insignificant (p=0.231, 0.442, 0.118 respectively). Transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy is a safe method; it does not worsen the speech of repaired cleft palate patients. It enables the surgeon to strictly inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure with better determination of the adenoidal part that may contribute in velopharyngeal closure. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Bed Rest Worsens Impairments in Fat and Glucose Metabolism in Older, Overweight Adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. The effects of bed rest on the dysregulation of fatty acid and glucose metabolism have not been addressed in the older population. Objective. We examined the effect of 10 days of bed rest on fatty acid kinetics and hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance in aging. Methods. We utilized an octreotide, basal glucagon replacement, multistage insulin infusion, and the concomitant infusion of [6,6 2H2]glucose to derive insulin-mediated suppression of glucose production and insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in nine older, overweight individuals (body mass index 28.1 ± 1.7 kg m−2; 39.9% ± 1.9% fat). During the multistage insulin infusion, we also infused [1-13C]palmitate to examine free fatty acid rate of appearance (R a). Results. Body weight, % body fat, and energy metabolism did not change with bed rest. There was a significant decrease (−2291 ± 316cm3) in visceral fat, and no change in abdominal subcutaneous fat with bed rest. Insulin-mediated suppression of glucose production was modest prior to bed rest and was further reduced (>15% ± 2%) by bed rest. There was also a minor decrease in the insulin-mediated suppression of free fatty acid R a after bed rest and, as a consequence, a small variation in plasma free fatty acid from pre- to post-bed rest in the first stage of the multistage insulin infusion. There was also a significant bed rest–induced decline (>2.0 ± 0.6 mg kg FFM−1 min− 1) in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Conclusions. Preexisting impairments in insulin sensitivity are worsened by bed rest and seem linked to alterations in the regulation of free fatty acid in older, overweight individuals. PMID:23902932

  2. Moderate exercise training does not worsen left ventricle remodeling and function in untreated severe hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Boissiere, Julien; Eder, Véronique; Machet, Marie-Christine; Courteix, Daniel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2008-02-01

    Exercise training and hypertension induced cardiac hypertrophy but modulate differently left ventricle (LV) function. This study set out to evaluate cardiac adaptations induced by moderate exercise training in normotensive and untreated severe hypertensive rats. Four groups of animals were studied: normotensive (Ctl) and severe hypertensive (HT) Wistar rats were assigned to be sedentary (Sed) or perform a moderate exercise training (Ex) over a 10-wk period. Severe hypertension was induced in rat by a two-kidney, one-clip model. At the end of the training period, hemodynamic parameters and LV morphology and function were assessed using catheterism and conventional pulsed Doppler echocardiography. LV histology was performed to study fibrosis infiltrations. Severe hypertension increased systolic blood pressure to 202 +/- 9 mmHg and induced pathological hypertrophy (LV hypertrophy index was 0.34 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.02 in Ctl-Sed and HT-Sed groups, respectively) with LV relaxation alteration (early-to-atrial wave ratio = 2.02 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.63 +/- 0.12). Blood pressure was not altered by exercise training, but arterial stiffness was reduced in trained hypertensive rats (pulse pressure was 75 +/- 7 vs. 62 +/- 3 mmHg in HT-Sed and HT-Ex groups, respectively). Exercise training induced eccentric hypertrophy in both Ex groups by increasing LV cavity without alteration of LV systolic function. However, LV hypertrophy index was significantly decreased in normotensive rats only (0.34 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.30 +/- 0.02 in Ctl-Sed and Ctl-Ex groups, respectively). Moreover, exercise training improved LV passive filling in Ctl-Ex rats but not in Ht-Ex rats. In this study, exercise training did not reduce blood pressure and induced an additional physiological hypertrophy in untreated HT rats, which was slightly blunted when compared with Ctl rats. However, cardiac function was not worsened by exercise training.

  3. Significant worsening sperm parameters are associated to testicular hypotrophy in patients with a high grade varicocele.

    PubMed

    Guzel, O; Aslan, Y; Balci, M; Tuncel, A; Unal, B; Atan, A

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between testicular volume and semen parameter sin patients with unilateral high grade left varicocele. One hundred eighty seven patients who had left high grade varicocele aged 19-to-25 years were included in this study. All patients underwent a standard evaluation, including medical history and physical examination. The percentage testicular volume difference between the right and left testicles was calculated. The patients were divided into the following three groups; Group 1 (n=72) testicular volume difference <10%, testicular volume difference 10%-20% Group 2 (n=74) and testicular volume difference >20% Group 3 (n=41). The mean age and BMI of the patients were 21.5 years and 23.1kg/m(2), respectively (P=.596, P=.943). The semen parameters and testicular volumes of the three groups were compared. The total motile sperm count, percentage of motile sperm, percentage of normal morphology sperm were found to be lower in Group 3 (P=.011, P=.012, P=.029 respectively). The mean testicular volumes for the left and the right testis were found to be 15.2cm(3) and 17.7cm(3) (P<.001), respectively. No significant difference was found in the right testicular volumes between groups (17.4, 17.7 and 18.1cm(3), P=.573). A high grade left testicular varicocele is associated with ipsilateral testicular hypotrophy and parallel to worsened sperm parameters. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Regional cortical thinning predicts worsening apathy and hallucinations across the Alzheimer disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Nancy J; Wadsworth, Lauren P; Lorius, Natacha; Locascio, Joseph J; Rentz, Dorene M; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Marshall, Gad A

    2014-11-01

    To examine regions of cortical thinning and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers associated with apathy and hallucinations in a continuum of individuals including clinically normal elderly, mild cognitive impairment, and mild AD dementia. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. Fifty-seven research sites across North America. Eight-hundred twelve community-dwelling volunteers; 413 participants in the CSF sub-study. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data and CSF concentrations of amyloid-β 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau derived from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database were analyzed. Apathy and hallucinations were measured at baseline and over 3 years using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire. General linear models and mixed effects models were used to evaluate the relationships among baseline cortical thickness in seven regions, and baseline CSF biomarkers, apathy, and hallucinations at baseline and longitudinally. Covariates included diagnosis, sex, age, apolipoprotein E genotype, premorbid intelligence, memory performance, processing speed, antidepressant use, and AD duration. Reduced baseline inferior temporal cortical thickness was predictive of increasing apathy over time, and reduced supramarginal cortical thickness was predictive of increasing hallucinations over time. There was no association with cortical thickness at baseline. CSF biomarkers were not related to severity of apathy or hallucinations in cross-sectional or longitudinal analyses. These results suggest that greater baseline temporal and parietal atrophy is associated with worsening apathy and hallucinations in a large AD spectrum cohort, while adjusting for multiple disease-related variables. Localized cortical neurodegeneration may contribute to the pathophysiology of apathy and hallucinations and their adverse consequences in AD. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  5. Lung-Specific Loss of α3 Laminin Worsens Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa I.; Rogel, Micah R.; Eisenberg, Jessica L.; Hamill, Kevin J.; Soberanes, Saul; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Chi, Monica; Cho, Takugo; Radigan, Kathryn A.; Ridge, Karen M.; Misharin, Alexander V.; Woychek, Alex; Hopkinson, Susan; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M.; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Jones, Jonathan C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric proteins that are secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the basement membrane, and their expression is altered in extracellular matrices from patients with pulmonary fibrosis. In a small number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, we found that the normal basement membrane distribution of the α3 laminin subunit was lost in fibrotic regions of the lung. To determine if these changes play a causal role in the development of fibrosis, we generated mice lacking the α3 laminin subunit specifically in the lung epithelium by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-Cre) with mice expressing floxed alleles encoding the α3 laminin gene (Lama3fl/fl). These mice exhibited no developmental abnormalities in the lungs up to 6 months of age, but, compared with control mice, had worsened mortality, increased inflammation, and increased fibrosis after the intratracheal administration of bleomycin. Similarly, the severity of fibrosis induced by an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor-β was worse in mice deficient in α3 laminin in the lung. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of α3 laminin in the lung epithelium does not affect lung development, but plays a causal role in the development of fibrosis in response to bleomycin or adenovirally delivered transforming growth factor-β. Thus, we speculate that the loss of the normal basement membrane organization of α3 laminin that we observe in fibrotic regions from the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis contributes to their disease progression. PMID:25188360

  6. Liver Perilipin 5 Expression Worsens Hepatosteatosis But Not Insulin Resistance in High Fat-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Michelle B.; Mazur-Hart, David; Machida, Yui; King, Timothy; Nadler, Joseph; Galkina, Elena V.; Poddar, Arjun; Dutta, Sucharita

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 5 (PLIN5) is a lipid droplet (LD) protein highly expressed in oxidative tissues, including the fasted liver. However, its expression also increases in nonalcoholic fatty liver. To determine whether PLIN5 regulates metabolic phenotypes of hepatosteatosis under nutritional excess, liver targeted overexpression of PLIN5 was achieved using adenoviral vector (Ad-PLIN5) in male C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat diet. Mice treated with adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (Ad-GFP) served as control. Ad-PLIN5 livers increased LD in the liver section, and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry revealed increases in lipid classes associated with LD, including triacylglycerol, cholesterol ester, and phospholipid classes, compared with Ad-GFP liver. Lipids commonly associated with hepatic lipotoxicity, diacylglycerol, and ceramides, were also increased in Ad-PLIN5 liver. The expression of genes in lipid metabolism regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α was reduced suggestive of slower mobilization of stored lipids in Ad-PLIN5 mice. However, the increase of hepatosteatosis by PLIN5 overexpression did not worsen glucose homeostasis. Rather, serum insulin levels were decreased, indicating better insulin sensitivity in Ad-PLIN5 mice. Moreover, genes associated with liver injury were unaltered in Ad-PLIN5 steatotic liver compared with Ad-GFP control. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B was increased in Ad-PLIN5-transduced AML12 hepatocyte despite of the promotion of fatty acid incorporation to triacylglycerol as well. Collectively, our data indicates that the increase in liver PLIN5 during hepatosteatosis drives further lipid accumulation but does not adversely affect hepatic health or insulin sensitivity. PMID:26296152

  7. CT Hounsfield Units as a Predictor for the Worsening of Traumatic Vertebral Compression Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Soliman, Hesham M; Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Kurpad, Shekar; Maiman, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    With vertebral compression fractures (VCF), height loss has been associated with kyphotic deformity and intractable pain, 2 indications for potential surgical intervention. Consequently, assessment of factors associated with continual height loss can provide insights regarding management. Computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield units (HU), a measure of radiodensity, have been implicated for the assessment of bone quality. No studies have assessed the relationship between CT HU and traumatic VCF. Consequently, the objective of this study was to evaluate this relationship. Patients who sustained a traumatic VCF from a motor vehicle accident from 2006 to 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Inclusion criteria were single VCF from L1 to L4, appropriate imaging, and appropriate follow-up. Clinical data were extracted (age, gender, history of osteoporosis, body mass index [BMI], and length of follow-up). Initial CT imaging was evaluated for averaged HU at the levels above and below the index level of the VCF. Interval percentage change (Δ%) in anterior compression was evaluated between radiographs obtained during initial presentation and at follow-up. Age, BMI, and CT HU significantly correlated with Δ% (P < 0.01), whereas initial height loss, history of osteoporosis, and length of follow-up did not. A multiple linear regression for Δ% that combined age, BMI, and CT HU values elicited a regression model with R(2) 0.648, and adjusted R(2) 0.606; each variable in the model showed P < 0.05. A receiver operating characteristic analysis to predict Δ% < 10% from Δ% ≥10% showed an area under the curve 0.983 (P < 0.01), where CT HU at 171.58 showed a combination of sensitivity at 0.923 and specificity at 0.91. Age, BMI, and CT HU values are independent predictors of worsening VCF. These factors can help determine appropriate clinical follow-up and need for surgical intervention. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Deep brain stimulation may reduce the relative risk of clinically important worsening in early stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Mallory L; Tonascia, James; Turchan, Maxim; Currie, Amanda; Heusinkveld, Lauren; Konrad, Peter E; Davis, Thomas L; Neimat, Joseph S; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Wang, Lily; Shi, Yaping; Shade, David M; Sternberg, Alice L; Drye, Lea T; Charles, David

    2015-10-01

    The Vanderbilt pilot trial of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in early Parkinson's disease (PD) enrolled patients on medications six months to four years without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias. We conducted a patient-centered analysis based on clinically important worsening of motor symptoms and complications of medical therapy for all subjects and a subset of subjects with a more focused medication duration. Continuous outcomes were also analyzed for this focused cohort. A post hoc analysis was conducted on all subjects from the pilot and a subset of subjects taking PD medications 1-4 years at enrollment. Clinically important worsening is defined as both a ≥ 3 point increase in UPDRS Part III and a ≥ 1 point increase in Part IV. DBS plus optimal drug therapy (DBS + ODT) subjects experienced a 50-80% reduction in the relative risk of worsening after two years. The DBS + ODT group was improved compared to optimal drug therapy (ODT) at each time point on Total UPDRS and Part III (p = 0.04, p = 0.02, respectively, at 24 months). Total UPDRS, Part IV, and PDQ-39 scores significantly worsened in the ODT group after two years (p < 0.003), with no significant change in the DBS + ODT group. DBS + ODT in early PD may reduce the risk of clinically important worsening. These findings further confirm the need to determine if DBS + ODT is superior to medical therapy for managing symptoms, reducing the complications of medications, and improving quality of life. The FDA has approved the conduct of a large-scale, pivotal clinical trial of DBS in early stage PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Measures Associated With Increased Risk of Covert Brain Infarction and Worsening Leukoaraiosis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lester Y; Bartz, Traci M; Rice, Kenneth; Floyd, James; Psaty, Bruce; Gutierrez, Jose; Longstreth, W T; Mukamal, Kenneth J

    2017-08-01

    In people without previous stroke, covert findings on serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of incident brain infarcts and worsening leukoaraiosis are associated with increased risk for ischemic stroke and dementia. We evaluated whether various measures of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate are associated with these MRI findings. In the CHS (Cardiovascular Health Study), a longitudinal cohort study of older adults, we used relative risk regression to assess the associations of mean, variability, and trend in systolic BP, diastolic BP, and heart rate measured at 4 annual clinic visits between 2 brain MRIs with incident covert brain infarction and worsening white matter grade (using a 10-point scale to characterize leukoaraiosis). We included participants who had both brain MRIs, no stroke before the follow-up MRI, and no change in antihypertensive medication status during follow-up. Among 878 eligible participants, incident covert brain infarction occurred in 15% and worsening white matter grade in 27%. Mean systolic BP was associated with increased risk for incident covert brain infarction (relative risk per 10 mm Hg, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.47), and mean diastolic BP was associated with increased risk for worsening white matter grade (relative risk per 10 mm Hg, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-1.69). These findings persisted in secondary and sensitivity analyses. Elevated mean systolic BP is associated with increased risk for covert brain infarction, and elevated mean diastolic BP is associated with increased risk for worsening leukoaraiosis. These findings reinforce the importance of hypertension in the development of silent cerebrovascular diseases, but the pathophysiologic relationships to BP for each may differ. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Partial meniscectomy is associated with increased risk of incident radiographic osteoarthritis and worsening cartilage damage in the following year.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Frank W; Kwoh, C Kent; Hannon, Michael J; Hunter, David J; Eckstein, Felix; Grago, Jason; Boudreau, Robert M; Englund, Martin; Guermazi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether partial meniscectomy is associated with increased risk of radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) and worsening cartilage damage in the following year. We studied 355 knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative that developed ROA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥ 2), which were matched with control knees. The MR images were assessed using the semi-quantitative MOAKS system. Conditional logistic regression was applied to estimate risk of incident ROA. Logistic regression was used to assess the risk of worsening cartilage damage in knees with partial meniscectomy that developed ROA. In the group with incident ROA, 4.4 % underwent partial meniscectomy during the year prior to the case-defining visit, compared with none of the knees that did not develop ROA. All (n = 31) knees that had partial meniscectomy and 58.9 % (n = 165) of the knees with prevalent meniscal damage developed ROA (OR = 2.51, 95 % CI [1.73, 3.64]). In knees that developed ROA, partial meniscectomy was associated with an increased risk of worsening cartilage damage (OR = 4.51, 95 % CI [1.53, 13.33]). The probability of having had partial meniscectomy was higher in knees that developed ROA. When looking only at knees that developed ROA, partial meniscectomy was associated with greater risk of worsening cartilage damage. • Partial meniscectomy is a controversial treatment option for degenerative meniscal tears. • Partial meniscectomy is strongly associated with incident osteoarthritis within 1 year. • Partial meniscectomy is associated with increased risk of worsening cartilage damage.

  11. Worsening Cognitive Impairment and Neurodegenerative Pathology Progressively Increase Risk for Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Daniel H.J.; Skelly, Donal T.; Murray, Carol; Hennessy, Edel; Bowen, Jordan; Norton, Samuel; Brayne, Carol; Rahkonen, Terhi; Sulkava, Raimo; Sanderson, David J.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas; Bannerman, David M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Cunningham, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Background Delirium is a profound neuropsychiatric disturbance precipitated by acute illness. Although dementia is the major risk factor this has typically been considered a binary quantity (i.e., cognitively impaired versus cognitively normal) with respect to delirium risk. We used humans and mice to address the hypothesis that the severity of underlying neurodegenerative changes and/or cognitive impairment progressively alters delirium risk. Methods Humans in a population-based longitudinal study, Vantaa 85+, were followed for incident delirium. Odds for reporting delirium at follow-up (outcome) were modeled using random-effects logistic regression, where prior cognitive impairment measured by Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) (exposure) was considered. To address whether underlying neurodegenerative pathology increased susceptibility to acute cognitive change, mice at three stages of neurodegenerative disease progression (ME7 model of neurodegeneration: controls, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks) were assessed for acute cognitive dysfunction upon systemic inflammation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg). Synaptic and axonal correlates of susceptibility to acute dysfunction were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In the Vantaa cohort, 465 persons (88.4 ± 2.8 years) completed MMSE at baseline. For every MMSE point lost, risk of incident delirium increased by 5% (p = 0.02). LPS precipitated severe and fluctuating cognitive deficits in 16-week ME7 mice but lower incidence or no deficits in 12-week ME7 and controls, respectively. This was associated with progressive thalamic synaptic loss and axonal pathology. Conclusion A human population-based cohort with graded severity of existing cognitive impairment and a mouse model with progressing neurodegeneration both indicate that the risk of delirium increases with greater severity of pre-existing cognitive impairment and neuropathology. PMID:25239680

  12. Radiographic basal ganglia abnormalities secondary to nonketotic hyperglycemia with unusual clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ju Young; Park, Joon Min; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Jun Seok; Shin, Dong Wun; Kim, Hoon; Jeon, Woo Chan; Kim, Hyun Jong

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was admitted to a local clinic for altered consciousness and presented with a suspected basal ganglion hemorrhage detected on brain computed tomography. The patient was stuporous, but her vital signs were stable. Her initial blood glucose was 607 mg/dL, and a hyperdense lesion was found in the right basal ganglion on brain computed tomography. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signal intensity in the right basal ganglion. Electroencephalography showed no seizure activity. The patient was treated with a fluid infusion, and serum glucose level was controlled with insulin. The patient gradually recovered consciousness and was alert within 24 hours as serum glucose level normalized. The basal ganglion lesion caused by hyperglycemia was not accompanied by involuntary limb movement. This is the first report of a patient presenting with decreased consciousness and typical neural radiographic changes associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia but without movement abnormalities. PMID:28168232

  13. Steroid hyperglycemia: Prevalence, early detection and therapeutic recommendations: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; Quintanilla-Flores, Dania Lizet; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; González-González, José Gerardo; Tamez-Peña, Alejandra Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Steroids are drugs that have been used extensively in a variety of conditions. Although widely prescribed for their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, glucocorticoids have several side effects, being hyperglycemia one of the most common and representative. In the present review, we discuss the main epidemiologic characteristics associated with steroid use, with emphasis on the identification of high risk populations. Additionally we present the pathophysiology of corticosteroid induced hyperglycemia as well as the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics associated with steroid use. We propose a treatment strategy based on previous reports and the understanding of the mechanism of action of both, the different types of glucocorticoids and the treatment options, in both the ambulatory and the hospital setting. Finally, we present some of the recent scientific advances as well as some options for future use of glucocorticoids. PMID:26240704

  14. Antihyperglycemic and Antihyperlipidemic Activity of Hydroponic Stevia rebaudiana Aqueous Extract in Hyperglycemia Induced by Immobilization Stress in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanyan, Anush; Movsisyan, Zaruhi

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a serious worldwide problem related to human hyperglycemia. Thus, herbal preparations with antihyperglycemic properties especially leaf extracts of hydroponic Stevia rebaudiana (SR) would be useful in hyperglycemia treatment. The antihyperglycemic potential of this medicinal plant grown using hydroponics methods has been evaluated. Significant reduction of some biochemical characteristics for sugars and fatty acids in blood, liver, and muscle especially fasting glucose levels, serum triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol levels, and increased HDL-cholesterol ones was shown with SR aqueous extract treatment. Therefore, the aqueous extract of SR is suggested to have antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activity and to restore liver and muscle glycogen levels (hepatoprotective effects) in hyperglycemia induced by immobilization stress in rabbits and might be recommended for treatment of DM (hyperglycemia). PMID:28758125

  15. Non-infectious chemotherapy-associated acute toxicities during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Müller, Klaus; Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Mogensen, Pernille Rudebeck; Wolthers, Benjamin Ole; Stoltze, Ulrik Kristoffer; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Frandsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    During chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, all organs can be affected by severe acute side effects, the most common being opportunistic infections, mucositis, central or peripheral neuropathy (or both), bone toxicities (including osteonecrosis), thromboembolism, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, endocrinopathies (especially steroid-induced adrenal insufficiency and hyperglycemia), high-dose methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity, asparaginase-associated hypersensitivity, pancreatitis, and hyperlipidemia. Few of the non-infectious acute toxicities are associated with clinically useful risk factors, and across study groups there has been wide diversity in toxicity definitions, capture strategies, and reporting, thus hampering meaningful comparisons of toxicity incidences for different leukemia protocols. Since treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia now yields 5-year overall survival rates above 90%, there is a need for strategies for assessing the burden of toxicities in the overall evaluation of anti-leukemic therapy programs. PMID:28413626

  16. Random fasting hyperglycemia as cardiovascular risk factor in the elderly: a 6-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Antonicelli, R; Gesuita, R; Boemi, M; Paciaroni, E

    2001-04-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that diabetes increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but whether fasting hyperglycemia is associated with a major risk for CHD is still under debate. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role played by fasting hyperglycemia in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in an elderly population when associated with common risk factors for CVD (i.e., hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, etc). We analyzed a sample of 455 subjects aged > or = 60 years. The risk factors taken into account were systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels, use of antihypertensive drugs, total serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides, and smoking habit. Glycemia was measured at entry on a fasting sample. During the follow-up period (mean 6 years), the occurrence of CVD was monitored (criteria for the occurrence of CVD included total cardiovascular mortality, fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction, symptomatic coronary heart disease [stable and unstable angina], the need for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft, fatal or nonfatal stroke, and transient ischemic attack). A total of 427 subjects completed the follow-up. During this period, 73 subjects (17.10%) developed CVD according to the above criteria. A Cox proportional hazard model was designed to evaluate the contribution of variables in predicting CVD. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for CVD were calculated from the regression coefficients to study the association between the risk of developing CVD and predicting variables. We found a relation between occurrence of CVD and fasting hyperglycemia: subjects with fasting glycemia, > 126 mg/dl at enrollment, but without previous clinical diagnosis of diabetes, showed a 2.01 times higher risk than those with fasting glycemia < 126 mg/dl. Hence, random fasting hyperglycemia can predict the occurrence of CVD in elderly subjects.

  17. Effect of Mild Hyperglycemia on Autonomic Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Bagai, Kanika; Artibee, Kay; Diedrich, André; Garland, Emily; Elasy, Thomas; Shi, Yaping; Wang, Lily; Feldman, Eva L.; Robertson, David; Malow, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been hypothesized to cause a hypersympathetic state, which may be the mechanism for the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in OSA. However, there is a high prevalence of hyperglycemia in OSA patients which may also contribute to autonomic dysfunction. Thirty-five patients with OSA and eleven controls with average body-mass index (BMI) of 32.0 ± 4.6 underwent polysomnography, glucose tolerance testing, autonomic function tests, lying and standing catecholamines, overnight urine collection, and baseline ECG and continuous blood pressure measurements for spectral analysis. A linear regression model adjusting for age and BMI was used to analyze spectral data, other outcome measures were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test. Twenty-three OSA patients and two control patients had hyperglycemia (based on 2001 American Diabetes Association criteria). AHI correlated with total power and low frequency (LF) power (r=0.138, 0.177, p=0.031; and r= 0.013) but not with the LF/high frequency (HF) ratio (p=0.589). Glucose negatively correlated with LF systolic power (r=-0.171, p=0.038) but not AHI (p=0.586) and was marginally associated with pnn50, total power, LF, and HF power (p ranged from 0.07 to 0.08). These data suggest that patients with OSA and mild hyperglycemia have a trend towards lower heart rate variability and sympathetic tone. Hyperglycemia is an important confounder and should be evaluated in studies of OSA and autonomic function. PMID:21796355

  18. Effects of hyperglycemia on bone metabolism and bone matrix in goldfish scales.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kei-Ichiro; Andoh, Tadashi; Okesaku, Wakana; Tazaki, Yuya; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Sugitani, Kayo; Kobayashi, Isao; Suzuki, Nobuo; Chen, Wenxi; Ikegame, Mika; Hattori, Atsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk of fracture associated with type 2 diabetes has been a topic of recent concern. Fracture risk is related to a decrease in bone strength, which can be affected by bone metabolism and the quality of the bone. To investigate the cause of the increased fracture rate in patients with diabetes through analyses of bone metabolism and bone matrix protein properties, we used goldfish scales as a bone model for hyperglycemia. Using the scales of seven alloxan-treated and seven vehicle-treated control goldfish, we assessed bone metabolism by analyzing the activity of marker enzymes and mRNA expression of marker genes, and we measured the change in molecular weight of scale matrix proteins with SDS-PAGE. After only a 2-week exposure to hyperglycemia, the molecular weight of α- and β-fractions of bone matrix collagen proteins changed incrementally in the regenerating scales of hyperglycemic goldfish compared with those of euglycemic goldfish. In addition, the relative ratio of the γ-fraction significantly increased, and a δ-fraction appeared after adding glyceraldehyde-a candidate for the formation of advanced glycation end products in diabetes-to isolated type 1 collagen in vitro. The enzymatic activity and mRNA expression of osteoblast and osteoclast markers were not significantly different between hyperglycemic and euglycemic goldfish scales. These results indicate that hyperglycemia is likely to affect bone quality through glycation of matrix collagen from an early stage of hyperglycemia. Therefore, non-enzymatic glycation of collagen fibers in bone matrix may lead to the deterioration of bone quality from the onset of diabetes.

  19. Hyperglycemia and subsequent torsades de pointes with marked QT prolongation during refeeding.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takashi; Kubota, Tomoki; Takasugi, Nobuhiro; Kitagawa, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Takahiro; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Nishigaki, Kazuhiko; Ogura, Shinji; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    A fatal cardiac complication can occasionally present in malnourished patients during refeeding; this is known as refeeding syndrome. However, to our knowledge, hyperglycemia preceding torsades de pointes with QT prolongation during refeeding has not been reported. In the present study, we present a case in which hyperglycemia preceded torsades de pointes with QT prolongation during refeeding. The aim of this study was to determine the possible mechanism underlying QT prolongation during refeeding and indicate how to prevent it. A 32-y-old severely malnourished woman (body mass index 14.57 kg/m(2)) was admitted to the intensive care unit of our institution after resuscitation from cardiopulmonary arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. She was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa. Although no obvious electrolyte abnormalities were observed, her blood glucose level was 11 mg/dL. A 12-lead electrocardiogram at admission showed sinus rhythm with normal QT interval (QTc 0.448). Forty mL of 50% glucose (containing 20 g of glucose) was intravenously injected, followed by a drip infusion of glucose to maintain blood glucose level within normal range. After 9 h, the patient's blood glucose level increased to 569 mg/dL. However, after 38 h, an episode of marked QT prolongation (QTc 0.931) followed by torsades de pointes developed. Hyperglycemia during refeeding can present with QT prolongation; consequently, monitoring blood glucose levels may be useful in avoiding hyperglycemia, which can result in QT prolongation. Furthermore, additional monitoring of QT intervals using a 12-lead electrocardiogram should allow the early detection of QT prolongation when glucose solution is administered to a malnourished patient with (severe) hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of thiamine pyrophosphate on retinopathy induced by hyperglycemia in rats: A biochemical and pathological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cinici, Emine; Ahiskali, Ibrahim; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahadir; Kukula, Osman; Altuner, Durdu; Coban, Abdulkadir; Balta, Hilal; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Information is lacking on the protective effects of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) against hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy in rats. This study investigated the biochemical and histopathological aspects of the effect of TPP on hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy induced by alloxan in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were separated into a diabetic TPP-administered group (DTPG), a diabetes control group (DCG) and a healthy group (HG). While the DTPG was given TPP, the DCG and HG were administered distilled water as a solvent at the same concentrations. This procedure was repeated daily for 3 months. At the end of this period, all of the rats were euthanized under thiopental sodium anesthesia, and biochemical and histopathological analyses of the ocular retinal tissues were performed. The results of the DTPG were compared with those of the DCG and HG. Results: TPP prevented hyperglycemia by increasing the amount of malondialdehyde and decreasing endogen antioxidants, including total glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase. In addition, the amounts of the DNA oxidation product 8-hydroxyguanine were significantly lower in the retinas of the DTPG compared to the DCG. In the retinas of the DCG, there was a marked increase in vascular structures and congestion, in addition to edema. In contrast, little vascularization and edema were observed in the DTPG, and there was no congestion. The results suggest that TPP significantly reduced the degree of hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that TPP may be useful for prophylaxis against diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27488151

  1. Hyperglycemia and downregulation of caveolin-1 enhance neuregulin-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cuijuan; Rouen, Shefali; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2008-06-01

    Neuregulins (NRGs) are growth factors which bind to Erb receptor tyrosine kinases that localize to Schwann cells (SCs). Although NRGs can promote cell survival, mitogenesis, and myelination in undifferentiated SCs, they also induce demyelination of myelinated co-cultures of SCs and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have shown previously that Erb B2 activity increased in premyelinating SCs in response to hyperglycemia, and that this correlated with the downregulation of the protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1). As myelinated SCs undergo substantial degeneration in diabetic neuropathy, we used myelinated SC/DRG neuron co-cultures to determine if hyperglycemia and changes in Cav-1 expression could enhance NRG-induced demyelination. In basal glucose, NRG1 caused a 2.4-fold increase in the number of damaged myelin segments. This damage reached 3.8-fold under hyperglycemic conditions, and was also associated with a robust decrease in the expression of Cav-1 and compact myelin proteins. The loss of Cav-1 and compact myelin proteins following hyperglycemia and NRG treatment was not due to neuronal loss, since the axons remained intact and there was no loss of PGP 9.5, an axonal marker protein. To examine if changes in Cav-1 were sufficient to alter the extent of NRG-induced demyelination, SC/DRG neurons co-cultures were infected with antisense or dominant-negative Cav-1(P132L) adenoviruses. Either antisense-mediated downregulation or mis-localization of endogenous Cav-1 by Cav-1(P132L) resulted in a 1.5- to 2.4-fold increase in NRG-induced degeneration compared to that present in control cultures. These data support that hyperglycemia and changes in Cav-1 are sufficient to sensitize myelinated SC/DRG co-cultures to NRG-induced demyelination. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Hyperglycemia and Downregulation of Caveolin-1 Enhance Neuregulin-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    YU, CUIJUAN; ROUEN, SHEFALI; DOBROWSKY, RICK T.

    2008-01-01

    Neuregulins (NRGs) are growth factors which bind to Erb receptor tyrosine kinases that localize to Schwann cells (SCs). Although NRGs can promote cell survival, mitogenesis, and myelination in undifferentiated SCs, they also induce demyelination of myelinated co-cultures of SCs and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have shown previously that Erb B2 activity increased in premyelinating SCs in response to hyperglycemia, and that this correlated with the downregulation of the protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1). As myelinated SCs undergo substantial degeneration in diabetic neuropathy, we used myelinated SC/DRG neuron co-cultures to determine if hyperglycemia and changes in Cav-1 expression could enhance NRG-induced demyelination. In basal glucose, NRG1 caused a 2.4-fold increase in the number of damaged myelin segments. This damage reached 3.8-fold under hyperglycemic conditions, and was also associated with a robust decrease in the expression of Cav-1 and compact myelin proteins. The loss of Cav-1 and compact myelin proteins following hyperglycemia and NRG treatment was not due to neuronal loss, since the axons remained intact and there was no loss of PGP 9.5, an axonal marker protein. To examine if changes in Cav-1 were sufficient to alter the extent of NRG-induced demyelination, SC/DRG neurons co-cultures were infected with antisense or dominant-negative Cav-1(P132L) adenoviruses. Either antisense-mediated downregulation or mis-localization of endogenous Cav-1 by Cav-1(P132L) resulted in a 1.5- to 2.4-fold increase in NRG-induced degeneration compared to that present in control cultures. These data support that hyperglycemia and changes in Cav-1 are sufficient to sensitize myelinated SC/DRG co-cultures to NRG-induced demyelination. PMID:18338795

  3. Hydrogen sulfide replacement therapy protects the vascular endothelium in hyperglycemia by preserving mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kunihiro; Olah, Gabor; Modis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Kulp, Gabriella; Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Chang, Tuanjie; Zhou, Zongmin; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of changes in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) homeostasis in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of bEnd3 microvascular endothelial cells to elevated extracellular glucose (in vitro “hyperglycemia”) induced the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted in an increased consumption of endogenous and exogenous H2S. Replacement of H2S or overexpression of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced enhancement of ROS formation, attenuated nuclear DNA injury, reduced the activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and improved cellular viability. In vitro hyperglycemia resulted in a switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, an effect that was partially corrected by H2S supplementation. Exposure of isolated vascular rings to high glucose in vitro induced an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, which was prevented by CSE overexpression or H2S supplementation. siRNA silencing of CSE exacerbated ROS production in hyperglycemic endothelial cells. Vascular rings from CSE−/− mice exhibited an accelerated impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to in vitro hyperglycemia, compared with wild-type controls. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats resulted in a decrease in the circulating level of H2S; replacement of H2S protected from the development of endothelial dysfunction ex vivo. In conclusion, endogenously produced H2S protects against the development of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesize that, in hyperglycemic endothelial cells, mitochondrial ROS production and increased H2S catabolism form a positive feed-forward cycle. H2S replacement protects against these alterations, resulting in reduced ROS formation, improved endothelial metabolic state, and maintenance of normal endothelial function. PMID:21808008

  4. Concurrent hyperglycemia does not influence the long-term prognosis of unresectable hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Zhen; Meng, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Wen-Xia; Liu, Lu-Ming

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The association has been established between the disorder of carbohydrate metabolism and liver cancer. However, little is known regarding the impact of concurrent hyperglycemia on prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study aimed at solving this problem. METHODS: A total of 225 patients included in this study, were admitted from January 1998 to December 2001 for an unresectable HCC proven by histological and imaging examinations. Most of the patients received interventional treatment, radiation and biotherapy. Response was evaluated by computerized tomography (CT) scan conducted 4-6 weeks following completion of the treatment, and then every 3 months. Survival was calculated from the beginning of treatment using the Kaplan-Meier method. Pretreatment, treatment and follow-up variables with possible prognostic significance were analyzed. A stepwise multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox regression model, and a prognostic index was obtained. RESULTS: No differences were observed in survival parameters between the patients with and without hyperglycemia, median survival times of the patients were being 26 ± 3.46 months and 29.5 ± 2.04 months, respectively, and the 3-year survival rate was 8.36% and 9.62%, respectively. The univariate analysis indicated that there were several survival-associated variables including serum AFP level, clinical stage, Child-Pugh grade, method of treatment, size and number of tumor nodule (s). However, only the clinical stage, Child-Pugh grade and the treatment procedure were proved to be independent prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that hyperglycemia does not influence the long-term prognosis of HCC, and concurrent hyperglycemia should not be considered as an unfavorable prognostic factor during the treatment of patients with HCC. PMID:12918136

  5. Cardiorenal biomarkers in acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Rajiv; Gopal, Dipika; Kipper, Ben A.; De La Parra Landa, Alejandro; Lee, Hermineh Aramin Elizabeth; Shah, Saloni; Maisel, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Managing patients with heart failure (HF) is a challenging task within itself, but the presence of associated worsening renal function can greatly increase mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to prevent re-hospitalizations and reduce healthcare costs. Biomarkers have long been established as highly sensitive and specific tools in diagnosing and prognosticating patients with HF. Reflecting distinct pathophysiological events and ongoing cellular insult, biomarkers have been proven superior to conventional laboratory tests. Availability of better assays and rapid analysis has allowed the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests in the emergency department and at the patient's bed-side. Acute HF patients often go on to develop worsening renal function, termed as acute cardiorenal syndrome. The growing breadth of studies has shown the implications of combining multiple biomarkers to better chart outcomes and produce desirable results in such patients. PMID:23097660

  6. [The current aspects of the pharmacological correction of hyperglycemia in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2)].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, N I

    1999-01-01

    Data on the mechanisms of developing of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus (type 2) are analyzed and reviewed. The current concept of hypoglycemic therapy aimed both at amelioration of hyperglycemia symptoms and reduction of the risk of diabetic micro- and macroangiopathies is considered. The main directions of pharmacological action of hypoglycemic drugs (both in use and in the stage of design) and data of the efficiency and possible incidental action are presented.

  7. Hyperglycemia-induced metabolic compensation inhibits metformin sensitivity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Lacey M.; Mukherjee, Abir; Eckert, Mark A.; Johnson, Alyssa; Mills, Kathryn A.; Pan, Shawn; Shridhar, Viji; Lengyel, Ernst; Romero, Iris L.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing interest in repurposing the diabetic medication metformin for cancer treatment has raised important questions about the translation of promising preclinical findings to therapeutic efficacy, especially in non-diabetic patients. A significant limitation of the findings to date is the use of supraphysiologic metformin doses and hyperglycemic conditions in vitro. Our goals were to determine the impact of hyperglycemia on metformin response and to address the applicability of metformin as a cancer therapeutic in non-diabetic patients. In normoglycemic conditions, lower concentrations of metformin were required to inhibit cell viability, while metformin treatment in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in increased glucose uptake and glycolytic flux, contributing to cell survival. Mechanistically, maintenance of c-Myc expression under conditions of hyperglycemia or via gene amplification facilitated metabolic escape from the effects of metformin. In vivo, treatment of an ovarian cancer mouse model with metformin resulted in greater tumor weight reduction in normoglycemic vs. hyperglycemic mice, with increased c-Myc expression observed in metformin-treated hyperglycemic mice. These findings indicate that hyperglycemia inhibits the anti-cancer effects of metformin in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, our results suggest that metformin may elicit stronger responses in normoglycemic vs. hyperglycemic patients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical testing in patients without diabetes. PMID:26172303

  8. Chromium picolinate attenuates hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Bhuvaneshwari; Aggarwal, Aanchal; Sandhir, Rajat

    2013-04-01

    Chromium picolinate is advocated as an anti-diabetic agent for impaired glycemic control. It is a transition metal that exists in various oxidation states and may thereby act as a pro-oxidant. The present study has been designed to examine the effect of chromium picolinate supplementation on hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50mg/kg body weight) and chromium was administered orally as chromium picolinate (1mg/kg body weight) daily for a period of four weeks after the induction of diabetes. As is characteristic of diabetic condition, hyperglycemia was associated with an increase in oxidative stress in liver in terms of increased lipid peroxidation and decreased glutathione levels. The activity of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase were significantly reduced in liver of diabetic animals. Levels of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid were found to be considerably lower in plasma of diabetic rats. Chromium picolinate administration on the other hand was found to have beneficial effect in normalizing glucose levels, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status. The results from the present study demonstrate potential of chromium picolinate to attenuate hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress in experimental diabetes.

  9. Royal jelly improves hyperglycemia in obese/diabetic KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mei; Hayashi, Kaori; Watadani, Risa; Okano, Yoshiyasu; Tanimura, Keiya; Kotoh, Jun; Sasaki, Daiki; Matsumoto, Kozo; Maeda, Akihiko

    2017-02-14

    The study examined whether royal jelly (RJ) can prevent obesity and ameliorate hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. This study utilized obese/diabetic KK-Ay mice. RJ (10 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage. Body weight, plasma glucose and insulin levels were measured. mRNA and protein levels were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Four weeks of RJ administration improved hyperglycemia and partially suppressed body weight gain, although the latter effect did not reach statistical significance. In addition, RJ administration did not improve insulin resistance. RJ administration suppressed the mRNA expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis, in the liver. Simultaneously, RJ administration induced adiponectin (AdipoQ) expression in abdominal fat, adiponectin receptor-1 (AdipoR1) expression in the liver and phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) expression, which suppressed G6Pase levels in the livers of KK-Ay mice. pAMPK levels were also increased in skeletal muscle, but glucose transporter-4 (Glut4) translocation was not increased in the RJ supplementation group. The improvement in hyperglycemia due to long-term RJ administration may be because of the suppression of G6Pase expression through the upregulation of AdipoQ and AdipoR1 mRNA and pAMPK protein expressions.

  10. Inhibitory effects of hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) extracts on intestinal alpha-glucosidase activity and postprandial hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Yanagiya, Chikako; Mizutani, Junya; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2003-10-01

    It has been known that Hyssopus officinalis (hyssop) is a herb that grows in the wild and is a source of natural antioxidants. We previously reported that a-glucosidase inhibitors, (2S, 3S)1-O-beta-D-6'-O-cinnamoylglucopyranosyl-3-(3", 5"-dimethoxy-4"-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3-propanetriol and (2S, 3S)1-O-beta-D-glucopranosyl-3-(3", 5"-dimethoxy-4"-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3-propanetriol, from the dry leaves of hyssop, were isolated. This study examined the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory effects of hyssop extracts on intestinal carbohydrate absorption in rat everted gut sac and carbohydrate-loaded hyperglycemia in mice. In the everted gut sac experiment, 10 mM sucrose- and 5 mM maltose-treated increases in glucose concentration in the serosal compartment were inhibited in the presence of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ mL hyssop extracts, although a 10 mM glucose-induced increase in serosal glucose was not inhibited by the extracts. Additionally, hyperglycemia in sucrose- and maltose-loaded mice was significantly suppressed at an early stage, within 30 to 60 min by oral pre-administration of 300 and 100 mg/kg hyssop extracts, respectively. These findings suggest that hyssop extracts inhibited the digestion of complex carbohydrates, but not that of absorbable monosaccharide, and might be a useful supplemental food for hyperglycemia.

  11. Serum potassium concentration in hyperglycemia of diabetes mellitus with long-term dialysis.

    PubMed

    Tzamaloukas, A H; Avasthi, P S

    1987-